WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground magnetic field

  1. Ground Vehicle Navigation Using Magnetic Field Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Jeremiah A.

    The Earth's magnetic field has been the bedrock of navigation for centuries. The latest research highlights the uniqueness of magnetic field measurements based on position due to large scale variations as well as localized perturbations. These observable changes in the Earth's magnetic field as a function of position provide distinct information which can be used for navigation. This dissertation describes ground vehicle navigation exploiting variation in Earth's magnetic field using a self-contained navigation system consisting of only a magnetometer and magnetic field maps. In order to achieve navigation, effective calibration enables repeatable magnetic field measurements from different vehicles and facilitates mapping of the observable magnetic field as a function of position. A new modified ellipsoid calibration technique for strapdown magnetometers in large vehicles is described, as well as analysis of position measurement generation comparing a multitude of measurement compositions using existing and newly developed likelihood techniques. Finally, navigation solutions are presented using both a position measurement and direct incorporation of the magnetometer measurements via a particle filter to demonstrate road navigation in three different environments. Emphatically, the results affirm that navigation using magnetic field variation in ground vehicles is viable and achieves adequate performance for road level navigation.

  2. Ground Vehicle Navigation Using Magnetic Field Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    using three-axis magnetic field measurements for navigation. While Storms innovative work exposed the ability to navigate using three-axis magnetometer...level of difficulty, Ascher et al. combine a magnetometer with a pair of inertial measurement units, a barometer , and a laser for precise indoor

  3. Magnetism of Rare-Earth Compounds with Non-Magnetic Crystal-Field Ground Levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhao-Sen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Among rare-earth compounds, there are many materials having non-magnetic crystal-field (CF) ground levels.To understand their magnetic behaviour at low temperatures, we study the effects of the CF levels and the Heisenberg-like coupling on the magnetic process of such a crystalline with mean-field and CF theory. It is found that the material can be magnetically ordered if the Heisenberg exchange is sufficiently strong. Additionally we obtain a condition for initial magnetic ordering, and derive a formula for estimating the Curie temperature if the ordering occurs.

  4. GROUND-STATE ALIGNMENT OF ATOMS AND IONS: NEW DIAGNOSTICS OF ASTROPHYSICAL MAGNETIC FIELD IN DIFFUSE MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yan

    2009-01-01

    that the corresponding studies of magnetic fields can be performed with optical and UV polarimetry. A unique feature of these studies is that they can reveal the 3D orientation of magnetic field. In addition, we point out that the polarization of the radiation arising from the transitions between fine and hyperfine states of the ground level can provide yet another promising diagnostic of magnetic fields, including the magnetic fields in the Early Universe. We mention several cases of interplanetary, circumstellar and interstellar magnetic fields for which the studies of magnetic fields using ground state atomic alignment effect are promising.

  5. Density-matrix-functional calculations for matter in strong magnetic fields: Ground states of heavy atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kristinn; Yngvason, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    and the electron number N tend to infinity with N/Z fixed, and the magnetic field B tends to infinity in such a way that B/Z4/3→∞. We have calculated electronic density profiles and ground-state energies for values of the parameters that prevail on neutron star surfaces and compared them with results obtained...

  6. Spin-Exchange Collisions of the Ground State of Cs Atoms in a High Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Li-Ping; LUO Jun; ZENG Xi-Zhi

    2000-01-01

    Cs atoms were optically pumped with a Ti:sapphire laser in a magnetic field of 1.516 T. Steady absorption spectra and populations of Zeeman sublevels of the ground state of Cs in N2 gas at various pressures (5, 40, and 80 Torr)were obtained. The results show that in a high magnetic field, the combined electron-nuclear spin transition(flip-flop transition), which is mainly induced by the collision modification δa( J.I)of hyperfine interaction, is an important relaxation mechanism at high buffer-gas pressures.

  7. Ground state of an antiferromagnetic superconductor in the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzumura, Y.; Naji, A.D.S. (Waterloo Univ., Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics)

    1981-11-01

    The effect of a homogeneous magnetic field, H/sub 0/. on the ground state of an antiferromagnetic superconductor has been investigated. Assuming a one-dimensional like half-filled band, a new state has been found having gapless superconductivity and H/sub 0/-dependent order parameter. This state exists for Hsub(Q)/..delta../sub 0/ > 0.22 and when ..delta.. - Hsub(Q) <= H/sub 0/ < ..delta.. + Hsub(Q) Hsub(Q) is the staggered magnetic field, ..delta.. is the superconducting order parameter and ..delta../sub 0/ is ..delta.. in the absence of Hsub(Q) and H/sub 0/.

  8. New Shell Structures and Their Ground Electronic States in Spherical Quantum Dots (II) under Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Yusuke; Takeda, Kyozaburo; Tamura, Hiroyuki

    2005-04-01

    We theoretically studied the electronic structure of the three-dimensional spherical parabolic quantum dot (3D-SPQD) under a magnetic field. We obtained the quantum dot orbitals (QDOs) and determined the ground state by using the extended UHF approach where the expectation values of the z component of the total orbital angular momentum are conserved during the scf-procedure. The single-electron treatment predicts that the applied magnetic field (B) creates k-th new shells at the magnetic field of Bk=k(k+2)/(k+1)ω0 with the shell-energy interval of \\hbarω0/(k+1), where ω0(=\\hbar/m*l02) is the characteristic frequency originating from the spherical parabolic confinement potential. These shells are formed by the level crossing among multiple QDOs. The interelectron interaction breaks the simple level crossing but causes complicated dependences among the total energy, the chemical potential and their differences (magic numbers) with the magnetic field or the number of confinement electrons. The ground state having a higher spin multiplicity is theoretically predicted on the basis of the \\textit{quasi}-degeneracies of the QDOs around these shells.

  9. Possible ground states and parallel magnetic-field-driven phase transitions of collinear antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Feng

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the nature of all possible ground states and especially magnetic-field-driven phase transitions of antiferromagnets represents a major step towards unravelling the real nature of interesting phenomena such as superconductivity, multiferroicity or magnetoresistance in condensed-matter science. Here a consistent mean-field calculation endowed with antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange interaction (J), easy axis anisotropy (γ), uniaxial single-ion anisotropy (D) and Zeeman coupling to a magnetic field parallel to the AFM easy axis consistently unifies the AFM state, spin-flop (SFO) and spin-flip transitions. We reveal some mathematically allowed exotic spin states and fluctuations depending on the relative coupling strength of (J, γ and D). We build the three-dimensional (J, γ and D) and two-dimensional (γ and D) phase diagrams clearly displaying the equilibrium phase conditions and discuss the origins of various magnetic states as well as their transitions in different couplings. Besides the traditional first-order type one, we unambiguously confirm an existence of a second-order type SFO transition. This study provides an integrated theoretical model for the magnetic states of collinear antiferromagnets with two interpenetrating sublattices and offers a practical approach as an alternative to the estimation of magnetic exchange parameters (J, γ and D), and the results may shed light on nontrivial magnetism-related properties of bulks, thin films and nanostructures of correlated electron systems.

  10. Solid state magnetic field sensors for micro unattended ground networks using spin dependent tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondra, Mark; Nordman, Catherine A.; Lange, Erik H.; Reed, Daniel; Jander, Albrect; Akou, Seraphin; Daughton, James

    2001-09-01

    Micro Unattended Ground Sensor Networks will likely employ magnetic sensors, primarily for discrimination of objects as opposed to initial detection. These magnetic sensors, then, must fit within very small cost, size, and power budgets to be compatible with the envisioned sensor suites. Also, a high degree of sensitivity is required to minimize the number of sensor cells required to survey a given area in the field. Solid state magnetoresistive sensors, with their low cost, small size, and ease of integration, are excellent candidates for these applications assuming that their power and sensitivity performance are acceptable. SDT devices have been fabricated into prototype magnetic field sensors suitable for use in micro unattended ground sensor networks. They are housed in tiny SOIC 8-pin packages and mounted on a circuit board with required voltage regulation, signal amplification and conditioning, and sensor control and communications functions. The best sensitivity results to date are 289 pT/rt. Hz at 1 Hz, and and 7 pT/rt. Hz at f > 10 kHz. Expected near term improvements in performance would bring these levels to approximately 10 pT/rt Hz at 1 Hz and approximately 1 pT/rt. Hz at > 1 kHz.

  11. Long-range magnetic fields in the ground state of the Standard Model plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    In thermal equilibrium the ground state of the plasma of Standard Model particles is determined by temperature and exactly conserved combinations of baryon and lepton numbers. We show that at non-zero values of the global charges a translation invariant and homogeneous state of the plasma becomes unstable and the system transits into a new state, containing a large-scale magnetic field. The origin of this effect is the parity-breaking character of weak interactions and chiral anomaly. This situation can occur in the early Universe and may play an important role in its subsequent evolution.

  12. Long-Range Magnetic Fields in the Ground State of the Standard Model Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2012-09-01

    In thermal equilibrium the ground state of the plasma of Standard Model particles is determined by temperature and exactly conserved combinations of baryon and lepton numbers. We show that at nonzero values of the global charges a translation invariant and homogeneous state of the plasma becomes unstable and the system transits into a new equilibrium state, containing a large-scale magnetic field. The origin of this effect is the parity-breaking character of weak interactions and chiral anomaly. This situation could occur in the early Universe and may play an important role in its subsequent evolution.

  13. Ground State Transitions of Four-Electron Quantum Dots in Zero Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Shuai; XIE Wen-Fang; LIU Yi-Ming; SHI Ting-Yun

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study four electrons confined in a parabolic quantum dot in the absence of magnetic field, by the exact diagonalization method. The ground-state electronic structures and orbital and spin angular momenta transitions as a function of the confined strength are investigated. We find that the confinement may cause accidental degeneracies between levels with different low-lying states and the inversion of the energy values. The present results are useful to understand the optical properties and internal electron-electron correlations of quantum dot materials.

  14. Residential magnetic field: Accounting for external sources and residential grounding circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrow, D.A.

    1989-06-14

    A project to characterize the sources of magnetic fields in residential locations was established as part of Ontario Hydro's program to assess the risks, if any, posed by fields due to the electric power system. In this report, a simple model for the strength of the magnetic field at 60 Hz found inside houses is developed to account for the house wiring, and for sources external to the house. In the model the house wiring is reduced to a single circuit carrying the net current on the service drop to the house and the service grounding current. All sources external to the house are combined and represented as a single ambient field assumed to be spatially uniform throughout the volume of the house. This model and a measurmement procedure were tested on 5 houses in locations inside the houses remote from appliances, which were not included in the model. In the main, good agreement was found between actual measured field strengths and those predicted by the model. 4 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Future space missions and ground observatory for measurements of coronal magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Gibson, Sarah; Bemporad, Alessandro; Zhukov, Andrei; Damé, Luc; Susino, Roberto; Larruquert, Juan

    2016-07-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the near-future perspectives for probing coronal magnetism from space missions (i.e., SCORE and ASPIICS) and ground-based observatory (ESCAPE). Spectro-polarimetric imaging of coronal emission-lines in the visible-light wavelength-band provides an important diagnostics tool of the coronal magnetism. The interpretation in terms of Hanle and Zeeman effect of the line-polarization in forbidden emission-lines yields information on the direction and strength of the coronal magnetic field. As study case, this presentation will describe the Torino Coronal Magnetograph (CorMag) for the spectro-polarimetric observation of the FeXIV, 530.3 nm, forbidden emission-line. CorMag - consisting of a Liquid Crystal (LC) Lyot filter and a LC linear polarimeter. The CorMag filter is part of the ESCAPE experiment to be based at the French-Italian Concordia base in Antarctica. The linear polarization by resonance scattering of coronal permitted line-emission in the ultraviolet (UV)can be modified by magnetic fields through the Hanle effect. Space-based UV spectro-polarimeters would provide an additional tool for the disgnostics of coronal magnetism. As a case study of space-borne UV spectro-polarimeters, this presentation will describe the future upgrade of the Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment (SCORE) to include new generation, high-efficiency UV polarizer with the capability of imaging polarimetry of the HI Lyman-α, 121.6 nm. SCORE is a multi-wavelength imager for the emission-lines, HeII 30.4 nm and HI 121.6 nm, and visible-light broad-band emission of the polarized K-corona. SCORE has flown successfully in 2009. The second lauch is scheduled in 2016. Proba-3 is the other future solar mission that would provide the opportunity of diagnosing the coronal magnetic field. Proba-3 is the first precision formation-flying mission to launched in 2019). A pair of satellites will fly together maintaining a fixed configuration as a 'large rigid

  16. Ground state properties of spinless extended Falicov-Kimball model on a triangular lattice with finite magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Umesh K.

    2017-07-01

    Combined effects of correlated electron hopping, electron correlations and orbital magnetic field are studied on ground state properties of spinless Falicov-Kimball model (FKM). Results are obtained for finite size triangular lattice with periodic boundary conditions using numerical diagonalization and Monte-Carlo simulation techniques. It is found that the ground state configurations of electrons strongly depend on correlated electron hopping, onsite Coulomb interaction and orbital magnetic field. Several interesting configurations e.g. regular, segregated, axial and diagonal striped and hexagonal phases are found with change in correlated hopping and magnetic field. Study of density of states reveals that magnetic field induces a metal to insulator transition accompanied by segregated phase to an ordered phase. These results are applicable to the systems of recent interest like GdI2, NaTiO2 and MgV2O4 and can also be seen experimentally in cold atomic set up.

  17. Solar wind driven empirical forecast models of the time derivative of the ground magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wintoft Peter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical models are developed to provide 10–30-min forecasts of the magnitude of the time derivative of local horizontal ground geomagnetic field (|dBh/dt| over Europe. The models are driven by ACE solar wind data. A major part of the work has been devoted to the search and selection of datasets to support the model development. To simplify the problem, but at the same time capture sudden changes, 30-min maximum values of |dBh/dt| are forecast with a cadence of 1 min. Models are tested both with and without the use of ACE SWEPAM plasma data. It is shown that the models generally capture sudden increases in |dBh/dt| that are associated with sudden impulses (SI. The SI is the dominant disturbance source for geomagnetic latitudes below 50° N and with minor contribution from substorms. However, at occasions, large disturbances can be seen associated with geomagnetic pulsations. For higher latitudes longer lasting disturbances, associated with substorms, are generally also captured. It is also shown that the models using only solar wind magnetic field as input perform in most cases equally well as models with plasma data. The models have been verified using different approaches including the extremal dependence index which is suitable for rare events.

  18. Key Ground-Based and Space-Based Assets to Disentangle Magnetic Field Sources in the Earth's Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulliat, A.; Matzka, J.; Masson, A.; Milan, S. E.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic field measured on the ground or in space is the addition of several sources: from flows within the Earth's core to electric currents in distant regions of the magnetosphere. Properly separating and characterizing these sources requires appropriate observations, both ground-based and space-based. In the present paper, we review the existing observational infrastructure, from magnetic observatories and magnetometer arrays on the ground to satellites in low-Earth (Swarm) and highly elliptical (Cluster) orbits. We also review the capability of SuperDARN to provide polar ionospheric convection patterns supporting magnetic observations. The past two decades have been marked by exciting new developments in all observation types. We review these developments, focusing on how they complement each other and how they have led or could lead in the near future to improved separation and modeling of the geomagnetic sources.

  19. Nodal sets for ground-states of Schroedinger operators with zero magnetic field in non simply connected domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helffer, B. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Dept. de Mathematiques; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, M. [Institut fuer Mathematik, Universitaet Wien, Strudthofgasse 4, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Hoffmann-Ostenhof, T. [Institut fuer Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Wien, Waehringerstrasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria)]|[International Erwin Schroedinger Inst. for Mathematical Physics, Vienna (Austria); Owen, M.P. [International Erwin Schroedinger Inst. for Mathematical Physics, Vienna (Austria)

    1999-05-01

    We investigate nodal sets of magnetic Schroedinger operators with zero magnetic field, acting on a non-simply connected domain in R{sup 2}. For the case of circulation 1/2 of the magnetic vector potential around each hole in the region, we obtain a characterisation of the nodal set, and use this to obtain bounds on the multiplicity of the ground state. For the case of one hole and a fixed electric potential, we show that the first eigenvalue takes its highest value for circulation 1/2. (orig.) With 8 figs., 20 refs.

  20. Multi-point ground-based ULF magnetic field observations in Europe during seismic active periods in 2004 and 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prattes

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of ground-based Ultra Low Frequency (ULF magnetic field measurements observed from June to August 2004 during the Bovec earthquake on 12 July 2004. Further we give information about the seismic activity in the local observatory region for an extended time span 2004 and 2005. ULF magnetic field data are provided by the South European Geomagnetic Array (SEGMA where the experience and heritage from the CHInese MAGnetometer (CHIMAG fluxgate magnetometer comes to application. The intensities of the horizontal H and vertical Z magnetic field and the polarization ratio R of the vertical and horizontal magnetic field intensity are analyzed taking into consideration three SEGMA observatories located at different close distances and directions from the earthquake epicenter. We observed a significant increase of high polarization ratios during strong seismic activity at the observatory nearest to the Bovec earthquake epicenter. Apart from indirect ionospheric effects electromagnetic noise could be emitted in the lithosphere due to tectonic effects in the earthquake focus region causing anomalies of the vertical magnetic field intensity. Assuming that the measured vertical magnetic field intensities are of lithospheric origin, we roughly estimate the amplitude of electromagnetic noise in the Earths crust considering an average electrical conductivity of <σ>=10−3 S/m and a certain distance of the observatory to the earthquake epicenter.

  1. Numerical methods for computing the ground state of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates in a uniform magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Fong Yin; Bao, Weizhu

    2008-12-01

    We propose efficient and accurate numerical methods for computing the ground-state solution of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates subjected to a uniform magnetic field. The key idea in designing the numerical method is based on the normalized gradient flow with the introduction of a third normalization condition, together with two physical constraints on the conservation of total mass and conservation of total magnetization. Different treatments of the Zeeman energy terms are found to yield different numerical accuracies and stabilities. Numerical comparison between different numerical schemes is made, and the best scheme is identified. The numerical scheme is then applied to compute the condensate ground state in a harmonic plus optical lattice potential, and the effect of the periodic potential, in particular to the relative population of each hyperfine component, is investigated through comparison to the condensate ground state in a pure harmonic trap.

  2. Influence of rotating magnetic fields on THM growth of CdZnTe crystals under microgravity and ground conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelian, Carmen; Duffar, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    The influence of rotating magnetic fields (RMF) on species transport and interface stability during the growth of Cd0.96Zn0.04Te:In crystals by using the traveling heater method (THM), under microgravity and terrestrial conditions, is numerically investigated. The numerical results are compared to ground and space experiments. The modeling of THM under ground conditions shows very deleterious effects of the natural convection on the morphological stability of the growth interface. The vertical flow transports the liquid of low Te concentration from the dissolution interface to the growth interface, which is consequently destabilized. The suppression of this flow, in low-gravity conditions, results in higher morphological stability of the growth interface. Application of RMF induces a two flow cell pattern, which has a destabilizing effect on the growth interface. Simulations performed by varying the magnetic field induction in the range of 1 - 3 mT show optimal conditions for the growth with a stable interface at low strength of the magnetic field (B = 1 mT). Computations of indium distribution show a better homogeneity of crystals grown under purely diffusive conditions. Rotating magnetic fields of B = 1 mT induce low intensity convection, which generates concentration gradients near the growth interface. These numerical results are in agreement with experiments performed during the FOTON M4 space mission, showing good structural quality of Cd0.96Zn0.04Te crystals grown at very low gravity level. Applying low intensity rotating magnetic fields in ground experiments has no significant influence on the flow pattern and solute distribution. At high intensity of RMF (B = 50 mT), the buoyancy convection is damped near the growth front, resulting in a more stable advancing interface. However, convection is strengthening in the upper part of the liquid zone, where the flow becomes unsteady. The multi-cellular unsteady flow generates temperature oscillations, having

  3. Zero-Magnetic-Field Spin Splitting of Polaron's Ground State Energy Induced by Rashba Spin-Orbit Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jia; XIAO Jing-Ling

    2006-01-01

    We study theoretically the ground state energy of a polaron near the interface of a polar-polar semiconductor by considering the Rashba spin-orbit (SO) coupling with the Lee-Low-Pines intermediate coupling method. Our numerical results show that the Rashba SO interaction originating from the inversion asymmetry in the heterostructure splits the ground state energy of the polaron. The electron arealdensity and vector dependence of the ratio of the SO interaction to the total ground state energy or other energy composition are obvious. One can see that even without any external magnetic field, the ground state energy can be split by the Rashba SO interaction, and this split is not a single but a complex one. Since the presents of the phonons, whose energy gives negative contribution to the polaron's,the spin-splitting states of the polaron are more stable than electron's.

  4. Ground States of Ultracold Spin-1 Atoms in a Deep Double-Well Optical Superlattice in a Weak Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Gong-Ping; QIN Shuai-Feng; WANG Shou-Yang; JIAN Wen-Tian

    2013-01-01

    The ground states of the ultracold spin-1 atoms trapped in a deep one-dimensional double-well optical superlattice in a weak magnetic field are obtained.It is shown that the ground-state diagrams of the reduced doublewell model are remarkably different for the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic condensates.The transition between the singlet state and nematic state is observed for the antiferromagnetic interaction atoms,which can be realized by modulating the tunneling parameter or the quadratic Zeeman energy.An experiment to distinguish the different spin states is suggested.

  5. Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    of the fluid flow at the top of the core. However, what is measured at or near the surface of the Earth is the superposition of the core field and fields caused by magnetized rocks in the Earth’s crust, by electric currents flowing in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and oceans, and by currents induced......he Earth has a large and complicated magnetic field, the major part of which is produced by a self-sustaining dynamo operating in the fluid outer core. Magnetic field observations provide one of the few tools for remote sensing the Earth’s deep interior, especially regarding the dynamics...... in the Earth by time-varying external fields. These sources have their specific characteristics in terms of spatial and temporal variations, and their proper separation, based on magnetic measurements, is a major challenge. Such a separation is a prerequisite for remote sensing by means of magnetic field...

  6. Field experiment provides ground truth for surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R.; Grunewald, E.; Irons, T.; Dlubac, K.; Song, Y.; Bachman, H.N.; Grau, B.; Walsh, D.; Abraham, J.D.; Cannia, J.

    2012-01-01

    The need for sustainable management of fresh water resources is one of the great challenges of the 21st century. Since most of the planet's liquid fresh water exists as groundwater, it is essential to develop non-invasive geophysical techniques to characterize groundwater aquifers. A field experiment was conducted in the High Plains Aquifer, central United States, to explore the mechanisms governing the non-invasive Surface NMR (SNMR) technology. We acquired both SNMR data and logging NMR data at a field site, along with lithology information from drill cuttings. This allowed us to directly compare the NMR relaxation parameter measured during logging,T2, to the relaxation parameter T2* measured using the SNMR method. The latter can be affected by inhomogeneity in the magnetic field, thus obscuring the link between the NMR relaxation parameter and the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic material. When the logging T2data were transformed to pseudo-T2* data, by accounting for inhomogeneity in the magnetic field and instrument dead time, we found good agreement with T2* obtained from the SNMR measurement. These results, combined with the additional information about lithology at the site, allowed us to delineate the physical mechanisms governing the SNMR measurement. Such understanding is a critical step in developing SNMR as a reliable geophysical method for the assessment of groundwater resources.

  7. Singlet Ground State Magnetism:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loidl, A.; Knorr, K.; Kjems, Jørgen;

    1979-01-01

    The magneticGamma 1 –Gamma 4 exciton of the singlet ground state system TbP has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering above the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature. Considerable dispersion and a pronounced splitting was found in the [100] and [110] directions. Both the band width...... and the splitting increased rapidly as the transition temperature was approached in accordance with the predictions of the RPA-theory. The dispersion is analysed in terms of a phenomenological model using interactions up to the fourth nearest neighbour....

  8. Flare-induced changes of the photospheric magnetic field in a δ-spot deduced from ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gömöry, P.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; Koza, J.; Veronig, A. M.; González Manrique, S. J.; Kučera, A.; Schwartz, P.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2017-06-01

    Aims: Changes of the magnetic field and the line-of-sight velocities in the photosphere are being reported for an M-class flare that originated at a δ-spot belonging to active region NOAA 11865. Methods: High-resolution ground-based near-infrared spectropolarimetric observations were acquired simultaneously in two photospheric spectral lines, Fe i 10783 Å and Si i 10786 Å, with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) in Tenerife on 2013 October 15. The observations covered several stages of the M-class flare. Inversions of the full-Stokes vector of both lines were carried out and the results were put into context using (extreme)-ultraviolet filtergrams from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results: The active region showed high flaring activity during the whole observing period. After the M-class flare, the longitudinal magnetic field did not show significant changes along the polarity inversion line (PIL). However, an enhancement of the transverse magnetic field of approximately 550 G was found that bridges the PIL and connects umbrae of opposite polarities in the δ-spot. At the same time, a newly formed system of loops appeared co-spatially in the corona as seen in 171 Å filtergrams of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board SDO. However, we cannot exclude that the magnetic connection between the umbrae already existed in the upper atmosphere before the M-class flare and became visible only later when it was filled with hot plasma. The photospheric Doppler velocities show a persistent upflow pattern along the PIL without significant changes due to the flare. Conclusions: The increase of the transverse component of the magnetic field after the flare together with the newly formed loop system in the corona support recent predictions of flare models and flare observations. The movie associated to Figs. 4 and 5 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Relation between substorm characteristics and rapid temporal variations of the ground magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Viljanen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Auroral substorms are one of the major causes of large geomagnetically induced currents (GIC in technological systems. This study deals with different phases of the auroral substorm concerning their severity from the GIC viewpoint. Our database consists of 833 substorms observed by the IMAGE magnetometer network in 1997 (around sunspot minimum and 1999 (rising phase of the sunspot cycle, divided into two classes according to the Dst index: non-storm (Dst>-40 nT, 696 events and storm-time ones (Dst<-40 nT, 137 events. The key quantity concerning GIC is the time derivative of the horizontal magnetic field vector (dH/dt whose largest values during substorms occur most probably at about 5 min after the onset at stations with CGM latitude less than 72 deg. When looking at the median time of the occurrence of the maximum dH/dt after the expansion onset, it increases as a function of latitude from about 15 min at CGM lat=56 deg to about 45 min at CGM lat=75 deg for non-storm substorms. For storm-time events, these times are about 5 min longer. Based on calculated ionospheric equivalent currents, large dH/dt occur mostly during the substorm onset when the amplitude of the westward electrojet increases rapidly.

  10. The Distribution of Cloud to Ground Lightning Strike Intensities and Associated Magnetic Inductance Fields Near the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    Lightning strike location and peak current are monitored operationally in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) area by the Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS). The present study compiles ten years worth of CGLSS data into a database of near strikes. Using shuffle launch platform LP39A as a convenient central point, all strikes recorded within a 20-mile radius for the period of record O R ) from January 1, 1993 to December 31,2002 were included in the subset database. Histograms and cumulative probability curves are produced for both strike intensity (peak current, in kA) and the corresponding magnetic inductance fields (in A/m). Results for the full POR have application to launch operations lightning monitoring and post-strike test procedures.

  11. Ground States of the Lithium Atom and its Ions up to Z = 10 in the Presence of Magnetic Field using Variational Monte Carlo Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Doma, S B; Farag, A M; El-Gammal, F N

    2016-01-01

    The variational Monte Carlo method is applied to investigate the ground state energy of the lithium atom and its ions up to Z=10 in the presence of an external magnetic field regime. Our calculations are based on using three forms of compact and accurate trial wave functions, which were put forward in calculating energies in the absence of magnetic field. The obtained results are in good agreement with the most recent accurate values and also with the exact values.

  12. What Are Special About Ground-Level Events? Flares, CMEs, Active Regions And Magnetic Field Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Nitta, N V; DeRosa, M L; Nightingale, R W

    2012-01-01

    Ground level events (GLEs) occupy the high-energy end of gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events. They are associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, but we still do not clearly understand the special conditions that produce these rare events. During Solar Cycle 23, a total of 16 GLEs were registered, using ground-based neutron monitor data. We first ask if these GLEs are clearly distinguishable from other SEP events observed from space. Setting aside possible difficulties in identifying all GLEs consistently, we then try to find observables which may unmistakably isolate these GLEs by studying the basic properties of the associated eruptions and the active regions (ARs) that produced them. It is found that neither the magnitudes of the CMEs and flares nor the complexities of the ARs give sufficient conditions for GLEs. It is possible to find CMEs, flares or ARs that are not associated with GLEs but that have more extreme properties than those associated with GLEs. We also try to ev...

  13. Direct observation of electronic and nuclear ground state splitting in external magnetic field by inelastic neutron scattering on oxidized ferrocene and ferrocene containing polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appel Markus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum mechanical splitting of states by interaction of a magnetic moment with an external magnetic field is well known, e.g., as Zeeman effect in optical transitions, and is also often seen in magnetic neutron scattering. We report excitations observed in inelastic neutron spectroscopy on the redox-responsive polymer poly(vinylferrocene. They are interpreted as splitting of the electronic ground state in the organometallic ferrocene units attached to the polymer chain where a magnetic moment is created by oxidation. In a second experiment using high resolution neutron backscattering spectroscopy we observe the hyperfine splitting, i.e., interaction of nuclear magnetic moments with external magnetic fields leading to sub-μeV excitations observable in incoherent neutron spin-flip scattering on hydrogen and vanadium nuclei.

  14. Occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields during tasks at ground or floor level at 110 kV substations in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpinen, Leena; Pääkkönen, Rauno

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to investigate occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields during tasks at ground or floor level at 110 kV substations in Finland and to compare the measured values to Directive 2013/35/EU. Altogether, 347 electric field measurements and 100 magnetic field measurements were performed. The average value of all electric fields was 2.3 kV/m (maximum 6.4 kV/m) and that of magnetic fields was 5.8 µT (maximum 51.0 µT). It can be concluded that the electric and magnetic field exposure at ground or floor level is typically below the low action levels of Directive 2013/35/EU. The transposition of the directive will not create new needs to modify the work practice of the evaluated tasks, which can continue to be performed as before. However, for workers with medical implants, the exposure may be high enough to cause interference. PMID:27075421

  15. Determining Earth's magnetic field strength during magnetically quiet and stormy times and predict the location of dancing Auroras using THEMIS Mission Educators ground based magnetometer data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, N.; Peticolas, L.; Trautman, V.

    2006-12-01

    The Education and Public Outreach program of the THEMIS Mission has deployed 10 ground-based observatories with science-grade magnetometers in schools in the Northern U.S. This network of schools, called Geomagnetic Event Observation Network by Students (GEONS), monitors local magnetic disturbances. The magnetometers are receiving local data; data are archived and available at the THEMIS E/PO Website. The E/PO program conducts teacher professional development workshops for the teachers of these schools. During the third year of the project, teachers from Alaska and Wisconsin started their classroom research using magnetometers that are installed in their classrooms. We will describe how with highly committed and enthusiastic teachers a research project developed to determine the strength of the local magnetic field in locations such as AK and WI and to compare these results with "companion schools" at lower latitudes. The GEONS teachers not only learned science and research tools, but they also conducted workshops in their own states, influenced the science curricula in their districts, and also started student research in their classrooms. We will discuss the challenges, give the results of their research, and encourage other teachers who wish to use real data in their classrooms to participate in this exciting project.

  16. Magnetic Field Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Calculator will calculate the total magnetic field, including components (declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, northerly intensity,...

  17. Cosmological Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kunze, Kerstin E

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fields are observed on nearly all scales in the universe, from stars and galaxies upto galaxy clusters and even beyond. The origin of cosmic magnetic fields is still an open question, however a large class of models puts its origin in the very early universe. A magnetic dynamo amplifying an initial seed magnetic field could explain the present day strength of the galactic magnetic field. However, it is still an open problem how and when this initial magnetic field was created. Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide a window to the early universe and might therefore be able to tell us whether cosmic magnetic fields are of primordial, cosmological origin and at the same time constrain its parameters. We will give an overview of the observational evidence of large scale magnetic fields, describe generation mechanisms of primordial magnetic fields and possible imprints in the CMB.

  18. Magnetic Field Grid Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Properties Calculator will computes the estimated values of Earth's magnetic field(declination, inclination, vertical component, northerly...

  19. The Earth's Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Edda Lína Gunnarsdóttir 1988

    2012-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is essential for life on Earth, as we know it, to exist. It forms a magnetic shield around the planet, protecting it from high energy particles and radiation from the Sun, which can cause damage to life, power systems, orbiting satellites, astronauts and spacecrafts. This report contains a general overview of the Earth's magnetic field. The different sources that contribute to the total magnetic field are presented and the diverse variations in the field are describ...

  20. Electric field modulation of the tetragonal domain orientation revealed in the magnetic ground state of quantum paraelectric EuTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, A. P.; Kato, Y.; Sunku, S. S.; Ito, T.; Sengupta, P.; Spalek, L.; Shimuta, M.; Katsufuji, T.; Batista, C. D.; Saxena, S. S.; Panagopoulos, C.

    2013-02-01

    We present a study of the thermodynamic and magnetic properties of single-crystal EuTiO3. Signatures of metastability are visible in the heat capacity below the cubic-tetragonal phase transition at 283 K, supporting the evidence for a mismatch between long and short range structural order from previous x-ray diffraction studies. Employing the anisotropic magnetization as an indirect structural probe, we confirm the emergence of multiple orthogonal domains at low temperature. Torque magnetometry is capable of revealing the nature and temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy in spite of the domain misalignment; we hence deduce that tetragonal EuTiO3 enters an easy-axis antiferromagnetic phase at 5.6 K, with a first-order phase transition to an easy-plane ground state below 3 K. Our experimentally determined magnetic phase diagram is accurately reproduced by a three-dimensional (3D) anisotropic Heisenberg spin model. Furthermore, we demonstrate that electric field cooling acts to suppress this orientational disorder by realigning the domains due to the strong coupling between electric fields and lattice dipoles characteristic of paraelectric materials.

  1. Magnetic fields in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Most of the visible matter in the Universe is ionized, so that cosmic magnetic fields are quite easy to generate and due to the lack of magnetic monopoles hard to destroy. Magnetic fields have been measured in or around practically all celestial objects, either by in-situ measurements of spacecrafts or by the electromagnetic radiation of embedded cosmic rays, gas or dust. The Earth, the Sun, solar planets, stars, pulsars, the Milky Way, nearby galaxies, more distant (radio) galaxies, quasars and even intergalactic space in clusters of galaxies have significant magnetic fields, and even larger volumes of the Universe may be permeated by "dark" magnetic fields. Information on cosmic magnetic fields has increased enormously as the result of the rapid development of observational methods, especially in radio astronomy. In the Milky Way, a wealth of magnetic phenomena was discovered, which are only partly related to objects visible in other spectral ranges. The large-scale structure of the Milky Way's magnetic fie...

  2. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, Mathias; Bjarnø, Jonas Bækby

    2017-01-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter’s planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor ...

  3. The First Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Widrow, Lawrence M; Schleicher, Dominik; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Tsagas, Christos G; Treumann, Rudolf A

    2011-01-01

    We review current ideas on the origin of galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields. We begin by summarizing observations of magnetic fields at cosmological redshifts and on cosmological scales. These observations translate into constraints on the strength and scale magnetic fields must have during the early stages of galaxy formation in order to seed the galactic dynamo. We examine mechanisms for the generation of magnetic fields that operate prior during inflation and during subsequent phase transitions such as electroweak symmetry breaking and the quark-hadron phase transition. The implications of strong primordial magnetic fields for the reionization epoch as well as the first generation of stars is discussed in detail. The exotic, early-Universe mechanisms are contrasted with astrophysical processes that generate fields after recombination. For example, a Biermann-type battery can operate in a proto-galaxy during the early stages of structure formation. Moreover, magnetic fields in either an early genera...

  4. Singlet Ground State Magnetism: III Magnetic Excitons in Antiferromagnetic TbP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, K.; Loidl, A.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1981-01-01

    The dispersion of the lowest magnetic excitations of the singlet ground state system TbP has been studied in the antiferromagnetic phase by inelastic neutron scattering. The magnetic exchange interaction and the magnetic and the rhombohedral molecular fields have been determined.......The dispersion of the lowest magnetic excitations of the singlet ground state system TbP has been studied in the antiferromagnetic phase by inelastic neutron scattering. The magnetic exchange interaction and the magnetic and the rhombohedral molecular fields have been determined....

  5. Organic magnetic field sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCamey, Dane; Boehme, Christoph

    2017-01-24

    An organic, spin-dependent magnetic field sensor (10) includes an active stack (12) having an organic material with a spin-dependence. The sensor (10) also includes a back electrical contact (14) electrically coupled to a back of the active stack (12) and a front electrical contact (16) electrically coupled to a front of the active stack (12). A magnetic field generator (18) is oriented so as to provide an oscillating magnetic field which penetrates the active stack (12).

  6. Measured electric and magnetic fields from an unusual cloud-to-ground lightning flash containing two positive strokes followed by four negative strokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerauld, J. E.; Uman, M. A.; Rakov, V. A.; Rambo, K. J.; Jordan, D. M.; Schnetzer, G. H.

    2009-10-01

    We present electric and magnetic fields measured at multiple stations between about 300 and 800 m of a cloud-to-ground "bipolar" lightning flash containing two initial positive strokes, separated in time by 53 ms and striking ground at two locations separated by about 800 m, followed by four negative strokes that traversed the same path as the second positive stroke. The leader electric field durations for the positive first, positive second, and negative third strokes were about 120 ms, 35 ms, and 1 ms, respectively. The first-stroke leader electric field changes measured at five stations ranged from about +16 to +35 kV/m, the second stroke +8 to +13 kV/m, and the third stroke -0.9 to -1.8 kV/m (atmospheric electricity sign convention). The microsecond-scale return stroke waveforms of the first and second (positive) strokes exhibited a similar "slow-front/fast-transition" to those observed for close negative first strokes. The peak rate-of-change of the positive first stroke electric field normalized to 100 km was about 20 V m-1μs-1, similar to the values observed for close negative first strokes. The positive second stroke was followed by a long continuing current of duration at least 400 ms, while the positive first stroke had a total current duration of only about 1 ms. All four negative strokes were followed by long continuing current, with durations ranging from about 70 ms to about 230 ms. The overall flash duration was about 1.5 s.

  7. The CMS Experiment: on and under Ground Motions of Structures Due to the Magnetic Field Forces as Observed by the Link Alignment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.; Brochero, J.; Calderon, A.; Fernandez, M. G.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F. J.; Martinez-Ribero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Rui-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Fernandez, J.

    2010-05-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test (at SX5 on ground Hall) and the CRAFT08 and 09 periods data taking in the point P5 (UX5), 100 m underground. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotation of detector structures (from microradiants to milliradiants). Observed motions are studied as functions of the magnetic fi eld intensity. Comparisons between recorded data on and under ground are made. (Author) 23 refs.

  8. Quantum Electrodynamics in a Uniform Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, J

    2005-01-01

    A systematic formalism for quantum electrodynamics in a classical uniform magnetic field is discussed. The first order radiative correction to the ground state energy of an electron is calculated. This then leads to the anomalous magnetic moment of an electron without divergent integrals. Thorough analyses of this problem are given for the weak magnetic field limit. A new expression for the radiative correction to the ground state energy is obtained. This contains only one integral with an additional summation with respect to each Landau level. The importance of this formalism is also addressed in order to deal with quantum electrodynamics in an intense external field.

  9. Magnetization reversal in ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, M; Fassbender, J; Hillebrands, B

    2000-01-01

    We report the switching properties of a thin magnetic film subject to an ultrashort, laterally localized magnetic field pulse, obtained by numerical investigations. The magnetization distribution in the film is calculated on a grid assuming Stoner-like coherent rotation within the grid square size. Perpendicularly and in-plane magnetized films exhibit a magnetization reversal due to a 4 ps magnetic field pulse. Outside the central region the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period. In this area the evolution of the magnetization during the field pulse does not depend strongly on magnetic damping and/or pulse shape. However, the final magnetization distribution is affected by the magnetic damping. Although the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period, the time needed for the relaxation of the magnetization to the equilibrium state is rather large. The influence of the different magnetic anisotropy contributions and the magnetic damping parameter enters into the magnetization ...

  10. Pair annihilation in superstrong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, J. K.; Bussard, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The kinematical and dynamical aspects of the annihilation processes in superstrong magnetic fields are studied. The feasibility and potential significance of detecting from magnetic neutron stars are discussed. The discussion proceeds from the derivation of the fully relativistic differential cross sections and annihilation rates for both one- and two-photon emission from a ground-state gas of electrons and positrons in a static, uniform magnetic field.

  11. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  12. Magnetic properties of ground-state mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonis, V. [Vilnius University Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2016-04-15

    Starting with the bag model a method for the study of the magnetic properties (magnetic moments, magnetic dipole transition widths) of ground-state mesons is developed. We calculate the M1 transition moments and use them subsequently to estimate the corresponding decay widths. These are compared with experimental data, where available, and with the results obtained in other approaches. Finally, we give the predictions for the static magnetic moments of all ground-state vector mesons including those containing heavy quarks. We have a good agreement with experimental data for the M1 decay rates of light as well as heavy mesons. Therefore, we expect our predictions for the static magnetic properties (i.e., usual magnetic moments) to be of sufficiently high quality, too. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic properties of ground-state mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Simonis, Vytautas

    2016-01-01

    Starting with the bag model a method for the study of the magnetic properties (magnetic moments, magnetic dipole transition widths) of ground-state mesons is developed. We calculate the M1 transition moments and use them subsequently to estimate the corresponding decay widths. These are compared with experimental data, where available, and with the results obtained in other approaches. Finally, we give the predictions for the static magnetic moments of all ground-state vector mesons including those containing heavy quarks. We have a good agreement with experimental data for the M1 decay rates of light as well as heavy mesons. Therefore, we expect our predictions for the static magnetic properties (usual magnetic moments) to be of sufficiently high quality, too.

  14. Reducing Magnetic Fields Around Power Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Noel B.; Gitelman, Florida; Pongracz-Bartha, Edward; Spalding, John

    1993-01-01

    Four power conductors arranged symmetrically about fifth grounded conductor. Four current-carrying wires arranged symmetrically around central grounded wire that nominally carries no current. In comparison with other cable configurations, this one results in smaller magnetic fields around cable. Technique for use when size of wires in cable makes twisting impractical.

  15. ISR Radial Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    There were 37 (normal) + 3 (special) Radial Field magnets in the ISR to adjust vertically the closed orbit. Gap heights and strengths were 200 mm and .12 Tm in the normal magnets, 220 mm and .18 Tm in the special ones. The core length was 430 mm in both types. Due to their small length as compared to the gap heights the end fringe field errors were very important and had to be compensated by suitably shaping the poles. In order to save on cables, as these magnets were located very far from their power supplies, the coils of the normal type magnets were formed by many turns of solid cpper conductor with some interleaved layers of hollow conductor directly cooled by circulating water

  16. The study of magnetization of the spin systm in the ground state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Wei; Wang Xi-Kun; Zhao Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Within the framework of the effective-field theory with self-spin correlations and the differential operator technique,the ground state magnetizations of the biaxial crystal field spin system on the honeycomb lattices have been studied.The influences of the biaxial crystal field on the magnetization in the ground state have been investigated in detail.

  17. Cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, Philipp P

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important in the Universe and their effects contain the key to many astrophysical phenomena that are otherwise impossible to understand. This book presents an up-to-date overview of this fast-growing topic and its interconnections to plasma processes, astroparticle physics, high energy astrophysics, and cosmic evolution. The phenomenology and impact of magnetic fields are described in diverse astrophysical contexts within the Universe, from galaxies to the filaments and voids of the intergalactic medium, and out to the largest redshifts. The presentation of mathematical formulae is accessible and is designed to add insight into the broad range of topics discussed. Written for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics and related disciplines, this volume will inspire readers to devise new ways of thinking about magnetic fields in space on galaxy scales and beyond.

  18. Solar Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. O. Stenflo

    2008-03-01

    Since the structuring and variability of the Sun and other stars are governed by magnetic fields, much of present-day stellar physics centers around the measurement and understanding of the magnetic fields and their interactions. The Sun, being a prototypical star, plays a unique role in astrophysics, since its proximity allows the fundamental processes to be explored in detail. The PRL anniversary gives us an opportunity to look back at past milestones and try to identify the main unsolved issues that will be addressed in the future.

  19. Solar Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hood, Alan W

    2011-01-01

    This review provides an introduction to the generation and evolution of the Sun's magnetic field, summarising both observational evidence and theoretical models. The eleven year solar cycle, which is well known from a variety of observed quantities, strongly supports the idea of a large-scale solar dynamo. Current theoretical ideas on the location and mechanism of this dynamo are presented. The solar cycle influences the behaviour of the global coronal magnetic field and it is the eruptions of this field that can impact on the Earth's environment. These global coronal variations can be modelled to a surprising degree of accuracy. Recent high resolution observations of the Sun's magnetic field in quiet regions, away from sunspots, show that there is a continual evolution of a small-scale magnetic field, presumably produced by small-scale dynamo action in the solar interior. Sunspots, a natural consequence of the large-scale dynamo, emerge, evolve and disperse over a period of several days. Numerical simulation...

  20. High field superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  1. Assembly of magnetic spheres in strong homogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, René; Stanković, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The assembly in two dimensions of spherical magnets in strong magnetic field is addressed theoretically. It is shown that the attraction and assembly of parallel magnetic chains is the result of a delicate interplay of dipole-dipole interactions and short ranged excluded volume correlations. Minimal energy structures are obtained by numerical optimization procedure as well as analytical considerations. For a small number of constitutive magnets Ntot ≤ 26, a straight chain is found to be the ground state. In the regime of larger Ntot ≥ 27, the magnets form two touching chains with equally long tails at both ends. We succeed to identify the transition from two to three touching chains at Ntot = 129. Overall, this study sheds light on the mechanisms of the recently experimentally observed ribbon formation of superparamagnetic colloids via lateral aggregation of magnetic chains in magnetic field (Darras et al., 2016).

  2. Delayed quarkonium formation in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Kei

    2016-01-01

    Formation time of heavy quarkonia in a homogeneous magnetic field is analyzed by using a phenomenological ansatz of the vector current correlator. Because the existence of a magnetic field mixes vector quarkonia ($J/\\psi$, $\\psi^\\prime$) and their pseudoscalar partners ($\\eta_c$, $\\eta_c^\\prime$), the properties of the quarkonia can be modified through such a spin mixing. This means that the formation time of quarkonia is also changed by the magnetic field. We show the formation time of vector quarkonia is delayed by an idealized constant magnetic field, where the formation time of the excited state becomes longer than that of the ground state. As a more realistic situation in heavy-ion collisions, effects by a time-dependent magnetic field are also discussed.

  3. Magnetic fields in diffuse media

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, Elisabete; Melioli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the current knowledge of magnetic fields in diffuse astrophysical media. Starting with an overview of 21st century instrumentation to observe astrophysical magnetic fields, the chapters cover observational techniques, origin of magnetic fields, magnetic turbulence, basic processes in magnetized fluids, the role of magnetic fields for cosmic rays, in the interstellar medium and for star formation. Written by a group of leading experts the book represents an excellent overview of the field. Nonspecialists will find sufficient background to enter the field and be able to appreciate the state of the art.

  4. Field-induced transition of the magnetic ground state from A-type antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic order in CsCo2Se2

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rohr, Fabian; Krzton-Maziopa, Anna; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Grundmann, Henrik; Guguchia, Zurab; Schnick, Wolfgang; Schilling, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of CsCo2Se2 with ThCr2Si2 structure, which we have characterized through a series of magnetization and neutron diffraction measurements. We find that CsCo2Se2 undergoes a phase transition to an antiferromagnetically ordered state with a Néel temperature of {{T}\\text{N}}≈ 66 K. The nearest neighbour interactions are ferromagnetic as observed by the positive Curie-Weiss temperature of \\Theta≈ 51.0 K. We find that the magnetic structure of CsCo2Se2 consists of ferromagnetic sheets, which are stacked antiferromagnetically along the tetragonal c-axis, generally referred to as A-type antiferromagnetic order. The observed magnitude of the ordered magnetic moment at T  =  1.5 K is found to be only 0.20(1){μ\\text{Bohr}}  / Co. Already in comparably small magnetic fields of {μ0}H{{}\\text{MM}}(5~K)≈ 0.3 T, we observe a metamagnetic transition that can be attributed to spin-rearrangements of CsCo2Se2, with the moments fully ferromagnetically saturated in a magnetic field of {μ0}{{H}\\text{FM}}(5~K)≈ 6.4 T. We discuss the entire experimentally deduced magnetic phase diagram for CsCo2Se2 with respect to its unconventionally weak magnetic coupling. Our study characterizes CsCo2Se2, which is chemically and electronically posed closely to the A x Fe2-y Se2 superconductors, as a host of versatile magnetic interactions.

  5. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2017-09-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  6. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  7. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  8. Limits for primordial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Caprini, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    A possible explanation for the origin of the magnetic fields observed today in matter structures is that they were generated in the primordial universe. After briefly revising the model of a primordial stochastic magnetic field and sketching the main features of its time evolution in the primordial plasma, we illustrate the current upper bounds on the magnetic field amplitude and spectral index from Cosmic Microwave Background observations and gravitational wave production. We conclude that a primordial magnetic field generated by a non-causal process such as inflation with a red spectrum seems to be favoured as a seed for the magnetic fields observed today in structures.

  9. Superhorizon magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    [Abridged] We analyze the evolution of superhorizon-scale magnetic fields from the end of inflation till today. Whatever is the mechanism responsible for their generation during inflation, we find that a given magnetic mode with wavenumber $k$ evolves, after inflation, according to the values of $k\\eta_e$, $n_{\\mathbf{k}}$, and $\\Omega_k$, where $\\eta_e$ is the conformal time at the end of inflation, $n_{\\mathbf{k}}$ is the number density spectrum of inflation-produced photons, and $\\Omega_k$ is the phase difference between the two Bogolubov coefficients which characterize the state of that mode at the end of inflation. For any realistic inflationary magnetogenesis scenario, we find that $n_{\\mathbf{k}}^{-1} \\ll |k\\eta_e| \\ll 1$, and three evolutionary scenarios are possible: ($i$) $|\\Omega_k \\mp \\pi| = \\mathcal{O}(1)$, in which case the evolution of the magnetic spectrum $B_k(\\eta)$ is adiabatic, $a^2B_k(\\eta) = \\mbox{const}$, with $a$ being the expansion parameter; ($ii$) $|\\Omega_k \\mp \\pi| \\ll |k\\eta_e|$,...

  10. SCUPOL Magnetic Field Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Poidevin, Frederick; Kowal, Grzegorz; Pino, Elisabete de Gouveia Dal; Magalhaes, Antonio-Mario

    2013-01-01

    We present an extensive analysis of the 850 microns polarization maps of the SCUPOL Catalog produced by Matthews et al. (2009), focusing exclusively on the molecular clouds and star-forming regions. For the sufficiently sampled regions, we characterize the depolarization properties and the turbulent-to-mean magnetic field ratio of each region. Similar sets of parameters are calculated from 2D synthetic maps of dust emission polarization produced with 3D MHD numerical simulations scaled to the S106, OMC-2/3, W49 and DR21 molecular clouds polarization maps. For these specific regions the turbulent MHD regimes retrieved from the simulations, as described by the turbulent Alfv\\`en and sonic Mach numbers, are consistent within a factor 1 to 2 with the values of the same turbulent regimes estimated from the analysis of Zeeman measurements data provided by Crutcher (1999). Constraints on the values of the inclination angle of the mean magnetic field with respect to the LOS are also given. The values obtained from th...

  11. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  12. Magnetic Fields and Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Van Loo, S; Falle, S A E G

    2012-01-01

    Research performed in the 1950s and 1960s by Leon Mestel on the roles of magnetic fields in star formation established the framework within which he and other key figures have conducted subsequent investigations on the subject. This short tribute to Leon contains a brief summary of some, but not all, of his ground breaking contributions in the area. It also mentions of some of the relevant problems that have received attention in the last few years. The coverage is not comprehensive, and the authors have drawn on their own results more and touched more briefly on those of others than they would in a normal review. Theirs is a personal contribution to the issue honouring Leon, one of the truly great gentlemen, wits, and most insightful of astrophysicists.

  13. Reconnection of Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, J.; Priest, E. R.

    2007-01-01

    Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1.1 The Sun E. R. Priest; 1.2 Earth's magnetosphere J. Birn; Part II. Basic Theory of MHD Reconnection: 2.1 Classical theory of two-dimensional reconnection T. G. Forbes; 2.2 Fundamental concepts G. Hornig; 2.3 Three-dimensional reconnection in the absence of magnetic null points G. Hornig; 2.4 Three-dimensional reconnection at magnetic null points D. Pontin; 2.5 Three-dimensional flux tube reconnection M. Linton; Part III. Basic Theory of Collisionless Reconnection: 3.1 Fundamentals of collisionless reconnection J. Drake; 3.2 Diffusion region physics M. Hesse; 3.3 Onset of magnetic reconnection P. Pritchett; 3.4 Hall-MHD reconnection A. Bhattacharjee and J. Dorelli; 3.5 Role of current-aligned instabilities J. Büchner and W. Daughton; 3.6 Nonthermal particle acceleration M. Hoshino; Part IV. Reconnection in the Magnetosphere: 4.1 Reconnection at the magnetopause: concepts and models J. G. Dorelli and A. Bhattacharjee; 4.2 Observations of magnetopause reconnection K.-H. Trattner; 4.3 On the stability of the magnetotail K. Schindler; 4.4 Simulations of reconnection in the magnetotail J. Birn; 4.5 Observations of tail reconnection W. Baumjohann and R. Nakamura; 4.6 Remote sensing of reconnection M. Freeman; Part V. Reconnection in the Sun's Atmosphere: 5.1 Coronal heating E. R. Priest; 5.2 Separator reconnection D. Longcope; 5.3 Pinching of coronal fields V. Titov; 5.4 Numerical experiments on coronal heating K. Galsgaard; 5.5 Solar flares K. Kusano; 5.6 Particle acceleration in flares: theory T. Neukirch; 5.7 Fast particles in flares: observations L. Fletcher; 6. Open problems J. Birn and E. R. Priest; Bibliography; Index.

  14. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  15. Lightning Magnetic Field Measurements around Langmuir Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, M.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Aulich, G. D.; Edens, H. E.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    In the absence of artificial conductors, underground lightning transients are produced by diffusion of the horizontal surface magnetic field of a return stroke vertically downward into the conducting earth. The changing magnetic flux produces an orthogonal horizontal electric field, generating a dispersive, lossy transverse electromagnetic wave that penetrates a hundred meters or more into the ground according to the skin depth of the medium. In turn, the electric field produces currents that flow toward or away from the channel to ground depending on the stroke polarity. The underground transients can produce large radial horizontal potential gradients depending on the distance from the discharge and depth below the surface. In this study we focus on the surface excitation field. The goal of the work is to compare measurements of surface magnetic field waveforms B(t) at different distances from natural lightning discharges with simple and detailed models of the return stroke fields. In addition to providing input to the diffusion mechanism, the results should aid in further understanding return stroke field generation processes. The observational data are to be obtained using orthogonal sets of straightened Rogowski coils to measure magnetic field waveforms in N-S and E-W directions. The waveforms are sampled at 500 kS/s over 1.024 second time intervals and recorded directly onto secure digital cards. The instrument operates off of battery power for several days or weeks at a time in remote, unattended locations and measures magnetic field strengths of up to several tens of amperes/meter. The observations are being made in conjunction with collocated slow electric field change measurements and under good 3-D lightning mapping array (LMA) and fast electric field change coverage.

  16. Magnetic response to applied electrostatic field in external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorno, T.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); University of Florida, Department of Physics, Gainesville, FL (United States); Gitman, D.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Shabad, A.E. [P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-15

    We show, within QED and other possible nonlinear theories, that a static charge localized in a finite domain of space becomes a magnetic dipole, if it is placed in an external (constant and homogeneous) magnetic field in the vacuum. The magnetic moment is quadratic in the charge, depends on its size and is parallel to the external field, provided the charge distribution is at least cylindrically symmetric. This magneto-electric effect is a nonlinear response of the magnetized vacuum to an applied electrostatic field. Referring to the simple example of a spherically symmetric applied field, the nonlinearly induced current and its magnetic field are found explicitly throughout the space; the pattern of the lines of force is depicted, both inside and outside the charge, which resembles that of a standard solenoid of classical magnetostatics. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic response to applied electrostatic field in external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Adorno, T C; Shabad, A E

    2014-01-01

    We show, within QED and other possible nonlinear theories, that a static charge localized in a finite domain of space becomes a magnetic dipole, if it is placed in an external (constant and homogeneous) magnetic field in the vacuum. The magnetic moment is quadratic in the charge, depends on its size and is parallel to the external field, provided the charge distribution is at least cylindrically symmetric. This magneto-electric effect is a nonlinear response of the magnetized vacuum to an applied electrostatic field. Referring to a simple example of a spherically-symmetric applied field, the nonlinearly induced current and its magnetic field are found explicitly throughout the space, the pattern of lines of force is depicted, both inside and outside the charge, which resembles that of a standard solenoid of classical magnetostatics.

  18. NMR in pulsed magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30.4 T focused on 1H and 93Nb nuclei are reported. Here we discuss the advantage and limitation of pulsed field NMR and why this technique is able to become a promising research tool. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Fast Reconnection of Weak Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1998-01-01

    Fast magnetic reconnection refers to annihilation or topological rearrangement of magnetic fields on a timescale that is independent (or nearly independent) of the plasma resistivity. The resistivity of astrophysical plasmas is so low that reconnection is of little practical interest unless it is fast. Yet, the theory of fast magnetic reconnection is on uncertain ground, as models must avoid the tendency of magnetic fields to pile up at the reconnection layer, slowing down the flow. In this paper it is shown that these problems can be avoided to some extent if the flow is three dimensional. On the other hand, it is shown that in the limited but important case of incompressible stagnation point flows, every flow will amplify most magnetic fields. Although examples of fast magnetic reconnection abound, a weak, disordered magnetic field embedded in stagnation point flow will in general be amplified, and should eventually modify the flow. These results support recent arguments against the operation of turbulent resistivity in highly conducting fluids.

  20. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  1. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, D; Silchenko, O; Sokoloff, D; Horellou, C; Beck, R

    2016-01-01

    Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. However, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. We use tested methods for modelling $\\alpha-\\Omega$ galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513 where th...

  2. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  3. Spectral confinement and current for atoms in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren

    2007-01-01

    e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B<3......e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B

  4. Low Cost Magnetic Field Controller

    CERN Document Server

    Malafronte, Alexandre A

    2005-01-01

    The Physics Institute of the University of São Paulo (IFUSP) is building a continuous wave (cw) racetrack microtron. This machine has several dipole magnets, like the first and second stage recirculators, and a number of smaller ones in the transport line. These magnets must produce very stable magnetic fields to allow the beam to recirculate along very precise orbits and paths. Furthermore, the fields must be reproducible with great accuracy to allow an easier setup of the machine, though the effects of hysteresis tend to jeopardize the reproducibility. If the magnetic field is chosen by setting the current in the coils, temperature effects over the magnet and power supply tend to change the field. This work describes an inexpensive magnetic field controller that allows a direct measure of the magnetic field through an Hall probe. It includes a microcontroller running a feedback algorithm to control the power supply, in order to keep the field stable and reproducible. The controller can also execu...

  5. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  6. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  7. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, M. J.

    2006-06-01

    The first significant cosmic fields, and the seed field for galactic dynamos probably developed after the formation of the first non-linear structures. The history of star formation and the intergalactic medium is controlled, at least in part, by how and when galaxies and their precursors acquired their fields. The amplification of fields behind shocks, and the diffusivity of the magnetic flux, are crucial to the interpretation of radio sources, gamma ray burst afterglows, and other energetic cosmic phenomena. The build-up of magnetic fields is an important aspect of the overall cosmogonic process.

  8. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  9. ISR split-field magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The experimental apparatus used at intersection 4 around the Split-Field Magnet by the CERN-Bologna Collaboration (experiment R406). The plastic scintillator telescopes are used for precise pulse-height and time-of-flight measurements.

  10. What Are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... take for granted. What are electric and magnetic fields? Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) are invisible lines of ... humans. AC electric power produces electric and magnetic fields that create weak electric currents in humans. Being exposed to some kinds ...

  11. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benn, M.; Bjarno, J. B.; Denver, T.; Espley, J.; Jorgensen, J. L.; Jorgensen, P. S.; Lawton, P.; Malinnikova, A.; Merayo, J. M.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Schnurr, R.; Sheppard, D.; Smith, E. J.

    2017-02-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter's planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor suites, each consisting of a tri-axial Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located imaging sensors mounted on an ultra-stable optical bench. The imaging system sensors are part of a subsystem that provides accurate attitude information (to ˜20 arcsec on a spinning spacecraft) near the point of measurement of the magnetic field. The two sensor suites are accommodated at 10 and 12 m from the body of the spacecraft on a 4 m long magnetometer boom affixed to the outer end of one of 's three solar array assemblies. The magnetometer sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics boards within the magnetometer electronics package mounted inside Juno's massive radiation shielded vault. The imaging sensors are controlled by a fully hardware redundant electronics package also mounted within the radiation vault. Each magnetometer sensor measures the vector magnetic field with 100 ppm absolute vector accuracy over a wide dynamic range (to 16 Gauss = 1.6 × 106 nT per axis) with a resolution of ˜0.05 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range (±1600 nT per axis). Both magnetometers sample the magnetic field simultaneously at an intrinsic sample rate of 64 vector samples per second. The magnetic field instrumentation may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. The attitude determination system compares images with an on-board star catalog to provide attitude solutions (quaternions) at a rate of up to 4 solutions per second, and may be configured to acquire images of selected targets for science and engineering analysis. The system tracks and catalogs objects that pass through the imager field of

  12. The Juno Magnetic Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Benna, M.; Bjarno, J. B.; Denver, T.; Espley, J.; Jorgensen, J. L.; Jorgensen, P. S.; Lawton, P.; Malinnikova, A.; Merayo, J. M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Juno Magnetic Field investigation (MAG) characterizes Jupiter's planetary magnetic field and magnetosphere, providing the first globally distributed and proximate measurements of the magnetic field of Jupiter. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent magnetometer sensor suites, each consisting of a tri-axial Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located imaging sensors mounted on an ultra-stable optical bench. The imaging system sensors are part of a subsystem that provides accurate attitude information (to approx. 20 arcsec on a spinning spacecraft) near the point of measurement of the magnetic field. The two sensor suites are accommodated at 10 and 12 m from the body of the spacecraft on a 4 m long magnetometer boom affixed to the outer end of one of 's three solar array assemblies. The magnetometer sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics boards within the magnetometer electronics package mounted inside Juno's massive radiation shielded vault. The imaging sensors are controlled by a fully hardware redundant electronics package also mounted within the radiation vault. Each magnetometer sensor measures the vector magnetic field with 100 ppm absolute vector accuracy over a wide dynamic range (to 16 Gauss = 1.6 x 10(exp. 6) nT per axis) with a resolution of approx. 0.05 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range (+/-1600 nT per axis). Both magnetometers sample the magnetic field simultaneously at an intrinsic sample rate of 64 vector samples per second. The magnetic field instrumentation may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. The attitude determination system compares images with an on-board star catalog to provide attitude solutions (quaternions) at a rate of up to 4 solutions per second, and may be configured to acquire images of selected targets for science and engineering analysis. The system tracks and catalogs objects that pass through

  13. Magnetic-Field Hazards Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    produced during pulsed- magnetic-field therapy for non-union of the tibia." Med. Biol. Eng. Comput., Vol. 20, pp. 501-511 (1982). 32. Miller, D. A...Phenum Publishing Co. (1983). 40. Topper, R. F., "Electromagnetic shielding feasibility study," ASD -TDR-63-194 (Armour Research Foundation, Chicago...mammalian cells by strong magnetic fields (1976). 93. Malins, D. C., and Collier, T. K., "Xenobiotic interactions in aquatic organisms-effects on

  14. Absence of Magnetic Dipolar Phase Transition and Evolution of Low-Energy Excitations in PrNb2Al20 with Crystal Electric Field Γ3 Ground State: Evidence from 93Nb-NQR Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Tetsuro; Kotegawa, Hisashi; Tou, Hideki; Higashinaka, Ryuji; Nakama, Akihiro; Aoki, Yuji; Sato, Hideyuki

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of bulk magnetic susceptibility and 93Nb nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in the Pr-based caged compound PrNb2Al20. By analyzing the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization, the crystal electric field (CEF) level scheme of PrNb2Al20 is determined to be Γ3(0 K)-Γ4(21.32 K)-Γ5(43.98 K)-Γ1(51.16 K) within the framework of the localized 4f electron picture. The 93Nb-NQR spectra exhibit neither spectral broadening nor spectral shift upon cooling down to 75 mK. The 93Nb-NQR spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 at 5 K depends on the frequency and remains almost constant below 5 K. The frequency dependence of 1/T1 is attributed to the magnetic fluctuation due to the hyperfine-enhanced 141Pr nuclear moment inherent in the nonmagnetic Γ3 CEF ground state. The present NQR results provide evidence that no symmetry-breaking magnetic dipole order occurs down to 75 mK. Also, considering an invariant form of the quadrupole and octupole couplings between a 93Nb nucleus and Pr 4f electrons, Pr 4f quadrupoles and an octupole can couple with a 93Nb nuclear quadrupole moment and nuclear spin, respectively. Together with the results of bulk measurements, the present NQR results suggest that the possibility of a static quadrupole or octupole ordering can be excluded down to 100 mK. At low temperatures below 500 mK, however, the nuclear spin-echo decay rate gradually increases and the decay curve changes from Gaussian decay to Lorentzian decay, suggesting the evolution of a low-energy excitation.

  15. Properties of a Bound Polaron under a Perpendicular Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field on a bound polaron near the interface of a polar-polar semiconductor with Rashba effect. The external magnetic field strongly changes the ground state binding energy of the polaron and the Rashba spin-orbit (SO) interaction originating from the inversion asymmetry in the heterostructure splits the ground state binding energy of the bound polaron. In this paper, we have shown how the ground state binding energy will be with the change of the external magnetic field, the location of a single impurity, the wave vector of the electron and the electron areal density, taking into account the SO coupling. Due to the presence of the phonons, whose energy gives negative contribution to the polaron's, the spin-splitting states of the bound polaron are more stable, and we find that in the condition of week magnetic field, the Zeeaman effect can be neglected.

  16. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Radio synchrotron emission, its polarization and Faraday rotation of the polarization angle are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30 \\upmu G) and in central starburst regions (50-100 \\upmu G). Such fields are dynamically important; they affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized emission traces ordered fields, which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, where the latter originates from isotropic turbulent fields by the action of compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields (10-15 \\upmu G) are generally found in interarm regions. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered fields are also observed at the inner edges of spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies and in central regions. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are a tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium.—Faraday rotation measures of the diffuse polarized radio emission from galaxy disks reveal large-scale spiral patterns that can be described by the superposition of azimuthal modes; these are signatures of regular fields generated by mean-field dynamos. "Magnetic arms" between gaseous spiral arms may also be products of dynamo action, but need a stable spiral pattern to develop. Helically twisted field loops winding around spiral arms were found in two galaxies so far. Large-scale field reversals, like the one found in the Milky Way, could not yet be detected in external galaxies. In radio halos around edge-on galaxies, ordered magnetic fields with X-shaped patterns are observed. The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields, in particular their first occurrence in young galaxies and their dynamical importance during galaxy evolution, will be studied with

  17. Nanometric alternating magnetic field generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, A P; Tejo, F; Vidal-Silva, N; Escrig, J

    2017-07-05

    In this work we introduce an alternating magnetic field generator in a cylindrical nanostructure. This field appears due to the rotation of a magnetic domain wall located at some position, generating a magnetic region that varies its direction of magnetization alternately, thus inducing an alternating magnetic flux in its vicinity. This phenomenon occurs due to the competition between a spin-polarized current and a magnetic field, which allows to control both the angular velocity and the pinning position of the domain wall. As proof of concept, we study the particular case of a diameter-modulated nanowire with a spin-polarized current along its axis and the demagnetizing field produced by its modulation. This inhomogeneous field allows one to control the angular velocity of the domain wall as a function of its position along the nanowire allowing frequencies in the GHz range to be achieved. This generator could be used in telecommunications for devices in the range of radiofrequencies or, following Faraday's induction law, could also induce an electromotive force and be used as a movable alternate voltage source in future nanodevices.

  18. Theory of singlet-ground-state magnetism. Application to field-induced transitions in CsFeCl3 and CsFeBr3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, P.-A.; Schmid, B.

    1993-01-01

    the experimental data can be excellently described by the self-consistent random-phase approximation results. For magnetic fields near the critical magnetic field only qualitative conclusions can be obtained. Numerical results for the critical scattering, the correlation lengths, and the specific heat, which....... A sophisticated numerical and graphical method leads to a self-consistent determination of the induced magnetization and the quadrupole moment as well as to the determination of the excitation spectrum for CsFeBr3 and CsFeCl3 as a function of the magnetic field. For magnetic fields below the phase transition...

  19. $H_{2}^{+}$ ion in strong magnetic field an accurate calculation

    CERN Document Server

    López, J C; Turbiner, A V

    1997-01-01

    Using a unique trial function we perform an accurate calculation of the ground state $1\\sigma_g$ of the hydrogenic molecular ion $H^+_2$ in a constant uniform magnetic field ranging $0-10^{13}$ G. We show that this trial function also makes it possible to study the negative parity ground state $1\\sigma_u$.

  20. Magnetic Field Observations at Purcell, Oklahoma Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, P. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gibson, J. P. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The campaign “Magnetic Field Observations at Purcell, Oklahoma” installed a ground-based magnetometer at Purcell’s U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility boundary installation at the Kessler Atmospheric and Ecological Field Station, University of Oklahoma, to measure local magnetic field variations. It is a part of the nine stations of the Mid-continent MAgnetoseismic Chain (McMAC) placed as close to the 330° magnetic longitude as possible. This is the meridian in the world where land covers the greatest continuous range in magnetic latitude. Figure 1 shows the map of the magnetometer stations along the 330th magnetic meridian, including the Purcell (PCEL) station. The main scientific objective of the campaign is to detect the field line resonance (FLR) frequencies of the magnetic field line connected to the Purcell station. This magnetic field line extends from Purcell to the outer space at distances as far as 2 Earth radii (RE). To accurately identify FLR frequencies, however, simultaneous measurements at slightly different latitudes along the same meridian are necessary to allow the use of the cross-phase technique. This consideration explains the arrangement to operate magnetometers at the Americus (AMER) and Richardson (RICH) stations nearby. The measured resonant frequency can infer the plasma mass density along the field line through the method of normal-mode magnetoseismology. The magnetometer at the Purcell station can detect many other types of magnetic field fluctuations associated with the changes in the electric currents in the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, which by large are affected by the solar activity. In other words, the magnetic field data collected by this campaign are also useful for understanding space weather phenomena. The magnetometer was installed at Purcell’s ARM boundary facility in March 27, 2006. The construction of the triaxial fluxgate magnetometer used by the

  1. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrario, Lilia; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence,in the generation and stability of neutron star fields. Independent information on the internal magnetic field of neutron stars will come from future gravitational wave detections. Thus we maybe at the dawn of a ...

  2. Self-organization of topological defects for a triangular-lattice magnetic dots array subject to a perpendicular magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Khymyn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The regular array of magnetic particles (magnetic dots of the form of a two-dimensional triangular lattice in the presence of external magnetic field demonstrates complicated magnetic structures. The magnetic symmetry of the ground state for such a system is lower than that for the underlying lattice. Long range dipole-dipole interaction leads to a specific antiferromagnetic order in small fields, whereas a set of linear topological defects appears with the growth of the magnetic field. Self-organization of such defects determines the magnetization process for a system within a wide range of external magnetic fields.

  3. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing

  4. Magnetic Fields in Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Radio synchrotron emission is a powerful tool to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30\\mu G) and in central starburst regions (50-100\\mu G). Such fields are dynamically important; they affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized emission traces ordered fields, which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, where the latter originates from isotropic turbulent fields by the action of compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields (10-15\\mu G) are generally found in interarm regions. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered fields are also observed at the inner edges of spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies, and in central regions. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are a tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the interg...

  5. Magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  6. Magnetic fields of neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Reisenegger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Neutron stars contain the strongest magnetic fields known in the Universe. In this paper, I discuss briefly how these magnetic fields are inferred from observations, as well as the evidence for their time-evolution. I show how these extremely strong fields are actually weak in terms of their effects on the stellar structure, as is also the case for magnetic stars on the upper main sequence and magnetic white dwarfs, which have similar total magnetic fluxes. I propose a scenario in which a stable hydromagnetic equilibrium (containing a poloidal and a toroidal field component) is established soon after the birth of the neutron star, aided by the strong compositional stratification of neutron star matter, and this state is slowly eroded by non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic processes such as beta decays and ambipolar diffusion in the core of the star and Hall drift and breaking of the solid in its crust. Over sufficiently long time scales, the fluid in the neutron star core will behave as if it were barotropic, becau...

  7. Magnetic fields during galaxy mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Rodenbeck, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy mergers are expected to play a central role for the evolution of galaxies, and may have a strong impact on their magnetic fields. We present the first grid-based 3D magneto-hydrodynamical simulations investigating the evolution of magnetic fields during merger events. For this purpose, we employ a simplified model considering the merger event of magnetized gaseous disks in the absence of stellar feedback and without a stellar or dark matter component. We show that our model naturally leads to the production of two peaks in the evolution of the average magnetic field strength within 5 kpc, within 25 kpc and on scales in between 5 and 25 kpc. The latter is consistent with the peak in the magnetic field strength reported by Drzazga et al. (2011) in a merger sequence of observed galaxies. We show that the peak on the galactic scale and in the outer regions is likely due to geometrical effects, as the core of one galaxy enters the outskirts of the other one. In addition, there is a physical enhancement of t...

  8. Barrier Li Quantum Dots in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYi-Min; LIXiao-Zhu; YANWen-Hong; BAOCheng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The methods for the few-body system are introduced to investigate the states of the barrier Li quantum dots (QDs) in an arbitrary strength of magnetic field. The configuration, which consists of a positive ion located on the z-axis at a distaneed from the two-dimensional QD plane (the x-y plane) and three electrons in the dot plane bound by the positive ion, is called a barrier Li center. The system, which consists of three electrons in the dot plane bound by the ion,is called a barrier Li QD. The dependence of energy of the state of the barrier Li QD on an external magnetic field B and the distance d is obtained. The angular momentum L of the ground states is found to jump not only with the variation orB but also with d.

  9. Instabilities in strong magnetic fields in string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kiritsis, Elias B; Kiritsis, Elias; Kounnas, Costas

    1995-01-01

    We construct groundstates of the string with non-zero mass gap and non-trivial chromo-magnetic fields as well as curvature. The exact spectrum as function of the chromo-magnetic fields and curvature is derived. We examine the behavior of the spectrum, and find that there is a maximal value for the magnetic field H_{\\rm max}\\sim M_{\\rm Plank}^2. At this value all states that couple to the magnetic field become infinitely massive and decouple. We also find tachyonic instabilities for strong background fields of the order {\\cal O}(\\mu M_{\\rm Planck}) where \\mu is the mass gap of the theory. Unlike the field theory case, we find that such ground states become stable again for magnetic fields of the order {\\cal O}(M^2_{\\rm Plank}). The implications of these results are discussed.

  10. Zero magnetic field type magnetic field sensor. Reijikaigata jikai sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, T.; Ueda, R. (Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1990-11-20

    It is shown in this paper that a new type of sensor with excellent characteristics can be made by demagnetizing the sensor core toward a zero field state and then detecting an unknown field to be detected by the demagnetizing current. The core operates equivalently in a zero magnetic field so that the detection sensitivity is determined by the coil constant including the number of turns of the solenoid for demagnetization required to offset the field to be detected. Therefore the detection sensitivity does not depend on its configuration and magnetization characteristics and does not depend on the temperature. It is thereby considered that these characteristics can largely reduce such problems at present as the aging deterioration of magnetic materials or the quality control accompanied by manufacturing. In addition, the following points have been clarified: (1) The upper limit of the detectable range does not exist in principle. (2) The accuracy of the detection is 0.02% to the full scale 20kA/m. (3) The magnetization property required to the core used as a sensor is that it has a rectangular B-H loop which is as sharp as possible. 14 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Two charges on plane in a magnetic field: II. Moving neutral quantum system across magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Escobar-Ruiz, M A

    2014-01-01

    The moving neutral system of two Coulomb charges on a plane subject to a constant magnetic field $B$ perpendicular to the plane is considered. It is shown that the composite system of finite total mass is bound for any center-of-mass momentum $P$ and magnetic field strength; the energy of the ground state is calculated accurately using a variational approach. Their accuracy is cross-checked in Lagrange-mesh method for $B=1$\\,a.u. and in a perturbation theory at small $B$ and $P$. The constructed trial function has a property to be a uniform approximation of the exact eigenfunction. For Hydrogen atom and Positronium a double perturbation theory in $B$ and $P$ is developed and the first corrections are found algebraically. A phenomenon of a sharp change of energy behavior for a certain center-of-mass momentum but a fixed magnetic field is indicated.

  12. Particle in short-range potential in two dimensional structure in magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreev, S. P.; Pavlova, T. V.

    2006-01-01

    An exact solution is given for the problem of determining the ground state of a charge particle in a zero range force field located in a quantum well and in a magnetic field. The dependence of the electron's ground state on the potential depth and the magnetic field is investigated in a semiconducto

  13. Primordial Magnetic Fields and Causality

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Durrer, Ruth; Caprini, Chiara

    2003-01-01

    In this letter we discuss the implications of causality on a primordial magnetic field. We show that the residual field on large scales is much stronger suppressed than usually assumed and that a helical component is even suppressed even more than the parity even part. We show that due to this strong suppression, even maximal primordial fields generated at the electroweak phase transition can just marginally seed the fields in galaxies and clusters, but they cannot leave any detectable imprint on the cosmic microwave background.

  14. NEGATIVE DONOR CENTER QUANTUM DOTS IN MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Wen-fang

    2000-01-01

    The method of few-body physics is applied to treat a D- center quantumdot system in a magnetic field. The magnetic field is applied in the zdirection. Using this method, we investigate the energy spectra of low-lyingstates of D- center quantum dots as a function of magnetic field. Thedependence of the binding energies of the ground-state of the D- centerare calculated as a function of the dot radius with a few values of themagnetic field strength and compared with other results.

  15. Magnetic fields around black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, David A. G.

    Active Galactic Nuclei are the most powerful long-lived objects in the universe. They are thought to harbor supermassive black holes that range from 1 million solar masses to 1000 times that value and possibly greater. Theory and observation are converging on a model for these objects that involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy of accreting gas to radiation as well as Poynting flux produced by the interaction of the rotating spacetime and the electromagnetic fields originating in the ionized accretion flow. The presence of black holes in astrophysics is taking center stage, with the output from AGN in various forms such as winds and jets influencing the formation and evolution of the host galaxy. This dissertation addresses some of the basic unanswered questions that plague our current understanding of how rotating black holes interact with their surrounding magnetized accretion disks to produce the enormous observed energy. Two magnetic configurations are examined. The first involves magnetic fields connecting the black hole with the inner accretion disk and the other involves large scale magnetic fields threading the disk and the hole. We study the effects of the former type by establishing the consequences that magnetic torques between the black hole and the inner accretion disk have on the energy dissipation profile. We attempt a plausible explanation to the observed "Deep Minimum" state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6- 30-15. For the latter type of magnetic geometry, we study the effects of the strength of the magnetic field threading the black hole within the context of the cherished Blandford & Znajek mechanism for black hole spin energy extraction. We begin by addressing the problem in the non-relativistic regime where we find that the black hole-threading magnetic field is stronger for greater disk thickness, larger magnetic Prandtl number, and for a larger accretion disk. We then study the problem in full relativity where we show that our

  16. Iridate compound produces extraordinarily high coercive magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Vivien; Topping, Craig; Kim, Jae-Wook; Mun, Eun-Deok; Goddard, Paul; Ghannadzadeh, Saman; Luo, Xuan; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Singleton, John

    2014-03-01

    We present a data on an iridate compound that shows an extraordinarily large magnetic hysteresis loop. The coercive magnetic field exceeds 40 Tesla in single-crystal samples. The hysteresis coexists with a linear background, and the total remanent magnetization is about half a Bohr magneton. We will discuss the emergence of these properties from the interplay of spin-orbit coupling, magnetic exchange and possible frustration. The single crystalline material exhibits a magnetic hysteresis loop for one orientation of the magnetic field and a smooth linear increase in the magnetization with field for the other. Measurements were conducted in 65 T short-pulse magnets and the 60 Tesla shaped-pulse magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Lab in Los Alamos. We do not observe any dependence of the magnetic hysteresis on magnetic field sweep rate. Compounds containing Ir4 + have attracted attention recently due to strong spin-orbit coupling that competes with crystal-electric field and exchange interactions. This competition can result in non-Hund's-rule ground states with unusual properties.

  17. Chiral transition with magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia; Rojas, Juan Cristobal; Villavicencio, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    We study the nature of the chiral transition for an effective theory with spontaneous breaking of symmetry, where charged bosons and fermions are subject to the effects of a constant external magnetic field. The problem is studied in terms of the relative intensity of the magnetic field with respect to the mass and the temperature. When the former is the smallest of the scales, we present a suitable method to obtain magnetic and thermal corrections up to ring order at high temperature. By these means, we solve the problem of the instability in the boson sector for these theories, where the squared masses, taken as functions of the order parameter, can vanish and even become negative. The solution is found by considering the screening properties of the plasma, encoded in the resummation of the ring diagrams at high temperature. We also study the case where the magnetic field is the intermediate of the three scales and explore the nature of the chiral transition as we vary the field strength, the coupling const...

  18. Magnetic Fields of Neutron Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushan Konar

    2017-09-01

    This article briefly reviews our current understanding of the evolution of magnetic fields in neutron stars, which basically defines the evolutionary pathways between different observational classes of neutron stars. The emphasis here is on the evolution in binary systems and the newly emergent classes of millisecond pulsars.

  19. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Marita

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic field structure in edge-on galaxies observed so far shows a plane-parallel magnetic field component in the disk of the galaxy and an X-shaped field in its halo. The plane-parallel field is thought to be the projected axisymmetric (ASS) disk field as observed in face-on galaxies. Some galaxies addionionally exhibit strong vertical magnetic fields in the halo right above and below the central region of the disk. The mean-field dynamo theory in the disk cannot explain these observed fields without the action of a wind, which also probably plays an important role to keep the vertical scale heights constant in galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation activities, as has been observed in the radio continuum: At λ6 cm the vertical scale heights of the thin disk and the thick disk/halo in a sample of five edge-on galaxies are similar with a mean value of 300 +/- 50 pc for the thin disk and 1.8 +/- 0.2 kpc for the thick disk (a table and references are given in Krause 2011) with our sample including the brightest halo observed so far, NGC 253, with strong star formation, as well as one of the weakest halos, NGC 4565, with weak star formation. If synchrotron emission is the dominant loss process of the relativistic electrons the outer shape of the radio emission should be dumbbell-like as has been observed in several edge-on galaxies like e.g. NGC 253 (Heesen et al. 2009) and NGC 4565. As the synchrotron lifetime t syn at a single frequency is proportional to the total magnetic field strength B t -1.5, a cosmic ray bulk speed (velocity of a galactic wind) can be defined as v CR = h CR /t syn = 2 h z /t syn , where h CR and h z are the scale heights of the cosmic rays and the observed radio emission at this freqnency. Similar observed radio scale heights imply a self regulation mechanism between the galactic wind velocity, the total magnetic field strength and the star formation rate SFR in the disk: v CR ~ B t 1.5 ~ SFR ~ 0.5 (Niklas & Beck 1997).

  20. Primordial Magnetic Fields that Last?

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, S M; Carroll, Sean M.; Field, George B.

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic fields we observe in galaxies today may have their origins in the very early universe. While a number of mechanisms have been proposed which lead to an appreciable field amplitude at early times, the subsequent evolution of the field is of crucial importance, especially whether the correlation length of the field can grow as large as the size of a protogalaxy. This talk is a report on work in progress, in which we consider the fate of one specific primordial field scenario, driven by pseudoscalar effects near the electroweak phase transition. We argue that such a scenario has a number of attractive features, although it is still uncertain whether a field of appropriate size can survive until late times.

  1. Magnetic Properties of Erbium Gallium Gallate under High Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xijuan; Cheng Haiying; Yang Cuihong; Wang Wei

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical investigation on the magnetic properties of rare-earth Er3+ in Er3 Ga5 O12 was reported. The average magnetic moments(M) for applied magnetic field H parallel to the [001 ], [ 100], [ 110], [ 111 ] direction was studied based on the quantum theory. Temperature dependence of the magnetic properties is analyzed for H applied parallel to the [ 100] and [ 111 ] crystallographic directions. The magnetization decreases with increasing temperature,showing good agreement with thermal effect. A strong anisotropy of the magnetization is found under high magnetic field, but when the magnetic field is small, M and H are proportional.

  2. Modeling and analysis of magnetic dipoles in weak magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic leakage field distribution resulting from linear defects of a tube sample in the geomagnetic field is modeled according to the magnetic dipole theory.The formula to compute the normal component of the weak magnetic field is deduced based on the spatial distribution of the magnetic dipole.The shape and characteristics of the zero line (an important criterion for magnetic memory testing) of the normal field is analyzed under different longitudinal magnetizations.Results show that the characteristics of the zero line should be considered when the metal magnetic memory testing method is used to find and locate the defect.

  3. Galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    This course-tested textbook conveys the fundamentals of magnetic fields and relativistic plasma in diffuse cosmic media, with a primary focus on phenomena that have been observed at different wavelengths. Theoretical concepts are addressed wherever necessary, with derivations presented in sufficient detail to be generally accessible.In the first few chapters the authors present an introduction to various astrophysical phenomena related to cosmic magnetism, with scales ranging from molecular clouds in star-forming regions and supernova remnants in the Milky Way, to clusters of galaxies. Later c

  4. Stress Field of Straight Edge Dislocation in Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhao-long; HU Hai-yun; FAN Tian-you

    2007-01-01

    To study the changes in mechanical properties of materials within magnetic fields and the motion of dislocations,stress fields of dislocation in magnetic field need to be calculated.The straight edge dislocation is of basic importance in various defects.The stress field of straight edge dislocation in an external static magnetic field is determined by the theory of elasticity and electrodynamics according to the Volterra dislocation model for continuous media.This reduces to the known stress field when the magnet field is zero.The results can be used for further study on the strain energy of dislocations and the interactions between dislocations in magnetic fields.

  5. Diagnosis of solar chromospheric magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Hongqi(张洪起)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the measurements of the chromospheric magnetic field and the spatial configuration of the field at the lower solar atmosphere inferred by the distribution of the solar photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields. Some questions in the study of the chromospheric magnetic field are also presented.

  6. The HMI Magnetic Field Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, Jon Todd; Liu, Y.; Schou, J.; Scherrer, P.; HMI Science Team

    2009-05-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) will provide frequent full-disk magnetic field data after launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), currently scheduled for fall 2009. 16 megapixel line-of-sight magnetograms (Blos) will be recorded every 45 seconds. A full set of polarized filtergrams needed to determine the vector magnetic field requires 90 seconds. Quick-look data will be available within a few minutes of observation. Quick-look space weather and browse products must have identified users, and the list currently includes full disk magnetograms, feature identification and movies, 12-minute disambiguated vector fields in active region patches, time evolution of AR indices, synoptic synchronic frames, potential and MHD model results, and 1 AU predictions. A more complete set of definitive science data products will be offered about a day later and come in three types. "Pipeline” products, such as full disk vector magnetograms, will be computed for all data on an appropriate cadence. A larger menu of "On Demand” products, such as Non-Linear Force Free Field snapshots of an evolving active region, will be produced whenever a user wants them. Less commonly needed "On Request” products that require significant project resources, such as a high resolution MHD simulation of the global corona, will be created subject to availability of resources. Further information can be found at the SDO Joint Science Operations Center web page, jsoc.stanford.edu

  7. Airborne ground penetrating radar: practical field experiments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Schoor, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The performance of ground penetrating radar (GPR) under conditions where the ground coupling of the antenna is potentially compromised is investigated. Of particular interest is the effect of increasing the distance between the antennae...

  8. A Vorticity-Magnetic Field Dynamo Instability

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We generalize the mean field magnetic dynamo to include local evolution of the mean vorticity in addition to the mean magnetic field. The coupled equations exhibit a general mean field dynamo instability that enables the transfer of turbulent energy to the magnetic field and vorticity on larger scales. The growth of the vorticity and magnetic field both require helical turbulence which can be supplied by an underlying global rotation. The dynamo coefficients are derived including the backreac...

  9. Magnetic field of a combined plasma trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotenko, V. G.; Moiseenko, V. E.; Ågren, O.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations performed on the structure of a magnetic field created by the magnetic system of a combined plasma trap. The magnetic system includes the stellarator-type magnetic system and one of the mirror-type. For the stellarator type magnetic system the numeric model contains a magnetic system of an l=2 torsatron with the coils of an additional toroidal magnetic field. The mirror-type magnetic system element is considered as being single current-carrying turn enveloping the region of existence of closed magnetic surfaces of the torsatron. The calculations indicate the existence of a vast area of the values of the additional magnetic field magnitude and magnetic field of the single turn where, in principle, the implementation of the closed magnetic surface configuration is quite feasible.

  10. ANALYTIC EXPRESSION OF MAGNETIC FIELD DISTRIBUTION OF RECTANGULAR PERMANENT MAGNETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苟晓凡; 杨勇; 郑晓静

    2004-01-01

    From the molecular current viewpoint,an analytic expression exactly describing magnetic field distribution of rectangular permanent magnets magnetized sufficiently in one direction was derived from the Biot-Savart's law. This expression is useful not only for the case of one rectangular permanent magnet bulk, but also for that of several rectangular permanent magnet bulks. By using this expression,the relations between magnetic field distribution and the size of rectangular permanent magnets as well as the magnitude of magnetic field and the distance from the point in the space to the top (or bottom) surface of rectangular permanent magnets were discussed in detail. All the calculating results are consistent with experimental ones. For transverse magnetic field which is a main magnetic field of rectangular permanent magnets,in order to describe its distribution,two quantities,one is the uniformity in magnitude and the other is the uniformity in distribution of magnetic field,were defined. Furthermore, the relations between them and the geometric size of the magnet as well as the distance from the surface of permanent magnets were investigated by these formulas. The numerical results show that the geometric size and the distance have a visible influence on the uniformity in magnitude and the uniformity in distribution of the magnetic field.

  11. Climatologies of nighttime upper thermospheric winds measured by ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometers during geomagnetically quiet conditions: 2. High-latitude circulation and interplanetary magnetic field dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmert, J.T.; Hernandez, G.; Jarvis, M.J.;

    2006-01-01

    Stromfjord (67 degrees N, 51 degrees W), and Thule (77 degrees N, 68 degrees W). We examine the wind patterns as a function of magnetic local time and latitude, solar cycle, day of year, and the dawn-dusk and north-south components of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF B-y and B-z). In magnetic...... at latitudes as low as that of Millstone Hill ( magnetic latitude 53 degrees N). Quiet time Bz effects are negligible except over the magnetic polar cap station of Thule....

  12. Field and Thermal Characteristics of Magnetizing Fixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes field modeling and thermal modeling for magnetizing fixture. As the detailed characteristics of magnetizing fixture can be obtained, the efficient design of magnetizer which produce desired magnet will be possible using our modeling. For field modeling finite-element analysis is used as part of the design and analysis process for magnetizing fixture. The thermal modeling method of magnetizing fixture resistor uses multi-lumped model with equivalent thermal resistance and thermal capacitance.

  13. Magnetic fields for fluid motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Melissa C; Gerner, Matthew D; Fritsch, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    Three forces induced by magnetic fields offer unique control of fluid motion and new opportunities in microfluidics. This article describes magnetoconvective phenomena in terms of the theory and controversy, tuning by redox processes at electrodes, early-stage applications in analytical chemistry, mature applications in disciplines far afield, and future directions for micro total analysis systems. (To listen to a podcast about this article, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html .).

  14. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-03-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects,1,2 researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields,3-5 which was given the name "The Moses Effect."5 Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary were produced by superconducting magnets.

  15. Passive Magnetic Shielding in Gradient Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bidinosti, C P

    2013-01-01

    The effect of passive magnetic shielding on dc magnetic field gradients imposed by both external and internal sources is studied. It is found that for concentric cylindrical or spherical shells of high permeability material, higher order multipoles in the magnetic field are shielded progressively better, by a factor related to the order of the multipole. In regard to the design of internal coil systems for the generation of uniform internal fields, we show how one can take advantage of the coupling of the coils to the innermost magnetic shield to further optimize the uniformity of the field. These results demonstrate quantitatively a phenomenon that was previously well-known qualitatively: that the resultant magnetic field within a passively magnetically shielded region can be much more uniform than the applied magnetic field itself. Furthermore we provide formulae relevant to active magnetic compensation systems which attempt to stabilize the interior fields by sensing and cancelling the exterior fields clos...

  16. Design and realization of a two-dimensional spatial magnetic field mapping apparatus to measure magnetic fields of metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quan; Zhou, Xiao Yang; Chin, Jessie Yao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-07-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) spatial electric-field mapping apparatus [Opt. Express 14, 8694 (2006)] plays an important role in experiments involving metamaterials, such as the verification of free-space and ground-plane invisibility cloaks. However, such an apparatus is valid only for the transverse-electric (TE) mode and is invalid for the transverse-magnetic (TM) mode, as it requires perfectly magnetic conducting (PMC) planes, which do not exist in nature. In this paper, we propose a 2D spatial magnetic-field mapping apparatus based on artificial magnetic conductor (AMC) plates. The AMC structure is designed using periodically perfectly electrical conducting patches with a sub-wavelength size on a dielectric substrate backed with the ground plane, which can simulate a PMC plane. Using two parallel PMC plates to form a TM-wave planar waveguide, we realize the 2D spatial magnetic-field mapping apparatus in order to measure the external and internal magnetic fields of metamaterials. Two types of excitations, a plane-wave source and a magnetic dipole, are used to feed the system. In order to validate the performance of the magnetic-field mapper, two gradient-index metamaterial lenses are measured, and the experimental results are in good agreement with the full-wave simulations.

  17. Monitoring the Earth's Dynamic Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Applegate, David; Townshend, John B.

    2008-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey's Geomagnetism Program is to monitor the Earth's magnetic field. Using ground-based observatories, the Program provides continuous records of magnetic field variations covering long timescales; disseminates magnetic data to various governmental, academic, and private institutions; and conducts research into the nature of geomagnetic variations for purposes of scientific understanding and hazard mitigation. The program is an integral part of the U.S. Government's National Space Weather Program (NSWP), which also includes programs in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense (DOD), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSWP works to provide timely, accurate, and reliable space weather warnings, observations, specifications, and forecasts, and its work is important for the U.S. economy and national security. Please visit the National Geomagnetism Program?s website, http://geomag.usgs.gov, where you can learn more about the Program and the science of geomagnetism. You can find additional related information at the Intermagnet website, http://www.intermagnet.org.

  18. Magnetic field perturbartions in closed-field-line systems with zero toroidal magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauel, M; Ryutov, D; Kesner, J

    2003-12-02

    In some plasma confinement systems (e.g., field-reversed configurations and levitated dipoles) the confinement is provided by a closed-field-line poloidal magnetic field. We consider the influence of the magnetic field perturbations on the structure of the magnetic field in such systems and find that the effect of perturbations is quite different from that in the systems with a substantial toroidal field. In particular, even infinitesimal perturbations can, in principle, lead to large radial excursions of the field lines in FRCs and levitated dipoles. Under such circumstances, particle drifts and particle collisions may give rise to significant neoclassical transport. Introduction of a weak regular toroidal magnetic field reduces radial excursions of the field lines and neoclassical transport.

  19. Bats respond to very weak magnetic fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Xiang Tian

    Full Text Available How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 μT; the lowest field strength tested here, the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT, despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05. Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth's magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years.

  20. Hybrid Shielding for Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, David; Royal, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Precision symmetry measurements such as the search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron require magnetic shielding rooms to reduce the ambient field to the pT scale. The massive mu-metal sheets and large separation between layers make these shield rooms bulky and expensive. Active field cancellation systems used to reduce the surrounding field are limited in uniformity of cancellation. A novel approach to reducing the space between shield layers and increasing the effectiveness of active cancellation is to combine the two systems into a hybrid system, with active and passive layers interspersed. We demonstrate this idea in a prototype with an active layer sandwiched between two passive layers of shielding.

  1. Manifestations of Magnetic Field Inhomogeneities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawrence Rudnick

    2011-12-01

    Both observations and simulations reveal large inhomogeneities in magnetic field distributions in diffuse plasmas. Incorporating these inhomogeneities into various calculations can significantly change the inferred physical conditions. In extragalactic sources, e.g., these can compromise analyses of spectral ageing, which I will illustrate with some current work on cluster relics. I also briefly re-examine the old issue of how inhomogeneous fields affect particle lifetimes; perhaps not surprisingly, the next generation of radio telescopes are unlikely to find many sources that can extend their lifetimes from putting relativistic electrons into a low-field ‘freezer’. Finally, I preview some new EVLA results on the complex relic in Abell 2256, with implications for the interspersing of its relativistic and thermal plasmas.

  2. Effects of magnetic field on fluidization properties of magnetic pearls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maoming Fan; Zhenfu Luo; Yuemin Zhao; Qingru Chen; Daniel Tao; Xiuxiang Tao; Zhenqiang Chen

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study of the influence of external magnetic field on the fluidization behavior of magnetic pearls was carried out. Magnetic pearls are a magnetic form of iron oxide that mainly consists of Fe2O3 which are recovered from a high-volume power plant fly ash from pulverized coal combustion. Due to its abundance, low price and particular physical and chemical properties, magnetic pearls can be used as a heavy medium for minerals or solid waste dry separation based on density difference. This paper introduces the properties of magnetic pearls and compares the performance of magnetic pearls fluidised bed operation with or without an external magnetic field. Experimental results show that an external magnetic field significantly improves the fluidization performance of magnetic pearls such as uniformity and stability.

  3. Two-dimensional hydrogen negative ion in a magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Wen-Fang

    2004-01-01

    Making use of the adiabatic hyperspherical approach, we report a calculation for the energy spectrum of the ground and low-excited states of a two-dimensional hydrogen negative ion H- in a magnetic field. The results show that the ground and low-excited states of H- in low-dimensional space are more stable than those in three-dimensional space and there may exist more bound states.

  4. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. H...

  5. Interaction between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Ku

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A new formula for the interaction force between two magnetic dipoles in a uniform magnetic field is derived taking their mutual magnetic interaction into consideration and used to simulate their relative motion. Results show that when the angle β between the direction of external magnetic field and the centerline of two magnetic dipoles is 0 ° or 90 °, magnetic dipoles approach each other or move away from each other in a straight line, respectively. And the time required for them to contact each other from the initial position is related to the specific susceptibility and the diameter of magnetic particles, medium viscosity and magnetic field strength. When β is between 0 ° and 90 °, magnetic dipole pair performs approximate elliptical motion, and the motion trajectory is affected by the specific susceptibility, diameter and medium viscosity but not magnetic field strength. However, time required for magnetic dipoles to complete the same motion trajectory is shorter when adopting stronger magnetic field. Moreover, the subsequent motion trajectory of magnetic dipoles is ascertained once the initial position is set in a predetermined motion trajectory. Additionally, magnetic potential energy of magnetic dipole pairs is transformed into kinetic energy and friction energy during the motion.

  6. Effective magnetic moment of neutrinos in strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, A; Masood, S S; Gaitan, R; Rodríguez, S

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we compute the effective magnetic moment of neutrinos propagating in dense high magnetized medium. Taking typical values of magnetic field and densities of astrophysical objects (such as the cores of supernovae and neutron stars) we obtain an effective type of dipole magnetic moment in agreement with astrophysical and cosmological bounds. (Author)

  7. Magnetic field penetration of erosion switch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Rodney J.; Jones, Michael E.; Grossmann, John M.; Ottinger, Paul F.

    1988-10-01

    Computer simulations demonstrate that the entrainment (or advection) of magnetic field with the flow of cathode-emitted electrons can constitute a dominant mechanism for the magnetic field penetration of erosion switch plasmas. Cross-field drift in the accelerating electric field near the cathode starts the penetration process. Plasma erosion propagates the point for emission and magnetic field injection along the cathode toward the load-for the possibility of rapid switch opening.

  8. Magnetic field reversals and galactic dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We argue that global magnetic field reversals similar to those observed in the Milky Way occur quite frequently in mean-field galactic dynamo models that have relatively strong, random, seed magnetic fields that are localized in discrete regions. The number of reversals decreases to zero with reduction of the seed strength, efficiency of the galactic dynamo and size of the spots of the seed field. A systematic observational search for magnetic field reversals in a representative sample of spi...

  9. Nonlinear subelliptic Schrodinger equations with external magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyril Tintarev

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available To account for an external magnetic field in a Hamiltonian of a quantum system on a manifold (modelled here by a subelliptic Dirichlet form, one replaces the the momentum operator $frac 1i d$ in the subelliptic symbol by $frac 1i d-alpha$, where $alphain TM^*$ is called a magnetic potential for the magnetic field $eta=dalpha$. We prove existence of ground state solutions (Sobolev minimizers for nonlinear Schrodinger equation associated with such Hamiltonian on a generally, non-compact Riemannian manifold, generalizing the existence result of Esteban-Lions [5] for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a constant magnetic field on $mathbb{R}^N$ and the existence result of [6] for a similar problem on manifolds without a magnetic field. The counterpart of a constant magnetic field is the magnetic field, invariant with respect to a subgroup of isometries. As an example to the general statement we calculate the invariant magnetic fields in the Hamiltonians associated with the Kohn Laplacian and for the Laplace-Beltrami operator on the Heisenberg group.

  10. The mean solar magnetic field as an indicator of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bremer

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mean Solar Magnetic Field (MSMF measured daily by ground based observations at the Standford Observatory shows similar structures like the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF near the Earth about 5 to 7 days later. The ionospheric effect in the mid-latitude F2-region due to such MSMF changes is most marked for strong MSMF changes from anti to pro sectors. The mean ionospheric response is very similar to the results obtained earlier with IMF sector structure data derived from Svalgaard (1976 and Wilcox (1982, private communication. Therefore, the MSMF data can successfully be used to predict the mean IMF sector structure and the mean ionospheric response 5 to 7 days in advance.

  11. Progressive Transformation between Two Magnetic Ground States for One Crystal Structure of a Chiral Molecular Magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Nishihara, Sadafumi; Inoue, Katsuya; Kurmoo, Mohamedally

    2016-03-21

    We report the exceptional observation of two different magnetic ground states (MGS), spin glass (SG, T(B) = 7 K) and ferrimagnet (FI, T(C) = 18 K), for one crystal structure of [{Mn(II)(D/L-NH2ala)}3{Mn(III)(CN)6}]·3H2O obtained from [Mn(CN)6](3-) and D/L-aminoalanine, in contrast to one MGS for [{Mn(II)(L-NH2ala)}3{Cr(III)(CN)6}]·3H2O. They consist of three Mn(NH2ala) helical chains bridged by M(III)(CN)6 to give the framework with disordered water molecules in channels and between the M(III)(CN)6. Both MGS are characterized by a negative Weiss constant, bifurcation in ZFC-FC magnetizations, blocking of the moments, both components of the ac susceptibilities, and hysteresis. They differ in the critical temperatures, absolute magnetization for 5 Oe FC (lack of spontaneous magnetization for the SG), and the shapes of the hysteresis and coercive fields. While isotropic pressure increases both T(crit) and the magnetizations linearly and reversibly in each case, dehydration progressively transforms the FI into the SG as followed by concerted in situ magnetic measurements and single-crystal diffraction. The relative strengths of the two moderate Mn(III)-CN-Mn(II) antiferromagnetic (J1 and J2), the weak Mn(II)-OCO-Mn(II) (J3), and Dzyaloshinkii-Moriya antisymmetric (DM) interactions generate the two sets of characters. Examination of the bond lengths and angles for several crystals and their corresponding magnetic properties reveals a correlation between the distortion of Mn(III)(CN)6 and the MGS. SG is favored by higher magnetic anisotropy by less distorted Mn(III)(CN)6 in good accordance with the Mn-Cr system. This conclusion is also born out of the magnetization measurements on orientated single crystals with fields parallel and perpendicular to the unique c axis of the hexagonal space group.

  12. Properties of the ground state in a spin-2 transverse Ising model with the presence of a crystal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜伟; 魏国柱; 杜安; 张起

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the ground state in the spin-2 transverse Ising model with the presence of a crystal field arestudied by using the effective-field theory with correlations. The longitudinal and transverse magnetizations, the phasediagram and the internal energy in the ground state are given numerically for a honeycomb lattice (z=3).

  13. Properties of the ground state in a spin—2 transverse Ising model with the presence of a srystal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜伟; 魏国柱; 等

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the ground state in the spin-2 transverse Ising model with the presence of a crystal of a crystal field are studied by using the effective-field theory with correlations,The longitudinal and transverse magnetizations,the phase diagram and the internal energy in the ground state are given numerically for a honeycomb lattice(z=3).

  14. Near-Field Magnetic Dipole Moment Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Patrick K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the data analysis technique used for magnetic testing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Excellent results have been obtained using this technique to convert a spacecraft s measured magnetic field data into its respective magnetic dipole moment model. The model is most accurate with the earth s geomagnetic field cancelled in a spherical region bounded by the measurement magnetometers with a minimum radius large enough to enclose the magnetic source. Considerably enhanced spacecraft magnetic testing is offered by using this technique in conjunction with a computer-controlled magnetic field measurement system. Such a system, with real-time magnetic field display capabilities, has been incorporated into other existing magnetic measurement facilities and is also used at remote locations where transport to a magnetics test facility is impractical.

  15. Magnetic Fields from the Electroweak Phase Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Törnkvist, O

    1998-01-01

    I review some of the mechanisms through which primordial magnetic fields may be created in the electroweak phase transition. I show that no magnetic fields are produced initially from two-bubble collisions in a first-order transition. The initial field produced in a three-bubble collision is computed. The evolution of fields at later times is discussed.

  16. Strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields generation

    CERN Document Server

    Shneerson, German A; Krivosheev, Sergey I

    2014-01-01

    Strong pulsed magnetic fields are important for several fields in physics and engineering, such as power generation and accelerator facilities. Basic aspects of the generation of strong and superstrong pulsed magnetic fields technique are given, including the physics and hydrodynamics of the conductors interacting with the field as well as an account of the significant progress in generation of strong magnetic fields using the magnetic accumulation technique. Results of computer simulations as well as a survey of available field technology are completing the volume.

  17. History of Solar Magnetic Fields Since George Ellery Hale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2017-09-01

    As my own work on the Sun's magnetic field started exactly 50 years ago at Crimea in the USSR, I have been a participant in the field during nearly half the time span since Hale's discovery in 1908 of magnetic fields in sunspots. The present historical account is accompanied by photos from my personal slide collection, which show a number of the leading personalities who advanced the field in different areas: measurement techniques, from photographic to photoelectric and imaging methods in spectro-polarimetry; theoretical foundations of MHD and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields (birth of dynamo theory); the quest for increased angular resolution from national projects to international consortia (for instruments both on ground and in space); introduction of the Hanle effect in astrophysics and the Second Solar Spectrum as its playground; small-scale nature of the field, the fundamental resolution limit, and transcending it by resolution-independent diagnostics.

  18. History of Solar Magnetic Fields Since George Ellery Hale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2015-09-01

    As my own work on the Sun's magnetic field started exactly 50 years ago at Crimea in the USSR, I have been a participant in the field during nearly half the time span since Hale's discovery in 1908 of magnetic fields in sunspots. The present historical account is accompanied by photos from my personal slide collection, which show a number of the leading personalities who advanced the field in different areas: measurement techniques, from photographic to photoelectric and imaging methods in spectro-polarimetry; theoretical foundations of MHD and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields (birth of dynamo theory); the quest for increased angular resolution from national projects to international consortia (for instruments both on ground and in space); introduction of the Hanle effect in astrophysics and the Second Solar Spectrum as its playground; small-scale nature of the field, the fundamental resolution limit, and transcending it by resolution-independent diagnostics.

  19. History of Solar Magnetic Fields since George Ellery Hale

    CERN Document Server

    Stenflo, Jan

    2015-01-01

    As my own work on the Sun's magnetic field started exactly 50 years ago at Crimea in the USSR, I have been a participant in the field during nearly half the time span since Hale's discovery in 1908 of magnetic fields in sunspots. The present historical account is accompanied by photos from my personal slide collection, which show a number of the leading personalities who advanced the field in different areas: measurement techniques, from photographic to photoelectric and imaging methods in spectro-polarimetry; theoretical foundations of MHD and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields (birth of dynamo theory); the quest for increased angular resolution from national projects to international consortia (for instruments both on ground and in space); introduction of the Hanle effect in astrophysics and the Second Solar Spectrum as its playground; small-scale nature of the field, the fundamental resolution limit, and transcending it by resolution-independent diagnostics.

  20. Electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum induced by strong magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Chernodub, M N

    2012-01-01

    The quantum vacuum may become an electromagnetic superconductor in the presence of a strong external magnetic field of the order of 10^{16} Tesla. The magnetic field of the required strength (and even stronger) is expected to be generated for a short time in ultraperipheral collisions of heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider. The superconducting properties of the new phase appear as a result of a magnetic-field-assisted condensation of quark-antiquark pairs with quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons. We discuss similarities and differences between the suggested superconducting state of the quantum vacuum, a conventional superconductivity and the Schwinger pair creation. We argue qualitatively and quantitatively why the superconducting state should be a natural ground state of the vacuum at the sufficiently strong magnetic field. We demonstrate the existence of the superconducting phase using both the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and an effective bosonic model based on the vector meson dominance (th...

  1. Magnetic excitons in singlet-ground-state ferromagnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgeneau, R.J.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Bucher, E.

    1971-01-01

    The authors report measurements of the dispersion of singlet-triplet magnetic excitons as a function of temperature in the singlet-ground-state ferromagnets fcc Pr and Pr3Tl. Well-defined excitons are observed in both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic regions, but with energies which are nearly...

  2. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  3. Exploring Magnetic Fields with a Compass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunk, Brandon; Beichner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A compass is an excellent classroom tool for the exploration of magnetic fields. Any student can tell you that a compass is used to determine which direction is north, but when paired with some basic trigonometry, the compass can be used to actually measure the strength of the magnetic field due to a nearby magnet or current-carrying wire. In this…

  4. Biological Effect of Magnetic Field in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Wei ZENG

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the biological effect of magnetic field in mice bodies. Method: With a piece of permanent magnet embeded in mice bodies beside the femoral artery and vein to measure the electrophoretic velocity(um/s). Result: The magnetic field in mice bodies on the experiment group that the electrophoretic velocity is faster more than control and free group.Conclusion:The magnetic field in animal's body can raise the negative electric charges on the surface of erythrocyte to improve the microcirculation, this is the biological effect of magnetic field.

  5. The Magnetic Field Effect on Planetary Nebulae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. R. Khesali; K. Kokabi

    2006-01-01

    In our previous work on the 3-dimensional dynamical structure of planetary nebulae the effect of magnetic field was not considered. Recently Jordan et al. have directly detected magnetic fields in the central stars of some planetary nebulae. This discovery supports the hypothesis that the non-spherical shape of most planetary nebulae is caused by magnetic fields in AGB stars. In this study we focus on the role of initially weak toroidal magnetic fields embedded in a stellar wind in altering the shape of the PN. We found that magnetic pressure is probably influential on the observed shape of most PNe.

  6. Magnetic field concentrator for probing optical magnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Wróbel, Piotr; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2010-12-06

    Development of all dielectric and plasmonic metamaterials with a tunable optical frequency magnetic response creates a need for new inspection techniques. We propose a method of measuring magnetic responses of such metamaterials within a wide range of optical frequencies with a single probe. A tapered fiber probe with a radially corrugated metal coating concentrates azimuthally polarized light in the near-field into a subwavelength spot the longitudinal magnetic field component which is much stronger than the perpendicular electric one. The active probe may be used in a future scanning near-field magnetic microscope for studies of magnetic responses of subwavelength elementary cells of metamaterials.

  7. Magnetic rotation imaging method to measure the geomagnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new imaging method for measuring the geomagnetic field based on the magnetic rotation effect is put forward. With the help of polarization property of the sunlight reflected from the ground and the magnetic rotation of the atmosphere, the geomagnetic field can be measured by an optical system installed on a satellite. According to its principle, the three-dimensional image of the geomagnetic field can be obtained. The measuring speed of this method is very high, and there is no blind spot and distortion. In this paper, the principle of this method is presented, and some key problems are discussed.

  8. Electrolytic tiltmeters inside magnetic fields: Some observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Arce, P. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Barcala, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Luque, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Molinero, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Navarrete, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Oller, J.C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Garcia-Moral, L.A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Gomez, G. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Martinez-Rivero, C. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Matorras, F. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Rodrigo, T. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Ruiz-Arbol, P. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Scodellaro, L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Sobron, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Vila, I. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)

    2007-04-21

    We present observations of the electrolytic clinometers behaviour inside magnetic field environments introducing phenomenological expressions to account for the measured output voltage variations as functions of field gradients and field strengths.

  9. From Inverse to Delayed Magnetic Catalysis in Strong Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    We study magnetic field effect on chiral phase transition in a Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. In comparison with mean field approximation containing quarks only, including mesons as quantum fluctuations in the model leads to a transition from inverse to delayed magnetic catalysis at finite temperature and delays the transition at finite baryon chemical potential. The location of the critical end point depends on the the magnetic field non-monotonously.

  10. Dynamic shielding of the magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAU, M.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a comparative study of the methods used to control and compensate the direct and alternative magnetic fields. Two frequently used methods in the electromagnetic compatibility of the complex biomagnetism installations were analyzed. The two methods refer to the use of inductive magnetic field sensors (only for alternative fields and of fluxgate magnetometers as active transducers which measures both the direct and alternative components of the magnetic field. The applications of the dynamic control of the magnetic field are: control of the magnetic field of the military ships, control of parasite magnetic field produced by power transformers and the electrical networks, protection of the mass spectrometers, electronic microscopes, SQUID and optical pumping magnetometers for applications in biomagnetism.

  11. Field free line magnetic particle imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Erbe, Marlitt

    2014-01-01

    Marlitt Erbe provides a detailed introduction into the young research field of Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) and field free line (FFL) imaging in particular. She derives a mathematical description of magnetic field generation for FFL imaging in MPI. To substantiate the simulation studies on magnetic FFL generation with a proof-of-concept, the author introduces the FFL field demonstrator, which provides the world's first experimentally generated rotated and translated magnetic FFL field complying with the requirements for FFL reconstruction. Furthermore, she proposes a scanner design of consi

  12. Electrical Grounding - a Field for Geophysicists and Electrical Engineers Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, P. F.; Pane, E.; Guaraldo, N.

    2012-12-01

    Technology for designing ground electrodes for high-voltage direct current transmission systems (HVDC) has being using in the last years, deep soil models based on a wide range of geophysical methods. These models shall include detailed representation of shallow soil, down to 100 meters, in order to allow the evaluation of the soil conditions where the ground electrodes will be buried. Also deep soil models are needed, to be used for the interference studies, which shall represent a soil volume of about 15 km deep and a surface area of about 15 to 30 km radius. Large facilities for power plants (hydroelectric and wind farms, for example) and industrial complexes (such as petrochemical plants) has become usual at the current stage of Brazil industrialization. Grounding mats for these facilities are made of a buried cooper mesh, interconnected to a wide variety of metallic masses, such as steel reinforced concrete foundations, ducts in general etc. These grounding systems may present dimensions with the order of hundreds of meters, and, at least in Brazil, are usually calculated by using electrical resistivity soil models, based on short spacing Wenner measurements (with maximum spacing of about 64 m.). The soil model shall be the best possible representation of the environment in which the grounding electrodes are immersed, for the purpose of calculation of resistance or for digital simulation. The model to be obtained is limited by the amount and quality of soil resistivity measurements are available, and the resources to be used in the calculations and simulations. Geophysics uses a wide range of technologies for exploring subsoil, ranging from surface measurements to wells logging - seismic, gravimetric, magnetic, electrical, electromagnetic and radiometric. The electrical and electromagnetic methods includes various measurement techniques (Wenner, Schlumberger, TDEM, Magneto-telluric etc.), which together allow the development of complex resistivity soil models

  13. Second order semiclassics with self-generated magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdös, Laszlo; Fournais, Søren; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2012-01-01

    We consider the semiclassical asymptotics of the sum of negative eigenvalues of the three-dimensional Pauli operator with an external potential and a self-generated magnetic field $B$. We also add the field energy $\\beta \\int B^2$ and we minimize over all magnetic fields. The parameter $\\beta......$ effectively determines the strength of the field. We consider the weak field regime with $\\beta h^{2}\\ge {const}>0$, where $h$ is the semiclassical parameter. For smooth potentials we prove that the semiclassical asymptotics of the total energy is given by the non-magnetic Weyl term to leading order...... in the companion paper \\cite{EFS3} to prove the second order Scott correction to the ground state energy of large atoms and molecules....

  14. Magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087244; Arpaia, Pasquale

    This thesis presents a magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils. The requirements, the architecture, the conceptual design, and the prototype for straight magnets were shown. The proposed system is made up of a rotating coil transducer and a train-like system for longitudinal motion and positioning inside magnet bore. The mapper allows a localized measurement of magnetic fields and the variation of the harmonic multipole content in the magnet ends. The proof-of-principle demonstration and the experimental characterization of the rotating-coil transducer specifically conceived for mapping validated the main objective of satisfying the magnetic measurement needs of the next generation of compact accelerators.

  15. DC-based magnetic field controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Morgan, John P,. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  16. DC-based magnetic field controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  17. High magnetic fields science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, Noboru

    2003-01-01

    This three-volume book provides a comprehensive review of experiments in very strong magnetic fields that can only be generated with very special magnets. The first volume is entirely devoted to the technology of laboratory magnets: permanent, superconducting, high-power water-cooled and hybrid; pulsed magnets, both nondestructive and destructive (megagauss fields). Volumes 2 and 3 contain reviews of the different areas of research where strong magnetic fields are an essential research tool. These volumes deal primarily with solid-state physics; other research areas covered are biological syst

  18. Trapped magnetic field measurements on HTS bulk by peak controlled pulsed field magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Watasaki, Masahiro [Department of Electronic Control Engineering, Hiroshima National College of Maritime Technology, 4272-1, Higashino, Ohsakikamijima-cho, Toyota-gun, Hiroshima 725-0231 (Japan); Kimura, Yosuke [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. Technical Institute System Technology Development Centre 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Akashi-shi, Hyogo 673-8666 (Japan); Miki, Motohiro; Izumi, Mitsuru, E-mail: ida@hiroshima-cmt.ac.j [Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchu-jima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    For the past several years, we have studied the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) synchronous motor assembled with melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk magnets. If the single pulse field magnetizes a bulk effectively, size of electrical motor will become small for the strong magnetic field of the HTS magnets without reducing output power of motor. In the previous study, we showed that the HTS bulk was magnetized to excellent cone-shape magnetic field distribution by using the waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM) method. The WCPM technique made possible the active control of the waveform on which magnetic flux motion depended. We generated the pulse waveform with controlled risetime for HTS bulk magnetization to suppress the magnetic flux motion which decreases magnetization efficiency. The pulsed maximum magnetic flux density with slow risetime is not beyond the maximum magnetic flux density which is trapped by the static field magnetization. But, as for applying the pulse which has fast risetime, the magnetic flux which exceed greatly the threshold penetrates the bulk and causes the disorder of the trapped magnetic distribution. This fact suggests the possibility that the threshold at pulsed magnetization influences the dynamic magnetic flux motion. In this study, Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk is magnetized by the controlled arbitrary trapezoidal shape pulse, of which the maximum magnetic flux density is controlled not to exceed the threshold. We will present the trapped magnetic characteristics and the technique to generate the controlled pulsed field.

  19. Magnetic field evolution in tidal disruption events

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Rossi, Elena M

    2016-01-01

    When a star gets tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole, its magnetic field is expected to be transmitted to the debris. In this paper, we study this process via smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the disruption and early debris evolution including the stellar magnetic field. As the gas stretches into a stream, we show that the magnetic field evolution is strongly dependent on its orientation with respect to the stretching direction. In particular, an alignment of the field lines with the direction of stretching induces an increase of the magnetic energy. For disruptions happening well within the tidal radius, the star compression causes the magnetic field strength to sharply increase by an order of magnitude at the time of pericentre passage. If the disruption is partial, we find evidence for a dynamo process occurring inside the surviving core due to the formation of vortices. This causes an amplification of the magnetic field strength by a factor of $\\sim 10$. However, this valu...

  20. Synchrotron Applications of High Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This workshop aims at discussing the scientific potential of X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy in magnetic fields above 30 T. Pulsed magnetic fields in the range of 30 to 40 T have recently become available at Spring-8 and the ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facility). This document gathers the transparencies of the 6 following presentations: 1) pulsed magnetic fields at ESRF: first results; 2) X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction experiments by using mini-coils: applications to valence state transition and frustrated magnet; 3) R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}: an ideal system to be studied in X-ray under high magnetic field?; 4) high field studies at the Advanced Photon Source: present status and future plans; 5) synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies under extreme conditions; and 6) projects for pulsed and steady high magnetic fields at the ESRF.

  1. Demagnetizing fields in active magnetic regenerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian R.H.; Smith, Anders

    2014-01-01

    is in general both a function of the overall shape of the regenerator and its morphology (packed particles, parallel plates etc.) as well as the magnetization of the material. Due to the pronounced temperature dependence of the magnetization near the Curie temperature, the demagnetization field is also......A magnetic material in an externally applied magnetic field will in general experience a spatially varying internal magnetic field due to demagnetizing effects. When the performance of active magnetic regenerators (AMRs) is evaluated using numerical models the internal field is often assumed...... temperature dependent. We propose a relatively straightforward method to correct sufficiently for the demagnetizing field in AMR models. We discuss how the demagnetizing field behaves in regenerators made of packed spheres under realistic operation conditions....

  2. New knowledge of the Galactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J L

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic fields of our Milky Way galaxy are the main agent for cosmic rays to transport. In the last decade, much new knowledge has been gained from measurements of the Galactic magnetic fields. In the Galactic disk, from the RMs of a large number of newly discovered pulsars, the large-scale magnetic fields along the spiral arms have been delineated in a much larger region than ever before, with alternating directions in the arm and interarm regions. The toroidal fields in the Galactic halo were revealed to have opposite directions below and above the Galactic plane, which is an indication of an A0 mode dynamo operating in the halo. The strength of large-scale fields obtained from pulsar RM data has been found to increase exponentially towards the Galactic center. Compared to the steep Kolmogorov spectrum of magnetic energy at small scales, the large-scale magnetic fields show a shallow broken spatial magnetic energy spectrum.

  3. Behaviour of ferrocholesterics under external magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Emil; Motoc, Cornelia

    2001-08-01

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the orientational behaviour of a ferrocholesteric with a positive magnetic anisotropy is investigated. Both the phenomena arising when the field was switched on or switched off are considered. It is found that the field needed for a ferrocholesteric-ferronematic transition BFC↑ is higher when compared to that obtained for the pure cholesteric ( BC↑). A similar result was obtained when estimating the critical field for the homeotropic ferronematic-ferrocholesteric (focal conic) transition, occurring when the magnetic field was decreased or switched off. We found that BFC↓> BC↓. These results are explained when considering that the magnetic moments of the magnetic powder are not oriented parallel to the liquid crystal molecular directors, therefore hindering their orientation under a magnetic field.

  4. Coulomb crystals in the magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Baiko, D A

    2009-01-01

    The body-centered cubic Coulomb crystal of ions in the presence of a uniform magnetic field is studied using the rigid electron background approximation. The phonon mode spectra are calculated for a wide range of magnetic field strengths and for several orientations of the field in the crystal. The phonon spectra are used to calculate the phonon contribution to the crystal energy, entropy, specific heat, Debye-Waller factor of ions, and the rms ion displacements from the lattice nodes for a broad range of densities, temperatures, chemical compositions, and magnetic fields. Strong magnetic field dramatically alters the properties of quantum crystals. The phonon specific heat increases by many orders of magnitude. The ion displacements from their equilibrium positions become strongly anisotropic. The results can be relevant for dusty plasmas, ion plasmas in Penning traps, and especially for the crust of magnetars (neutron stars with superstrong magnetic fields $B \\gtrsim 10^{14}$ G). The effect of the magnetic ...

  5. Generating the optimal magnetic field for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Insinga, Andrea Roberto; Smith, Anders

    2016-01-01

    remanence distribution for any desired magnetic field. The method is based on the reciprocity theorem, which through the use of virtual magnets can be used to calculate the optimal remanence distribution. Furthermore, we present a method for segmenting a given magnet design that always results...

  6. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  7. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Aquino, D.; Rinaldi, C.

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given.

  8. Beam Transport in Toroidal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a storage ring with toroidal magnetic field was presented in the two previous EPAC conferences. Here we report the first results of experiments performed with beam transport in toroidal magnetic fields and details of the injection system. The beam transport experiments were carried out with 30 degree toroidal segments with an axial magnetic field of 0.6T. The multi turn injection system relies on a transverse injection coil together with an electric kicker system.

  9. Magnetically modified bioсells in constant magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, E. G.; Panina, L. K.; Kolikov, V. A.; Bogomolova, E. V.; Snetov, V. N.; Cherepkova, I. A.; Kiselev, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    Paper addresses the inverse problem in determining the area, where the external constant magnetic field captures the biological cells modified by the magnetic nanoparticles. Zero velocity isolines, in area where the modified cells are captured by the magnetic field were determined by numerical method for two locations of the magnet. The problem was solved taking into account the gravitational field, magnetic induction, density of medium, concentration and size of cells, and size and magnetization of nanoparticles attached to the cell. Increase in the number of the nanoparticles attached to the cell and decrease in the cell' size, enlarges the area, where the modified cells are captured and concentrated by the magnet. Solution is confirmed by the visible pattern formation of the modified cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  10. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Ledbetter, Micah; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectr...

  11. Solving Quantum Ground-State Problems with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Lu, Dawei; Whitfield, James D; Peng, Xinhua; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Du, Jiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    Quantum ground-state problems are computationally hard problems; for general many-body Hamiltonians, there is no classical or quantum algorithm known to be able to solve them efficiently. Nevertheless, if a trial wavefunction approximating the ground state is available, as often happens for many problems in physics and chemistry, a quantum computer could employ this trial wavefunction to project the ground state by means of the phase estimation algorithm (PEA). We performed an experimental realization of this idea by implementing a variational-wavefunction approach to solve the ground-state problem of the Heisenberg spin model with an NMR quantum simulator. Our iterative phase estimation procedure yields a high accuracy for the eigenenergies (to the 10^-5 decimal digit). The ground-state fidelity was distilled to be more than 80%, and the singlet-to-triplet switching near the critical field is reliably captured. This result shows that quantum simulators can better leverage classical trial wavefunctions than c...

  12. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Altarev, I; Lins, T; Marino, M G; Nießen, B; Petzoldt, G; Reisner, M; Stuiber, S; Sturm, M; Singh, J T; Taubenheim, B; Rohrer, H K; Schläpfer, U

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a linear improvement in the systematic reach and a 40 % improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  13. Magnetic field evolution in tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnerot, Clément; Price, Daniel J.; Lodato, Giuseppe; Rossi, Elena M.

    2017-08-01

    When a star gets tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole, its magnetic field is expected to pervade its debris. In this paper, we study this process via smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the disruption and early debris evolution including the stellar magnetic field. As the gas stretches into a stream, we show that the magnetic field evolution is strongly dependent on its orientation with respect to the stretching direction. In particular, an alignment of the field lines with the direction of stretching induces an increase of the magnetic energy. For disruptions happening well within the tidal radius, the star compression causes the magnetic field strength to sharply increase by an order of magnitude at the time of pericentre passage. If the disruption is partial, we find evidence for a dynamo process occurring inside the surviving core due to the formation of vortices. This causes an amplification of the magnetic field strength by a factor of ˜10. However, this value represents a lower limit since it increases with numerical resolution. For an initial field strength of 1 G, the magnetic field never becomes dynamically important. Instead, the disruption of a star with a strong 1 MG magnetic field produces a debris stream within which magnetic pressure becomes similar to gas pressure a few tens of hours after disruption. If the remnant of one or multiple partial disruptions is eventually fully disrupted, its magnetic field could be large enough to magnetically power the relativistic jet detected from Swift J1644+57. Magnetized streams could also be significantly thickened by magnetic pressure when it overcomes the confining effect of self-gravity.

  14. Magnetic field screening effect in electroweak model

    CERN Document Server

    Bakry, A; Zhang, P M; Zou, L P

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that in the Weinberg-Salam model a magnetic field screening effect for static magnetic solutions takes place. The origin of that phenomenon is conditioned by features of the electro-weak interaction, namely, there is mutual cancellation of Abelian magnetic fields created by the SU(2) gauge fields and Higgs boson. The effect implies monopole charge screening in finite energy system of monopoles and antimonopoles. We consider another manifestation of the screening effect which leads to an essential energy decrease of magnetic solutions. Applying variational method we have found a magnetic field configuration with a topological azimuthal magnetic flux which minimizes the energy functional and possesses a total energy of order 1 TeV. We suppose that corresponding magnetic bound state exists in the electroweak theory and can be detected in experiment.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Level Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    According to Maxwell electromagnetic field theory and magnetic vector potential integral equation, a mathematical model of LMF (Level Magnetic Field) for EMBR (Electromagnetic brake) was proposed, and the reliable software for LMF calculation was developed. The distribution of magnetic flux density given by numerical simulation shows that the magnetic flux density is greater in the magnet and magnetic leakage is observed in the gap. The magnetic flux density is uniform in horizontal plane and a peak is observed in vertical plane. Furthermore, the effects of electromagnetic and structural parameters on magnetic flux density were discussed. The relationship between magnetic flux, electromagnetic parameters and structural parameters is obtained by dimensional analysis, simulation experiment and least square method.

  16. Rydberg EIT in High Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lu; Anderson, David; Miller, Stephanie; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards an all-optical approach for measurements of strong magnetic fields using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with Rydberg atoms in an atomic vapor. Rydberg EIT spectroscopy is a promising technique for the development of atom-based, calibration- and drift-free technology for high magnetic field sensing. In this effort, Rydberg EIT is employed to spectroscopically investigate the response of Rydberg atoms exposed to strong magnetic fields, in which Rydberg atoms are in the strong-field regime. In our setup, two neodymium block magnets are used to generate fields of about 0.8 Tesla, which strongly perturb the atoms. Information on the field strength and direction is obtained by a comparison of experimental spectra with calculated spectral maps. Investigations of magnetic-field inhomogeneities and other decoherence sources will be discussed.

  17. Optical fibers with composite magnetic coating for magnetic field sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radojevic, V.; Nedeljkovic, D.; Talijan, N. E-mail: ntalijan@elab.tmf.bg.ac.yu; Trifunovic, D.; Aleksic, R

    2004-05-01

    The investigated system for optical fiber sensor was multi-mode optical fiber with magnetic composite coating. Polymer component of composite coating was poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)-EVA, and the magnetic component was powder of SmCo{sub 5} permanent magnet in form of single domain particles. The influence of the applied external magnetic field on the change of intensity of the light signal propagated through optical fiber was investigated.

  18. Optical fibers with composite magnetic coating for magnetic field sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojevic, V.; Nedeljkovic, D.; Talijan, N.; Trifunovic, D.; Aleksic, R.

    2004-05-01

    The investigated system for optical fiber sensor was multi-mode optical fiber with magnetic composite coating. Polymer component of composite coating was poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)-EVA, and the magnetic component was powder of SmCo5 permanent magnet in form of single domain particles. The influence of the applied external magnetic field on the change of intensity of the light signal propagated through optical fiber was investigated.

  19. Magnetic reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail: A comprehensive magnetic field survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. W.; Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process throughout the solar system, significantly shaping and modulating the magnetospheres of the magnetized planets. Within planetary magnetotails reconnection can be responsible for energizing particles and potentially changing the total flux and mass contained within the magnetosphere. The Kronian magnetosphere is thought to be a middle ground between the rotationally dominated Jovian magnetosphere and the solar wind driven terrestrial magnetosphere. However, previous studies have not been able to find a statistical reconnection x-line, as has been possible at both Jupiter and Earth. Additionally the standard picture of magnetotail reconnection at Saturn, developed by Cowley et al. [2004], suggests a potential asymmetry between the dawn and dusk flanks, caused by different reconnection processes dominating. This work centers on the development of an algorithm designed to find reconnection related events in spacecraft magnetometer data, aiming to reduce the bias that manual searches could inherently introduce, thereby ensuring the validity of any statistical analysis. The algorithm primarily identifies the reconnection related events from deflections in the north-south component of the magnetic field, allowing an almost uninterrupted in-situ search (when the spacecraft is situated within the magnetotail). The new catalogue of candidate reconnection events, produced by the algorithm, enables a more complete statistical view of reconnection in the Kronian magnetotail. Well-studied data encompassing the deep magnetotail and dawn flank (particularly from orbits in 2006) were used to train the algorithm and develop reasonable criteria. The algorithm was then applied to data encompassing the dusk flank (including orbits from 2009, for which plasma data have been examined by Thomsen et al. [2014]). This combination enables a robust, and global, comparison of reconnection rates, signatures and properties in the Kronian magnetotail.

  20. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  1. An Intergalactic Magnetic Field from Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, S; Furlanetto, Steven; Loeb, Abraham

    2001-01-01

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We find that by a redshift z ~ 3, about 5-80% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density > 10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at ~ 10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the fields observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification.

  2. MDI Synoptic Charts of Magnetic Field: Interpolation of Polar Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Hoeksema, J. T.; Zhao, X.; Larson, R. M.

    2007-05-01

    In this poster, we compare various methods for interpolation of polar field for the MDI synoptic charts of magnetic field. By examining the coronal and heliospheric magnetic field computed from the synoptic charts based on a Potential Field Source Surface model (PFSS), and by comparing the heliospheric current sheets and footpoints of open fields with the observations, we conclude that the coronal and heliospheric fields calculated from the synoptic charts are sensitive to the polar field interpolation, and a time-dependent interpolation method using the observed polar fields is the best among the seven methods investigated.

  3. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Landreman, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The properties of curl-free magnetic fields allow magnetic field distributions to be ranked in order of their difficulty of production from a distance. Plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may be difficult to support, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may be efficiently supported by distant coils. Two measures of difficulty, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally-produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix y...

  4. The Evolution of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Gubbins, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the change of earth's magnetic field at the boundary between the outer core and the mantle. Measurement techniques used during the last 300 years are considered. Discusses the theories and research for explaining the field change. (YP)

  5. The Physics of Attraction and Repulsion: Magnetism and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakotte, Heinz

    2001-11-01

    The development of new materials with improved magnetic properties completely changed the modern world in the past decades. Recent progress is predominantly due to a better understanding of magnetism that has gone far beyond compass needles rotating in a magnetic field and bar magnets attracting or repelling each other. New magnetic materials are used to build smaller and smaller read/write heads and hard disks with increased storage capacity, developments that are responsible the revolution in the computer industry. Another example is the field of magnetic levitation that became feasible for commercial applications with the discovery of new superconducting materials, and a prototype train is under development in Japan. In medicine, the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an alternative to other (destructive) radiation techniques.

  6. Evolution of Neutron Star Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipankar Bhattacharya

    2002-03-01

    This paper reviews the current status of the theoretical models of the evolution of the magnetic fields of neutron stars other than magnetars. It appears that the magnetic fields of neutron stars decay significantly only if they are in binary systems. Three major physical models for this, namely spindown-induced flux expulsion, ohmic evolution of crustal field and diamagnetic screening of the field by accreted plasma, are reviewed.

  7. Space vehicle field unit and ground station system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Delapp, Jerry; Proicou, Michael; Seitz, Daniel; Michel, John; Enemark, Donald

    2017-09-19

    A field unit and ground station may use commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components and share a common architecture, where differences in functionality are governed by software. The field units and ground stations may be easy to deploy, relatively inexpensive, and be relatively easy to operate. A novel file system may be used where datagrams of a file may be stored across multiple drives and/or devices. The datagrams may be received out of order and reassembled at the receiving device.

  8. Space vehicle field unit and ground station system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Delapp, Jerry; Proicou, Michael; Seitz, Daniel; Michel, John; Enemark, Donald

    2016-10-25

    A field unit and ground station may use commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components and share a common architecture, where differences in functionality are governed by software. The field units and ground stations may be easy to deploy, relatively inexpensive, and be relatively easy to operate. A novel file system may be used where datagrams of a file may be stored across multiple drives and/or devices. The datagrams may be received out of order and reassembled at the receiving device.

  9. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto-Aquino, D. [ERC Incorporated, Air Force Research Laboratory, 10 E. Saturn Blvd., Edwards AFB, CA 93524 (United States); Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, PO Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611-6131 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given. - Highlights: • Rosensweig's model for SAR was extended to high fields. • The MRSh relaxation equation was used to predict SAR at high fields. • Rotational Brownian dynamics simulations were used to predict SAR. • The results of these models were compared. • Predictions of effect of size and field conditions on SAR are presented.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION BY MAGNETIC FIELD AROUND POWER LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Ranković

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the contemporary epidemiological researches, there are some indications that extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields harm human health which has been proved through numerous scientific studies published in recent years. Today, most countries use the ICNIRP guidelines and Council Recommendation as the scientific basis for their recommended levels of exposure. Magnetic fields from high voltage transmission power lines have been discussed in this paper. The field profiles and their contribution to environmental pollution are studied. The obtained results are found to be useful for discussing the comparison of the field densities on the human body at the ground level under or near the lines.

  11. Two-axis magnetic field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jander, Albrecht (Inventor); Nordman, Catherine A. (Inventor); Qian, Zhenghong (Inventor); Smith, Carl H. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A ferromagnetic thin-film based magnetic field sensor with first and second sensitive direction sensing structures each having a nonmagnetic intermediate layer with two major surfaces on opposite sides thereof having a magnetization reference layer on one and an anisotropic ferromagnetic material sensing layer on the other having a length in a selected length direction and a smaller width perpendicular thereto and parallel to the relatively fixed magnetization direction. The relatively fixed magnetization direction of said magnetization reference layer in each is oriented in substantially parallel to the substrate but substantially perpendicular to that of the other. An annealing process is used to form the desired magnetization directions.

  12. Magnetic fields and rotation of spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E; Florido, E

    1998-01-01

    We present a simplified model in which we suggest that two important galactic problems -the magnetic field configuration at large scales and the flat rotation curve- may be simultaneously explained. A highly convective disc produces a high turbulent magnetic diffusion in the vertical direction, stablishing a merging of extragalactic and galactic magnetic fields. The outer disc may then adquire a magnetic energy gradient very close to the gradient required to explain the rotation curve, without the hypothesis of galactic dark matter. Our model predicts symmetries of the galactic field in noticeable agreement with the large scale structure of our galaxy.

  13. Rotating artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lembessis, V E; Alshamari, S; Siddig, A; Aldossary, O M

    2016-01-01

    We consider the creation of artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields created when a two-level atom interacts with an optical Ferris wheel light field.These fields have the spatial structure of the optical Ferris wheel field intensity profile. If this optical field pattern is made to rotate in space then we have the creation of artificial electromagnetic fields which propagate in closed paths. The properties of such fields are presented and discussed

  14. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Viganò, Daniele; Miralles, Juan A; Rea, Nanda

    2015-01-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  15. Earth magnetism a guided tour through magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Wallace H

    2001-01-01

    An introductory guide to global magnetic field properties, Earth Magnetism addresses, in non-technical prose, many of the frequently asked questions about Earth''s magnetic field. Magnetism surrounds and penetrates our Earth in ways basic science courses can rarely address. It affects navigation, communication, and even the growth of crystals. As we observe and experience an 11-year solar maximum, we may witness spectacular satellite-destroying solar storms as they interact with our magnetic field. Written by an acknowledged expert in the field, this book will enrich courses in earth science, atmospheric science, geology, meteorology, geomagnetism, and geophysics. Contains nearly 200 original illustrations and eight pages of full-color plates.* Largely mathematics-free and with a wide breadth of material suitable for general readers* Integrates material from geomagnetism, paleomagnetism, and solar-terrestrial space physics.* Features nearly 200 original illustrations and 4 pages of colour plates

  16. Magnetic effects of magnetospheric currents at ground and in low orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolle, Claudia; Naemi Willer, Anna; Finlay, Chris

    to diminish with reducing solar activity (as was previously noted by Lühr & Maus, 2010), while the slope is hardly affected. There have been several suggestions for the origin of this systematic difference between ground and space based observations of magnetospheric fields. We compare magnetic residuals...... of selected observatories with those of CHAMP satellite observations at times of conjunctions, separating the data pairs by criteria including local time and longitude, season, solar and magnetic activity. Obtaining rough estimates of the ionospheric conductivity in this way, we are able to discuss possible...... field model from Magsat vector data. Geophys. Res. Lett. 7:793-96 Lühr H, Maus S. 2010. Solar cycle dependence of quiet-time magnetospheric currents and a model of their near-Earth magnetic fields. Earth Planets Space 62:843-48...

  17. Magnetic fields of HgMn stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubrig, S.; Gonzalez, J. F.; Ilyin, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The frequent presence of weak magnetic fields on the surface of spotted late-B stars with HgMn peculiarity in binary systems has been controversial during the two last decades. Recent studies of magnetic fields in these stars using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique have fai...

  18. Lattice Planar QED in external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Cea, Paolo; Giudice, Pietro; Papa, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We investigate planar Quantum ElectroDynamics (QED) with two degenerate staggered fermions in an external magnetic field on the lattice. Our preliminary results indicate that in external magnetic fields there is dynamical generation of mass for two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions in the weak coupling region. We comment on possible implications to the quantum Hall effect in graphene.

  19. Helical Magnetic Fields in AGN Jets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y. J. Chen; G.-Y. Zhao; Z.-Q. Shen

    2014-09-01

    We establish a simple model to describe the helical magnetic fields in AGN jets projected on the sky plane and the line-of-sight. This kind of profile has been detected in the polarimetric VLBI observation of many blazar objects, suggesting the existence of helical magnetic fields in these sources.

  20. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  1. High magnetic field {mu}SR instrument scientific case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, A

    2005-10-15

    In order to gain more insight into the specific behavior of materials, it is often necessary to perform measurements as a function of different external parameters. Despite its high sensitivity to internal fields, this simple observation also applies for the {mu}SR technique. The most common parameter which can be tuned during an experiment is the sample temperature. By using a range of cryostats, temperatures between 0.02 and 900 K can be covered at the PSI {mu}SR Facility. On the other hand, and by using high-energy muons, pressures as high as 10'000 bars can nowadays be reached during {mu}SR experiments. As will be demonstrated in the following Sections, the magnetic field is an additional external parameter playing a fundamental role when studying the ground state properties of materials in condensed matter physics and chemistry. However, the availability of high magnetic fields for {mu}SR experiments is still rather limited. Hence, if on one hand the high value of the gyromagnetic ratio of the muon provides the high magnetic sensitivity of the method, on the other hand it can lead to very high muon-spin precession frequencies when performing measurements in applied fields (the muon-spin precession frequency in a field of 1 Tesla s 135.5 MHz). Consequently, the use of ultra-fast detectors and electronics is mandatory when measuring in magnetic fields exceeding 1 Tesla. If such fields are very intense when compared to the Earth magnetic field < 10{sup -4} Tesla), the energy associated with them is still modest in view of the thermal energy. Hence, the Zeeman energy splitting of a free electron in a magnetic field of 1 Tesla corresponds to a thermal energy as low as 0.67 Kelvin. It is worth mentioning that nowadays magnetic fields of the order of 10 to 15 Tesla are quite common in condensed matter laboratories and have opened up vast new exciting experimental possibilities. (author)

  2. Magnetic Fields in Stars: Origin and Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Langer, N

    2013-01-01

    Various types of magnetic fields occur in stars: small scale fields, large scale fields, and internal toroidal fields. While the latter may be ubiquitous in stars due to differential rotation, small scale fields (spots) may be associated with envelop convection in all low and high mass stars. The stable large scale fields found in only about 10 per cent of intermediate mass and massive stars may be understood as a consequence of dynamical binary interaction, e.g., the merging of two stars in a binary. We relate these ideas to magnetic fields in white dwarfs and neutron stars, and to their role in core-collapse and thermonuclear supernova explosions.

  3. Classical theory of electric and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Roland H

    1971-01-01

    Classical Theory of Electric and Magnetic Fields is a textbook on the principles of electricity and magnetism. This book discusses mathematical techniques, calculations, with examples of physical reasoning, that are generally applied in theoretical physics. This text reviews the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's Equations, Lorentz Force, and Faraday's Law of Induction. The book also focuses on electrostatics and the general methods for solving electrostatic problems concerning images, inversion, complex variable, or separation of variables. The text also explains ma

  4. Mechanics of magnetic fluid column in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Platonov, V. B.

    2017-06-01

    Elastic-and magnetic properties of magnetic fluid confined by ponderomotive force in a tube fixed in horizontal position are considered. The system is placed in a strong magnetic field under the influence of external static and dynamic perturbations. An experimental setup has been developed. A theoretical basis of the processes of magnetic colloid elastic deformation has been proposed. The values of the static ponderomotive elasticity coefficient and the elasticity coefficient under dynamic action are experimentally determined. The calculations of the saturation magnetization for two magnetic fluid samples, carried out according to the equation containing the dynamic elasticity coefficient, are in good agreement with the experimental magnetization curve. The described method is of interest when studying magnetophoresis and aggregation of nanoparticles in magnetic colloids.

  5. Exciton effective mass enhancement in coupled quantum wells in electric and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, J.; Muljarov, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a calculation of exciton states in semiconductor coupled quantum wells in the presence of electric and magnetic fields applied perpendicular to the QW plane. The exciton Schrödinger equation is solved in real space in three-dimensions to obtain the Landau levels of both direct and indirect excitons. Calculation of the exciton energy levels and oscillator strengths enables mapping of the electric and magnetic field dependence of the exciton absorption spectrum. For the ground state of the system, we evaluate the Bohr radius, optical lifetime, binding energy and dipole moment. The exciton mass renormalization due to the magnetic field is calculated using a perturbative approach. We predict a non-monotonous dependence of the exciton ground state effective mass on magnetic field. Such a trend is explained in a classical picture, in terms of the ground state tending from an indirect to a direct exciton with increasing magnetic field.

  6. Lightning electromagnetic field generated by grounding electrode considering soil ionization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Rong; HE Jinliang; ZHANG Bo; GAO Yanqing

    2006-01-01

    A circuit model with lumped time-variable parameter is proposed to calculate the transient characteristic of grounding electrode under lightning current, which takes into consideration the dynamic and nonlinear effect of soil ionization around the grounding electrode. The ionization phenomena in the soil are simulated by means of time-variable parameters under appropriate conditions. The generated electromagnetic field in the air is analyzed by using electrical dipole theory and image theory when the lightning current flows into the grounding electrode. The influence of soil ionization on the electromagnetic field is investigated.

  7. Structure of magnetic fields in intracluster cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos Nektarios; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies show ubiquitous presence of X-ray cavities, presumably blown by the AGN jets. We consider magnetic field structures of these cavities. Stability requires that they contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, while realistic configurations should have vanishing magnetic field on the boundary. For axisymmetric configurations embedded in unmagnetized plasma, the continuity of poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components on the surface of the bubble then requires solving the elliptical Grad-Shafranov equation with both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. This leads to a double eigenvalue problem, relating the pressure gradients and the toroidal magnetic field to the radius of the bubble. We have found fully analytical stable solutions. This result is confirmed by numerical simulation. We present synthetic X-ray images and synchrotron emission profiles and evaluate the rotation measure for radiation traversing the bubble.

  8. Probing Magnetic Fields of Early Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    How do magnetic fields form and evolve in early galaxies? A new study has provided some clever observations to help us answer this question.The Puzzle of Growing FieldsDynamo theory is the primary model describing how magnetic fields develop in galaxies. In this picture, magnetic fields start out as weak seed fields that are small and unordered. These fields then become ordered and amplified by large-scale rotation and turbulence in galaxy disks and halos, eventually leading to the magnetic fields we observe in galaxies today.Schematic showinghow to indirectly measure protogalactic magnetic fields. The measured polarization of a background quasar is altered by the fields in a foreground protogalaxy. Click for a closer look! [Farnes et al. 2017/Adolf Schaller/STSCI/NRAO/AUI/NSF]To test this model, we need observations of the magnetic fields in young protogalaxies. Unfortunately, we dont have the sensitivity to be able to measure these fields directly but a team of scientists led by Jamie Farnes (Radboud University in the Netherlands) have come up with a creative alternative.The key is to find early protogalaxies that absorb the light of more distant background objects. If a protogalaxy lies between us and a distant quasar, then magnetic fields of the protogalaxy if present will affect the polarization measurements of the background quasar.Observing Galactic Building BlocksTop: Redshift distribution for the background quasars in the authors sample. Bottom: Redshift distribution for the foreground protogalaxies the authors are exploring. [Farnes et al. 2017]Farnes and collaborators examined two types of foreground protogalaxies: Damped Lyman-Alpha Absorbers (DLAs) and Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs). They obtained polarimetric data for a sample of 114 distant quasars with nothing in the foreground (the control sample), 19 quasars with DLAs in the foreground, and 27 quasars with LLSs in the foreground. They then used statistical analysis techniques to draw conclusions about

  9. Formation of magnetically anisotropic composite films at low magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi Zahedi, Maryam; Ennen, Inga; Marchi, Sophie; Barthel, Markus J.; Hütten, Andreas; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Fragouli, Despina

    2017-04-01

    We present a straightforward two-step technique for the fabrication of poly (methyl methacrylate) composites with embedded aligned magnetic chains. First, ferromagnetic microwires are realized in a poly (methyl methacrylate) solution by assembling iron nanoparticles in a methyl methacrylate solution under heat in an external magnetic field of 160 mT. The simultaneous thermal polymerization of the monomer throughout the wires is responsible for their permanent linkage and stability. Next, the polymer solution containing the randomly dispersed microwires is casted on a solid substrate in the presence of a low magnetic field (20–40 mT) which induces the final alignment of the microwires into long magnetic chains upon evaporation of the solvent. We prove that the presence of the nanoparticles assembled in the form of microwires is a key factor for the formation of the anisotropic films under low magnetic fields. In fact, such low fields are not capable of driving and assembling dispersed magnetic nanoparticles in the same type of polymer solutions. Hence, this innovative approach can be utilized for the synthesis of magnetically anisotropic nanocomposite films at low magnetic fields.

  10. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and measurement of the spatial variation of magnetic field components along a line near magnets. We describe the experimental tasks, various difficulties students have throughout, and ways this lab makes even their incorrect predictions better. We suggest that developing lab activities of this nature brings a new dimension to the ways students learn and interact with field concepts.

  11. Magnetic fields of HgMn stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubrig, S.; González, J. F.; Ilyin, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The frequent presence of weak magnetic fields on the surface of spotted late-B stars with HgMn peculiarity in binary systems has been controversial during the two last decades. Recent studies of magnetic fields in these stars using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique have...... failed to detect magnetic fields, indicating an upper limit on the longitudinal field between 8 and 15G. In these LSD studies, assumptions were made that all spectral lines are identical in shape and can be described by a scaled mean profile. Aims. We re-analyse the available spectropolarimetric material...

  12. Warm inflation in presence of magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Piccinelli, Gabriella; Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the possible effects that primordial magnetic fields can have for a warm inflation scenario, based on global supersymmetry, with a new-inflation-type potential. This work is motivated by two considerations: first, magnetic fields seem to be present in the universe on all scales, which rises the possibility that they could also permeate the early universe; second, the recent emergence of inflationary models where the inflaton is not assumed to be isolated but instead it is taken as an interacting field, even during the inflationary expansion. The effects of magnetic fields are included resorting to Schwinger proper time method.

  13. Lattice Field Theory Study of Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    DeTar, Carleton; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the simulation of the low-energy effective field theory (EFT) for graphene in the presence of an external magnetic field. Our fully nonperturbative calculation uses methods of lattice gauge theory to study the theory using a hybrid Monte Carlo approach. We investigate the phenomenon of magnetic catalysis in the context of graphene by studying the chiral condensate which is the order parameter characterizing the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. In the EFT, the symmetry breaking pattern is given by $U(4) \\to U(2) \\times U(2)$. We also comment on the difficulty, in this lattice formalism, of studying the time-reversal-odd condensate characterizing the ground state in the presence of a magnetic field. Finally, we study the mass spectrum of the theory, in particular the Nambu-Goldstone (NG) mode as well as the Dirac quasiparticle, which is predicted to obtain a dynamical mass.

  14. Entanglement of a Five-Qubit Heisenberg XX Chain in a Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Min; LING Yin-Sheng; ZHU Shi-Qun

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a five-qubit isotropic Heisenberg model in an external magnetic field, and give analytical results for the concurrence of two nearest-neighbor qubits. A magnetic field can eliminate degeneration and change the ground state of the system. Therefore increasing the value of the magnetic field can induce entanglement in a certain range both for the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic case.

  15. Thermal fermionic dispersion relations in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Elmfors, P; Skagerstam, B S; Elmfors, Per; Persson, David; Skagerstam, Bo Sture

    1996-01-01

    The thermal self-energy of an electron in a static uniform magnetic field B is calculated to first order in the fine structure constant \\alpha and to all orders in eB. We use two methods, one based on the Furry picture and another based on Schwinger's proper-time method. As external states we consider relativistic Landau levels with special emphasis on the lowest Landau level. In the high-temperature limit we derive self-consistent dispersion relations for particle and hole excitations, showing the chiral asymmetry caused by the external field. For weak fields, earlier results on the ground- state energy and the anomalous magnetic moment are discussed and compared with the present analysis. In the strong-field limit the appearance of a field-independent imaginary part of the self-energy, related to Landau damping in the e^{+}e^{-} plasma, is pointed out.

  16. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  17. Magnetic-field-controlled reconfigurable semiconductor logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sungjung; Kim, Taeyueb; Shin, Sang Hoon; Lim, Ju Young; Hong, Jinki; Song, Jin Dong; Chang, Joonyeon; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Rhie, Kungwon; Han, Suk Hee; Shin, Kyung-Ho; Johnson, Mark

    2013-02-07

    Logic devices based on magnetism show promise for increasing computational efficiency while decreasing consumed power. They offer zero quiescent power and yet combine novel functions such as programmable logic operation and non-volatile built-in memory. However, practical efforts to adapt a magnetic device to logic suffer from a low signal-to-noise ratio and other performance attributes that are not adequate for logic gates. Rather than exploiting magnetoresistive effects that result from spin-dependent transport of carriers, we have approached the development of a magnetic logic device in a different way: we use the phenomenon of large magnetoresistance found in non-magnetic semiconductors in high electric fields. Here we report a device showing a strong diode characteristic that is highly sensitive to both the sign and the magnitude of an external magnetic field, offering a reversible change between two different characteristic states by the application of a magnetic field. This feature results from magnetic control of carrier generation and recombination in an InSb p-n bilayer channel. Simple circuits combining such elementary devices are fabricated and tested, and Boolean logic functions including AND, OR, NAND and NOR are performed. They are programmed dynamically by external electric or magnetic signals, demonstrating magnetic-field-controlled semiconductor reconfigurable logic at room temperature. This magnetic technology permits a new kind of spintronic device, characterized as a current switch rather than a voltage switch, and provides a simple and compact platform for non-volatile reconfigurable logic devices.

  18. Solar Force-free Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegelmann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the solar corona is dominated by the magnetic field. In most areas in the corona magnetic forces are so dominant that all non-magnetic forces like plasma pressure gradient and gravity can be neglected in the lowest order. This model assumption is called the force-free field assumption, as the Lorentz force vanishes. This can be obtained by either vanishing electric currents (leading to potential fields) or the currents are co-aligned with the magnetic field lines. First we discuss a mathematically simpler approach that the magnetic field and currents are proportional with one global constant, the so-called linear force-free field approximation. In the generic case, however, the relation between magnetic fields and electric currents is nonlinear and analytic solutions have been only found for special cases, like 1D or 2D configurations. For constructing realistic nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field models in 3D, sophisticated numerical computations are required and boundar...

  19. Magnetic monopole field exposed by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Béché, A; Van Tendeloo, G; Verbeeck, J

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles have provided a rich field of study, leading to a wide area of research in particle physics, solid state physics, ultra-cold gases, superconductors, cosmology, and gauge theory. So far, no true magnetic monopoles were found experimentally. Using the Aharonov-Bohm effect, one of the central results of quantum physics, shows however, that an effective monopole field can be produced. Understanding the effects of such a monopole field on its surroundings is crucial to its observation and provides a better grasp of fundamental physical theory. We realize the diffraction of fast electrons at a magnetic monopole field generated by a nanoscopic magnetized ferromagnetic needle. Previous studies have been limited to theoretical semiclassical optical calculations of the motion of electrons in such a monopole field. Solid state systems like the recently studied 'spin ice' provide a constrained system to study similar fields, but make it impossible to separate the monopole from the material. Free space ...

  20. External-field-free magnetic biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuanpeng; Wang, Yi; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpwang@umn.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    In this paper, we report a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) detection scheme without the presence of any external magnetic field. The proposed magnetic sensor uses a patterned groove structure within the sensor so that no external magnetic field is needed to magnetize the MNPs. An example is given based on a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing device with a spin valve structure. For this structure, the detection of MNPs located inside the groove and near the free layer is demonstrated under no external magnetic field. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to calculate the signal to noise level of this detection scheme. A maximum signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 18.6 dB from one iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle with 8 nm radius is achieved. As proof of concept, this external-field-free GMR sensor with groove structure of 200 nm × 200 nm is fabricated using a photo and an electron beam integrated lithography process. Using this sensor, the feasibility demonstration of the detection SNR of 9.3 dB is achieved for 30 μl magnetic nanoparticles suspension (30 nm iron oxide particles, 1 mg/ml). This proposed external-field-free sensor structure is not limited to GMR devices and could be applicable to other magnetic biosensing devices.

  1. Interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic Dst variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1973-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field has been shown to influence the ring current field represented by Dst. Explorer 28 hourly magnetic field observations have been used with the hourly Dst values. The moderate geomagnetic storms of 60 gammas and quiet-time fluctuations of 10 to 30 gammas are correlated with the north to south change of the interplanetary field component perpendicular to the ecliptic. This change in the interplanetary field occurs one to three hours earlier than the corresponding change in the Dst field.

  2. Polarized radiation diagnostics of stellar magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, Gautier

    The main techniques used to diagnose magnetic fields in stars from polarimetric observations are presented. First, a summary of the physics of spectral line formation in the presence of a magnetic field is given. Departures from the simple case of linear Zeeman effect are briefly considered: partial Paschen-Back effect, contribution of hyperfine structure, and combined Stark and Zeeman effects. Important approximate solutions of the equation of transfer of polarized light in spectral lines are introduced. The procedure for disk-integration of emergent Stokes profiles, which is central to stellar magnetic field studies, is described, with special attention to the treatment of stellar rotation. This formalism is used to discuss the determination of the mean longitudinal magnetic field (through the photographic technique and through Balmer line photopolarimetry). This is done within the specific framework of Ap stars, which, with their unique large-scale organized magnetic fields, are an ideal laboratory for studies of stellar magnetism. Special attention is paid to those Ap stars whose magnetically split line components are resolved in high-dispersion Stokes I spectra, and to the determination of their mean magnetic field modulus. Various techniques of exploitation of the information contained in polarized spectral line profiles are reviewed: the moment technique (in particular, the determination of the crossover and of the mean quadratic field), Zeeman-Doppler imaging, and least-squares deconvolution. The prospects that these methods open for linear polarization studies are sketched. The way in which linear polarization diagnostics complement their Stokes I and V counterparts is emphasized by consideration of the results of broad band linear polarization measurements. Illustrations of the use of various diagnostics to derive properties of the magnetic fields of Ap stars are given. This is used to show the interest of deriving more physically realistic models of the

  3. Scattering in a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David C. Carey

    2002-08-19

    The fixed target program at Fermilab has come to an end. New projects are in the planning stage. Among them is a muon storage ring. Up to the present, all storage rings in high-energy physics have carried stable particles, namely the electron and proton and their antiparticles. The muon is unstable and decays with a mean lifetime of 2.0 x 10{sup -6} sec. Two types of cooling have been used in the past. One is stochastic cooling where an electrode is used to detect the positions of the particles and send a signal to another position across the ring. Through successive applications of this technique, the phase space is ultimately greatly reduced and beams can be made to collide with a useful event rate. The second type of cooling is electron cooling. Here protons and electrons are made to travel together for a short distance. Equipartition causes transfer of transverse energy of the protons to that of the electrons. Neither of these methods is fast enough to allow acceleration of a sufficient number of muons up to maximum energy before they decay. A new method known as ionization cooling has been proposed.[1] The muons are cooled by passing them through a container of liquid hydrogen. The energy loss reduces both transverse and longitudinal momentum. The longitudinal momentum is restored with RF cavities. The net result is to maintain the longitudinal momentum while cooling the transverse momentum. To minimize the total travel distance of the muons the liquid hydrogen is placed inside the focusing solenoids. The question arises as to whether the presence of the solenoids influences the phase space occupied by the muons. After the muon scatters it has transverse momentum. In a constant longitudinal magnetic field the trajectory wraps around the field lines and coincides in momentum and position with a particle which scatters one cycle later. Here we calculate the change in emittance for both a drift space and a solenoid. We find that the presence of the solenoid does

  4. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  5. Hyperfine magnetic fields in substituted Finemet alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brzózka, K., E-mail: k.brzozka@uthrad.pl [University of Technology and Humanities in Radom, Department of Physics (Poland); Sovák, P. [P.J. Šafárik University, Institute of Physics (Slovakia); Szumiata, T.; Gawroński, M.; Górka, B. [University of Technology and Humanities in Radom, Department of Physics (Poland)

    2016-12-15

    Transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to determine the hyperfine fields of Finemet-type alloys in form of ribbons, substituted alternatively by Mn, Ni, Co, Al, Zn, V or Ge of various concentration. The comparative analysis of magnetic hyperfine fields was carried out which enabled to understand the role of added elements in as-quenched as well as annealed samples. Moreover, the influence of the substitution on the mean direction of the local hyperfine magnetic field was examined.

  6. Magnetic fields in Local Group dwarf irregulars

    CERN Document Server

    Chyzy, Krzysztof T; Beck, Rainer; Bomans, Dominik J

    2011-01-01

    We clarify whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in typically low-mass dwarf galaxies and what is the role of dwarf galaxies in the magnetization of the Universe. We performed a search for radio emission and magnetic fields in an unbiased sample of 12 Local Group (LG) irregular and dwarf irregular galaxies with the 100m Effelsberg telescope at 2.64 and 4.85GHz. Magnetic fields in LG dwarfs are three times weaker than in the normal spirals (6muG) are observed only in dwarfs of extreme characteristics while typical LG dwarfs are not suitable objects for efficient supply of magnetic fields to the intergalactic medium.

  7. Magnetic field homogeneity perturbations in finite Halbach dipole magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Krzysztof; Liszkowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Halbach hollow cylinder dipole magnets of a low or relatively low aspect ratio attract considerable attention due to their applications, among others, in compact NMR and MRI systems for investigating small objects. However, a complete mathematical framework for the analysis of magnetic fields in these magnets has been developed only for their infinitely long precursors. In such a case the analysis is reduced to two-dimensions (2D). The paper details the analysis of the 3D magnetic field in the Halbach dipole cylinders of a finite length. The analysis is based on three equations in which the components of the magnetic flux density Bx, By and Bz are expanded to infinite power series of the radial coordinate r. The zeroth term in the series corresponds to a homogeneous magnetic field Bc, which is perturbed by the higher order terms due to a finite magnet length. This set of equations is supplemented with an equation for the field profile B(z) along the magnet axis, presented for the first time. It is demonstrated that the geometrical factors in the coefficients of particular powers of r, defined by intricate integrals are the coefficients of the Taylor expansion of the homogeneity profile (B(z)-Bc)/Bc. As a consequence, the components of B can be easily calculated with an arbitrary accuracy. In order to describe perturbations of the field due to segmentation, two additional equations are borrowed from the 2D theory. It is shown that the 2D approach to the perturbations generated by the segmentation can be applied to the 3D Halbach structures unless r is not too close to the inner radius of the cylinder ri. The mathematical framework presented in the paper was verified with great precision by computations of B by a highly accurate integration of the magnetostatic Coulomb law and utilized to analyze the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in the magnet with the accuracy better than 1 ppm.

  8. Instability of strong magnetic field and neutrino magnetic dipole moment

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum instability of the strong electromagnetic field has been discussed since long time ago. The instability of the strong electric field due to creation of electron pairs is one of the examples, which is known as Schwinger process. What matters are the coupling of particles to the electromagnetic field and the mass of the particle to be produced. The critical electric field for electrons in the minimal coupling is ~ m^2/e . Spin 1/2 neutral particles but with magnetic dipole moments can interact with the electromagnetic field through Pauli coupling. The instability of the particular vacuum under the strong magnetic field can be formulated as the emergence of imaginary parts of the effective potential. In this talk, the development of the imaginary part in the effective potential as a function of the magnetic field strength is discussed for the configurations of the uniform magnetic field and the inhomogeneous magnetic field. Neutrinos are the lightest particle(if not photon or gluon) in the "standard model...

  9. Computation of magnetic fields in hysteretic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adly, A.A.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Gomez, R.D.; Burke, E.R. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States))

    1993-11-01

    A newly developed vector Preisach-type model of hysteresis is applied to the computation of static magnetic fields in media with hysteresis. Time stepping technique is used to trace the time evolution of local magnetic fields which form the history of magnetizing process. At each time step, the magnetostatic problem is formulated in terms of an integral equation and an efficient iterative algorithm is employed for solving this problem. The technique has been used to simulate some magnetic recording processes. Sample results of these simulations are given in the paper.

  10. Apparatus for ground water chemistry investigations in field caissons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cokal, E.J.; Stallings, E.; Walker, R.; Nyhan, J.W.; Polzer, W.L.; Essington, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Los Alamos is currently in its second season of ground water chemistry and hydrology experimentation in a field facility that incorporates clusters of six, 3-meter-diameter by 6-meter-deep, soil-filled caissons and required ancillaries. Initial experience gained during the 1983 field season indicated the need for further development of the technology of this type of experimentation supporting hydrologic waste management research. Uniform field application of water/matrix solutions to the caisson, matrix and tracer solution blending/storage, and devices for ground water sampling are discussed.

  11. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreman, Matt, E-mail: mattland@umd.edu [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Boozer, Allen H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However, the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The efficiency of an externally generated magnetic field is a measure of the field's shaping component magnitude at the plasma compared to the magnitude near the coils; the efficiency of a plasma equilibrium can be measured using the efficiency of the required external shaping field. Counterintuitively, plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may have low efficiency, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may have high efficiency. Two precise measures of magnetic field efficiency, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix yields an efficiency ordered basis for the magnetic field distributions. Calculations are carried out for both tokamak and stellarator cases. For axisymmetric surfaces with circular cross-section, the SVD is calculated analytically, and the range of poloidal and toroidal mode numbers that can be controlled to a given desired level is determined. If formulated properly, these efficiency measures are independent of the coordinates used to parameterize the surfaces.

  12. Zero-field-cooled/field-cooled magnetization study of Dendrimer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arejdal, M.; Bahmad, L.; Benyoussef, A.

    2017-01-01

    Being motivated by Dendrimer model with mixed spins σ=3 and S=7/2, we investigated the magnetic nanoparticle system in this study. We analyzed and discussed the ground-state phase diagrams and the stable phases. Then, we elaborated and explained the magnetic properties of the system by using Monte Carlo Simulations (MCS) in the framework of the Ising model. In this way, we determined the blocking temperature, which is deduced through studying the partial-total magnetization and susceptibility as a function of the temperature, and we established the effects of both the exchange coupling interaction and the crystal field on the hysteresis loop.

  13. Quark matter under strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres Menezes, Debora [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Depto de Fisica - CFM, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Laercio Lopes, Luiz [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Depto de Fisica - CFM, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Campus VIII, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Varginha, MG (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    We revisit three of the mathematical formalisms used to describe magnetized quark matter in compact objects within the MIT and the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models and then compare their results. The tree formalisms are based on 1) isotropic equations of state, 2) anisotropic equations of state with different parallel and perpendicular pressures and 3) the assumption of a chaotic field approximation that results in a truly isotropic equation of state. We have seen that the magnetization obtained with both models is very different: while the MIT model produces well-behaved curves that are always positive for large magnetic fields, the NJL model yields a magnetization with lots of spikes and negative values. This fact has strong consequences on the results based on the existence of anisotropic equations of state. We have also seen that, while the isotropic formalism results in maximum stellar masses that increase considerably when the magnetic fields increase, maximum masses obtained with the chaotic field approximation never vary more than 5.5%. The effect of the magnetic field on the radii is opposed in the MIT and NJL models: with both formalisms, isotropic and chaotic field approximation, for a fixed mass, the radii increase with the increase of the magnetic field in the MIT bag model and decrease in the NJL, the radii of quark stars described by the NJL model being smaller than the ones described by the MIT model. (orig.)

  14. Alignment of magnetic uniaxial particles in a magnetic field: Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovnia, O.A., E-mail: golovnya@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, Str. S. Kovalevskoy, 18, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Popov, A.G [Institute of Metal Physics, Str. S. Kovalevskoy, 18, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sobolev, A.N. [South Ural State University (National Research University), av. Lenina, 76, 454080 Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Hadjipanayis, G.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, 217 Sharp Lab, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The numerical investigations of the process of alignment of magnetically uniaxial Nd–Fe–B powders in an applied magnetic field were carried out using the discrete element method (DEM). It is shown that magnetic alignment of ensemble of spherical particles provides extremely high degree of alignment, which is achieved in low magnetic fields. A model of formation of anisotropic particles as a combination of spherical particles is suggested. The influence of the shape anisotropy and friction coefficient on the alignment degree was analyzed. The increase in the friction coefficient leads to a decrease in the alignment degree; the simulation results are in qualitative agreement with experimental dependences. It is shown that in magnetic fields higher than 5 T, the calculated field dependences of the alignment degree quantitatively render the experimental data. The increase of about 6% in the alignment degree in the experiments with addition of internal lubricant can be explained by the decrease of 14% in friction coefficient. - Highlights: • We simulate the magnetic alignment of ensemble of Nd–Fe–B spherical uniaxial particles. • Anisotropic particles as a combination of spherical particles are constructed. • Influence of the particle shape anisotropy and friction on the alignment is analyzed. • We compare calculated and experimental data on field dependence of magnetic alignment. • The results render the experimental dependence.

  15. Magnetic field dependence of the lowest-frequency edge-localized spin wave mode in a magnetic nanotriangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C S; Lim, H S; Wang, Z K; Ng, S C; Kuok, M H; Adeyeye, A O

    2011-03-01

    An understanding of the spin dynamics of nanoscale magnetic elements is important for their applications in magnetic sensing and storage. Inhomogeneity of the demagnetizing field in a non-ellipsoidal magnetic element results in localization of spin waves near the edge of the element. However, relative little work has been carried out to investigate the effect of the applied magnetic fields on the nature of such localized modes. In this study, micromagnetic simulations are performed on an equilateral triangular nanomagnet to investigate the magnetic field dependence of the mode profiles of the lowest-frequency spin wave. Our findings reveal that the lowest-frequency mode is localized at the base edge of the equilateral triangle. The characteristics of its mode profile change with the ground state magnetization configuration of the nanotriangle, which, in turn, depends on the magnitude of the in-plane applied magnetic field.

  16. Electric-field guiding of magnetic skyrmions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Yu, Guoqiang; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically study equilibrium and dynamic properties of nanosized magnetic skyrmions in thin magnetic films with broken inversion symmetry, where an electric field couples to magnetization via spin-orbit coupling. Based on a symmetry-based phenomenology and micromagnetic simulations we show that this electric-field coupling, via renormalizing the micromagnetic energy, modifies the equilibrium properties of the skyrmion. This change, in turn, results in a significant alteration of the current-induced skyrmion motion. Particularly, the speed and direction of the skyrmion can be manipulated by designing a desired energy landscape electrically, which we describe within Thiele's analytical model and demonstrate in micromagnetic simulations including electric-field-controlled magnetic anisotropy. We additionally use this electric-field control to construct gates for controlling skyrmion motion exhibiting a transistorlike and multiplexerlike function. The proposed electric-field effect can thus provide a low-energy electrical knob to extend the reach of information processing with skyrmions.

  17. Magnetic field in the primitive solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, E. H.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites have apparently been magnetized in their early history in magnetic fields with intensities of 0.1 to 10 G, but the origin of the magnetizing field has remained obscured. It is suggested that the magnetic field recorded in the remanence of carbonaceous chondrites may have been produced by a self-excited hydromagnetic dynamo in the gaseous preplanetary nebula from which the solar system is thought to have formed. Recently computed models for the evolution of the preplanetary nebula, consisting of turbulent and differentially rotating gaseous disks with characteristic radial scales of several AU, are used to demonstrate the feasibility of this hypothesis. The maximum field intensity that might be realized by the dynamo production process is estimated to be as high as 1 to 10 G, taking into account two dynamical mechanisms that limit the strength of the field (the Coriolis force and ambipolar diffusion).

  18. Magnetic field evolution in neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, F.; Reisenegger, A.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    Neutron stars contain the strongest magnetic fields known in the Universe. Using numerical simulations restricted to axially symmetric geometry, we study the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the interior of an isolated neutron star under the effect of ambipolar diffusion, i.e. the drift of the magnetic field and the charged particles relative to the neutrons. We model the stellar interior as an electrically neutral fluid composed of neutrons, protons and electrons; these species can be converted into each other by weak interactions (beta decays), suffer binary collisions, and be affected by each other's macroscopic electromagnetic fields. We show that, in the restricted case of pure ambipolar diffusion, neglecting weak interactions, the magnetic fields evolves towards a stable MHD equilibria configuration, in the timescales analytically expected.

  19. Magnetic field induced optical vortex beam rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Shuai; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Bao-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Light with orbital angular momentum (OAM) has drawn a great deal of attention for its important applications in the fields of precise optical measurements and high capacity optical communications. Here we adopt a method to study the rotation of a light beam, which is based on magnetic field induced circular birefringence in warm 87Rb atomic vapor. The dependence of the rotation angle to the intensity of the magnetic field makes it appropriate for weak magnetic field measurement. We derive a detail theoretical description that is in well agreement with the experimental observations. The experiment shows here provides a new method for precise measurement of magnetic field intensity and expands the application of OAM-carrying light.

  20. Hyperon Stars in Strong Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes, R O; Vasconcellos, C A Z

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of strong magnetic fields on the properties of hyperon stars. The matter is described by a hadronic model with parametric coupling. The matter is considered to be at zero temperature, charge neutral, beta-equilibrated, containing the baryonic octet, electrons and muons. The charged particles have their orbital motions Landau-quantized in the presence of strong magnetic fields (SMF). Two parametrisations of a chemical potential dependent static magnetic field are considered, reaching $1-2 \\times 10^{18}\\,G$ in the center of the star. Finally, the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov (TOV) equations are solved to obtain the mass-radius relation and population of the stars.

  1. Magnetic fields from second-order interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Osano, Bob

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that when two types of perturbations interact in cosmological perturbation theory, the interaction may lead to the generation of a third type. In this article we discuss the generation of magnetic fields from such interactions. We determine conditions under which the interaction of a first-order magnetic field with a first-order scalar-or vector-, or tensor-perturbations would lead to the generation of second order magnetic field. The analysis is done in a covariant-index-free approach, but could be done in the standard covariant indexed-approach.

  2. Dissipative charged fluid in a magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Abbasi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the collective excitations in a dissipative charged fluid at zero chemical potential when an external magnetic field is present. While in the absence of magnetic field, four collective excitations appear in the fluid, we find five hydrodynamic modes here. This implies that the magnetic field splits the degeneracy between the transverse shear modes. Using linear response theory, we then compute the retarded response functions. In particular, it turns out that the correlation between charge and the energy fluctuations will no longer vanish, even at zero chemical potential. By use of the response functions, we also derive the relevant Kubo formulas for the transport coefficients.

  3. Magnetic fields from second-order interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Osano, Bob

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that when two types of perturbations interact in cosmological perturbation theory, the interaction may lead to the generation of a third type. In this article we discuss the generation of magnetic fields from such interactions. We determine conditions under which the interaction of a first-order magnetic field with a first-order scalar-or vector-, or tensor-perturbations would lead to the generation of second order magnetic field. The analysis is done in a covariant-index-fre...

  4. Magnetic Field Control of Combustion Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmina, I.; Valdmanis, R.; Zake, M.; Kalis, H.; Marinaki, M.; Strautins, U.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies and mathematical modelling of the effects of magnetic field on combustion dynamics at thermo-chemical conversion of biomass are carried out with the aim of providing control of the processes developing in the reaction zone of swirling flame. The joint research of the magnetic field effect on the combustion dynamics includes the estimation of this effect on the formation of the swirling flame dynamics, flame temperature and composition, providing analysis of the magnetic field effects on the flame characteristics. The results of experiments have shown that the magnetic field exerts the influence on the flow velocity components by enhancing a swirl motion in the flame reaction zone with swirl-enhanced mixing of the axial flow of volatiles with cold air swirl, by cooling the flame reaction zone and by limiting the thermo-chemical conversion of volatiles. Mathematical modelling of magnetic field effect on the formation of the flame dynamics confirms that the electromagnetic force, which is induced by the electric current surrounding the flame, leads to field-enhanced increase of flow vorticity by enhancing mixing of the reactants. The magnetic field effect on the flame temperature and rate of reactions leads to conclusion that field-enhanced increase of the flow vorticity results in flame cooling by limiting the chemical conversion of the reactants.

  5. Magnetic field evolution of accreting neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Istomin, Ya N

    2016-01-01

    The flow of a matter, accreting onto a magnetized neutron star, is accompanied by an electric current. The closing of the electric current occurs in the crust of a neutron stars in the polar region across the magnetic field. But the conductivity of the crust along the magnetic field greatly exceeds the conductivity across the field, so the current penetrates deep into the crust down up to the super conducting core. The magnetic field, generated by the accretion current, increases greatly with the depth of penetration due to the Hall conductivity of the crust is also much larger than the transverse conductivity. As a result, the current begins to flow mainly in the toroidal direction, creating a strong longitudinal magnetic field, far exceeding an initial dipole field. This field exists only in the narrow polar tube of $r$ width, narrowing with the depth, i.e. with increasing of the crust density $\\rho$, $r\\propto \\rho^{-1/4}$. Accordingly, the magnetic field $B$ in the tube increases with the depth, $B\\propto...

  6. Dispersion of Magnetic Fields in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Hildebrand, Roger H; Dotson, Jessie L; Houde, Martin; Vaillancourt, John E

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for determining the dispersion of magnetic field vectors about local mean fields in turbulent molecular clouds. The method is designed to avoid inaccurate estimates of MHD or turbulent dispersion - and hence to avoid inaccurate estimates of field strengths - due to large-scale, non-turbulent field structure when using the well-known method of Chandrasekhar and Fermi. Our method also provides accurate, independent estimates of the turbulent to mean magnetic field strength ratio. We discuss applications to the molecular clouds Orion, M17, and DR21.

  7. Reversals of the Earth's Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duene E.

    J.A. Jacobs of Cambridge University has written a concise, authoritative, and up-todate text on reversals of the earth's magnetic field. Chapter 1 is a concise summary of the basic attributes of the geomagnetic field and its behavior in different time frames. It explains spherical harmonic analysis of the field and presents the history of acquisition of the data that best represent the recent field. Lastly, it includes a short summary of the origin and electrodynamics of the magnetic field, outlining the current theoretical basis for its generation.

  8. Hearing the zero locus of a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, R. [California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

    1995-04-01

    We investigate the ground state of a two-dimensional quantum particle in a magnetic field where the field vanishes nondegenerately along a closed curve. We show that the ground state concentrates on this curve as e/h tends to infinity, where e is the charge, and that the ground state energy grows like (e/h){sup 2/3}. These statements are true for any energy level, the level being fixed as the charge tends to infinity. If the magnitude of the gradient of the magnetic field is a constant b{sub 0} along its zero locus, then we get the precise asymptotics (e/h){sup 2/3}(b{sub 0}){sup 2/3} E{sub *} + O(1) for every energy level. The constant E{sub *} {approx_equal} .5698 is the infimum of the ground state energies E({beta}) of the anharmonic oscillator family -d{sup 2}/dy{sup 2} + (1/2 y{sup 2} - {beta}){sup 2}. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic field considerations in fusion power plant environs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liemohn, H.B.; Lessor, D.L.; Duane, B.H.

    1976-09-01

    A summary of magnetic field production mechanisms and effects is given. Discussions are included on the following areas: (1) stray magnetic and electric fields from tokamaks, (2) methods for reducing magnetic fields, (3) economics of magnetic field reductions, (4) forces on magnetizable objects near magnetic confinement fusion reactors, (5) electric field transients in tokamaks, (6) attenuation and decay of electromagnetic fields, and (7) magnetic field transients from tokamak malfunctions.

  10. Total Magnetic Field Signatures over Submarine HVDC Power Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. M.; Tchernychev, M.; Johnston, J. M.; Tryggestad, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mikhail Tchernychev, Geometrics, Inc. Ross Johnson, Geometrics, Inc. Jeff Johnston, Geometrics, Inc. High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) technology is widely used to transmit electrical power over considerable distances using submarine cables. The most commonly known examples are the HVDC cable between Italy and Greece (160 km), Victoria-Tasmania (300 km), New Jersey - Long Island (82 km) and the Transbay cable (Pittsburg, California - San-Francisco). These cables are inspected periodically and their location and burial depth verified. This inspection applies to live and idle cables; in particular a survey company could be required to locate pieces of a dead cable for subsequent removal from the sea floor. Most HVDC cables produce a constant magnetic field; therefore one of the possible survey tools would be Marine Total Field Magnetometer. We present mathematical expressions of the expected magnetic fields and compare them with fields observed during actual surveys. We also compare these anomalies fields with magnetic fields produced by other long objects, such as submarine pipelines The data processing techniques are discussed. There include the use of Analytic Signal and direct modeling of Total Magnetic Field. The Analytic Signal analysis can be adapted using ground truth where available, but the total field allows better discrimination of the cable parameters, in particular to distinguish between live and idle cable. Use of a Transverse Gradiometer (TVG) allows for easy discrimination between cable and pipe line objects. Considerable magnetic gradient is present in the case of a pipeline whereas there is less gradient for the DC power cable. Thus the TVG is used to validate assumptions made during the data interpretation process. Data obtained during the TVG surveys suggest that the magnetic field of a live HVDC cable is described by an expression for two infinite long wires carrying current in opposite directions.

  11. Magnetic fields in early protostellar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    González-Casanova, Diego F; Lazarian, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian & Vishniac (1999) model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe". In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M$_\\odot$ protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, "reconnection diffusion", removes the magnetic flux from the disk, the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the a...

  12. Intergalactic Magnetic Fields from Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, S; Furlanetto, Steven; Loeb, Abraham

    2001-01-01

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function of size and magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We generically find that by a redshift z=3, about 5-20% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density >10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at T=10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the field strength observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification. The intergalactic magnetic field could also provide a nonthermal contribution to the pressure of the photo-ionized gas that may account for the claimed discrepancy between the simulated and observed Doppler width distributions of the Ly-al...

  13. The CMS Magnetic Field Map Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, VI; Sarycheva, L I; Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Gaddi, A; Amapane, N; Gerwig, H; Andreev, V; Cure, B; Mulders, M; Loveless, R; Karimaki, V; Popescu, S; Herve, A

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive featuresinclude a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. During two major tests of the CMS magnet the magnetic flux density was measured inside the coil in a cylinder of 3.448 m diameter and 7 m length with a specially designed field-mapping pneumatic machine as well as in 140 discrete regions of the CMS yoke with NMR probes, 3-D Hall sensors and flux-loops. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet has been developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. A volume based representation of the magnetic field is used to provide the CMS simulation and reconstruction software with the magnetic field ...

  14. Compact Electric- And Magnetic-Field Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, Daniel; Smith, Edward

    1994-01-01

    Compact sensor measures both electric and magnetic fields. Includes both short electric-field dipole and search-coil magnetometer. Three mounted orthogonally providing triaxial measurements of electromagnetic field at frequencies ranging from near 0 to about 10 kHz.

  15. High Field Pulse Magnets with New Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Lesch, B.; Cochran, V. G.; Eyssa, Y.; Tozer, S.; Mielke, C. H.; Rickel, D.; van Sciver, S. W.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2004-11-01

    High performance pulse magnets using the combination of CuNb conductor and Zylon fiber composite reinforcement with bore sizes of 24, 15 and 10 mm have been designed, manufactured and tested to destruction. The magnets successfully reached the peak fields of 64, 70 and 77.8 T respectively with no destruction. Failures occurred near the end flanges at the layer. The magnet design, manufacturing and testing, and the mode of the failure are described and analyzed.

  16. Light Polarization Using Ferrofluids and Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Tufaile

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting an experimental setup based on polarized light, enabling the visualization of the magnetic field of magnetic assemblies using a Hele-Shaw cell filled with ferrofluids. We have simulated the observed patterns with hypergeometric polynomials.

  17. The magnetic field of zeta Orionis A

    CERN Document Server

    Blazère, A; Tkachenko, A; Bouret, J -C; Rivinius, Th

    2015-01-01

    Zeta Ori A is a hot star claimed to host a weak magnetic field, but no clear magnetic detection was obtained so far. In addition, it was recently shown to be a binary system composed of a O9.5I supergiant and a B1IV star. We aim at verifying the presence of a magnetic field in zeta Ori A, identifying to which of the two binary components it belongs (or whether both stars are magnetic), and characterizing the field.Very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data were obtained with Narval at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France. Archival HEROS, FEROS and UVES spectroscopic data were also used. The data were first disentangled to separate the two components. We then analyzed them with the Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD) technique to extract the magnetic information. We confirm that zeta Ori A is magnetic. We find that the supergiant component zeta Ori Aa is the magnetic component: Zeeman signatures are observed and rotational modulation of the longitudinal magnetic field is clearly detected with a per...

  18. Studies of Solar Vector Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report a few advances in the studies based on the solar vector magnetic field observations which were carried out mainly with the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at the Huairou Solar Observing Station in the 1990s. (1) We developed necessary methodology and concepts in vector magnetogram analysis (Wang et al. 1996). For the first time, we proposed to use the photospheric free magnetic energy to quantify the major flare productivity of solar active regions (ARs), and it had been proved to be the best parameter in representing the major flare activity. (2) We revealed that there was always a dominant sense of magnetic shear in a given AR (Wang 1994), which was taken as the premise of the helicity calculation in ARs; we made the first quantitative estimation of magnetic helicity evolution in ARs (Wang 1996). (3) We identified the first group of evidence of magnetic reconnection in the lower solar atmosphere with vector magnetic field observations and proposed a two-step reconnection flare model to interpret the observed association of flux cancellation and flares (Wang and Shi 1993). Efforts to quantify the major flare productivity of super active regions with vector magnetic field observations have been also taken.

  19. High Field Magnetization of Tb Single Crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roeland, L. W.; Cock, G. J.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1975-01-01

    The magnetization of Tb single crystals was measured in magnetic fields to 34T along the hard direction at temperature of 1.8, 4.2, 65.5 and 77K, and along with easy direction at 4.2 and 77K. The data are compared with the results of a self-consistent spin wave calculation using a phenomenological...

  20. Zero modes in finite range magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, C; Nash, C

    2000-01-01

    We find a class of Fermion zero modes of Abelian Dirac operators in three dimensional Euclidean space where the gauge potentials and the related magnetic fields are nonzero only in a finite space region.

  1. Axion production from primordial magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Kohei; Nakai, Yuichiro

    2017-07-01

    Production of axionlike particles (ALPs) by primordial magnetic fields may have significant impacts on cosmology. We discuss the production of ALPs in the presence of the primordial magnetic fields. We find a region of the ALP mass and photon coupling which realizes the observed properties of the dark matter with appropriate initial conditions for the magnetic fields. This region may be interesting in light of recent indications for the 3.5 keV lines from galaxy clusters. For a small axion mass, a region of previously allowed parameter spaces is excluded by overproduction of ALPs as a hot/warm dark matter component. Since the abundance of ALPs strongly depends on the initial conditions of primordial magnetic fields, our results provide implications for scenarios of magnetogenesis.

  2. Compact muon solenoid magnet reaches full field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Scientist of the U.S. Department of Energy in Fermilab and collaborators of the US/CMS project announced that the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet has reached full field in tests at CERN. (1 apge)

  3. A Topology for the Penumbral Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez

    2009-01-01

    We describe a scenario for the topology of the magnetic field in penumbrae that accounts for recent observations showing upflows, downflows, and reverse magnetic polarities. According to our conjecture, short narrow magnetic loops fill the penumbral photosphere. Flows along these arched field lines are responsible for both the Evershed effect and the convective transport. This scenario seems to be qualitatively consistent with most existing observations, including the dark cores in penumbral filaments reported by Scharmer et al. Each bright filament with dark core would be a system of two paired convective rolls with the dark core tracing the common lane where the plasma sinks down. The magnetic loops would have a hot footpoint in one of the bright filament and a cold footpoint in the dark core. The scenario fits in most of our theoretical prejudices (siphon flows along field lines, presence of overturning convection, drag of field lines by downdrafts, etc). If the conjecture turns out to be correct, the mild...

  4. Local Magnetic Field Role in Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Patrick M; Ho, Paul T P; Zhang, Qizhou; Girart, Josep M; Chen, Huei-Ru V; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Hua-bai; Li, Zhi-Yun; Liu, Hau-Yu B; Padovani, Marco; Qiu, Keping; Rao, Ramprasad; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Frau, Pau; Chen, How-Huan; Ching, Tao-Chung

    2015-01-01

    We highlight distinct and systematic observational features of magnetic field morphologies in polarized submm dust continuum. We illustrate this with specific examples and show statistical trends from a sample of 50 star-forming regions.

  5. Revisiting holographic superconductor with Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Momeni, Davood

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of the bulk magnetic field (charge) on scalar condensation using an analytical approach of matching. An AdS-magnetized black hole solution has been used as a probe solution of normal phase of a strongly coupled condensed matter system on boundary. In the zero temperature limit of the black hole and infinite temperature, we show that there exists a critical magnetic field and so, the Meissner's effect presented. We compare this analytical result with our previous variational approach. By studying the different between heat capacities of the normal and superconducting phases near the critical point, we show that this thermodynamic quantity becomes divergent as the Rutgers formula predicted. Mathematical pole of Rutgers formula gives us a maximum for magnetic field which at this value, the system backs to the normal phase. In zero temperature we investigate exact series solutions of the field equations using an appropriate boundary conditions set. We show that conformal dimension is fixed by ...

  6. A Holographic Bound on Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    McInnes, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields large enough to be observable are ubiquitous in astrophysics, even at extremely large length scales. This has led to the suggestion that such fields are seeded at very early (inflationary) times, and subsequently amplified by various processes involving, for example, dynamo effects. Many such mechanisms give rise to extremely large magnetic fields at the end of inflationary reheating, and therefore also during the quark-gluon plasma epoch of the early universe. Such plasmas have a well-known holographic description. We show that holography imposes an upper bound on the intensity of magnetic fields (scaled by the squared temperature) in these circumstances, and that the values expected in some models of cosmic magnetism come close to attaining that bound.

  7. Magnetic Fields in Limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozitsky, V. G.; Lozitska, N. I.; Botygina, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    Two limb solar flares, of 14 July 2005 and 19 July 2012, of importance X1.2 and M7.7, are analyzed at present work. Magnetic field strength in named flares are investigated by Stokes I±V profiles of Hα and D3 HeI lines. There are direct evidences to the magnetic field inhomogeneity in flares, in particular, non-paralelism of bisectors in I+V and I-V profiles. In some flare places, the local maximums of bisectors splitting were found in both lines. If these bisector splittings are interpreted as Zeeman effect manifestation, the following magnetic field strengths reach up to 2200 G in Hα and 1300 G in D3. According to calculations, the observed peculiarities of line profiles may indicate the existence of optically thick emissive small-scale elements with strong magnetic fields and lowered temperature.

  8. Construction of high magnetic field facilities approved

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On 25 January, the National Development and Reform Commission gave the green light to a proposal to construct high magnetic field facilities for experimental use. The suggestion was jointly submitted by the Ministry of Education and CAS.

  9. The Magnetic Field of Helmholtz Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, H. J. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the magnetic field of Helmholtz coils qualitatively and then provides the basis for a quantitative expression. Since the mathematical calculations are very involved, a computer program for solving the mathematical expression is presented and explained. (GS)

  10. EIT waves and coronal magnetic field diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN PengFei

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic field in the solar lower atmosphere can be measured by the use of the Zeeman and Hanle effects. By contrast, the coronal magnetic field well above the solar surface, which directly controls various eruptive phenomena, can not be precisely measured with the traditional techniques. Several attempts are being made to probe the coronal magnetic field, such as force-free extrapolation based on the photospheric magnetograms, gyroresonance radio emissions, and coronal seismology based on MHD waves in the corona. Compared to the waves trapped in the localized coronal loops, EIT waves are the only global-scale wave phenomenon, and thus are the ideal tool for the coronal global seismology. In this paper, we review the observations and modelings of EIT waves, and illustrate how they can be applied to probe the global magnetic field in the corona.

  11. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  12. Magnetic Field Amplification in Young Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Klessen, Ralf S

    2013-01-01

    The Universe at present is highly magnetized, with fields of the order of a few 10^-5 G and coherence lengths larger than 10 kpc in typical galaxies like the Milky Way. We propose that the magnetic field was amplified to this values already during the formation and the early evolution of the galaxies. Turbulence in young galaxies is driven by accretion as well as by supernova (SN) explosions of the first generation of stars. The small-scale dynamo can convert the turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy and amplify very weak primordial magnetic seed fields on short timescales. The amplification takes place in two phases: in the kinematic phase the magnetic field grows exponentially, with the largest growth on the smallest non-resistive scale. In the following non-linear phase the magnetic energy is shifted towards larger scales until the dynamo saturates on the turbulent forcing scale. To describe the amplification of the magnetic field quantitatively we model the microphysics in the interstellar medium ...

  13. Split-Field Magnet facility upgraded

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The Split Field Magnet (SFM) was the largest spectrometer for particles from beam-beam collisions in the ISR. It could determine particle momenta in a large solid angle, but was designed mainly for the analysis of forward travelling particles.As the magnet was working on the ISR circulating beams, its magnetic field had to be such as to restore the correct proton orbit.The SFM, therefore, produced zero field at the crossing point and fields of opposite signs upstream and downstream of it and was completed by 2 large and 2 small compensator magnets. The gradient effects were corrected by magnetic channels equipped with movable flaps. The useful magnetic field volume was 28 m3, the induction in the median plane 1.14 T, the gap heigth 1.1 m, the length 10.5 m, the weight about 1000 ton. Concerning the detectors, the SFM was the first massive application of multiwire proportional chambers (about 70000 wires) which filled the main and the large compensator magnets. In 1976 an improved programme was started with tw...

  14. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Qiu, Keping [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, C5p 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhi-Yun [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Frau, Pau [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Alfonso XII, 3 E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Li, Hua-Bai [Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Padovani, Marco [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, UMR 8112 du CNRS, École Normale Supérieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bontemps, Sylvain [OASU/LAB-UMR5804, CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, F-33270 Floirac (France); Csengeri, Timea, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  15. Core Processes: Earth's eccentric magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause.......Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause....

  16. Orbit stability in billiards in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kovács, Z

    1997-01-01

    We study the stability properties of orbits in dispersing billiards in a homogeneous magnetic field by using a modified formalism based on the Bunimovich-Sinai curvature (horocycle method). We identify simple periodic orbits that can be stabilized by the magnetic field in the four-disk model and the square-lattice Lorentz gas. The stable orbits can play a key role in determining the transport properties of these models.

  17. Magnetic Field Measurement on a Refined Kicker

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Tai-Ching; Lin, Fu-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    To prepare for the operation of top-up mode and increase the efficiency of injection at storage ring, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC) has upgraded the kicker magnets and power supply. We have built up a new magnetic field measurement system to test the kicker. This system, including a search coil and a coil loop, can map the field and take the first integral of field automatically. We also simulate the trajectory of electron beam by pulsed wire method of field measurement. We analyze the performance of the kicker system in this paper.

  18. Biological systems in high magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, A.

    1990-12-01

    Diamagnetic orientation of biological systems have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. Fibrinogen, one of blood proteins, were polymerized in static high magnetic fields up to 8 T. Clotted gels composed of oriented fibrin fibers were obtained even in a field as low as 1 T. Red blood cells (RBC) show full orientation with their plane parallel to the applied field of 4 T. It is confirmed experimentally that the magnetic orientation of RBC is caused by diamagnetic anisotropy. Full orientation is also obtained with blood platelet in a field of 3 T.

  19. Cooling Curve of Strange Star in Strong Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Qin; LUO Zhi-Quan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, firstly, we investigate the neutrino emissivity from quark Urca process in strong magnetic field. Then, we discuss the heat capacity of strange stars in strong magnetic field. Finally, we give the cooling curve in strong magnetic field. In order to make a comparison, we also give the corresponding cooling curve in the case of null magnetic field. It turns out that strange stars cool faster in strong magnetic field than that without magnetic field.

  20. Real-time Gaussian Markov random-field-based ground tracking for ground penetrating radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Kyle; Torrione, Peter A.; Collins, Leslie

    2009-05-01

    Current ground penetrating radar algorithms for landmine detection require accurate estimates of the location of the air/ground interface to maintain high levels of performance. However, the presence of surface clutter, natural soil roughness, and antenna motion lead to uncertainty in these estimates. Previous work on improving estimates of the location of the air/ground interface have focused on one-dimensional filtering techniques to localize the air/ground interface. In this work, we propose an algorithm for interface localization using a 2- D Gaussian Markov random field (GMRF). The GMRF provides a statistical model of the surface structure, which enables the application of statistical optimization techniques. In this work, the ground location is inferred using iterated conditional modes (ICM) optimization which maximizes the conditional pseudo-likelihood of the GMRF at a point, conditioned on its neighbors. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed interface localization approach, pre-screener performance with and without the proposed ground localization algorithm is compared. We show that accurate localization of the air/ground interface provides the potential for future performance improvements.

  1. Combustion instability mitigation by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocher, Agnes; Pitsch, Heinz; Gomez, Thomas; Bonnety, Jérôme; Legros, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    The present interdisciplinary study combines electromagnetics and combustion to unveil an original and basic experiment displaying a spontaneous flame instability that is mitigated as the non-premixed sooting flame experiences a magnetic perturbation. This magnetic instability mitigation is reproduced by direct numerical simulations to be further elucidated by a flow stability analysis. A key role in the stabilization process is attributed to the momentum and thermochemistry coupling that the magnetic force, acting mainly on paramagnetic oxygen, contributes to sustain. The spatial local stability analysis based on the numerical simulations shows that the magnetic field tends to reduce the growth rates of small flame perturbations.

  2. The effects of near null magnetic field upon the leucocyte response in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofteiu, M; Morariu, V V; Marina, C; Zirbo, M

    1995-01-01

    Wistar rats were kept for 2 and 4 weeks in conditions of near null magnetic field. The total serum proteins, lipids and glucides, as well as the leucocyte and neutrophil counts showed no significant changes against controls kept in natural magnetic field conditions. A significant monocytosis, a decrease in the circulating phagocyte count and in the phagocytic activity was noticed in null magnetic field. These results suggest that the natural magnetic field significantly influences health both on the ground and possibly in cosmic conditions.

  3. Wuhan pulsed high magnetic field center

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Liang; Peng, Tao; Ding, Honfa; Han, Xiaotao; Ding, Tonghai; Chen, Jin; Wang, Junfeng; Xie, Jianfeng; Wang, Shaoliang; Duan, Xianzhong; Wang, Cheng; Herlach, Fritz; Vanacken, Johan; Pan, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Wuhan pulsed high magnetic field facility is under development. Magnets of bore sizes from 12 to 34 mm with the peak field in the range of 50 to 80 T have been designed. The pulsed power supplies consists of a 12 MJ, 25 kV capacitor bank and a 100 MVA/100 MJ flywheel pulse generator. A prototype 1 MJ, 25 kV capacitor bank is under construction. Five magnets wound with CuNb wire and copper wire reinforced internally with Zylon fiber composites and externally with stainless steel shells have be...

  4. Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) Hardware Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Reed, Dave; Wang, Chung; Stuckey, Bob; Cox, Dave

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Provide insight into water delivery in microgravity and determine optimal germination paper wetting for subsequent seed germination in microgravity; (2) Observe the behavior of water exposed to a strong localized magnetic field in microgravity; and (3) Simulate the flow of fixative (using water) through the hardware. The Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) is a new piece of hardware slated to fly on the Space Shuttle in early 2001. MFA is designed to expose plant tissue to magnets in a microgravity environment, deliver water to the plant tissue, record photographic images of plant tissue, and deliver fixative to the plant tissue.

  5. Wuhan pulsed high magnetic field center

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Liang; Peng, Tao; Ding, Honfa; Han, Xiaotao; Ding, Tonghai; Chen, Jin; Wang, Junfeng; Xie, Jianfeng; Wang, Shaoliang; DUAN, Xianzhong; Wang, Cheng; Herlach, Fritz; Vanacken, Johan; Pan, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Wuhan pulsed high magnetic field facility is under development. Magnets of bore sizes from 12 to 34 mm with the peak field in the range of 50 to 80 T have been designed. The pulsed power supplies consists of a 12 MJ, 25 kV capacitor bank and a 100 MVA/100 MJ flywheel pulse generator. A prototype 1 MJ, 25 kV capacitor bank is under construction. Five magnets wound with CuNb wire and copper wire reinforced internally with Zylon fiber composites and externally with stainless steel shells have be...

  6. New electric field in asymmetric magnetic reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakit, K; Shay, M A; Cassak, P A; Ruffolo, D

    2013-09-27

    We present a theory and numerical evidence for the existence of a previously unexplored in-plane electric field in collisionless asymmetric magnetic reconnection. This electric field, dubbed the "Larmor electric field," is associated with finite Larmor radius effects and is distinct from the known Hall electric field. Potentially, it could be an important indicator for the upcoming Magnetospheric Multiscale mission to locate reconnection sites as we expect it to appear on the magnetospheric side, pointing earthward, at the dayside magnetopause reconnection site.

  7. Influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic field on the thermal conductivity of magnetic nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Lai, Mei-Feng; Hou, Yun-Fang; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-05-13

    We investigated the influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of suspended magnetic nanowires. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires was obtained using steady-state Joule heating to measure the change in resistance caused by spontaneous heating. The results showed that the thermal conductivity coefficients of straight and wavy magnetic nanowires decreased with an increase in the magnetic domain wall number, implying that the scattering between magnons and domain walls hindered the heat transport process. In addition, we proved that the magnetic field considerably reduced the thermal conductivity of a magnetic nanowire. The influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline magnetic nanowires can be attributed to the scattering of long-wavelength spin waves mediated by intergrain exchange coupling.

  8. Where is magnetic anisotropy field pointing to?

    CERN Document Server

    Gutowski, Marek W

    2013-01-01

    The desired result of magnetic anisotropy investigations is the determination of value(s) of various anisotropy constant(s). This is sometimes difficult, especially when the precise knowledge of saturation magnetization is required, as it happens in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) studies. In such cases we usually resort to `trick' and fit our experimental data to the quantity called \\emph{anisotropy field}, which is strictly proportional to the ratio of the searched anisotropy constant and saturation magnetization. Yet, this quantity is scalar, simply a number, and is therefore of little value for modeling or simulations of the magnetostatic or micromagnetic structures. Here we show how to `translate' the values of magnetic anisotropy constants into the complete vector of magnetic anisotropy field. Our derivation is rigorous and covers the most often encountered cases, from uniaxial to cubic anisotropy.

  9. Superconducting magnetic separation of ground steel slag powder for recovery of resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, H. W.; Kim, J. J.; Kim, Young Hun [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Ha, D. W. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, J. H. [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Catholic University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Steel slag has been considered as an industrial waste. A huge amount of slag is produced as a byproduct and the steel slag usually has been dumped in a landfill site. However the steel slag contains valuable resources such as iron, copper, manganese, and magnesium. Superconducting magnetic separation has been applied on recovery of the valuable resources from the steel slag and this process also has intended to reduce the waste to be dumped. Cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet with 100 mm bore and 600 mm of height was used as the magnetic separator. The separating efficiency was evaluated in the function of magnetic field. A steel slag was ground and analyzed for the composition. Iron containing minerals were successfully concentrated from less iron containing portion. The separation efficiency was highly dependent on the particle size giving higher separating efficiency with finer particle. The magnetic field also effects on the separation ratio. Current study showed that an appropriate grinding of slag and magnetic separation lead to the recovery of metal resources from steel slag waste rather than dumping all of the volume.

  10. Bootstrapping the Coronal Magnetic Field with STEREO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2010-05-01

    The 3D coronal magnetic field obtained from stereoscopically triangulated loops has been compared with standard photospheric magnetogram extrapolations. We found a large misalignment of 20-40 deg, depending on the complexity of an AR (Sandman et al. 2009; DeRosa et al. 2009). These studies prove that the magnetic field in the photosphere is not force-free and fundamentally cannot reproduce the coronal magnetic field. Bootstrapping with coronal loop 3D geometries are required to improve modeling of the coronal field. Such coronal field bootstrapping methods are currently developed using stereoscopically triangulated loops from STEREO/EUVI and preliminary results show already a significantly reduced misalignment of 10-20 deg.

  11. Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; /Los Alamos; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

    2011-11-04

    Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, <1 {mu}s, pulsed power source and a TE013-like mode copper cavity, we have been measuring critical magnetic fields of superconductors for accelerator cavity applications. This device can eliminate both thermal and field emission effects due to a short pulse and no electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

  12. Growth of Czochralski silicon under magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuesheng; LIU Caichi; WANG Haiyun; ZHANG Weilian; YANG Qingxin; LI Yangxian; REN Binyan; LIU Fugui

    2004-01-01

    Growth of Czochralski (CZ) silicon crystals under the magnetic field induced by a cusp-shaped permanent magnet of NdFeB has been investigated. It is found that the mass transport in silicon melt was controlled by its diffusion while the magnetic intensity at the edge of a crucible was over 0.15 T. In comparison with the growth of conventional CZ silicon without magnetic field, the resistivity homogeneity of the CZ silicon under the magnetic field was improved. Furthermore, the Marangoni convection which has a significant influence on the control of oxygen concentration was observed on the surface of silicon melt. It is suggested that the crystal growth mechanism in magnetic field was similar to that in micro-gravity if a critical value was reached, named the growth of equivalent micro-gravity. The relationship of the equivalent micro-gravity and the magnetic intensity was derived as g=(v0/veff)g0. Finally, the orders of the equivalent micro-gravity corresponding to two crucibles with characteristic sizes were calculated.

  13. Generalized description of few-electron quantum dots at zero and nonzero magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftja, Orion [Department of Physics, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States)

    2007-01-31

    We introduce a generalized ground state variational wavefunction for parabolically confined two-dimensional quantum dots that equally applies to both cases of weak (or zero) and strong magnetic field. The wavefunction has a Laughlin-like form in the limit of infinite magnetic field, but transforms into a Jastrow-Slater wavefunction at zero magnetic field. At intermediate magnetic fields (where a fraction of electrons is spin-reversed) it resembles Halperin's spin-reversed wavefunction for the fractional quantum Hall effect. The properties of this variational wavefunction are illustrated for the case of two-dimensional quantum dot helium (a system of two interacting electrons in a parabolic confinement potential) where we find the description to be an excellent representation of the true ground state for the whole range of magnetic fields.

  14. Simulating magnetic fields in the Antennae galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kotarba, H; Naab, T; Johansson, P H; Dolag, K; Lesch, H

    2009-01-01

    We present self-consistent high-resolution simulations of NGC4038/4039 (the "Antennae galaxies") including star formation, supernova feedback and magnetic fields performed with the N-body/SPH code Gadget, in which hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics are followed with the SPH method. We vary the initial magnetic field in the progenitor disks from 1 nG to 1 muG. At the time of the best match with the central region of the Antennae system the magnetic field has been amplified by compression and shear flows to an equilibrium field of approximately 10 muG, independent of the initial seed field. This simulations are a proof of the principle that galaxy mergers are efficient drivers for the cosmic evolution of magnetic fields. We present a detailed analysis of the magnetic field structure in the central overlap region. Simulated radio and polarization maps are in good morphological and quantitative agreement with the observations. In particular, the two cores with the highest synchrotron intensity and ridges of r...

  15. Rearing in a distorted magnetic field disrupts the ‘map sense’ of juvenile steelhead trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Nathan F.; Meinke, Amanda M.; Noakes, David L. G.

    2014-01-01

    We used simulated magnetic displacements to test orientation preferences of juvenile steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to magnetic fields existing at the northernmost and southernmost boundaries of their oceanic range. Fish reared in natural magnetic conditions distinguished between these two fields by orienting in opposite directions, with headings that would lead fish towards marine foraging grounds. However, fish reared in a spatially distorted magnetic field failed to distinguish between the experimental fields and were randomly oriented. The non-uniform field in which fish were reared is probably typical of fields that many hatchery fish encounter due to magnetic distortions associated with the infrastructure of aquaculture. Given that the reduced navigational abilities we observed could negatively influence marine survival, homing ability and hatchery efficiency, we recommend further study on the implications of rearing salmonids in unnatural magnetic fields. PMID:24899681

  16. Rearing in a distorted magnetic field disrupts the 'map sense' of juvenile steelhead trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Nathan F; Meinke, Amanda M; Noakes, David L G

    2014-06-01

    We used simulated magnetic displacements to test orientation preferences of juvenile steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to magnetic fields existing at the northernmost and southernmost boundaries of their oceanic range. Fish reared in natural magnetic conditions distinguished between these two fields by orienting in opposite directions, with headings that would lead fish towards marine foraging grounds. However, fish reared in a spatially distorted magnetic field failed to distinguish between the experimental fields and were randomly oriented. The non-uniform field in which fish were reared is probably typical of fields that many hatchery fish encounter due to magnetic distortions associated with the infrastructure of aquaculture. Given that the reduced navigational abilities we observed could negatively influence marine survival, homing ability and hatchery efficiency, we recommend further study on the implications of rearing salmonids in unnatural magnetic fields. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic Field Transport in Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Amir; Vishniac, Ethan

    2017-06-01

    The most plausible theories for launching astrophysical jets rely on strong magnetic fields at the inner parts of some accretion disks. An internal dynamo can in principle generate small scale magnetic fields in situ but generating a large scale field in a disk seems a difficult task in the dynamo theories. In fact, as far as numerous numerical experiments indicate, a dynamo-generated field in general would not be coherent enough over the large length scales of order the disk's radius. Instead, a large scale poloidal field dragged in from the environment, and compressed by the accretion, provides a more promising possibility. The difficulty in the latter picture, however, arises from the reconnection of the radial field component across the mid-plane which annihilates the field faster than it is dragged inward by the accretion. We suggest that a combination of different effects, including magnetic buoyancy and turbulent pumping, is responsible for the vertical transport of the field lines toward the surface of the disk. The radial component of the poloidal field vanishes at the mid-plane, which efficiently impedes reconnection, and grows exponentially toward the surface where it can become much larger than the vertical field component. This allows the poloidal field to be efficiently advected to small radii until the allowed bending angle drops to of order unity, and the field can drive a strong outflow.

  18. Superconductivity in Strong Magnetic Field (Greater Than Upper Critical Field)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessema, G.X.; Gamble, B.K.; Skove, M.J.; Lacerda, A.H.; Mielke, C.H.

    1998-08-22

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation and other US federal Agencies, has in recent years built a wide range of magnetic fields, DC 25 to 35 Tesla, short pulse 50 - 60 Tesla, and quasi-continuous 60 Tesla. Future plans are to push the frontiers to 45 Tesla DC and 70 to 100 Tesla pulse. This user facility, is open for national and international users, and creates an excellent tool for materials research (metals, semiconductors, superconductors, biological systems ..., etc). Here we present results of a systematic study of the upper critical field of a novel superconducting material which is considered a promising candidate for the search for superconductivity beyond H{sub c2} as proposed by several new theories. These theories predict that superconductors with low carrier density can reenter the superconducting phase beyond the conventional upper critical field H{sub c2}. This negates the conventional thinking that superconductivity and magnetic fields are antagonistic.

  19. Study of marine magnetic field

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattacharya, G.C.

    (COB) is again both a basic scientific requirement as well at some places is a requirement under the UNCLOS related Legal Continental Shelf demarcation purpose. In the oceanic areas, the marine magnetic studies are one of the essential tools... oceans increased, more and more deviations from this simplified model, such as propagating ridges and overlapping spreading centers were discovered. These observations enabled the study of new aspects of seafloor spreading process beyond the initial...

  20. Magnetic field amplification in turbulent astrophysical plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in astrophysical accretion discs, and in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. They drive jets, suppress fragmentation in star-forming clouds and can have a significant impact on the accretion rate of stars. However, the exact amplification mechanisms of cosmic magnetic fields remain relatively poorly understood. Here I start by reviewing recent advances in the numerical and theoretical modelling of the 'turbulent dynamo', which may explain the origin of galactic and inter-galactic magnetic fields. While dynamo action was previously investigated in great detail for incompressible plasmas, I here place particular emphasis on highly compressible astrophysical plasmas, which are characterised by strong density fluctuations and shocks, such as the interstellar medium. I find that dynamo action works not only in subsonic plasmas, but also in highly supersonic, compressible plasmas, as well as for low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers. I further present new numerical simu...

  1. The Magnetic Field of Solar Spicules

    CERN Document Server

    Centeno, R; Ramos, A Asensio

    2009-01-01

    Determining the magnetic field of solar spicules is vital for developing adequate models of these plasma jets, which are thought to play a key role in the thermal, dynamic, and magnetic structure of the chromosphere. Here we report on magnetic spicule properties in a very quiet region of the off-limb solar atmosphere, as inferred from new spectropolarimetric observations in the HeI 10830 A triplet. We have used a novel inversion code for Stokes profiles caused by the joint action of atomic level polarization and the Hanle and Zeeman effects (HAZEL) to interpret the observations. Magnetic fields as strong as 40G were unambiguously detected in a very localized area of the slit, which may represent a possible lower value of the field strength of organized network spicules.

  2. QCD thermodynamics and magnetization in nonzero magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Ezzelarab, Nada; Shalaby, Asmaa G

    2016-01-01

    In nonzero magnetic field, the magnetic properties and thermodynamics of the quantum-chromodynamic (QCD) matter is studied in the hadron resonance gas and the Polyakov linear-sigma models and compared with recent lattice calculations. Both models are fairly suited to describe the degrees of freedom in the hadronic phase. The partonic ones are only accessible by the second model. It is found that the QCD matter has paramagnetic properties, which monotonically depend on the temperature and are not affected by the hadron-quark phase-transition. Furthermore, raising the magnetic field strength increases the thermodynamic quantities, especially in the hadronic phase but reduces the critical temperature, i.e. inverse magnetic catalysis.

  3. The magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn and the characteristics of their magnetospheres, formed by interaction with the solar wind, are discussed. The origins of both magnetic fields are associated with a dynamo process deep in the planetary interior. The Jovian magnetosphere is analogous to that of a pulsar magnetosphere: a massive central body with a rapid rotation and an associated intense magnetic field. Its most distinctive feature is its magnetodisk of concentrated plasma and particle flux, and reduced magnetic field intensity. The magnetopause near the subsolar point has been observed at radial distances ranging over 50 to 100 Jovian radii, implying a relatively compressible obstacle to solar wind flow. The composition of an embedded current sheet within the magnetic tail is believed to be influenced by volcanic eruptions and emissions from Io. Spectral troughs of the Jovian radiation belts have been interpreted as possible ring particles. The Saturnian magnetosphere appears to be more like the earth in its topology. It is mainly characterized by a dipole axis parallel to the rotational axis of the planet and a magnetic field intensity much less than expected.

  4. Measurements of Photospheric and Chromospheric Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagg, Andreas; Lites, Bruce; Harvey, Jack; Gosain, Sanjay; Centeno, Rebecca

    2017-09-01

    The Sun is replete with magnetic fields, with sunspots, pores and plage regions being their most prominent representatives on the solar surface. But even far away from these active regions, magnetic fields are ubiquitous. To a large extent, their importance for the thermodynamics in the solar photosphere is determined by the total magnetic flux. Whereas in low-flux quiet Sun regions, magnetic structures are shuffled around by the motion of granules, the high-flux areas like sunspots or pores effectively suppress convection, leading to a temperature decrease of up to 3000 K. The importance of magnetic fields to the conditions in higher atmospheric layers, the chromosphere and corona, is indisputable. Magnetic fields in both active and quiet regions are the main coupling agent between the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and are therefore not only involved in the structuring of these layers, but also for the transport of energy from the solar surface through the corona to the interplanetary space. Consequently, inference of magnetic fields in the photosphere, and especially in the chromosphere, is crucial to deepen our understanding not only for solar phenomena such as chromospheric and coronal heating, flares or coronal mass ejections, but also for fundamental physical topics like dynamo theory or atomic physics. In this review, we present an overview of significant advances during the last decades in measurement techniques, analysis methods, and the availability of observatories, together with some selected results. We discuss the problems of determining magnetic fields at smallest spatial scales, connected with increasing demands on polarimetric sensitivity and temporal resolution, and highlight some promising future developments for their solution.

  5. Planar Near-Field Measurements of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter; Hansen, Thorkild

    2004-01-01

    Planar near-field measurements are formulated for a general ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna. A total plane-wave scattering matrix is defined for the system consisting of the GPR antenna and the planar air-soil interface. The transmitting spectrum of the GPR antenna is expressed in terms...

  6. Magnetizing a complex plasma without a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kählert, H; Bonitz, M; Löwen, H; Greiner, F; Piel, A

    2012-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a concept that mimics the magnetization of the heavy dust particles in a complex plasma while leaving the properties of the light species practically unaffected. It makes use of the frictional coupling between a complex plasma and the neutral gas, which allows to transfer angular momentum from a rotating gas column to a well-controlled rotation of the dust cloud. This induces a Coriolis force that acts exactly as the Lorentz force in a magnetic field. Experimental normal mode measurements for a small dust cluster with four particles show excellent agreement with theoretical predictions for a magnetized plasma.

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles for applications in oscillating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeraphatdit, Chorthip [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Enzymatic and thermochemical catalysis are both important industrial processes. However, the thermal requirements for each process often render them mutually exclusive: thermochemical catalysis requires high temperature that denatures enzymes. One of the long-term goals of this project is to design a thermocatalytic system that could be used with enzymatic systems in situ to catalyze reaction sequences in one pot; this system would be useful for numerous applications e.g. conversion of biomass to biofuel and other commodity products. The desired thermocatalytic system would need to supply enough thermal energy to catalyze thermochemical reactions, while keeping the enzymes from high temperature denaturation. Magnetic nanoparticles are known to generate heat in an oscillating magnetic field through mechanisms including hysteresis and relaxational losses. We envisioned using these magnetic nanoparticles as the local heat source embedded in sub-micron size mesoporous support to spatially separate the particles from the enzymes. In this study, we set out to find the magnetic materials and instrumental conditions that are sufficient for this purpose. Magnetite was chosen as the first model magnetic material in this study because of its high magnetization values, synthetic control over particle size, shape, functionalization and proven biocompatibility. Our experimental designs were guided by a series of theoretical calculations, which provided clues to the effects of particle size, size distribution, magnetic field, frequency and reaction medium. Materials of theoretically optimal size were synthesized, functionalized, and their effects in the oscillating magnetic field were subsequently investigated. Under our conditions, the materials that clustered e.g. silica-coated and PNIPAM-coated iron oxides exhibited the highest heat generation, while iron oxides embedded in MSNs and mesoporous iron oxides exhibited the least bulk heating. It is worth noting that the specific

  8. Linear field demagnetisation of artificial magnetic square ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Phillip Morgan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have studied experimentally the states formed in artificial square ice nanomagnet systems following demagnetisation in a rotating in-plane applied magnetic field that reduces to zero in a manner that is linear in time. The final states are found to be controlled via the system's lattice constant, which determines the strength of the magnetostatic interactions between the elements, as well as the field ramping rate. We understand these effects as a requirement that the system undergoes a sufficiently large number of active rotations within the critical field window in which elements may be reversed, such that the interactions are allowed to locally exert their influence if the ground state is to be approached. On the other hand, if quenched disorder is too strong when compared to the interaction strength, any close approach to the ground state is impossible. These results show that it is not necessary for there to be any ac component to the field amplitude that is applied to the system during demagnetisation, which is the method almost exclusively employed in field protocols reported to date. Furthermore, by optimising the parameters of our linear demagnetisation protocol, the largest field-generated ground state domains yet reported are found.

  9. Primordial magnetic fields from the string network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic strings are a type of cosmic defect formed by a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe. Individual strings would have gathered to build a network, and their dynamical motion would induce scalar-, vector-, and tensor-type perturbations. In this paper, we focus on the vector mode perturbations arising from the string network based on the one scale model and calculate the time evolution and the power spectrum of the associated magnetic fields. We show that the relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids induced by the string network can generate magnetic fields over a wide range of scales based on standard cosmology. We obtain the magnetic field spectrum before recombination as aB(k,z)~4×10Gμ/1k)3.5 gauss on super-horizon scales, and aB(k,z)~2.4×10Gμ/1k)2.5 gauss on sub-horizon scales in co-moving coordinates. This magnetic field grows up to the end of recombination, and has a final amplitude of approximately B~10Gμ gauss at the k~1 Mpc scale today. This field might serve as a seed for cosmological magnetic fields.

  10. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and…

  11. Galactic magnetic fields and hierarchical galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Luiz Felippe S; Fletcher, Andrew; Baugh, Carlton

    2015-01-01

    A framework is introduced for coupling the evolution of galactic magnetic fields sustained by the mean-field dynamo with the formation and evolution of galaxies in the cold dark matter cosmology. Estimates of the steady-state strength of the large-scale and turbulence magnetic fields from mean-field and fluctuation dynamo models are used together with galaxy properties predicted by semi-analytic models of galaxy formation for a population of spiral galaxies. We find that the field strength is mostly controlled by the evolving gas content of the galaxies. Thus, because of the differences in the implementation of the star formation law, feedback from supernovae and ram-pressure stripping, each of the galaxy formation models considered predicts a distribution of field strengths with unique features. The most prominent of them is the difference in typical magnetic fields strengths obtained for the satellite and central galaxies populations as well as the typical strength of the large-scale magnetic field in galax...

  12. A deep dynamo generating Mercury's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ulrich R

    2006-12-21

    Mercury has a global magnetic field of internal origin and it is thought that a dynamo operating in the fluid part of Mercury's large iron core is the most probable cause. However, the low intensity of Mercury's magnetic field--about 1% the strength of the Earth's field--cannot be reconciled with an Earth-like dynamo. With the common assumption that Coriolis and Lorentz forces balance in planetary dynamos, a field thirty times stronger is expected. Here I present a numerical model of a dynamo driven by thermo-compositional convection associated with inner core solidification. The thermal gradient at the core-mantle boundary is subadiabatic, and hence the outer region of the liquid core is stably stratified with the dynamo operating only at depth, where a strong field is generated. Because of the planet's slow rotation the resulting magnetic field is dominated by small-scale components that fluctuate rapidly with time. The dynamo field diffuses through the stable conducting region, where rapidly varying parts are strongly attenuated by the skin effect, while the slowly varying dipole and quadrupole components pass to some degree. The model explains the observed structure and strength of Mercury's surface magnetic field and makes predictions that are testable with space missions both presently flying and planned.

  13. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and…

  14. Nonperturbative Physics in a Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    de la Incera, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    Non-Perturbative Quantum Field Theory has played an important role in the study of phenomena where a fermion condensate can appear under certain physical conditions. The familiar phenomenon of electric superconductivity, the color superconductivity of very dense quark matter, and the chiral symmetry breaking of low energy effective chiral theories are all examples of that sort. Often one is interested in the behavior of these systems in the presence of an external magnetic field. In this talk I will outline the effects of an external magnetic field on theories with either fermion-fermion or fermion-antifermion condensates.

  15. Hyperon bulk viscosity in strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, Monika

    2008-01-01

    We study bulk viscosity in neutron star matter including $\\Lambda$ hyperons in the presence of quantizing magnetic fields. Relaxation time and bulk viscosity due to both the non-leptonic weak process involving $\\Lambda$ hyperons and the direct Urca (dUrca) process are calculated here. In the presence of a strong magnetic field, bulk viscosity coefficients are enhanced when protons, electrons and muons are populated in their respective zeroth Landau levels compared with the field free cases. The enhancement of bulk viscosity coefficient is larger for the dUrca case.

  16. Opening the cusp. [using magnetic field topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, N. U.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Gussenhoven, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic field topology (determined by the superposition of dipole, image, and uniform fields) for mapping the cusp to the ionosphere. The model results are compared to both new and published observations and are then used to map the footprint of a flux transfer event caused by a time variation in the merging rate. It is shown that the cusp geometry distorts the field lines mapped from the magnetopause to yield footprints with dawn and dusk protrusions into the region of closed magnetic flux.

  17. String field theory solution corresponding to constant background magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Ishibashi, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Following the method recently proposed by Erler and Maccaferri, we construct solutions to the equation of motion of Witten's cubic string field theory, which describe constant magnetic field background. We study the boundary condition changing operators relevant to such background and calculate the operator product expansions of them. We obtain solutions whose classical action coincide with the Born-Infeld action.

  18. Magnetic fields of young solar twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, L.; Kochukhov, O.; Hackman, T.; Lehtinen, J.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: The goal of this work is to study the magnetic fields of six young solar-analogue stars both individually, and collectively, to search for possible magnetic field trends with age. If such trends are found, they can be used to understand magnetism in the context of stellar evolution of solar-like stars and to understand the past of the Sun and the solar system. This is also important for the atmospheric evolution of the inner planets, Earth in particular. Methods: We used Stokes IV data from two different spectropolarimeters, NARVAL and HARPSpol. The least-squares deconvolution multi-line technique was used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We then applied a modern Zeeman-Doppler imaging code in order to reconstruct the magnetic topology of all stars and the brightness distribution of one of our studied stars. Results: Our results show a significant decrease in the magnetic field strength and energy as the stellar age increases from 100 Myr to 250 Myr, while there is no significant age dependence of the mean magnetic field strength for stars with ages 250-650 Myr. The spread in the mean field strength between different stars is comparable to the scatter between different observations of individual stars. The meridional field component is weaker than the radial and azimuthal field components in 15 of the 16 magnetic maps. It turns out that 89-97% of the magnetic field energy is contained in l = 1 - 3. There is also no clear trend with age and distribution of field energy into poloidal/toroidal and axisymmetric/non-axisymmetric components within the sample. The two oldest stars in this study show an octupole component that is twice as strong as the quadrupole component. This is only seen in 1 of the 13 maps of the younger stars. One star, χ1 Ori, displays two field polarity switches during almost 5 yr of observations suggesting a magnetic cycle length of 2, 6, or 8 yr. Based on observations made with the HARPSpol instrument on the ESO 3.6 m

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic experiments on cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Stefani, Frank; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    It is widely known that cosmic magnetic fields, including the fields of planets, stars, and galaxies, are produced by the hydromagnetic dynamo effect in moving electrically conducting fluids. It is less well known that cosmic magnetic fields play also an active role in cosmic structure formation by enabling outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Considerable theoretical and computational progress has been made in understanding both processes. In addition to this, the last ten years have seen tremendous efforts in studying both effects in liquid metal experiments. In 1999, magnetic field self-excitation was observed in the large scale liquid sodium facilities in Riga and Karlsruhe. Recently, self-excitation was also obtained in the French "von Karman sodium" (VKS) experiment. An MRI-like mode was found on the background of a turbulent spherical Couette flow at the University of Maryland. Evidence for MRI as the first instability of an hydrodynamica...

  20. Magnetic Field Amplification via Protostellar Disc Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dyda, Sergei; Ustyugova, Galina V; Koldoba, Alexander V; Wasserman, Ira

    2015-01-01

    We model the generation of a magnetic field in a protostellar disc using an \\alpha-dynamo and perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of a T Tauri star. We find that for small values of the dimensionless dynamo parameter $\\alpha_d$ the poloidal field grows exponentially at a rate ${\\sigma} \\propto {\\Omega}_K \\sqrt{\\alpha_d}$ , before saturating to a value $\\propto \\sqrt{\\alpha_d}$ . The dynamo excites dipole and octupole modes, but quadrupole modes are suppressed, because of the symmetries of the seed field. Initial seed fields too weak to launch MHD outflows are found to grow sufficiently to launch winds with observationally relevant mass fluxes of order $10^{-9} M_{\\odot}/\\rm{yr}$ for T Tauri stars. For large values of $\\alpha_d$ magnetic loops are generated over the entire disc. These quickly come to dominate the disc dynamics and cause the disc to break up due to the magnetic pressure.

  1. A holographic bound on cosmic magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett McInnes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic fields large enough to be observable are ubiquitous in astrophysics, even at extremely large length scales. This has led to the suggestion that such fields are seeded at very early (inflationary times, and subsequently amplified by various processes involving, for example, dynamo effects. Many such mechanisms give rise to extremely large magnetic fields at the end of inflationary reheating, and therefore also during the quark–gluon plasma epoch of the early universe. Such plasmas have a well-known holographic description in terms of a thermal asymptotically AdS black hole. We show that holography imposes an upper bound on the intensity of magnetic fields (≈3.6×1018gauss at the hadronization temperature in these circumstances; this is above, but not far above, the values expected in some models of cosmic magnetogenesis.

  2. Measuring vector magnetic fields in solar prominences

    CERN Document Server

    Suárez, D Orozco; Bueno, J Trujillo

    2012-01-01

    We present spectropolarimetric observations in the He I 1083.0 nm multiplet of a quiescent, hedgerow solar prominence. The data were taken with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter attached to the German Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife; Canary Islands; Spain). The observed He I circular and linear polarization signals are dominated by the Zeeman effect and by atomic level polarization and the Hanle effect, respectively. These observables are sensitive to the strength and orientation of the magnetic field vector at each spatial point of the field of view. We determine the magnetic field vector of the prominence by applying the HAZEL inversion code to the observed Stokes profiles. We briefly discuss the retrieved magnetic field vector configuration.

  3. Magnetic fields during high redshift structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schleicher, Dominik R G; Schober, Jennifer; Schmidt, Wolfram; Bovino, Stefano; Federrath, Christoph; Niemeyer, Jens; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-01-01

    We explore the amplification of magnetic fields in the high-redshift Universe. For this purpose, we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations following the formation of primordial halos with \\sim10^7 M_solar, revealing the presence of turbulent structures and complex morphologies at resolutions of at least 32 cells per Jeans length. Employing a turbulence subgrid-scale model, we quantify the amount of unresolved turbulence and show that the resulting turbulent viscosity has a significant impact on the gas morphology, suppressing the formation of low-mass clumps. We further demonstrate that such turbulence implies the efficient amplification of magnetic fields via the small-scale dynamo. We discuss the properties of the dynamo in the kinematic and non-linear regime, and explore the resulting magnetic field amplification during primordial star formation. We show that field strengths of \\sim10^{-5} G can be expected at number densities of \\sim5 cm^{-3}.

  4. Inference of magnetic fields in inhomogeneous prominences

    CERN Document Server

    Milic, Ivan; Atanackovic, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Most of the quantitative information about the magnetic field vector in solar prominences comes from the analysis of the Hanle effect acting on lines formed by scattering. As these lines can be of non-negligible optical thickness, it is of interest to study the line formation process further. We investigate the multidimensional effects on the interpretation of spectropolarimetric observations, particularly on the inference of the magnetic field vector. We do this by analyzing the differences between multidimensional models, which involve fully self-consistent radiative transfer computations in the presence of spatial inhomogeneities and velocity fields, and those which rely on simple one-dimensional geometry. We study the formation of a prototype line in ad hoc inhomogeneous, isothermal 2D prominence models. We solve the NLTE polarized line formation problem in the presence of a large-scale oriented magnetic field. The resulting polarized line profiles are then interpreted (i.e. inverted) assuming a simple 1D...

  5. Nonrelativistic Fermions in Magnetic Fields a Quantum Field Theory Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa, Olivier R; Lepe, S; Méndez, F

    2001-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of nonrelativistic fermions in a constant magnetic field is considered from the quantum field theory point of view. The fermionic determinant is computed using a general procedure that contains all possible regularizations. The nonrelativistic grand-potential can be expressed in terms polylogarithm functions, whereas the partition function in 2+1 dimensions and vanishing chemical potential can be compactly written in terms of the Dedekind eta function. The strong and weak magnetic fields limits are easily studied in the latter case by using the duality properties of the Dedekind function.

  6. Vector magnetic field in solar polar region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓元勇; 汪景秀; 艾国祥

    1999-01-01

    By means of ’deep integration’ observations of a videomagnetograph the vector magnetic field was first systematically measured near the solar south polar region on April 12, 1997 when the Sun was in the minimal phase between the 22nd and 23rd solar cycle. It was found that the polar magnetic field deviated from the normal of solar surface by about 42.2°±3.2°, a stronger magnetic element may have smaller inclination, and that within the polar cap above heliolatitude of 50°, the unsigned and net flux densities were 7.8×10-4 T and -3.4×10-4 T, respectively, and consequently, the unsigned and net fluxes were about 5.5×1022 and -2.5×1022 Mx. The net magnetic flux, which belongs to the large-scale global magnetic field of the Sun, roughly approaches the order of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) measured at distance of 1 AU.

  7. Magnetic fields of young solar twins

    CERN Document Server

    Rosén, L; Hackman, T; Lehtinen, J

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work is to study the magnetic fields of six young solar-analogue stars both individually, and collectively, to search for possible magnetic field trends with age. If such trends are found, they can be used to understand magnetism in the context of stellar evolution of solar-like stars and, the past of the Sun and the solar system. This is also important for the atmospheric evolution of the inner planets, Earth in particular. We used Stokes IV data from two different spectropolarimeters, NARVAL and HARPSpol. The least-squares deconvolution multi-line technique was used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We then applied a modern Zeeman-Doppler imaging code in order to reconstruct the magnetic topology of all stars and the brightness distribution of one of our studied stars. Our results show a significant decrease in the magnetic field strength and energy as the stellar age increases from 100Myr to 250Myr while there is no significant age dependence of the mean magnetic field str...

  8. Magnetic fields in Local Group dwarf irregulars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyży, K. T.; Weżgowiec, M.; Beck, R.; Bomans, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We wish to clarify whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in typically low-mass dwarf galaxies and to assess the role of dwarf galaxies in the magnetization of the Universe. Methods: We performed a search for radio emission and magnetic fields in an unbiased sample of 12 Local Group (LG) irregular and dwarf irregular galaxies with the 100-m Effelsberg telescope at 2.64 GHz. Three galaxies were detected. A higher frequency (4.85 GHz) was used to search for polarized emission in five dwarfs that are the most luminous ones in the infrared domain, of which three were detected. Results: Magnetic fields in LG dwarfs are weak, with a mean value of the total field strength of regulated mainly by the star-formation surface density (with the power-law exponent of 0.30 ± 0.04) or by the gas surface density (with the exponent 0.47 ± 0.09). In addition, we find systematically stronger fields in objects of higher global star-formation rate. The dwarf galaxies follow a similar far-infrared relationship (with a slope of 0.91 ± 0.08) to that determined for high surface brightness spiral galaxies. The magnetic field strength in dwarf galaxies does not correlate with their maximum rotational velocity, indicating that a small-scale rather than a large-scale dynamo process is responsible for producting magnetic fields in dwarfs. If magnetization of the Universe by galactic outflows is coeval with its metal enrichment, we show that more massive objects (such as Lyman break galaxies) can efficiently magnetize the intergalactic medium with a magnetic field strength of about 0.8 nG out to a distance of 160-530 kpc at redshifts 5-3, respectively. Magnetic fields that are several times weaker and shorter magnetization distances are expected for primordial dwarf galaxies. We also predict that most star-forming local dwarfs might have magnetized their surroundings up to a field strength about 0.1 μG within about a 5 kpc distance. Conclusions: Strong magnetic

  9. Shape Biased Low Power Spin Dependent Tunneling Magnetic Field Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondra, Mark; Qian, Zhenghong; Wang, Dexin; Nordman, Cathy; Anderson, John

    2001-10-01

    Spin Dependent Tunneling (SDT) devices are leading candidates for inclusion in a number of Unattended Ground Sensor applications. Continued progress at NVE has pushed their performance to 1OOs of pT I rt. Hz 1 Hz. However, these sensors were designed to use an applied field from an on-chip coil to create an appropriate magnetic sensing configuration. The power required to generate this field (^100mW) is significantly greater than the power budget (^lmW) for a magnetic sensor in an Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) application. Consequently, a new approach to creating an ideal sensing environment is required. One approach being used at NVE is "shape biasing." This means that the physical layout of the SDT sensing elements is such that the magnetization of the sensing film is correct even when no biasing field is applied. Sensors have been fabricated using this technique and show reasonable promise for UGS applications. Some performance trade-offs exist. The power is easily tinder 1 MW, but the sensitivity is typically lower by a factor of 10. This talk will discuss some of the design details of these sensors as well as their expected ultimate performance.

  10. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Ledbetter, Micah; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with non-trivial spectra.

  11. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, M P; Theis, T; Blanchard, J W; Ring, H; Ganssle, P; Appelt, S; Blümich, B; Pines, A; Budker, D

    2011-09-02

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near zero field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high-field case, where heteronuclear J couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with nontrivial spectra.

  12. Ground states, magnetization plateaus and bipartite entanglement of frustrated spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg and Heisenberg triangular tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alécio, Raphael C.; Lyra, Marcelo L.; Strečka, Jozef

    2016-11-01

    The ground-state phase diagram, magnetization process and bipartite entanglement of the frustrated spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg and Heisenberg triangular tube (three-leg ladder) are investigated in a non-zero external magnetic field. The exact ground-state phase diagram of the spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg tube with Heisenberg intra-rung and Ising inter-rung couplings consists of six distinct gapped phases, which manifest themselves in a magnetization curve as intermediate plateaus at zero, one-third and two-thirds of the saturation magnetization. Four out of six available ground states exhibit quantum entanglement between two spins from the same triangular unit evidenced by a non-zero concurrence. Density-matrix renormalization group calculations are used in order to construct the ground-state phase diagram of the analogous but purely quantum spin-1/2 Heisenberg tube with Heisenberg intra- and inter-rung couplings, which consists of four gapped and three gapless phases. The Heisenberg tube shows a continuous change of the magnetization instead of a plateau at zero magnetization, while the intermediate one-third and two-thirds plateaus may be present or not in the zero-temperature magnetization curve.

  13. Magnetic Fields in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The Milky Way is magnetized. Invisible magnetic fields thread the Galaxy on all scales and play a vital but still poorly understood role in regulating flows of gas in the interstellar medium and the formation of stars. I will present highlights from my thesis work on magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar gas and in accretion disks. At high Galactic latitudes, diffuse neutral hydrogen is organized into an intricate network of slender linear features. I will show that these neutral hydrogen “fibers” are extremely well aligned with the ambient magnetic field as traced by both starlight polarization (Clark et al. 2014) and Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission (Clark et al. 2015). The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. Because the orientation of neutral hydrogen is an independent predictor of the local dust polarization angle, our work provides a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination. Magnetic fields also drive accretion in astrophysical disks via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). I analytically derive the behavior of this instability in the weakly nonlinear regime and show that the saturated state of the instability depends on the geometry of the background magnetic field. The analytical model describes the behavior of the MRI in a Taylor-Couette flow, a set-up used by experimentalists in the ongoing quest to observe MRI in the laboratory (Clark & Oishi 2016a, 2016b).

  14. Effects of static magnetic fields on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, O.

    In our recent experiment on STS-107 (MFA-Biotube) we took advantage of the magnetic heterogeneity of the gravity receptor cells of flax roots, namely stronger diamagnetism of starch-filled amyloplasts compared to cytoplasm (Δ ≊ HGMF, grad(H2/2) up to 109-1010 Oe2/cm) of the experimental chambers (MFCs) repelled amyloplasts from the zones of stronger field thus providing a directional stimulus for plant gravisensing system in microgravity, and causing the roots to react. Such reaction was observed in the video downlink pictures. Unfortunately, the ``Columbia'' tragedy caused loss of the plant material and most of the images, thus preventing us from detailed studies of the results. Currently we are looking for a possibility to repeat this experiment. Therefore, it is very important to understand, what other effects (besides displacing amyloplasts) static magnetic fields with intensities 0 to 2.5104 Oe, and with the size of the area of non-uniformity 10-3 to 1 cm. These effects were estimated theoretically and tested experimentally. No statistically significant differences in growth rates or rates of gravicurvature were observed in experiments with Linum, Arabidopsis, Hordeum, Avena, Ceratodon and Chara between the plants grown in uniform magnetic fields of various intensities (102 to 2.5104 Oe) and those grown in the Earth's magnetic field. Microscopic studies also did not detect any structural differences between test and control plants. The magnitudes of possible effects of static magnetic fields on plant cells and organs (including effects on ion currents, magneto-hydrodynamic effects in moving cytoplasm, ponderomotive forces on other cellular structures, effects on some biochemical reactions and biomolecules) were estimated theoretically. The estimations have shown, that these effects are small compared to the thermodynamic noise and thus are insignificant. Both theoretical estimations and control experiments confirm, that intracellular magnetophoresis of

  15. Inference of magnetic fields in inhomogeneous prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milić, I.; Faurobert, M.; Atanacković, O.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Most of the quantitative information about the magnetic field vector in solar prominences comes from the analysis of the Hanle effect acting on lines formed by scattering. As these lines can be of non-negligible optical thickness, it is of interest to study the line formation process further. Aims: We investigate the multidimensional effects on the interpretation of spectropolarimetric observations, particularly on the inference of the magnetic field vector. We do this by analyzing the differences between multidimensional models, which involve fully self-consistent radiative transfer computations in the presence of spatial inhomogeneities and velocity fields, and those which rely on simple one-dimensional geometry. Methods: We study the formation of a prototype line in ad hoc inhomogeneous, isothermal 2D prominence models. We solve the NLTE polarized line formation problem in the presence of a large-scale oriented magnetic field. The resulting polarized line profiles are then interpreted (i.e. inverted) assuming a simple 1D slab model. Results: We find that differences between input and the inferred magnetic field vector are non-negligible. Namely, we almost universally find that the inferred field is weaker and more horizontal than the input field. Conclusions: Spatial inhomogeneities and radiative transfer have a strong effect on scattering line polarization in the optically thick lines. In real-life situations, ignoring these effects could lead to a serious misinterpretation of spectropolarimetric observations of chromospheric objects such as prominences.

  16. Planar Near-Field Measurements of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter; Hansen, Thorkild

    2004-01-01

    Planar near-field measurements are formulated for a general ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna. A total plane-wave scattering matrix is defined for the system consisting of the GPR antenna and the planar air-soil interface. The transmitting spectrum of the GPR antenna is expressed in terms...... of measurements obtained with a buried probe as the GPR antenna moves over a scan plane on the ground. A numerical example in which the scan plane is finite validates the expressions for the spectrum of the GPR antenna....

  17. Whistler modes with wave magnetic fields exceeding the ambient field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, R L; Urrutia, J M; Strohmaier, K D

    2006-03-10

    Whistler-mode wave packets with fields exceeding the ambient dc magnetic field have been excited in a large, high electron-beta plasma. The waves are induced with a loop antenna with dipole moment either along or opposite to the dc field. In the latter case the excited wave packets have the topology of a spheromak but are propagating in the whistler mode along and opposite to the dc magnetic field. Field-reversed configurations with net zero helicity have also been produced. The electron magnetohydrodynamics fields are force free, have wave energy density exceeding the particle energy density, and propagate stably at subelectron thermal velocities through a nearly uniform stationary ion density background.

  18. Dissipation function in a magnetic field (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, V. L.

    2015-07-01

    The dissipation function is introduced to describe the behavior of the system of harmonic oscillations interacting with the environment (thermostat). This is a quadratic function of generalized velocities, which determines the rate of dissipation of the mechanical energy in the system. It was assumed earlier (Landau, Lifshitz) that the dissipation function can be introduced only in the absence of magnetic field. In the present review based on the author's studies, it has been shown how the dissipation function can be introduced in the presence of a magnetic field B. In a magnetic field, both dissipative and nondissipative responses arise as a response to perturbation and are expressed in terms of kinetic coefficients. The matrix of nondissipative coefficients can be obtained to determine an additional term formally including it into the equations of motion, which still satisfy the energy conservation law. Then, the dissipative part of the matrix can be considered in exactly the same way as without magnetic field, i.e., it defines the dissipation loss. As examples, the propagation and absorption of ultrasound in a metal or a semiconductor in a magnetic field have been considered using two methods: (i) the method based on the phenomenological theory using the equations of the theory of elasticity and (ii) the method based on the microscopic approach by analyzing and solving the kinetic equation. Both examples are used to illustrate the approach with the dissipation function.

  19. Magnetic Fields and Massive Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qizhou; Girart, Josep M; Hauyu,; Liu,; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M; Li, Zhi-Yun; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T P; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Ching, Tao-Chung; Frau, Pau; Chen, How-Huan; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain; Csengeri, Timea; Juarez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars ($M > 8$ \\msun) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 $\\mu$m obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of $\\lsim$ 0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within $40^\\circ$ of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the ...

  20. Magnetic fields of the outer planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    1993-01-01

    It is difficult to imagine a group of planetary dynamos more diverse than those visited by the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft. The magnetic field of Jupiter is large in magnitude and has a dipole axis within 10 deg of its rotation axis, comfortably consistent with the paleomagnetic history of the geodynamo. Saturn's remarkable (zonal harmonic) magnetic field has an axis of symmetry that is indistinguishable from its rotation axis (mush less than 1 deg angular separation); it is also highly antisymmetric with respect to the equator plane. According to one hypothesis, the spin symmetry may arise from the differential rotation of an electrically conducting and stably stratified layer above the dynamo. The magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune are very much alike, and equally unlike those of the other known magnetized planets. These two planets are characterized by a large dipole tilts (59 deg and 47 deg, respectively) and quadrupole moments (Schmidt-normalized quadrupole/dipole ratio approximately equal 1.0). These properties may be characteristic of dynamo generation in the relatively poorly conducting 'ice' interiors of Uranus and Neptune. Characteristics of these planetary magnetic fields are illustrated using contour maps of the field on the planet's surface and discussed in the context of planetary interiors and dynamo generation.

  1. Cosmic Magnetic Fields: Observations and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation at radio frequencies of 0.2-10 GHz are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of cosmic magnetic fields. The observational results are reviewed for spiral, barred and flocculent galaxies, the Milky Way, halos and relics of galaxy clusters, and for the intergalactic medium. Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes will open a new era in the observation of cosmic magnetic fields and will help to understand their origin. At low frequencies, LOFAR (10-250 MHz) will allow us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), as observed with the EVLA, ASKAP, MeerKAT, APERTIF and the SKA, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of nearby galaxies in unprecedented detail. Surveys of Faraday rotation measures of pulsars will map the Milky Way's magnetic field with high precision. All-sky sur...

  2. Magnetic fields in primordial accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are considered a vital ingredient of contemporary star formation and may have been important during the formation of the first stars in the presence of an efficient amplification mechanism. Initial seed fields are provided via plasma fluctuations and are subsequently amplified by the small-scale dynamo, leading to a strong, tangled magnetic field. We explore how the magnetic field provided by the small-scale dynamo is further amplified via the α-Ω dynamo in a protostellar disk and assess its implications. For this purpose, we consider two characteristic cases, a typical Pop. III star with 10M⊙ and an accretion rate of 10-3M⊙ yr-1, and a supermassive star with 105M⊙ and an accretion rate of 10-1M⊙ yr-1. For the 10M⊙ Pop. III star, we find that coherent magnetic fields can be produced on scales of at least 100 AU, which are sufficient to drive a jet with a luminosity of 100L⊙ and a mass outflow rate of 10-3.7M⊙ yr-1. For the supermassive star, the dynamical timescales in its environment are even shorter, implying smaller orbital timescales and an efficient magnetization out to at least 1000 AU. The jet luminosity corresponds to ~106.0L⊙ and a mass outflow rate of 10-2.1M⊙ yr-1. We expect that the feedback from the supermassive star can have a relevant impact on its host galaxy.

  3. Magnetic Field Strengths in Photodissociation Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Balser, Dana S; Jeyakumar, S; Bania, T M; Montet, Benjamin T; Shitanishi, J A

    2015-01-01

    We measure carbon radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 5.3 GHz toward four HII regions with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to determine the magnetic field strength in the photodissociation region (PDR) that surrounds the ionized gas. Roshi (2007) suggests that the non-thermal line widths of carbon RRLs from PDRs are predominantly due to magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) waves, thus allowing the magnetic field strength to be derived. We model the PDR with a simple geometry and perform the non-LTE radiative transfer of the carbon RRL emission to solve for the PDR physical properties. Using the PDR mass density from these models and the carbon RRL non-thermal line width we estimate total magnetic field strengths of B ~ 100-300 micro Gauss in W3 and NGC6334A. Our results for W49 and NGC6334D are less well constrained with total magnetic field strengths between B ~ 200-1000 micro Gauss. HI and OH Zeeman measurements of the line-of-sight magnetic field strength (B_los), taken from the literature, are between a facto...

  4. Magnetic field effect on spoke behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnilica, Jaroslav; Slapanska, Marta; Klein, Peter; Vasina, Petr

    2016-09-01

    The investigations of the non-reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using high-speed camera imaging, optical emission spectroscopy and electrical probes showed that plasma is not homogeneously distributed over the target surface, but it is concentrated in regions of higher local plasma density called spokes rotating above the erosion racetrack. Magnetic field effect on spoke behaviour was studied by high-speed camera imaging in HiPIMS discharge using 3 inch titanium target. An employed camera enabled us to record two successive images in the same pulse with time delay of 3 μs between them, which allowed us to determine the number of spokes, spoke rotation velocity and spoke rotation frequency. The experimental conditions covered pressure range from 0.15 to 5 Pa, discharge current up to 350 A and magnetic fields of 37, 72 and 91 mT. Increase of the magnetic field influenced the number of spokes observed at the same pressure and at the same discharge current. Moreover, the investigation revealed different characteristic spoke shapes depending on the magnetic field strength - both diffusive and triangular shapes were observed for the same target material. The spoke rotation velocity was independent on the magnetic field strength. This research has been financially supported by the Czech Science Foundation in frame of the project 15-00863S.

  5. Reducing blood viscosity with magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, R; Huang, K

    2011-07-01

    Blood viscosity is a major factor in heart disease. When blood viscosity increases, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of heart attacks. Currently, the only method of treatment is to take drugs such as aspirin, which has, however, several unwanted side effects. Here we report our finding that blood viscosity can be reduced with magnetic fields of 1 T or above in the blood flow direction. One magnetic field pulse of 1.3 T lasting ~1 min can reduce the blood viscosity by 20%-30%. After the exposure, in the absence of magnetic field, the blood viscosity slowly moves up, but takes a couple of hours to return to the original value. The process is repeatable. Reapplying the magnetic field reduces the blood viscosity again. By selecting the magnetic field strength and duration, we can keep the blood viscosity within the normal range. In addition, such viscosity reduction does not affect the red blood cells' normal function. This technology has much potential for physical therapy.

  6. The Magnetic Field of Planet Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulot, G.; Finlay, Chris; Constable, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth is by far the best documented magnetic field of all known planets. Considerable progress has been made in our understanding of its characteristics and properties, thanks to the convergence of many different approaches and to the remarkable fact that surface rocks h...... yr) to the longest (virtually the age of the Earth) time scales are finally reviewed, underlining the respective roles of the magnetohydodynamics at work in the core, and of the slow dynamic evolution of the planet as a whole.......The magnetic field of the Earth is by far the best documented magnetic field of all known planets. Considerable progress has been made in our understanding of its characteristics and properties, thanks to the convergence of many different approaches and to the remarkable fact that surface rocks...... observations have been made possible from space, leading to the possibility of observing the Earth’s magnetic field in much more details than was previously possible. The progressive increase in computer power was also crucial, leading to advanced ways of handling and analyzing this considerable corpus of data...

  7. Cosmological Magnetic Fields from Primordial Helical Seeds

    CERN Document Server

    Sigl, G

    2002-01-01

    Most early Universe scenarios predict negligible magnetic fields on cosmological scales if they are unprocessed during subsequent expansion of the Universe. We present a new numerical treatment of the evolution of primordial fields and apply it to weakly helical seeds as they occur in certain early Universe scenarios. We find that initial helicities not much larger than the baryon to photon number can lead to fields of about 10^{-13} Gauss with coherence scales slightly below a kilo-parsec today.

  8. High-field magnetization in transuranium compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, K. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan) and KYOKUGEN, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)]. E-mail: sugiyama@phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nakashima, H. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Aoki, D. [Institute of Material Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Institute of Material Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Haga, Y. [Advanced Science and Research Centerer, JAEA, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yamamoto, E. [Advanced Science and Research Centerer, JAEA, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nakamura, A. [Advanced Science and Research Centerer, JAEA, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Homma, Y. [Institute of Material Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Shiokawa, Y. [Institute of Material Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kindo, K. [Institite of Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Hagiwara, M. [KYOKUGEN, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Onuki, Y. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Advanced Science and Research Centerer, JAEA, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    We measured the high-field magnetization up to 55T and constructed a magnetic phase diagram for a transuranium antiferromagnet NpRhGa{sub 5} with the tetragonal structure. The magnetization at 4.2K for H(parallel) [100] indicates a sharp metamagnetic transition with a step at H{sub c}=26T and saturates above H{sub s}=38T, reaching 0.43{mu}{sub B}/Np. An ordered moment of 0.96{mu}{sub B}/Np at zero field, which was determined from the neutron scattering experiment, is found to be reduced to 0.43{mu}{sub B}/Np at H{sub s}, together with an orientation of the magnetic moment from the (001) plane to the (100) plane.

  9. Mechanism of magnetic field effect in cryptochrome

    CERN Document Server

    Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2011-01-01

    Creatures as varied as mammals, fish, insects, reptiles, and migratory birds have an intriguing `sixth' sense that allows them to distinguish north from south by using the Earth's intrinsic magnetic field. Yet despite decades of study, the physical basis of this magnetic sense remains elusive. A likely mechanism is furnished by magnetically sensitive radical pair reactions occurring in the retina, the light-sensitive part of the eyes. A photoreceptor, cryptochrome, has been suggested to endow birds with magnetoreceptive abilities as the protein has been shown to exhibit the biophysical properties required for an animal magnetoreceptor to operate properly. Here, we propose a concrete light-driven reaction cycle in cryptochrome that lets a magnetic field influence the signaling state of the photoreceptor. The reaction cycle ties together transient absorption and electron-spin-resonance observations with known facts on avian magnetoreception. Our analysis establishes the feasibility of cryptochrome to act as a g...

  10. Field Evaporation of Grounded Arsenic Doped Silicon Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Zexiang; Li, Zhibing; WeiliangWang,

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated field evaporation of grounded arsenic (As) doped silicon (Si) clusters consist of 52 atoms with density functional theory to mimic Si nano structures of hundreds of nanometers long standing on a substrate. Six cluster structures with different As doping concentrations and dopant locations are studied. The critical evaporation electric fields are found to be lower for clusters with higher doping concentrations and doping sites closer to the surface. We attribute the difference to the difference in binding energies corresponding to the different As-doping concentrations and to the doping locations. Our theoretical study could shed light on the stability of nano apexs under high electric field.

  11. Magnetic Field Effects on Plasma Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, F.; Shebalin, J.; Girimaji, S.; Staack, D.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we will discuss our numerical studies of plasma jets and loops, of basic interest for plasma propulsion and plasma astrophysics. Space plasma propulsion systems require strong guiding magnetic fields known as magnetic nozzles to control plasma flow and produce thrust. Propulsion methods currently being developed that require magnetic nozzles include the VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) [1] and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. Magnetic nozzles are functionally similar to de Laval nozzles, but are inherently more complex due to electromagnetic field interactions. The two crucial physical phenomenon are thrust production and plasma detachment. Thrust production encompasses the energy conversion within the nozzle and momentum transfer to a spacecraft. Plasma detachment through magnetic reconnection addresses the problem of the fluid separating efficiently from the magnetic field lines to produce maximum thrust. Plasma jets similar to those of VASIMR will be studied with particular interest in dual jet configurations, which begin as a plasma loops between two nozzles. This research strives to fulfill a need for computational study of these systems and should culminate with a greater understanding of the crucial physics of magnetic nozzles with dual jet plasma thrusters, as well as astrophysics problems such as magnetic reconnection and dynamics of coronal loops.[2] To study this problem a novel, hybrid kinetic theory and single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solver known as the Magneto-Gas Kinetic Method is used.[3] The solver is comprised of a "hydrodynamic" portion based on the Gas Kinetic Method and a "magnetic" portion that accounts for the electromagnetic behaviour of the fluid through source terms based on the resistive MHD equations. This method is being further developed to include additional physics such as the Hall effect. Here, we will discuss the current level of code development, as well as numerical simulation results

  12. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN EARLY PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Casanova, Diego F.; Lazarian, Alexander [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Santos-Lima, Reinaldo, E-mail: casanova@astro.wisc.edu [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, R. do Matão, 1226, São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2016-03-10

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian and Vishniac model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called “magnetic braking catastrophe.” In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M{sub ⊙} protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, “reconnection diffusion,” removes the magnetic flux from the disk; the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the absolute value of the magnetic flux through the disk. We demonstrate that for the first mechanism, turbulence causes a magnetic flux transport outward from the inner disk to the ambient medium, thus decreasing the coupling of the disk to the ambient material. A similar effect is achieved through the change of the magnetic field's topology from a split monopole configuration to a dipole configuration. We explore how both mechanisms prevent the catastrophic loss of disk angular momentum and compare both above turbulent reconnection mechanisms with alternative mechanisms from the literature.

  13. Sintering of Soft Magnetic Material under Microwave Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadatsugu Takayama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a simple process for sintering of soft magnetization materials using microwave sintering. The saturated magnetization (Ms of sintered magnetite was 85.6 emu/g, which was as high as 95% of magnetite before heating (90.4 emu/g. On the other hand, the averaged remanence (Mr and coercivity (Hc of the magnetite after heating were 0.17 emu/g and 1.12 Oe under measuring limit of SQUID, respectively. For the sintering process of soft magnetic materials, magnetic fields of microwave have been performed in nitrogen atmosphere. Therefore, a microwave single-mode system operating at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and with a maximum power level of 1.5 kW was used. We can sinter the good soft magnetic material in microwave magnetic field. The sample shrank to 82% theoretical density (TD from 45%TD of green body. The sintered sample was observed the microstructure by TEM and the crystal size was estimated the approximate average size is 10 nm.

  14. Magnetic Linear Birefringence Measurements Using Pulsed Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Berceau, Paul; Battesti, Remy; Rizzo, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the accomplishment of the further step towards the vacuum magnetic birefringence measurement based on pulsed fields. After describing our BMV experiment, we report the calibration of our apparatus with nitrogen gas and we discuss the precision of our measurement giving a detailed error budget. Our best present vacuum sensitivity is 2.1x 10^-19 T^-2 per 5 ms magnetic pulse. We finally discuss the perspectives to reach our final goal.

  15. Magnetic Field and Force Calculations for ATLAS Asymmetrical Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nessi, Marzio

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic field distortion in the assymetrical ATLAS structure are calculated. Magnetic forces in the system are estimated. 3D magnetic field simulation by the Opera3D code for symmetrical and asymmetrical systems is used.

  16. High magnetic field magnetization of a new triangular lattice antiferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, H. D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Stritzinger, Laurel Elaine Winter [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harrison, Neil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-23

    In CsV(MoO4)2, the magnetic V3+ ions with octahedral oxygen-coordination form a geometrically frustrated triangular lattice. So fare, there is no magnetic properties reported on it. Recently, we successfully grew single crystals of CsV(MoO4)2 by using flux method. The susceptibility shows a sharp drop around 24 K, representing a long range magnetic ordering. To understand the physical properties of this new triangular lattice antiferromagnet (TLAF), we pursued high field magnetization measurements to answer two questions: (i) what is the saturation field, which will be very useful to calculate the exchange interaction of the system? (ii) Will it exhibit spin state transition, such as the up up down phase with 1/3-saturation moment as other TLAFs? Recently, we performed VSM measurements in Cell 8, Tallahassee, NHMFL, the results show that the magnetization reaches 0.38 MuB at 34 T, which is just 19% of the full moment of 2 MuB for V3+ (3d2) ions. Apparently we need higher field to reach 1/3 value or full moment.

  17. Ground tilt monitoring at Phlegraean Fields (Italy: a methodological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Del Gaudio

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Among geodetic methods used for monitoring ground deformation in volcanic areas, tiltmetry represents the most rapid technique and therefore it is used by almost all the volcanological observatories in the world. The deformation of volcanic building is not only the result of endogenous causes (i.e. dykes injection or magma rising, but also non-tectonic environmental factors. Such troubles cannot be removed completely but they can be reduce. This article outlines the main source of errors affecting the signals recorded by Phlegraean tilt, network, such as the dependence of the tilt response on temperature and to the thermoelastic effect on ground deformation. The analytical procedure used to evaluate about such errors and their reduction is explained. An application to data acquired from the tilt network during two distinct phases of ground uplift and subsidence of the Phlegraean Fields is reported.

  18. Magnetic fields in early-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Grunhut, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    For several decades we have been cognizant of the presence of magnetic fields in early-type stars, but our understanding of their magnetic properties has recently (over the last decade) expanded due to the new generation of high-resolution spectropolarimeters (ESPaDOnS at CFHT, Narval at TBL, HARPSpol at ESO). The most detailed surface magnetic field maps of intermediate-mass stars have been obtained through Doppler imaging techniques, allowing us to probe the small-scale structure of these stars. Thanks to the effort of large programmes (e.g. the MiMeS project), we have, for the first time, addressed key issues regarding our understanding of the magnetic properties of massive (M > 8 M_sun) stars, whose magnetic fields were only first detected about fifteen years ago. In this proceedings article we review the spectropolarimetric observations and statistics derived in recent years that have formed our general understanding of stellar magnetism in early-type stars. We also discuss how these observations have fu...

  19. Magnetic translation algebra with or without magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudry, Christopher; Chamon, Claudio

    2013-03-01

    The magnetic translation algebra plays an important role in the quantum Hall effect. Murthy and Shankar have shown how to realize this algebra using fermionic bilinears defined on a two-dimensional square lattice. We show that, in any dimension d, it is always possible to close the magnetic translation algebra using fermionic bilinears, be it in the continuum or on the lattice. We also show that these generators are complete in even, but not odd, dimensions, in the sense that any fermionic Hamiltonian in even dimensions that conserves particle number can be represented in terms of the generators of this algebra, whether or not time-reversal symmetry is broken. As an example, we reproduce the f-sum rule of interacting electrons at vanishing magnetic field using this representation. We also show that interactions can significantly change the bare band width of lattice Hamiltonians when represented in terms of the generators of the magnetic translation algebra.

  20. Effect of magnetic field in malaria diagnosis using magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; Yuen, Clement

    2011-07-01

    The current gold standard method of Malaria diagnosis relies on the blood smears examination. The method is laborintensive, time consuming and requires the expertise for data interpretation. In contrast, Raman scattering from a metabolic byproduct of the malaria parasite (Hemozoin) shows the possibility of rapid and objective diagnosis of malaria. However, hemozoin concentration is usually extremely low especially at the early stage of malaria infection, rendering weak Raman signal. In this work, we propose the sensitive detection of enriched β-hematin, whose spectroscopic properties are equivalent to hemozoin, based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) by using magnetic nanoparticles. A few orders of magnitude enhancement in the Raman signal of β-hematin can be achieved using magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the effect of magnetic field on SERS enhancement is investigated. Our result demonstrates the potential of SERS using magnetic nanoparticles in the effective detection of hemozoin for malaria diagnosis.

  1. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  2. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  3. The Drift of Dust Grains Induced by Transient Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华建军; 叶茂福; 王龙

    2003-01-01

    Our experiment shows that the dust grains, suspended on the edge of the sheath of a radio-frequency discharge, undergo a contraction when switching a vertical magnetic field on, and an expansion when switching the magnetic field off. We call this kind of magnetic field "transient magnetic field". A primary analysis is proposed for the phenomenon.

  4. High magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgen, John [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard [Oak Ridge, TN; Ludtka, Gail [Oak Ridge, TN; Jaramillo, Roger [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for high magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact treatment of conductive materials in a high magnetic field. A method includes applying a high magnetic field to at least a portion of a conductive material; and applying an inductive magnetic field to at least a fraction of the conductive material to induce a surface current within the fraction of the conductive material, the surface current generating a substantially bi-directional force that defines a vibration. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, the fraction of the conductive material is located within the portion of the conductive material and ohmic heating from the surface current is ohmically decoupled from the vibration. An apparatus includes a high magnetic field coil defining an applied high magnetic field; an inductive magnetic field coil coupled to the high magnetic field coil, the inductive magnetic field coil defining an applied inductive magnetic field; and a processing zone located within both the applied high magnetic field and the applied inductive magnetic field. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, and ohmic heating of a conductive material located in the processing zone is ohmically decoupled from a vibration of the conductive material.

  5. CMB anisotropies from primordial inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, A

    2004-01-01

    Primordial inhomogeneous magnetic fields of the right strength can leave a signature on the CMB temperature anisotropy and polarization. Potentially observable contributions to polarization B-modes are generated by vorticity and gravitational waves sourced by the magnetic anisotropic stress. We compute the corresponding CMB transfer functions in detail including the effect of neutrinos. The shear rapidly causes the neutrino anisotropic stress to cancel the stress from the magnetic field, suppressing the production of gravitational waves and vorticity on super-horizon scales after neutrino decoupling. A significant large scale signal from tensor modes can only be produced before neutrino decoupling, and the actual amplitude is somewhat uncertain. Plausible values suggest primordial nearly scale invariant fields of ~ 10^(-10)G today may be observable from their large scale tensor anisotropy. They can be distinguished from primordial gravitational waves by their non-Gaussianity. Vector mode vorticity sources B-m...

  6. Solar Flare Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George

    2012-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the dynamics and diagnostics of solar magnetic fields and plasmas in the Sun’s atmosphere. Five broad areas of current research in Solar Physics are presented: (1) New techniques for incorporating radiation transfer effects into three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models of the solar interior and atmosphere, (2) The connection between observed radiation processes occurring during flares and the underlying flare energy release and transport mechanisms, (3) The global balance of forces and momenta that occur during flares, (4) The data-analysis and theoretical tools needed to understand and assimilate vector magnetogram observations and (5) Connecting flare and CME phenomena to the topological properties of the magnetic field in the Solar Atmosphere. The role of the Sun’s magnetic field is a major emphasis of this book, which was inspired by a workshop honoring Richard C. (Dick) Canfield.  Dick has been making profound contributions to these areas of research over a long and pro...

  7. Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    DeTar, Carleton; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first observation of magnetic catalysis at zero temperature in a fully nonperturbative simulation of the graphene effective field theory. Using lattice gauge theory, a nonperturbative analysis of the theory of strongly-interacting, massless, (2+1)-dimensional Dirac fermions in the presence of an external magnetic field is performed. We show that in the zero-temperature limit, a nonzero value for the chiral condensate is obtained which signals the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. This result implies a nonzero value for the dynamical mass of the Dirac quasiparticle. This in turn has been posited to account for the quantum-Hall plateaus that are observed at large magnetic fields.

  8. Orbital magnetic field driven metal-insulator transition in spinless extended Falicov-Kimball model on a triangular lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Umesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Ground state properties of spinless, extended Falicov-Kimball model (FKM) on a finite size triangular lattice with orbital magnetic field normal to the lattice are studied using numerical diagonalization and Monte-Carlo simulation methods. We show that the ground state configurations of localized electrons strongly depend on the magnetic field. Magnetic field induces a metal to insulator transition accompanied by segregated phase to an ordered regular phase except at density nf = 1 / 2 of localized electrons. It is proposed that magnetic field can be used as a new tool to produce segregated phase which was otherwise accessible only either with correlated hopping or with large on-site interactions.

  9. Manifestations of the Galactic Center Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Several independent lines of evidence reveal that a relatively strong and highly ordered magnetic field is present throughout the Galaxy's central molecular zone (CMZ). The field within dense clouds of the central molecular zone is predominantly parallel to the Galactic plane, probably as a result of the strong tidal shear in that region. A second magnetic field system is present outside of clouds, manifested primarily by a population of vertical, synchrotron-emitting filamentary features aligned with the field. Whether or not the strong vertical field is uniform throughout the CMZ remains undetermined, but is a key central issue for the overall energetics and the impact of the field on the Galactic center arena. The interactions between the two field systems are considered, as they are likely to drive some of the activity within the CMZ. As a proxy for other gas-rich galaxies in the local group and beyond, the Galactic center region reveals that magnetic fields are likely to be an important diagnostic, if no...

  10. Holographic fermions in external magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gubankova, E; Cubrovic, M; Schalm, K; Schijven, P; Zaanen, J

    2011-01-01

    We study the Fermi level structure of 2+1-dimensional strongly interacting electron systems in external magnetic field using the AdS/CFT correspondence. The gravity dual of a finite density fermion system is a Dirac field in the background of the dyonic AdS-Reissner-Nordstrom black hole. In the probe limit the magnetic system can be reduced to the non-magnetic one, with Landau-quantized momenta and rescaled thermodynamical variables. We find that at strong enough magnetic fields, the Fermi surface vanishes and the quasiparticle is lost either through a crossover to conformal regime or through a phase transition to an unstable Fermi surface. In the latter case, the vanishing Fermi velocity at the critical magnetic field triggers the non-Fermi liquid regime with unstable quasiparticles and a change in transport properties of the system. We associate it with a metal-"strange metal" phase transition. Next we compute compute the DC Hall and longitudinal conductivities using the gravity-dressed fermion propagators....

  11. Magnetic field homogeneity for neutron EDM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa

    2016-09-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is an observable which, if non-zero, would violate time-reversal symmetry, and thereby charge-parity symmetry of nature. New sources of CP violation beyond those found in the standard model of particle physics are already tightly constrained by nEDM measurements. Our future nEDM experiment seeks to improve the precision on the nEDM by a factor of 30, using a new ultracold neutron (UCN) source that is being constructed at TRIUMF. Systematic errors in the nEDM experiment are driven by magnetic field inhomogeneity and instability. The goal field inhomogeneity averaged over the experimental measurement cell (order of 1 m) is 1 nT/m, at a total magnetic field of 1 microTesla. This equates to roughly 10-3 homogeneity. A particularly challenging aspect of the design problem is that nearby magnetic materials will also affect the magnetic inhomogeneity, and this must be taken into account in completing the design. This poster will present the design methodology and status of the main coil for the experiment where we use FEA software (COMSOL) to simulate and analyze the magnetic field. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

  12. Building Magnetic Fields in White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    White dwarfs, the compact remnants left over at the end of low- and medium-mass stars lifetimes, are often found to have magnetic fields with strengths ranging from thousands to billions of times that of Earth. But how do these fields form?MultiplePossibilitiesAround 1020% of white dwarfs have been observed to have measurable magnetic fields with a wide range of strengths. There are several theories as to how these fields might be generated:The fields are fossil.The original weak magnetic fields of the progenitor stars were amplified as the stars cores evolved into white dwarfs.The fields are caused by binary interactions.White dwarfs that formed in the merger of a binary pair might have had a magnetic field amplified as a result of a dynamo that was generated during the merger.The fields were produced by some other internal physical mechanism during the cooling of the white dwarf itself.In a recent publication, a team of authors led by Jordi Isern (Institute of Space Sciences, CSIC, and Institute for Space Studies of Catalonia, Spain) explored this third possibility.Dynamos from CrystallizationThe inner and outer boundaries of the convective mantle of carbon/oxygen white dwarfs of two different masses (top vs. bottom panel) as a function of luminosity. As the white dwarf cools (toward the right), the mantle grows thinner due to the crystallization and settling of material. [Isern et al. 2017]As white dwarfs have no nuclear fusion at their centers, they simply radiate heat and gradually cool over time. The structure of the white dwarf undergoes an interesting change as it cools, however: though the object begins as a fluid composed primarily of an ionized mixture of carbon and oxygen (and a few minor species like nickel and iron), it gradually crystallizes as its temperature drops.The crystallized phase of the white dwarf is oxygen-rich which is denser than the liquid, so the crystallized material sinks to the center of the dwarf as it solidifies. As a result, the

  13. Attitude and Trajectory Estimation Using Earth Magnetic Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetometer has long been a reliable, inexpensive sensor used in spacecraft momentum management and attitude estimation. Recent studies show an increased accuracy potential for magnetometer-only attitude estimation systems. Since the Earth's magnetic field is a function of time and position, and since time is known quite precisely, the differences between the computer and measured magnetic field components, as measured by the magnetometers throughout the entire spacecraft orbit, are a function of both the spacecraft trajectory and attitude errors. Therefore, these errors can be used to estimate both trajectory and attitude. Traditionally, satellite attitude and trajectory have been estimated with completely separate system, using different measurement data. Recently, trajectory estimation for low earth orbit satellites was successfully demonstrated in ground software using only magnetometer data. This work proposes a single augmented extended Kalman Filter to simultaneously and autonomously estimate both spacecraft trajectory and attitude with data from a magnetometer and either dynamically determined rates or gyro-measured body rates.

  14. The influence of magnetic fields on absorption and emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Heshou; Richter, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations play essential roles in astrophysics. They are crucial for determining important physical parameters, providing information about the composition of various objects in the universe, as well as depicting motions in the universe. However, spectroscopic studies often do not consider the influence of magnetic fields. In this paper, we explore the influence of magnetic fields on the spectroscopic observations arising from Ground State Alignment (GSA). Synthetic spectra are generated to show the measurable changes of the spectra due to GSA. The influences of atomic alignment on absorption from DLAs, emission from H\\,{\\sc ii} Regions, submillimeter fine-structure lines from star forming regions are presented as examples to illustrate the effect in diffuse gas. Furthermore, we demonstrate the influence of atomic alignment on physical parameters derived from spectral line ratios, such as the alpha-to-iron ratio([X/Fe]), interstellar temperature, and ionization rate. Results in our paper show...

  15. Relativistic Scott correction in self-generated magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdös, Laszlo; Fournais, Søren; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2012-01-01

    We consider a large neutral molecule with total nuclear charge $Z$ in a model with self-generated classical magnetic field and where the kinetic energy of the electrons is treated relativistically. To ensure stability, we assume that $Z \\alpha .../3}$ and it is unchanged by including the self-generated magnetic field. We prove the first correction term to this energy, the so-called Scott correction of the form $S(\\alpha Z) Z^2$. The current paper extends the result of \\cite{SSS} on the Scott correction for relativistic molecules to include a self-generated...... constant. We are interested in the ground state energy in the simultaneous limit $Z \\rightarrow \\infty$, $\\alpha \\rightarrow 0$ such that $\\kappa=Z \\alpha$ is fixed. The leading term in the energy asymptotics is independent of $\\kappa$, it is given by the Thomas-Fermi energy of order $Z^{7...

  16. Evolution of Primordial Magnetic Fields: From Generation Till Today

    CERN Document Server

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Tevzadze, Alexander G

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation we summarize our previous results concerning the evolution of primordial magnetic fields with and without helicity during the expansion of the Universe. We address different magnetogenesis scenarios such as inflation, electroweak and QCD phase transitions magnetogenesis. A high Reynolds number in the early Universe ensures strong coupling between magnetic field and fluid motions. After generation the subsequent dynamics of the magnetic field is governed by decaying hydromagnetic turbulence. We claim that primordial magnetic fields can be considered as a seeds for observed magnetic fields in galaxies and clusters. Magnetic field strength bounds obtained in our analysis are consistent with the upper and lower limits of extragalactic magnetic fields.

  17. POLARBEAR constraints on cosmic birefringence and primordial magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, Peter A. R.; Arnold, Kam; Atlas, Matt; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Barron, Darcy; Boettger, David; Borrill, Julian; Chapman, Scott; Chinone, Yuji; Cukierman, Ari; Dobbs, Matt; Ducout, Anne; Dunner, Rolando; Elleflot, Tucker; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feeney, Stephen; Feng, Chang; Gilbert, Adam; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Groh, John; Hall, Grantland; Halverson, Nils W.; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hattori, Kaori; Hazumi, Masashi; Hill, Charles; Holzapfel, William L.; Hori, Yasuto; Howe, Logan; Inoue, Yuki; Jaehnig, Gregory C.; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jeong, Oliver; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Kaufman, Jonathan P.; Keating, Brian; Kermish, Zigmund; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kusaka, Akito; Le Jeune, Maude; Lee, Adrian T.; Leitch, Erik M.; Leon, David; Li, Yun; Linder, Eric; Lowry, Lindsay; Matsuda, Frederick; Matsumura, Tomotake; Miller, Nathan; Montgomery, Josh; Myers, Michael J.; Navaroli, Martin; Nishino, Haruki; Okamura, Takahiro; Paar, Hans; Peloton, Julien; Pogosian, Levon; Poletti, Davide; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Raum, Christopher; Rebeiz, Gabriel; Reichardt, Christian L.; Richards, Paul L.; Ross, Colin; Rotermund, Kaja M.; Schenck, David E.; Sherwin, Blake D.; Shimon, Meir; Shirley, Ian; Siritanasak, Praween; Smecher, Graeme; Stebor, Nathan; Steinbach, Bryan; Suzuki, Aritoki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Tajima, Osamu; Takakura, Satoru; Tikhomirov, Alexei; Tomaru, Takayuki; Whitehorn, Nathan; Wilson, Brandon; Yadav, Amit; Zahn, Alex; Zahn, Oliver; Polarbear Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We constrain anisotropic cosmic birefringence using four-point correlations of even-parity E -mode and odd-parity B -mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background measurements made by the POLARization of the Background Radiation (POLARBEAR) experiment in its first season of observations. We find that the anisotropic cosmic birefringence signal from any parity-violating processes is consistent with zero. The Faraday rotation from anisotropic cosmic birefringence can be compared with the equivalent quantity generated by primordial magnetic fields if they existed. The POLARBEAR nondetection translates into a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit of 93 nanogauss (nG) on the amplitude of an equivalent primordial magnetic field inclusive of systematic uncertainties. This four-point correlation constraint on Faraday rotation is about 15 times tighter than the upper limit of 1380 nG inferred from constraining the contribution of Faraday rotation to two-point correlations of B -modes measured by Planck in 2015. Metric perturbations sourced by primordial magnetic fields would also contribute to the B -mode power spectrum. Using the POLARBEAR measurements of the B -mode power spectrum (two-point correlation), we set a 95% C.L. upper limit of 3.9 nG on primordial magnetic fields assuming a flat prior on the field amplitude. This limit is comparable to what was found in the Planck 2015 two-point correlation analysis with both temperature and polarization. We perform a set of systematic error tests and find no evidence for contamination. This work marks the first time that anisotropic cosmic birefringence or primordial magnetic fields have been constrained from the ground at subdegree scales.

  18. Reduction of a Ship's Magnetic Field Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, John

    2008-01-01

    Decreasing the magnetic field signature of a naval vessel will reduce its susceptibility to detonating naval influence mines and the probability of a submarine being detected by underwater barriers and maritime patrol aircraft. Both passive and active techniques for reducing the magnetic signatures produced by a vessel's ferromagnetism, roll-induced eddy currents, corrosion-related sources, and stray fields are presented. Mathematical models of simple hull shapes are used to predict the levels of signature reduction that might be achieved through the use of alternate construction materials. Al

  19. Magnetic field processing of inorganic polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunerth, D.C.; Peterson, E.S. [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate, understand, and demonstrate the use of magnetic field processing (MFP) to modify the properties of inorganic-based polymers and to develop the basic technical knowledge required for industrial implementation. Polyphosphazene membranes for chemical separation applications are being emphasized by this project. Previous work demonstrated that magnetic fields, appropriately applied during processing, can be used to beneficially modify membrane morphology. MFP membranes have significantly increased flux capabilities while maintaining the same chemical selectivity as the unprocessed membranes.

  20. In situ characterization of undulator magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Thierry; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    A new in situ method is proposed to characterize the peak magnetic fields of undulator sources. The X-ray beam emitted by the HU52 Apple-2 undulator of the DEIMOS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron is analyzed using the Bragg diffraction of a Si(111) crystal. Measurements over the undulator gap range in linear horizontal polarization are compared with simulations in order to rebuild the Halbach function linking the undulator gaps to their peak magnetic fields. The method presented also allows information about the electron beam to be obtained.

  1. Second order semiclassics with self-generated magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Erdos, Laszlo; Solovej, Jan Philip

    2011-01-01

    We consider the semiclassical asymptotics of the sum of negative eigenvalues of the three-dimensional Pauli operator with an external potential and a self-generated magnetic field $B$. We also add the field energy $\\beta \\int B^2$ and we minimize over all magnetic fields. The parameter $\\beta$ effectively determines the strength of the field. We consider the weak field regime with $\\beta h^{2}\\ge {const}>0$, where $h$ is the semiclassical parameter. For smooth potentials we prove that the semiclassical asymptotics of the total energy is given by the non-magnetic Weyl term to leading order with an error bound that is smaller by a factor $h^{1+\\e}$, i.e. the subleading term vanishes. However, for potentials with a Coulomb singularity the subleading term does not vanish due to the non-semiclassical effect of the singularity. Combined with a multiscale technique, this refined estimate is used in the companion paper \\cite{EFS3} to prove the second order Scott correction to the ground state energy of large atoms an...

  2. Vortex states in a non-Abelian magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Predrag

    2016-08-01

    A type-II superconductor survives in an external magnetic field by admitting an Abrikosov lattice of quantized vortices. This is an imprint of the Aharonov-Bohm effect created by the Abelian U(1) gauge field. The simplest non-Abelian analog of such a gauge field, which belongs to the SU(2) symmetry group, can be found in topological insulators. Here we discover a superconducting ground state with a lattice of SU(2) vortices in a simple two-dimensional model that presents an SU(2) "magnetic" field (invariant under time reversal) to attractively interacting fermions. The model directly captures the correlated topological insulator quantum well, and approximates one channel for instabilities on the Kondo topological insulator surface. Due to its simplicity, the model might become amenable to cold atom simulations in the foreseeable future. The vitality of low-energy vortex states born out of SU(2) magnetic fields is promising for the creation of incompressible vortex liquids with non-Abelian fractional excitations.

  3. Using Locally Generated Magnetic Indices to Characterize the Ionosphere From Magnetic Data Acquisition System (Magdas Ground Based Observatories in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.C. Rabiu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an attempt to establish a baseline for geomagnetic indices inNigeria. This is particularly very crucial since these indices give indications of theseverity of magnetic fluctuations, and hence the level of disturbances in theionosphere. K (an index which measures the magnetic perturbations of theplanetary field and A (a linear measure of the Earth's field that provides a dailyaverage level for geomagnetic activity geomagnetic indices were generated locallyfrom geomagnetic data obtained using ground based MAGDAS magnetometerslocated at Abuja (9 ̊ 40’N, 7 ̊ 29’E, Ilorin (8 ̊30’N, 4 ̊33’E and Lagos (6 ̊27’N,3 ̊23’E in Nigeria using Computer-based derivation. The indices generated wereused to characterize the ionosphere over the Magdas magnetometer Nigerianetwork stations. Results obtained showed average K values of 3.5 (ABU, 4.60(LAG and 4.13 (ILR, the ionosphere over the three stations was found to berelatively active (4.08 thus setting the baseline for characterizing the ionosphereover Nigeria from ground based magnetometers.

  4. Glassy behaviour of random field Ising spins on Bethe lattice in external magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khalid Bannora; Galal Ismail; Wafaa Hassan

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamics and the phase diagram of random field Ising model (RFIM) on Bethe lattice are studied by using a replica trick. This lattice is placed in an external magnetic field (B). A Gaussian distribution of random field (hi) with zero mean and variance = H2RF is considered. The free-energy (F), the magnetization (M) and the order parameter (q) are investigated for several values of coordination number (z). The phase diagram shows several interesting behaviours and presents tricritical point at critical temperature TC = J/k and when HRF = 0 for finite z. The free-energy (F) values increase as T increases for different intensities of random field (HRF) and finite z. The internal energy (U) has a similar behaviour to that obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations. The ground state of magnetization decreases as the intensity of random field HRF increases. The ferromagnetic (FM)-paramagnetic (PM) phase boundary is clearly observed only when z →∞. While FM-PM-spin glass (SG) phase boundaries are present for finite z. The magnetic susceptibility (X) shows a sharp cusp at TC in a small random field for finite z and rounded different peaks on increasing HRF.

  5. Magnetic fields in primordial accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, Muhammad A

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are considered as a vital ingredient of contemporary star formation, and may have been important during the formation of the first stars in the presence of an efficient amplification mechanism. Initial seed fields are provided via plasma fluctuations, and are subsequently amplified by the small-scale dynamo, leading to a strong tangled magnetic field. Here we explore how the magnetic field provided by the small-scale dynamo is further amplified via the $\\alpha-\\Omega$ dynamo in a protostellar disk and assess its implications. For this purpose, we consider two characteristic cases, a typical Pop.~III star with $10$~M$_\\odot$ and an accretion rate of $10^{-3}$~M$_\\odot$~yr$^{-1}$, and a supermassive star with $10^5$~M$_\\odot$ and an accretion rate of $10^{-1}$~M$_\\odot$~yr$^{-1}$. For the $10$~M$_\\odot$ Pop.~III star, we find that coherent magnetic fields can be produced on scales of at least $100$~AU, which are sufficient to drive a jet with a luminosity of $100$~L$_\\odot$ and a mass outflow ra...

  6. High magnetic fields in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Laurence J.; Parkin, Don E.; Crow, Jack E.; Schneider-Muntau, Hans J.; Sullivan, Neil S.

    During the past thirty years research using high magnetic fields has technically evolved in the manner, but not the magnitude, of the so-called big science areas of particle physics, plasma physics, neutron scattering, synchrotron light scattering, and astronomy. Starting from the laboratories of individual researchers it moved to a few larger universities, then to centralized national facilities with research and maintenance staffs, and, finally, to joint international ventures to build unique facilities, as illustrated by the subject of this conference. To better understand the nature of this type of research and its societal justification it is helpful to compare it, in general terms, with the aforementioned big-science fields. High magnetic field research differs from particle physics, plasma physics, and astronomy in three respects: (1) it is generic research that cuts across a wide range of scientific disciplines in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and engineering; (2) it studies materials and processes that are relevant for a variety of technological applications and it gives insight into biological processes; (3) it has produced, at least, comparably significant results with incomparably smaller resources. Unlike neutron and synchrotron light scattering, which probe matter, high magnetic fields change the thermodynamic state of matter. This change of state is fundamental and independent of other state variables, such as pressure and temperature. After the magnetic field is applied, various techniques are then used to study the new state.

  7. Magnetic field exposure of commercial airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood; Nicholas; Butler; Lackland; Hoel; Mohr

    2000-10-01

    PURPOSE: Airline pilots are exposed to magnetic fields generated by the aircraft's electrical and electronic systems. The purpose of this study was to directly measure the flight deck magnetic fields to which commercial airline pilots are exposed when flying on different aircraft types over a 75-hour flight-duty month.METHODS: Magentic field measurements were taken using personal dosimeters capable of measuring magnetic fields in the 40-800 Hz frequency range. Dosimeters were carried by either the Captain or the First Officer on Boeing 737/200, Boeing 747/400, Boeing 767/300ER, and Airbus 320 aircraft. The data were analyzed by aircraft type, with statistics based on block hours. Block hours begin when the aircraft departs the gate prior to take off and end when the aircraft returns to the gate after landing.RESULTS: Approximately 1008 block hours were recorded at a sampling rate of 3 seconds. Total block time exposure to the pilots ranged from a harmonic geometric mean of 6.7 milliGauss (mG) for the Boeing 767/300ER to 12.7 mG for the Boeing 737/200.CONCLUSIONS: Measured flight deck magnetic field levels were substantially above the 0.8 to 1 mG level typically found in the home or office and suggest the need for further study to evaluate potential health effects of long-term exposure.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-01

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π / 2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  9. Synchronization of magnetic dipole rotation in an ac magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belovs, M; Cebers, A, E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.lv [University of Latvia, Zellu-8, Riga, LV-1002 (Latvia)

    2011-07-22

    The synchronization of the rotation of magnetic dipoles due to weak dipolar interactions is studied. The set of equations is analyzed by the time averaging technique. It is found that dipoles synchronously oscillate at low applied fields and rotate synchronously at large applied fields. The mean angular velocity of synchronous rotation increases with the field strength and reaches a constant value equal to the angular frequency of the field above the critical value of the field strength. The critical value of the field strength above which the synchronous rotation takes place can be calculated from dimensionless parameters using a model derived from first principles by others. The values thus obtained are in good agreement with the values we obtain from a numerical simulation. Thus, we may conclude that the liquid flow observed in these systems may be caused by synchronized rotations of the dipoles.

  10. Evidence of transverse magnetospheric field line oscillations as observed from Cluster and ground magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sinha

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic spectrum of ULF waves from magnetic field data obtained by the elliptically orbiting Cluster satellites (with an apogee of 119000km, perigee of 19000km and the orbital period of 57h have been prepared in the frequency range 0 to 120mHz when the satellite was near its perigee. The existence of field line oscillations, with increasing frequency in the inbound sector and decreasing frequency in the outbound sector, is seen in the transverse components, indicating the presence of independently oscillating local magnetic flux tubes in the form of transverse standing Alfvén waves. The results show that toroidal and poloidal modes are excited simultaneously. The analysis of simultaneous ground magnetometer data at the footprint of the satellite suggests that these modes are also excited due to coupling to magnetospheric waveguide modes. The clear signature of a resonant fundamental mode is seen in the ground data whereas Cluster detects a harmonic of this frequency. Lower frequency modes indicative of waveguide oscillations are seen in both the ground data and the compressional field at Cluster.

  11. A model for QCD ground state with magnetic disorder

    CERN Document Server

    Szczepaniak, Adam P

    2010-01-01

    We explore an ansatz for the QCD vacuum in the Coulomb gauge that describes gauge field fluctuations in presence of a weakly interacting gas of abelian monopoles. Such magnetic disorder leads to long-range correlations which are manifested through the area law for the Wilson loop. In particular we focus on the role of the residual monopole-monopole interactions in providing the mechanism for suppression of the gluon propagator at low-momenta which also leads to low momentum enhancement in the ghost propagator.

  12. Model for QCD ground state with magnetic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Matevosyan, Hrayr H.

    2010-05-01

    We explore an ansatz for the QCD vacuum in the Coulomb gauge that describes gauge field fluctuations in the presence of a weakly interacting gas of Abelian monopoles. Such magnetic disorder leads to long-range correlations which are manifested through the area law for the Wilson loop. In particular we focus on the role of the residual monopole-monopole interactions in providing the mechanism for suppression of the gluon propagator at low momenta which also leads to low-momentum enhancement in the ghost propagator.

  13. Decadal period external magnetic field variations determined via eigenanalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shore, R. M.; Whaler, K. A.; Macmillan, S.

    2016-01-01

    We perform a reanalysis of hourly mean magnetic data from ground-based observatories spanning 1997-2009 inclusive, in order to isolate (after removal of core and crustal field estimates) the spatiotemporal morphology of the external fields important to mantle induction, on (long) periods of months......-the form of the decomposition is controlled by the data. We apply a spherical harmonic analysis to the EOF outputs in a joint inversion for internal and external coefficients. The results justify our assumption that the EOF procedure responds primarily to the long-period external inducing field...... contributions. Though we cannot determine uniquely the contributory source regions of these inducing fields, we find that they have distinct temporal characteristics which enable some inference of sources. An identified annual-period pattern appears to stem from a north-south seasonal motion of the background...

  14. HEIGHT VARIATION OF THE VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELD IN SOLAR SPICULES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suárez, D. Orozco; Ramos, A. Asensio; Bueno, J. Trujillo, E-mail: dorozco@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-04-20

    Proving the magnetic configuration of solar spicules has hitherto been difficult due to the lack of spatial resolution and image stability during off-limb ground-based observations. We report spectropolarimetric observations of spicules taken in the He i 1083 nm spectral region with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter II at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope of the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain). The data provide the variation with geometrical height of the Stokes I, Q, U, and V profiles, whose encoded information allows the determination of the magnetic field vector by means of the HAZEL inversion code. The inferred results show that the average magnetic field strength at the base of solar spicules is about 80 gauss, and then it decreases rapidly with height to about 30 gauss at a height of 3000 km above the visible solar surface. Moreover, the magnetic field vector is close to vertical at the base of the chromosphere and has mid-inclinations (about 50°) above 2 Mm height.

  15. Height variation of the vector magnetic field in solar spicules

    CERN Document Server

    Suarez, D Orozco; Bueno, J Trujillo

    2015-01-01

    Proving the magnetic configuration of solar spicules has hitherto been difficult due to the lack of spatial resolution and image stability during off-limb ground-based observations. We report spectropolarimetric observations of spicules taken in the He I 1083 nm spectral region with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter II at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope of the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife; Canary Islands; Spain). The data provide the variation with geometrical height of the Stokes I, Q, U, and V profiles whose encoded information allows the determination of the magnetic field vector by means of the HAZEL inversion code. The inferred results show that the average magnetic field strength at the base of solar spicules is about 80 gauss and then it decreases rapidly with height to about 30 gauss at a height of 3000 km above the visible solar surface. Moreover, the magnetic field vector is close to vertical at the base of the chromosphere and has mid inclinations (about 50 degree) above 2 Mm height.

  16. Spontaneous magnetic fluctuations in ultrathin magnetic films at zero field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Andrew; Unguris, John

    2014-03-01

    We use magneto optical Kerr effect (MOKE) microscopy to observe room temperature, zero field magnetic fluctuations in perpendicularly magnetized cobalt films at thicknesses near the in-plane to out-of-plane spin reorientation transition. The magnetic behavior of our films resembles that of collections of superparamagnetic particles, in that globally they exhibit zero net moment, while local areas continually undergo thermal magnetic fluctuations between saturated states of the maze-like domain structure. Unlike superparamagnetic particles, the fluctuations are not constrained by particle boundaries and thus are subject to both exchange and magnetostatic interactions. Due to this we can observe temporal and spatial correlations in the fluctuations. Furthermore, we observe that the fluctuations obey dynamics distinct from field-driven Barkhausen jumps. We also determine scaling exponents of the fluctuations, finding their areas follow a power law distribution (t =1.5), and their temporal noise power spectrum is close to 1/f (a = 1.04). Based on these observations, we discuss these films as possible candidates for exhibiting magnetic self-organized criticality.

  17. Magnetic-field-compensation optical vector magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoyan, Aram; Shmavonyan, Svetlana; Khanbekyan, Alen; Khanbekyan, Karen; Marinelli, Carmela; Mariotti, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    A concept for an optical magnetometer used for the measurement of magnitude and direction of a magnetic field (B-field) in two orthogonal directions is developed based on double scanning of a B-field to compensate the measured field to zero value, which is monitored by a resonant magneto-optical process in an unshielded atomic vapor cell. Implementation of the technique using the nonlinear Hanle effect on the D2 line of rubidium demonstrates viability and efficiency of the proposed concept. The ways to enhance characteristics of the suggested technique and optimize its performance, as well as the possible extension to three-axis magnetometry, are discussed.

  18. Effects of Crossed Electric and Magnetic Fields on Shallow Donor Impurity Binding Energy in a Parabolic Quantum Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E. Kasapoglu; H. Sari; I. S(o)kmen

    2004-01-01

    @@ We have calculated variationally the ground state binding energy of a hydrogenic donor impurity in a parabolic quantum well in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields. These homogeneous crossed fields are such that the magnetic field is parallel to the heterostructure layers and the electric field is applied perpendicular to the magnetic field. The dependence of the donor impurity binding energy to the well width and the strength of the electric and magnetic fields are discussed. We hope that the obtained results will provide important improvements in device applications, especially for a suitable choice of both fields in the narrow well widths.

  19. Anchoring Magnetic Field in Turbulent Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hua-bai; Goodman, Alyssa; Hildebrand, Roger; Novak, Giles

    2009-01-01

    One of the key problems in star formation research is to determine the role of magnetic fields. Starting from the atomic inter-cloud medium (ICM) which has density nH ~ 1 per cubic cm, gas must accumulate from a volume several hundred pc across in order to form a typical molecular cloud. Star formation usually occurs in cloud cores, which have linear sizes below 1 pc and densities nH2 > 10^5 per cubic cm. With current technologies, it is hard to probe magnetic fields at scales lying between the accumulation length and the size of cloud cores, a range corresponds to many levels of turbulent eddy cascade, and many orders of magnitude of density amplification. For field directions detected from the two extremes, however, we show here that a significant correlation is found. Comparing this result with molecular cloud simulations, only the sub-Alfvenic cases result in field orientations consistent with our observations.

  20. Magnetic Field Twisting by Intergranular Downdrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroyan, Youra; Williams, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of an intergranular downdraft with an embedded vertical magnetic field is examined. It is demonstrated that the downdraft may couple to small magnetic twists leading to an instability. The descending plasma exponentially amplifies the magnetic twists when it decelerates with depth due to increasing density. Most efficient amplification is found in the vicinity of the level, where the kinetic energy density of the downdraft reaches equipartition with the magnetic energy density. Continual extraction of energy from the decelerating plasma and growth in the total azimuthal energy occurs as a consequence of the wave-flow coupling along the downdraft. The presented mechanism may drive vortices and torsional motions that have been detected between granules and in simulations of magnetoconvection.

  1. The nucleon in a periodic magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Agadjanov, Andria; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-01-01

    The energy shift of a nucleon in a static periodic magnetic field is evaluated at second order in the external field strength in perturbation theory. It is shown that the measurement of this energy shift on the lattice allows one to determine the unknown subtraction function in the forward doubly-virtual Compton scattering amplitude. The limits of applicability of the obtained formula for the energy shift are discussed.

  2. Anomaly induced effects in a magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    We consider a modification of electrodynamics by an additional light massive vector field, interacting with the photon via Chern-Simons-like coupling. This theory predicts observable effects for the experiments studying the propagation of light in an external magnetic field, very similar to those, predicted by theories of axion and axion-like particles. We discuss a possible microscopic origin of this theory from a theory with non-trivial gauge anomaly cancellation between massive and light p...

  3. Magnetic field influence on paramecium motility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, M.F.; Rosen, A.D. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The influence of a moderately intense static magnetic field on movement patterns of free swimming Paramecium was studied. When exposed to fields of 0.126 T, these ciliated protozoa exhibited significant reduction in velocity as well as a disorganization of movement pattern. It is suggested that these findings may be explained on the basis of alteration in function of ion specific channels within the cell membrane.

  4. Pulsed-field magnetometry for rock magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Kazuto

    2015-07-01

    An improved method is proposed for measuring dynamic magnetizations of bulk volcanic rock samples induced by a pulsed-field of 0.7 T and a duration of 10 ms. The transient magnetization is measured by a sensing system that consists of a pair of inductive differential coils, an analog preamplifier and integrator, and a high-speed digital storage scope. The system was calibrated using a paramagnetic salt (Gd2O3) and was tested to different kinds of volcanic rocks with their magnetic properties well-documented previously. The results were comparable with those measured by a quasi-static method using a vibrating sample magnetometer, although there were small discrepancies in hysteresis parameters suggesting the time-dependence of the magnetic properties. The proposed system provides not only the magnetization over the short interval of a pulse but also the rapid (~3 ms) exponential decay after a pulse. The decay time constant was different among the samples under study, indicating the variations of their magnetic relaxation time. Although the present system is not sensitive enough to characterize varieties of natural samples including sediments, it has the potential as a versatile and convenient tool for rock magnetism.

  5. Laboratory Measurements of Astrophysical Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C. D.; Miniati, F.; Edwards, M.; Mithen, J.; Bell, A. R.; Constantin, C.; Everson, E.; Schaeffer, D.; Niemann, C.; Ravasio, A.; Brambrink, E.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Gregory, C.; Woolsey, N.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ryutov, D.; Bingham, R.; Gargate, L.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gregori, G.

    2010-11-01

    It has been proposed that high Mach number collisionless shocks propagating in an initially unmagnetized plasma play a major role in the magnetization of large scale structures in the Universe. A detailed study of the experimental configuration necessary to scale such environments down to laboratory dimensions will be presented. We will show initial results from preliminary experiments conducted at the Phoenix laser (UCLA) and the LULI laser (Ecole Polytechnique) where collisionless shocks are generated by the expansion of exploding foils driven by energetic laser beams. The time evolution of the magnetic field is probed with induction coils placed at 10 cm from the laser focus. We will discuss various mechanisms of magnetic field generation and compare them with the experimental results.

  6. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salsbury Jr., Freddie [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-02-01

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules.

  7. Heavy meson spectroscopy under strong magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Spectra of the neutral heavy mesons, $\\eta_c(1S,2S)$, $J/psi$, $\\psi(2S)$, $\\eta_b(1S,2S,3S)$, $\\Upsilon(1S,2S,3S)$, $D$, $D^\\ast$, $B$, $B^\\ast$, $B_s$ and $B_s^\\ast$, in a homogeneous magnetic field are analyzed in a potential model of constituent quarks. To obtain anisotropic wave functions and the corresponding eigenvalues, the cylindrical Gaussian expansion method is applied, where the wave functions for transverse and longitudinal directions in the cylindrical coordinate are expanded by the Gaussian bases separately. Energy level structures in the wide range of magnetic field are obtained and the deformation of the wave functions is shown, which reflects effects of the spin mixing, the Zeeman splitting and quark Landau levels. The contribution from the magnetic catalysis in heavy-light mesons is discussed as a change of the light constituent quark mass.

  8. Magnetic Fields in the Solar Convection Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Fan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Active regions on the solar surface are generally thought to originate from a strong toroidal magnetic field generated by a deep seated solar dynamo mechanism operating at the base of the solar convection zone. Thus the magnetic fields need to traverse the entire convection zone before they reach the photosphere to form the observed solar active regions. Understanding this process of active region flux emergence is therefore a crucial component for the study of the solar cycle dynamo. This article reviews studies with regard to the formation and rise of active region scale magnetic flux tubes in the solar convection zone and their emergence into the solar atmosphere as active regions.

  9. Test particle transport in perturbed magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rover, M.; Schilham, A.M.R.; Montvai, A.; Cardozo, N. J. L.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical calculations of magnetic field line trajectories in a tokamak are used to investigate the common hypotheses that (i) field lines in a chaotic field make a Gaussian random walk and (ii) that the poloidal component of the magnetic field is uniform in regions with a chaotic magnetic field. Bo

  10. On the Physics of Primordial Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E

    2000-01-01

    There are at present more then 30 theories about the origin of cosmic magnetic fields at galactic and intergalactic scales. Most of them rely on concepts of elementary particle physics, like phase transitions in the early Universe, string theory and processes during the inflationary epoch. Here we present some more astrophysical arguments to provide some guidance through this large number and variety of models. Especially the fact that the evolution of magnetic fields depends on the spatial coherence scale of the fields leds to some interesting conclusions, which may rule out the majority of the theoretical scenarios. In principle one has to distinguish between the large-scale and small-scale magnetic fields. Large scale fields are defined as those as becoming sub-horizon at that redshift at which the mass energy density becomes equal to the photon energy density, which we name as equality. Small scale fields which are sub-horizon even before equality, i.e. with scales lower than (present) few Mpc cannot surv...

  11. 1D valence bond solids in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaizzi, Adam; Sandvik, Anders W.

    2015-09-01

    A Valence bond solid (VBS) is a nonmagnetic, long-range ordered state of a quantum spin system where local spin singlets are formed in some regular pattern. We here study the competition between VBS order and a fully polarized ferromagnetic state as function of an external magnetic field in a one-dimensional extended Heisenberg model—the J-Q2 model— using stochastic series expansion (SSE) quantum Monte Carlo simulations with directed loop updates. We discuss the ground state phase diagram.

  12. Three-Electron Quantum Dots in Zero Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    By using the exact diagonalization method, a system of three electrons confined in a parabolic quantum dot in zero magnetic field is studied. The ground-state electronic structures and orbital and spin angular momenta transitions as a function of the confined strength are investigated. We find that the confinement may cause accidental degeneracies between levels with different low-lying states and the inversion of the energy values. The present results are useful to understanding the optical properties and internal electron-electron correlations of quantum dot materials.

  13. Consistency relation for cosmic magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, R. K.; Sloth, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields. DOI...

  14. Magnetic Field Structure in Relativistic Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jermak Helen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Relativistic jets are ubiquitous when considering an accreting black hole. Two of the most extreme examples of these systems are blazars and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs, the jets of which are thought to be threaded with a magnetic field of unknown structure. The systems are made up of a black hole accreting matter and producing, as a result, relativistic jets of plasma from the poles of the black hole. Both systems are viewed as point sources from Earth, making it impossible to spatially resolve the jet. In order to explore the structure of the magnetic field within the jet we take polarisation measurements with the RINGO polarimeters on the world’s largest fully autonomous, robotic optical telescope: The Liverpool Telescope. Using the polarisation degree and angle measured by the RINGO polarimeters it is possible to distinguish between global magnetic fields created in the central engine and random tangled magnetic fields produced locally in shocks. We also monitor blazar sources regularly during quiescence with periods of flaring monitored more intensively. Reported here are the early polarisation results for GRBs 060418 and 090102, along with future prospects for the Liverpool Telescope and the RINGO polarimeters.

  15. Magnetic field effects on photosynthetic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Although the influence of magnetic fields on the rates and product yields of a host of chemical reactions are well documented and can be understood in the framework of the Radical Pair Mechanism (RPM), it has so far proved impossible to demonstrate convincingly a biological RPM effect. In this work

  16. Passive levitation in alternating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Louis; Christenson, Todd; Aronson, Eugene A.

    2010-09-14

    Stable levitation of an object in an alternating magnetic field can be achieved by eliminating coupling between the rotational and translational forces acting on the object. Stable levitation can also be achieved by varying the coupling between the rotational and translational forces acting on the object, while maintaining one or more of the rotational and translational forces steady in time.

  17. Measurement of the SC magnetic field

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    The 3.5-metre-arm carrying 100 Hall plates used for the measurmeent of the SC magnetic field. The arm rotates in a horizontal plane, its positioning and the data read-out are controlled by an on-line computer.

  18. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  19. Magnetic Field Reentrant Superconductivity in Aluminum Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz-Sullivan, Terence; Goldman, Allen

    Reentrance to the superconducting state through the application of a magnetic field to quasi-one dimensional superconductors driven resistive by current, is counter to the expected properties of superconductors. It was not until recently that a microscopic mechanism explaining the phenomenon was proposed in which superconductivity and phase slip driven dissipation coexist in a non-equilibrium state. Here we present additional results of magnetic field induced reentrance into the superconducting state in quasi-one-dimensional aluminum nanowires with an in-plane magnetic field both transverse to, and along the wire axis. The reentrant behavior is seen in the magnetic field dependence of the I-V characteristic and resistance vs. temperature, and in the wire's magnetoresistance at 450mK. This work was supported by DOE Basic Energy Sciences Grant DE-FG02-02ER46004. Samples were fabricated at the Minnesota Nanofabrication Center. Parts of this work were carried out in the University of Minnesota Characterization Facility, a member of the Materials Research Facilities Network (www.mrfn.org) funded via the NSF MRSEC program.

  20. Compensation-device for a magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to compensation device for a magnetic field generated through electric traction in a tram or train transport system that comprises an overhead line and rails, the overhead line and rails during operation being live, wherein a predetermined section of the overhead line and rails

  1. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection…

  2. Magnetic fields of the W4 superbubble

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, X Y; Reich, P; Han, J L; Kothes, R

    2015-01-01

    Superbubbles and supershells are the channels for transferring mass and energy from the Galactic disk to the halo. Magnetic fields are believed to play a vital role in their evolution. We study the radio continuum and polarized emission properties of the W4 superbubble to determine its magnetic field strength. New sensitive radio continuum observations were made at 6 cm, 11 cm, and 21 cm. The total intensity measurements were used to derive the radio spectrum of the W4 superbubble. The linear polarization data were analysed to determine the magnetic field properties within the bubble shells. The observations show a multi-shell structure of the W4 superbubble. A flat radio continuum spectrum that stems from optically thin thermal emission is derived from 1.4 GHz to 4.8 GHz. By fitting a passive Faraday screen model and considering the filling factor fne , we obtain the thermal electron density ne = 1.0/\\sqrt{fne} (\\pm5%) cm^-3 and the strength of the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field B// = -5.0/\\sq...

  3. Magnetic fields during primordial star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schleicher, Dominik R G; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S; Federrath, Christoph; Arshakian, Tigran; Beck, Rainer; Spaans, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Recent FERMI observations provide a lower limit of 10^{-15} G for the magnetic field strength in the intergalactic medium (IGM). This is consistent with theoretical expectations based on the Biermann battery effect, which predicts such IGM fields already at redshifts z~10. During gravitational collapse, such magnetic fields can be amplified by compression and by turbulence, giving rise to the small-scale dynamo. On scales below the Jeans length, the eddy turnover timescale is much shorter than the free-fall timescale, so that saturation can be reached during collapse. This scenario has been tested and confirmed with magneto-hydrodynamical simulations following the collapse of a turbulent, weakly magnetized cloud. Based on a spectral analysis, we confirm that turbulence is injected on the Jeans scale. For the power spectrum of the magnetic field, we obtain the Kazantsev slope which is characteristic for the small-scale dynamo. A calculation of the critical length scales for ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissip...

  4. Manipulation of molecular structures with magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boamfa, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    The present thesis deals with the use of magnetic fields as a handle to manipulate matter at a molecular level and as a tool to probe molecular properties or inter molecular interactions. The work consists of in situ optical studies of (polymer) liquid crystals and molecular aggregates in high magne

  5. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  6. Primordial magnetic fields from the string network

    CERN Document Server

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic strings are a type of cosmic defect formed by a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe. Individual strings would have gathered to build a network, and their dynamical motion would induce scalar--, vector-- and tensor--type perturbations. In this paper, we focus on the vector mode perturbations arising from the string network based on the one scale model and calculate the time evolution and the power spectrum of the associated magnetic fields. We show that the relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids induced by the string network can generate magnetic fields over a wide range of scales based on standard cosmology. We obtain the magnetic field spectrum before recombination as $a^2B(k,z)\\sim4\\times10^{-16}G\\mu/((1+z)/1000)^{4.25}(k/{\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^{3.5}$ Gauss on super-horizon scales, and $a^2B(k,z)\\sim2.4\\times10^{-17}G\\mu/((1+z)/1000)^{3.5}(k/{\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^{2.5}$ Gauss on sub-horizon scales in co-moving coordinates. This magnetic field grows up to the end of recombination, ...

  7. Magnetic Fields inside Extremely Fast Shock Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of my research on magnetic fields in extremely fast shock waves has been to predict the properties of shock waves that move almost with the speed of light. These shocks are created in the tenuous interstellar medium by catastrophic events such as the explosion of stars many times heavier

  8. Magnetic Fields inside Extremely Fast Shock Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of my research on magnetic fields in extremely fast shock waves has been to predict the properties of shock waves that move almost with the speed of light. These shocks are created in the tenuous interstellar medium by catastrophic events such as the explosion of stars many times heavier

  9. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-03-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection processes.

  10. Physics of semiconductors in high magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    This book summarizes most of the fundamental physical phenomena which semiconductors and their modulated structures exhibit in high magnetic fields. Readers can learn not only the basic theoretical background but also the present state of the art from the most advanced data in this rapidly growing research area.

  11. Gravimetric Measurement of Magnetic Field Gradient Spatial Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Arutunian, S G; Egiazarian, S L; Mailian, M R; Sinenko, I G; Sinjavski, A V; Vasiniuk, I E

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic interaction between a weighing sample and an external magnetic field allows to measure characteristics of magnetic field (a sample with known magnetic characteristics), as well as the magnetic properties of a sample (a known magnetic field). Measurement of materials magnetic permeability is a well known application of this method. In this paper we restrict ourselves to the measurement of magnetic field spatial distribution, which was achieved by scanning of samples from known materials along the vertical axis. Field measurements by Hall detector were done to calibrate obtained data. Such measurements are of great interest in some branches of physics, in particular, in accelerator physics, where the quality of magnetic system parts eventually determine the quality of accelerated bunches. Development of a simple and cheep device for measurement of magnetic field spatial distribution is an urgent problem. The developed system for gravimetric measurement of magnetic field gradients partially solves this ...

  12. Uniform Magnetic Field Between Face-to-Face HTS Bulk Magnets Combining Concave and Convex Magnetic Field Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Yaginuma, S.; Ogawa, J.; Fukui, S.; Sato, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Nakamura, T.

    The authors have been attempting to obtain the uniform magnetic field distribution in the space between the face-to-face HTS bulk magnets. The magnetic poles containing the HTS bulk magnets are usually characterized as non-uniform magnetic field distribution. Since the distributions show the conical or convex shapes, it is difficult to obtain the uniform magnetic field spaces even when the magnetic poles would be placed face-to-face. The authors have modified the shape of the distribution of one-side magnetic pole by attaching an iron plate on the surface, and formed the concave magnetic field distribution on the pole surface. The steep concave or convex distributions at each pole surface change to be flat with increasing distance from the pole surface. After the experimental result recording the best uniformity of 358 ppm by combining the concave and convex field distributions face-to-face, we attempted to simulate the feasible performance in this configuration. In the numerical simulation, the concave field distribution modified by attaching an imaginary spiral coil on the pole surface was coupled with the original convex field. We succeeded in obtaining the best uniformity of 30 ppm at 1.1 T in 4 x 4 mm2x-y plane at 7 mm distant from the pole surface in the gap of 30 mm. This result suggests that the concave and convex magnetic field distributions compensate the field uniformity with each other with keeping the magnetic field strength in the gap, and also suggests the novel compact NMR/MRI devices in the future.

  13. Phase Space Diagnostics of Trapped Atoms By Magnetic Ground-State Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, S. B.; Kumarakrishnan, A.; Shim, U.; Sleator, T.

    1997-04-01

    The in-situ measurement of the phase space distribution of atoms in a trap is important in the study of both ordinary and Bose-condensed matter. The current techniques for measuring the density distribution involve imaging the light emitted by atoms in the trap, time-of-flight measurement of the atoms as they fall through a sheet of light(C.D. Wallace, et al, JOSA B,11),703 (1994), resonant absorption imaging of the cloud(J.R. Ensher, et al, PRL 77), 4984 (1996), or off-resonant dispersive imaging. The first two techniques are in general use for imaging magneto-optical traps (MOTs) and the second two for Bose condensates. Velocity information is obtained indirectly by recording the expansion of the trap at different times following shut-off. By exploiting the magnetic field dependence of ground-state magnetic sublevel coherences, we have employed two techniques, MGE and MGFID(B. Dubetsky and P.R. Berman, Appl. Phys. B, 59), 147 (1994), to obtain atomic spatial information. This variant of atomic beam magnetic imaging(J.E. Thomas and L.J. Wang, Physics Reports 262), 311-366 (1995) also yields correlated position-velocity information by appropriate orientation of the applied magnetic field, as the detuning of the atom depends on both its position and velocity. Initial studies have given the velocity distribution and size of the MOT, and future experiments to measure correlations are proposed.

  14. Primordial magnetic fields from self-ordering scalar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-01-01

    A symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe could have led to the formation of cosmic defects. Because these defects dynamically excite not only scalar and tensor type cosmological perturbations but also vector type ones, they may serve as a source of primordial magnetic fields. In this study, we calculate the time evolution and the spectrum of magnetic fields that are generated by a type of cosmic defects, called global textures, using the non-linear sigma (NLSM) model. Based on the standard cosmological perturbation theory, we show, both analytically and numerically, that a vector-mode relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids is induced by textures, which inevitably leads to the generation of magnetic fields over a wide range of scales. We find that the amplitude of the magnetic fields is given by $B\\sim{10^{-9}}{((1+z)/10^3)^{-2.5}}({v}/{m_{\\rm pl}})^2({k}/{\\rm Mpc^{-1}})^{3.5}/{\\sqrt{N}}$ Gauss in the radiation dominated era for $k\\lesssim 1$ Mpc$^{-1}$, with $v$ being the vacuum ...

  15. Magnetic resonance of field-frozen and zero-field-frozen magnetic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, A.R. E-mail: anarita@fis.ufg.br; Pelegrini, F.; Neto, K. Skeff; Buske, N.; Morais, P.C. E-mail: pcmor@unb.br

    2004-05-01

    In this study magnetic resonance was used to investigate magnetic fluid samples frozen under zero and non-zero (15 kG) external fields. The magnetite-based sample containing 2x10{sup 17} particle/cm{sup 3} was investigated from 100 to 400 K. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the resonance field revealed bigger magnetic structures in the frozen state than in the liquid phase. Also, differences in the mesoscopic organization in the frozen state may explain the data obtained from samples frozen under zero and non-zero fields.

  16. Introduction to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the reader to electric and magnetic fields, particularly those fields produced by electric power systems and other sources using frequencies in the power-frequency range. Electric fields are produced by electric charges; a magnetic field also is produced if these charges are in motion. Electric fields exert forces on other charges; if in motion, these charges will experience magnetic forces. Power-frequency electric and magnetic fields induce electric currents in conduct...

  17. Measuring the Earth's Magnetic Field in a Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartacci, A.; Straulino, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for measuring the Earth's magnetic field are described. In the former, according to Gauss, the Earth's magnetic field is compared with that of a permanent magnet; in the latter, a well-known method, the comparison is made with the magnetic field generated by a current. As all the used instruments are available off the shelf, both…

  18. Collisionless reconnection: magnetic field line interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic field lines are quantum objects carrying one quantum Φ0 = 2πh/e of magnetic flux and have finite radius λm. Here we argue that they possess a very specific dynamical interaction. Parallel field lines reject each other. When confined to a certain area they form two-dimensional lattices of hexagonal structure. We estimate the filling factor of such an area. Anti-parallel field lines, on the other hand, attract each other. We identify the physical mechanism as being due to the action of the gauge potential field, which we determine quantum mechanically for two parallel and two anti-parallel field lines. The distortion of the quantum electrodynamic vacuum causes a cloud of virtual pairs. We calculate the virtual pair production rate from quantum electrodynamics and estimate the virtual pair cloud density, pair current and Lorentz force density acting on the field lines via the pair cloud. These properties of field line dynamics become important in collisionless reconnection, consistently explaining why and how reconnection can spontaneously set on in the field-free centre of a current sheet below the electron-inertial scale.

  19. Warm Magnetic Field Measurements of LARP HQ Magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S; Cheng, D; Deitderich, D; Felice, H; Ferracin, P; Hafalia, R; Joseph, J; Lizarazo, J; Martchevskii, M; Nash, C; Sabbi, G L; Vu, C; Schmalzle, J; Ambrosio, G; Bossert, R; Chlachidze, G; DiMarco, J; Kashikhin, V

    2011-03-28

    The US-LHC Accelerator Research Program is developing and testing a high-gradient quadrupole (HQ) magnet, aiming at demonstrating the feasibility of Nb{sub 3}Sn technologies for the LHC luminosity upgrade. The 1 m long HQ magnet has a 120 mm bore with a conductor-limited gradient of 219 T/m at 1.9 K and a peak field of 15 T. HQ includes accelerator features such as alignment and field quality. Here we present the magnetic measurement results obtained at LBNL with a constant current of 30 A. A 100 mm long circuit-board rotating coil developed by FNAL was used and the induced voltage and flux increment were acquired. The measured b{sub 6} ranges from 0.3 to 0.5 units in the magnet straight section at a reference radius of 21.55 mm. The data reduced from the numerical integration of the raw voltage agree with those from the fast digital integrators.

  20. Magnetic Field Gradient Waveform Monitoring for Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui

    Linear magnetic field gradients have played a central role in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) since Fourier Transform MRI was proposed three decades ago. Their primary function is to encode spatial information into MR signals. Magnetic field gradients are also used to sensitize the image contrast to coherent and/or incoherent motion, to selectively enhance an MR signal, and to minimize image artifacts. Modern MR imaging techniques increasingly rely on the implementation of complex gradient waveforms for the manipulation of spin dynamics. However, gradient system infidelities caused by eddy currents, gradient amplifier imperfections and group delays, often result in image artifacts and other errors (e.g., phase and intensity errors). This remains a critical problem for a wide range of MRI techniques on modern commercial systems, but is of particular concern for advanced MRI pulse sequences. Measuring the real magnetic field gradients, i.e., characterizing eddy currents, is critical to addressing and remedying this problem. Gradient measurement and eddy current calibration are therefore a general topic of importance to the science of MRI. The Magnetic Field Gradient Monitor (MFGM) idea was proposed and developed specifically to meet these challenges. The MFGM method is the heart of this thesis. MFGM methods permit a variety of magnetic field gradient problems to be investigated and systematically remedied. Eddy current effects associated with MR compatible metallic pressure vessels were analyzed, simulated, measured and corrected. The appropriate correction of eddy currents may enable most MR/MRI applications with metallic pressure vessels. Quantitative imaging (1D/2D) with model pressure vessels was successfully achieved by combining image reconstruction with MFGM determined gradient waveform behaviour. Other categories of MR applications with metallic vessels, including diffusion measurement and spin echo SPI T2 mapping, cannot be realized solely by MFGM guided

  1. Acceleration of superparamagnetic particles with magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, R.; Lenk, F.; Bley, T.; Boschke, E.

    2017-04-01

    High magnetic capture efficiency in the context of Biomagnetic Separation (BMS) using superparamagnetic particles (SMPs) requires efficient mixing and high relative velocities between cellular and other targets and SMPs. For this purpose, batch processes or microfluidic systems are commonly used. Here, we analyze the characteristics of an in-house developed batch process experimental setup, the Electromagnetic Sample Mixer (ESM) described earlier. This device uses three electromagnets to increase the relative velocity between SMPs and targets. We carry out simulations of the magnetic field in the ESM and in a simpler paradigmatic setup, and thus were able to calculate the force field acting on the SMPs and to simulate their relative velocities and fluid dynamics due to SMP movement. In this way we were able to show that alternate charging of the magnets induces a double circular stream of SMPs in the ESM, resulting in high relative velocities of SMPs to the targets. Consequently, due to the conservation of momentum, the fluid experiences an acceleration induced by the SMPs. We validated our simulations by microscopic observation of the SMPs in the magnetic field, using a homemade apparatus designed to accommodate a long working-distance lens. By comparing the results of modeling this paradigmatic setup with the experimental observations, we determined that the velocities of the SMPs corresponded to the results of our simulations.

  2. Spontaneous electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum induced by a strong magnetic field: QCD and electroweak theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chernodub, M N; Verschelde, H

    2012-01-01

    Both in electroweak theory and QCD, the vacuum in strong magnetic fields develops charged vector condensates once a critical value of the magnetic field is reached. Both ground states have a similar Abrikosov lattice structure and superconducting properties. It is the purpose of these proceedings to put the condensates and their superconducting properties side by side and obtain a global view on this type of condensates. Some peculiar aspects of the superfluidity and backreaction of the condensates are also discussed.

  3. Binding Energy of an Exciton in the Quantum Dot Under a Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-nng

    2001-01-01

    The author reports on a calculation of the binding energy of the ground and some excited states of excitons in parabolic quantum dots in the presence of an external magnetic field. Calculations are made by using the method of few-body physics within the effective-mass approximation. The results are obtained for several strength values of the magnetic field as a function of the quantum dot radius.

  4. Magnetization plateaus and ground-state phase diagrams of the S=1 Ising model on the Shastry Sutherland lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviren, Seyma Akkaya

    2017-02-01

    In this research, we have investigated the magnetic properties of the spin-1 Ising model on the Shastry Sutherland lattice with the crystal field interaction by using the effective-field theory with correlations. The effects of the applied field on the magnetization are examined in detail in order to obtain the magnetization plateaus, thus different types of magnetization plateaus, such as 1/4, 1/3, 1/2, 3/5, 2/3 and 7/9 of the saturation, are obtained for strong enough magnetic fields (h). Magnetization plateaus exhibit single, triple, quintuplet and sextuple forms according to the interaction parameters, hence the magnetization plateaus originate from the competition between the crystal field (D) and exchange interaction parameters (J, J‧). The ground-state phase diagrams of the system are presented in three varied planes, namely (h/J, J‧/J), (h/J, D/J) and (D/J, J‧/J) planes. These phase diagrams display the Néel (N), collinear (C) and ferromagnetic (F) phases for certain values of the model parameters. The obtained results are in good agreement with some theoretical and experimental studies.

  5. Navigation: bat orientation using Earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Richard A; Thorup, Kasper; Vonhof, Maarten J; Cochran, William W; Wikelski, Martin

    2006-12-07

    Bats famously orientate at night by echolocation, but this works over only a short range, and little is known about how they navigate over longer distances. Here we show that the homing behaviour of Eptesicus fuscus, known as the big brown bat, can be altered by artificially shifting the Earth's magnetic field, indicating that these bats rely on a magnetic compass to return to their home roost. This finding adds to the impressive array of sensory abilities possessed by this animal for navigation in the dark.

  6. Navigation: Bat orientation using Earth's magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, Richard A.; Thorup, Kasper; Vonhof, Maarten J.

    2006-01-01

    Bats famously orientate at night by echolocation 1 , but this works over only a short range, and little is known about how they navigate over longer distances 2 . Here we show that the homing behaviour of Eptesicus fuscus, known as the big brown bat, can be altered by artificially shifting...... the Earth's magnetic field, indicating that these bats rely on a magnetic compass to return to their home roost. This finding adds to the impressive array of sensory abilities possessed by this animal for navigation in the dark....

  7. The energy budget of stellar magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, V.; Jardine, M.; Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Folsom, C. P.; Boro Saikia, S.; Bouvier, J.; Fares, R.; Gregory, S. G.; Hussain, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.; Moutou, C.; do Nascimento, J. D.; Petit, P.; Rosén, L.; Waite, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations have been used to map stellar magnetic fields, many of which display strong bands of azimuthal fields that are toroidal. A number of explanations have been proposed to explain how such fields might be generated though none are definitive. In this paper, we examine the toroidal fields of a sample of 55 stars with magnetic maps, with masses in the range 0.1-1.5 M⊙. We find that the energy contained in toroidal fields has a power-law dependence on the energy contained in poloidal fields. However the power index is not constant across our sample, with stars less and more massive than 0.5 M⊙ having power indices of 0.72 ± 0.08 and 1.25 ± 0.06, respectively. There is some evidence that these two power laws correspond to stars in the saturated and unsaturated regimes of the rotation-activity relation. Additionally, our sample shows that strong toroidal fields must be generated axisymmetrically. The latitudes at which these bands appear depend on the stellar rotation period with fast rotators displaying higher latitude bands than slow rotators. The results in this paper present new constraints for future dynamo studies.

  8. The energy budget of stellar magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    See, V; Vidotto, A A; Donati, J -F; Folsom, C P; Saikia, S Boro; Bouvier, J; Fares, R; Gregory, S G; Hussain, G; Jeffers, S V; Marsden, S C; Morin, J; Moutou, C; Nascimento, J D do; Petit, P; Rosen, L; Waite, I A

    2015-01-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations have been used to map stellar magnetic fields, many of which display strong bands of azimuthal fields that are toroidal. A number of explanations have been proposed to explain how such fields might be generated though none are definitive. In this paper, we examine the toroidal fields of a sample of 55 stars with magnetic maps, with masses in the range 0.1-1.5$\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$. We find that the energy contained in toroidal fields has a power law dependence on the energy contained in poloidal fields. However the power index is not constant across our sample, with stars less and more massive than 0.5$\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$ having power indices of 0.72$\\pm$0.08 and 1.25$\\pm$0.06 respectively. There is some evidence that these two power laws correspond to stars in the saturated and unsaturated regimes of the rotation-activity relation. Additionally, our sample shows that strong toroidal fields must be generated axisymmetrically. The latitudes at which these bands appear depend on the ste...

  9. Topological insulator in a helicoidal magnetization field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagraczyński, S.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Dugaev, V. K.; Jia, C.-L.; Ernst, A.; Komnik, A.; Berakdar, J.

    2016-11-01

    A key feature of topological insulators is the robustness of the electron energy spectrum. At a surface of a topological insulator, the Dirac point is protected by the characteristic symmetry of the system. The breaking of the symmetry opens a gap in the energy spectrum. Therefore, topological insulators are very sensitive to magnetic fields, which can open a gap in the electronic spectrum. Concerning "internal" magnetic effects, for example, the situation with doped magnetic impurities, is not trivial. A single magnetic impurity is not enough to open the band gap, while in the case of a ferromagnetic chain of deposited magnetic impurities the Dirac point is lifted. However, a much more interesting case is when localized magnetic impurities form a chiral spin order. Our first principle density functional theory calculations have shown that this is the case for Fe deposited on the surface of a Bi2Se3 topological insulator. But not only magnetic impurities can form a chiral helicoidal spin texture. An alternative way is to use chiral multiferroics (prototype material is LiCu2O2 ) that induce a proximity effect. The theoretical approach we present here is valid for both cases. We observed that opposite to a ferromagnetically ordered case, a chiral spin order does not destroy the Dirac point. We also observed that the energy gap appears at the edges of the new Brillouin zone. Another interesting result concerns the spin dynamics. We derived an equation for the spin density dynamics with a spin current and relaxation terms. We have shown that the motion of the conductance electron generates a magnetic torque and exerts a certain force on the helicoidal texture.

  10. Ultrafast time domain demonstration of bulk magnetization precession at zero magnetic field ferromagnetic resonance induced by terahertz magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, M; Namai, A; Ohkoshi, S; Suemoto, T

    2010-08-16

    We report the first observation of sub-terahertz bulk-magnetization precession, using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetization precession in gallium-substituted epsilon-iron oxide nano-ferromagnets under zero magnetic field is induced by the impulsive magnetic field of the THz wave through the gyromagnetic effect. Just at the resonance frequency, the linear to circular polarized wave conversion is realized. This is understood as the free induction decay signal radiated from a rotating magnetic dipole corresponding to the natural resonance. Furthermore, this demonstration reveals that the series of gallium-substituted epsilon-iron oxide nano-ferromagnets is very prospective for magneto-optic devices, which work at room temperature without external magnetic field, in next-generation wireless communication.

  11. The manipulation of magnetic coercive field and orientation of magnetic anisotropy via electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jun-Sen; Ye, Jun; Yang, Yun-Long; Xie, Yong; Li, Wei; Chen, Zi-Yu

    2016-08-01

    We report the effects of the electric field on the magnetic coercive field (H c) and uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) orientation of polycrystalline Ni film grown on an unpoled (0 1 1) [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3](1-x)-[PbTiO3] x (PMN-PT) single crystal substrate. Under various electric fields, normalized magnetic hysteresis loops of Ni films change in width; this represents the change of coercive field (ΔH c). Loop shapes are found to depend on the angle between the magnetic field and the sample, where changes in the shape reveal a small rotation of UMA. All these changes show that the magnetic properties vary periodically with a periodic electric field, by strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling in the Ni/Ag/PMN-PT/Ag heterostructure. The poled PMN-PT produces strains under electric fields in the range of  -4.2 kV cm-1  ⩽  E  ⩽  4.2 kV cm-1, then transfers it to Ni films resulting in changes to its H c and UMA. The curves of the in-plane H c and strain, at two mutually orthogonal directions, represent butterfly patterns versus the applied electric field. In addition, the changes observed in both the H c and strain show asymmetric features in two orthogonal directions, which results in a small rotation angle of the UMA of Ni as the electric field decreases. The effective manipulation of magnitude and orientation of magnetic anisotropy via electric fields in ferromagnetic/ferroelectric (FM/FE) heterostructures is an important step towards controlling the magnetic tunnel junctions.

  12. Using Strong Magnetic Fields to Control Solutal Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in microgravity , we have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  13. On the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2008-04-01

    We review the extensive and controversial literature concerning how the cosmic magnetic fields pervading nearly all galaxies and clusters of galaxies actually got started. Some observational evidence supports a hypothesis that the field is already moderately strong at the beginning of the life of a galaxy and its disc. One argument involves the chemical abundance of the light elements Be and B, while a second one is based on the detection of strong magnetic fields in very young high red shift galaxies. Since this problem of initial amplification of cosmic magnetic fields involves important plasma problems it is obvious that one must know the plasma in which the amplification occurs. Most of this review is devoted to this basic problem and for this it is necessary to devote ourselves to reviewing studies that take place in environments in which the plasma properties are most clearly understood. For this reason the authors have chosen to restrict themselves almost completely to studies of dynamos in our Galaxy. It is true that one can get a much better idea of the grand scope of galactic fields in extragalactic systems. However, most mature galaxies share the same dilemma as ours of overcoming important plasma problems. Since the authors are both trained in plasma physics we may be biased in pursuing this approach, but we feel it is justified by the above argument. In addition we feel we can produce a better review by staying close to that which we know best. In addition we have chosen not to consider the saturation problem of the galactic magnetic field since if the original dynamo amplification fails the saturation question does not arise. It is generally accepted that seed fields, whose strength is of order 10-20 G, easily spring up in the era preceding galaxy formation. Several mechanisms have been proposed to amplify these seed magnetic fields to a coherent structure with the microgauss strengths of the currently observed galactic magnetic fields. The standard

  14. Effects of Magnetic Field on the Valence Bond Property of the Double-Quantum-Dot Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立民; 罗莹; 马本堃

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the magnetic field on the valence bond property of the double-quantum-dot molecule are numerically studied by the finite element method and perturbation approach because of the absence of cylindrical symmetry in the horizontally coupled dots. The calculation results show that the energy value of the ground state changes differently from that of the first excited state with increasing magnetic field strength, and they cross under a certain magnetic field. The increasing magnetic field makes the covalent bond state change into an ionic bond state, which agrees qualitatively with experimental results and makes ionic bond states remain. The oscillator strength of transition between covalent bond states decreases distinctly with the increasing magnetic field strength, when the molecule is irradiated by polarized light. Such a phenomenon is possibly useful for actual applications.

  15. A hybrid two-component Bose–Einstein condensate interferometer for measuring magnetic field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Fei [Key Laboratory of Fiber Optic Sensing Technology and Information Processing, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, Jiahao, E-mail: hjiahao@mail2.sysu.edu.cn [TianQin Research Center & School of Physics and Astronomy, Sun Yat-Sen University, SYSU Zhuhai Campus, Zhuhai 519082 (China); Liu, Quan [Key Laboratory of Fiber Optic Sensing Technology and Information Processing, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2017-03-03

    Highlights: • A scheme for detecting magnetic field gradients via a double-well two-component Bose–Einstein condensate interferometer. • The magnetic field gradient can be extracted by either the spin population or the external state. • Our proposal is potentially sensitive to weak magnetic field inhomogeneity due to its small sensor size. - Abstract: We have proposed a scheme to detect magnetic field gradients via an interferometer based on a double-well two-component Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC). Utilizing a sequence of quantum control operations on both external and internal degree of the BEC, one can extract the magnetic field gradients by measuring either the population in one component or the fidelity between the final external state and the initial ground state. Our scheme can be implemented by current experimental techniques of manipulating ultracold atoms.

  16. Magnetic field gradients and their uses in the study of the earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Southam, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic field gradients are discussed from the standpoint of their usefulness in modeling crustal magnetizations. The fact that gradients enhance shorter wavelength features helps reduce both the core signal and the signal from external fields in comparison with the crustal signal. If the gradient device can be oriented, then directions of lineation can be determined from single profiles, and anomalies caused by unlineated sources can be identified.

  17. Magnetic Fields in a Sample of Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Van Eck, Cameron; Shukurov, Anvar; Fletcher, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Both observations and modelling of magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar gas of spiral galaxies are well developed but the theory has been confronted with observations for only a handful of individual galaxies. There is now sufficient data to consider statistical properties of galactic magnetic fields. We have collected data from the literature on the magnetic fields and interstellar media (ISM) of 20 spiral galaxies, and tested for various physically motivated correlations between magnetic field and ISM parameters. Clear correlations emerge between the total magnetic field strength and molecular gas density as well as the star formation rate. The magnetic pitch angle exhibits correlations with the total gas density, the star formation rate and the strength of the axisymmetric component of the mean magnetic field. The total and mean magnetic field strengths exhibit noticeable degree of correlation, suggesting a universal behaviour of the degree of order in galactic magnetic fields. We also compare the p...

  18. Interplanetary magnetic field ensemble at 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthaeus, W.H.; Goldstein, M.L.; King, J.H.

    1985-04-01

    A method for calculation ensemble averages from magnetic field data is described. A data set comprising approximately 16 months of nearly continuous ISEE-3 magnetic field data is used in this study. Individual subintervals of this data, ranging from 15 hours to 15.6 days comprise the ensemble. The sole condition for including each subinterval in the averages is the degree to which it represents a weakly time-stationary process. Averages obtained by this method are appropriate for a turbulence description of the interplanetary medium. The ensemble average correlation length obtained from all subintervals is found to be 4.9 x 10 to the 11th cm. The average value of the variances of the magnetic field components are in the approximate ratio 8:9:10, where the third component is the local mean field direction. The correlation lengths and variances are found to have a systematic variation with subinterval duration, reflecting the important role of low-frequency fluctuations in the interplanetary medium.

  19. Magnetic Fields and Galactic Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Van Loo, Sven; Falle, Sam A E G

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of molecular clouds within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas ($n_{\\rm{H}}>10^5\\:{\\rm{cm}^{-3}}$) at an efficiency of 2\\% per local free fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated $B$-field case of $80\\:{\\rm{\\mu}}$G. However, our chosen kpc scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbu...

  20. Validation of the CMS Magnetic Field Map

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Mulders, M; Calvelli, V; Hervé, A; Loveless, R

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4-T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10,000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux loops and 82 three-dimensional (3-D) Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. The magnetic field description is compared with the measurements and discussed.

  1. Generation of Cosmic Magnetic Fields at Recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, C J

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the standard cosmological model predicts ab initio generation of large-scale cosmic magnetic fields at the epoch of recombination of the primeval plasma. Matter velocities dominated by coherent flows on a scale $L\\approx 50h^{-1}(1+z)^{-1}$ Mpc lead to a dipole of radiation flux in the frame of the moving matter. Thomson scattering of the radiation differentially accelerates the electrons and ions, creating large-scale coherent electric currents and magnetic fields. This process is analyzed using magnetohydrodynamic equations which include a modification of Ohm's law describing the effect of Thomson drag on the electrons. The field strength saturates near equipartition with the baryon kinetic energy density at $B\\simeq 5\\times 10^{-5}$G. Magnetic stresses significantly damp baryonic motions at the epoch of last scattering, reducing the predicted background radiation anisotropy at small angles and changing estimates of fitted cosmological parameters. The field at late times retains its large-s...

  2. A topology for the penumbral magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez

    2008-01-01

    We describe a scenario for the sunspot magnetic field topology that may account for recent observations of upflows and downflows in penumbrae. According to our conjecture, short narrow magnetic loops fill the penumbral volume. Flows along these field lines are responsible for both the Evershed effect and the convective transport. This scenario seems to be qualitatively consistent with most existing observations, including the dark cores in penumbral filaments reported by Scharmer et al. Each bright filament with dark core would be a system of two paired convective rolls with the dark core tracing the lane where the plasma sinks down. The magnetic loops would have a hot footpoint in one of the bright filament and a cold footpoint in the dark core. The scenario also fits in most of our theoretical prejudices (siphon flows along field lines, presence of overturning convection, drag of field lines by downdrafts, etc). If the conjecture turns out to be correct, the mild upward and downward velocities observed in p...

  3. Intergalactic magnetic fields in Stephan's Quintet

    CERN Document Server

    Nikiel-Wroczyński, B; Urbanik, M; Beck, R; Bomans, D J

    2013-01-01

    We present results of the VLA radio continuum total power and polarised intensity observations of Stephan's Quintet at 1.43 and 4.86 GHz along with complementary 4.85 and 8.35 GHz Effelsberg observations. Our study shows a large envelope of radio emission encompassing all the member galaxies and hence a large volume of intergalac- tic matter. Infall of the galaxy NGC 7318B produces a ridge of intergalactic, polarised emission, for which the magnetic field strength was estimated as 11.0 \\pm 2.2 {\\mu}G, with an ordered component of 2.6 \\pm 0.8 {\\mu}G. The energy density of the field within the ridge area is of the same order as estimates of the thermal component, implying a significant role of the magnetic field in the dynamics of the intergalactic matter. We also report that the tidal dwarf galaxy candidate SQ-B possesses a strong and highly anisotropic magnetic field with the total strength being equal to 6.5 \\pm 1.9 {\\mu}G and an ordered component reaching 3.5 \\pm 1.2 {\\mu}G, which is comparable to that foun...

  4. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  5. Electron accumulation layer in ultrastrong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammon, M.; Fu, Han; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2017-02-01

    When a three-dimensional electron gas is subjected to a very strong magnetic field, it can reach a quasi-onedimensional state in which all electrons occupy the lowest Landau level. This state is referred to as the extreme quantum limit ( EQL ) and has been studied in the physics of pulsars and bulk semiconductors. Here we present a theory of the EQL phase in electron accumulation layers created by an external electric field E at the surface of a semiconductor with a large Bohr radius such as InSb , PbTe , SrTiO 3 ( STO ) , and particularly in the LaA 1 O 3 / SrTiO 3 ( LAO / STO ) heterostructure. The phase diagram of the electron gas in the plane of the magnetic field strength and the electron surface concentration is found for different orientations of the magnetic field. We find that in addition to the quasi-classical metallic phase ( M ), there is a metallic EQL phase, as well as an insulating Wigner crystal state ( WC ). Within the EQL phase, the Thomas-Fermi approximation is used to find the electron density and the electrostatic potential profiles of the accumulation layer. Additionally, the quantum capacitance for each phase is calculated as a tool for experimental study of these phase diagrams.

  6. Polarization in cyclotron radiation in strong magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luidmila Semionova; Denis Leahy; Jorge Paez

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the problem of radiative transitions of electrons in the presence of a strong magnetic field.We derive fully relativistic cyclotron transition rates for an arbitrary magnetic field,for any orientation of electron spin and for any polarization of the emitted radiation.Also,we obtain the transition rates for any value of the initial electron's parallel momentum.For very strong magnetic fields,transitions to the ground state predominate.Transition rates summed over the electron's spin orientation and for unpolarized radiation are also obtained,which confirm previous results by Latal.Transition widths are calculated for different electron spin orientations and different polarizations of radiation.We obtain general expressions for transition rates that reduce to the results for the non-relativistic case and for unpolarized radiation.Additionally we get,for the non-relativistic approximation,the transition rates for any polarization of radiation.As an application,the first five emission lines are evaluated and compared to the X-ray emitting neutron star V0332+53,which has multiple observable cyclotron lines,taking into account gravitational redshift.The most probable polarization is ∈(2).

  7. Solar Magnetic Field and the Mass Egections during CYCLE23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdhady, Ahmed; Shaltout, Mosalam

    The solar cycle 23 started in 1996 and its maximum was in May 2001. More than ten high energic flares (Proton flares) occurred from solar active region’s of large and complex magnetic fields of strength 2500 to 3000 gauss. The mass ejection measured by artificial satellites for proton of energies more than 10 Mev. The increased of the solar wind in velocity and density which occurred after the releasing of the solar eruptive flares was measured by artificial satellites. The geomagnetic storms and the sudden ionospheric disturbance measured by ground stations. The used data will be world-wide solar-geophysical data as that of NOAA USA and Bejin observatory China. The results lead to important role of the local magnetic field of the solar active region in production of high-energetic solar flares and its effect on the electromagnetic component and dynamic component of the flare. The effect of the magnetic field on the three different phase of the eruptive flare were given (thermal phase impulsive phase and recovery phase). Our results in this study may be help in flare prediction and mass ejection estimation before its reach to the earth and produce geomagnetic storms.

  8. The influence of magnetic fields on absorption and emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Heshou; Yan, Huirong [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Richter, Philipp [Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP) (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Spectroscopic observations play essential roles in astrophysics. They are crucial for determining important physical parameters, providing information about the composition of various objects in the universe, as well as depicting motions in the universe. However, spectroscopic studies often do not consider the influence of magnetic fields. In this paper, we explore the influence of magnetic fields on the spectroscopic observations arising from Ground State Alignment (GSA). Synthetic spectra are generated to show the measurable changes of the spectra due to GSA. The influences of atomic alignment on absorption from DLAs, emission from H II Regions, submillimeter fine-structure lines from star forming regions are presented as examples to illustrate the effect in diffuse gas. Furthermore, we demonstrate the influence of atomic alignment on physical parameters derived from spectral line ratios, such as the alpha-to-iron ratio([X/Fe]), interstellar temperature, and ionization rate. Results in our paper show that due to GSA, magnetic fields will affect the spectra of diffuse gas with high signal-to-noise(S/N) ratio under the condition that photon-excitation is much more efficient than thermal collision.

  9. Geology, Geochemistry and Ground Magnetic Survey on Kalateh Naser Iron Ore Deposit, Khorasan Jonoubi Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Saadat

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Ground magnetometer surveys is one of the oldest geophysical exploration methods used in identifying iron reserves. The correct interpretation of ground magnetic surveys, along with geological and geochemical data will not only reduce costs but also to indicate the location, depth and dimensions of the hidden reserves of iron (Robinson and Coruh, 2005; Calagari, 1992. Kalateh Naser prospecting area is located at 33° 19َ to 33° 19ََ 42" latitude and 60° 0' to 60° 9َ 35" longitude in the western side of the central Ahangaran mountain range, eastern Iran (Fig.1. Based on primary field evidences, limited outcrops of magnetite mineralization were observed and upon conducting ground magnetic survey, evidence for large Iron ore deposits were detected (Saadat, 2014. This paper presents the geological and geochemical studies and the results of magnetic measurements in the area of interest and its applicability in exploration of other potential Iron deposits in the neighboring areas. Materials and methods To better understand the geological units of the area, samples were taken and thin sections were studied. Geochemical studies were conducted through XRF and ICP-Ms and wet chemistry analysis. The ground magnetic survey was designed to take measurements from grids of 20 meter apart lines and 10 meter apart points along the north-south trend. 2000 points were measured during a 6-day field work by expert geophysicists. Records were made by Canadian manufactured product Magnetometer Proton GSM19T (Fig. 2. Properties of Proton Magnetometer using in magnetic survey in Kalateh Naser prospecting area is shown in Table 1. Total magnetic intensity map, reduced to pole magnetic map, analytic single map, first vertical derivative map and upward continuation map have been prepared for this area. Results The most significant rock units in the area are cretaceous carbonate rocks (Fig. 3. The unit turns to shale and thin bedded limestone in the

  10. Hanle Effect Diagnostics of the Coronal Magnetic Field - A Test Using Realistic Magnetic Field Configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Raouafi, N -E; Wiegelmann, T

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of coronal phenomena, such as coronal plasma thermodynamics, faces a major handicap caused by missing coronal magnetic field measurements. Several lines in the UV wavelength range present suitable sensitivity to determine the coronal magnetic field via the Hanle effect. The latter is a largely unexplored diagnostic of coronal magnetic fields with a very high potential. Here we study the magnitude of the Hanle-effect signal to be expected outside the solar limb due to the Hanle effect in polarized radiation from the H {\\sc{i}} Ly$\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ lines, which are among the brightest lines in the off-limb coronal FUV spectrum. For this purpose we use a magnetic field structure obtained by extrapolating the magnetic field starting from photospheric magnetograms. The diagnostic potential of these lines for determining the coronal magnetic field, as well as their limitations are studied. We show that these lines, in particular H {\\sc{i}} Ly$\\beta$, are useful for such measurements.

  11. The role of hematite ilmenite solid solution in the production of magnetic anomalies in ground- and satellite-based data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Wasilewski, Peter J.; Taylor, Patrick T.

    2002-03-01

    Remanent magnetization (RM) of rocks with hematite-ilmenite solid solution (HISS) minerals, at all crustal levels, may be an important contribution to magnetic anomalies measured by ground and satellite altitude surveys. The possibility that lower thermal gradient relatively deep in the crust can result in exsolution of HISS compositions with strong remanent magnetizations (RM) was studied for two bulk compositions within the HISS system. Samples from granulite-terrane around Wilson Lake, Labrador, Canada contains titanohematite with exsolved ferrian ilmenite lamellae. Other samples from the anorthosite-terrane of Allard Lake, Quebec, Canada contain ferrian ilmenite with exsolved titanohematite lamellae. In both cases, the final exsolved titanohematite has similar Ti content and carries dominant magnetic remanence with REM (=NRM/SIRM, where NRM is the natural remanent magnetization and SIRM is the saturation isothermal remanent magnetization) that is comparable to the Ti-free end member. The RM was acquired prior to exsolution and the ilmeno-hematite-rich rock possesses thermal remanent magnetization (TRM), whereas rocks with hemo-ilmenite possess chemical remanent magnetization (CRM). In both cases, we found fairly large homogeneous grains with low demagnetizing energy that acquired intense RM. The magnetism of the ilmeno-hematite solid solution phases is not significantly perturbed by the continuous reaction: ilmeno-hematite≧titanohematite solid solution. Hence, the occurrence of HISS in rocks that cooled slowly in a low intensity magnetic field will have an intense magnetic signature characterized by a large REM.

  12. Magnetic field generation by intermittent convection

    CERN Document Server

    Chertovskih, R; Chimanski, E V

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic field generation by convective flows in transition to weak turbulence is studied numerically. By fixing the Prandtl number at P=0.3 and varying the Rayleigh number (Ra) as a control parameter in three-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection of an electrically conducting fluid, a recently reported route to hyperchaos involving quasiperiodic regimes, crises and chaotic intermittent attractors is followed, and the critical magnetic Prandtl number ($P_m^c$) for dynamo action is determined as a function of Ra. A mechanism for the onset of on-off intermittency in the magnetic energy is described, the most beneficial convective regimes for dynamo action are identified, and how intermittency affects the dependence of $P_m^c$ on Ra is discussed.

  13. Flavoured Large N Gauge Theory in an External Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Filev, V G; Rashkov, R C; Viswanathan, K S; Filev, Veselin G.; Johnson, Clifford V.

    2007-01-01

    We consider a D7-brane probe of AdS$_{5}\\times S^5$ in the presence of pure gauge $B$-field. In the dual gauge theory, the $B$-field couples to the fundamental matter introduced by the D7-brane and acts as an external magnetic field. The $B$-field supports a 6-form Ramond-Ramond potential on the D7-branes world volume that breaks the supersymmetry and enables the dual gauge theory to develop a non-zero fermionic condensate. We explore the dependence of the fermionic condensate on the bare quark mass $m_{q}$ and show that at zero bare quark mass a chiral symmetry is spontaneously broken. A study of the meson spectrum reveals a coupling between the vector and scalar modes, and in the limit of weak magnetic field we observe Zeeman splitting of the states. We also observe the characteristic $\\sqrt{m_{q}}$ dependence of the ground state corresponding to the Goldstone boson of spontaneously broken chiral symmetry.

  14. Magnetic Field Structure from Synchrotron Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, R

    2006-01-01

    Total magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, as observed through their total synchrotron emission, are strongest (up to \\simeq 30\\mu G) in the spiral arms. The degree of radio polarization is low; the field in the arms must be mostly turbulent or tangled. Polarized synchrotron emission shows that the resolved regular fields are generally strongest in the interarm regions (up to \\simeq 15\\mu G), sometimes forming 'magnetic arms' parallel to the optical arms. The field structure is spiral in almost every galaxy, even in flocculent and bright irregular types which lack spiral arms. The observed large-scale patterns of Faraday rotation in several massive spiral galaxies reveal coherent regular fields, as predicted by dynamo models. However, in most galaxies observed so far no simple patterns of Faraday rotation could be found. Either many dynamo modes are superimposed and cannot be resolved by present-day telescopes, or most of the apparently regular field is in fact anisotropic random, with frequent reversals, due ...

  15. Field trial of composite fiber-optic overhead ground wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, S.; Kawahira, H.; Nakajima, T.; Matsubara, I.; Saito, Y.; Kitayama, Y.

    A composite fiber-optic ground wire (OPGW), which provides additional communication capabilities for system protection and control of overhead power transmission systems has been developed. After laboratory tests, the OPGW was strung along a live power transmission line in a mountainous region and has been confirmed to have sufficient performance to establish a high-speed digital transmission network able to withstand actual conditions. The field line, constructed substantially by existing techniques, has proved that the new OPGW, accessories such as clamps and joint boxes, installation technique, and on-tower splicing method can be effectively utilized to produce a protection and control system with extremely stable characteristics.

  16. 单晶场三亚点阵Ising模型铁磁基态自旋微观构型及磁矩%Ferromagnetic Ground State Sping Configuration and Magnetic Moment of Three Sublattice of Ising Model in Single Crystal Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李美玲; 王明勇

    2001-01-01

    根据基态能量,讨论基态的自旋微观构型,给出基态子晶格的饱和磁矩.%In this paper,according to ground state energy,microcosmic spin configuration of ground state of three sublittice is discussed,saturated magnetic moment of each sublattice in ground state is given.

  17. Feynman's Proof and Non-Elastic Displacement Fields: Relationship Between Magnetic Field and Defects Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nozomu; Yamasaki, Kazuhito

    2016-08-01

    We consider the relationship between the magnetic field and the non-elastic displacement field including defects, from the viewpoints of non-commutativity of the positions and non-commutativity of the derivatives. The former non-commutativity is related to the magnetic field by Feynman's proof (1948), and the latter is related to the defect fields by the continuum theory of defects. We introduce the concept of differential geometry to the non-elastic displacement field and derive an extended relation that includes basic equations, such as Gauss's law for magnetism and the conservation law for dislocation density. The relation derived in this paper also extends the first Bianchi identity in linear approximation to include the effect of magnetism. These findings suggest that Feynman's approach with a non-elastic displacement field is useful for understanding the relationship between magnetism and non-elastic mechanics.

  18. Feynman's Proof and Non-Elastic Displacement Fields: Relationship Between Magnetic Field and Defects Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nozomu; Yamasaki, Kazuhito

    2016-12-01

    We consider the relationship between the magnetic field and the non-elastic displacement field including defects, from the viewpoints of non-commutativity of the positions and non-commutativity of the derivatives. The former non-commutativity is related to the magnetic field by Feynman's proof (1948), and the latter is related to the defect fields by the continuum theory of defects. We introduce the concept of differential geometry to the non-elastic displacement field and derive an extended relation that includes basic equations, such as Gauss's law for magnetism and the conservation law for dislocation density. The relation derived in this paper also extends the first Bianchi identity in linear approximation to include the effect of magnetism. These findings suggest that Feynman's approach with a non-elastic displacement field is useful for understanding the relationship between magnetism and non-elastic mechanics.

  19. Application of high magnetic fields in advanced materials processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yanwei; XIAO Liye; YAN Luguang

    2006-01-01

    Recently, steady magnetic fields available from cryogen-free superconducting magnets open up new ways to process materials. In this paper,the main results obtained by using a high magnetic field to process several advanced materials are reviewed. These processed objects primarily include superconducting, magnetic, metallic and nanometer-scaled materials. It has been found that a high magnetic field can effectively align grains when fabricating the magnetic and non-magnetic materials and make inclusions migrate in a molten metal. The mechanism is discussed from the theoretical viewpoint of magnetization energy.

  20. Improving Magnet Designs With High and Low Field Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders

    2011-01-01

    to low field regions. Also, a general way to replace magnet material with a high permeability soft magnetic material where appropriate is discussed. As an example, these schemes are applied to a two dimensional concentric Halbach cylinder design resulting in a reduction of the amount of magnet material......A general scheme for increasing the difference in magnetic flux density between a high and a low magnetic field region by removing unnecessary magnet material is presented. This is important in, e.g., magnetic refrigeration where magnet arrays have to deliver high field regions in close proximity...