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Sample records for ground deformation measurements

  1. Deformation vector measurement by means of ground based interferometric radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Alberto; Coppi, Francesco

    2017-10-01

    Ground Based Interferometric Radar (GBInRad) is a class of terrestrial remote sensing imaging system, based on microwave interferometric techniques. The principal application of GBInRad system is deformation monitoring, since respect to other techniques they can provide remote sensing, high sensitivity to small deformations, long range of measurements, imaging capability and fast scan time. The main limitation of standard GBInRad system is their capability of detecting movements only along the Line of Sight (LoS) of the sensor, although actual targets may show deformations in any direction of space; this represents an important limitation with respect to other techniques able to estimate the full 3D deformation vector. If the displacement direction is not known a priori, combining together LoS displacement measured from different spatial positions, it is possible to reconstruct the actual 3D displacement vector of monitored targets. In this paper are introduced and analysed the various aspect of the displacement vector measurement with multiple GBInRad system that work both in a monostatic and in a bistatic configuration. In the monostatic configuration every system transmits and receives the signal independently from the others; this approach requires multiple GBInRad system deployed to monitoring the same scenario and therefore its main limitations lie in the costs, power consumption and maintenance. A possible cost-effective evolution of the monostatic configuration is to exploit GBInRad system in a multiple bistatic configuration; a multiple bistatic Radar is a system in which a transmitter operates together with multiple receivers located in different positions in space. In this paper, the deformation vector measurement by means of bistatic GBInRad is proposed.

  2. Estimating Actual 2D Ground Deformations Induced by Underground Activities with Cross-Heading InSAR Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available InSAR can only monitor relative ground deformations with respect to a reference area. In order to obtain actual deformations, GCPs or stable area is required in the study area, which, however, may be unavailable in the investigating of geohazards associated with underground activities (i.e., groundwater pumping, underground mining, and oil/gas exploitation. We propose a novel approach to estimate actual 2D deformations based on the InSAR relative LOS measurements acquired from cross-heading datasets. The errors induced by the arbitrary selection of reference areas can thus be avoided. The performance of the proposed approach is validated by a series of simulations. By providing the ascending and descending measurements with errors of 2 and 1.5 mm/year STDs, respectively, the RMSEs are 2.1 and 2.6 mm/year for the estimated vertical and east deformations, respectively. A case study is carried out in Cangzhou, China, for estimating the actual 2D ground deformations associated with groundwater pumping. By integrating ALOS ascending and ENVISAT descending datasets acquired between 2007 and 2010, we found that the Cangzhou area experienced ground subsidence of up to 23.4 mm/year in the suburbs but ground uplift of up to 20.9 mm/year in the urban area, both of which are accompanied by considerable lateral deformations.

  3. Implications of ground-deformation measurements across earth fissures in subsidence areas in the southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Ground deformation was monitored at earth fissures in areas of land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction in the southwestern United States. The ground deformation is consistent with the mechanism that fissures are caused by horizontal strains generated by bending of overburden in response to localized differential compaction. Subsidence profiles indicated that localized differential subsidence occurred across the fissures and that maximum convex-upward curvature was at the fissure. The overall shape of the profile stayed similar with time, and maximum curvature remained stationary at the fissure. Horizontal displacements were largest near the fissure, and generally were small to negligible away from the fissure. Maximum tensile horizontal strains were at the fissure and coincided with maximum curvature in the subsidence profiles. Horizontal tensile strain continued to accumulate at fissures after they formed with rates of opening ranging from 30 to 120 microstrain/year at fissures in Arizona.

  4. Lifetime measurements of the first 2+ states in 104,106Zr: Evolution of ground-state deformations

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    F. Browne

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The first fast-timing measurements from nuclides produced via the in-flight fission mechanism are reported. The lifetimes of the first 2+ states in 104,106Zr nuclei have been measured via β-delayed γ-ray timing of stopped radioactive isotope beams. An improved precision for the lifetime of the 21+ state in 104Zr was obtained, τ(21+=2.90−20+25 ns, as well as a first measurement of the 21+ state in 106Zr, τ(21+=2.60−15+20 ns, with corresponding reduced transition probabilities of B(E2;21+→0g.s.+=0.39(2 e2b2 and 0.31(1 e2b2, respectively. Comparisons of the extracted ground-state deformations, β2=0.39(1 (104Zr and β2=0.36(1 (106Zr with model calculations indicate a persistence of prolate deformation. The data show that 104Zr is the most deformed of the neutron-rich Zr isotopes measured so far.

  5. Interfacial characterization of soil-embedded optical fiber for ground deformation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Cheng-Cheng; Zhu, Hong-Hu; Shi, Bin; She, Jun-Kuan

    2014-01-01

    Recently fiber-optic sensing technologies have been applied for performance monitoring of geotechnical structures such as slopes, foundations, and retaining walls. However, the validity of measured data from soil-embedded optical fibers is strongly influenced by the properties of the interface between the sensing fiber and the soil mass. This paper presents a study of the interfacial properties of an optical fiber embedded in soil with an emphasis on the effect of overburden pressure. Laboratory pullout tests were conducted to investigate the load-deformation characteristics of a 0.9 mm tight-buffered optical fiber embedded in soil. Based on a tri-linear interfacial shear stress-displacement relationship, an analytical model was derived to describe the progressive pullout behavior of an optical fiber from soil matrix. A comparison between the experimental and predicted results verified the effectiveness of the proposed pullout model. The test results are further interpreted and discussed. It is found that the interfacial bond between an optical fiber and soil is prominently enhanced under high overburden pressures. The apparent coefficients of friction of the optical fiber/soil interface decrease as the overburden pressure increases, due to the restrained soil dilation around the optical fiber. Furthermore, to facilitate the analysis of strain measurement, three working states of a soil-embedded sensing fiber were defined in terms of two characteristic displacements. (paper)

  6. Typhoon-Induced Ground Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouyen, M.; Canitano, A.; Chao, B. F.; Hsu, Y.-J.; Steer, P.; Longuevergne, L.; Boy, J.-P.

    2017-11-01

    Geodetic instruments now offer compelling sensitivity, allowing to investigate how solid Earth and surface processes interact. By combining surface air pressure data, nontidal sea level variations model, and rainfall data, we systematically analyze the volumetric deformation of the shallow crust at seven borehole strainmeters in Taiwan induced by 31 tropical cyclones (typhoons) that made landfall to the island from 2004 to 2013. The typhoon's signature consists in a ground dilatation due to air pressure drop, generally followed by a larger ground compression. We show that this compression phase can be mostly explained by the mass loading of rainwater that falls on the ground and concentrates in the valleys towards the strainmeter sensitivity zone. Further, our analysis shows that borehole strainmeters can help quantifying the amount of rainwater accumulating and flowing over a watershed during heavy rainfalls, which is a useful constraint for building hydrological models.

  7. Design and Testing of the Strain Transducer for Measuring Deformations of Pipelines Operating in the Mining-deformable Ground Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawedzki Waclaw

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Design and laboratory test results of the strain transducer intended for monitoring and assessing stress states of pipelines sited in mining areas are presented in this paper. This transducer allows measuring strains of pipelines subjected to external forces - being the mining operations effect. Pipeline strains can have a direct influence on a tightness loss and penetration of the transported fluid into the environment. The original strain gauge transducer was proposed for performing measurements of strains. It allows measuring circumferential strains and determining the value and direction of the main longitudinal strain. This strain is determined on the basis of measuring component longitudinal strains originating from axial forces and the resultant bending moment. The main purpose of investigations was the experimental verification of the possibility of applying the strain transducer for measuring strains of polyethylene pipelines. The obtained results of the transducer subjected to influences of tensile and compression forces are presented and tests of relaxation properties of polyethylene are performed.

  8. General considerations for a Sentinel-1 constellation InSAR time series processing chain for ground deformation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, P. J.; Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sentinel-1A was launched on April 3rd, 2014. It is the first satellite of a European Space Agency (ESA) constellation that promises to revolutionize measurement of deformation of the Earth's surface. The constellation is designed to acquire data globally as frequently as every 6 days on the same orbital pass, and every 3 days in alternating ascending and descending orbits over the same regions. This data acquisition plan is possible due to a much larger swath coverage than previous SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) sensors. In addition, all observations from Copernicus, the European Commission Earth Observation program, have a liberal data policy, which will enable full exploitation of the archived Sentinel-1 big data, both for scientific and commercial use.Sentinel-1, and similar future constellations, shape a new landscape in the way that InSAR data have traditionally been processed. We have started to develop a completely new re-engineered and adapted InSAR time series processing approach, which efficiently processes the data from this new type of SAR constellation, with the goal to deliver ground deformation products with the highest possible precision. In summary, the proposed system approach will require the development of an automatic, almost unsupervised, system that integrates methods to obtain time-dependent surface deformation estimates and correction products for atmospheric noise and refined orbits. The ground velocity maps will ideally meet the desired precision of 1 mm/yr / 100 km to measure strain-rates (10 nanostrain/yr) at a comparable level of precision to current existing sparse regional GPS measurement networks.In this communication, we describe the different steps we have adopted to partially solve: 1) coregistration of TOPS (Terrain Observation with Progressive Scans) SAR images to enable interferometry, 2) how to manage the ambiguity between ground motion in azimuth and in line-of-sight for TOPS InSAR, 3) how to process efficiently newly

  9. Global positioning system measurements of ground deformation caused by magma intrusion and lava discharge: the 1990 1995 eruption at Unzendake volcano, Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, K.; Ono, H.; Mori, H.

    1999-04-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) measurements made around Unzendake volcano, Kyushu, Japan, since January 1991 have detected ground deformation caused by magma intrusion and lava discharge. In the intermittent phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruption stage, the ground was inflating. After growth of the lava dome and following frequent pyroclastic flows at Unzendake volcano, the ground began deflating. These ground deformations are explained by the inflation and deflation of a Mogi's source model (a point source model) located about 6 km west of the active crater at a depth of 11 km, at an aseismic region. The observed horizontal displacement vectors pointed radially away from the estimated pressure source during inflation and pointed to the pressure source during deflation. The horizontal displacements at the reference GPS station calculated from contraction of the estimated pressure source coincide well with the actual horizontal displacements observed from other GPS baseline systems. These observations validate our estimates for the pressure source. Based on the relation between the deformation volume of the ground surface and the discharged volume of the lava, it is estimated that during the eruption there was magma supply from the deeper portion as well as magma discharge at the crater. Magma is estimated to be supplied to the reservoir at an average rate of 1.1×10 5 m 3/day; magma intrusion began in December 1989 at the latest and continued for 1.9×10 3 days.

  10. Measuring ground deformations caused by 2015 Mw7.8 Nepal earthquake using high-rate GPS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Huang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The April 25, 2015 Mw7.8 Nepal earthquake was successfully recorded by Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC and Nepal Geodetic Array (NGA. We processed the high-rate GPS data (1 Hz and 5 Hz by using relative kinematic positioning and derived dynamic ground motions caused by this large earthquake. The dynamic displacements time series clearly indicated the displacement amplitude of each station was related to the rupture directivity. The stations which located in the direction of rupture propagation had larger displacement amplitudes than others. Also dynamic ground displacement exceeding 5 cm was detected by the GPS station that was 2000 km away from the epicenter. Permanent coseismic displacements were resolved from the near-field high-rate GPS stations with wavelet decomposition-reconstruction method and P-wave arrivals were also detected with S transform method. The results of this study can be used for earthquake rupture process and Earthquake Early Warning studies.

  11. Integration of Ground-based Magnetics and Vertical Deformation Measurements for the Characterization of the San Andreas Fault at the Durmid Hill Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, K.; Polet, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Durmid Hill region is located near the termination of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Bombay Beach. This section of the fault has not experienced any major earthquakes for at least the last three centuries. During a 6 year study, Sylvester et al. (1993) collected vertical deformation measurements at Durmid Hill from monuments they installed along a 2.37 km leveling line normal to the SAF. They concluded that interseismic processes account for most of the growth at Durmid Hill and estimated more than 9 mm of uplift within the leveling line, with uniform tilt at distances greater than 500 m from the fault. Langenheim et al. (2014) created a model based on ground-based magnetic data that they collected in the same area and found a complex magnetic structure with a broad band magnetic anomaly present on the northeast side of SAF and a prominent magnetic high along the main mapped trace of the SAF. A primary objective of our study is to reoccupy the leveling line from Sylvester et al. (1993), across the SAF at Durmid Hill. Additionally, we will utilize subsurface geophysical techniques to enhance our understanding of the fault geometry along the southernmost end of the SAF and its relationship to the aseismic deformation at Durmid Hill. Elevation profiles are measured using Nikon Nivo 5C total stations and magnetic field intensity measurements are made by a GSM-19TGW v7.0 walking magnetometer, with a VLF (Very Low requency) attachment. We will present preliminary results from data sets gathered in March and May of 2017, as well as additional surveys that will be carried out in October and November. The preliminary maps produced from the results of the first magnetic surveys show two significant and distinct magnetic anomalies consistent with earlier studies. Initial monument elevation comparisons could only be made for monuments located at the north-eastern end of the leveling line, at a distance of about 1.5 km behind Bat Cave Buttes. There appear to be sections of

  12. Studies Of A Local Ground Deformation Episode Measured By Gps, During The 2001 Eruption, In The Upper Southern Flank Of Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, G.; Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Palano, M.; Galvani, A.; Pesci, A.

    positions of each kinematic station, for different days, have been compared in order to estimate its displacement. The most significantly result of the data processing refers to a deformation episode occurred on a very short period during the first days of the eruption, between July 20th and 27th, even if a more ac- curate analysis shows that most of the this deformation episode seems to be occurred mainly during the last two days of this one week period, between July 25th to 27th. Offsets are relative to benchmarks crossing the tensile fracture field opened during the 1989 Mt. Etna eruption. Here the ground deformation pattern shows a divergent motion of GPS stations from the fracture area. Data inversions for the July 20th to 27th comparison have been performed using an Okada model. Results converged to a shallow deformation source with the same orientation of the 1989 fracture, showing dextral strike slip behaviour of the fault, with a minor normal dip and tensile compo- nents.

  13. Monitoring of Deformation in Ground Before and After Tunnel Excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Mehmet; Hilmi Erkoç, Muharrem

    2017-04-01

    As population increase in metropolitan city, we need transportation and transmission tunnel. In this context, the engineers and administors attach impotance to building and planning underground-tunnel. Moreover, we must at regular intervals monitoring to deformation in underground-tunnel for quality and safety. Firstly, a deformation monitoring network is designed as perpendicular to the tunnel main axis. Secondly, the prescribed number of deformation measurements must be made. Finally, the deformation analysis is evaluated and its results is interpreted. This study investigates how deformation in monitoring network during and after tunnel excavate change.For this purpose, a deformation monitoring network of 18 object point and 4 reference point was established. Object points networks was designed steeply to the tunnel main axis as 3 cross section. Each cross section consisted of 3 point left, 2 point right and 1 point at the flowing line. Initial conditional measurement was made before tunnel excavation. Then the deformation measurement was made 5 period (1 period measured after tunnel excavate). All data sets were adjusted according to free adjustment method. The results from the investigation considering the tunnel line, a symmetrical subsidence was observed. The following day of tunnel excavation, we were observed %68 per of the total deformation. At the end of the last period measurements, %99 per of the total deformation was detected. Keywords: Tunnel, Deformation, Subsidence, Excavation

  14. Ground state shape and crossing of near spherical and deformed bands in 182Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, W.C.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hamilton, J.H.; Robinson, S.J.; Barclay, M.E.; Zhao, K.; Cole, J.D.; Zganjar, E.F.; Spejewski, E.H.

    1983-01-01

    The energy levels of 182 Hg have been identified for the first time through comparison of in-beam studies of the reactions 156 154 Gd( 32 S,4n) 184 182 Hg. Levels up to 12 + in 182 Hg were established from γ-γ coincidence and singles measurement. The data establish that the ground state shape is near spherical, and that the ground band is crossed by a well deformed band at 4 + . In contrast to IBA model predictions that the deformed band will rise in energy in 182 Hg compared to 184 Hg, the energies of the deformed levels in 182 Hg continue to drop. 7 references

  15. Meteorite Impact "Earthquake" Features (Rock Liquefaction, Surface Wave Deformations, Seismites) from Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Geoelectric Complex Resistivity/Induced Polarization (IP) Measurements, Chiemgau (Alpine Foreland, Southeast Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstson, K.; Poßekel, J.

    2017-12-01

    Densely spaced GPR and complex resistivity measurements on a 30,000 square meters site in a region of enigmatic sinkhole occurrences in unconsolidated Quaternary sediments have featured unexpected and highlighting results from both a meteorite impact research and an engineering geology point of view. The GPR measurements and a complex resistivity/IP electrical imaging revealed extended subrosion depressions related with a uniformly but in various degrees of intensity deformed loamy and gravelly ground down to at least 10 m depth. Two principle observations could be made from both the GPR high-resolution measurements and the more integrating resistivity and IP soundings with both petrophysical evidences in good complement. Subrosion can be shown to be the result of prominent sandy-gravelly intrusions and extrusions typical of rock liquefaction processes well known to occur during strong earthquakes. Funnel-shaped structures with diameters up to 25 m near the surface and reaching down to the floating ground water level at 10 m depth were measured. GPR radargrams could trace prominent gravelly-material transport bottom-up within the funnels. Seen in both GPR tomography and resistivity/IP sections more or less the whole investigated area is overprinted by wavy deformations of the unconsolidated sediments with wavelengths of the order of 5 - 10 m and amplitudes up to half a meter, likewise down to 10 m depth. Substantial earthquakes are not known in this region. Hence, the observed heavy underground disorder is considered the result of the prominent earthquake shattering that must have occurred during the Holocene (Bronze Age/Celtic era) Chiemgau meteorite impact event that produced a 60 km x 30 km sized crater strewn field directly hosting the investigated site. Depending on depth and size of floating aquifers local concentrations of rock liquefaction and seismic surface waves (probably LOVE waves) to produce the wavy deformations could develop, when the big

  16. Study of the deformation mechanism of the Gaoliying ground fissure

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    G. Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Gaoliying ground fissure in Beijing has caused building cracking and road damage, and has seriously influenced city construction. Based on investigations and trenching, the influences of the fault and the variation of groundwater levels on the formation mechanism of the Gaoliying ground fissure were investigated by using FLAC3D. The results indicated that (1 the surface location of Gaoliying fissure is controlled by the underlying normal fault activity, and over pumping further exacerbates development of the ground fissure; (2 when the groundwater level declines, obvious differential settlement occurs at both sides of the ground fissure, in which greater settlement occurs in the vicinity of the hanging wall, the greater the distance from the hanging wall, the smaller the ground subsidence, however smaller ground subsidence occurs in the vicinity of the footwall, the greater the distance from the footwall, the greater the ground subsidence; (3 the vertical velocity of the ground fissure triggered by the fault activity and groundwater decline ranges from 15.5 to 18.3 mm a−1, which is basically in line with the monitoring data. The fault activity contributes about 28–39 %, and the groundwater contributes about 61–72 % to the deformation of the ground fissure, respectively.

  17. Ground Surface Deformation around Tehran due to Groundwater Recharge: InSAR Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourmelen, N.; Peyret, M.; Fritz, J. F.; Cherry, J.

    2003-04-01

    Tehran is located on an active tectonic and seismic zone. The surface deformation monitoring provides a powerful tool for getting a better understanding of faults kinematics and mechanisms. Used in conjunction with GPS networks, InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) provides dense and precise deformation measurements which are essential for mapping complex heterogeneous deformation fields. Moreover, urban and arid areas preserve interferometric phase coherence. The archived acquisitions of ERS that span 9 months between September 1998 and June 1999 reveal wide areas of surface uplift (by as much as 9 cm). This vertical deformation (gradual in time) has probably no tectonic meaning but is rather the ground response to ground water recharge. These zones are all located dowstream of large alluvial fans like the one of Karaj. The variation of effective stress caused by intersticial water draining could explain such surface deformation. It can also be noticed that some faults act as boundary for these deformation zones and fluid motion. The understanding of this deformation is relevant for groundwater monitoring and urban developement management. It is also necessary for discriminating it from tectonic deformation that also occurs on this zone. Due to the lack of attitude control of satellite ERS-2 since February 2001, the last images acquired could not be combined with the former acquisitions. Nevertheless, we expect to be able to enrich our set of images in order to map tectonic deformation on a longer period and to monitor in a more continuous way the deformation due to groundwater evolution. This would allow to quantify the permanent and reversible part of this signal.

  18. 6. International FIG-symposium on deformation measurements. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelzer, H.; Heer, R. [eds.

    1996-12-31

    Due to the diversified fields of specialization of the authors, the papers span a very wide spectrum of theories, applications and case studies, concerning various problems of deformation studies in structural, geotechnical and mining engineering, in rock mechanics and earth crustal movements, covering such topics as: Design and analysis of deformations surveys; Integration of terrestrial, and space measurement techniques; New instrumental developements for automatic, continuous and telemetric data-acquisition with respect to geotechnical and geodetic applications; Monitoring and prediction of ground subsidence in mining areas, land slides and tectonic movements; Modeling and computation of deformations by Kalman-filtering techniques, finite element analysis and a special view to continuum mechanics; Application of expert systems and artificial intelligence; Description and analysis of dynamical deformation problems; special views in rock- and groundmechanics; Demonstration of mechanical engineering problems with respect to the supervision of industrial production and quality control. (orig.)

  19. Ground state properties of exotic nuclei in deformed medium mass region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manju; Chatterjee, R.; Singh, Jagjit; Shubhchintak

    2017-01-01

    The dipole moment, size of the nucleus and other ground state properties of deformed nuclei 37 Mg and 31 Ne are presented. Furthermore with this deformed wave function the electric dipole strength distribution for deformed nuclei 37 Mg and 31 Ne is calculated. This will allow us to investigate the two dimensional scaling phenomenon with two parameters: quadrupole deformation and separation energy

  20. Ground Deformation Detection Using China’s ZY-3 Stereo Imagery in an Opencast Mining Area

    OpenAIRE

    Wenmin Hu; Lixin Wu; Wei Zhang; Bin Liu; Jiaxing Xu

    2017-01-01

    Detection and extraction of mining-induced ground deformation can be used to understand the deformation process and space distribution and to estimate the deformation laws and trends. This study focuses on the application of ground deformation detection and extraction combined with digital surface model (DSM), derived from China’s ZiYuan-3 (ZY-3) satellite stereo imagery and the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer global digital elevation model (ASTER GDEM) data. A ...

  1. Ground-truth measurement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, R.; Seliga, T. A.; Lhermitte, R. M.; Nystuen, J. A.; Cherry, S.; Bringi, V. N.; Blackmer, R.; Heymsfield, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Ground-truth measurements of precipitation and related weather events are an essential component of any satellite system designed for monitoring rainfall from space. Such measurements are required for testing, evaluation, and operations; they provide detailed information on the actual weather events, which can then be compared with satellite observations intended to provide both quantitative and qualitative information about them. Also, very comprehensive ground-truth observations should lead to a better understanding of precipitation fields and their relationships to satellite data. This process serves two very important functions: (a) aiding in the development and interpretation of schemes of analyzing satellite data, and (b) providing a continuing method for verifying satellite measurements.

  2. Constraints and conundrums resulting from ground-deformation measurements made during the 2004-2005 dome-building eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington: Chapter 14 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lisowski, Michael; Poland, Michael P.; Sherrod, David R.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    A prolonged period of dome growth at Mount St. Helens starting in September-October 2004 provides an opportunity to study how the volcano deforms before, during, and after an eruption by using modern instruments and techniques, such as global positioning system (GPS) receivers and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), together with more traditional ones, including tiltmeters, triangulation, photogrammetry, and time-lapse photography. No precursory ground deformation was detected by campaign GPS measurements made in 2000 and 2003, nor by a continuous GPS station (JRO1) operating ~9 km to the north-northwest of the vent area since May 1997. However, JRO1 abruptly began moving downward and southward, toward a source centered about 8 km beneath the volcano, concurrently with the start of a shallow earthquake swarm on September 23, 2004. The JRO1 velocity slowed from ~0.5 millimeters per day (mm/d) in late September–early October 2004 until spring 2005. Thereafter, it was essentially constant at ~0.04 mm/d through December 2005. In similar fashion, the growth rate of the welt on the south crater floor slowed from 8.9 m3/s during October 4–11 to 6.4 m3/s during October 11-13, 2004; this trend continued after emergence of the first lava spine on October 11. The volumetric extrusion rate decreased from 5.9 m3/s during October 13-November 4, 2004, to 2.5 m3/s during December 11, 2004-January 3, 2005, and for the remainder of 2005, it was in the range 2.0-0.7 m3/s. Fifteen continuous GPS stations, installed soon after the eruption began, showed radially inward and downward ground motions through December 2005. Likewise, InSAR observations spanning the first year of the eruption indicate broad subsidence centered near the vent. Model-derived estimates of source-volume decrease from September 23, 2004, to October 31, 2006, are 16-24×106 m3, substantially less than the volume erupted during the same period (87×106 m3 through October 21, 2006). The discrepancy

  3. Observations of coupled seismicity and ground deformation at El Hierro Island (2011-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    New insights into the magma storage and evolution at oceanic island volcanoes are now being achieved using remotely sensed space geodetic techniques, namely satellite radar interferometry. Differential radar interferometry is a technique tracking, at high spatial resolution, changes in the travel-time (distance) from the satellites to the ground surface, having wide applications in Earth sciences. Volcanic activity usually is accompanied by surface ground deformation. In many instances, modelling of surface deformation has the great advantage to estimate the magma volume change, a particularly interesting parameter prior to eruptions. Jointly interpreted with petrology, degassing and seismicity, it helps to understand the crustal magmatic systems as a whole. Current (and near-future) radar satellite missions will reduce the revisit time over global sub-aerial volcanoes to a sub-weekly basis, which will increase the potential for its operational use. Time series and filtering processing techniques of such streaming data would allow to track subsurface magma migration with high precision, and frequently update over vast areas (volcanic arcs, large caldera systems, etc.). As an example for the future potential monitoring scenario, we analyze multiple satellite radar data over El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain) to measure and model surface ground deformation. El Hierro has been active for more than 3 years (2011 to 2014). Initial phases of the unrest culminated in a submarine eruption (late 2011 - early 2012). However, after the submarine eruption ended, its magmatic system still active and affected by pseudo-regular energetic seismic swarms, accompanied by surface deformation without resumed eruptions. Such example is a great opportunity to understand the crustal magmatic systems in low magma supply-rate oceanic island volcanoes. This new approach to measure surface deformation processes is yielding an ever richer level of information from volcanology to

  4. Modelling ground deformation patterns associated with volcanic processes at the Okataina Volcanic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, L.; Cas, R.; Fournier, N.; Ailleres, L.

    2017-09-01

    The Okataina Volcanic Centre (OVC) is one of two large active rhyolite centres in the modern Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) in the North Island of New Zealand. It is located in a complex section of the Taupo rift, a tectonically active section of the TVZ. The most recent volcanic unrest at the OVC includes the 1315 CE Kaharoa and 1886 Tarawera eruptions. Current monitoring activity at the OVC includes the use of continuous GPS receivers (cGPS), lake levelling and seismographs. The ground deformation patterns preceding volcanic activity the OVC are poorly constrained and restricted to predictions from basic modelling and comparison to other volcanoes worldwide. A better understanding of the deformation patterns preceding renewed volcanic activity is essential to determine if observed deformation is related to volcanic, tectonic or hydrothermal processes. Such an understanding also means that the ability of the present day cGPS network to detect these deformation patterns can also be assessed. The research presented here uses the finite element (FE) modelling technique to investigate ground deformation patterns associated with magma accumulation and diking processes at the OVC in greater detail. A number of FE models are produced and tested using Pylith software and incorporate characteristics of the 1315 CE Kaharoa and 1886 Tarawera eruptions, summarised from the existing body of research literature. The influence of a simple ring fault structure at the OVC on the modelled deformation is evaluated. The ability of the present-day continuous GPS (cGPS) GeoNet monitoring network to detect or observe the modelled deformation is also considered. The results show the modelled horizontal and vertical displacement fields have a number of key features, which include prominent lobe based regions extending northwest and southeast of the OVC. The results also show that the ring fault structure increases the magnitude of the displacements inside the caldera, in particular in the

  5. Ground Liquefaction and Deformation Analysis of Breakwater Structures Under Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ground liquefaction and deformation is one of the important causes that damage engineering structures. Chinese current code for seismic design of breakwater is based on the single-level seismic design method as well as code for port and water-way engineering. However, this code can not exactly reflect the seismic performance of breakwater structures which experience different seismic intensities. In this paper, the author used a finite difference software, namely, FLAC3D, to analyze the state and compute seismic responses of breakwater structure. The breakwater foundation’s pore pressure ratio and displacement due to different earthquake have been studied. And the result show that: Smaller earthquakes have little influence on serviceability of the foundation, and severe earthquakes can liquefy some parts of the foundation; In the latter case , obvious changes of pores and foundation displaces can be found. Particularly, when seismic peak acceleration reachs 0.2g, Liquefaction appears in the foundation and mainly concentrated in the upper right side of the structure. In addition, the survey of ultra-hole pressure and displacement values of sand layers of the breakwater, manifests when the ultra pore pressure near 1.0, displacement and overturning structure is relatively large, resulting in varying degrees of damage to the structure. This paper’s research can provide theoretical and designable reference for similar engineering structures

  6. MetaSensing's FastGBSAR: ground based radar for deformation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödelsperger, Sabine; Meta, Adriano

    2014-10-01

    The continuous monitoring of ground deformation and structural movement has become an important task in engineering. MetaSensing introduces a novel sensor system, the Fast Ground Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (FastGBSAR), based on innovative technologies that have already been successfully applied to airborne SAR applications. The FastGBSAR allows the remote sensing of deformations of a slope or infrastructure from up to a distance of 4 km. The FastGBSAR can be setup in two different configurations: in Real Aperture Radar (RAR) mode it is capable of accurately measuring displacements along a linear range profile, ideal for monitoring vibrations of structures like bridges and towers (displacement accuracy up to 0.01 mm). Modal parameters can be determined within half an hour. Alternatively, in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) configuration it produces two-dimensional displacement images with an acquisition time of less than 5 seconds, ideal for monitoring areal structures like dams, landslides and open pit mines (displacement accuracy up to 0.1 mm). The MetaSensing FastGBSAR is the first ground based SAR instrument on the market able to produce two-dimensional deformation maps with this high acquisition rate. By that, deformation time series with a high temporal and spatial resolution can be generated, giving detailed information useful to determine the deformation mechanisms involved and eventually to predict an incoming failure. The system is fully portable and can be quickly installed on bedrock or a basement. The data acquisition and processing can be fully automated leading to a low effort in instrument operation and maintenance. Due to the short acquisition time of FastGBSAR, the coherence between two acquisitions is very high and the phase unwrapping is simplified enormously. This yields a high density of resolution cells with good quality and high reliability of the acquired deformations. The deformation maps can directly be used as input into an Early

  7. Using Ground Radar Interferometry for Precise Determining of Deformation and Vertical Deflection of Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talich, Milan

    2017-12-01

    The paper describes possibilities of the relatively new technics - ground based radar interferometry for precise determining of deformation of structures. Special focus on the vertical deflection of bridge structures and on the horizontal movements of high-rise buildings and structural objects is presented. The technology of ground based radar interferometry can be used in practice to the contactless determination of deformations of structures with accuracy up to 0.01 mm in real time. It is also possible in real time to capture oscillations of the object with a frequency up to 50 Hz. Deformations can be determined simultaneously in multiple places of the object, for example a bridge structure at points distributed on the bridge deck at intervals of one or more meters. This allows to obtain both overall and detailed information about the properties of the structure during the dynamic load and monitoring the impact of movements either individual vehicles or groups. In the case of high-rise buildings, it is possible to monitor the horizontal vibration of the whole object at its different height levels. It is possible to detect and determine the compound oscillations that occur in some types of buildings. Then prevent any damage or even disasters in these objects. In addition to the necessary theory basic principles of using radar interferometry for determining of deformation of structures are given. Practical examples of determining deformation of bridge structures, water towers reservoirs, factory chimneys and wind power plants are also given. The IBIS-S interferometric radar of the Italian IDS manufacturer was used for the measurements.

  8. Evaluation of Base Station CORS UDIP and CSEM for monitoring Ground Deformation Sayung Demak Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwono, B. D.; Awaluddin, M.; Kun, F. H.; Lutfi, E. R.

    2017-12-01

    Sayung is a subdistrict in Demak Regency which is located on the north coast is very vulnerable to natural disasters such as rob flood, abrasion and deformation of land subsidence. The condition is suspected, among others, by several factors, among others, geological structure as a large area dominated by young alluvium layers are still experiencing compression, loading and retrieval of ground water. It is necessary to do research related to ground deformation. The geodetic method used for monitoring ground deformation by satellite surveys with GNSS. The research was conducted to observe GPS survey in 2015 and 2016. GNSS data would be processed with scientific processing GAMIT 10.6. Strategic of GPS data proccesing is the important to reach a better accuracy. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the result of calculation of coordinate value and spatial deformation obtained by both base station that is CORS UDIP and CORS CSEM for monitoring ground deformation.

  9. Bridge continuous deformation measurement technology based on fiber optic gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Weibing; Hu, Wenbin; Liu, Fang; Tang, Jianguang; Li, Sheng; Yang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Bridge is an important part of modern transportation systems and deformation is a key index for bridge's safety evaluation. To achieve the long span bridge curve measurement rapidly and timely and accurately locate the bridge maximum deformation, the continuous deformation measurement system (CDMS) based on inertial platform is presented and validated in this paper. Firstly, based on various bridge deformation measurement methods, the method of deformation measurement based on the fiber optic gyro (FOG) is introduced. Secondly, the basic measurement principle based on FOG is presented and the continuous curve trajectory is derived by the formula. Then the measurement accuracy is analyzed in theory and the relevant factors are presented to ensure the measurement accuracy. Finally, the deformation measurement experiments are conducted on a bridge across the Yangtze River. Experimental results show that the presented deformation measurement method is feasible, practical, and reliable; the system can accurately and quickly locate the maximum deformation and has extensive and broad application prospects.

  10. PSP SAR interferometry monitoring of ground and structure deformations in the archeological site of Pompeii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Mario; Francioni, Elena; Paglia, Luca; Minati, Federico; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Trigila, Alessandro; Iadanza, Carla; De Nigris, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The "Major Project Pompeii" (MPP) is a great collective commitment of different institututions and people to set about solving the serious problem of conservation of the largest archeological sites in the world. The ancient city of Pompeii with its 66 hectares, 44 of which are excaveted, is divided into 9 regiones (district), subdivided in 118 insulae (blocks) and almost 1500 domus (houses), and is Unesco site since 1996. The Italian Ministry for Heritage and Cultural Activities and Tourism (MiBACT) and Finmeccanica Group have sealed an agreement whereby the Finmeccanica Group will donate innovative technologies and services for monitoring and protecting the archaeological site of Pompeii. Moreover, the Italian Institute for Environment Protection and Research (ISPRA) - Geological Survey of Italy, was also involved to support the ground based analysis and interpretation of the measurements provided by the industrial team, in order to promote an interdisciplinary approach. In this work, we will focus on ground deformation measurements obtained by satellite SAR interferometry and on their interpretation. The satellite monitoring service is based on the processing of COSMO-SkyMed Himage data by the e-Geos proprietary Persistent Scatterer Pair (PSP) SAR interferometry technology. The PSP technique is a proven SAR interferometry method characterized by the fact of exploiting in the processing only the relative properties between close points (pairs) in order to overcome atmospheric artifacts (which are one of the main problems of SAR interferometry). Validations analyses showed that this technique applied to COSMO-SkyMed Himage data is able to retrieve very dense (except of course on vegetated or cultivated areas) millimetric deformation measurements with sub-metric localization. By means of the COSMO-SkyMed PSP SAR interferometry processing, a historical analysis of the ground and structure deformations occurred over the entire archaeological site of Pompeii in the

  11. Non-Gaussian ground-state deformations near a black-hole singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Stefan; Schneider, Marc

    2017-03-01

    The singularity theorem by Hawking and Penrose qualifies Schwarzschild black holes as geodesic incomplete space-times. Albeit this is a mathematically rigorous statement, it requires an operational framework that allows us to probe the spacelike singularity via a measurement process. Any such framework necessarily has to be based on quantum theory. As a consequence, the notion of classical completeness needs to be adapted to situations where the only adequate description is in terms of quantum fields in dynamical space-times. It is shown that Schwarzschild black holes turn out to be complete when probed by self-interacting quantum fields in the ground state and in excited states. The measure for populating quantum fields on hypersurfaces in the vicinity of the black-hole singularity goes to zero towards the singularity. This statement is robust under non-Gaussian deformations of and excitations relative to the ground state. The physical relevance of different completeness concepts for black holes is discussed.

  12. Ionospheric errors compensation for ground deformation estimation with new generation SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomba, Giorgio; De Zan, Francesco; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR (InSAR) measurements are disturbed by the propagation velocity changes of microwaves that are caused by the high density of free electrons in the ionosphere. Most affected are low-frequency (L- or P-band) radars, as the recently launched ALOS-2 and the future Tandem-L and NISAR, although higher frequency (C- or X-band) systems, as the recently launched Sentinel-1, are not immune. Since the ionosphere is an obstacle to increasing the precision of new generation SAR systems needed to remotely measure the Earth's dynamic processes as for example ground deformation, it is necessary to estimate and compensate ionospheric propagation delays in SAR signals. In this work we discuss about the influence of the ionosphere on interferograms and the possible correction methods with relative accuracies. Consequently, the effect of ionospheric induced errors on ground deformation measurements prior and after ionosphere compensation will be analyzed. Examples will be presented of corrupted measurements of earthquakes and fault motion along with the corrected results using different methods.

  13. Spatio-temporal evolution of aseismic ground deformation in the Mexicali Valley (Baja California, Mexico from 1993 to 2010, using differential SAR interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Sarychikhina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ground deformation in Mexicali Valley, Baja California, Mexico, the southern part of the Mexicali-Imperial valley, is influenced by active tectonics and human activity, mainly that of geothermal fluid extraction in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. Significant ground deformation, mainly subsidence (~ 18 cm yr−1, and related ground fissures cause severe damage to local infrastructure. The technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR has been demonstrated to be a very effective remote sensing tool for accurately measuring the spatial and temporal evolution of ground displacements over broad areas. In present study ERS-1/2 SAR and ENVISAT ASAR images acquired between 1993 and 2010 were used to perform a historical analysis of aseismic ground deformation in Mexicali Valley, in an attempt to evaluate its spatio-temporal evolution and improve the understanding of its dynamic. For this purpose, the conventional 2-pass DInSAR was used to generate interferograms which were used in stacking procedure to produce maps of annual aseismic ground deformation rates for different periods. Differential interferograms that included strong co-seismic deformation signals were not included in the stacking and analysis. The changes in the ground deformation pattern and rate were identified. The main changes occur between 2000 and 2005 and include increasing deformation rate in the recharge zone and decreasing deformation rate in the western part of the CPGF production zone. We suggested that these changes are mainly caused by production development in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

  14. Ground deformation detection of the greater area of Thessaloniki (Northern Greece using radar interferometry techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Raucoules

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study SAR interferometric techniques (stacking of conventional interferograms and Permanent Scatterers, using images from satellites ERS-1 and 2, have been applied to the region of Thessaloniki (northern Greece. The period covered by the images is 1992–2000. Both techniques gave good quantitative and qualitative results. The interferometric products were used to study ground surface deformation phenomena that could be related to the local tectonic context, the exploitation of underground water and sediments compaction.

    The city of Thessaloniki shows relatively stable ground conditions. Subsidence in four locations, mainly in the area surrounding the city of Thessaloniki, has been detected and assessed. Two of the sites (Sindos-Kalochori and Langadhas were already known from previous studies as subsiding areas, using ground base measurements. On the contrary the other two sites in the northern suburbs of Thessaloniki (Oreokastro and in the south-east (airport area were unknown as areas of subsidence. A further investigation based on fieldwork is needed in these two areas. Finally, an attempt to interpret the observed deformation, according to the geological regime of the area and its anthropogenic activities, has been carried out.

  15. Validation of a simple method for measuring cranial deformities (plagiocephalometry)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Adrichem, Léon N. A.; van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; Cadanová, Dominika; Helders, Paul J. M.; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.; van Neck, Han J. W.; Koning, Anton H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial measuring is essential for diagnosis or evaluation of growth and therapies. Skull deformities in children are mainly caused by craniosynostosis or by external pressure in positional skull deformations. Traditional anthropometry does not sufficiently analyze craniofacial shape. In

  16. Does the Magma intrusion at Long Valley caldera (California) drive the detected ground deformation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizzani, Pietro

    2010-05-01

    The Long Valley caldera (California) formed ~760,000 yr ago following the massive eruption of the Bishop Tuff. Postcaldera volcanism in the Long Valley volcanic field includes lava domes as young as 650 yr. In the last two decades the caldera region has experienced an unrest phenomenon characterized by uplift of the resurgent dome and earthquake activity followed by periods of relative quiescence. More specifically, the analysis performed on spatial dense InSAR deformation map and time series, detected via Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) techniques, revealed that the deformation trend has been characterized by a slow background uplift (1992-1997) followed by an a 1997-1998 unrest phenomenon and a 1998-2000 subsidence phase. The cause of unrest is still debated, and hypotheses range from hybrid sources (e.g., magma with a high percentage of volatiles) to hydrothermal fluid intrusion. In order to clarify the shape, size and spatial orientation of the stress source, an analytical optimization model of ground deformation based on differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR), global positioning system (GPS), two-color electronic distance meter (EDM) was performed. Finally, the joint analysis that considers space based geodetic measurements and microgravity data, we are able to discriminate the nature of the causative unrest's source.

  17. Ground and Structure Deformation 3d Modelling with a Tin Based Property Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    TIAN, T.; Zhang, J.; Jiang, W.

    2013-12-01

    With the development of 3D( three-dimensional) modeling and visualization, more and more 3D tectonics are used to assist the daily work in Engineering Survey, in which the prediction of deformation field in strata and structure induced by underground construction is an essential part. In this research we developed a TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network) based property model for the 3D (three dimensional) visualization of ground deformation filed. By record deformation vector for each nodes, the new model can express the deformation with geometric-deformation-style by drawing each node in its new position and deformation-attribute-distribution-style by drawing each node in the color correspond with its deformation attribute at the same time. Comparing with the volume model based property model, this new property model can provide a more precise geometrical shape for structure objects. Furthermore, by recording only the deformation data of the user-interested 3d surface- such as the ground surface or the underground digging surface, the new property model can save a lot of space, which makes it possible to build the deformation filed model of a much more large scale. To construct the models of deformation filed based on TIN model, the refinement of the network is needed to increase the nodes number, which is necessary to express the deformation filed with a certain resolution. The TIN model refinement is a process of sampling the 3D deformation field values on points on the TIN surface, for which we developed a self-adapting TIN refinement method. By set the parameter of the attribute resolution, this self-adapting method refines the input geometric-expressing TIN model by adding more vertexes and triangles where the 3D deformation filed changing faster. Comparing with the even refinement method, the self-adapting method can generate a refined TIN model with nodes counted less by two thirds. Efficiency Comparison between Self-adapting Refinement Method and Even

  18. Deformations and Rotational Ground Motions Inferred from Downhole Vertical Array Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graizer, V.

    2017-12-01

    Only few direct reliable measurements of rotational component of strong earthquake ground motions are obtained so far. In the meantime, high quality data recorded at downhole vertical arrays during a number of earthquakes provide an opportunity to calculate deformations based on the differences in ground motions recorded simultaneously at different depths. More than twenty high resolution strong motion downhole vertical arrays were installed in California with primary goal to study site response of different geologic structures to strong motion. Deformation or simple shear strain with the rate γ is the combination of pure shear strain with the rate γ/2 and rotation with the rate of α=γ/2. Deformations and rotations were inferred from downhole array records of the Mw 6.0 Parkfield 2004, the Mw 7.2 Sierra El Mayor (Mexico) 2010, the Mw 6.5 Ferndale area in N. California 2010 and the two smaller earthquakes in California. Highest amplitude of rotation of 0.60E-03 rad was observed at the Eureka array corresponding to ground velocity of 35 cm/s, and highest rotation rate of 0.55E-02 rad/s associated with the S-wave was observed at a close epicentral distance of 4.3 km from the ML 4.2 event in Southern California at the La Cienega array. Large magnitude Sierra El Mayor earthquake produced long duration rotational motions of up to 1.5E-04 rad and 2.05E-03 rad/s associated with shear and surface waves at the El Centro array at closest fault distance of 33.4km. Rotational motions of such levels, especially tilting can have significant effect on structures. High dynamic range well synchronized and properly oriented instrumentation is necessary for reliable calculation of rotations from vertical array data. Data from the dense Treasure Island array near San Francisco demonstrate consistent change of shape of rotational motion with depth and material. In the frequency range of 1-15 Hz Fourier amplitude spectrum of vertical ground velocity is similar to the scaled tilt

  19. Seasonal slope surface deformation measured with TLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, L; Smethurst, J; Powrie, W; Sellaiya, A

    2014-01-01

    In temperate European climates, soil water removal due to vegetation transpiration peaks in summer and soil rewetting from higher levels of precipitation occurs in winter. In clays of high plasticity, the seasonal cycles of drying and wetting cause the soil to experience a volumetric change, resulting in seasonal shrinking and swelling. For a clay slope exhibiting volume change, such behaviour can lead to excessive deformation and could contribute to strain-softening and progressive slope failure. This can in turn cause traffic disruption and loss of life if roads and railways are founded on or surrounded by such slopes. This paper discusses the driving forces of seasonal surface movement, in particular the role of vegetation, and presents the use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to measure the surface movement of a lightly vegetated London Clay slope near Newbury, UK. Two TLS scans were carried out in early and late summer respectively, representing relative wet and dry conditions of the slope. Continuous field measurements of soil water content in upper layers of the slope were obtained from TDR ThetaProbes already installed at the site. The water content data are used to support the results obtained from TLS by indicating the likely volumetric change in the soil due to loss of water

  20. Measurements and calculations of nuclear deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quentin, P.

    1975-01-01

    Main sources of experimental data pertaining to equilibrium deformation properties are shortly reviewed. Different approximations and methods relevant to their systematical calculations are discussed and compared. Finally, a rapid survey of some open problems is undertaken [fr

  1. Ground-State Band and Deformation of the Z = 102 Isotope N 254

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lister, C.J.; Seweryniak, D.; Ahmad, I.; Alcorta, M.; Carpenter, M.P.; Cizewski, J.A.; Davids, C.N.; Gervais, G.; Greene, J.P.; Henning, W.F.; Janssens, R.V.; Lauritsen, T.; Siem, S.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Sullivan, D.; Uusitalo, J.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Amzal, N.; Butler, P.A.; Chewter, A.J.; Greenlees, P.T.; Herzberg, R.; Jones, G.D.; Cizewski, J.A.; Ding, K.Y.; Fotiades, N.; Fox, J.D.; Korten, W.; Leino, M.; Vetter, K.; Siem, S.

    1999-01-01

    The ground-state band of the Z=102 isotope 254 No has been identified up to spin 14, indicating that the nucleus is deformed. The deduced quadrupole deformation, β=0.27 , is in agreement with theoretical predictions. These observations confirm that the shell-correction energy responsible for the stability of transfermium nuclei is partly derived from deformation. The survival of 254 No up to spin 14 means that its fission barrier persists at least up to that spin. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  2. Measurement of copper vapour laser-induced deformation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-14

    Feb 14, 2014 ... Abstract. AMichelson interferometer-based technique has been used to measure the deformation of dielectric-coated mirror, caused by an incident repetitive pulsed laser beam with high average power. Minimum measurable deformation of 17 nm is reported.

  3. SBAS Analysis of Induced Ground Surface Deformation from Wastewater Injection in East Central Oklahoma, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Loesch

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The state of Oklahoma has experienced a dramatic increase in the amount of measurable seismic activities over the last decade. The needs of a petroleum-driven world have led to increased production utilizing various technologies to reach energy reserves locked in tight formations and stimulate end-of-life wells, creating significant amounts of undesirable wastewater ultimately injected underground for disposal. Using Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR data, we performed a differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR technique referred to as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS-based analysis over east central Oklahoma to identify ground surface deformation with respect to the location of wastewater injection wells for the period of December 2006 to January 2011. Our results show broad spatial correlation between SBAS-derived deformation and the locations of injection wells. We also observed significant uplift over Cushing, Oklahoma, the largest above ground crude oil storage facility in the world, and a key hub of the Keystone Pipeline. This finding has significant implications for the oil and gas industry due to its close proximity to the zones of increased seismicity attributed to wastewater injection. Results southeast of Drumright, Oklahoma represent an excellent example of the potential of InSAR, identifying a fault bordered by an area of subduction to the west and uplift to the east. This differentiated movement along the fault may help explain the lack of any seismic activity in this area, despite the large number of wells and high volume of fluid injected.

  4. PSP SAR interferometry monitoring of ground and structure deformations applied to archaeological sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Mario; Francioni, Elena; Trillo, Francesco; Minati, Federico; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Trigila, Alessandro; Iadanza, Carla

    2017-04-01

    Archaeological sites and cultural heritage are considered as critical assets for the society, representing not only the history of region or a culture, but also contributing to create a common identity of people living in a certain region. In this view, it is becoming more and more urgent to preserve them from climate changes effect and in general from their degradation. These structures are usually just as precious as fragile: remote sensing technology can be useful to monitor these treasures. In this work, we will focus on ground deformation measurements obtained by satellite SAR interferometry and on the methodology adopted and implemented in order to use the results operatively for conservation policies in a Italian archaeological site. The analysis is based on the processing of COSMO-SkyMed Himage data by the e-GEOS proprietary Persistent Scatterer Pair (PSP) SAR interferometry technology. The PSP technique is a proven SAR interferometry technology characterized by the fact of exploiting in the processing only the relative properties between close points (pairs) in order to overcome atmospheric artefacts (which are one of the main problems of SAR interferometry). Validations analyses [Costantini et al. 2015] settled that this technique applied to COSMO-SkyMed Himage data is able to retrieve very dense (except of course on vegetated or cultivated areas) millimetric deformation measurements with sub-metric localization. Considering the limitations of all the interferometric techniques, in particular the fact that the measurement are along the line of sight (LOS) and the geometric distortions, in order to obtain the maximum information from interferometric analysis, both ascending and descending geometry have been used. The ascending analysis allows selecting measurements points over the top and, approximately, South-West part of the structures, while the descending one over the top and the South-East part of the structures. The interferometric techniques needs

  5. The design procedures on brick building against surface ground deformations due to mining and earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, J.; Yang, S. (China University of Mining and Technology (China))

    1992-05-01

    By analysing the effects of ground motion and deformation on surface buildings, and drawing on the experience of damages caused by the Tangshan and Chenhai earthquakes, the authors discuss the design of brick and concrete buildings which are protected against the damaging effects of both earthquakes and mining activities. 5 figs.

  6. Geodetic network design for InSAR : Application to ground deformation monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahapatra, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    For the past two decades, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been used to monitor ground deformation with subcentimetric precision from space. But the applicability of this technique is limited in regions with a low density of naturally-occurring phase-coherent radar targets, e.g.

  7. Measurement of copper vapour laser-induced deformation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-14

    Feb 14, 2014 ... of dielectric-coated mirror, caused by an incident repetitive pulsed laser beam with high average power. Minimum measurable deformation of 17 nm is reported. Keywords. Michelson interferometer; interferogram; high reflectivity mirror; nanoscale deformation. PACS Nos 68.47.Mn; 42.79.–e. 1. Introduction.

  8. Finite element modeling of ground deformation and gravity field at Mt. Etna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ganci

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An elastic 3-D axi-symmetric model based on Finite Element Method (FEM is proposed to compute ground deformation and gravity changes caused by overpressure sources in volcanic areas. The numerical computations are focused on the modeling of a complex description of Mt Etna in order to evaluate the effect of topography, medium heterogeneities and source geometries. Both ground deformation and gravity changes are investigated by solving a coupled numerical problem considering a simplified ground surface profile and a multi-layered crustal structure inferred from seismic tomography. The role of the source geometry is also explored taking into account spherical and ellipsoidal volumetric sources. The comparison between numerical results and those predicted by analytical solutions disclosed significant discrepancies. These differences constrain the applicability of simple spherical source and homogeneous half-space hypotheses, which are usually implicitly assumed when analytical solutions are applied.

  9. Comparison of Small Baseline Interferometric SAR Processors for Estimating Ground Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Gong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The small Baseline Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR Interferometry (SBI technique has been widely and successfully applied in various ground deformation monitoring applications. Over the last decade, a variety of SBI algorithms have been developed based on the same fundamental concepts. Recently developed SBI toolboxes provide an open environment for researchers to apply different SBI methods for various purposes. However, there has been no thorough discussion that compares the particular characteristics of different SBI methods and their corresponding performance in ground deformation reconstruction. Thus, two SBI toolboxes that implement a total of four SBI algorithms were selected for comparison. This study discusses and summarizes the main differences, pros and cons of these four SBI implementations, which could help users to choose a suitable SBI method for their specific application. The study focuses on exploring the suitability of each SBI module under various data set conditions, including small/large number of interferograms, the presence or absence of larger time gaps, urban/vegetation ground coverage, and temporally regular/irregular ground displacement with multiple spatial scales. Within this paper we discuss the corresponding theoretical background of each SBI method. We present a performance analysis of these SBI modules based on two real data sets characterized by different environmental and surface deformation conditions. The study shows that all four SBI processors are capable of generating similar ground deformation results when the data set has sufficient temporal sampling and a stable ground backscatter mechanism like urban area. Strengths and limitations of different SBI processors were analyzed based on data set configuration and environmental conditions and are summarized in this paper to guide future users of SBI techniques.

  10. Deformation Behaviors of Geosynthetic Reinforced Soil Walls on Shallow Weak Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You-Seong; Won, Myoung-Soo

    In this study, the fifteen-month behavior of two geosynthetic reinforced soil walls, which was constructed on the shallow weak ground, was measured and analyzed. The walls were backfilled with clayey soil obtained from the construction site nearby, and the safety factors obtained from general limit equilibrium analysis were less than 1.3 in both wall. To compare with the measured data from the real GRS walls and unreinforced soil mass, a series of finite element method (FEM) analyses on two field GRS walls and unreinforced soil mass were conducted. The FEM analysis results showed that failure plane of unreinforced soil mass was consistent with the Rankine active state, but failure plane did not occur in GRS walls. In addition, maximum horizontal displacements and shear strains in GRS walls were 50% smaller than those found in unreinforced soil mass. Modeling results such as the maximum horizontal displacements, horizontal pressure, and geosynthetic tensile strengths in GRS wall have a god agreement with the measured data. Based on this study, it could be concluded that geosynthetic reinforcement are effective to reduce the displacement of the wall face and/or the deformation of the backfill soil even if the mobilized tensile stress after construction is very small.

  11. Topography and structural heterogeneities in surface ground deformation: a simulation test for Somma-Vesuvius volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammaro, Umberto; Riccardi, Umberto; Romano, Vittorio; Meo, Michele; Capuano, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Through a 3D finite element code we simulate, the deformation of Somma-Vesuvius volcano caused by some overpressure sources. Under the assumption of linear elastic isotropic material behavior, the volcano deformation sources are located at various depths and their geometry (shape and lateral extension) is mainly constrained by the results of recent seismic tomography studies. These simulations have the objective to inquire about the influence of topography and structural heterogeneity on ground deformation. Structural heterogeneities have been modeled in terms of dynamical elastic parameters (Young's modulus) accounting for previous seismic tomography and gravity studies. Topography of Somma-Vesuvius is taken into account, using a digital terrain model. The main outcomes of this study is a strong deviation from axially symmetric pattern of the displacement field, which is quietly unaccounted by simplistic Mogi modeling in homogeneous medium with simplified topography. These results demonstrate that real topography and structural heterogeneities are key factors controlling the pattern of ground deformations, i.e. one of the most relevant problem in volcano monitoring. Moreover, an improved knowledge of deformation patterns can significantly help in the location of monitoring sensors as well as in the design of an efficient geodetic network.

  12. Improvement of heterogeneous deformation measurement in digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huan; Liang, Zhonghan; Cheng, Baishun

    2017-07-01

    Heterogeneous deformation measurement using traditional digital image correlation (DIC) has times error of homogeneous deformation due to localized complexity. In case of small strain window, displacement field error will substantially corrupt the derived strain. On the contrary, large strain window will induce a reasonable information reduction in particular of heterogeneous deformation. In this paper, a novel parameter was put forward to correct displacement field and select strain subset size dynamically. This parameter was determined by localized displacement field that is called the localized displacement non-uniform intensity (λ). In addition, there is a simple and effective method to eliminate the rigid body rotation impact on strain measurement. A series of speckle images containing different heterogeneous deformation are simulated finally. Results show that the accuracy on the displacement and strain field can be substantially improved especially in heterogeneous deformation fields.

  13. A preliminary study on surface ground deformation near shallow foundation induced by strike-slip faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pei-Syuan; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2016-04-01

    According to investigation of recent earthquakes, ground deformation and surface rupture are used to map the influenced range of the active fault. The zones of horizontal and vertical surface displacements and different features of surface rupture are investigated in the field, for example, the Greendale Fault 2010, MW 7.1 Canterbury earthquake. The buildings near the fault rotated and displaced vertically and horizontally due to the ground deformation. Besides, the propagation of fault trace detoured them because of the higher rigidity. Consequently, it's necessary to explore the ground deformation and mechanism of the foundation induced by strike-slip faulting for the safety issue. Based on previous study from scaled analogue model of strike-slip faulting, the ground deformation is controlled by material properties, depth of soil, and boundary condition. On the condition controlled, the model shows the features of ground deformation in the field. This study presents results from shear box experiment on small-scale soft clay models subjected to strike-slip faulting and placed shallow foundations on it in a 1-g environment. The quantifiable data including sequence of surface rupture, topography and the position of foundation are recorded with increasing faulting. From the result of the experiment, first en echelon R shears appeared. The R shears rotated to a more parallel angle to the trace and cracks pulled apart along them with increasing displacements. Then the P shears crossed the basement fault in the opposite direction appears and linked R shears. Lastly the central shear was Y shears. On the other hand, the development of wider zones of rupture, higher rising surface and larger the crack area on surface developed, with deeper depth of soil. With the depth of 1 cm and half-box displacement 1.2 cm, en echelon R shears appeared and the surface above the fault trace elevated to 1.15 mm (Dv), causing a 1.16 cm-wide zone of ground-surface rupture and deformation

  14. Measurement of shape and deformation of insect wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Duo; Wei, Zhen; Wang, Zeyu; Zhou, Changqiu

    2018-01-01

    To measure the shape and deformation of an insect wing, a scanning setup adopting laser triangulation and image matching was developed. Only one industry camera with two light sources was employed to scan the transparent insect wings. 3D shape and point to point full field deformation of the wings could be obtained even when the wingspan is less than 3 mm. The venation and corrugation could be significantly identified from the results. The deformation of the wing under pin loading could be seen clearly from the results as well. Calibration shows that the shape and deformation measurement accuracies are no lower than 0.01 mm. Laser triangulation and image matching were combined dexterously to adapt wings' complex shape, size, and transparency. It is suitable for insect flight research or flapping wing micro-air vehicle development.

  15. The mechanics of ground deformation precursory to dome-building extrusions at Mount St. Helens 1981-1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, W.W.; Archuleta, R.J.; Swanson, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Detailed monitoring at Mount St. Helens since 1980 has enabled prediction of the intermittent eruptive activity (mostly dome growth) with unprecedented success. During 1981 and 1982, accelerating deformation of the crater floor around the vent (including radial cracks, thrust faults, and ground tilt) was the earliest indicator of impending activity. The magnitude of the shear stress required to match observed dipslacements (1-7 MPa) is inversely proportional to the conduit diameter (estimated to be 25-100 m). The most probable source of this shear stress is the flow of viscous magma up to the conduit and into the lava dome. A model is proposed in which the accelerating deformation, beginning as much as 4 weeks before extrusions, is caused by the increasing velocity of ascending magma in the conduit. This model is examined by using deformation data of the dome before four extrusions in 1981 and 1982 to estimate the volumetric flow rate through the conduit. This flow rate and an estimate of the effective viscosity of the magma enable calculation of an ascent velocity and an applied shear stress that, again, depend on the conduit diameter. The results of these calculations are consistent with the finite element experiments and show that the proposed model is feasible. Precursory deformation like that measured at Mount St. Helens should be observable at similar volcanoes elsewhere because it is caused by the fundamental process of magma ascent.-from Authors

  16. Deriving 3-D Time-Series Ground Deformations Induced by Underground Fluid Flows with InSAR: Case Study of Sebei Gas Fields, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoge Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Multi-temporal Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (MT-InSAR technique has proven to be a powerful tool for the monitoring of time-series ground deformations along the line-of-sight (LOS direction. However, the one-dimensional (1-D measurements cannot provide comprehensive information for interpreting the related geo-hazards. Recently, a novel method has been proposed to map the three-dimensional (3-D deformation associated with underground fluid flows based on single-track InSAR LOS measurements and the deformation modeling associated with the Green’s function. In this study, the method is extended in temporal domain by exploiting the MT-InSAR measurements, and applied for the first time to investigate the 3-D time series deformation over Sebei gas field in Qinghai, Northwest China with 37 Sentinel-1 images acquired during October 2014–July 2017. The estimated 3-D time series deformations provide a more complete view of ongoing deformation processes as compared to the 1-D time series deformations or the 3-D deformation velocities, which is of great importance for assessing the possible geohazards. In addition, the extended method allows for the retrieval of time series of fluid volume changes due to the gas extraction in the Sebei field, which agrees well with those from the PetroChina Qinghai Oilfield Company Yearbooks (PQOCYs. This provides a new way to study the variations of subsurface fluids at unprecedented resolution.

  17. Measurement of Dam Deformations: Case Study of Obruk Dam (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulal, V. Engin; Alkan, R. Metin; Alkan, M. Nurullah; İlci, Veli; Ozulu, I. Murat; Tombus, F. Engin; Kose, Zafer; Aladogan, Kayhan; Sahin, Murat; Yavasoglu, Hakan; Oku, Guldane

    2016-04-01

    In the literature, there is information regarding the first deformation and displacement measurements in dams that were conducted in 1920s Switzerland. Todays, deformation measurements in the dams have gained very different functions with improvements in both measurement equipment and evaluation of measurements. Deformation measurements and analysis are among the main topics studied by scientists who take interest in the engineering measurement sciences. The Working group of Deformation Measurements and Analysis, which was established under the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), carries out its studies and activities with regard to this subject. At the end of the 1970s, the subject of the determination of fixed points in the deformation monitoring network was one of the main subjects extensively studied. Many theories arose from this inquiry, as different institutes came to differing conclusions. In 1978, a special commission with representatives of universities has been established within the FIG 6.1 working group; this commission worked on the issue of determining a general approach to geometric deformation analysis. The results gleaned from the commission were discussed at symposiums organized by the FIG. In accordance with these studies, scientists interested in the subject have begun to work on models that investigate cause and effect relations between the effects that cause deformation and deformation. As of the scientist who interest with the issue focused on different deformation methods, another special commission was established within the FIG engineering measurements commission in order to classify deformation models and study terminology. After studying this material for a long time, the official commission report was published in 2001. In this prepared report, studies have been carried out by considering the FIG Engineering Surveying Commission's report entitled, 'MODELS AND TERMINOLOGY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF GEODETIC MONITORING OBSERVATIONS

  18. Ground deformation at Mt. Etna: a joint interpretation of GPS and InSAR data from 1993 to 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Palano, M.; Puglisi, G.; Gresta, S.

    2006-01-01

    Combined Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements and Interferometry SAR (InSAR) have been applied on Mt. Etna to study the ground deformation affecting the volcano both over the long (1993-2000) and short-term (1997-2000). From 1993 to 1997, data indicate a re-pressurization of Mt. Etna’s plumbing system that i) triggered most of the seismicity, ii) induced the dilatation of the volcano, and iii) produced a series of summit eruptions since 1995. InSAR detected a deep intru...

  19. GPS application to the study of ground deformation in the volcano tectonic systems of the Terceira Island (Azores) - preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rita; Ferreira, Teresa; Okada, Jun; Trota, António; Gaspar, João.

    2010-05-01

    The Azores Archipelago comprises nine volcanic islands, located where the Eurasian, American and African plates meet. Due to this complex tectonic setting seismic and volcanic activities are frequent in the archipelago. Since its settlement, in the 15th century, several volcanic eruptions and destructive earthquakes have been reported causing thousands of deaths and severe damages. Last eruption in the Azores occurred at sea, from 1998 until 2001, almost 10 km W of Serreta (Terceira Island). Ground deformation due to volcanic magma intrusion is recognised as an important precursor of eruptive activity at a volcano. The GPS is ideally suited for this application by being able to measure three-dimensional coordinate changes of the monitoring points over time. A comprehensive volcano-monitoring program should include techniques to measure surface deformations in order to contribute to a complete characterization of volcanic behaviour. Conventional modern geodetic techniques provide useful tools for the acquisition of discrete or continuous ground-deformation data. In the scope of the Azores seismovolcanic monitoring programme a geodetic network was implemented in Terceira Island. Forty geodetic benchmarks which include two permanent stations distributed according to the main volcanic and tectonic structures in the island. In the last six years five survey-mode campaigns have been performed, and the absolute velocities and internal deformations of the island have been evaluated from 2003 to 2009. Bernese 5.0 Software was used for GPS data processing and estimation of station coordinates and velocities for the periods. Obtained velocity fields considering S. Miguel Island fixed shows subsidence over all of the island and oblique displacement along Terceira Rift. This supports the existence of the shear zone between S. Miguel and Terceira Islands. Regarding internal deformations in the island, the lower magnitude of horizontal velocities indicate apparently stable regime

  20. Ground deformation before the 2015 eruptions of Cotopaxi volcano detected by InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Rivera, Anieri M.; Amelung, Falk; Mothes, Patricia; Hong, Sang-Hoon; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Jarrin, Paul

    2017-07-01

    Cotopaxi volcano started a period of volcanic unrest in April 2015 that led to a series of eruptions between August and November 2015. We use COSMO-SkyMed Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar supported by continuous GPS observations spanning the period of 2014-2016 to obtain time-dependent ground deformation data over Cotopaxi volcano related to the period of unrest and onset of eruptions. We find evidence of precursory deformation, with a maximum uplift on the western flank of 3.4 cm from April to August 2015. Deformation is explained by an inclined sheet intrusion located a few km southwest of the summit with an opening volume of 6.8 × 106 m3, extending from a depth of 12.1 km and shallowing to 5.5 km below the summit, that contributed to internal edifice growth. The temporal coincidence of deformation prior to the eruptions potentially suggests that short-term eruptions at Cotopaxi are partly controlled by episodic edifice growth.

  1. Deformed ground states and double backbending at high spins in light Kr isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, J H; Cleemann, L; Döring, J; Eberth, J; Frauendorf, S; Funke, L; Heck, T; Kim, H J; Lin, J; Maguire, C F; Neumann, W; Nolte, M; Piercey, R B; Ramayya, A V; Rester, A C; Robinson, R L; Roth, J; Soundranayagam, R; Sun, X J; Wells, J C; Winter, G; Zhao, Z Z

    1981-01-01

    The energy levels in /sup 74,76/Kr have been studied with a range of in-beam, gamma -spectroscopy techniques following heavy-ion reactions and in /sup 76/Kr via the radioactive decay of /sup 76/Rb. Breaks in the level energies and moments of inertia in /sup 74,76/Kr are observed at low spins. These data can be understood in terms of the crossing of bands built on near-spherical and deformed shapes with the ground states having very large deformation. In /sup 74/Kr the yrast cascade is observed to a tentative 20/sup +/ level. Double backbending of J is observed at spins of 12/sup +/ and 16/sup +/. These changes are interpreted in terms of rotation-aligned structures. (17 refs).

  2. The implications of gas slug ascent in a stratified magma for acoustic and ground deformation source mechanisms in Strombolian eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capponi, Antonio; Lane, Stephen J.; James, Mike R.

    2017-06-01

    The interpretation of geophysical measurements at active volcanoes is vital for hazard assessment and for understanding fundamental processes such as magma degassing. For Strombolian activity, interpretations are currently underpinned by first-order fluid dynamic models which give relatively straightforward relationships between geophysical signals and gas and magma flow. However, recent petrological and high-speed video evidence has indicated the importance of rheological stratification within the conduit and, here, we show that under these conditions, the straightforward relationships break down. Using laboratory analogue experiments to represent a rheologically-stratified conduit we characterise the distinct variations in the shear stress exerted on the upper sections of the flow tube and in the gas pressures measured above the liquid surface, during different degassing flow configurations. These signals, generated by varying styles of gas ascent, expansion and burst, can reflect field infrasonic measurements and ground motion proximal to a vent. The shear stress signals exhibit timescales and trends in qualitative agreement with the near-vent inflation-deflation cycles identified at Stromboli. Therefore, shear stress along the uppermost conduit may represent a plausible source of near-vent tilt, and conduit shear contributions should be considered in the interpretation of ground deformation, which is usually attributed to pressure sources only. The same range of flow processes can produce different experimental infrasonic waveforms, even for similar masses of gas escape. The experimental data resembled infrasonic waveforms acquired from different vents at Stromboli associated with different eruptive styles. Accurate interpretation of near-vent ground deformation, infrasonic signal and eruptive style therefore requires detailed understanding of: a) spatiotemporal magma rheology in the shallow conduit, and b) shallow conduit geometry, as well as bubble

  3. Deformation at Longyao Ground Fissure and its Surroundings Revealed by ALOS PALSAR PS-InSAR, North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Zhang, Q.; Lu, Z.; Zhao, C.; Peng, J.; Ji, L.

    2017-12-01

    Longyao ground fissure is the longest and most active one among more than 1000 ground fissures on North China Plain. Considering the scientific importance and the potential damage to the environment, studies on the formation mechanism of Longyao ground fissure have been done by many geologists, based on the regional tectonic analysis and numerical simulation. In order to provide a better understanding of the formation mechanism, the deformation of the crack and its surrounding environment should be taken into consideration. In this paper, PS-InSAR technology was employed to assess the ground deformation of Longyao ground fissure and its surrounding area with L-band ALOS-1 PALSAR images from 2007 to 2011. The characteristics of the ground deformation, the relationship among the fissure activity, surrounding faults and groundwater exploitation were analyzed. Our studies show that the north side of Longyao fault is uplifting while the south side is subsiding, which provides the tectonic conditions for the activity of the ground fissure. Local groundwater exploitation plays an important role in the development of ground fissures. Modeling the influence of the existing fault on the regional deformation will also be discussed.

  4. Real-time deformation measurement using a transportable shearography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijers, A. L.; van Brug, Hedser H.; Frankena, Hans J.

    1997-03-01

    A new system for deformation visualization has been developed, being a real time phase stepped shearing speckle interferometer. This system provides the possibility to measure quantitatively deformations of diffusely reflecting objects in an industrial environment. The main characteristics of this interferometer are its speed of operation and its reduced sensitivity to external disturbances. Apart from its semiconductor laser source, this system has a shoe-box size and is mounted on a tripod for easy handling during inspection. This paper describes the shearing speckle interferometry set-up, as it is developed at our laboratory and its potential for detecting defects.

  5. Time dependent deformation in prestressed concrete girder: Measurement and prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Y. J.; Tyrer, P.

    1981-11-01

    Prestressed concrete girders which are intended for composite construction in bridges and other similar structures are often stored unloaded for some time before being placed in their final positions where top deck is being poured over. During that free storage the girders are subjected to creep and shrinkage which manifests itself through increased upward deformation usually defined as camber. The analytical estimation of this deformation is important as it controls the minimum thickness of the top deck. An attempt was made to correlate on site measurements with continuous computer modeling of the time-dependent behavior using data from recently adopted international standard for concrete structures.

  6. Understanding cyclic seismicity and ground deformation patterns at volcanoes: Intriguing lessons from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberg, Jürgen W.; Collinson, Amy S. D.; Mothes, Patricia A.; Ruiz, Mario C.; Aguaiza, Santiago

    2018-01-01

    Cyclic seismicity and ground deformation patterns are observed on many volcanoes worldwide where seismic swarms and the tilt of the volcanic flanks provide sensitive tools to assess the state of volcanic activity. Ground deformation at active volcanoes is often interpreted as pressure changes in a magmatic reservoir, and tilt is simply translated accordingly into inflation and deflation of such a reservoir. Tilt data recorded by an instrument in the summit area of Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador, however, show an intriguing and unexpected behaviour on several occasions: prior to a Vulcanian explosion when a pressurisation of the system would be expected, the tilt signal declines significantly, hence indicating depressurisation. At the same time, seismicity increases drastically. Envisaging that such a pattern could carry the potential to forecast Vulcanian explosions on Tungurahua, we use numerical modelling and reproduce the observed tilt patterns in both space and time. We demonstrate that the tilt signal can be more easily explained as caused by shear stress due to viscous flow resistance, rather than by pressurisation of the magmatic plumbing system. In general, our numerical models prove that if magma shear viscosity and ascent rate are high enough, the resulting shear stress is sufficient to generate a tilt signal as observed on Tungurahua. Furthermore, we address the interdependence of tilt and seismicity through shear stress partitioning and suggest that a joint interpretation of tilt and seismicity can shed new light on the eruption potential of silicic volcanoes.

  7. Ground robotic measurement of aeolian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feifei; Jerolmack, Douglas; Lancaster, Nicholas; Nikolich, George; Reverdy, Paul; Roberts, Sonia; Shipley, Thomas; Van Pelt, R. Scott; Zobeck, Ted M.; Koditschek, Daniel E.

    2017-08-01

    Models of aeolian processes rely on accurate measurements of the rates of sediment transport by wind, and careful evaluation of the environmental controls of these processes. Existing field approaches typically require intensive, event-based experiments involving dense arrays of instruments. These devices are often cumbersome and logistically difficult to set up and maintain, especially near steep or vegetated dune surfaces. Significant advances in instrumentation are needed to provide the datasets that are required to validate and improve mechanistic models of aeolian sediment transport. Recent advances in robotics show great promise for assisting and amplifying scientists' efforts to increase the spatial and temporal resolution of many environmental measurements governing sediment transport. The emergence of cheap, agile, human-scale robotic platforms endowed with increasingly sophisticated sensor and motor suites opens up the prospect of deploying programmable, reactive sensor payloads across complex terrain in the service of aeolian science. This paper surveys the need and assesses the opportunities and challenges for amassing novel, highly resolved spatiotemporal datasets for aeolian research using partially-automated ground mobility. We review the limitations of existing measurement approaches for aeolian processes, and discuss how they may be transformed by ground-based robotic platforms, using examples from our initial field experiments. We then review how the need to traverse challenging aeolian terrains and simultaneously make high-resolution measurements of critical variables requires enhanced robotic capability. Finally, we conclude with a look to the future, in which robotic platforms may operate with increasing autonomy in harsh conditions. Besides expanding the completeness of terrestrial datasets, bringing ground-based robots to the aeolian research community may lead to unexpected discoveries that generate new hypotheses to expand the science

  8. Measurement of blockage in deformed LWR multi-rod arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Jones, C.; Whitty, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper critically reviews the current methods used for measuring blockage in multi-rod arrays and discusses their application. A new definition which overcomes the deficiencies of the previous methods is proposed. Also examples of the application of automatic computerised techniques to directly measure rod strain, blockage, sub-channel blockage and perimeter changes from photographs of sections through deformed arrays are presented. (author)

  9. Anthropogenic and natural ground deformation in the Hengill geothermal area, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncu, Daniel; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Hooper, Andy; Gunnarsson, Gunnar

    2017-04-01

    We investigate crustal deformation due to the extraction of water and steam from a high-enthalpy geothermal reservoir; a common occurrence, yet not well understood. The cause of this deformation can be a change in pressure or in temperature in the reservoir, both of which can be caused by extraction or injection of geothermal fluids. Our study area, the Hengill mountains in SW Iceland, is an active volcanic center and a plate triple junction that hosts two power plants producing geothermal energy. This combination of natural and anthropogenic processes causes a complex displacement field at the surface. We analyze geodetic data—Global Navigation Satellite System and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar—to obtain the surface velocity field, which we then simulate using an inverse modeling approach. This way we are able to untangle the deformation signal and find that plate motion and a deep contracting body can explain the broad scale signal in the area. Local deformation near the two power plants, Hellisheidi and Nesjavellir, can be explained by extraction of geothermal fluids. We estimate reservoirs extending from 0.6 to 3.0 km depth at Hellisheidi, and 1.0 to 3.0 km depth at Nesjavellir for observed pressure decrease rates of 0.25 MPa/yr and 0.1 MPa/yr, respectively. We find that the main cause for the subsidence in the geothermal area is the observed pressure drawdown. This means that surface deformation could be used to constrain reservoir pressure models and improve their performance, which could make surface deformation measurements a valuable tool in reservoir monitoring.

  10. InSAR observations of ground surface deformation and lava flow emplacement at Pacaya volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, L. N.; Lu, Z.; Oommen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a persistently active basaltic cone complex located in the Central American Volcanic Arc in Guatemala. In May, 2010, violent VEI-3 eruptions caused significant topographic changes to the edifice, including the dispersion of ~20 cm of tephra and ash on the cone, the emplacement of a ~5.4 km long lava flow, and 3 m of co-eruptive movement of the southwest flank. For this study, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) images (interferograms) processed from both spaceborne Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) and aerial Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data were used to measure post-eruptive deformation events. Interferograms suggest four distinct deformation processes after the May 2010 eruption: (1) magma intrusion near the vents of the 2010 lava flow; (2) subsidence of the 2010 lava flow; (3) slow deflation of an elongated magma source near the summit, and; (4) settlement of the material involved in the co-eruptive slope movement. Our results provide insights into Pacaya's complex magmatic plumbing system and the postemplacement behavior of lava flows. The detection of several different deformation events emphasizes the utility of measuring volcanic deformation using high-resolution remote sensing techniques with broad spatial coverage.

  11. Grounding the randomness of quantum measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2016-05-28

    Julian Schwinger provided to physics a mathematical reconstruction of quantum mechanics on the basis of the characteristics of sequences of measurements occurring at the atomic level of physical structure. The central component of this reconstruction is an algebra of symbols corresponding to quantum measurements, conceived of as discrete processes, which serve to relate experience to theory; collections of outcomes of identically circumscribed such measurements are attributed expectation values, which constitute the predictive content of the theory. The outcomes correspond to certain phase parameters appearing in the corresponding symbols, which are complex numbers, the algebra of which he finds by a process he refers to as 'induction'. Schwinger assumed these (individually unpredictable) phase parameters to take random, uniformly distributed definite values within a natural range. I have previously suggested that the 'principle of plenitude' may serve as a basis in principle for the occurrence of the definite measured values that are those members of the collections of measurement outcomes from which the corresponding observed statistics derive (Jaeger 2015Found. Phys.45, 806-819. (doi:10.1007/s10701-015-9893-6)). Here, I evaluate Schwinger's assumption in the context of recent critiques of the notion of randomness and explicitly relate the randomness of these phases with the principle of plenitude and, in this way, provide a fundamental grounding for the objective, physically irreducible probabilities, conceived of as graded possibilities, that are attributed to measurement outcomes by quantum mechanics. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Target Recognition Using Neural Networks for Model Deformation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Richard W.; Hibler, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Optical measurements provide a non-invasive method for measuring deformation of wind tunnel models. Model deformation systems use targets mounted or painted on the surface of the model to identify known positions, and photogrammetric methods are used to calculate 3-D positions of the targets on the model from digital 2-D images. Under ideal conditions, the reflective targets are placed against a dark background and provide high-contrast images, aiding in target recognition. However, glints of light reflecting from the model surface, or reduced contrast caused by light source or model smoothness constraints, can compromise accurate target determination using current algorithmic methods. This paper describes a technique using a neural network and image processing technologies which increases the reliability of target recognition systems. Unlike algorithmic methods, the neural network can be trained to identify the characteristic patterns that distinguish targets from other objects of similar size and appearance and can adapt to changes in lighting and environmental conditions.

  13. Volcano seismicity and ground deformation unveil the gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics of a volcanic eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Donne, Dario Delle; Genco, Riccardo; Maggio, Giuseppe; Pistolesi, Marco; Marchetti, Emanuele; Lacanna, Giorgio; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Poggi, Pasquale

    2015-05-18

    Effusive eruptions are explained as the mechanism by which volcanoes restore the equilibrium perturbed by magma rising in a chamber deep in the crust. Seismic, ground deformation and topographic measurements are compared with effusion rate during the 2007 Stromboli eruption, drawing an eruptive scenario that shifts our attention from the interior of the crust to the surface. The eruption is modelled as a gravity-driven drainage of magma stored in the volcanic edifice with a minor contribution of magma supplied at a steady rate from a deep reservoir. Here we show that the discharge rate can be predicted by the contraction of the volcano edifice and that the very-long-period seismicity migrates downwards, tracking the residual volume of magma in the shallow reservoir. Gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics explain the initially high discharge rates observed during eruptive crises and greatly influence our ability to predict the evolution of effusive eruptions.

  14. The ground deformation field induced by a listric thrust fault with an overburden soil layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shaogang; Cai, Yong'en

    2013-12-01

    The surface deformation field induced by a listric thrust fault with a thick, overburden soil layer is studied in this paper by the finite element method (FEM). The results show: (a) The maximum slip induced by the buried fault is not located at upper tip of the fault, but below it. (b) The vertical displacement changes remarkably near the fault, forming a fault scarp. With the increase of the soil layer thickness, the height of the scarp is decreased for the same earthquake magnitude. (c) The strong strain zone on the surface is localized near the projection of the fault tip on the ground surface. The horizontal strains in the zone are in tension above the hanging wall and in compression above the foot wall, and the vertical strains in the zone are vice versa, which is favorable for tensileshear, compression-shear fissures above hanging wall and foot wall, respectively.

  15. Countermeasures Assessment of Liquefaction-Induced Lateral Deformation in a Slope Ground System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Forcellini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquefaction-induced lateral spreading may result in significant damage and disruption of functionality for structures and Slope Ground System. In this regard, finite-element simulations are increasingly providing a versatile environment in order to assess economical and effective countermeasures. Several systematic bidimensional FEM computations have been conducted to evaluate mitigation strategies under the action of an applied earthquake excitation. The presented study highlights the potential of computations in providing insights for analysis of liquefaction-induced lateral deformations. In the analysis, some specific assumptions are introduced and verified such as a nine-node quadrilateral elements, massive columns of soil with periodic boundary conditions, and a Lysmer-Kuhlemeyer dashpot used to model the finite rigidity of the underlying elastic medium. Moreover, the study aims to systematically explore the effectiveness of densification as a countermeasure and then evaluate the best extension comparing two scenarios.

  16. Using PSInSAR to Investigate the Surface Deformation Induced by Ground Water Variation in Taipei Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P. C.; Hu, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Soil liquefaction induced from shaking of earthquake is a crucial issue for seismic hazards in urban area. Since 1975, the water pumping was prohibited in Taipei basin due to severe land subsidence with ground water level of about 60-70 m below sea level, consequently the ground water level recover to a high level of about 5-10 m below sea level which high potential soil liquefaction area should happen in think sediments area of Taipei basin. However, the anthropogenic pumping ground water still happened for construction of Taipei Rapid Transit System since 1993. In this study, we use persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI) technique for processing 37 high resolution X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images archived from COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) constellation to get precise deformation map in the period from May 2011 to April 2015. The surface deformation rate along line of sight (LOS) toward to the satellite will be constrained by 3-D deformation rate from continuous GPS projected to the LOS. In addition, the vertical deformation rate from precise levelling across the Taipei basin will be compared to the deformation trend of PSI. In average, a subsidence rate of 5 mm/yr near the Banqiao station. Moreover, the high correlation between LOS rate and ground water table in Wuku station. The previous study suggested that the transient deformation in LOS of PSInSAR in Taipei Basin is highly related to the confined aquifer deformation of Jingmei formation. The storativity is roughly constant across most of the aquifer with values between 0.8 x 10-4 and 1.3 x 10-3. Thus, the storativity can be calculated to specific storage and values of aquifer compressibility for water resources management in Taipei basin.

  17. Observation of ground deformation associated with hydraulic fracturing and seismicity in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubanek, J.; Liu, Y.; Harrington, R. M.; Samsonov, S.

    2017-12-01

    In North America, the number of induced earthquakes related to fluid injection due to the unconventional recovery of oil and gas resources has increased significantly within the last five years. Recent studies demonstrate that InSAR is an effective tool to study surface deformation due to large-scale wastewater injection, and highlight the value of surface deformation monitoring with respect to understanding evolution of pore pressure and stress at depth - vital parameters to forecast fault reactivation, and thus, induced earthquakes. In contrast to earthquakes related to the injection of large amounts of wastewater, seismic activity related to the hydraulic fracturing procedure itself was, until recently, considered to play a minor role without significant hazard. In the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB), however, Mw>4 earthquakes have recently led to temporary shutdown of industrial injection activity, causing multi-million dollar losses to operators and raising safety concerns with the local population. Recent studies successfully utilize seismic data and modeling to link seismic activity with hydraulic fracturing in the WCSB. Although the study of surface deformation is likely the most promising tool for monitoring integrity of a well and to derive potential signatures prior to moderate or large induced events, InSAR has, to date, not been utilized to detect surface deformation related to hydraulic fracturing and seismicity. We therefore plan to analyze time-series of SAR data acquired between 1991 to present over two target sites in the WCSB that will enable the study of long- and short-term deformation. Since the conditions for InSAR are expected to be challenging due to spatial and temporal decorrelation, we have designed corner reflectors that will be installed at one target site to improve interferometric performance. The corner reflectors will be collocated with broadband seismometers and Trimble SeismoGeodetic Systems that simultaneously measure

  18. Die Deformation Measurement System during Sheet Metal Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funada, J.; Takahashi, S.; Fukiharu, H.

    2011-08-01

    In order to reduce affection to the earth environment, it is necessary to lighten the vehicles. For this purpose, high tensile steels are applied. Because of high strength, high forming force is required for producing automotive sheet metal parts. In this situation, since the dies are elastic, they are deformed during forming parts. For reducing die developing period, sheet metal forming simulation is widely applied. In the numerical simulation, rigid dies are usually used for shortening computing time. It means that the forming conditions in the actual forming and the simulation are different. It will make large errors in the results between actual forming and simulation. It can be said that if contact pressure between dies and a sheet metal in the simulation can be reproduced in the actual forming, the differences of forming results between them can also been reduced. The basic idea is to estimate die shape which can produce the same distribution as computed from simulation with rigid dies. In this study, die deformation analyses with Finite Element Method as basic technologies are evaluated. For example, simple shape and actual dies elastic contact problems were investigated. The contact width between simple shape dies was investigated. The computed solutions were in good agreement with experimental results. The one case of the actual dies in two cases was also investigated. Bending force was applied to the blank holder with a mechanical press machine. The methodology shown with applying inductive displacement sensor for measuring die deformation during applying force was also proposed.

  19. Inferring field-scale properties of a fractured aquifer from ground surface deformation during a well test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuite, Jonathan; Longuevergne, Laurent; Bour, Olivier; Boudin, Frédérick; Durand, Stéphane; Lavenant, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Fractured aquifers which bear valuable water resources are often difficult to characterize with classical hydrogeological tools due to their intrinsic heterogeneities. Here we implement ground surface deformation tools (tiltmetry and optical leveling) to monitor groundwater pressure changes induced by a classical hydraulic test at the Ploemeur observatory. By jointly analyzing complementary time constraining data (tilt) and spatially constraining data (vertical displacement), our results strongly suggest that the use of these surface deformation observations allows for estimating storativity and structural properties (dip, root depth, and lateral extension) of a large hydraulically active fracture, in good agreement with previous studies. Hence, we demonstrate that ground surface deformation is a useful addition to traditional hydrogeological techniques and opens possibilities for characterizing important large-scale properties of fractured aquifers with short-term well tests as a controlled forcing.

  20. Monitoring ground deformation of cultural heritage sites using UAVs and geodetic techniques: the case study of Choirokoitia, JPI PROTHEGO project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Danezis, Chris; Mendonidis, Evangelos; Lymperopoulou, Efstathia

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the integrated methods using UAVs and geodetic techniques to monitor ground deformation within the Choirokoitia UNESCO World Heritage Site in Cyprus. The Neolithic settlement of Choirokoitia, occupied from the 7th to the 4th millennium B.C., is one of the most important prehistoric sites in the eastern Mediterranean. The study is conducted under the PROTHEGO (PROTection of European Cultural HEritage from GeO-hazards) project, which is a collaborative research project funded in the framework of the Joint Programming Initiative on Cultural Heritage and Global Change (JPICH) - Heritage Plus in 2015-2018 (www.prothego.eu) and through the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation. PROTHEGO aims to make an innovative contribution towards the analysis of geo-hazards in areas of cultural heritage, and uses novel space technology based on radar interferometry to retrieve information on ground stability and motion in the 400+ UNESCO's World Heritage List monuments and sites of Europe. The field measurements collected at the Choirokoitia site will be later compared with SAR data to verify micro-movements in the area to monitor potential geo-hazards. The site is located on a steep hill, which makes it vulnerable to rock falls and landslides.

  1. GDM: a ForM@Ter service for ground deformation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostanciaux, Emilie; Diament, Michel; Jamet, Olivier; Mandea, Mioara

    2015-04-01

    ForM@Ter is a French solid Earth thematic data pole project. It was launched in 2012 by the French national space agency (CNES) and the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), with the active participation of the National institute for geographical and forestry information (IGN). Currently, it relies on the contributions of scientists from more than 20 French Earth science laboratories. Its perimeter, designed with the scientific community, focus on the determination of the shape and movements of the Earth surface (ForM@Ter: Formes et Mouvements de la Terre) with the objective to federate a wide variety of scientific areas (earthquake cycle, tectonics, morphogenesis, volcanism, erosion dynamics, mantle rheology, geodesy) and to offer many interfaces with other thematics, such as glaciology or snow evolution. The project aims at providing a national cooperative platform to facilitate data access, provide processing tools and value-added products with support for non-expert users. However its challenge in the evolving context of the current and forthcoming national and international e-infrastructures, is to design a non-redundant service based on interoperations with existing services, and to cope with highly complex data flows due to the granularity of the data and its associated knowledge. For this purpose, the services offer by the pole will be built based on the needs expressed by the scientific community. This is the case of Ground Deformation Monitoring (GDM) service which we will present here. This service will be based on a CNES computing infrastructure hosting Sentinels products, and will offer catalogue access, HPC facilities and thematic computation services on inSAR and optical imagery. Computation services will give scientists access to DTM, displacement map times series, quality indicators and modelling tools. GDM is aimed at serving a wide panel of scientific fields, such as earthquake cycle studies, tectonics, volcanism, erosion dynamics, or

  2. 3D temporal evolution and modeling of ground deformation recorded on Mt. Etna from the 2007 to 2008 through the SISTEM method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Puglisi, G.

    2012-04-01

    A study of the ground deformation pattern of Mount Etna volcano, based on the results of the SISTEM (Simultaneous and Integrated Strain Tensor Estimation from geodetic and satellite deformation Measurements) integration method is reported. The SISTEM enables integrating geodetic in situ ground deformation measurements (GPS) with satellite interferometric measurements (ENVISAT), in order to obtain high resolution 3D displacement maps, allowing to overcome the limitations of each technique and take advantage of the particular features of each of them. In this work ground motion data provided by GPS surveys are integrated with the interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) Envisat data, collected from 2007 to 2008, to provide 3D displacements maps. We imaged the time evolution of ground displacement measured along the Line Of Sight (LOS) of the Envisat satellite for both ascending and descending Envisat geometries. The main deformation episode occurred on Mt. Etna during the 2007-2008 time period was the May 2008 dike intrusion and the following 2008-2009 eruption. It started on May 13th, 2008, with the opening of an eruptive fissure propagating inside the topographical depression of the Valle del Bove, where the lava flows expanded. The eruption produced a lava flow of about 6 Km length, and it was preceded and accompanied by strong seismic release, and lava fountaining activity. The 3D temporal evolution of ground deformation was analyzed in order to define the dynamics preceding and accompanying the onset of the 2008-2009 Mt. Etna eruption. In particular, this analysis reveals a slight inflation visible on the upper western side of the volcano in the pre-eruptive period (form June 2007 to May 2008) characterized by a small amplitude of the ground deformation, except on the eastern flank. Data inversions detected a pressurizing source located beneath the western flank of the volcano at a depth of about 3Km bsl. In the period encompassing the eruption onset

  3. A cognitively grounded measure of pronunciation distance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Wieling

    Full Text Available In this study we develop pronunciation distances based on naive discriminative learning (NDL. Measures of pronunciation distance are used in several subfields of linguistics, including psycholinguistics, dialectology and typology. In contrast to the commonly used Levenshtein algorithm, NDL is grounded in cognitive theory of competitive reinforcement learning and is able to generate asymmetrical pronunciation distances. In a first study, we validated the NDL-based pronunciation distances by comparing them to a large set of native-likeness ratings given by native American English speakers when presented with accented English speech. In a second study, the NDL-based pronunciation distances were validated on the basis of perceptual dialect distances of Norwegian speakers. Results indicated that the NDL-based pronunciation distances matched perceptual distances reasonably well with correlations ranging between 0.7 and 0.8. While the correlations were comparable to those obtained using the Levenshtein distance, the NDL-based approach is more flexible as it is also able to incorporate acoustic information other than sound segments.

  4. Measured ground-surface movements, Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Cerro Prieto geothermal area in the Mexicali Valley, 30 kilometers southeast of Mexicali, Baja California, incurred slight deformation because of the extraction of hot water and steam, and probably, active tectonism. During 1977 to 1978, the US Geological Survey established and measured two networks of horizontal control in an effort to define both types of movement. These networks consisted of: (1) a regional trilateration net brought into the mountain ranges west of the geothermal area from stations on an existing US Geological Survey crustal-strain network north of the international border; and (2) a local net tied to stations in the regional net and encompassing the present and planned geothermal production area. Electronic distance measuring instruments were used to measure the distances between stations in both networks in 1978, 1979 and 1981. Lines in the regional net averaged 25 km. in length and the standard deviation of an individual measurement is estimated to be approx. 0.3 part per million of line length. The local network was measured using different instrumentation and techniques. The average line length was about 5 km. and the standard deviation of an individual measurement approached 3 parts per million per line length. Ground-surface movements in the regional net, as measured by both the 1979 and 1981 resurveys, were small and did not exceed the noise level. The 1979 resurvey of the local net showed an apparent movement of 2 to 3 centimeters inward toward the center of the production area. This apparent movement was restricted to the general limits of the production area. The 1981 resurvey of the local net did not show increased movement attributable to fluid extraction.

  5. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry Analysis of Ground Deformation within the Coso Geothermal Site, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawner, Erik

    Earth's surface movement may cause as a potential hazard to infrastructure and people. Associated earthquake hazards pose a potential side effect of geothermal activity. Modern remote sensing techniques known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) can measure surface change with a high degree of precision to mm scale movements. Previous work has identified a deformation anomaly within the Coso Geothermal site in eastern California. Surface changes have not been analyzed since the 1990s, allowing a decade of geothermal production impact to occur since previously assessed. In this study, InSAR data was acquired and analyzed between the years 2005 and 2010. Acquired by the ENVISAT satellite from both ascending and descending modes. This provides an independent dataset from previous work. Incorporating data generated from a new sensor covering a more modern temporal study period. Analysis of this time period revealed a subsidence anomaly in correlation with the extents of the geothermal production area under current operation. Maximum subsidence rates in the region reached approximately 3.8 cm/yr. A similar rate assessed from previous work throughout the 1990s. The correlation of subsidence patterns suggests a linear source of deformation from measurements spanning multiple decades. Regions of subsidence branch out from the main anomaly to the North-Northeast and to the South where additional significant peaks of subsidence occurring. The extents of the deformation anomaly directly correlate with the dispersal of geothermal production well site locations. Depressurization within the geothermal system provides a leading cause to surface subsidence from excessive extraction of hydrothermal fluids. As a result of minimal reinjection of production fluids.

  6. Geometric Aspects of Ground Augmentation of Satellite Networks for the Needs of Deformation Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protaziuk, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Satellite measurements become competitive in many tasks of engineering surveys, however, in many requiring applications possibilities to apply such solutions are still limited. The possibility to widely apply satellite technologies for displacements measurements is related with new challenges; the most important of them relate to increasing requirements concerning the accuracy, reliability and continuity of results of position determination. One of the solutions is a ground augmentation of satellite network, which intention is to improve precision of positioning, ensure comparable accuracy of coordinates and reduce precision fluctuations over time. The need for augmentation of GNSS is particularly significant in situations: where the visibility of satellites is poor because of terrain obstacles, when the determined position is not precise enough or a satellites constellation does not allow for reliable positioning. Ground based source/sources of satellite signal placed at a ground, called pseudosatellites, or pseudolites were intensively investigated during the last two decades and finally were developed into groundbased, time-synchronized transceivers, that can transmit and receive a proprietary positioning signal. The paper presents geometric aspects of the ground based augmentation of the satellite networks using various quality measures of positioning geometry, which depends on access to the constellation of satellites and the conditions of the observation environment. The issue of minimizing these measures is the key problem that allows to obtain the position with high accuracy. For this purpose, the use of an error ellipsoid is proposed and compared with an error ellipse. The paper also describes the results of preliminary accuracy analysis obtained at test area and a comparison of various measures of the quality of positioning geometry.

  7. FTIR measurements of OH in deformed quartz and feldspars of the South Tibetan Detachment, Greater Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezek, L.; Law, R. D.; Jessup, M. J.; Searle, M. P.; Kronenberg, A. K.

    2017-12-01

    OH absorption bands due to water in deformed quartz and feldspar grains of mylonites from the low-angle Lhotse Detachment (of the South Tibetan Detachment System, Rongbuk Valley north of Mount Everest) have been measured by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. Previous microstructural studies have shown that these rocks deformed by dislocation creep at high temperature conditions in the middle crust (lower - middle amphibolite facies), and oxygen isotope studies suggest significant influx of meteoric water. OH absorption bands at 3400 cm-1 of quartz mylonites from the footwall of the Lhotse Detachment Fault are large, with the character of the molecular water band due to fluid inclusions in milky quartz. Mean water contents depend on structural position relative to the core of the Lhotse Detachment, from 1000 ppm (OH/106 Si) at 420 m below the fault to 11,350 (+/-1095) ppm near its center. The gradient in OH content shown by quartz grains implies influx of meteoric water along the Lhotse Detachment from the Tibetan Plateau ground surface to middle crustal depths, and significant fluid penetration into the extruding Himalayan slab by intergranular, permeable fluid flow processes. Feldspars of individual samples have comparable water contents to those of quartz and some are wetter. Large water contents of quartz and feldspar may have contributed to continued deformation and strain localization on the South Tibetan Detachment System. Dislocation creep in quartz is facilitated by water in laboratory experiments, and the water contents of the Lhotse fault rocks are similar to (and even larger than) water contents of quartz experimentally deformed during water weakening. Water contents of feldspars are comparable to those of plagioclase aggregates deformed experimentally by dislocation and diffusion creep under wet conditions.

  8. 3D time dependent thermo-fluid dynamic model of ground deformation at Campi Flegrei caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, R.; Tizzani, P.; Manconi, A.; Manzo, M.; Pepe, S.; Pepe, A.; Lanari, R.

    2012-04-01

    In active volcanic areas deformation signals are generally characterized by non-linear spatial and temporal variations [Tizzani P. et al., 2007]. This behaviour has been revealed in the last two decades by the so-called advanced DInSAR processing algorithms, developed to analyze surface deformation phenomena [Berardino P. et al., 2002; Ferretti C. et al., 2001]. Notwithstanding, most of the inverse modelling attempts to characterize the evolution of the volcanic sources are based on the assumption that the Earth's crust behaves as a homogeneous linear elastic material. However, the behaviour of the upper lithosphere in thermally anomalous regions (as active volcanoes are) might be well described as a non-Newtonian fluid, where some of the material proprieties of the rocks (i.e., apparent viscosities) can change over time [Pinkerton H. et al., 1995]. In this context, we considered the thermal proprieties and mechanical heterogeneities of the upper crust in order to develop a new 3D time dependent thermo-fluid dynamic model of Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera, Southern Italy. More specifically, according to Tizzani P. et al. (2010), we integrated in a FEM environment geophysical information (gravimetric, seismic, and borehole data) available for the considered area and performed two FEM optimization procedures to constrain the 3D distribution of unknown physical parameters (temperature and viscosity distributions) that might help explaining the data observed at surface (geothermal wells and DInSAR measurements). First, we searched for the heat production, the volume source distribution and surface emissivity parameters providing the best-fit of the geothermal profiles data measured at six boreholes [Agip ESGE, 1986], by solving the Fourier heat equation over time (about 40 kys). The 3D thermal field resulting from this optimization was used to calculate the 3D brittle-ductile transition. This analysis revealed the presence of a ductile region, located beneath the centre of

  9. Measuring Transmission Spectra from the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Andres; Espinoza, Nestor; Eyheramendy, Susana

    2015-08-01

    Transmission spectroscopy allows study of the atmospheres of exoplanets without the need of spatially resolving them from their parent stars and is one of the most valuable follow-up possibilities offered by transiting systems. The measurement of a transmission spectrum, i.e. the apparent planetary size in units in the stellar radius as a function of wavelength, is conceptually simple, but the expected features that need to be discerned are on the order of one part in a thousand or less, and need to be extracted against a background of (potentially correlated) noise and systematic effects with amplitudes greatly exceeding that of the sought signal. In this talk I will describe how we have tackled the estimation of transmission spectra in a ground based survey we are carrying out with IMACS at Las Campanas Observatory, the Arizona-CfA-Catolica Exoplanet Spectroscopy Survey. Our treatment assumes an additive model consisting of the signal, common systematics and one of a set of stochastic processes with different memory characteristics for the noise. Common systematics are estimated from comparison stars using principal component analysis and the model parameter posterior distributions are estimated using MCMC. Model comparison is used to let the data select the model with the most appropriate noise component. I will illustrate the performance of our approach, and discuss possible avenues of improvement. I will also illustrate the importance of potential biases arising from our incomplete knowledge of stellar properties. In particular, I will show that limb darkening assumptions can limit the accuracy of our estimates of planetary radii above the achievable precisions in regimes currently being probed.

  10. Before PBO: What Do We Know About Ground Deformation in the Cascade Range?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzurisin, D.; Lisowski, M.; Poland, M.; Wicks, C. W.; Diefenbach, A. K.

    2003-12-01

    of coastal Oregon as determined from modeling of regional GPS-measured deformation. A dense 40-station campaign GPS network around Mount St. Helens was established in 2000 and remeasured in 2003. Preliminary results indicate no significant deformation of the volcano beyond the 1980-86 lava dome, part of which is subsiding 8 cm/yr. The source of apparent far-field deformation is not yet clear. InSAR observations show that thick 1980 deposits in the North Fork Toutle River valley north of the volcano are subsiding and presumably compacting a few cm/yr.

  11. Ground deformation at Merapi Volcano, Java, Indonesia: distance changes, June 1988-October 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K.D.; Voight, B.; ,; ,; ,; Casadevall, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    Edifice deformations are reported here for the period 1988–1995 at Merapi volcano, one of the most active and dangerous volcanoes in Indonesia. The study period includes a major resumption in lava effusion in January 1992 and a major dome collapse in November 1994. The data comprise electronic distance measurements (EDM) on a summit trilateration network, slope distance changes measured to the upper flanks, and other data collected from 1988 to 1995. A major consequence of this study is the documentation of a significant 4-year period of deformation precursory to the 1992 eruption. Cross-crater strain rates accelerated from less than 3×10−6/day between 1988 and 1990 to more than 11×10−6/day just prior to the January 1992 activity, representing a general, asymmetric extension of the summit during high-level conduit pressurization. After the vent opened and effusion of lava resumed, strain occurred at a much-reduced rate of less than 2×10−6/day. EDM measurements between lower flank benchmarks and the upper edifice indicate displacements as great as 1 m per year over the four years before the 1992 eruption. The Gendol breach, a pronounced depression formed by the juxtaposition of old lava coulées on the southeast flank, functioned as a major displacement discontinuity. Since 1993, movements have generally not exceeded the 95% confidence limits of the summit network. Exceptions to this include 12 cm outward movement for the northwest crater rim in 1992–1993, probably from loading by newly erupted dome lava, and movements as much as 7 cm on the south flank between November 1994 and September 1995. No short-term precursors were noted before the November 1994 lava dome collapse, but long-term adjustments of crater geometry accompanied lava dome growth in 1994. Short-term 2-cm deflation of the edifice occurred following the November 1994 dome collapse.

  12. Measurement of Ground Electrical Conductivity for Planning Medium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results of propagation measurements are often required to improve the coverage of Medium Frequency (MF) broadcast transmitters. To achieve this, ground electrical conductivity measurement is one of the parameters often determined. In this study, ground conductivity has been measured around MF radio transmitters in ...

  13. Measurement protocol for radon measurements in workplaces above ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mjoenes, L.; Soederman, A.-L.

    2004-01-01

    measurement made during the warmer part of the year is likely to show radon levels that are not representative for the whole year. Measurements have to cover at least 20 % of the rooms used for work places situated on the ground floor, in upper floors one measurement per floor has to be made and at least one per 500 m 2 . More measurements are recommended for buildings constructed from material with enhanced uranium and radium levels, such as blue lightweight concrete. Rooms in upper floors with vertical piping or other vertical openings through the building or rooms adjacent to rooms with piping should be measured. The detectors should not be moved during the measurement period and they should be placed so that the result is representative for the work place. Measurement devises must be calibrated every 12 months. This can be done at SSI or another laboratory recommended by SSI. Laboratories, consulting firms etc responsible for radon measurements have to guarantee that the results are correct. A quality system is required in order to perform measurements. The measurement protocol describes every method that can be used for radon measurements in detail as far as calibration and control systems are concerned. (author)

  14. Fiber-Reinforced Rocks Akin to Roman Concrete Help Explain Ground Deformation at Campi Flegrei Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanorio, Tiziana; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

    2016-04-01

    these gases rise toward the surface, the natural cement layer halts them, leading to pore pressure increase and subsequent ground deformations.

  15. An application of the ground laser scanning to recognise terrain surface deformation over a shallowly located underground excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilecka, Elżbieta; Szwarkowski, Dariusz

    2017-11-01

    In the Upper Silesian Coal Basin area, there are post-mining sites of shallow exploitation of metal ores and hard coal deposits that reveal discontinuous deformations. Most often, these areas are heavily urbanised and the appearing deformations may be dangerous to the existing building infrastructure. The work, described in this article, presents the results of the research, which aimed to rate the usefulness of laser scanning to recognize discontinuous deformations on surface areas located over shallow mining excavations. Two laser scanning measurements were taken over the course of a few months. The surface area images were compared to identify changes in its deformation, especially those areas located above mining excavations. The tests carried out by the laser scanning method showed that some of the identified discontinuous deformations could have been connected to the shallowly located mining excavations.

  16. Experimental relations between airborne and ground measured wheat canopy temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, J. P.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Goettelman, R. C.; Leroy, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments using ground-based measurements of canopy temperatures have shown that plant temperatures are good indicators of plant water stress, and thus are useful for assessing water requirements and predicting yields. An intensive 23-day airborne- and ground-measurement program was conducted in Phoenix, Arizona in 1977 to compare airborne-acquired wheat canopy temperatures with simultaneous ground measurements. For canopies that covered at least 85 percent of the soil surface, airborne measurements differed from ground measurements of plant temperature by less than 2 C. Regardless of the amount of plant cover, the airborne measurements were virtually identical to ground-nadir measurements, and thus represent a combination of plant temperature and solid background temperature.

  17. Research on filling scheme and deformation properties of wide subgrade of foamed lightweight soil on soft ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Faru; Yang, Deguang; Zhang, Liujun

    2018-01-01

    The wide subgrade on soft soil ground has the significantly different transverse settlement curve characteristics and the lacation of the maximum asymmetrical transverse settlement compared with ordinary subgrade. Especially when the subgrade filled with materials of different densities, the synergism deformation of ground-subgrade-pavement and the pavement structure stress become more complex. Combining with the engineering example, the settlement deformation characteristics of wide subgrade adopting the different filling scheme and the stress distribution of pavement structure are analyzed. Results show that the settlement curve of wide subgrade has a shape of flat middle with steep sides, and the maximum transverse asymmetrical settlement locates in close to the shoulder position. The maximum stress within the pavement structure is also in close to the shoulder position. Regarding the wide subgrade composed of main road and relief road, the post-construction settlement can be greatly reduced when both roads are filled with foamed lightweight soil.

  18. Pre-eruptive ground deformation of Azerbaijan mud volcanoes detected through satellite radar interferometry (DInSAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonielli, Benedetta; Monserrat, Oriol; Bonini, Marco; Righini, Gaia; Sani, Federico; Luzi, Guido; Feyzullayev, Akper A.; Aliyev, Chingiz S.

    2014-12-01

    Mud volcanism is a process that leads to the extrusion of subsurface mud, fragments of country rocks, saline waters and gases. This mechanism is typically linked to hydrocarbon traps, and the extrusion of this material builds up a variety of conical edifices with a similar morphology to those of magmatic volcanoes, though smaller in size. The Differential Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) technique has been used to investigate the ground deformation related to the activity of the mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan. The analysis of a set of wrapped and unwrapped interferograms, selected according to their coherence, allowed the detection of significant superficial deformation related to the activity of four mud volcanoes. The ground displacement patterns observed during the period spanning from October 2003 to November 2005 are dominated by uplift, which reach a cumulative value of up to 20 and 10 cm at the Ayaz-Akhtarma and Khara-Zira Island mud volcanoes, respectively. However, some sectors of the mud volcano edifices are affected by subsidence, which might correspond to deflation zones that coexist with the inflation zones characterized by the dominant uplift. Important deformation events, caused by fluid pressure and volume variations, have been observed both (1) in connection with main eruptive events in the form of pre-eruptive uplift, and (2) in the form of short-lived deformation pulses that interrupt a period of quiescence. Both deformation patterns show important similarities to those identified in some magmatic systems. The pre-eruptive uplift has been observed in many magmatic volcanoes as a consequence of magma intrusion or hydrothermal fluid injection. Moreover, discrete short-duration pulses of deformation are also experienced by magmatic volcanoes and are repeated over time as multiple inflation and deflation events.

  19. Pre-eruptive ground deformation of Azerbaijan mud volcanoes detected through satellite radar interferometry (DInSAR)

    OpenAIRE

    Monserrat, Oriol; Bonini, Marco; Luzi, Guido; Feyzullayev, Akper; Antonielli, Benedetta; Righini, Gaia; Sani, Federico; Aliyev, Chingiz S.

    2014-01-01

    Mud volcanism is a process that leads to the extrusion of subsurface mud, fragments of country rocks, saline waters and gases. This mechanism is typically linked to hydrocarbon traps, and the extrusion of this material builds up a variety of conical edifices with a similar morphology to those of magmatic volcanoes, though smaller in size. The Differential Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) technique has been used to investigate the ground deformation related to the activity of t...

  20. Earthquake Ground Motion Measures for Seismic Response Evaluation of Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, In-Kil; Ahn, Seong-Moon; Choun, Young-Sun; Seo, Jeong-Moon

    2007-03-15

    This study used the assessment results of failure criteria - base shear, story drift, top acceleration and top displacement - for a PSC containment building subjected to 30 sets of near-fault ground motions to evaluate the earthquake ground motion intensity measures. Seven intensity measures, peak ground acceleration(PGA), peak ground velocity(PGV), spectral acceleration(Sa), velocity(Sv), spectrum intensity for acceleration(SIa), velocity(SIv) and displacement(SId), were used to represent alternative ground motion. The regression analyses of the failure criteria for a PSC containment building were carried out to evaluate a proper intensity measure by using two regression models and seven ground motion parameters. The regression analysis results demonstrate the correlation coefficients of the failure criteria in terms of the candidate IM. From the results, spectral acceleration(Sa) is estimated as the best parameter for a evaluation of the structural safety for a seismic PSA.

  1. Measuring hull girder deformations on a 9300 TEU containership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koning Jos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A 9300 TEU container carrier was equipped in 2006 with instrumentation aimed at wave induced accelerations, and motions. In 2010 the system was extended with strain sensors to include structural loads. Section loads for vertical bending could be readily obtained but the originally intended derivation of horizontal bending and torsion from the measured strains was found to be unreliable. This paper addresses an alternative approach that was adopted in the post processing of results. In particular the concept to use acceleration sensors to capture global hull deformations along the length of the hull, and the use of a data fusion procedure to obtain section loads from combined sensor data and finite element calculations. The approach is illustrated by comparison of actually measured accelerations and local strains with values obtained from the data fusion model. It is concluded that the approach is promising but in need of further validation and development. In particular the number and shapes of the modes used may not have been sufficient to represent the true deflection and thus strain distributions along the high loaded areas.

  2. Measuring hull girder deformations on a 9300 TEU containership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Jos; Schiere, Marcus

    2014-12-01

    A 9300 TEU container carrier was equipped in 2006 with instrumentation aimed at wave induced accelerations, and motions. In 2010 the system was extended with strain sensors to include structural loads. Section loads for vertical bending could be readily obtained but the originally intended derivation of horizontal bending and torsion from the measured strains was found to be unreliable. This paper addresses an alternative approach that was adopted in the post processing of results. In particular the concept to use acceleration sensors to capture global hull deformations along the length of the hull, and the use of a data fusion procedure to obtain section loads from combined sensor data and finite element calculations. The approach is illustrated by comparison of actually measured accelerations and local strains with values obtained from the data fusion model. It is concluded that the approach is promising but in need of further validation and development. In particular the number and shapes of the modes used may not have been sufficient to represent the true deflection and thus strain distributions along the high loaded areas.

  3. Nanoscale deformation measurements for reliability assessment of material interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jürgen; Gollhardt, Astrid; Vogel, Dietmar; Michel, Bernd

    2006-03-01

    With the development and application of micro/nano electronic mechanical systems (MEMS, NEMS) for a variety of market segments new reliability issues will arise. The understanding of material interfaces is the key for a successful design for reliability of MEMS/NEMS and sensor systems. Furthermore in the field of BIOMEMS newly developed advanced materials and well known engineering materials are combined despite of fully developed reliability concepts for such devices and components. In addition the increasing interface-to volume ratio in highly integrated systems and nanoparticle filled materials are challenges for experimental reliability evaluation. New strategies for reliability assessment on the submicron scale are essential to fulfil the needs of future devices. In this paper a nanoscale resolution experimental method for the measurement of thermo-mechanical deformation at material interfaces is introduced. The determination of displacement fields is based on scanning probe microscopy (SPM) data. In-situ SPM scans of the analyzed object (i.e. material interface) are carried out at different thermo-mechanical load states. The obtained images are compared by grayscale cross correlation algorithms. This allows the tracking of local image patterns of the analyzed surface structure. The measurement results are full-field displacement fields with nanometer resolution. With the obtained data the mixed mode type of loading at material interfaces can be analyzed with highest resolution for future needs in micro system and nanotechnology.

  4. Multilayer Steel Materials Deformation Resistance and Roll Force Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Kolesnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To create new types of cars, raise their reliability, gain operational life, and decrease in metal consumption of products it is necessary to improve mechanical, physical, and also special properties of the constructional materials applied in mechanical engineering. Presently, there are intensive researches and developments under way to create materials with ultrafine-grained structure (the sizes of grains in their crystal lattice make less than 1 micron in one of the measurements.BMSTU developed a manufacturing technology of multilayer steel sheets with steady ultrafine-grained structure based on the multiple hot rolling of billet as a composition consisting of the alternating metal sheets. A principled condition for implementation of such technology is existence of different crystallographic modifications in the adjoining sheets of the composition at specified temperature of rolling.Power parameters of rolling are important technical characteristics of the process. Usually, to determine a deformation resistance value when rolling the diverse multilayer materials, is used the actual resistance value averaging in relation to the components of the composition. The aim of this work is a comparative analysis of known calculated dependences with experimental data when rolling the 100-layer samples. Objects of research were the 100-layer compositions based on the alternating layers of steel 08H18N10 and U8.Experimental samples represented the vacuumized capsules with height, width, and length of 53 mm x 53 mm x 200 mm, respectively, in which there were the 100-layer packs from sheets, each of 0.5 mm, based on the composition of steels (U8+08H18N10. Rolling was made on the double-high mill with rolls of 160 mm in diameter during 19 passes to the thickness of 7 mm with the speed of 0,1 m/s. Relative sinking in each pass was accepted to be equal 10±2,5%. Rolling forces were measured by the strain-gauging method using the measuring cells, located under

  5. The role of thermo-rheological properties of the crust beneath Ischia Island (Southern Italy) in the modulation of the ground deformation pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, R.; Gola, G.; Santilano, A.; De Novellis, V.; Pepe, S.; Manzo, M.; Manzella, A.; Tizzani, P.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we develop a model of the ground deformation behaviour occurred at Ischia Island (Southern Italy) in the 1992-2010 time period. The model is employed to investigate the forces and physical parameters of the crust controlling the subsidence of the Island. To this aim, we integrate and homogenize in a Finite Element (FE) environment a large amount of data derived from several and different observation techniques (i.e., geological, geophysical and remote sensing). In detail, the main steps of the multiphysics model are: (i) the generation of a 3D geological model of the crust beneath the Island by merging the available geological and geophysical information; (ii) the optimization of a 3D thermal model by exploiting the thermal measurements available in literature; (iii) the definition of the 3D Brittle/Ductile transition by using the temperature distribution of the crust and the physical information of the rocks; (iv) the optimization of the ground deformation velocity model (that takes into account the rheological stratification) by considering the spatial and temporal information detected via satellite multi-orbit C-Band SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) measurements acquired during the 1992-2010 time period. The achieved results allow investigating the physical process responsible for the observed ground deformation pattern. In particular, they reveal how the rheology modulates the spatial and temporal evolution of the long-term subsidence phenomenon, highlighting a coupling effect of the viscosities of the rocks and the gravitational loading of the volcano edifice. Moreover, the achieved results provide a very detailed and realistic velocity field image of the subsurface crust of the Ischia Island Volcano.

  6. Delineating shallow Neogene deformation structures in northeastern Pará State using Ground Penetrating Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilce F. Rossetti

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The geological characterization of shallow subsurface Neogene deposits in northeastern Pará State using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR revealed normal and reverse faults, as well as folds, not yet well documented by field studies. The faults are identified mostly by steeply-dipping reflections that sharply cut the nearby reflections causing bed offsets, drags and rollovers. The folds are recognized by reflections that are highly undulating, configuring broad concave and convex-up features that are up to 50 m wide and 80 to 90 ns deep. These deformation structures are mostly developed within deposits of Miocene age, though some of the faults might continue into younger deposits as well. Although the studied GPR sections show several diffractions caused by trees, differential degrees of moisture, and underground artifacts, the structures recorded here can not be explained by any of these ''noises''. The detailed analysis of the GPR sections reveals that they are attributed to bed distortion caused by brittle deformation and folding. The record of faults and folds are not widespread in the Neogene deposits of the Bragantina area. These GPR data are in agreement with structural models, which have proposed a complex evolution including strike-slip motion for this area from the Miocene to present.A caracterização geológica de depósitos neógenos ocorrentes em sub-superfície rasa no nordeste do Estado do Pará, usando Radar de Penetração no Solo (GPR, revelou a presença de falhas normais e reversas, bem como dobras, ainda não documentadas em estudos de campo prévios. As falhas são identificadas por reflexões inclinadas que cortam bruscamente reflexões vizinhas, causando freqüentes deslocamentos de camadas. As dobras são reconhecidas por reflexões fortemente ondulantes, configurando feições côncavas e convexas que medem até 50 m de amplitude e 80 a 90 m de profundidade. Estas estruturas deformacionais desenvolvem-se, principalmente

  7. 2014-2016 Mt. Etna Ground deformation imaged by SISTEM approach using GPS and SENTINEL-1A/1B TOPSAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    an uplift of about 28 mm localized in the central and western area of the volcano. Suddenly, in the first days of December 2015, volcanic activity abruptly restarted at the central crater with a very strongly explosive eruption; this kind of activity continued, with a decreasing intensity, with other episodes at the same crater and then involving, in turn, all the other three summit craters of the volcano. On December 8, when the eruptive activity was concluding, a seismic swarm affected the uppermost part of the Pernicana fault where it joins the NE-Rift. The SBAS time series have then been integrated by the SISTEM algorithm with the ground displacements measured by two GPS surveys carried out on the NE flank of the volcano at the end of April and in mid-December 2015. Results of this data integration provide a very detailed picture of the ground deformation pattern on the volcano, preceding and accompanying the vigorous eruption and the seismic swarm; besides the general inflation of the edifice during the pre-eruptive period. The January 2016 - November 2016 is the last period analyzed, characterized by the kinematic of the eastern unstable flank, with displacement involving both the Pernicana fault and the other structures dissecting this sector of the volcano.

  8. Intelligent Tires Based on Measurement of Tire Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Todoroki, Akira

    From a traffic safety point-of-view, there is an urgent need for intelligent tires as a warning system for road conditions, for optimized braking control on poor road surfaces and as a tire fault detection system. Intelligent tires, equipped with sensors for monitoring applied strain, are effective in improving reliability and control systems such as anti-lock braking systems (ABSs). In previous studies, we developed a direct tire deformation or strain measurement system with sufficiently low stiffness and high elongation for practical use, and a wireless communication system between tires and vehicle that operates without a battery. The present study investigates the application of strain data for an optimized braking control and road condition warning system. The relationships between strain sensor outputs and tire mechanical parameters, including braking torque, effective radius and contact patch length, are calculated using finite element analysis. Finally, we suggested the possibility of optimized braking control and road condition warning systems. Optimized braking control can be achieved by keeping the slip ratio constant. The road condition warning would be actuated if the recorded friction coefficient at a certain slip ratio is lower than a ‘safe’ reference value.

  9. A Comparison of Vertical Deformations Derived from Space-based Gravimetry, Ground-based Sensors, and Model-based Hydrologic Loading over the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, G.; Forman, B. A.; Loomis, B. D.; Luthcke, S. B.

    2017-12-01

    Vertical deformation of the Earth's crust due to the movement and redistribution of terrestrial freshwater can be studied using satellite measurements, ground-based sensors, hydrologic models, or a combination thereof. This current study explores the relationship between vertical deformation estimates derived from mass concentrations (mascons) from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), vertical deformation from ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) observations collected from the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), and hydrologic loading estimates based on model output from the NASA Catchment Land Surface Model (Catchment). A particular focus is made to snow-dominated basins where mass accumulates during the snow season and subsequently runs off during the ablation season. The mean seasonal cycle and the effects of atmospheric loading, non-tidal ocean loading, and glacier isostatic adjustment (GIA) are removed from the GPS observations in order to derive the vertical displacement caused predominately by hydrological processes. A low-pass filter is applied to GPS observations to remove high frequency noise. Correlation coefficients between GRACE- and GPS-based estimates at all PBO sites are calculated. GRACE-derived and Catchment-derived displacements are subtracted from the GPS height variations, respectively, in order to compute the root mean square (RMS) reduction as a means of studying the consistency between the three different methods. Results show that in most sites, the three methods exhibit good agreement. Exceptions to this generalization include the Central Valley of California where extensive groundwater pumping is witnessed in the GRACE- and GPS-based estimates, but not in the Catchment-based estimates because anthropogenic groundwater pumping activities are not included in the Catchment model. The relatively good agreement between GPS- and GRACE-derived vertical crustal displacements suggests that ground-based GPS has tremendous

  10. CLPX-Ground: ISA Soil Moisture Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of in-situ point measurements of soil moisture within three 25-km by 25-km Meso-cell Study Areas (MSAs) in northern Colorado (Fraser, North...

  11. Speckle photography applied to measure deformations of very large structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Edgar; Morgan, Chris K.

    1995-04-01

    Fundamental principles of mechanics have recently been brought to bear on problems concerning very large structures. Fields of study include tectonic plate motion, nuclear waste repository vault closure mechanisms, the flow of glacier and sea ice, and highway bridge damage assessment and residual life prediction. Quantitative observations, appropriate for formulating and verifying models, are still scarce however, so the need to adapt new methods of experimental mechanics is clear. Large dynamic systems often exist in environments subject to rapid change. Therefore, a simple field technique that incorporates short time scales and short gage lengths is required. Further, the measuring methods must yield displacements reliably, and under oft-times adverse field conditions. Fortunately, the advantages conferred by an experimental mechanics technique known as speckle photography nicely fulfill this rather stringent set of performance requirements. Speckle seemed to lend itself nicely to the application since it is robust and relatively inexpensive. Experiment requirements are minimal -- a camera, high resolution film, illumination, and an optically rough surface. Perhaps most important is speckle's distinct advantage over point-by-point methods: It maps the two dimensional displacement vectors of the whole field of interest. And finally, given the method's high spatial resolution, relatively short observation times are necessary. In this paper we discuss speckle, two variations of which were used to gage the deformation of a reinforced concrete bridge structure subjected to bending loads. The measurement technique proved to be easily applied, and yielded the location of the neutral axis self consistently. The research demonstrates the feasibility of using whole field techniques to detect and quantify surface strains of large structures under load.

  12. Ground robotic measurement of aeolian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Models of aeolian processes rely on accurate measurements of the rates of sediment transport by wind, and careful evaluation of the environmental controls of these processes. Existing field approaches typically require intensive, event-based experiments involving dense arrays of instruments. These d...

  13. Exploring deformation scenarios in Timanfaya volcanic area (Lanzarote, Canary Islands) from GNSS and ground based geodetic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, U.; Arnoso, J.; Benavent, M.; Vélez, E.; Tammaro, U.; Montesinos, F. G.

    2018-05-01

    We report on a detailed geodetic continuous monitoring in Timanfaya volcanic area (TVA), where the most intense geothermal anomalies of Lanzarote Island are located. We analyze about three years of GNSS data collected on a small network of five permanent stations, one of which at TVA, deployed on the island, and nearly 20 years of tiltmeter and strainmeter records acquired at Los Camelleros site settled in the facilities of the Geodynamics Laboratory of Lanzarote within TVA. This study is intended to contribute to understanding the active tectonics on Lanzarote Island and its origin, mainly in TVA. After characterizing and filtering out the seasonal periodicities related to "non-tectonic" sources from the geodetic records, a tentative ground deformation field is reconstructed through the analysis of both tilt, strain records and the time evolution of the baselines ranging the GNSS stations. The joint interpretation of the collected geodetic data show that the area of the strongest geothermal anomaly in TVA is currently undergoing a SE trending relative displacement at a rate of about 3 mm/year. This area even experiences a significant subsidence with a maximum rate of about 6 mm/year. Moreover, we examine the possible relation between the observed deformations and atmospheric effects by modelling the response functions of temperature and rain recorded in the laboratory. Finally, from the retrieval of the deformation patterns and the joint analysis of geodetic and environmental observations, we propose a qualitative model of the interplaying role between the hydrological systems and the geothermal anomalies. Namely, we explain the detected time correlation between rainfall and ground deformation because of the enhancement of the thermal transfer from the underground heat source driven by the infiltration of meteoric water.

  14. Ground and airborne methane measurements with an optical parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Riris, Haris; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Kawa, Stephan R.; Dawsey, Martha; Ramanathan, Anand; Mao, Jianping; Krainak, Michael; Abshire, James

    2012-06-01

    We report on ground and airborne atmospheric methane measurements with a differential absorption lidar using an optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Methane is a strong greenhouse gas on Earth and its accurate global mapping is urgently needed to understand climate change. We are developing a nanosecond-pulsed OPA for remote measurements of methane from an Earth-orbiting satellite. We have successfully demonstrated the detection of methane on the ground and from an airplane at ~11-km altitude.

  15. Ground and Airborne Methane Measurements with an Optical Parametric Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    We report on ground and airborne atmospheric methane measurements with a differential absorption lidar using an optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Methane is a strong greenhouse gas on Earth and its accurate global mapping is urgently needed to understand climate change. We are developing a nanosecond-pulsed OPA for remote measurements of methane from an Earth-orbiting satellite. We have successfully demonstrated the detection of methane on the ground and from an airplane at approximately 11-km altitude.

  16. Measurements of ground motion and SSC dipole vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Shiltsev, V.D.; Weaver, H.J.

    1993-06-01

    The results of seismic ground measurements at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site and investigations of vibrational properties of superconducting dipoles for the SSC are presented. Spectral analysis of the data obtained in the large frequency band from 0.05 Hz to 2000 Hz is done. Resonant behavior and the dipole-to-ground transform ratio are investigated. The influence of measured vibrations on SSC operations is considered

  17. Measurement of Microscopic Deformations Using Double-Exposure Holographic Interferometry and the Fourier Transform Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percival Almoro

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic deformations on the surface of a circular diaphragm were measured using double exposure holographic interferometry and Fourier transform method (FTM. The three-dimensional surface deformations were successfully visualized by applying FTM to holographic interferogram analysis. The minimum surface displacement measured was 0.317 µm. This was calibrated via the Michelson interferometry technique.

  18. Subsurface deformation measurements during a fast shallow landslide triggered by rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarinejad, Amin; Springman, Sarah M.; Akca, Devrim; Bleiker, Ernst; Gruen, Armin

    2010-05-01

    A forested area in Ruedlingen, northern Switzerland, was selected to investigate the geotechnical and hydrological response of a steep slope prior to a rainfall induced failure. Artificial rainfall was applied according to a pre-planned schedule and parameters such as pore water pressure, volumetric water content, horizontal soil pressure, temperature, piezometric water level and subsurface deformations were monitored. The latter were determined from four deformation probes that were developed in the Institute for Geotechnical Engineering, ETHZ. Strain gauges have been attached at a regular spacing along a long, slender, flexible plate to enable measurements of bending strain to be made at different points along it. The strain gauges were connected as 'half bridges' to minimize the temperature effects. A biaxial inclinometer was also installed on the top of the plate, 20 cm above the soil surface, to measure the tilt above ground level, providing more boundary conditions to determine the deformed shape of the probe. The probe is installed vertically inside the soil, while the lowest part is grouted into the stiffer layer under the topsoil, and is assumed to be stable and without any rotation. Bending strains and the inclination at the top of the probe are sampled at a frequency of 100 Hz. These are input into an algorithm to determine a polynomial relationship of deformations and rotations with depth, so that the initiation of slow movements and propagation of failure during fast soil mass movements can be examined. A 4-camera arrangement was used for the image acquisition to monitor surface movements using photogrammetric analyses. Approximately 250 white ping-pong balls were attached to the ground and used as target points. Using a network simulation tool that was developed in-house, an a priori point positioning accuracy of the ping-pong balls was estimated to be ± 10.3 mm along the horizontal direction and ± 3.5 mm in the vertical direction. The cameras

  19. Weak long-lived ground deformation related to Iwate volcanism revealed by Bayesian decomposition of strain, tilt and positioning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Minemori; Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2006-07-01

    Weak long-lived ground deformation associated with the volcanic unrest of Mt. Iwate, northeastern Japan in 1998-2002 is detected from borehole strainmeter, tiltmeter and global positioning system (GPS) data. This deformation is relatively weak (0.01 μ/day strain, 0.01 μrad/day tilt, and 0.01 cm/day displacement), but persists for a period of 5 years. To detect such weak long-term deformation, a new decomposition method based on Bayesian theory is developed and applied to the recorded data. This method is effective for extracting secular drift from the strain and tilt data, and seasonal changes from the GPS data. From a selection of possible models, a composite source model consisting of a dike series and a Mogi source is identified as the best fit to the observed data. The deformation is divided into 8 phases based on the characteristic variations in tilt and strain. Based on this model, the deformation sequence is considered to have initiated with the intrusion of a dike at intermediated depth below the summit region between February and April 1998, with short periods of shallow dikes intrusion toward the west in March and April. Shallow dike intrusion resumed in September, reaching a final volume of 5.9 × 10 6 m 3. The Mogi source is inferred to have been located 3 km beneath the western flank of the volcano, slowly inflating to a maximum volume 1.2 × 10 7 m 3 by the end of 2000, then deflating by 49% to 2002. This ground deformation was accompanied by seismic migration, from the summit region in the vicinity of the intruding dike to the west following the dike extension. This dike-correlating seismic activity ceased simultaneously with deflation of the Mogi source, suggesting that the Mogi source was a hydrothermal reservoir that was breached by the intruding dike. The Bayesian decomposition method developed in this study makes it possible to clarify the detailed characteristics of dike intrusions and the long-lived activity of the Mogi source utilizing the

  20. Splitting of ISGMR strength in the light-mass nucleus 24Mg due to ground-state deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.K. Gupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR strength distribution in 24Mg has been determined from background-free inelastic scattering of 386-MeV α particles at extreme forward angles, including 0∘. The ISGMR strength distribution has been observed for the first time to have a two-peak structure in a light-mass nucleus. This splitting of ISGMR strength is explained well by microscopic theory in terms of the prolate deformation of the ground state of 24Mg.

  1. Plastic Deformations of Measured Object Surface in Contact with Undeformable Surface of Measuring Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik Marek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring errors caused by deformation (flattening of a measured object appear under the influence of pressure force and weight of the measured object. Plastic strain, arising at the contact of a measured object and an undeformable contact tip of a measuring device, can be calculated by applying the Hertz plastic solution and the hypothesis of plastic strain. In a small area of contact between two bodies pressing against one another with force F, there appears the so-called contact stress. It can sometime reach very high values, exceeding the yield point, even when the contact pressure is relatively small. In the present work, the authors describe a theoretical solution to the problem of plastic strain between two bodies. The derived relationships enable to calculate force F during measurements of a deformable object by means of an instrument with an undeformable, spherical measuring tip. By applying the τmax hypothesis, a solution was obtained for the force F in an inexplicit form. The theoretical solution was verified with the digital simulation and experimental measurement. With the FEM method, the limit length gage was modeled in interaction with the measured shaft of a diameter d larger than the nominal one of Δl value.

  2. Plastic Deformations of Measured Object Surface in Contact with Undeformable Surface of Measuring Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Marek; Rucki, Mirosław; Paszta, Piotr; Gołębski, Rafał

    2016-10-01

    Measuring errors caused by deformation (flattening) of a measured object appear under the influence of pressure force and weight of the measured object. Plastic strain, arising at the contact of a measured object and an undeformable contact tip of a measuring device, can be calculated by applying the Hertz plastic solution and the hypothesis of plastic strain. In a small area of contact between two bodies pressing against one another with force F, there appears the so-called contact stress. It can sometime reach very high values, exceeding the yield point, even when the contact pressure is relatively small. In the present work, the authors describe a theoretical solution to the problem of plastic strain between two bodies. The derived relationships enable to calculate force F during measurements of a deformable object by means of an instrument with an undeformable, spherical measuring tip. By applying the τmax hypothesis, a solution was obtained for the force F in an inexplicit form. The theoretical solution was verified with the digital simulation and experimental measurement. With the FEM method, the limit length gage was modeled in interaction with the measured shaft of a diameter d larger than the nominal one of Δl value.

  3. Finite-element analysis of the deformation of thin Mylar films due to measurement forces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Michael Sean; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Tran, Hy D.

    2012-01-01

    Significant deformation of thin films occurs when measuring thickness by mechanical means. This source of measurement error can lead to underestimating film thickness if proper corrections are not made. Analytical solutions exist for Hertzian contact deformation, but these solutions assume relatively large geometries. If the film being measured is thin, the analytical Hertzian assumptions are not appropriate. ANSYS is used to model the contact deformation of a 48 gauge Mylar film under bearing load, supported by a stiffer material. Simulation results are presented and compared to other correction estimates. Ideal, semi-infinite, and constrained properties of the film and the measurement tools are considered.

  4. Measurement of Rotorcraft Blade Deformation Using Projection Moiré Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A. Fleming

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Projection Moiré Interferometry (PMI has been used to obtain near instantaneous, quantitative blade deformation measurements of a generic rotorcraft model at several test conditions. These laser-based measurements provide quantitative, whole field, dynamic blade deformation profiles conditionally sampled as a function of rotor azimuth. The instantaneous nature of the measurements permits computation of the mean and unsteady blade deformation, blade bending, and twist. The PMI method is presented, and the image processing steps required to obtain quantitative deformation profiles from PMI interferograms are described. Experimental results are provided which show blade bending, twist, and unsteady motion. This initial proof-of-concept test has demonstrated the capability of PMI to acquire accurate, full field rotorcraft blade deformation data.

  5. Optical coherence elastography for measuring the deformation within glass fiber composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, P.; Groves, R.M.; Benedictus, R.

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) has been applied to the study of microscopic deformation in biological tissue under compressive stress for more than a decade. In this paper, OCE has been extended for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, to deformation measurement in a glass fiber

  6. The influence of geologic structures on deformation due to ground water withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbey, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    A 62 day controlled aquifer test was conducted in thick alluvial deposits at Mesquite, Nevada, for the purpose of monitoring horizontal and vertical surface deformations using a high-precision global positioning system (GPS) network. Initial analysis of the data indicated an anisotropic aquifer system on the basis of the observed radial and tangential deformations. However, new InSAR data seem to indicate that the site may be bounded by an oblique normal fault as the subsidence bowl is both truncated to the northwest and offset from the pumping well to the south. A finite-element numerical model was developed using ABAQUS to evaluate the potential location and hydromechanical properties of the fault based on the observed horizontal deformations. Simulation results indicate that for the magnitude and direction of motion at the pumping well and at other GPS stations, which is toward the southeast (away from the inferred fault), the fault zone (5 m wide) must possess a very high permeability and storage coefficient and cross the study area in a northeast-southwest direction. Simulated horizontal and vertical displacements that include the fault zone closely match observed displacements and indicate the likelihood of the presence of the inferred fault. This analysis shows how monitoring horizontal displacements can provide valuable information about faults, and boundary conditions in general, in evaluating aquifer systems during an aquifer test.

  7. Repeated absolute gravity measurements for monitoring slow intraplate vertical deformation in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, M. J.; de Viron, O.; Scherneck, H.; Hinzen, K. G.; Williams, S. D.; Lecocq, T.; Quinif, Y.; Camelbeeck, T.

    2011-12-01

    In continental plate interiors, ground surface movements are at the limit of the noise level and close to or below the accuracy of current geodetic techniques. Absolute gravity measurements are valuable to quantify slow vertical movements, as this instrument is drift free and, unlike GPS, independent of the terrestrial reference frame. Repeated absolute gravity (AG) measurements have been performed in Oostende (Belgian coastline) and at 8 stations along a southwest-northeast profile across the Belgian Ardennes and the Roer Valley Graben (Germany), in order to estimate the tectonic deformation in the area. The AG measurements, repeated once or twice a year, can resolve elusive gravity changes with a precision better than 3.7 nm/s2/yr (95% confidence interval) after 11 years, even in difficult conditions. After 8-15 years (depending on the station), we find that the gravity rates of change lie in the [-3.1, 8.1] nm/s2/yr interval and result from a combination of anthropogenic, climatic, tectonic, and Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) effects. After correcting for the GIA, the inferred gravity rates and consequently, the vertical land movements, reduce to zero within the uncertainty level at all stations except Jülich (due to man-induced subsidence) and Sohier (possibly, an artefact due to the shortness of the time series at that station).

  8. Measurement of Local Deformations in Steel Monostrands Using Digital Image Correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Jan; Fischer, Gregor; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2014-01-01

    , difficulties with the placement of strain gauges in the vicinity of the anchorage, and, most importantly, the relatively small magnitude of deformation occurring in the monostrand. This paper focuses on the measurement of localized deformations in high-strength steel monostrands using the digital image......The local deformation mechanisms in steel monostrands have a significant influence on their fatigue life and failure mode. However, the observation and quantification of deformations in monostrands experiencing axial and transverse deformations is challenging because of their complex geometry....... To validate the proposed image-based measurement method, two different tests were performed, with the one correlation method showing good agreement. Data collected from the DIC technique creates a basis for the analysis of the fretting and localized bending behavior of the monostrand and provides relevant...

  9. Planar Near-Field Measurements of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter; Hansen, Thorkild

    2004-01-01

    Planar near-field measurements are formulated for a general ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna. A total plane-wave scattering matrix is defined for the system consisting of the GPR antenna and the planar air-soil interface. The transmitting spectrum of the GPR antenna is expressed in terms...... of measurements obtained with a buried probe as the GPR antenna moves over a scan plane on the ground. A numerical example in which the scan plane is finite validates the expressions for the spectrum of the GPR antenna....

  10. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  11. Identification of the ground deformation associated with the earthquake of April 16 Pedernales - Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, A. P.; Audin, L.; Saillard, M., Sr.; Espín, P.; Le Pennec, J. L.; Maria Jose, H.; Hollingsworth, J.; Champenois, J.; Aguilar, J.

    2016-12-01

    On April 16, 2016 a subduction seismic event (Mw 7.8) occurred near the city of Pedernales in Ecuador. This event was widely felt throughout the Ecuadorian territory. Due to the location and superficial damages of the event, the Instituto Geofisico de Quito (IG EPN), Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD) and Geology Department of EPN immediately deployed a tectonic team to evaluate damages along the coastal region induced by this event. This work presents a detailed report of the tectonic features reactivated in the upper plate, which can be directly linked to the occurrence of the 20km deep subduction event. In this study, we review the tectonics of the region and identify the directions of the main reactivated features such as induced lateral spreading and landslides. Evidence for liquefaction will also be presented. Observations of coseismic and postseismic deformation associated with the 2016 Mw = 7.8 Pedernales earthquake in Ecuador should provide constraints on the spatial heterogeneities of frictional properties along the subduction megathrust. We observed that the bulk of coseismic compressive deformation in the upper plate occurs at both ends of the identified rupture zone near Pedernales and Canoa. Additional compressional features and vertical displacements greater than 40 cm are mapped in Manta and Bahía de Caraquez, southward from the ruptured region. Given the observations, barrier effects may be attributed to locked patches and reactivated crustal faults. However, no large scale uplift has been observed along the coastline, suggesting that coseismic and postseismic deformation have not resulted in permanent strain in the forearc region.

  12. In situ measurement of grain rotation during deformation of polycrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margulies, L.; Winther, G.; Poulsen, H.F.

    2001-01-01

    Texture evolution governs many of the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of polycrystalline materials, but texture models have only been tested on the macroscopic Level, which makes it hard to distinguish between approaches that are conceptually very different. Here, we present...... a universal method for providing data on the underlying structural dynamics at the grain and subgrain Level. The method is based on diffraction with focused hard x-rays, First results relate to the tensile deformation of pure aluminum. Experimental grain rotations are inconsistent with the classical Taylor...

  13. Practical aspects of tritium measurement in ground and surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitzsche, O. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik; Hebert, D. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1997-03-01

    Tritium measurements are a powerful tool in hydrological and hydrogeological investigations for detecting mean residence times of several water reservoirs. Due to the low tritium activities in precipitation, ground and surface waters a low level measurement is necessary. Therefore often the liquid scintillation counting after an electrolytic enrichment of water is used. In this paper some practical aspects and problems of measurement are discussed and the problem of contamination in low level laboratories is shown. (orig.)

  14. Modeling ground deformation associated with the destructive earthquakes occurring on Mt. Etna's southeastern flank in 1984

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cannavò

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Timpe Fault System is the source of very shallow but destructive earthquakes that affect several towns and villages on the eastern flank of Mt. Etna (Italy. In 1984, several seismic events, and specifically on 19 and 25 October, caused one fatality, 12 injuries and produced serious damage in the Zafferana and Acireale territories. This seismicity was mainly related to the activity of the Fiandaca Fault, one of the structures belonging to the Timpe Fault System. We inverted ground deformation data collected by a geodimeter trilateration network set up in 1977 at a low altitude along the eastern side of the volcano in order to define the Timpe Fault System faulting mechanisms linked to the seismicity in 1984. We have found that in the period May 1980–October 1984, the Fiandaca Fault was affected by a strike-slip and normal dip-slip of about 20.4 and 12.7 cm respectively. This result is kinematically consistent with field observations of the coseismic ground ruptures along the fault but it is notably large compared to displacements estimated by seismicity, then suggesting that most of the slip over the fault plane was aseismic. The results once again confirm how seismicity and its relation with ground ruptures and creep displacement represent a very high hazard to the several towns and villages situated along the Timpe Fault System.

  15. THE EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION OF THE GROUNDING DEVICE RESISTANCE MEASUREMENT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Nizhevskyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper considers experimental research of three-electrode units for measuring the resistance of grounding devices for different purposes. Methodology. The experimental study of the method of resistance measurement of grounding devices for any design in any soil structure using the method of physical modeling is presented. Results. By results of model operation the set of equations of the sixth order is solved. It allowed to determine the own and mutual impedance in the three-electrode unit with high accuracy without searching the point of zero potential. Features of measuring and defining the own and relative resistances of various combinations of electrodes for three-electrode measuring unit are considered. Originality. The necessity of finding a zero potential point is excluded. Practical value. The proposed method provides the smallest possible spacing of potential electrodes outside the grounding devices. This reduces the wiring length measurement circuit in several times, increases the ratio «signal – noise», removes the restrictions on building of the territory outside the test grounding device.

  16. Stress partitioning behavior of multilayered steels during tensile deformation measured by in situ neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, M.; Inoue, J.; Nambu, S.; Xu, P.; Akita, K.; Suzuki, H.; Koseki, T.

    2012-01-01

    Stress partitioning in multilayered steels consisting of martensitic and austenitic layers was measured during tensile deformation by in situ neutron diffraction measurements to investigate the mechanism of the improved strength–elongation balance. The deformation mode can be classified into three stages, and the results indicate that the applied stress is effectively transferred to the martensitic phase, because no stress concentration sites exist, owing to the multilayered structure. Hence, even as-quenched martensite deformed uniformly, resulting in improved strength–elongation balance in multilayered steels.

  17. Shape and deformation measurements of 3D objects using volume speckle field and phase retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anand, A; Chhaniwal, VK; Almoro, Percival

    2009-01-01

    Shape and deformation measurement of diffusely reflecting 3D objects are very important in many application areas, including quality control, nondestructive testing, and design. When rough objects are exposed to coherent beams, the scattered light produces speckle fields. A method to measure the ......-sized deformation induced on a metal sheet was obtained upon subtraction of the phase, corresponding to unloaded and loaded states. Results from computer simulations confirm the experiments. (C) 2009 Optical Society of America....

  18. Measurements of residual deformations of steel-aluminum conductors in operating overhead lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durov, E.V.; Kesel' man, L.M.; Treiger, A.S.

    1982-12-01

    Experience in the operation of overhead power lines using steel-aluminum conductors is presented. Measurements were taken on the residual deformation of the steel-aluminum lines to determine the amount of sag increase and to forecast this increase for the entire period of operation. It is recommended that the work on measuring the residual deformation in the power lines be extended to a broader range of operating conditions such as conductors, spans, and climate conditions.

  19. Equipment for measuring autogenous RH-change and autogenous deformation in cement paste and concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1997-01-01

    Equipment for measuring autogenous RH-change and autogenous deformation in cement paste and concrete are presented. The equipment consists of a Rotronic Hygroskop DT including a measuring chamber for measuring autogenous RH-change in cement paste and concrete, a paste dilatometer for measuring...

  20. AMS Ground Truth Measurements: Calibrations and Test Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasiolek, Piotr T. [National Security Technologies, LLC

    2015-12-01

    Airborne gamma spectrometry is one of the primary techniques used to define the extent of ground contamination after a radiological incident. Its usefulness was demonstrated extensively during the response to the Fukushima NPP accident in March-May 2011. To map ground contamination, a set of scintillation detectors is mounted on an airborne platform (airplane or helicopter) and flown over contaminated areas. The acquisition system collects spectral information together with the aircraft position and altitude every second. To provide useful information to decision makers, the count data, expressed in counts per second (cps), need to be converted to a terrestrial component of the exposure rate at 1 meter (m) above ground, or surface activity of the isotopes of concern. This is done using conversion coefficients derived from calibration flights. During a large-scale radiological event, multiple flights may be necessary and may require use of assets from different agencies. However, because production of a single, consistent map product depicting the ground contamination is the primary goal, it is critical to establish a common calibration line very early into the event. Such a line should be flown periodically in order to normalize data collected from different aerial acquisition systems and that are potentially flown at different flight altitudes and speeds. In order to verify and validate individual aerial systems, the calibration line needs to be characterized in terms of ground truth measurements This is especially important if the contamination is due to short-lived radionuclides. The process of establishing such a line, as well as necessary ground truth measurements, is described in this document.

  1. Measurement of curvature and twist of a deformed object using digital holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wen; Quan Chenggen; Cho Jui Tay

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of curvature and twist is an important aspect in the study of object deformation. In recent years, several methods have been proposed to determine curvature and twist of a deformed object using digital shearography. Here we propose a novel method to determine the curvature and twist of a deformed object using digital holography and a complex phasor. A sine/cosine transformation method and two-dimensional short time Fourier transform are proposed subsequently to process the wrapped phase maps. It is shown that high-quality phase maps corresponding to curvature and twist can be obtained. An experiment is conducted to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method

  2. Measurements of Active Tectonic Deformation on the Guerrero Coast, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, T.; Cundy, A.; Carranza-Edwards, A.; Morales, E.; Kostoglodov, V.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2004-12-01

    The study of tectonic deformation rates using displaced shoreline features is relatively well-established, and has provided much useful information on seismic hazard. Such studies have frequently been complemented by analysis of the coastal sedimentary record, where past marine to terrestrial environmental changes (and vice versa) may be recorded by clear changes in stratigraphy. Studies of this type are particularly valuable for tectonically-active areas where the preservation of former shoreline features is poor, or where long-term subsidence has resulted in their erosion, drowning or burial. The specific objective of this study is to derive rates of tectonic deformation from geomorphic and stratigraphic studies of the Guerrero coastal area, and to examine the feasibility of this stratigraphic approach in the coastal lagoons of the Mexican Pacific coast, in the Guerrero gap. The Guerrero gap coastal area, where a major earthquake is expected to occur, parallels the Cocos plate subduction zone. Here convergence rates vary from 5.2 cm/yr to 5.8 cm/yr. The Guerrero gap has experienced several historical earthquakes, notably the 1911 (7.8 Ms). However, no large magnitude events since the 1911 earthquake and only a few Ms~6 events have occurred near the Guerrero gap edges. It is expected that a major interplate earthquake of estimated magnitude Mw=8.1 to 8.4 has a high probability to occur. Landforms within the Guerrero gap indicate that the coast is subsiding. A series of key indicators such as elongated islands reminiscent of ancient barriers, submerged barriers island, extensive marshy environments, increased depths in the lagoons, and submerged anthropogenic features (shell mounds), among others, suggest active tectonic subsidence of the coast. In contrast, the adjacent northwest area off the Guerrero gap exhibits landforms characteristic of tectonic uplift (marine terraces and uplifted beach ridges), indicating a different seismo-tectonic regime northwest of the

  3. Ground deformation source model at Kuchinoerabu-jima volcano during 2006-2014 as revealed by campaign GPS observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kohei; Iguchi, Masato

    2017-12-01

    We analyzed campaign Global Positioning System observation data in Kuchinoerabu-jima during 2006-2014. Most benchmarks located around Shin-dake crater showed crater-centered radial horizontal displacements. Horizontal displacements at western rim of the Shin-dake crater were tended to be larger compared to those at eastern rim. In addition, benchmark KUC14 which locates near the cliff at Furu-dake showed westward horizontal displacement rather than crater-centered radial (southward) one. Meanwhile, small displacements were detected at the benchmarks located at the foot of Kuchinoerabu-jima. We modeled the observed displacements applying a finite element method. We set entire FE domain as 100 × 100 × 50 km3. We set top of the domain as a free surface, and sides and bottom to be fixed boundaries. Topography was introduced in the area within Kuchinoerabu-jima using digital elevation model data provided by Kagoshima prefecture and elevation information from Google earth, and elevation of the outside area was assumed to be sea level. We assumed a stratified structure based on a one-dimensional P-wave velocity structure. We applied a vertical spheroid source model and searched optimal values of horizontal location, depth, equatorial and polar radiuses, and internal pressure change of the source using the forward modeling method. A spherical source with a radius of 50 m was obtained beneath the Shin-dake crater at a depth of 400 m above sea level. The internal pressure increase of 361 MPa yields its volume increase of 31,700 m3. Taking effects of topography and heterogeneity of ground into account allowed reproduction of overall deformation in Kuchinoerabu-jima. The location of deformation source coincides with hypocenters of shallow volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes and the aquifer estimated from a two-dimensional resistivity model by audio-frequency magnetotellurics method. The obtained deformation source may be corresponding to the pressurized aquifer, and shallow VT

  4. Experimental Investigation of Aeroelastic Deformation of Slender Wings at Supersonic Speeds Using a Video Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    A video-based photogrammetric model deformation system was established as a dedicated optical measurement technique at supersonic speeds in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This system was used to measure the wing twist due to aerodynamic loads of two supersonic commercial transport airplane models with identical outer mold lines but different aeroelastic properties. One model featured wings with deflectable leading- and trailing-edge flaps and internal channels to accommodate static pressure tube instrumentation. The wings of the second model were of single-piece construction without flaps or internal channels. The testing was performed at Mach numbers from 1.6 to 2.7, unit Reynolds numbers of 1.0 million to 5.0 million, and angles of attack from -4 degrees to +10 degrees. The video model deformation system quantified the wing aeroelastic response to changes in the Mach number, Reynolds number concurrent with dynamic pressure, and angle of attack and effectively captured the differences in the wing twist characteristics between the two test articles.

  5. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes. PMID:26055494

  6. Minimising the effect of nanoparticle deformation in intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babic, Bakir; Lawn, Malcolm A.; Coleman, Victoria A.; Jämting, Åsa K.; Herrmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The results of systematic height measurements of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles using intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (IC-AM-AFM) are presented. The experimental findings demonstrate that PS nanoparticles deform during AFM imaging, as indicated by a reduction in the measured particle height. This deformation depends on the IC-AM-AFM imaging parameters, material composition, and dimensional properties of the nanoparticles. A model for nanoparticle deformation occurring during IC-AM-AFM imaging is developed as a function of the peak force which can be calculated for a particular set of experimental conditions. The undeformed nanoparticle height can be estimated from the model by extrapolation to zero peak force. A procedure is proposed to quantify and minimise nanoparticle deformation during IC-AM-AFM imaging, based on appropriate adjustments of the experimental control parameters.

  7. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Ground Validation (GV) Science Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2008-01-01

    For pre-launch algorithm development and post-launch product evaluation Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Ground Validation (GV) goes beyond direct comparisons of surface rain rates between ground and satellite measurements to provide the means for improving retrieval algorithms and model applications.Three approaches to GPM GV include direct statistical validation (at the surface), precipitation physics validation (in a vertical columns), and integrated science validation (4-dimensional). These three approaches support five themes: core satellite error characterization; constellation satellites validation; development of physical models of snow, cloud water, and mixed phase; development of cloud-resolving model (CRM) and land-surface models to bridge observations and algorithms; and, development of coupled CRM-land surface modeling for basin-scale water budget studies and natural hazard prediction. This presentation describes the implementation of these approaches.

  8. Optimal ground motion intensity measure for long-period structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Minsheng; Du, Hongbiao; Zeng, Qingli; Cui, Jie; Jiang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to select the most appropriate ground motion intensity measure (IM) that is used in selecting earthquake records for the dynamic time history analysis of long-period structures. For this purpose, six reinforced concrete frame-core wall structures, designed according to modern seismic codes, are studied through dynamic time history analyses with a set of twelve selected earthquake records. Twelve IMs and two types of seismic damage indices, namely, the maximum seismic response-based and energy-based parameters, are chosen as the examined indices. Selection criteria such as correlation, efficiency, and proficiency are considered in the selection process. The optimal IM is identified by means of a comprehensive evaluation using a large number of data of correlation, efficiency, and proficiency coefficients. Numerical results illustrate that peak ground velocity is the optimal one for long-period structures and peak ground displacement is also a close contender. As compared to previous reports, the spectral-correlated parameters can only be taken as moderate IMs. Moreover, the widely used peak ground acceleration in the current seismic codes is considered inappropriate for long-period structures. (paper)

  9. Point-Connecting Measurements of the Hallux Valgus Deformity: A New Measurement and Its Clinical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Ho; Boedijono, Dimas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate new point-connecting measurements for the hallux valgus angle (HVA) and the first intermetatarsal angle (IMA), which can reflect the degree of subluxation of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ). Also, this study attempted to compare the validity of midline measurements and the new point-connecting measurements for the determination of HVA and IMA values. Materials and Methods Sixty feet of hallux valgus patients who underwent surgery between 2007 and 2011 were classified in terms of the severity of HVA, congruency of the first MTPJ, and type of chevron metatarsal osteotomy. On weight-bearing dorsal-plantar radiographs, HVA and IMA values were measured and compared preoperatively and postoperatively using both the conventional and new methods. Results Compared with midline measurements, point-connecting measurements showed higher inter- and intra-observer reliability for preoperative HVA/IMA and similar or higher inter- and intra-observer reliability for postoperative HVA/IMA. Patients who underwent distal chevron metatarsal osteotomy (DCMO) had higher intraclass correlation coefficient for inter- and intra-observer reliability for pre- and post-operative HVA and IMA measured by the point-connecting method compared with the midline method. All differences in the preoperative HVAs and IMAs determined by both the midline method and point-connecting methods were significant between the deviated group and subluxated groups (p=0.001). Conclusion The point-connecting method for measuring HVA and IMA in the subluxated first MTPJ may better reflect the severity of a HV deformity with higher reliability than the midline method, and is more useful in patients with DCMO than in patients with proximal chevron metatarsal osteotomy. PMID:26996576

  10. Point-Connecting Measurements of the Hallux Valgus Deformity: A New Measurement and Its Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Ho; Ahn, Ji-Yong; Boedijono, Dimas

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate new point-connecting measurements for the hallux valgus angle (HVA) and the first intermetatarsal angle (IMA), which can reflect the degree of subluxation of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ). Also, this study attempted to compare the validity of midline measurements and the new point-connecting measurements for the determination of HVA and IMA values. Sixty feet of hallux valgus patients who underwent surgery between 2007 and 2011 were classified in terms of the severity of HVA, congruency of the first MTPJ, and type of chevron metatarsal osteotomy. On weight-bearing dorsal-plantar radiographs, HVA and IMA values were measured and compared preoperatively and postoperatively using both the conventional and new methods. Compared with midline measurements, point-connecting measurements showed higher inter- and intra-observer reliability for preoperative HVA/IMA and similar or higher inter- and intra-observer reliability for postoperative HVA/IMA. Patients who underwent distal chevron metatarsal osteotomy (DCMO) had higher intraclass correlation coefficient for inter- and intra-observer reliability for pre- and post-operative HVA and IMA measured by the point-connecting method compared with the midline method. All differences in the preoperative HVAs and IMAs determined by both the midline method and point-connecting methods were significant between the deviated group and subluxated groups (p=0.001). The point-connecting method for measuring HVA and IMA in the subluxated first MTPJ may better reflect the severity of a HV deformity with higher reliability than the midline method, and is more useful in patients with DCMO than in patients with proximal chevron metatarsal osteotomy.

  11. Measuring medial longitudinal arch deformation during gait. A reliability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bencke, Jesper; Christiansen, Ditte; Jensen, Anne Kathrine Bendrup

    2012-01-01

    during gait and to compare this method with a static measure and a 2D dynamic method. Fifty-two feet (26 healthy male participants) were tested twice 4-9 days apart in a biomechanical gait analysis laboratory using a 3D three-marker foot model, a 2D video-based model for the measurement of MLAD during...

  12. Measuring co-seismic deformation of the Sichuan earthquake by satellite differential INSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghong; Gong, Wenyu; Zhang, Jixian

    2008-12-01

    The Sichuan Earthquake, occurred on May 12, 2008, is the strongest earthquake to hit China since the 1976 Tangshan earthquake. The earthquake had a magnitude of M 8.0, and caused surface deformation greater than 3 meters. This paper presents the research work of measuring the co-seismic deformations of the earthquake with satellite differential interferometric SAR technique. Four L-band SAR images were used to form the interferogram with 2 pre- scenes imaged on Feb 17, 2008 and 2 post- scenes on May 19, 2008. The Digital Elevation Models extracted from 1:50,000-scale national geo-spatial database were used to remove the topographic contribution and form a differential interferogram. The interferogram presents very high coherence in most areas, although the pre- and post- images were acquired with time interval of 92 days. This indicates that the L-band PALSAR sensor is very powerful for interferometry applications. The baseline error is regarded as the main phase error source in the differential interferogram. Due to the difficulties of doing field works immediately after the earthquake, only one deformation measurement recorded by a permanent GPS station is obtained for this research. An approximation method is proposed to eliminate the orbital phase error with one control point. The derived deformation map shows similar spatial pattern and deformation magnitude compared with deformation field generated by seismic inversion method.

  13. Measurement of full-field deformation induced by a dc electrical field in organic insulator films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudou L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital image correlation method (DIC using the correlation coefficient curve-fitting for full-field surface deformation measurements of organic insulator films is investigated in this work. First the validation of the technique was undertaken. The computer-generated speckle images and the measurement of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE of aluminium are used to evaluate the measurement accuracy of the technique. In a second part the technique is applied to measure the mechanical deformation induced by electrical field application to organic insulators. For that Poly(ethylene naphthalene 2,6-dicarboxylate (PEN thin films were subjected to DC voltage stress and DIC provides the full-field induced deformations of the test films. The obtained results show that the DIC is a practical and robust tool for better comprehension of mechanical behaviour of the organic insulator films under electrical stress.

  14. A thermal comparator sensor for measuring autogenous deformation in hardening Portland cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Thomas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a simple and accurate experimental device specially developed to measure autogenous deformation in hardening cement-based materials. The measuring system consists of a so-called thermal comparator sensor and a modular thermostatically controlled system. The operating principle...... of the thermal comparator is based on thermal expansion of aluminium. A particular characteristic of the measuring system is the fixation of the thermal comparator sensor to the deforming specimen. The modular system ensures effective thermostatic control of the hydrating cement paste samples. The technique...

  15. Real-time Inversion of Tsunami Source from GNSS Ground Deformation Observations and Tide Gauges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcas, D.; Wei, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Over the last decade, the NOAA Center for Tsunami Research (NCTR) has developed an inversion technique to constrain tsunami sources based on the use of Green's functions in combination with data reported by NOAA's Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART®) systems. The system has consistently proven effective in providing highly accurate tsunami forecasts of wave amplitude throughout an entire basin. However, improvement is necessary in two critical areas: reduction of data latency for near-field tsunami predictions and reduction of maintenance cost of the network. Two types of sensors have been proposed as supplementary to the existing network of DART®systems: Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations and coastal tide gauges. The use GNSS stations to provide autonomous geo-spatial positioning at specific sites during an earthquake has been proposed in recent years to supplement the DART® array in tsunami source inversion. GNSS technology has the potential to provide substantial contributions in the two critical areas of DART® technology where improvement is most necessary. The present study uses GNSS ground displacement observations of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake in combination with NCTR operational database of Green's functions, to produce a rapid estimate of tsunami source based on GNSS observations alone. The solution is then compared with that obtained via DART® data inversion and the difficulties in obtaining an accurate GNSS-based solution are underlined. The study also identifies the set of conditions required for source inversion from coastal tide-gauges using the degree of nonlinearity of the signal as a primary criteria. We then proceed to identify the conditions and scenarios under which a particular gage could be used to invert a tsunami source.

  16. Budget of shallow magma plumbing system at Asama Volcano, Japan, revealed by ground deformation and volcanic gas studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazahaya, Ryunosuke; Aoki, Yosuke; Shinohara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Multiple cycles of the intensive volcanic gas discharge and ground deformation (inflation and deflation) were observed at Asama Volcano, Japan, from 2000 to 2011. Magma budget of the shallow magma plumbing system was estimated on the basis of the volcanic gas emission rates and ground deformation data. Recent inflations observed in 2004 and 2008 were modeled as a dike intrusion to 2-3 km west of Asama Volcano. Previous studies proposed that magma ascends from a midcrustal magma reservoir to the dike and reaches the surface via a sinuous conduit which connects the dike to the summit. The intensive volcanic sulfur dioxide discharge of up to 4600 t/d at the volcano was modeled by magma convective degassing through this magma pathway. The volcano deflates as shrinkage of the magma in a reservoir by volcanic gas discharge. We estimated the volume change of the dike modeled based on the GPS observations, the volume decrease of the magma by the volcanic gas discharge, and the amount of degassed magma produced to calculate the magma budget. The results show that the volume decrease of the magma by the volcanic gas discharge was larger than the volume change of the dike during the inflation periods. This indicates that a significant volume of magma at least more than 2 times larger than the volume change of the dike was supplied from the midcrustal magma reservoir to the dike. The volume decrease of the dike was comparable with the volume decrease of the magma by the volcanic gas discharge during the deflation periods. The long-term deflation trend of the dike and the volume of degassed magma (108-9 m3) suggest that the degassed magma produced is not stored in the dike and the magma is mainly supplied from the midcrustal magma reservoir. In both periods, the volume of degassed magma produced was 1 order of magnitude larger than the volume change of the dike. This indicates that the actual volume of the magma supplied from the midcrustal magma reservoir is up to 1 order of

  17. Investigation on coupling error characteristics in angular rate matching based ship deformation measurement approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuai; Wu, Wei; Wang, Xingshu; Xu, Zhiguang

    2018-01-01

    The coupling error in the measurement of ship hull deformation can significantly influence the attitude accuracy of the shipborne weapons and equipments. It is therefore important to study the characteristics of the coupling error. In this paper, an comprehensive investigation on the coupling error is reported, which has a potential of deducting the coupling error in the future. Firstly, the causes and characteristics of the coupling error are analyzed theoretically based on the basic theory of measuring ship deformation. Then, simulations are conducted for verifying the correctness of the theoretical analysis. Simulation results show that the cross-correlation between dynamic flexure and ship angular motion leads to the coupling error in measuring ship deformation, and coupling error increases with the correlation value between them. All the simulation results coincide with the theoretical analysis.

  18. Geodetic measurement of deformation in the Ventura basin region, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Hager, Bradford H.; King, Robert W.; Herring, Thomas A.

    1993-12-01

    We have measured the deformation in the Ventura basin region, southern California, with Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements carried out over 4.6 years between 1987 and 1992. The deformation within our network is spatically variable on scales of tens of kilometers, with strain rates reaching 0.6 +/- 1 micro-rad/yr in the east-central basin. Blocklike rotations are observed south and northwest of the basin where the maximum shear strain rates are an order of magnitude lower (0.06 +/- 1 micro-rad/yr to the south). We also observed clockwise rotations of 1 deg - 7 deg/m.y. Shear strain rates determined by comparing angle changes from historical triangulation spanning several decades and GPS measurements give consistent, though less precise, results. The geodetic rates of shortening across the basin and Western Transverse Ranges are lower than those estimated from geological observations, but the patterns of deformation from the two methods agree qualitatively.

  19. Evaluation of Grounding Impedance of a Complex Lightning Protective System Using Earth Ground Clamp Measurements and ATP Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Rakov, V. A.; Mata, Angel G.

    2010-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. A total of nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long, on average) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each of the nine downconductors is connected to a 7.62-meter radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced 6-meter long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bounded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple direction around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall of potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the downconductors grounding impedance, an Earth Ground Clamp (a stakeless grounding resistance measuring device) and a LPS Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model are used. The Earth Ground Clamp is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding impedance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the Earth Ground Clamp measurements.

  20. Application of image analysis method for measurement of fabric stretch deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariyapunya, N.; Baheti, S.

    2017-10-01

    For design of comfortable knitted fabric garments, it is necessary to know their distribution of elastic properties under the deformation. The standard tensile testing methods are not sufficient to explain distribution of these stretch properties. However, digital image analysis technique adjusted to the standard tensile test method can perform detailed study on distribution of local elastic deformation properties. The aim of this research was to develop a new method for the measurement of the local deformations between dots of stretch knitted fabrics during tensile testing. The image analysis approach was selected to calculate the gradient deformation tensor under the extension ranging from 10 %, 20%, 30% and 40 % in respective course, wale and bias directions. Moreover, this method was applied to know the deformation distribution on cylindrical surface as well by stretching the fabric under different extension. Subsequently the analysis of the deformation distribution by image processing system in MATLAB was carried out to determine the compression between cylindrical model and specimens. The results of image analysis were compared with ASTM D4964-96 standard and the actual obtained experimental results.

  1. Ground penetrating radar measurements at the ONKALO research tunnel and eastern part of the Olkiluoto investigation area at July 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipola, V.; Tarvainen, A.-M.

    2007-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) measurements were carried out at ONKALO research site in summer 2006. Measurements included 400 metres of measurements inside ONKALO access tunnel and about 1800 metres of measurements on the ground, at the eastern parts of Olkiluoto investigation area. The purpose of the measurements done inside the access tunnel was to investigate, whether it would be possible to locate deformation structures or long fractures in the rock mass below the tunnel. The purpose of the measurements made on top of the ground was to investigate, whether it would be possible to locate glacio-isostatic faults from the soils. A secondary target was to try and locate the rock surface. The chosen part of ONKALO tunnel was measured using five different frequencies, which enabled comparing the results to each other. It also enabled getting a higher resolution picture of the top rock, than what would have been possible using only one low-frequency antenna. The on-the-ground measurements were measured using only one frequency. (orig.)

  2. Surface deformation induced by ground water pumping in Taipei Basin: A case study in rban underground construction of Taipei metro station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Chin; Hu, Jyr-Ching

    2017-04-01

    Since 1955, the rapid development of population has requested for large amount of water usage in Taipei city. Thus, the overuse of ground water leads to the land subsidence rate up to 5 cm/yr. In 1989, the government stated to put restrictions on water pumping. Consequently, ground water recovered and resulted in the a wideapred uplift in Taipei basin. Due to the underground transportation and wiring, ground water were massively pumped for the safety of construction sites. In this study, persistent scatterer interferometry technique is used for processing 37 high resolution X-band radar images to characterize deformation map in the period from May 2011 to April 2015. From the ground table records of 30 wells in Taipei basin, the results indicated that the main factor to the surface deformation of Taipei basin is the elevation change of water table. In the case of Wuku groundwater well, the elevation change of the ground water table is about 15 m during September 2011 to April 2015. In the same period of the time, the change of surface deformation within 100 m of Wuku groundwater well is consistent to the elevation change of ground water table, and is more than 5 cm along line of sight. The storability is roughly constant across most of the aquifer with values between 0.8 x 10-4 and 1.3 x 10-3. Moreover, in the case of Taipei metro construction, according to the analytical results of radar image and the 380 vertical control points of Taipei, the high water pumping before the underground construction project will inflict surface deformation. It is noticeable that, the Jingmei Formation and the Wuku Formation are composed of the sediments with high porosity. Thus, the actual land subsidence caused by water pumping would be five times than the underground construction areas.

  3. Slip-weakening distance and energy budget inferred from near-fault ground deformation during the 2016 Mw7.8 Kaikōura earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiro; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Hamling, Ian James

    2017-05-01

    The 2016 M7.8 Kaikōura (New Zealand) earthquake struck the east coast of the northern South Island, resulting in strong ground shaking and large surface fault slip. Since the earthquake was well recorded by a local strong-motion seismic network, near-fault data may provide direct measurements of dynamic parameters associated with the fault-weakening process. Here we estimate a proxy for slip-weakening distance Dc '', defined as double the fault-parallel displacement at the time of peak ground velocity, from accelerograms recorded at a near-fault station. Three-component ground displacements were recovered from the double numerical integration of accelerograms, and the corresponding final displacements are validated against coseismic displacement from geodetic data. The estimated Dc '' is 4.9 m at seismic station KEKS located ˜2.7 km from a segment of the Kekerengu fault where large surface fault slip (˜12 m) has been observed. The inferred Dc '' is the largest value ever estimated from near-fault strong motion data, yet it appears to follow the scaling of Dc '' with final slip for several large strike-slip earthquakes. The energy budget of the M7.8 Kaikōura earthquake inferred from the scaling of Dc '' with final slip indicates that a large amount of energy was dissipated by on- and off-fault inelastic deformation during the propagation of the earthquake rupture, resulting in a slower average rupture speed (≲2.0 km/s).

  4. Measurements of very large deformations in potash salt in conjunction with an ongoing mining operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, A.R.; Christensen, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    Room and pillar deformation were measured in conjunction with a relatively new type of mining operation in a southeastern New Mexico potash mine. The extraction ration was approximately 90 percent in a first mining operation. Due to severe deformations encountered, instrumentation had to be developed/modified for these measurements. This paper concentrates on experiment design, design of special instrumentation, field installation of equipment, and presentation of the data. Measurements made include extensometers in the pillar, in the floor and ceiling in the room between pillars, absolute level measurements, floor ceiling closure, and stress (strain) measurements. Associated laboratory rock mechanics measurements of samples from the mine are being done separately. Two separate room pillar complexes were instrumented. In the first complex, floor-ceiling deformations of approximately 1 inch/day and pillar deformations around 1/2 inch/day were measured. In the second complex, instrumentation was installed while the pillar was a part of a long wall and the subsequent sequential mining (long wall-pillar with only one adjoining room on one side - pillar in the middle of room pillar complex) was observed. Data return from this operation was good

  5. Earthquake Triggering Inferred from Rupture Histories, DInSAR Ground Deformation and Stress-Transfer Modelling: The Case of Central Italy During August 2016-January 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, G. A.; Ganas, A.; Agalos, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Triantafyllou, I.; Kontoes, Ch.; Papoutsis, I.; Diakogianni, G.

    2017-10-01

    On August 24, October 26 and 30, 2016, Central Apennines (Italy) were hit by three shallow, normal faulting very strong earthquakes rupturing in an NW-SE striking zone. Event 3 (Norcia) occurred between event 1 (Amatrice) at the SE and event 2 (Visso) at the NW of the entire rupture zone. The rupture histories of the three events, as revealed by teleseismic P-wave inversion, showed that all were characterized by bilateral rupture process with stronger rupture directivity towards NW for events 1 and 3 and towards SSE for event 2. Maximum seismic slip of 1.2, 0.8, and 1.4 m in the hypocenter and magnitude of M w 6.2, 6.1, and 6.5 were calculated for the three events, respectively. DInSaR measurements based on Sentinel-1 and 2 satellite images showed ground deformation directivity from events 1 and 2 towards event 3, which is consistent with the rupture process directivity. For events 1, 2, and 3, the maximum ground subsidence was found equal to 0.2, 0.15, and 0.35 m. Based on rupture directivity and ground deformation pattern, we put forward the hypothesis that the area of the second event was stress loaded by the first one and that both the first and second earthquake events caused stress loading in the area, where the third event ruptured. Coulomb stress-transfer modelling yields strong evidence in favor of our hypothesis. The stress in the fault plane of event 2 was increased by 0.19 bars due to loading from event 1. Event 3 fault plane was loaded by an amount of 2 bars, due to the combined stress transfer from the two previous events, despite its proximity to the negative/positive lobe boundary. The three events produced combined stress loading of more than +0.5 bar along the Apennines to the NW and SE of the entire rupture zone. In the SE stress lobe, a series of strong earthquakes of M w 5.3, 5.6, and 5.7 occurred on January 18, 2017, but likely, seismic potential remains in the area. We consider that in the NW and more extensive stress lobe, the seismic

  6. Deformation Measurements of Gabion Walls Using Image Based Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Fraštia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The image based modeling finds use in applications where it is necessary to reconstructthe 3D surface of the observed object with a high level of detail. Previous experiments showrelatively high variability of the results depending on the camera type used, the processingsoftware, or the process evaluation. The authors tested the method of SFM (Structure fromMotion to determine the stability of gabion walls. The results of photogrammetricmeasurements were compared to precise geodetic point measurements.

  7. Deformation Measurement Of Lumbar Vertebra By Holographic Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshiro; Kojima, Arata; Ogawa, Ryoukei; Iwata, Koichi; Nagata, Ryo

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of normal lumbar vertebra and one with the interarticular part cut off to simulate hemi-spondylolysis were measured by the double exposure holographic interferometry. In the normal lumbar vertebra, displacement due to the load applied to the inferior articular process was greater than that of superior articular process under the same load. The interarticular part was subjected to the high stress. From these points, one of the valuable data to consider the cause of spondylolysis was obtained.

  8. Elastic strains of cementite in a pearlite steel during tensile deformation measured by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanie, A.; Tomota, Y.; Torii, S.; Kamiyama, T.

    2004-01-01

    Lattice plane strain, i.e., elastic strain, in cementite plates embedded in the ferrite matrix was measured by in situ neutron diffraction during tensile deformation for a hypereutectoid pearlite steel. The employment of time-of-flight method and microstructure control enable us to measure the shift of cementite peaks along tensile and transverse directions at the applied stress up to 1.6 GPa. The highest elastic strains of cementite determined was approximately 0.015. Heterogeneous plastic deformation between ferrite and cementite as well as among ferrite blocks are discussed. (author)

  9. The analysis of the bedrock deformation in Olkiluoto using precise levelling measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saaranen, V.; Rouhiainen, P.; Suurmaeki, H.

    2014-01-01

    In order to research vertical bedrock deformations in the Olkiluoto area, Posiva Oy and the Finnish Geodetic Institute began monitoring with precise levelling in 2003. At the moment, the measuring plan includes a loop between the monitoring GPS stations around the island, a levelling line from the island to the mainland, levelling loops to ONKALO, the final disposal site, and VLJ, the low and intermediate level waste repository there. The levelling to the mainland has been performed every fourth year and the levelling of the GPS stations every second year. The micro loops (ONKALO and VLJ) have been measured annually. In this report, we use three-step method to research a vertical deformation of the Olkiluoto area. Firstly, the linear deformation rate in the area has been determined by the least squares adjustment of the levelling data. It varies from -0.2 mm/yr to +0.2 mm/yr. Secondly, local deformations have been analysed by comparing the height differences for different years. In this comparison a starting value for the yearly adjustment has been corrected for land uplift. Using this method the elevation changes are relative to the whole network. For a fixed benchmark, we correct its yearly deformation. Thirdly, the fault lines have been analysed by comparing the elevation changes between the successive benchmarks from one observation epoch to another. The results show that ONKALO and Lapijoki are in the subsidence area of the network, and VLJ has small uplift rate. On the island some deformations exist, but elevation difference from 2003 to 2011 is less than one millimetre at every benchmarks. The measurements in the Lapijoki-Olkiluoto line in 2003, 2007 and 2011 show that linear elevation change between the mainland and Olkiluoto island is a little since 2003. The elevation differences, from Olkiluoto to Lapijoki, measured in 2003 and 2011 differ less than one millimetre each other, but the 2007 observation differs three millimetres from the other measurements

  10. Transient and microscale deformations and strains measured under exogenous loading by noninvasive magnetic resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deva D Chan

    Full Text Available Characterization of spatiotemporal deformation dynamics and material properties requires non-destructive methods to visualize mechanics of materials and biological tissues. Displacement-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has emerged as a noninvasive and non-destructive technique used to quantify deformation and strains. However, the techniques are not yet applicable to a broad range of materials and load-bearing tissues. In this paper, we visualize transient and internal material deformation through the novel synchrony of external mechanical loading with rapid displacement-encoded MRI. We achieved deformation measurements in silicone gel materials with a spatial resolution of 100 µm and a temporal resolution (of 2.25 ms, set by the repetition time (TR of the rapid MRI acquisition. Displacement and strain precisions after smoothing were 11 µm and 0.1%, respectively, approaching cellular length scales. Short (1/2 TR echo times enabled visualization of in situ deformation in a human tibiofemoral joint, inclusive of multiple variable T(2 biomaterials. Moreover, the MRI acquisitions achieved a fivefold improvement in imaging time over previous technology, setting the stage for mechanical imaging in vivo. Our results provide a general approach for noninvasive and non-destructive measurement, at high spatial and temporal resolution, of the dynamic mechanical response of a broad range of load-bearing materials and biological tissues.

  11. Validation of an optical system to measure acetabular shell deformation in cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, Philipp; Bone, Martin C; Flohr, Markus; Preuss, Roman; Joyce, Tom J; Deehan, David; Holland, James

    2014-08-01

    Deformation of the acetabular shell at the time of surgery can result in poor performance and early failure of the hip replacement. The study aim was to validate an ATOS III Triple Scan optical measurement system against a co-ordinate measuring machine using in vitro testing and to check repeatability under cadaver laboratory conditions. Two sizes of custom-made acetabular shells were deformed using a uniaxial/two-point loading frame and measured at different loads. Roundness measurements were performed using both the ATOS III Triple Scan optical system and a co-ordinate measuring machine and then compared. The repeatability was also tested by measuring shells pre- and post-insertion in a cadaver laboratory multiple times. The in vitro comparison with the co-ordinate measuring machine demonstrated a maximum difference of 5 µm at the rim and 9 µm at the measurement closest to the pole of the shell. Maximum repeatability was below 1 µm for the co-ordinate measuring machine and 3 µm for the ATOS III Triple Scan optical system. Repeatability was comparable between the pre-insertion (below 2 µm) and post-insertion (below 3 µm) measurements in the cadaver laboratory. This study supports the view that the ATOS III Triple Scan optical system fulfils the necessary requirements to accurately measure shell deformation in cadavers. © IMechE 2014.

  12. In situ measurement on TSV-Cu deformation with hotplate system based on sheet resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunna; Wang, Bo; Wang, Huiying; Wu, Kaifeng; Yang, Shengyong; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2017-12-01

    The in situ measurement of TSVs deformation at different temperature is meaningful for learning more about the thermal deformation schemes of 3D TSVs in the microelectronic devices. An efficient and smart hotplate based on sheet resistance is designed for offering more heat, producing a uniform temperature distribution, relieving thermal stress and heat concentration issues, and reducing room space, which was optimized by the finite element method (FEM). The fabricated hotplate is efficient and smart (2.5 cm  ×  2.0 cm  ×  0.5 cm) enough to be located in the limited space during measuring. The thermal infrared imager was employed as the temperature sensor for monitoring the temperature distribution of TSVs sample. The 3D profilometry was adopted as the observer for TSVs profiles survey. The in situ 2D top surface profiles and 3D displacement profiles of TSVs sample at the different temperature were measured by 3D profilometer. The in situ average relative deformation and effective plastic deformation of the TSV sample were measured. With optical measurement method, 3D profilometry, the TSV sample can be tested repeatedly.

  13. Uncovering the Contribution of Microchannel Deformation to Impedance-Based Flow Rate Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Pengfei; Nablo, Brian J; Bhadriraju, Kiran; Reyes, Darwin R

    2017-11-07

    Changes in electrical impedance have previously been used to measure fluid flow rate in microfluidic channels. Ionic redistribution within the electrical double layer by fluid flow has been considered to be the primary mechanism underlying such impedance based microflow sensors. Here we describe a previously unappreciated contribution of microchannel deformation to such measurements. We found that flow-induced microchannel deformation contributes significantly to the change in electrical impedance of solutions, in particular to those solutions producing an electrical double layer in the order of a few tens of nanometers (i.e., containing relatively high ionic strength). Since the flow velocity at the measurement surface is near zero, due to the laminar nature of the flow, the contribution of the double layer under the conditions mentioned above should be negligible. In contrast, an increase in the fluid flow rate results in an increase in the microchannel cross-sectional area (because of higher local pressure), therefore, producing a decrease in solution resistance between the two electrodes. Our results suggest that microflow sensors based on the concept of elastic deformation could be designed for in situ monitoring and fine control of fluid flow in flexible microfluidics. Finally, we show that purposefully engineering a larger deformability of the microchannel, by changing the geometry and the Young's modulus of the microchannel, enhances the sensitivity of this flow rate measurement.

  14. Inter- and intrarater reliability of ulna variance versus lunate subsidence measurements in Madelung deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Sebastian; Bae, Donald S

    2015-01-01

    To assess inter- and intrarater reliability of both ulna variance and lunate subsidence measurement methods in a large consecutive series of children with Madelung deformity. Ulnar variance and lunate subsidence were measured on 41 standard anteroposterior wrist radiographs from 31 patients with Madelung deformity. The patients had a mean age of 13 years (range, 5-25) at the time of presentation. Two pediatric orthopedic hand/upper limb surgeons evaluated all radiographs twice in a 4-week interval using standard digital imaging software. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated for inter- and intrarater reliability, and results were reported using the Landis and Koch criteria. The interrater ICC for the ulna variance measurements was substantial, and for the lunate subsidence almost perfect. The intrarater ICC for ulna variance was substantial for both raters. In contrast, the intrarater ICC for lunate subsidence was almost perfect for both raters. Measurement of lunate subsidence showed both superior interrater and intrarater reliability compared with the ulnar variance method. Whenever relative ulna length is assessed in children and adolescents with Madelung deformity, the lunate subsidence should be the preferred method to characterize deformity. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Measurements of ground motion and magnet vibrations at the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiltsev, V.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents results of ground motion and magnet vibrations measurements at the Advanced Photon Source. The experiments were done over a wide, frequency range (0-05-100 Hz) with the use of SM-3KV-type seismic probes from the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russia). Spectral power densities of vertical and horizontal motions of the APS hall floor and quadrupoles on regular supports were obtained. Also investigated were magnet vibrations induced by designed cooling water flow and spectral characteristics of spatial correlation of the quadrupole vibrations at different sectors of the ring. The influence of personnel activity in the hall and traffic under the ring on the slow motion of storage ring elements were observed. Amplitudes of vibrations at the APS are compared with results of seismic measurements at some other accelerators

  16. Measurements of ground motion and magnets vibrations at the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shil'tsev, V.D.

    1994-01-01

    This article presents results of ground motion and magnets vibrations measurements at the Advanced Photon Source. The experiments were done over wide frequency range 0.05-100 Hz with use of SM-3KV type seismic probes from Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russia). Spectral power densities of vertical and horizontal motions of the APS hall floor and quadrupoles on regular supports were obtained. There were also investigated magnets vibrations induced by designed cooling water flow and spectral characteristics of spatial correlation of the quads vibration at different sectors of the ring. Influence of personnel activity in the hall and traffic under the ring on slow motion of storage ring elements were observed. Amplitudes of vibrations at the APS are compared with results of seismic measurements at some other accelerators. 9 refs.; 10 figs.; 1 tab

  17. The discrepancy between satellite and ground measurements is solved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenaas, Sigbjoern

    2000-01-01

    The article deals with explanations for the differences between surface and atmospheric measurements which is used as an argument against global warming due to increased greenhouse effect. New research shows that the various tendencies to some extent can be explained by climatic parameters not yet incorporated in the climatic models such as volcanic activity and stratospheric ozone. Independent measurements from radiowave emissions confirm the global warming of the atmosphere at the earth surface which has occurred in the last decades. Santer and others find it unlikely that the alterations are natural. Numerical simulations which consider the climatic parameters created by human made greenhouse gases, aerosols and ozone give trends at the earth surface which coincides well with the observations. Studies using probes substantiates the simulations. The atmospheric warming seems then to be more rapid at the ground level than higher up. Various reasons for the observations are discussed and further investigations recommended

  18. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: a pyrometer for measuring ground temperature on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Zorzano, María P; Martinez-Frias, Jesus; Esteban, Blanca; Ramos, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS), an instrument aboard NASA's Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor's main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment.

  19. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: A Pyrometer for Measuring Ground Temperature on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ramos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS, an instrument aboard NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor’s main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment.

  20. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: A Pyrometer for Measuring Ground Temperature on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Zorzano, María P.; Martinez-Frias, Jesus; Esteban, Blanca; Ramos, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS), an instrument aboard NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor’s main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment. PMID:22163405

  1. Measurement of deforming mode of lattice truss structures under impact loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao H.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Lattice truss structures, which are used as a core material in sandwich panels, were widely investigated experimentally and theoretically. However, explanation of the deforming mechanism using reliable experimental results is almost rarely reported, particularly for the dynamic deforming mechanism. The present work aimed at the measurement of the deforming mode of lattice truss structures. Indeed, quasi-static and Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB tests have been performed on the tetrahedral truss cores structures made of Aluminum 3003-O. Global values such as crushing forces and displacements between the loading platens are obtained. However, in order to understand the deforming mechanism and to explain the observed impact strength enhancement observed in the experiments, images of the truss core element during the tests are recorded. A method based on the edge detection algorithm is developed and applied to these images. The deforming profiles of one beam are extracted and it allows for calculating the length of beam. It is found that these lengths diminish to a critical value (due to compression and remain constant afterwards (because of significant bending. The comparison between quasi-static and impact tests shows that the beam were much more compressed under impact loading, which could be understood as the lateral inertia effect in dynamic bucking. Therefore, the impact strength enhancement of tetrahedral truss core sandwich panel can be explained by the delayed buckling of beam under impact (more compression reached, together with the strain hardening of base material.

  2. Measurement of the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhasz, B.; Widmann, E.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The hydrogen atom is one of the most extensively studied atomic systems, and its ground state hyperfine splitting (GS-HFS) of ν HFS = 1.42 GHz has been measured with an extremely high precision of δν HFS /ν HFS ∼ 10 -12 . Therefore, the antimatter counterpart of hydrogen, the antihydrogen atom, consisting of an antiproton and a positron, is an ideal laboratory for studying the CPT symmetry. As a test of the CPT invariance, measuring ν HFS of antihydrogen can surpass in accuracy a measurement of the 1S-2S transition frequency proposed by other groups. In fact, it has several advantages over a 1S-2S measurement. Firstly, it does not require the (neutral) antihydrogen atoms to be trapped. Secondly, the only existing consistent extension of the standard model, which is based on a microscopic theory of CPT and Lorentz violation, predicts that νHFS should be more sensitive to CPT violations. In addition, the parameters introduced by Kostelecky et al. have the dimension of energy (or frequency). Therefore, by measuring a relatively small quantity on an energy scale (like the 1.42 GHz GS-HFS splitting), a smaller relative accuracy is needed to reach the same absolute precision for a CPT test. This makes a determination of νHFS with a relative accuracy of 10 -4 competitive to the measured relative mass difference of K 0 and -- K 0 of 10 -18 , which is often quoted as the most precise CPT test so far. The ASACUSA collaboration at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) has recently submitted a proposal to measure νHFS of antihydrogen in an atomic beam apparatus similar to the ones which were used in the early days of hydrogen HFS spectroscopy. The apparatus consists of two sextupole magnets for the selection and analysis of the spin of the antihydrogen atoms, and a microwave cavity to flip the spin. This method has the advantage that antihydrogen atoms of temperatures up to 150 K, 'evaporating' from a formation region, can be used. Numerical simulations show

  3. Reliability and validity of measures of hammer toe deformity angle and tibial torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O Y; Tuttle, L J; Commean, P K; Mueller, M J

    2009-09-01

    Measures of second-fourth metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) angle (indicator of hammer toe deformity) and clinical measures of tibial torsion have limited evidence for validity and reliability. The purposes of this study are to determine: (1) reliability of using a 3D digitizer (Metrecom) and computed tomography (CT) to measure MTPJ angle for toes 2-4; (2) reliability of goniometer, 3D digitizer, and CT to measure tibial torsion; (3) validity of MTPJ angle measures for toes 2-4 using goniometry and 3D digitizer compared to CT (gold standard) and (4) validity of tibial torsion measures using goniometry and 3D digitizer (Metrecom) compared to CT (gold standard). Twenty-nine subjects participated in this study. 27 feet with hammer toe deformity and 31 feet without hammer toe deformity were tested using standardized gonimetric, 3D digitizer and CT methods. ICCs (3,1), standard error of the measurement (SEM) values, and difference measures were used to characterize intrarater reliability. Pearson correlation coefficients and an analysis of variance were used to determine associations and differences between the measurement techniques. 3D digitizer and CT measures of MTPJ angle had high test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.95-0.96 and 0.98-0.99, respectively; SEM = 2.64-3.35 degrees and 1.42-1.47 degrees, respectively). Goniometry, 3D digitizer, and CT measures of tibial torsion had good test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.75, 0.85, and 0.98, respectively; SEM = 2.15 degrees, 1.74 degrees, and 0.72 degree, respectively). Both goniometric and 3D digitizer measures of MTPJ angle were highly correlated with CT measures of MTPJ angle (r = 0.84-0.90, r = 0.84-0.88, respectively) and tibial torsion (r = 0.72, r = 0.83). Goniometry, 3D digitizer, and CT measures were all different from each other for measures of hammer toe deformity (p Goniometry measures were different from CT measures and 3D digitizer measures of tibial torsion (p reliable. Goniometer and 3D digitizer measures of

  4. Ground deformation occurring in the city of Auckland, New Zealand, and observed by Envisat interferometric synthetic aperture radar during 2003–2007

    OpenAIRE

    Samsonov, Sergey; Tiampo, Kristy F.; González Méndez, Pablo José; Manville, Vernon; Jolly, Gill

    2010-01-01

    In this study we present modeling results derived from ground deformation observed in the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) by the C-band Envisat Synthetic Aperture Radar. Auckland, the largest city in New Zealand with a current population of over one million, coincides with the AVF, which comprises about 50 individual, largely monogenetic, basaltic volcanoes distributed across a total area of 360 km2. The most recent and largest eruption there occurred 600 years ago. While it is anticipated that...

  5. Deformation measurements of materials at low temperatures using laser speckle photography method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumio Nakahara; Yukihide Maeda; Kazunori Matsumura; Shigeyoshi Hisada; Takeyoshi Fujita; Kiyoshi Sugihara

    1992-01-01

    The authors observed deformations of several materials during cooling down process from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature using the laser speckle photography method. The in-plane displacements were measured by the image plane speckle photography and the out-of-plane displacement gradients by the defocused speckle photography. The results of measurements of in-plane displacement are compared with those of FEM analysis. The applicability of laser speckle photography method to cryogenic engineering are also discussed

  6. A Method to Measure Thermal Deformation of Superconducting Magnet Cross Sections

    OpenAIRE

    Grau-Carles, A; García-Tabarés, L; Todesco, Ezio; Tommasini, D; Siegel, N

    1999-01-01

    The precision measurement of the cable positioning in superconducting coils is of great interest both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures because mechanical and thermal deformations affect the quality of the magnetic field. The paper describes a new two-coordinate measuring device, which is able to obtain scanned images of flat composite samples at liquid nitrogen temperature. The sample is cooled at 77 K into a flat quartz tray to permit the optical access to the sample from the bottom....

  7. Local deformation method for measuring element tension in space deployable structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belov Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the local deformation method to determine the tension of cord and thin membrane elements in space deployable structure as antenna reflector. Possible measuring instrument model, analytical and numerical solutions and experimental results are presented. The boundary effects on measurement results of metallic mesh reflector surface tension are estimated. The study case depicting non-uniform reflector surface tension is considered.

  8. Does an instrumented treadmill correctly measure the ground reaction forces?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A. Willems

    2013-11-01

    Since the 1990s, treadmills have been equipped with multi-axis force transducers to measure the three components of the ground reaction forces during walking and running. These measurements are correctly performed if the whole treadmill (including the motor is mounted on the transducers. In this case, the acceleration of the treadmill centre of mass relative to the reference frame of the laboratory is nil. The external forces exerted on one side of the treadmill are thus equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the external forces exerted on the other side. However, uncertainty exists about the accuracy of these measures: due to friction between the belt and the tread-surface, due to the motor pulling the belt, some believe that it is not possible to correctly measure the horizontal components of the forces exerted by the feet on the belt. Here, we propose a simple model of an instrumented treadmill and we demonstrate (1 that the forces exerted by the subject moving on the upper part of the treadmill are accurately transmitted to the transducers placed under it and (2 that all internal forces – including friction – between the parts of the treadmill are cancelling each other.

  9. Simultaneous shape and deformation measurements in a blood vessel model by two wavelength interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Nieves; Pinto, Cristina; Lobera, Julia; Palero, Virginia; Arroyo, M. Pilar

    2017-06-01

    Holographic techniques have been used to measure the shape and the radial deformation of a blood vessel model and a real sheep aorta. Measurements are obtained from several holograms recorded for different object states. For each object state, two holograms with two different wavelengths are multiplexed in the same digital recording. Thus both holograms are simultaneously recorded but the information from each of them is separately obtained. The shape analysis gives a wrapped phase map whose fringes are related to a synthetic wavelength. After a filtering and unwrapping process, the 3D shape can be obtained. The shape data for each line are fitted to a circumference in order to determine the local vessel radius and center. The deformation analysis also results in a wrapped phase map, but the fringes are related to the laser wavelength used in the corresponding hologram. After the filtering and unwrapping process, a 2D map of the deformation in an out-of-plane direction is reconstructed. The radial deformation is then calculated by using the shape information.

  10. Measurement errors induced by deformation of optical axes of achromatic waveplate retarders in RRFP Stokes polarimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Tang, Ming; Gong, Yandong

    2012-11-19

    The optical axes of achromatic waveplate retarders (AWR) may deform from ideal linear eigenpolarizations and be frequency-dependent owing to the imperfect design and fabrication. Such deformations result in the ellipticity error and the orientation error of an AWR away from the nominal values. In this paper, we address the measurement errors of Stokes parameters induced by deformation of optical axes of AWRs in roatatable retarder fixed polarizer (RRFP) Stokes polarimeters. A set of theoretical formulas is derived to reveal that such measurement errors actually depend on both retardance and angular orientations of the AWR in use, as well as the state of polarization (SOP) under test. We demonstrate that,by rotating the AWR to N (N≥5) uniformly spaced angles with the angle step of 180°/N or 360°/N, the measurement errors of Stokes parameters induced by the ellipticity error of the AWR can be suppressed compared with the result using any set of four specific angles, especially when the SOP under test is nearly circular. On the other hand, the measurement errors induced by the orientation error of the AWR have more complicated relationships with the angular orientations of the AWR: 1) when the SOP under test is nearly circular, above-mentioned N (N≥5) uniformly spaced angles also lead to much smaller measurement errors than any set of four specific angles; 2) when the SOP under test is nearly linear, N (N≥5) uniformly spaced angles result in smaller or larger measurement errors, depending on the SOP under test, compared with the usually-recommended sets of four specific angles. By theoretical calculations and numerical simulations, we can conclude that the RRFP Stokes polarimeters employing angle sets of N (N≥5) uniformly spaced angles, ( ± 90°, -54°, -18°, 18°, 54°) for instance, can effectively reduce the measurement errors of Stokes parameters induced by the optical axes deformation of the AWR.

  11. The Virtual Fields Method Extracting Constitutive Mechanical Parameters from Full-field Deformation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pierron, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    The Virtual Fields Method: Extracting Constitutive Mechanical Parameters from Full-field Deformation Measurements is the first book on the Virtual Fields Method (VFM), a technique to identify materials mechanical properties from full-field measurements. Firmly rooted with extensive theoretical description of the method, the book presents numerous examples of application to a wide range of materials (composites, metals, welds, biomaterials) and situations (static, vibration, high strain rate). The authors give a detailed training section with examples of progressive difficulty to lead the reader to program the VFM and include a set of commented Matlab programs as well as GUI Matlab-based software for more general situations. The Virtual Fields Method: Extracting Constitutive Mechanical Parameters from Full-field Deformation Measurements is an ideal book for researchers, engineers, and students interested in applying the VFM to new situations motivated by their research.  

  12. Ground and Airborne Methane Measurements Using Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Riris, Haris; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Kawa, Stephan R.; Abshire, James Brice; Dawsey, Martha; Ramanathan, Anand

    2011-01-01

    We report on ground and airborne methane measurements with an active sensing instrument using widely tunable, seeded optical parametric generation (OPG). The technique has been used to measure methane, CO2, water vapor, and other trace gases in the near and mid-infrared spectral regions. Methane is a strong greenhouse gas on Earth and it is also a potential biogenic marker on Mars and other planetary bodies. Methane in the Earth's atmosphere survives for a shorter time than CO2 but its impact on climate change can be larger than CO2. Carbon and methane emissions from land are expected to increase as permafrost melts exposing millennial-age carbon stocks to respiration (aerobic-CO2 and anaerobic-CH4) and fires. Methane emissions from c1athrates in the Arctic Ocean and on land are also likely to respond to climate warming. However, there is considerable uncertainty in present Arctic flux levels, as well as how fluxes will change with the changing environment. For Mars, methane measurements are of great interest because of its potential as a strong biogenic marker. A remote sensing instrument that can measure day and night over all seasons and latitudes can localize sources of biogenic gas plumes produced by subsurface chemistry or biology, and aid in the search for extra-terrestrial life. In this paper we report on remote sensing measurements of methane using a high peak power, widely tunable optical parametric generator (OPG) operating at 3.3 micrometers and 1.65 micrometers. We have demonstrated detection of methane at 3.3 micrometers and 1650 nanometers in an open path and compared them to accepted standards. We also report on preliminary airborne demonstration of methane measurements at 1.65 micrometers.

  13. Identifying deformation mechanisms in the NEEM ice core using EBSD measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Ernst-Jan; Weikusat, Ilka; Drury, Martyn R.; Pennock, Gill M.; de Winter, Matthijs D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Deformation of ice in continental sized ice sheets determines the flow behavior of ice towards the sea. Basal dislocation glide is assumed to be the dominant deformation mechanism in the creep deformation of natural ice, but non-basal glide is active as well. Knowledge of what types of deformation mechanisms are active in polar ice is critical in predicting the response of ice sheets in future warmer climates and its contribution to sea level rise, because the activity of deformation mechanisms depends critically on deformation conditions (such as temperature) as well as on the material properties (such as grain size). One of the methods to study the deformation mechanisms in natural materials is Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD). We obtained ca. 50 EBSD maps of five different depths from a Greenlandic ice core (NEEM). The step size varied between 8 and 25 micron depending on the size of the deformation features. The size of the maps varied from 2000 to 10000 grid point. Indexing rates were up to 95%, partially by saving and reanalyzing the EBSP patterns. With this method we can characterize subgrain boundaries and determine the lattice rotation configurations of each individual subgrain. Combining these observations with arrangement/geometry of subgrain boundaries the dislocation types can be determined, which form these boundaries. Three main types of subgrain boundaries have been recognized in Antarctic (EDML) ice core¹². Here, we present the first results obtained from EBSD measurements performed on the NEEM ice core samples from the last glacial period, focusing on the relevance of dislocation activity of the possible slip systems. Preliminary results show that all three subgrain types, recognized in the EDML core, occur in the NEEM samples. In addition to the classical boundaries made up of basal dislocations, subgrain boundaries made of non-basal dislocations are also common. ¹Weikusat, I.; de Winter, D. A. M.; Pennock, G. M.; Hayles, M

  14. An Experimental Comparison of Similarity Assessment Measures for 3D Models on Constrained Surface Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Lulin; Yang, Zhixin

    2010-05-01

    To address the issues in the area of design customization, this paper expressed the specification and application of the constrained surface deformation, and reported the experimental performance comparison of three prevail effective similarity assessment algorithms on constrained surface deformation domain. Constrained surface deformation becomes a promising method that supports for various downstream applications of customized design. Similarity assessment is regarded as the key technology for inspecting the success of new design via measuring the difference level between the deformed new design and the initial sample model, and indicating whether the difference level is within the limitation. According to our theoretical analysis and pre-experiments, three similarity assessment algorithms are suitable for this domain, including shape histogram based method, skeleton based method, and U system moment based method. We analyze their basic functions and implementation methodologies in detail, and do a series of experiments on various situations to test their accuracy and efficiency using precision-recall diagram. Shoe model is chosen as an industrial example for the experiments. It shows that shape histogram based method gained an optimal performance in comparison. Based on the result, we proposed a novel approach that integrating surface constrains and shape histogram description with adaptive weighting method, which emphasize the role of constrains during the assessment. The limited initial experimental result demonstrated that our algorithm outperforms other three algorithms. A clear direction for future development is also drawn at the end of the paper.

  15. The potential of ground gravity measurements to validate GRACE data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, D.; Hinderer, J.; Llubes, M.; Florsch, N.

    2003-06-01

    New satellite missions are returning high precision, time-varying, satellite measurements of the Earth's gravity field. The GRACE mission is now in its calibration/- validation phase and first results of the gravity field solutions are imminent. We consider here the possibility of external validation using data from the superconducting gravimeters in the European sub-array of the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) as ‘ground truth' for comparison with GRACE. This is a pilot study in which we use 14 months of 1-hour data from the beginning of GGP (1 July 1997) to 30 August 1998, when the Potsdam instrument was relocated to South Africa. There are 7 stations clustered in west central Europe, and one station, Metsahovi in Finland. We remove local tides, polar motion, local and global air pressure, and instrument drift and then decimate to 6-hour samples. We see large variations in the time series of 5-10µgal between even some neighboring stations, but there are also common features that correlate well over the 427-day period. The 8 stations are used to interpolate a minimum curvature (gridded) surface that extends over the geographical region. This surface shows time and spatial coherency at the level of 2- 4µgal over the first half of the data and 1-2µgal over the latter half. The mean value of the surface clearly shows a rise in European gravity of about 3µgal over the first 150 days and a fairly constant value for the rest of the data. The accuracy of this mean is estimated at 1µgal, which compares favorably with GRACE predictions for wavelengths of 500 km or less. Preliminary studies of hydrology loading over Western Europe shows the difficulty of correlating the local hydrology, which can be highly variable, with large-scale gravity variations.Key words. GRACE, satellite gravity, superconducting gravimeter, GGP, ground truth

  16. The potential of ground gravity measurements to validate GRACE data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Crossley

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available New satellite missions are returning high precision, time-varying, satellite measurements of the Earth’s gravity field. The GRACE mission is now in its calibration/- validation phase and first results of the gravity field solutions are imminent. We consider here the possibility of external validation using data from the superconducting gravimeters in the European sub-array of the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP as ‘ground truth’ for comparison with GRACE. This is a pilot study in which we use 14 months of 1-hour data from the beginning of GGP (1 July 1997 to 30 August 1998, when the Potsdam instrument was relocated to South Africa. There are 7 stations clustered in west central Europe, and one station, Metsahovi in Finland. We remove local tides, polar motion, local and global air pressure, and instrument drift and then decimate to 6-hour samples. We see large variations in the time series of 5–10µgal between even some neighboring stations, but there are also common features that correlate well over the 427-day period. The 8 stations are used to interpolate a minimum curvature (gridded surface that extends over the geographical region. This surface shows time and spatial coherency at the level of 2– 4µgal over the first half of the data and 1–2µgal over the latter half. The mean value of the surface clearly shows a rise in European gravity of about 3µgal over the first 150 days and a fairly constant value for the rest of the data. The accuracy of this mean is estimated at 1µgal, which compares favorably with GRACE predictions for wavelengths of 500 km or less. Preliminary studies of hydrology loading over Western Europe shows the difficulty of correlating the local hydrology, which can be highly variable, with large-scale gravity variations.Key words. GRACE, satellite gravity, superconducting gravimeter, GGP, ground truth

  17. [Posttraumatic torsional deformities of the forearm : Methods of measurement and decision guidelines for correction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossey, R D; Krettek, C; Liodakis, E

    2018-03-01

    Forearm fractures are common in all age groups. Even if the adjacent joints are not directly involved, these fractures have an intra-articular character. One of the most common complications of these injuries is a painful limitation of the range of motion and especially of pronation and supination. This is often due to an underdiagnosed torsional deformity; however, in recent years new methods have been developed to make these torsional differences visible and quantifiable through the use of sectional imaging. The principle of measurement corresponds to that of the torsion measurement of the lower limbs. Computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are created at defined heights. By searching for certain landmarks, torsional angles are measured in relation to a defined reference line. A new alternative is the use of 3D reformation models. The presence of a torsional deformity, especial of the radius, leads to an impairment of the pronation and supination of the forearm. In the presence of torsional deformities, radiological measurements can help to decide if an operation is needed or not. Unlike the lower limbs, there are still no uniform cut-off values as to when a correction is indicated. Decisions must be made together with the patient by taking the clinical and radiological results into account.

  18. Ground deformation occurring in the city of Auckland, New Zealand, and observed by Envisat interferometric synthetic aperture radar during 2003-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonov, Sergey; Tiampo, Kristy; GonzáLez, Pablo J.; Manville, Vernon; Jolly, Gill

    2010-08-01

    In this study we present modeling results derived from ground deformation observed in the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) by the C-band Envisat Synthetic Aperture Radar. Auckland, the largest city in New Zealand with a current population of over one million, coincides with the AVF, which comprises about 50 individual, largely monogenetic, basaltic volcanoes distributed across a total area of 360 km2. The most recent and largest eruption there occurred 600 years ago. While it is anticipated that the chance of any existing volcano reawakening is very low, a new volcano could be created at any time in a new location within the field. The aim of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) for mapping ground deformation associated with magma ascent, which would be a likely precursor to the onset of volcanic activity. For this study we acquired and processed 23 single look complex (SLC) images from the Envisat satellite (Track 151, Frame 6442, IS2, VV) spanning from July 2003 until November 2007. All possible combinations of differential interferograms were created. Stacking, Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and Permanent Scatterers (PS) processing algorithms were used to determine spatial and temporal patterns of surface deformation as well as their average rates. A number of localized deformation regions were consistently observed by all three techniques. Due to a lack of evidence pointing toward a relationship with volcanic or tectonic sources it was assumed that they are produced by groundwater withdrawal and recharge. Three largest regions of subsidence (S1-S3) and also three largest regions of uplift (U1-U3) were modeled with the derivative-free simplex algorithms for location, depth and source volume change using a Mogi point source approximation. The results show that InSAR is a viable technique capable of detecting the scale, rate and spatial distribution of precursory deformation that would likely be associated with

  19. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry analysis of ground deformation in the Po Plain (Piacenza-Reggio Emilia sector, Northern Italy): seismo-tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonielli, Benedetta; Monserrat, Oriol; Bonini, Marco; Cenni, Nicola; Devanthéry, Núria; Righini, Gaia; Sani, Federico

    2016-08-01

    This work aims to explore the ongoing tectonic activity of structures in the outermost sector of the Northern Apennines, which represents the active leading edge of the thrust belt and is dominated by compressive deformation. We have applied the Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) technique to obtain new insights into the present-day deformation pattern of the frontal area of the Northern Apennine. PSI has proved to be effective in detecting surface deformation of wide regions involved in low tectonic movements. We used 34 Envisat images in descending geometry over the period of time between 2004 and 2010, performing about 300 interferometric pairs. The analysis of the velocity maps and of the PSI time-series has allowed to observe ground deformation over the sector of the Po Plain between Piacenza and Reggio Emilia. The time-series of permanent GPS stations located in the study area, validated the results of the PSI technique, showing a good correlation with the PS time-series. The PS analysis reveals the occurrence of a well-known subsidence area on the rear of the Ferrara arc, mostly connected to the exploitation of water resources. In some instances, the PS velocity pattern reveals ground uplift (with mean velocities ranging from 1 to 2.8 mm yr-1) above active thrust-related anticlines of the Emilia and Ferrara folds, and part of the Pede-Apennine margin. We hypothesize a correlation between the observed uplift deformation pattern and the growth of the thrust-related anticlines. As the uplift pattern corresponds to known geological features, it can be used to constrain the seismo-tectonic setting, and a working hypothesis may involve that the active Emilia and Ferrara thrust folds would be characterized by interseismic periods possibly dominated by aseismic creep.

  20. Characterizing GEO Titan Transtage Fragmentations using Ground-based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, H.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2016-01-01

    In a continued effort to better characterize the Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) environment, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) utilizes various ground-based optical assets to acquire photometric and spectral data of known debris associated with fragmentations in or near GEO. The Titan IIIC Transtage upper stage is known to have fragmented four times. Two of the four fragmentations were in GEO while a third Transtage fragmented in GEO transfer orbit. The forth fragmentation occurred in Low Earth Orbit. In order to better assess what may be causing these fragmentations, the NASA ODPO recently acquired a Titan Transtage test and display article that was previously in the custody of the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) in Tucson, Arizona. After initial inspections at AMARG demonstrated that the test article was of sufficient fidelity to be of interest, the test article was brought to JSC to continue material analysis and historical documentation of the Titan Transtage. The Transtage will be a subject of forensic analysis using spectral measurements to compare with telescopic data; as well, a scale model will be created to use in the Optical Measurement Center for photometric analysis of an intact Transtage, including a BRDF. The following presentation will provide a review of the Titan Transtage, the current analysis that has been done to date, and the future work to be completed in support of characterizing the GEO and near GEO orbital debris environment.

  1. Experimental evaluation of a polycrystal deformation modeling scheme using neutron diffraction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bjørn; Lorentzen, Torben

    1997-01-01

    The uniaxial behavior of aluminum polycrystals is simulated using a rate-independent incremental self-consistent elastic-plastic polycrystal deformation model, and the results are evaluated by neutron diffraction measurements. The elastic strains deduced from the model show good agreement...... with the experimental results for the 111 and 220 reflections, whereas the predicted elastic strain level for the 200 reflection is, in general, approximately 10 pct too low in the plastic regime....

  2. Elastic particle deformation in rectangular channel flow as a measure of particle stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Margaret Y; Kim, Seo Gyun; Lee, Heon Sang; Muller, Susan J

    2018-01-03

    In this study, we experimentally observed and characterized soft elastic particle deformation in confined flow in a microchannel with a rectangular cross-section. Hydrogel microparticles of pNIPAM were produced using two different concentrations of crosslinker. This resulted in particles with two different shear moduli of 13.3 ± 5.5 Pa and 32.5 ± 15.7 Pa and compressive moduli of 66 ± 10 Pa and 79 ± 15 Pa, respectively, as measured by capillary micromechanics. Under flow, the particle shapes transitioned from circular to egg, triangular, arrowhead, and ultimately parachute shaped with increasing shear rate. The shape changes were reversible, and deformed particles relaxed back to circular/spherical in the absence of flow. The thresholds for each shape transition were quantified using a non-dimensional radius of curvature at the tip, particle deformation, circularity, and the depth of the concave dimple at the trailing edge. Several of the observed shapes were distinct from those previously reported in the literature for vesicles and capsules; the elastic particles had a narrower leading tip and a lower circularity. Due to variations in the shear moduli between particles within a batch of particles, each flow rate corresponded to a small but finite range of capillary number (Ca) and resulted in a series of shapes. By arranging the images on a plot of Ca versus circularity, a direct correlation was developed between shape and Ca and thus between particle deformation and shear modulus. As the shape was very sensitive to differences in shear modulus, particle deformation in confined flow may allow for better differentiation of microparticle shear modulus than other methods.

  3. Interseismic Deformation along the Red River Fault from InSAR Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Li, Z.; Clarke, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Red River Fault (RRF) zone is a profound geological discontinuity separating South China from Indochina. Right lateral movements along this >900 km fault are considered to accommodate the extrusion of SE China. Crustal deformation monitoring at high resolution is the key to understand the present-day mode of deformation in this zone and its interaction with the adjacent regions. This is the first study to measure the interseismic deformation of the entire fault with ALOS-1/2 and Sentinel-1 observations. Nine ascending tracks of ALOS-1 data between 2007 and 2011 are collected from the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), four descending tracks of Sentinel-1 data are acquired every 24 days since October 2014, and ALOS-2 data are being systematically acquired since 2014. The long wavelength (L-band) of ALOS-1/2 and short temporal baseline of Sentinel-1 ensure good coherence to overcome the limitations of heavy vegetation and variable climate in the region. Stacks of interferograms are generated by our automatic processing chain based on the InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) software, ionospheric errors are estimated and corrected using the split-spectrum method (Fattahi et al., IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens., 2017) and the tropospheric delays are calibrated using the Generic Atmospheric Correction Online Service for InSAR (GACOS: http://ceg-research.ncl.ac.uk/v2/gacos) with high-resolution ECMWF products (Yu et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2017). Time series analysis is performed to determine the interseismic deformation rate of the RRF using the in-house InSAR time series with atmospheric estimation model (InSAR TS + AEM) package based on the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm. Our results reveal the decrease of slip rate from north to south. We map the interseismic strain rate field to characterize the deformation patterns and seismic hazard throughout the RRF zone.

  4. Deformation of Olivine at Subduction Zone Conditions Determined from In situ Measurements with Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H Long; D Weidner; L Li; J Chen; L Wang

    2011-12-31

    We report measurements of the deformation stress for San Carlos olivine at pressures of 3-5 GPa, temperatures of 25-1150 C, and strain rates of 10{sup -7}-10{sup -5} s{sup -1}. We determine a deformation stress of approximately 2.5 GPa that is relatively temperature and strain rate independent in the temperature range of 400-900 C. The deformation experiments have been carried out on a deformation DIA (D-DIA) apparatus, Sam85, at X17B2, NSLS. Powder samples are used in these experiments. Enstatite (MgSiO{sub 3}) (3-5% total quality of sample) is used as the buffer to control the activity of silica. Ni foil is used in some experiments to buffer the oxygen fugacity. Water content is confirmed by IR spectra of the recovered samples. Samples are compressed at room temperature and are then annealed at 1200 C for at least 2 h before deformation. The total (plastic and elastic) strains (macroscopic) are derived from the direct measurements of the images taken by X-ray radiograph technique. The differential stresses are derived from the diffraction determined elastic strains. In the regime of 25-400 C, there is a small decrease of stress at steady state as temperature increases; in the regime of 400 C to the 'transition temperature', the differential stress at steady state ({approx}2.5 GPa) is relatively insensitive to the changes of temperature and strain rate; however, it drastically decreases to about 1 GPa and becomes temperature-dependent above the transition temperature and thereafter. The transition temperature is near 900 C. Above the transition temperature, the flow agrees with power law creep measurements of previous investigations. The anisotropy of differential stress in individual planes indicates that the deformation of olivine at low temperature is dominated by [0 0 1](1 0 0). Accounting to a slower strain rate in the natural system, the transition temperature for the olivine in the slab is most likely in the range of 570-660 C.

  5. Automatic method of analysis and measurement of additional parameters of corneal deformation in the Corvis tonometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Robert

    2014-11-19

    The method for measuring intraocular pressure using the Corvis tonometer provides a sequence of images of corneal deformation. Deformations of the cornea are recorded using the ultra-high-speed Scheimpflug camera. This paper presents a new and reproducible method of analysis of corneal deformation images that allows for automatic measurements of new features, namely new three parameters unavailable in the original software. The images subjected to processing had a resolution of 200 × 576 × 140 pixels. They were acquired from the Corvis tonometer and simulation. In total 14,000 2D images were analysed. The image analysis method proposed by the author automatically detects the edge of the cornea and sclera fragments. For this purpose, new methods of image analysis and processing proposed by the author as well as those well-known, such as Canny filter, binarization, median filtering etc., have been used. The presented algorithms were implemented in Matlab (version 7.11.0.584-R2010b) with Image Processing toolbox (version 7.1-R2010b) using both known algorithms for image analysis and processing and those proposed by the author. Owing to the proposed algorithm it is possible to determine three parameters: (1) the degree of the corneal reaction relative to the static position; (2) the corneal length changes; (3) the ratio of amplitude changes to the corneal deformation length. The corneal reaction is smaller by about 30.40% compared to its static position. The change in the corneal length during deformation is very small, approximately 1% of its original length. Parameter (3) enables to determine the applanation points with a correlation of 92% compared to the conventional method for calculating corneal flattening areas. The proposed algorithm provides reproducible results fully automatically within a few seconds/per patient using Core i7 processor. Using the proposed algorithm, it is possible to measure new, additional parameters of corneal deformation, which

  6. Floating frame grounding system. [for wind tunnel static force measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a floating frame grounding system (FFGS) for the 40- by 80-foot low speed wind tunnel facility at the NASA Ames Research Center National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex is addresssed. When electrical faults are detected, the FFGS ensures a ground path for the fault current. In addition, the FFGS alerts the tunnel operator when a mechanical foul occurs.

  7. Surface deformation measured with interferometric synthetic aperture radar: Case studies of basin and range and Garlock-San Andreas fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Fernando

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely used to detect ground deformation from varieties of geophysical origins. However, most studies lack the spatial and temporal resolutions to better characterize such observations. The purpose of this research is to use multi-track satellite radar imagery to generate time series to study and monitor vertical ground deformation over large regions such as the Nevada portion of the Basin and Range Province and the western end of the Mojave Desert. We developed an innovative method to remove horizontal movements from InSAR line-of-sight (LOS) observations using a GPS velocity field and subsequently combine the multi-track imagery resulting in one single high spatial resolution map of observed vertical crustal and surface movements. By implementing this technique we detect vertical deformation signals with short and intermediate wavelength signals associated to tectonic processes such as interseismic and postseismic deformation. In Central Nevada Seismic Belt we detect in three independent orbits a broad area of uplift that confirms results of previous studies that associate the origin of this signal to post-seimic deformation of the historic earthquakes at this region. In south-central Nevada we detect several valleys that show a gradual eastward tilt of the valley floors due to deep geodynamical processes. The valleys located at the eastern side of Ruby Mountains show a range decrease that could indicate uplift related to magma intrusion or post-seismic deformation due to older, unrecognized earthquakes. In the Big Bend segment in southern California we detect vertical uplift as expected by mechanical models of interseismic deformation. Additionaly all our velocity maps reveal small wavelength deformation signals of anthropogenic origin.

  8. Antenna characteristics and air-ground interface deembedding methods for stepped-frequency ground-penetrating radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Brian; Larsen, Jan; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2000-01-01

    The result from field-tests using a Stepped-Frequency Ground Penetrating Radar (SF-GPR) and promising antenna and air-ground deembedding methods for a SF-GPR is presented. A monostatic S-band rectangular waveguide antenna was used in the field-tests. The advantages of the SF-GPR, e.g., amplitude....... The methods are successfully evaluated on field-test data obtained from measurements on a large-scale in-door test field....

  9. Ground-based measurements of UV Index (UVI at Helwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Farouk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On October 2010 UV Index (UVI ground-based measurements were carried out by weather station at solar laboratory in NRIAG. The daily variation has maximum values in spring and summer days, while minimum values in autumn and winter days. The low level of UVI between 2.55 and 2.825 was found in December, January and February. The moderate level of UVI between 3.075 and 5.6 was found in March, October and November. The high level of UVI between 6.7 and 7.65 was found in April, May and September. The very high level of UVI between 8 and 8.6 was found in June, July and August. High level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI. According to the equation {UVI=a[SZA]b} the UVI increases with decreasing SZA by 82% on a daily scale and 88% on a monthly scale. Helwan exposure to a high level of radiation over 6 months per year including 3 months with a very high level UVI, so it is advisable not to direct exposure to the sun from 11 am to 2:00 pm.

  10. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  11. ONKALO EDZ-measurements using ground penetrating radar (GPR) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvast, M.; Wiljanen, B.

    2008-09-01

    This report presents pilot project results from various Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) tests performed on bedrock in ONKALO, the research tunnel system being built for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel (in Finland). In recent years the GPR technology for structure inspection has improved to faster systems and higher frequencies. Processing and interpretation software has been developed for better visualization of processed data. GPR is a powerful non-destructive testing method with major advantages such as fast measurement speed and continuous survey lines. The purpose of the tests was to determine the capacity of GPR in identifying the Excavation Damaged or Disturbed Zone (EDZ). Topics included comparison of different types of GPR systems and antennas in select locations in the tunnel system and data presentation. High quality GPR data was obtained from all systems that were used on surfaces without concrete or steel reinforcement. Data processed using Geo Doctor software, which enables integrated analysis of available datasets on a single screen, provided promising results. (orig.)

  12. Fully automatic measurements of axial vertebral rotation for assessment of spinal deformity in idiopathic scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Daniel; Lundström, Claes; Andersson, Mats; Vavruch, Ludvig; Tropp, Hans; Knutsson, Hans

    2013-03-01

    Reliable measurements of spinal deformities in idiopathic scoliosis are vital, since they are used for assessing the degree of scoliosis, deciding upon treatment and monitoring the progression of the disease. However, commonly used two dimensional methods (e.g. the Cobb angle) do not fully capture the three dimensional deformity at hand in scoliosis, of which axial vertebral rotation (AVR) is considered to be of great importance. There are manual methods for measuring the AVR, but they are often time-consuming and related with a high intra- and inter-observer variability. In this paper, we present a fully automatic method for estimating the AVR in images from computed tomography. The proposed method is evaluated on four scoliotic patients with 17 vertebrae each and compared with manual measurements performed by three observers using the standard method by Aaro-Dahlborn. The comparison shows that the difference in measured AVR between automatic and manual measurements are on the same level as the inter-observer difference. This is further supported by a high intraclass correlation coefficient (0.971-0.979), obtained when comparing the automatic measurements with the manual measurements of each observer. Hence, the provided results and the computational performance, only requiring approximately 10 to 15 s for processing an entire volume, demonstrate the potential clinical value of the proposed method.

  13. Nuclear moments and deformation changes in the lightest Pt isotopes measured by laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Roussière, B; Crawford, J; Duong, H T; Genevey, J; Girod, M; Huber, G; Ibrahim, F; Krieg, M; Le Blanc, F; Lee, J K P; Obert, J; Oms, J; Peru, S; Pinard, J; Putaux, J C; Sauvage, J; Sebastian, V; Zemlyanoi, S G; Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Lettry, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy measurements are performed with the lightest neutron-deficient platinum isotopes using the experimental setup COMPLIS installed at the ISOLDE-Booster facility. The hyperfine spectra of /sup 182-178/Pt and /sup 183m/Pt are recorded for the first time from the optical transition 5d/sup 9/6s/sup 3/D/sub 3/ to 5d/sup 9/6p/sup 3/P/sub 2/. The variation in the mean-square charge radius of these nuclei and the magnetic and quadrupole (for I>or=1) moments of the odd isotope nuclei are found. A large deformation change between the /sup 183g/Pt and /sup 183m/Pt nuclei, quite large inverted odd-even staggering of the charge radius around the neutron midshell N=104, and a nuclear deformation drop in the region A=179 are revealed. All the results are discussed in terms of nuclear shape variation and are compared with the results of Hartree-Fock- Bogoliubov calculations involving the Gogny force. Comparison of the deformation measured from /sup 183g, m/Pt to the odd-odd isotone /sup 184g, m/Au shows that...

  14. Novel Angular Measures of Cervical Deformity Account for Upper Cervical Compensation and Sagittal Alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Lafage, Renaud; Vira, Shaleen; Sciubba, Daniel; Soroceanu, Alex; Hamilton, Kojo; Smith, Justin; Passias, Peter G; Mundis, Gregory; Hart, Robert; Schwab, Frank; Klineberg, Eric; Shaffrey, Christopher; Lafage, Virginie; Ames, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    This is a retrospective review of a prospective multicenter database. This study introduces 2 new cervical alignment measures accounting for both cervical deformity (CD) and upper cervical compensation. Current descriptions of CD like the C2-C7 sagittal vertical axis (cSVA) do not account for compensatory mechanisms such as C0-C2 lordosis and pelvic tilt, which makes surgical planning difficult. The craniocervical angle (CCA) combines the slope of McGregor's line and the inclination from C7 to the hard palate. The C2-pelvic tilt (CPT) combines C2 tilt and pelvic tilt. Like the T1 pelvic angle, CPT is less affected by lower extremity and pelvic compensation. Novel and existing CD measures were correlated in 781 patients from a thoracolumbar deformity (TLD) database and 61 patients from a prospective CD database. CD patients were subanalyzed by region of deformity driver: cervical or cervico-thoracic junction. TLD patients were substratified according to whether or not they had CD as well, where CD was defined as cSVA>4 cm or T1 slope minus cervical lordosis mismatch (TS-CL) >20. TLD cohort: mean cSVA was 31.7±17.8 mm. Subanalysis of TLD patients with CD versus no-CD demonstrated significant differences in CCA (56.2 vs. 60.6, Paccount for both cervical sagittal alignment and upper cervical compensation and can be utilized in assessment of cervical alignment.

  15. Optomechanical measurement of the role of lamins in whole cell deformability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Thorsten; Kraxner, Julia; Skodzek, Kai; Haug, Michael; Crawford, Dean; Maaß, Kendra K; Aifantis, Katerina E; Whyte, Graeme

    2017-12-01

    There is mounting evidence that the nuclear envelope, and particularly the lamina, plays a critical role in the mechanical and regulation properties of the cell and changes to the lamina can have implications for the physical properties of the whole cell. In this study we demonstrate that the optical stretcher can measure changes in the time-dependent mechanical properties of living cells with different levels of A-type lamin expression. Results from the optical stretcher shows a decrease in the deformability of cells as the levels of lamin A increases, for cells which grow both adherently and in suspension. Further detail can be probed by combining the optical stretcher with fluorescence microscopy to investigate the nuclear mechanical properties which show a larger decrease in deformability than for the whole cell. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Radiography used to measure internal spinal cord deformation in an in vivo rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, E; Whyte, T; Liu, J; Tetzlaff, W; Cripton, P A

    2018-04-11

    Little is known about the internal mechanics of the in vivo spinal cord during injury. The objective of this study was to develop a method of tracking internal and surface deformation of in vivo rat spinal cord during compression using radiography. Since neural tissue is radio-translucent, radio-opaque markers were injected into the spinal cord. Two tantalum beads (260 µm) were injected into the cord (dorsal and ventral) at C5 of nine anesthetized rats. Four beads were glued to the lateral surface of the cord, caudal and cranial to the injection site. A compression plate was displaced 0.5 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm into the spinal cord and lateral X-ray images were taken before, during, and after each compression for measuring bead displacements. Potential bead migration was monitored for by comparing displacements of the internal and glued surface beads. Dorsal beads moved significantly more than ventral beads with a range in averages of 0.57-0.71 mm and 0.31-0.35 mm respectively. Bead displacements during 0.5 mm compressions were significantly lower than 2 mm and 3 mm compressions. There was no statistically significant migration of the internal beads. The results indicate the merit of this technique for measuring in vivo spinal cord deformation. The pattern of bead displacements illustrates the complex internal and surface deformations of the spinal cord during transverse compression. This information is needed for validating physical and finite element spinal cord surrogates and to define relationships between loading parameters, internal cord deformation, and biological and functional outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cell visco-elasticity measured with AFM and optical trapping at sub-micrometer deformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanila Nawaz

    Full Text Available The measurement of the elastic properties of cells is widely used as an indicator for cellular changes during differentiation, upon drug treatment, or resulting from the interaction with the supporting matrix. Elasticity is routinely quantified by indenting the cell with a probe of an AFM while applying nano-Newton forces. Because the resulting deformations are in the micrometer range, the measurements will be affected by the finite thickness of the cell, viscous effects and even cell damage induced by the experiment itself. Here, we have analyzed the response of single 3T3 fibroblasts that were indented with a micrometer-sized bead attached to an AFM cantilever at forces from 30-600 pN, resulting in indentations ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 micrometer. To investigate the cellular response at lower forces up to 10 pN, we developed an optical trap to indent the cell in vertical direction, normal to the plane of the coverslip. Deformations of up to two hundred nanometers achieved at forces of up to 30 pN showed a reversible, thus truly elastic response that was independent on the rate of deformation. We found that at such small deformations, the elastic modulus of 100 Pa is largely determined by the presence of the actin cortex. At higher indentations, viscous effects led to an increase of the apparent elastic modulus. This viscous contribution that followed a weak power law, increased at larger cell indentations. Both AFM and optical trapping indentation experiments give consistent results for the cell elasticity. Optical trapping has the benefit of a lower force noise, which allows a more accurate determination of the absolute indentation. The combination of both techniques allows the investigation of single cells at small and large indentations and enables the separation of their viscous and elastic components.

  18. A Method to Measure Thermal Deformation of Superconducting Magnet Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Grau-Carles, A; Todesco, Ezio; Tommasini, D; Siegel, N

    1999-01-01

    The precision measurement of the cable positioning in superconducting coils is of great interest both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures because mechanical and thermal deformations affect the quality of the magnetic field. The paper describes a new two-coordinate measuring device, which is able to obtain scanned images of flat composite samples at liquid nitrogen temperature. The sample is cooled at 77 K into a flat quartz tray to permit the optical access to the sample from the bottom. The comparison of the images taken at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures by a high-resolution flatbed scanner gives the thermal contraction of the components.

  19. Study on dynamic deformation synchronized measurement technology of double-layer liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huiying; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Zhanwei

    2017-11-01

    Accurate measurement of the dynamic deformation of double-layer liquid surfaces plays an important role in many fields, such as fluid mechanics, biomechanics, petrochemical industry and aerospace engineering. It is difficult to measure dynamic deformation of double-layer liquid surfaces synchronously for traditional methods. In this paper, a novel and effective method for full-field static and dynamic deformation measurement of double-layer liquid surfaces has been developed, that is wavefront distortion of double-wavelength transmission light with geometric phase analysis (GPA) method. Double wavelength lattice patterns used here are produced by two techniques, one is by double wavelength laser, and the other is by liquid crystal display (LCD). The techniques combine the characteristics such as high transparency, low reflectivity and fluidity of liquid. Two color lattice patterns produced by laser and LCD were adjusted at a certain angle through the tested double-layer liquid surfaces simultaneously. On the basis of the refractive indexes difference of two transmitted lights, the double-layer liquid surfaces were decoupled with GPA method. Combined with the derived relationship between phase variation of transmission-lattice patterns and out-of plane heights of two surfaces, as well as considering the height curves of the liquid level, the double-layer liquid surfaces can be reconstructed successfully. Compared with the traditional measurement method, the developed method not only has the common advantages of the optical measurement methods, such as high-precision, full-field and non-contact, but also simple, low cost and easy to set up.

  20. Ground and Airborne Methane Measurements using Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Kawa, Stephan R.; Abshire, James; Dawsey, Martha; Ramanathan, Anand

    2012-01-01

    constant methane mixing ratio of 1.8 parts per million. The in-situ spectrometer did not show any significant deviations from the ambient concentrations. Further analysis using meteorological data from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (http://gmao.gsfc.nasa.gov/) to derive the theoretical optical depth also showed good agreement with the experimentally derived values. The OPA lidar system with slight modifications has also been used to measure CO2, water vapor, and CO in the near and mid-infrared spectral regions on the ground.

  1. Full-Field Reconstruction of Structural Deformations and Loads from Measured Strain Data on a Wing Using the Inverse Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eric J.; Manalo, Russel; Tessler, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the measurement of wing deformation and internal loads using measured strain data. Future aerospace vehicle research depends on the ability to accurately measure the deformation and internal loads during ground testing and in flight. The approach uses the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM). The iFEM is a robust, computationally efficient method that is well suited for real-time measurement of real-time structural deformation and loads. The method has been validated in previous work, but has yet to be applied to a large-scale test article. This work is in preparation for an upcoming loads test of a half-span test wing in the Flight Loads Laboratory at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California). The method has been implemented into an efficient MATLAB® (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, Massachusetts) code for testing different sensor configurations. This report discusses formulation and implementation along with the preliminary results from a representative aerospace structure. The end goal is to investigate the modeling and sensor placement approach so that the best practices can be applied to future aerospace projects.

  2. Microscopic Measurements of Axial Accumulation of Red Blood Cells in Capillary Flows Effects of Deformability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Seki, Junji; Itano, Tomoaki; Sugihara-Seki, Masako

    2017-11-01

    In the microcirculation, red blood cells (RBCs) are known to accumulate in the region near the central axis of microvessels, which is called the ``axial accumulation''. Although this behavior of RBCs is considered to originate from high deformability of RBCs, there have been few experimental studies on the mechanism. In order to elucidate the effect of RBC deformability on the axial accumulation, we measured the cross-sectional distributions of RBCs flowing through capillary tubes with a high spatial resolution by a newly devised observation system for intact and softened RBCs as well as hardened RBCs to various degrees. It was found that the intact and softened RBCs are concentrated in the small area centered on the tube axis, whereas the hardened RBCs are dispersed widely over the tube cross section dependent on the degree of hardness. These results demonstrate clearly the essential role of the deformability of RBCs in the ``axial accumulation'' of RBCs. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 17H03176, Kansai University ORDIST group funds.

  3. Geodetic Measurements and Numerical Models of Deformation at Coso Geothermal Field, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S. T.; Reinisch, E. C.; Feigl, K. L.; Davatzes, N. C.

    2016-12-01

    We measure transient deformation at the Coso geothermal field in south-central California using interferometric synthetic aperture data acquired between 2004 and 2016 by the Envisat and Sentinel-1A satellite missions. All well-correlated interferometric pairs show subsidence, with rates as high as 30 mm/year, over a large 75 km2 circular area surrounding the field below which most of the seismicity associated with geothermal production is located. The deformation signature remains in the same location throughout the 12 year interval. Time-series analysis of multiple interferometric pairs reveals continuous subsidence. A decrease in the subsidence rate after 2010 corresponds to a decrease in the net production rate. Using three-dimensional, fully numerical, multiphysics models, we explore the coupling between deformation and geothermal production. We seek to distinguish between two possible mechanisms: (i) decreasing pore-pressure following net extraction of fluids, or (ii) decrease in temperature of presumably fractured reservoir rock. Irrespective of the mechanism, a contracting ellipsoidal reservoir located at a depth of 2 km, with a volume of 80 km3 or less is required to explain the geodetic observations. Almost 90% of the seismicity beneath the field occurs within this 80 km3 ellipsoid.

  4. Measurement of Strain in the Left Ventricle during Diastole withcine-MRI and Deformable Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veress, Alexander I.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2005-07-20

    The assessment of regional heart wall motion (local strain) can localize ischemic myocardial disease, evaluate myocardial viability and identify impaired cardiac function due to hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathies. The objectives of this research were to develop and validate a technique known as Hyperelastic Warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle from clinical cine-MRI image datasets. The technique uses differences in image intensities between template (reference) and target (loaded) image datasets to generate a body force that deforms a finite element (FE) representation of the template so that it registers with the target image. To validate the technique, MRI image datasets representing two deformation states of a left ventricle were created such that the deformation map between the states represented in the images was known. A beginning diastoliccine-MRI image dataset from a normal human subject was defined as the template. A second image dataset (target) was created by mapping the template image using the deformation results obtained from a forward FE model of diastolic filling. Fiber stretch and strain predictions from Hyperelastic Warping showed good agreement with those of the forward solution. The technique had low sensitivity to changes in material parameters, with the exception of changes in bulk modulus of the material. The use of an isotropic hyperelastic constitutive model in the Warping analyses degraded the predictions of fiber stretch. Results were unaffected by simulated noise down to an SNR of 4.0. This study demonstrates that Warping in conjunction with cine-MRI imaging can be used to determine local ventricular strains during diastole.

  5. The effect of modified benchmark on the accuracy of measuring the deformation at Muria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari Nugroho

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of deformation surrounding the Muria mountain is recommended by The IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). In addition, this study also to provide the data of deformation caused by the volcanic activity of Mount Muria, as a basic study in analyzing the volcanic hazard toward the NPP (Nuclear Power Plant). The main purpose of this study is to discover the accuracy between the two measurements by using the different BM (Benchmark). This study uses geodetic GPS (Global Positioning System) Trimble R7 GNSS. The measurement in the month of April to July 2011 used the standard BM and conducted in eight BM which are BKI (Bopkri), UJW (Ujung Watu), PDP (Perdopo), RTW (Rahtawu), RGG (Rengging), KTP (Ketek Putih), CRG (Cranggang), DM (Danyang Mulyo) and refer to one reference BM named Mijen. The measurement in the month of November 2011 used the modified BM and conducted in six BM which are BKI, PDP, RTW, RGG, KTP, CRG referred to the same reference BM named Mijen. These measurements resulted data in the range of 4-7 mm (horizontal), 16-28 mm (vertical), and in the range of 0.6 mm - 1.3 mm (horizontal), 0.3 mm – 0.6 mm, respectively. (author)

  6. Damage visualization and deformation measurement in glass laminates during projectile penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar Strassburger

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Transparent armor consists of glass-polymer laminates in most cases. The formation and propagation of damage in the different glass layers has a strong influence on the ballistic resistance of such laminates. In order to clarify the course of events during projectile penetration, an experimental technique was developed, which allows visualizing the onset and propagation of damage in each single layer of the laminate. A telecentric objective lens was used together with a microsecond video camera that allows recording 100 frames at a maximum rate of 1 MHz in a backlit photography set-up. With this technique, the damage evolution could be visualized in glass laminates consisting of four glass layers with lateral dimensions 500 mm × 500 mm. Damage evolution was recorded during penetration of 7.62 mm AP projectiles with tungsten carbide core and a total mass of 11.1 g in the impact velocity range from 800 to 880 m/s. In order to measure the deformation of single glass plates within the laminates, a piece of reflecting tape was attached to the corresponding glass plate, and photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV was applied. With the photonic Doppler velocimeter, an infrared laser is used to illuminate an object to be measured and the Doppler-shifted light is superimposed to a reference light beam at the detector. The simultaneous visualization and PDV measurement of the glass deformation allow determining the deformation at the time of the onset of fracture. The analysis of the experimental data was supported by numerical simulations, using the AUTODYN commercial hydro-code.

  7. A new method for measuring AFO deformation, tibial and footwear movement in three dimensional gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgewell, Emily; Sangeux, Morgan; Bach, Timothy; Baker, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Solid ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) are designed to immobilise the ankle but numerous studies have measured a considerable ankle range of motion (ROM) in AFO users. Measurement of ankle kinematics may be affected by soft-tissue artefact (STA) of the knee marker, deformation of the AFO or tibial movement within the AFO. A new model based on the Conventional Gait Model (CGM) was developed to calculate these effects. Although movement of the AFO within the shoe should not affect the measured ankle joint angle the model also allows an estimation of this movement. Seven children (13 limbs) with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy were assessed to present the benefits of the new model compared to the CGM. STA of the knee marker was estimated to result in a 1.5° overestimation of total ankle ROM (from 8.2° to 9.7°). STA error was strongly related to angle of knee flexion (r=0.82) with an average maximum error of 3.8°. AFO deformation contributed approximately two thirds of the ankle ROM (6.0±4.3°) with the remaining third from tibial movement relative to the AFO (2.8±0.9°). Movement of the AFO within the footwear was very small (1.8±0.8°). A strong positive relationship (r=0.9) was found between body mass (kg) and AFO deformation which was statistically significant (pAFOs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) MANUAL PRECIPITATION MEASUREMENTS GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Manual Precipitation Measurements GCPEx dataset was collected during the GPM Cold-season Precipitation Experiment...

  9. On-resonance deformation effect measurements: A probe of order within chaos in the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.D.; Gould, C.R.; Gould, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    The statistics of on-resonance measurements of the deformation effect cross section σ 02 in unpolarized neutron transmission through an aligned 165 Ho target is discussed. Under the standard Porter-Thomas assumption about reduced partial width amplitudes, the sign of σ 02 is random at s-wave resonances with d-wave admixtures. Motivated by the observation of sign correlations in epithermal parity-violation studies, conditions under which a doorway state will give rise to σ 02 close-quote s of nonrandom sign are identified. Oblate shape isomers lying at excitation energies in the isolated resonance regime could meet these conditions. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  10. Comparison between deformation modulus of rock mass measured by plate jacking and dilatometer tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Rezaei

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available For determination of the in-situ deformation modulus of rock mass at Bakhtiari Dam site, located in south-west of Iran, plate jacking tests (PJT and dilatometer tests (DLT carried out during the geotechnical investigations. In this study, the results of PJTs and DLTs were compared. This comparison involves 89 vertical and horizontal PJTs and 83 DLTs carried out in 6 rock units of Sarvak formation. Although, both PJTs and DLTs in the Bakhtiari Dam site were performed in same geological and geotechnical conditions, but there are not sufficient side by side data to make a paired two samples correlation. Therefore, the mean of in-situ data was compared at each rock unit. Besides Mann–Whitney U tests were performed to compare in-situ test results. The comparison shows that the deformation modulus measured by both methods has no significant differences. However, in low quality rock masses the moduli measured by the use of DLTs were greater than the modulus measured by PJTs. Conversely, in high quality rock masses the results of PJTs were greater than DLT’s.

  11. Integration of Space-borne SAR and Ground-Based Radar for 3D Deformation Mapping of the Central Calaveras Fault at Coyote Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C. L.; Baker, B.; Milillo, P.; Magnard, C.; Strozzi, T.; Wegmüller, U.

    2017-12-01

    The Central Calaveras Fault (CCF) passes directly through Coyote Dam located southeast of Morgan Hill, California. This earthen embankment dam owned and operated by the Santa Clara Valley Water District (District), has experienced over 80 cm of accumulated fault creep since its construction in 1936. The average slip rate is 10 to 15 mm/year as measured using surveying, GPS, and more recently, terrestrial radar interferometry (TRI). The CCF is a right-lateral strike-slip fault that has the potential for a M7.25 earthquake resulting in meter scale displacement. In 2015, the District initiated a geological analysis of the CCF integrating past surveying, GPS data, TRI deformation mapping, paleoseismic trenching, and boreholes. The initial TRI survey included dam measurements from two locations, imaging the upstream and downstream embankments over the period from February to July 2015. The TRI data from the downstream embankment data showed a complex deformation pattern not consistent with a strike-slip fault model. A second measurement campaign was initiated utilizing multiple radar viewpoints with the aim of resolving the 3D deformation field of the downstream embankment. The campaign occurred between May and November 2016 and showed an unexpected strong westward and downward movement exceeding 2 cm/year (see Figure). TRI data were acquired from 4 separate observation points every 2 to 4 weeks during this campaign. Point target analysis methods were used to avoid contamination of the deformation data by vegetation and radar shadow. Deformation uncertainty in the downstream fault zone was relatively high due to the nearly coplanar arrangement of the TRI observation points. To better constrain the vertical deformation, in this report we integrate spaceborne measurements from the Cosmo-SkyMed (CS) radar satellite in the 3D deformation solution. The LOS to the satellite has a large vertical component not present in the TRI measurement geometry that facilitates the

  12. Horizontal and vertical deformation field in New Caledonia, South West Pacific, derived from more than 20 years of GNSS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballu, V.; Calmant, S.; Valty, P.; Gravelle, M.; Sakic, P.; Aucan, J.; Pelletier, B.

    2015-12-01

    New Caledonia is located in the South West Pacific Ocean, on the Australian Plate just before its subduction under the North Fiji Basin. Because it is on the subducting side of the plate interface, New Caledonia is considered to be stable to first order and not to undergo rapid deformation. However, moderate seismicity is recorded close to the plate interface, in the southern part of the main land and along the Loyalty ridge. In addition, the main island and Loyalty ridge are subjected to long-term vertical deformation due to the flexure of the plate entering subduction. A geodetic network was installed since the early days of GPS (~1990) and has been further developed and occasionally measured since. Due to the low number of global GNSS recording stations in the early 1990s, the positioning accuracy that can be achieved with these data is poor compared to present-day standards, and expected movements are slow (possibly less than 1 mm/yr). However, the >20 year length of the time series may allow us to determine the current deformation field in New Caledonia and Loyalty Ridge. We pay special care in using older GNSS data for characterizing ground motions, reprocessing all available data using a range of different processing strategies and products. We calculated daily positions from double-differenced ionosphere-free carrier phase data in a global network using the GAMIT software and combined and aligned the results on the ITRF2008 using the CATREF software, according to the processing strategy developed as part of the current ULR6 (www.sonel.org) reprocessing campaign for IGS. We compare the double difference results with those obtained in PPP mode using JPL GIPSY software as well as CNES GINS software and different products (MIT, JPL and GRG orbits and clocks provided in the framework of the IGS2 reprocessing campaign). We present both the results for New Caledonia and an analysis of the applicability of these different processing strategies to older GNSS

  13. Characterisation of polycrystal deformation by numerical modelling and neutron diffraction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bjørn

    , that the effect of the elastic anisotropy is limited to the very early stages of plasticity (εP neutron diffraction mea-surements of elastic lattice strains...... reflections. The self-consistent model is used to determine the most suitable reflection for technological applications of neutron diffraction, where focus is on the volume av-erage stress state in engineering components. To be able to successfully convert the measured elastic lattice strains for a specific...... the smallest build-up of residual lattice strains. Below 5% deforma-tion the deviations from linearity and the residual strains are below the normal strain resolution of a neutron diffraction measurement. The model predictions have pinpointed, that the selection of the reflection is crucial for the validity...

  14. Ground motion measurements at the LBL Light Source site, the Bevatron and at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Majer, E.I.; More, V.D.; O'Connell, D.R.; Shilling, R.C.

    1986-12-01

    This report describes the technique for measuring ground motion at the site of the 1.0 to 2.0 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Facility which was known as the Advanced Light Source (in 1983 when the measurements were taken). The results of ground motion measurements at the Light Source site at Building 6 at LBL are presented. As comparison, ground motion measurements were made at the Byerly Tunnel, the Bevatron, Blackberry Canyon, and SLAC at the Spear Ring. Ground Motion at the Light Source site was measured in a band from 4 to 100 Hz. The measured noise is primarily local in origin and is not easily transported through LBL soils. The background ground motion is for the most part less than 0.1 microns. Localized truck traffic near Building 6 and the operation of the cranes in the building can result in local ground motions of a micron or more for short periods of time. The background motion at Building 6 is between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude higher than ground motion in a quiet seismic tunnel, which is representative of quiet sites worldwide. The magnitude of the ground motions at SLAC and the Bevatron are comparable to ground motions measured at the Building 6 Light Source site. However, the frequency signature of each site is very different

  15. The Development and Delivery of On-Demand RADARSAT Constellation Mission Ground Deformation Products Based on Advanced Insar Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonov, S. V.; Feng, W.

    2017-12-01

    InSAR-based mapping of surface deformation (displacement) has proven valuable to a variety of geoscience applications within NRCan. Conventional approaches to InSAR analysis require significant expert intervention to separate useful signal from noise and are not suited to the address the opportunities and challenges presented by the large multi-temporal SAR datasets provided by future radar constellations. The Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation (CCMEO) develops, in support of NRCAN and Government of Canada priorities a framework for automatic generation of standard and advanced deformation products based on Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technology from RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM) Synthetic Aperture Radar data. We utilize existing processing algorithms that are currently used for processing RADARSAT-2 data and adapt them to RCM specifications. In addition we develop novel advanced processing algorithms that address large data sets made possible by the satellites' rapid revisit cycle and expand InSAR functionality to regional and national scales across a wide range of time scales. Through automation the system makes it possible to extend the mapping of surface deformation to non-SAR experts. The architecture is scalable and expandable to serve large number of clients and simultaneously address multiple application areas including: natural and anthropogenic hazards, natural resource development, permafrost and glacier monitoring, coastal and environmental change and wetlands mapping.

  16. Onsets of nuclear deformation from measurements with the Isoltrap mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naimi, S.

    2010-10-01

    Mass measurements provide important information concerning nuclear structure. This work presents results from the pioneering Penning trap spectrometer Isoltrap at CERN-Isolde. High-precision mass measurements of neutron-rich manganese ( 58 - 66 Mn) and krypton isotopes ( 96, 97 Kr) are presented, of which the 66 Mn and 96, 97 Kr masses are measured for the first time. In particular, the mass of 97 Kr was measured using the preparation trap and required the definition of a new fit function. In the case of the manganese isotopes, the N=40 shell closure is addressed. The two-neutron-separation energies calculated from the new masses show no shell closure at N=40 but give an estimation of the proton-neutron interaction (around 0.5 MeV) responsible for the increase of collectivity and nuclear deformation in this mass region. The new krypton masses show behavior in sharp contrast with heavier neighbors where sudden and intense deformation is present, interpreted as the establishment of a nuclear quantum shape/phase transition critical-point boundary. The new masses confirm findings from nuclear mean-square charge-radius measurements up to N=60 but are at variance with conclusions from recent gamma-ray spectroscopy. Another part of this work was the design of new decay spectroscopy system behind the Isoltrap mass spectrometer. The beam purity achievable with Isoltrap will allow decay studies with γ and β detection coupled to a tape-station. This system has been mounted and commissioned with the radioactive beam 80 Rb. (author)

  17. Validation of OMI UV measurements against ground-based measurements at a station in Kampala, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyimbwa, Dennis; Dahlback, Arne; Stamnes, Jakob; Hamre, Børge; Frette, Øyvind; Ssenyonga, Taddeo; Chen, Yi-Chun

    2015-04-01

    We present solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance data measured with a NILU-UV instrument at a ground site in Kampala (0.31°N, 32.58°E), Uganda for the period 2005-2014. The data were analyzed and compared with UV irradiances inferred from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for the same period. Kampala is located on the shores of lake Victoria, Africa's largest fresh water lake, which may influence the climate and weather conditions of the region. Also, there is an excessive use of worn cars, which may contribute to a high anthropogenic loading of absorbing aerosols. The OMI surface UV algorithm does not account for absorbing aerosols, which may lead to systematic overestimation of surface UV irradiances inferred from OMI satellite data. We retrieved UV index values from OMI UV irradiances and validated them against the ground-based UV index values obtained from NILU-UV measurements. The UV index values were found to follow a seasonal pattern similar to that of the clouds and the rainfall. OMI inferred UV index values were overestimated with a mean bias of about 28% under all-sky conditions, but the mean bias was reduced to about 8% under clear-sky conditions when only days with radiation modification factor (RMF) greater than 65% were considered. However, when days with RMF greater than 70, 75, and 80% were considered, OMI inferred UV index values were found to agree with the ground-based UV index values to within 5, 3, and 1%, respectively. In the validation we identified clouds/aerosols, which were present in 88% of the measurements, as the main cause of OMI inferred overestimation of the UV index.

  18. The Deformation and Kinematic Characteristics of the Sanyi Thrust Fault by Incorporating the Outcrop Analysis, Ground-penetrating radar and Resistivity Imaging Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, G. R.; Chang, P. Y.

    2017-12-01

    In one of the important surface deformation laboratory with high uplifting and erosion rate - Taiwan. It is very important to map the fault trace in order to delineate the susceptibility zones of the active faults. In this study, we focused on the outcrop analysis, Ground-penetrating radar and Near surface resistivity mapping of the fault traces in the thrust fault system of western Taiwan. From the outcrop along the Dajia river, we studied the kinematics and deformation characteristics of the Sanyi fault. The Kweichulin formation forms the hanging wall of the Sanyi Fault and the footwall is composed of the unconsolidated gravels and sands in the study area. We observed that the Sanyi Fault is composed of a major and three minor fault zones, which extends about 100 meters, and is consisted of 1.5-m thick fault gouges and breccias. We also conducted electrical resistivity and Ground-penetrating radar image near the outcrop. Compared with the data and inverted resistivity images, we concluded that the Kweichulin formation in the hanging wall exhibits a resistivity lower than 100 Ohm-m and the thick gravel layers in the foot wall have a resistivity higher than 100 Ohm-m. The Ground-penetrating radar survey shows the fault plane can extend to 5 meters deep with variable dipping near the surface. Our study shows the fault trace not only exposed in the Dajia river but also pass through the east side of the Fengyuan township, and extends southeastward into the area that between the hill and the alluvial plain of Taichung Basin.

  19. Autocollimation system for measuring angular deformations with reflector designed by quaternionic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Phong V.; Konyakhin, Igor A.

    2017-06-01

    Autocollimators are widely used for angular measurements in instrument-making and the manufacture of elements of optical systems (wedges, prisms, plane-parallel plates) to check their shape parameters (rectilinearity, parallelism and planarity) and retrieve their optical parameters (curvature radii, measure and test their flange focusing). Autocollimator efficiency is due to the high sensitivity of the autocollimation method to minor rotations of the reflecting control element or the controlled surface itself. We consider using quaternions to optimize reflector parameters during autocollimation measurements as compared to the matrix technique. Mathematical model studies have demonstrated that the orthogonal positioning of the two basic unchanged directions of the tetrahedral reflector of the autocollimator is optimal by the criterion of reducing measurement errors where the axis of actual rotation is in a bisecting position towards them. Computer results are presented of running quaternion models that yielded conditions for diminishing measurement errors provided apriori information is available on the position of rotation axis. A practical technique is considered for synthesizing the parameters of the tetrahedral reflector that employs the newly-retrieved relationships. Following the relationships found between the angles of the tetrahedral reflector and the angles of the parameters of its initial orientation, an applied technique was developed to synthesize the control element for autocollimation measurements in case apriori information is available on the axis of actual rotation during monitoring measurements of shaft or pipeline deformation.

  20. Development of AN Open-Source Automatic Deformation Monitoring System for Geodetical and Geotechnical Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, P.; Schweimler, B.

    2016-04-01

    The deformation monitoring of structures and buildings is an important task field of modern engineering surveying, ensuring the standing and reliability of supervised objects over a long period. Several commercial hardware and software solutions for the realization of such monitoring measurements are available on the market. In addition to them, a research team at the Neubrandenburg University of Applied Sciences (NUAS) is actively developing a software package for monitoring purposes in geodesy and geotechnics, which is distributed under an open source licence and free of charge. The task of managing an open source project is well-known in computer science, but it is fairly new in a geodetic context. This paper contributes to that issue by detailing applications, frameworks, and interfaces for the design and implementation of open hardware and software solutions for sensor control, sensor networks, and data management in automatic deformation monitoring. It will be discussed how the development effort of networked applications can be reduced by using free programming tools, cloud computing technologies, and rapid prototyping methods.

  1. New results on ground deformation in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (southern Poland) obtained during the DORIS Project (EU-FP 7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graniczny, Marek; Colombo, Davide; Kowalski, Zbigniew; Przyłucka, Maria; Zdanowski, Albin

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents application of satellite interferometric methods (persistent scatterer interferometric synthetic aperture radar (PSInSAR™) and differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR)) for observation of ground deformation in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB) in Southern Poland. The presented results were obtained during the DORIS project (EC FP 7, Grant Agreement n. 242212, www.doris-project.eu). Several InSAR datasets for this area were analysed. Most of them were processed by Tele-Rilevamento Europa - T.R.E. s.r.l. Italy. Datasets came from different SAR satellites (ERS 1 and 2, Envisat, ALOS- PALSAR and TerraSAR-X) and cover three different SAR bands (L, C and X). They were processed using both InSAR techniques: DInSAR, where deformations are presented as interferometric fringes on the raster image, and PSInSAR, where motion is indentified on irregular set of persistent scatterer (PS) points. Archival data from the C-band European Space Agency satellites ERS and ENVISAT provided information about ground movement since 1992 until 2010 in two separate datasets (1992-2000 and 2003-2010). Two coal mines were selected as examples of ground motion within inactive mining areas: Sosnowiec and Saturn, where mining ceased in 1995 and 1997, respectively. Despite well pumping after closure of the mines, groundwater rose several dozen meters, returning to its natural horizon. Small surface uplift clearly indicated on satellite interferometric data is related to high permeability of the hydrogeological subregion and insufficient water withdrawal from abandoned mines. The older 1992-2000 PSInSAR dataset indicates values of ground motion ranging from -40.0 to 0.0 mm. The newer 2003-2010 dataset shows values ranging from -2.0 to +7.0 mm. This means that during this period of time subsidence was less and uplift greater in comparison to the older dataset. This is even more evident in the time series of randomly selected PS points from both coal

  2. Thermo-mechanical evolution of the magmatic plumbing system of Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat, and resultant ground deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Joachim; Odbert, Henry

    2014-05-01

    We exploit cyclic ground deformation timeseries from Soufrière Hills volcano expressed by ground uplift during reservoir priming and subsidence during extrusion. This study focuses on the period of eruptive repose between July 2003 and August 2005 marked by ground uplift prior to renewed dome growth thereafter. Using finite - element analysis we simulate the stress and pressure evolution in the magmatic plumbing system using a time-dependent, non-linear pressure-time history and inelastic thermo-mechanical properties of the upper crust. We compare two models of the plumbing system assembly: 1) two stacked spheroidal reservoirs and 2) a single prolate reservoir. In addition, two different crustal rheology models are tested for each of the plumbing models, with one order of magnitude difference in near-surface (multiple vertically stacked reservoirs or a single vertically elongated reservoir, and the stiffness of near-surface rocks has no significant influence. This indistinctiveness predominantly results from the thermal effect of the plumbing system on encasing rocks and the resultant inelastic mechanical response to reservoir stressing. Our study provides important insight into the complexities of time-dependent reservoir evolution of andesitic systems which can only be poorly constrained by models invoking crustal elasticity.

  3. Measurement of Flat Slab Deformations by the Multi-Image Photogrammetry Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marčiš, Marián; Fraštia, Marek; Augustín, Tomáš

    2017-12-01

    The use of photogrammetry during load tests of building components is a common practise all over the world. It is very effective thanks to its contactless approach, 3D measurement, fast data collection, and partial or full automation of image processing; it can deliver very accurate results. Multi-image convergent photogrammetry supported by artificial coded targets is the most accurate photogrammetric method when the targets are detected in an image with a higher degree of accuracy than a 0.1 pixel. It is possible to achieve an accuracy of 0.03 mm for all the points measured on the object observed if the camera is close enough to the object, and the positions of the camera and the number of shots are precisely planned. This contribution deals with the design of a special hanging frame for a DSLR camera used during the photogrammetric measurement of the deformation of flat concrete slab. The results of the photogrammetric measurements are compared to the results from traditional contact measurement techniques during load tests.

  4. A Review of Surface Deformation and Strain Measurement Using Two-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoo Sze-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the full-field optical measurement methods, the Digital Image Correlation (DIC is one of the techniques which has been given particular attention. Technically, the DIC technique refers to a non-contact strain measurement method that mathematically compares the grey intensity changes of the images captured at two different states: before and after deformation. The measurement can be performed by numerically calculating the displacement of speckles which are deposited on the top of object’s surface. In this paper, the Two-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation (2D-DIC is presented and its fundamental concepts are discussed. Next, the development of the 2D-DIC algorithms in the past 33 years is reviewed systematically. The improvement of 2DDIC algorithms is presented with respect to two distinct aspects: their computation efficiency and measurement accuracy. Furthermore, analysis of the 2D-DIC accuracy is included, followed by a review of the DIC applications for two-dimensional measurements.

  5. Dynamic deformation image de-blurring and image processing for digital imaging correlation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Li, Y.; Suo, T.; Liu, H.; Zhang, C.

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a method for de-blurring of images captured in the dynamic deformation of materials. De-blurring is achieved based on the dynamic-based approach, which is used to estimate the Point Spread Function (PSF) during the camera exposure window. The deconvolution process involving iterative matrix calculations of pixels, is then performed on the GPU to decrease the time cost. Compared to the Gauss method and the Lucy-Richardson method, it has the best result of the image restoration. The proposed method has been evaluated by using the Hopkinson bar loading system. In comparison to the blurry image, the proposed method has successfully restored the image. It is also demonstrated from image processing applications that the de-blurring method can improve the accuracy and the stability of the digital imaging correlation measurement.

  6. Neighborhood binary speckle pattern for deformation measurements insensitive to local illumination variation by digital image correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Yang, Ping; Zhao, Yue

    2017-06-01

    Speckle pattern-based characteristics of digital image correlation (DIC) restrict its application in engineering fields and nonlaboratory environments, since serious decorrelation effect occurs due to localized sudden illumination variation. A simple and efficient speckle pattern adjusting and optimizing approach presented in this paper is aimed at providing a novel speckle pattern robust enough to resist local illumination variation. The new speckle pattern, called neighborhood binary speckle pattern, derived from original speckle pattern, is obtained by means of thresholding the pixels of a neighborhood at its central pixel value and considering the result as a binary number. The efficiency of the proposed speckle pattern is evaluated in six experimental scenarios. Experiment results indicate that the DIC measurements based on neighborhood binary speckle pattern are able to provide reliable and accurate results, even though local brightness and contrast of the deformed images have been seriously changed. It is expected that the new speckle pattern will have more potential value in engineering applications.

  7. Validity of a smartphone protractor to measure sagittal parameters in adult spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, William Aaron; Madden, Michael; Potts, Shannon; Fogelson, Jeremy; Hershman, Stuart

    2017-10-01

    Smartphones have become an integral tool in the daily life of health-care professionals (Franko 2011). Their ease of use and wide availability often make smartphones the first tool surgeons use to perform measurements. This technique has been validated for certain orthopedic pathologies (Shaw 2012; Quek 2014; Milanese 2014; Milani 2014), but never to assess sagittal parameters in adult spinal deformity (ASD). This study was designed to assess the validity, reproducibility, precision, and efficiency of using a smartphone protractor application to measure sagittal parameters commonly measured in ASD assessment and surgical planning. This study aimed to (1) determine the validity of smartphone protractor applications, (2) determine the intra- and interobserver reliability of smartphone protractor applications when used to measure sagittal parameters in ASD, (3) determine the efficiency of using a smartphone protractor application to measure sagittal parameters, and (4) elucidate whether a physician's level of experience impacts the reliability or validity of using a smartphone protractor application to measure sagittal parameters in ASD. An experimental validation study was carried out. Thirty standard 36″ standing lateral radiographs were examined. Three separate measurements were performed using a marker and protractor; then at a separate time point, three separate measurements were performed using a smartphone protractor application for all 30 radiographs. The first 10 radiographs were then re-measured two more times, for a total of three measurements from both the smartphone protractor and marker and protractor. The parameters included lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, and pelvic tilt. Three raters performed all measurements-a junior level orthopedic resident, a senior level orthopedic resident, and a fellowship-trained spinal deformity surgeon. All data, including the time to perform the measurements, were recorded, and statistical analysis was performed to

  8. The unrest of the San Miguel volcano (El Salvador, Central America): installation of the monitoring network and observed volcano-tectonic ground deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Hernandez, Douglas Antonio; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Handal, Louis; Polío, Cecilia; Rapisarda, Salvatore; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2016-08-01

    On 29 December 2013, the Chaparrastique volcano in El Salvador, close to the town of San Miguel, erupted suddenly with explosive force, forming a column more than 9 km high and projecting ballistic projectiles as far as 3 km away. Pyroclastic density currents flowed to the north-northwest side of the volcano, while tephras were dispersed northwest and north-northeast. This sudden eruption prompted the local Ministry of Environment to request cooperation with Italian scientists in order to improve the monitoring of the volcano during this unrest. A joint force, made up of an Italian team from the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and a local team from the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, was organized to enhance the volcanological, geophysical and geochemical monitoring system to study the evolution of the phenomenon during the crisis. The joint team quickly installed a multiparametric mobile network comprising seismic, geodetic and geochemical sensors (designed to cover all the volcano flanks from the lowest to the highest possible altitudes) and a thermal camera. To simplify the logistics for a rapid installation and for security reasons, some sensors were colocated into multiparametric stations. Here, we describe the prompt design and installation of the geodetic monitoring network, the processing and results. The installation of a new ground deformation network can be considered an important result by itself, while the detection of some crucial deforming areas is very significant information, useful for dealing with future threats and for further studies on this poorly monitored volcano.

  9. Importance of methodological standardization for the ektacytometric measures of red blood cell deformability in sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renoux, Céline; Parrow, Nermi; Faes, Camille; Joly, Philippe; Hardeman, Max; Tisdale, John; Levine, Mark; Garnier, Nathalie; Bertrand, Yves; Kebaili, Kamila; Cuzzubbo, Daniela; Cannas, Giovanna; Martin, Cyril; Connes, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) deformability is severely decreased in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), which plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. However, investigation of RBC deformability from SCA patients demands careful methodological considerations. We assessed RBC deformability by ektacytometry (LORRCA MaxSis, Mechatronics, The Netherlands) in 6 healthy individuals and 49 SCA patients and tested the effects of different heights of the RBC diffraction patterns, obtained by altering the camera gain of the LORRCA, on the result of RBC deformability measurements, expressed as Elongation Index (EI). Results indicate that the pattern of RBCs from control subjects adopts an elliptical shape under shear stress, whereas the pattern of RBCs from individuals with SCA adopts a diamond shape arising from the superposition of elliptical and circular patterns. The latter represent rigid RBCs. While the EI measures did not change with the variations of the RBC diffraction pattern heights in the control subjects, we observed a decrease of EI when the RBC diffraction pattern height is increased in the SCA group. The differences in SCA EI values measured at 5 Pa between the different diffraction pattern heights correlated with the percent of hemoglobin S and the percent of sickled RBC observed by microscopy. Our study confirms that the camera gain or aperture of the ektacytometer should be used to standardize the size of the RBC diffraction pattern height when measuring RBC deformability in sickle cell patients and underscores the potential clinical utility of this technique.

  10. Using Hydraulic Head Measurements in Variable-Density Ground Water Flow Analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, V.E.A.; Kooi, H.; Simmons, C.T.

    2007-01-01

    The use of hydraulic head measurements in ground water of variable density is considerably more complicated than for the case of constant-density ground water. A theoretical framework for dealing with these complications does exist in the current literature but suffers from a lack of awareness among

  11. CLPX-Ground: ISA Soil Moisture Measurements, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of in-situ point measurements of soil moisture within three 25-km by 25-km Meso-cell Study Areas (MSAs) in northern Colorado (Fraser, North...

  12. An automated in vitro model for the evaluation of ultrasound modalities measuring myocardial deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stigö Albin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Echocardiography is the method of choice when one wishes to examine myocardial function. Qualitative assessment of the 2D grey scale images obtained is subjective, and objective methods are required. Speckle Tracking Ultrasound is an emerging technology, offering an objective mean of quantifying left ventricular wall motion. However, before a new ultrasound technology can be adopted in the clinic, accuracy and reproducibility needs to be investigated. Aim It was hypothesized that the collection of ultrasound sample data from an in vitro model could be automated. The aim was to optimize an in vitro model to allow for efficient collection of sample data. Material & Methods A tissue-mimicking phantom was made from water, gelatin powder, psyllium fibers and a preservative. Sonomicrometry crystals were molded into the phantom. The solid phantom was mounted in a stable stand and cyclically compressed. Peak strain was then measured by Speckle Tracking Ultrasound and sonomicrometry. Results We succeeded in automating the acquisition and analysis of sample data. Sample data was collected at a rate of 200 measurement pairs in 30 minutes. We found good agreement between Speckle Tracking Ultrasound and sonomicrometry in the in vitro model. Best agreement was 0.83 ± 0.70%. Worst agreement was -1.13 ± 6.46%. Conclusions It has been shown possible to automate a model that can be used for evaluating the in vitro accuracy and precision of ultrasound modalities measuring deformation. Sonomicrometry and Speckle Tracking Ultrasound had acceptable agreement.

  13. Longer-Term Postcure Measurement of Cuspal Deformation Induced by Dimensional Changes in Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsafi, A.; Oxman, J. D.; Tse, P.-H.; Ton, T. T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. This paper presents a simple, versatile in vitro methodology that enables indirect quantification of shrinkage and expansion stresses under clinically relevant conditions without the need for a dedicated instrument. Methods. For shrinkage effects, resulting cusp deformation of aluminum blocks with MOD type cavity, filled with novel filling compositions and commercial cements, has been measured using a bench-top micrometer and a Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT, a displacement transducer) based instrument. Results. The results demonstrated the validity of the proposed simple methodology. The technique was successfully used in longer-term measurements of shrinkage and expansion stress for several dental compositions. Conclusions. In contrast to in situ techniques where a measuring instrument is dedicated to the sample and its data collection, the proposed simple methodology allows for transfer of the samples to the environment of choice for storage and conditioning. The presented technique can be reliably used to quantify stress development of curing materials under clinically relevant (oral) conditions. This enables direct examination and comparison of structural properties corresponding to the final stage of formed networks. The proposed methodology is directly applicable to the study of self-curing systems as they require mouth-type conditions (temperature and humidity) to achieve their designed kinetics and reactions. PMID:26257783

  14. First 3D measurements of proton beams in a deformable silicone-based dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, E. M.; Sadel, M.; Kaplan, L.; Skyt, P. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Swakoń, J.; Mierzwińska, G.; Rydygier, M.; Malinowski, L.; Balling, P.

    2017-05-01

    3D dosimetry provides high-resolution dose information of radiation therapy (RT), and is explored to enable and secure high-quality delivery of advanced RT modalities, including proton therapy. We present the first 3D measurements of spot-scanning proton plans in a silicone-based, radiochromic dosimeter with deformation properties. The dose information was read-out by optical CT-scanning. We found that the dosimeter signal was quenched close to the Bragg peak, and that this had a large impact on a measured spread-out Bragg peak. The dose response was linear both in the entrance region and in the Bragg peak, however, the dose response significantly reduced in the Bragg peak. Quenching was attributed to a linear-energy-transfer dependent dose response. Linear energy transfer distributions for each proton treatment plan will provide a means for calibrating the optical measurement to linear energy transfer, as well as dose. This might enable use of the silicone-dosimeter in quality assurance of proton beams.

  15. 3D shape, deformation, and vibration measurements using infrared Kinect sensors and digital image correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hieu; Wang, Zhaoyang; Jones, Patrick; Zhao, Bing

    2017-11-10

    Consumer-grade red-green-blue and depth (RGB-D) sensors, such as the Microsoft Kinect and the Asus Xtion, are attractive devices due to their low cost and robustness for real-time sensing of depth information. These devices provide the depth information by detecting the correspondences between the captured infrared (IR) image and the initial image sent to the IR projector, and their essential limitation is the low accuracy of 3D shape reconstruction. In this paper, an effective technique that employs the Kinect sensors for accurate 3D shape, deformation, and vibration measurements is introduced. The technique involves using the RGB-D sensors, an accurate camera calibration scheme, and area- and feature-based image-matching algorithms. The IR speckle pattern projected from the Kinect projector considerably facilitates the digital image correlation analysis in the regions of interest with enhanced accuracy. A number of experiments have been carried out to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed technique and approach. It is shown that the technique can yield measurement accuracy at the 10 μm level for a typical field of view. The real-time capturing speed of 30 frames per second makes the proposed technique suitable for certain motion and vibration measurements, such as non-contact monitoring of respiration and heartbeat rates.

  16. Ground-based intercomparison of two isoprene measurement techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Leibrock

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An informal intercomparison of two isoprene (C5H8 measurement techniques was carried out during Fall of 1998 at a field site located approximately 3 km west of Boulder, Colorado, USA. A new chemical ionization mass spectrometric technique (CIMS was compared to a well-established gas chromatographic technique (GC. The CIMS technique utilized benzene cation chemistry to ionize isoprene. The isoprene levels measured by the CIMS were often larger than those obtained with the GC. The results indicate that the CIMS technique suffered from an anthropogenic interference associated with air masses from the Denver, CO metropolitan area as well as an additional interference occurring in clean conditions. However, the CIMS technique is also demonstrated to be sensitive and fast. Especially after introduction of a tandem mass spectrometric technique, it is therefore a candidate for isoprene measurements in remote environments near isoprene sources.

  17. Long-term geodetic measurements of large scale deformation at Iwo-jima caldera, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukawa, M.; Fujita, E.; Ueda, H.; Kumagai, T.; Nakajima, H.; Morita, H.

    2006-02-01

    Iwo-jima is a volcanic caldera located 1250 km south of Tokyo, and is part of the Izu-Ogasawara arc. An extremely high uplift rate (averaging 0.25 m/a over several hundred years) characterizes the volcanic activity of Iwo-jima. This deformation is believed to be due to post caldera uplift. To investigate the mechanisms contributing to the high uplift rate, we have repeatedly conducted leveling and trilateration surveys from 1976 to 1995, and GPS surveys from 1996 to 2002. These observations have detected two patterns of continuous crustal deformation: concentric subsidence around Motoyama at the center of the Iwo-jima caldera and uplift surrounding the subsiding area. During the period from 1977 to 1995, subsidence at Motoyama reached 0.54 m and uplift in the southwestern part of the island exceeded 3 m. In addition, the island has experienced broad, episodic uplift, which amounted to more than 1 m during volcanic unrest both in 1982 and 2001. Horizontal displacements around Motoyama exhibit contraction due to the concentric subsidence, indicating the presence of a deflating source at depth. Vertical deformation dominates the displacement field during periods of broad episodic uplift, suggesting a deeper and/or more extensive source. Focusing the Motoyama area, we modeled the subsidence source simultaneously with the broad episodic uplift, which is approximated by deformation with a planar gradient, for 14 times between 1976 and 2002, using a grid search combined with a least-squares method. By assuming the subsidence source could be located at any grid point, we applied the least-squares method to calculate the intensity of subsidence source and the parameters for the uplift with a planar gradient and then selected the best-fitting source location. The best-fitting subsidence source geometries for 1998-2000 and 2000-2002 (the two time periods with GPS results) are horizontal, squared-shaped sills with side lengths of 4 and 5 km, respectively. Adopting the

  18. EPA True NO2 ground site measurements – multiple sites, TCEQ ground site measurements of meteorological and air pollution parameters – multiple sites ,GeoTASO NO2 Vertical Column

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPA True NO2 ground site measurements – multiple sites - http://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/ArcView/discover-aq.tx-2013; TCEQ ground site measurements of...

  19. Soil moisture characterization of the Valencia anchor station. Ground, aircraft measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Baeza, E; Antolin, M C; Balling, Jan E.

    2009-01-01

    , soil type, lithology, geology, elevation, slope and vegetation cover conditions. Complementary to the ground measurements, flight operations were performed over this control area using the Helsinki University of Technology TKK Short Skyvan research aircraft which contained onboard a payload constituted......). Together with the ground SM measurements, other ground and meteorological measurements from the VAS area, kindly provided by other institutions, are currently been used to simulate passive microwave brightness temperature to obtain satellite "match ups" for validation purposes and to test the retrieval...... algorithms. The spatialization of the ground measurements up to a SMOS pixel is carried out by using the SURFace EXternalisee (SURFEX) model from Meteo France. Output data, particularly SM, are then used to simulate L-band surface emission through the use of the L-MEB (L-band Microwave Emission...

  20. Universal deformation of soft substrates near a contact line and the direct measurement of solid surface stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Style, Robert W; Boltyanskiy, Rostislav; Che, Yonglu; Wettlaufer, J S; Wilen, Larry A; Dufresne, Eric R

    2013-02-08

    Droplets deform soft substrates near their contact lines. Using confocal microscopy, we measure the deformation of silicone gel substrates due to glycerol and fluorinated-oil droplets for a range of droplet radii and substrate thicknesses. For all droplets, the substrate deformation takes a universal shape close to the contact line that depends on liquid composition, but is independent of droplet size and substrate thickness. This shape is determined by a balance of interfacial tensions at the contact line and provides a novel method for direct determination of the surface stresses of soft substrates. Moreover, we measure the change in contact angle with droplet radius and show that Young's law fails for small droplets when their radii approach an elastocapillary length scale. For larger droplets the macroscopic contact angle is constant, consistent with Young's law.

  1. Reorientation-effect measurement of the first 2+ state in 12C: Confirmation of oblate deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Raju, M.; Orce, J. N.; Navrátil, P.; Ball, G. C.; Drake, T. E.; Triambak, S.; Hackman, G.; Pearson, C. J.; Abrahams, K. J.; Akakpo, E. H.; Al Falou, H.; Churchman, R.; Cross, D. S.; Djongolov, M. K.; Erasmus, N.; Finlay, P.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Garrett, P. E.; Jenkins, D. G.; Kshetri, R.; Leach, K. G.; Masango, S.; Mavela, D. L.; Mehl, C. V.; Mokgolobotho, M. J.; Ngwetsheni, C.; O'Neill, G. G.; Rand, E. T.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Tardiff, E. R.; Williams, S. J.; Wong, J.

    2018-02-01

    A Coulomb-excitation reorientation-effect measurement using the TIGRESS γ-ray spectrometer at the TRIUMF/ISAC II facility has permitted the determination of the 〈 21+ ‖ E 2 ˆ ‖21+ 〉 diagonal matrix element in 12C from particle-γ coincidence data and state-of-the-art no-core shell model calculations of the nuclear polarizability. The nuclear polarizability for the ground and first-excited (21+) states in 12C have been calculated using chiral NN N4LO500 and NN+3NF350 interactions, which show convergence and agreement with photo-absorption cross-section data. Predictions show a change in the nuclear polarizability with a substantial increase between the ground state and first excited 21+ state at 4.439 MeV. The polarizability of the 21+ state is introduced into the current and previous Coulomb-excitation reorientation-effect analyses of 12C. Spectroscopic quadrupole moments of QS (21+) = + 0.053 (44) eb and QS (21+) = + 0.08 (3) eb are determined, respectively, yielding a weighted average of QS (21+) = + 0.071 (25) eb, in agreement with recent ab initio calculations. The present measurement confirms that the 21+ state of 12C is oblate and emphasizes the important role played by the nuclear polarizability in Coulomb-excitation studies of light nuclei.

  2. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 02-2-546 Teleoperated Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) Latency Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-11

    anti - lock brake systems , or self-leveling systems . 2. FACILITIES AND INSTRUMENTATION. 2.1 Facilities. Testing will be conducted at the...This TOP describes procedures for measuring teleoperated system latencies of Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) for the purpose of analyzing system ...discrete system components or measurements of latency in autonomous systems . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Unmanned Ground Vehicles, Basic Video Latency, End-to

  3. Status of a UAVSAR designed for repeat pass interferometry for deformation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Sadowy, Greg; Miller, Tim; Shaffer, Scott; Muellerschoen, Ron; Jones, Cathleen; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren; Paul, Rose

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is currently implementing a reconfigurable polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track interferometric (RTI) SAR data, also known as differential interferometric measurements. Differential interferometry can provide key deformation measurements, important for the scientific studies of Earthquakes and volcanoes. Using precision real-time GPS and a sensor controlled flight management system, the system will be able to fly predefined paths with great precision. The expected performance of the flight control system will constrain the flight path to be within a 10 m diameter tube about the desired flight track. The radar wilI be designed to operate on a UAV (Unpiloted Aria1 Vehicle) but will initially be demonstrated on a minimally piloted vehicle (MPV), such as the Proteus buitt by Scaled Composites or on a NASA Gulfstream III. The radar design is a fully polarimetric with an 80 MHz bandwidth (2 m range resolution) and 16 km range swath. The antenna is an electronically steered along track to assure that the actual antenna pointing can be controlled independent of the wind direction and speed. Other features supported by the antenna include an elevation monopulse option and a pulse-to-pulse resteering capability that will enable some novel modes of operation. The system will nominally operate at 45,000 ft (13800 m). The program began out as an Instrument Incubator Project (IIP) funded by NASA Earth Science and Technology Office (ESTO).

  4. Onsets of nuclear deformation from measurements with the Isoltrap mass spectrometer; Apparitions de deformation nucleaire a partir de mesures avec le spectrometre de masse isoltrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimi, S.

    2010-10-15

    Mass measurements provide important information concerning nuclear structure. This work presents results from the pioneering Penning trap spectrometer Isoltrap at CERN-Isolde. High-precision mass measurements of neutron-rich manganese ({sup 58}-{sup 66}Mn) and krypton isotopes ({sup 96,} {sup 97}Kr) are presented, of which the {sup 66}Mn and {sup 96,} {sup 97}Kr masses are measured for the first time. In particular, the mass of {sup 97}Kr was measured using the preparation trap and required the definition of a new fit function. In the case of the manganese isotopes, the N=40 shell closure is addressed. The two-neutron-separation energies calculated from the new masses show no shell closure at N=40 but give an estimation of the proton-neutron interaction (around 0.5 MeV) responsible for the increase of collectivity and nuclear deformation in this mass region. The new krypton masses show behavior in sharp contrast with heavier neighbors where sudden and intense deformation is present, interpreted as the establishment of a nuclear quantum shape/phase transition critical-point boundary. The new masses confirm findings from nuclear mean-square charge-radius measurements up to N=60 but are at variance with conclusions from recent gamma-ray spectroscopy. Another part of this work was the design of new decay spectroscopy system behind the Isoltrap mass spectrometer. The beam purity achievable with Isoltrap will allow decay studies with {gamma} and {beta} detection coupled to a tape-station. This system has been mounted and commissioned with the radioactive beam {sup 80}Rb. (author)

  5. A test case of the deformation rate analysis (DRA) stress measurement method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dight, P.; Hsieh, A. [Australian Centre for Geomechanics, Univ. of WA, Crawley (Australia); Johansson, E. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Hudson, J.A. [Rock Engineering Consultants (United Kingdom); Kemppainen, K.

    2012-01-15

    As part of Posiva's site and ONKALO investigations, the in situ rock stress has been measured by a variety of techniques, including hydraulic fracturing, overcoring, and convergence measurements. All these techniques involve direct measurements in a drillhole or at the rock surface. An alternative method is to test drillhole core in a way that enables estimation of the magnitudes and orientations of the in situ rock stress. The Kaiser Effect (KE) and Deformation Rate Analysis (DRA) are two ways to do this. In the work reported here, a 'blind' DRA test was conducted on core obtained from the POSE (Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment) niche in the ONKALO. The term 'blind' means that the two first authors of this report, who conducted the tests at the Australian Centre for Geomechanics, did not know the depths below surface at which the cores had been obtained. The results of this DRA Test Case are presented, together with an explanation of the DRA procedure. Also, additional information that would help in such DRA testing and associated analysis is explained. One of the problems in comparing the DRA results with the known Olkiluoto stress field is that the latter is highly variable across the site, as experienced by the previous in situ stress measurements and as predicted by numerical analysis. The variability is mainly caused by the presence of the large brittle deformation zones which perturb the local stress state. However, this variability reduces with depth and the stress field becomes more stable at the {approx} 350 m at which the drillhole cores were obtained. Another compounding difficulty is that the stress quantity, being a second order tensor, requires six independent components for its specification. In other words, comparison of the DRA results and the known stress field requires comparison of six different quantities. In terms of the major principal stress orientation, the DRA results predict an orientation completely

  6. A test case of the deformation rate analysis (DRA) stress measurement method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dight, P.; Hsieh, A.; Johansson, E.; Hudson, J.A.; Kemppainen, K.

    2012-01-01

    As part of Posiva's site and ONKALO investigations, the in situ rock stress has been measured by a variety of techniques, including hydraulic fracturing, overcoring, and convergence measurements. All these techniques involve direct measurements in a drillhole or at the rock surface. An alternative method is to test drillhole core in a way that enables estimation of the magnitudes and orientations of the in situ rock stress. The Kaiser Effect (KE) and Deformation Rate Analysis (DRA) are two ways to do this. In the work reported here, a 'blind' DRA test was conducted on core obtained from the POSE (Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment) niche in the ONKALO. The term 'blind' means that the two first authors of this report, who conducted the tests at the Australian Centre for Geomechanics, did not know the depths below surface at which the cores had been obtained. The results of this DRA Test Case are presented, together with an explanation of the DRA procedure. Also, additional information that would help in such DRA testing and associated analysis is explained. One of the problems in comparing the DRA results with the known Olkiluoto stress field is that the latter is highly variable across the site, as experienced by the previous in situ stress measurements and as predicted by numerical analysis. The variability is mainly caused by the presence of the large brittle deformation zones which perturb the local stress state. However, this variability reduces with depth and the stress field becomes more stable at the ∼ 350 m at which the drillhole cores were obtained. Another compounding difficulty is that the stress quantity, being a second order tensor, requires six independent components for its specification. In other words, comparison of the DRA results and the known stress field requires comparison of six different quantities. In terms of the major principal stress orientation, the DRA results predict an orientation completely different to the NW-SE regional

  7. Measurement of large ground motions with the ASM gage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, B.L.; Alrick, K.R.; Fritz, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    Conversion of the energy from undergound explosions to distant seismic signals involves hydrodynamic flows sampling a wide range of pressures. For lower pressures a larger portion of the initial wave motion must be measured to obtain definitive results. The intermediate pressure range, where the initial wave is strong enough to destroy most instrumentation but does not contain definitive information in its initial amplitude, presents special difficulties. We present design considerations for an experiment implementing the ASM gage principle (induction of eddy currents in a moving conducting plate) that can sample wave motion for many milliseconds. In essence we hang a large metal plate (large in area) on a wall and watch the free-surface release. This is not an in-itu measurement of the wave profile because the incoming wave is modififed by the release propagating backward from the wall. However, this a relatively clean modification of the incoming wave and is a situation commonly handled in many shock-wave experiments. copyright American Institute of Physics

  8. Impact of acoustic velocity structure to measurement of ocean bottom crustal deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Okuda, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Watanabe, T.; Eto, S.; Ando, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are developing a geodetic method of monitoring crustal deformation under the ocean using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging. The goal of our research is to achieve sub-centimeter accuracy in measuring oceanic crustal deformation by a very short-time measurement like 10 hours. In this study, we focused on lateral variation of acoustic velocity structure in seawater and introduced an inclined acoustic velocity structure model to improve accuracy of the measurement. We have a few measurement sites along Nankai trough, Japan. In each sites, we deployed a trio of transponders on ocean floor (seafloor benchmark units) within distance comparable with the depth. An ultrasonic signal is generated from a surface vessel drifting over the benchmark unit, which is received and replied by the benchmark unit. In this system, both acoustic velocity structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted on an assumption that the acoustic velocity structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. Ikuta et al., (AGU fall meeting 2009) reported an approach to improve accuracy of benchmark positioning using a new additional assumption. The additional assumption was that the configuration of the transponders trio constituting one benchmark unit does not change. They determined the time evolution of weight center for the fixed transponder triangle between different measurements using all repetitively obtained data sets at once. This is contrasting to the previous method in which each data set for different measurement was solved independently. This assumption worked well in reducing number of unknown parameters. As a result, repeatability of benchmark positioning improved from 5 cm to 3 cm. We conducted numerical experiments synthesizing acoustic travel-time data to evaluate the robustness of this new approach. When acoustic travel-time data is

  9. Interpretation of deformed ionograms induced by vertical ground motion of seismic Rayleigh waves and infrasound in the thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maruyama

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The vertical ground motion of seismic surface waves launches acoustic waves into the atmosphere and induces ionospheric disturbances. Disturbances due to Rayleigh waves near the short-period Airy phase appear as wavy fluctuations in the virtual height of an ionogram and have a multiple-cusp signature (MCS when the fluctuation amplitude is increased. An extremely developed MCS was observed at Kazan, Russia, after the 2010 M 8.8 Chile earthquake. The ionogram exhibited steep satellite traces for which the virtual heights increased rapidly with frequency starting near the top of cusps and continuing for 0.1–0.2 MHz. This complicated ionogram was analyzed by applying a ray tracing technique to the radio wave propagation in the ionosphere that was perturbed by acoustic waves. Acoustic wavefronts were inclined by the effects of finite Rayleigh wave velocity and sound speed in the thermosphere. The satellite echo traces were reproduced by oblique returns from the inclined wavefronts, in addition to the nearly vertical returns that are responsible for the main trace.

  10. ANALYSIS OF DEFORMATION PROCESSES IN THE LITHOSPHERE FROM GEODETIC MEASUREMENTS BASED ON THE EXAMPLE OF THE SAN ANDREAS FAULT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury V. Gabsatarov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of data from permanent GPS observation stations located in tectonically active regions provides for direct observation of deformation processes of the earth's surface which result from elastic interaction of the lithospheric plates and also occur when accumulated stresses are released by seismic events and postseismic processes.This article describes the methodology of applying the regression analysis of time series of data from GPS-stations for identification of individual components of the stations’ displacements caused by the influence of various deformation processes. Modelling of the stations’ displacements caused only by deformations of the marginal zone, wherein the lithospheric plates interact, allows us to study variations of the steady-state deformation in the marginal zone.he proposed methodology is applied to studies of variations of fields of cumulative surface displacements, surface displacement velocity and maximum shear strain velocity which are determined from the GPS data recorded prior to the Parkfield earthquake of 28 September 2004 (Mw=6.0.Combined analysis of the variations of the above-mentioned fields shows that measurable anomalies of the elastic deformation of the transform fault’s edge took place prior to the seismic event of 28 September 2004, and such anomalies were coincident in space and time with the focal area of the future seismic event.

  11. The unrest of S. Miguel volcano (El Salvador, CA): installation of the monitoring network and observed volcano-tectonic ground deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, A.; Hernandez, D.; Gutiérrez, E.; Handal, L.; Polío, C.; Rapisarda, S.; Scarlato, P.

    2015-10-01

    On 29 December 2013, the Chaparrastique volcano in El Salvador, close to the town of S. Miguel, erupted suddenly with explosive force, forming a more than 9 km high column and projecting ballistic projectiles as far as 3 km away. Pyroclastic Density Currents flowed to the north-northwest side of the volcano, while tephras were dispersed northwest and north-northeast. This sudden eruption prompted the local Ministry of Environment to request cooperation with Italian scientists in order to improve the monitoring of the volcano during this unrest. A joint force made up of an Italian team from the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and a local team from the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales was organized to enhance the volcanological, geophysical and geochemical monitoring system to study the evolution of the phenomenon during the crisis. The joint team quickly installed a multi-parametric mobile network comprising seismic, geodetic and geochemical sensors, designed to cover all the volcano flanks from the lowest to the highest possible altitudes, and a thermal camera. To simplify the logistics for a rapid installation and for security reasons, some sensors were co-located into multi-parametric stations. Here, we describe the prompt design and installation of the geodetic monitoring network, the processing and results. The installation of a new ground deformation network can be considered an important result by itself, while the detection of some crucial deforming areas is very significant information, useful for dealing with future threats and for further studies on this poorly monitored volcano.

  12. Myocardial Deformation Measured by 3-Dimensional Speckle Tracking in Children and Adolescents With Systemic Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarini, Susanne; Bellsham-Revell, Hannah; Chubb, Henry; Gu, Haotian; Sinha, Manish D; Simpson, John M

    2017-12-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension predisposes children to cardiovascular risk in childhood and adult life. Despite extensive study of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, detailed 3-dimensional strain analysis of cardiac function in hypertensive children has not been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate LV mechanics (strain, twist, and torsion) in young patients with hypertension compared with a healthy control group and assess factors associated with functional measurements. Sixty-three patients (26 hypertension and 37 normotensive) were enrolled (mean age, 14.3 and 11.4 years; 54% men and 41% men, respectively). All children underwent clinical evaluation and echocardiographic examination, including 3-dimensional strain. There was no difference in LV volumes and ejection fraction between the groups. Myocardial deformation was significantly reduced in those with hypertension compared with controls. For hypertensive and normotensive groups, respectively, global longitudinal strain was -15.1±2.3 versus -18.5±1.9 ( P hypertensive and normotensive children, but children with hypertension had significantly lower strain indices. Whether reduced strain might predict future cardiovascular risk merits further longitudinal study. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Longwall mining and surface deformation – lessons learned from dInSAR measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Engelbrecht, Jeanine

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available including 1) subsidence related to mining and groundwater abstraction, 2) deformation following earthquake events, 3) monitoring of landslides and slope stability, 4) monitoring the stability of infrastructure and large engineering works, and 5) monitoring...

  14. Real-time detection of antibiotic activity by measuring nanometer-scale bacterial deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriya, Rafael; Syal, Karan; Jing, Wenwen; Mo, Manni; Yu, Hui; Haydel, Shelley E.; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-12-01

    Diagnosing antibiotic-resistant bacteria currently requires sensitive detection of phenotypic changes associated with antibiotic action on bacteria. Here, we present an optical imaging-based approach to quantify bacterial membrane deformation as a phenotypic feature in real-time with a nanometer scale (˜9 nm) detection limit. Using this approach, we found two types of antibiotic-induced membrane deformations in different bacterial strains: polymyxin B induced relatively uniform spatial deformation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells leading to change in cellular volume and ampicillin-induced localized spatial deformation leading to the formation of bulges or protrusions on uropathogenic E. coli CFT073 cells. We anticipate that the approach will contribute to understanding of antibiotic phenotypic effects on bacteria with a potential for applications in rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  15. Crustal deformation pattern of the Morocco-Iberian area: constraints from 14 years of GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palano, Mimmo; González, Pablo; Fernandez, Josè

    2014-05-01

    We present an improved rendition of crustal motion field of the Morocco-Iberian area, based on an extensive GPS dataset covering about 14 years of observations from 1999.00 up to 2013.79 in order to provide a detailed spatial resolution of geodetic velocity and strain-rate fields. In particular, we included all available data from public continuous GPS stations, considering also data coming from networks developed mainly for mapping, engineering and cadastre purposes. In addition to continuous GPS sites, we included data from 31 episodic GPS sites located in Morocco with surveys spanning the 1999-2006 time interval, whose data are available through the UNAVCO archive (www.unavco.org). All GPS data were processed by using the GAMIT/GLOBK software, taking into account precise ephemerides from the IGS (International GNSS Service; http://igscb.jpl.nasa.gov) and Earth orientation parameters from the International Earth Rotation Service (http://www.iers.org). To improve the overall configuration of the network and tie the regional measurements to an external global reference frame, data coming from more than 25 continuously operating global tracking stations, largely from the IGS and EUREF permanent networks, were introduced in the processing. All stations were organized (and processed) into seven sub-networks of about 40-50 sites each, on average, sharing a few common sites to provide ties between them. Finally, by using the GLORG module of GLOBK, the GAMIT-solutions and their full covariance matrices were combined to estimated a consistent set of positions and velocities in the ITRF2008 reference frame by minimizing the horizontal velocity of the continuously operating global tracking stations mentioned above. To adequately investigate the crustal deformation pattern over the study area, we aligned our estimated GPS velocities to an Eurasian and a Nubian fixed reference frames. In addition, by taking into account the observed GPS horizontal velocity field and

  16. A Feasibility Study of Sea Ice Motion and Deformation Measurements Using Multi-Sensor High-Resolution Optical Satellite Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Uk Hyun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice motion and deformation have generally been measured using low-resolution passive microwave or mid-resolution radar remote sensing datasets of daily (or few days intervals to monitor long-term trends over a wide polar area. This feasibility study presents an application of high-resolution optical images from operational satellites, which have become more available in polar regions, for sea ice motion and deformation measurements. The sea ice motion, i.e., Lagrangian vector, is measured by using a maximum cross-correlation (MCC technique and multi-temporal high-resolution images acquired on 14–15 August 2014 from multiple spaceborne sensors on board Korea Multi-Purpose Satellites (KOMPSATs with short acquisition time intervals. The sea ice motion extracted from the six image pairs of the spatial resolutions were resampled to 4 m and 15 m yields with vector length measurements of 57.7 m root mean square error (RMSE and −11.4 m bias and 60.7 m RMSE and −13.5 m bias, respectively, compared with buoy location records. The errors from both resolutions indicate more accurate measurements than from conventional sea ice motion datasets from passive microwave and radar data in ice and water mixed surface conditions. In the results of sea ice deformation caused by interaction of individual ice floes, while free drift patterns of ice floes were delineated from the 4 m spatial resolution images, the deformation was less revealing in the 15 m spatial resolution image pairs due to emphasized discretization uncertainty from coarser pixel sizes. The results demonstrate that using multi-temporal high-resolution optical satellite images enabled precise image block matching in the melting season, thus this approach could be used for expanding sea ice motion and deformation dataset, with an advantage of frequent image acquisition capability in multiple areas by means of many operational satellites.

  17. Kinematic analyses of a cross-slot microchannel applicable to cell deformability measurement under inertial or viscoelastic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Min [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    A cross-slot microchannel has been harnessed for a wide range of applications, such as label-free measurements of cell deformability and rheological characterization of complex fluids. This work investigates flow kinematics in a cross-slot microchannel used for the measurements of cell deformability utilizing finite element method (FEM)- based numerical simulation. In a cross-slot microchannel, the cell is stretched near the stagnation of the cross-slot channel, and cell deformation is significantly affected by its trajectory. Two passive methods, inertia- and viscoelasticitybased, which do not rely on any external force such as an electric field, have been applied to focus particles along the channel centerline so that the cell trajectories are unified. However, it is not well understood how the flow kinematics inside the cross-slot channel is altered by the inertial or viscoelastic effect when these two methods are employed. This work demonstrates that the flow kinematics such as the distributions of flow type and strain rate is notably changed with an increase in the Reynolds number when an inertia-based method is employed. On the other hand, flow kinematics does not significantly deviate from that of an inertia-less Newtonian fluid irrespective of the Weissenberg numbers when a viscoelasticity-based method is used. The current work will be helpful for the design and operation of a cross-slot microdevice for measuring cell deformability.

  18. Designed microtremor array based actual measurement and analysis of strong ground motion at Palu city, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thein, Pyi Soe, E-mail: pyisoethein@yahoo.com [Geology Department, Yangon University (Myanmar); Pramumijoyo, Subagyo; Wilopo, Wahyu; Setianto, Agung [Geological Engineering Department, Gadjah Mada University (Indonesia); Brotopuspito, Kirbani Sri [Physics Department, Gadjah Mada University (Indonesia); Kiyono, Junji; Putra, Rusnardi Rahmat [Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2015-04-24

    In this study, we investigated the strong ground motion characteristics under Palu City, Indonesia. The shear wave velocity structures evaluated by eight microtremors measurement are the most applicable to determine the thickness of sediments and average shear wave velocity with Vs ≤ 300 m/s. Based on subsurface underground structure models identified, earthquake ground motion was estimated in the future Palu-Koro earthquake by using statistical green’s function method. The seismic microzonation parameters were carried out by considering several significant controlling factors on ground response at January 23, 2005 earthquake.

  19. The effect of time duration in the network and radial method toward the accuracy in measuring the deformation at Muria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari Nugroho and Hadi Suntoko

    2011-01-01

    The Deformation monitoring activities in the vicinity of Mount Muria are recommended by the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) to be done for 5 years. The purpose of these activities is to determine the rate of the deformation caused by the volcanic activity of Mount Muria, as a basic study in analyzing the volcanic hazard toward the NPP (Nuclear Power Plant). The whole coordinate points measured encompass the district of Jepara, Pati, Demak, and Kudus. In 2010 deformation measurements were periodically conducted for 4 times a year using two geodetic GPS units of Trimble R7 GNSS type through the network method. The measurements were carried out at seven points of interest and at one reference point in March, April, May and December. Each session of the measurements was performed for 2.5 hours. In 2011 the deformation measurements were periodically conducted for 4 times a year by means of the radial method. The measurements were made at eight points of interest and at one reference point in April and May, June and July. Each session of measurements was performed for 10 hours. Based on the results of the measurements by means of the network method in 2010, it was concluded that the range of horizontal and vertical accuracy is between 6-10 mm and 25-46 mm, while the results of the measurements of the radial method in 2011 is 4-7 mm, and 16-28 mm respectively. Furthermore, it provides the evidence that the radial method tends to has better result than the network method if it is applied 4 times longer than the network method, resulting the accuracy below 7 mm and 28 mm for horizontal and vertical respectively. (author)

  20. Study of mine stability using records of ground tilting

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Spottiswoode, SM

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available -carrying capacity of the pillars. Physical measurements of pillar deformations were deemed necessary. Towards this end, the use of ground ARMA/USRMS 06-1168 A study of mine stability...

  1. The use of ground reflecting boards in measuring wind turbine noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, A.R.; Mackinnon, A.; Benson, I.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper gives an account of an experimental programme to assess the ground microphone measurement technique which can potentially increase the accuracy, reliability and confidence in wind turbine noise emission measurements. It shows that a 1 m diameter circular board can achieve acceptable accuracy and, since it is significantly more practical to use, could readily be adopted for international standards. (author)

  2. Aerosol single scattering albedo estimated across China from a combination of ground and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon Ho Lee; Zhanqing Li; Man Sing Wong; Jinyuan Xin; Wang Yuesi; Wei Min Hao; Fengsheng Zhao

    2007-01-01

    Single scattering albedo (SSA) governs the strength of aerosols in absorbing solar radiation, but few methods are available to directly measure this important quantity. There currently exist many ground-based measurements of spectral transmittance from which aerosol optical thickness (AOT) are retrieved under clear sky conditions. Reflected radiances at the top of the...

  3. Post-Eruption Deformation Processes Measured Using ALOS-1 and UAVSAR InSAR at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren N. Schaefer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pacaya volcano is a persistently active basaltic cone complex located in the Central American Volcanic Arc in Guatemala. In May of 2010, violent Volcanic Explosivity Index-3 (VEI-3 eruptions caused significant topographic changes to the edifice, including a linear collapse feature 600 m long originating from the summit, the dispersion of ~20 cm of tephra and ash on the cone, the emplacement of a 5.4 km long lava flow, and ~3 m of co-eruptive movement of the southwest flank. For this study, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR images (interferograms processed from both spaceborne Advanced Land Observing Satellite-1 (ALOS-1 and aerial Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR data acquired between 31 May 2010 and 10 April 2014 were used to measure post-eruptive deformation events. Interferograms suggest three distinct deformation processes after the May 2010 eruptions, including: (1 subsidence of the area involved in the co-eruptive slope movement; (2 localized deformation near the summit; and (3 emplacement and subsequent subsidence of about a 5.4 km lava flow. The detection of several different geophysical signals emphasizes the utility of measuring volcanic deformation using remote sensing techniques with broad spatial coverage. Additionally, the high spatial resolution of UAVSAR has proven to be an excellent compliment to satellite data, particularly for constraining motion components. Measuring the rapid initiation and cessation of flank instability, followed by stabilization and subsequent influence on eruptive features, provides a rare glimpse into volcanic slope stability processes. Observing these and other deformation events contributes both to hazard assessment at Pacaya and to the study of the stability of stratovolcanoes.

  4. A flatfile of ground motion intensity measurements from induced earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennolet, Steven B.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Thompson, Eric M.; Yeck, William

    2018-01-01

    We have produced a uniformly processed database of orientation-independent (RotD50, RotD100) ground motion intensity measurements containing peak horizontal ground motions (accelerations and velocities) and 5-percent-damped pseudospectral accelerations (0.1–10 s) from more than 3,800 M ≥ 3 earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas that occurred between January 2009 and December 2016. Ground motion time series were collected from regional, national, and temporary seismic arrays out to 500 km. We relocated the majority of the earthquake hypocenters using a multiple-event relocation algorithm to produce a set of near-uniformly processed hypocentral locations. Ground motion processing followed standard methods, with the primary objective of reducing the effects of noise on the measurements. Regional wave-propagation features and the high seismicity rate required careful selection of signal windows to ensure that we captured the entire ground motion record and that contaminating signals from extraneous earthquakes did not contribute to the database. Processing was carried out with an automated scheme and resulted in a database comprising more than 174,000 records (https://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F73B5X8N). We anticipate that these results will be useful for improved understanding of earthquake ground motions and for seismic hazard applications.

  5. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Deformation Measurements Using Stereoscopic Imaging and Digital Speckle Photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prentice, H. J.; Proud, W. G.

    2006-01-01

    A technique has been developed to determine experimentally the three-dimensional displacement field on the rear surface of a dynamically deforming plate. The technique combines speckle analysis with stereoscopy, using a modified angular-lens method: this incorporates split-frame photography and a simple method by which the effective lens separation can be adjusted and calibrated in situ. Whilst several analytical models exist to predict deformation in extended or semi-infinite targets, the non-trivial nature of the wave interactions complicates the generation and development of analytical models for targets of finite depth. By interrogating specimens experimentally to acquire three-dimensional strain data points, both analytical and numerical model predictions can be verified more rigorously. The technique is applied to the quasi-static deformation of a rubber sheet and dynamically to Mild Steel sheets of various thicknesses

  6. Airflow resistivity instrument for in situ measurement on the earth's ground surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    An airflow resistivity instrument features a novel specimen holder, especially designed for in situ measurement on the earth's ground surface. This capability eliminates the disadvantages of prior intrusive instruments, which necessitate the removal of a test specimen from the ground. A prototype instrument can measure airflow resistivities in the range 10-5000 cgs rayl/cm, at specimen depths up to 15.24 cm (6 in.), and at differential pressures up to 2490.8 dyn sq cm (1 in. H2O) across the specimen. Because of the close relationship between flow resistivity and acoustic impedance, this instrument should prove useful in acoustical studies of the earth's ground surface. Results of airflow resistivity measurements on an uncultivated grass field for varying values of moisture content are presented.

  7. Model Deformation and Optical Angle of Attack Measurement System in the NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Laura K.; Drain, Bethany A.; Schairer, Edward T.; Heineck, James T.; Bell, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Both AoA and MDM measurements can be made using an optical system that relies on photogrammetry. Optical measurements are being requested by customers in wind tunnels with increasing frequency due to their non-intrusive nature and recent hardware and software advances that allow measurements to become near real time. The NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is currently developing a system based on photogrammetry to measure model deformation and model angle of attack. This paper describes the new system, its development, its use on recent tests and plans to further develop the system.

  8. Measurement of Slip, Force and Deformation Using Hybrid Tactile Sensor System for Robot Hand Gripping an Object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kawamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid tactile sensor system is proposed for a robot hand to hold and grip an object adaptively as the sensor system measures the slip of an object, the gripping force, and the deformation of its silicon rubber sensor element. A hybrid tactile sensor system consists of a Carbon Micro-Coil (CMC touch sensor and a force sensor. The CMC sensor element is made of silicon rubber containing CMCs several micrometres in diameter. It is considered that the sensor element constitutes an LCR circuit, and the CMC touch sensor, deformed mechanically, produces signals due to the modification of the circuit. In this study, a dome-shaped CMC sensor element similar to the shape of a human fingertip was used. This paper first examines the characteristics of the CMC sensor in terms of slip detection when the sensor system held and released an object. Next, the characteristics of the CMC element are clarified with respect to the compression force and deformation when the CMC element was compressed vertically. Finally, methods using the hybrid tactile sensor system are developed to detect the slip of an object and estimate the magnitude of deformation of the CMC element.

  9. Airborne and ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Weng, Chi Y.

    1989-01-01

    The first high accuracy remote measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile have been made. The measurements were made with a differential absorption lidar system that utilizes tunable alexandrite lasers. The absorption in the trough between two lines in the oxygen A-band near 760 nm was used for probing the atmosphere. Measurements of the two-dimensional structure of the pressure field were made in the troposphere from an aircraft looking down. Also, measurements of the one-dimensional structure were made from the ground looking up. Typical pressure accuracies for the aircraft measurements were 1.5-2 mbar with a 30-m vertical resolution and a 100-shot average (20 s), which corresponds to a 2-km horizontal resolution. Typical accuracies for the upward viewing ground based measurements were 2.0 mbar for a 30-m resolution and a 100-shot average.

  10. Solar cosmic ray effects in atmospheric chemistry evidenced from ground- based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, O.; Kasatkina, E.; Turyansky, V.

    Solar protons with a relatively soft energy spectrum (E450 MeV) of Ground Level Event (GLE) type can penetrate below 30 km and cause neutron flow enhancement detected by ground-based neutron monitors. Atmospheric effects of such high-energy particles seem to be more pronounced and appeared variations of total content of some atmospheric parameters that can be detected by ground-based devices. It was shown earlier that some GLEs cause considerable ozone total content decreases (up to 25%), or so-called ozone "miniholes" at high latitudes. This work presents ground-based measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) total content made at Murmansk, Kola Peninsula (corrected geomagnetic latitude: 64.8) during and after GLE of 2 May 1998. Nitrogen dioxide was measured by zenith viewing spectrophotometer in wavelength region between 435-450 nm. An increase (about of 20%) in total column of NO2 has been recorded after 2 May 1998 GLE by this facility. Model calculations based on gas phase photochemical theory quantitatively agree with observations. In addition to satellite measurements the information obtained by ground-based devices will be helpful to study atmospheric effects of cosmic ray events. This work was supported by the RFBR grants 01-05-64850 and 01-05-26226).

  11. Estimating the ground-state probability of a quantum simulation with product-state measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce eYoshimura

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available .One of the goals in quantum simulation is to adiabatically generate the ground state of a complicated Hamiltonian by starting with the ground state of a simple Hamiltonian and slowly evolving the system to the complicated one. If the evolution is adiabatic and the initial and final ground states are connected due to having the same symmetry, then the simulation will be successful. But in most experiments, adiabatic simulation is not possible because it would take too long, and the system has some level of diabatic excitation. In this work, we quantify the extent of the diabatic excitation even if we do not know {it a priori} what the complicated ground state is. Since many quantum simulator platforms, like trapped ions, can measure the probabilities to be in a product state, we describe techniques that can employ these simple measurements to estimate the probability of being in the ground state of the system after the diabatic evolution. These techniques do not require one to know any properties about the Hamiltonian itself, nor to calculate its eigenstate properties. All the information is derived by analyzing the product-state measurements as functions of time.

  12. Early results of micro-deformation measurements in Magdalena Jama (Slovenia) by a vertical static pendulum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalenda, Pavel; Neumann, L.; Šebela, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 1 (2013), s. 143-154 ISSN 0583-6050 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : tilt * pendulum * deformations * earthquakes Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.710, year: 2013 http://ojs.zrc-sazu.si/carsologica/article/view/635

  13. Evaluation of material's state during deformation process by means of thermographic measurement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žďárský, M.; Valach, Jaroslav; Kytýř, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2012), s. 102-107 ISSN 1435-4934. [Quantitative infrared thermotheraphy /11./. Naples, 11.06.2012-14.06.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/2101 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : thermography * ductile crack * plastic deformation Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics www.ndt.net/?id=13389

  14. Nanoscale deformation measurement of microscale interconnection assemblies by a digital image correlation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yaofeng; Pang, John H L; Fan Wei

    2007-01-01

    The continuous miniaturization of microelectronic devices and interconnections demand more and more experimental strain/stress analysis of micro- and nanoscale components for material characterization and structure reliability analysis. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique, with the aid of scanning probe microscopes, has become a very promising tool to meet this demand. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to scan and digitally image micro-interconnection assemblies in a micro-thermoelectric cooler. AFM images of the scan region of interest were obtained separately when the microelectronic device was operated before and after the cooling and heating stages. The AFM images were then used to obtain the in-plane deformation fields in the observed region of the micro-assembly. AFM image correlation is performed for nanoscale deformation analysis using the authors' AFM-DIC program. The results show that the observed region was subjected to cyclic strains when the device worked between its cooling and heating stages, and cyclic strain in the vertical direction was found to be a significant deformation mode. The thermally induced deformation behavior of the micro-assembly device was modeled by finite element analysis (FEA). Both thermal-electric analysis and thermal stress analysis were conducted on a 3D finite element model of the device. It is shown that the experimental results were able to validate the finite element analysis results

  15. Relation between self-image score of SRS-22 with deformity measures in female adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Wang, Y P; Yu, B; Zhang, J G; Shen, J X; Qiu, G X; Li, Y

    2014-11-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a pathology which affects the individual's functioning in the widely understood physical, psychic, and social aspects. More attention should be paid to patients' perception of self-image when evaluating the spine deformity. The present retrospective study evaluated the associations between the deformity measures and self-image score as determined by the SRS-22 questionnaire in Chinese female AIS patients. The self-image score correlates significantly with deformity measures. The location of main curve apex and the number of curve could affect the self-image score. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 202 female patients, collected data on patient's age, body mass index, radiographic and physical measures and self-image score of SRS-22 questionnaire. According to the location of main curve apex and the number of curve, the patients were divided to different subgroups. Correlations between deformity measures and self-image score of different groups were evaluated by the Spearman correlation test. The self-image score correlated negatively with the main Cobb angle, apical vertebral translation (AVT), and razor hump height. There is no significant difference of self-image score between thoracic curve (TC) and thoracolumbar curve (TL/LC) subgroups. And the self-image scores of one-curve, two-curve and three-curve subgroups are similar. For Chinese female AIS patients in our study, self-image was found to correlate negatively with the main Cobb angle, AVT and razor hump height. And the location of scoliosis apex and the number of curve are not influencing factors of self-image perception. Level IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Mapping liquid hazardous waste migration in ground water with electromagnetic terrain conductivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelle, R.H.; Pin, F.G.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic conductivity measurements were used to map apparent ground conductivity in the vicinity of a liquid hazardous waste disposal site. Approximately 600 conductivity measurements were obtained to prepare a conductivity map of the site which includes an area of 12 ha (30 acres). Conductivity measurements in the area correlate with specific conductance measurements of surface and ground water samples. Contouring of the conductivity data located contaminant migration pathways in the subsurface. A complex contaminant plume was defined by the conductivity survey. Conductivity values obtained reflected anisotropic characteristics related to local bedrock structure. Anisotropic characteristics of measurements and the use of different instrument configurations indicated semiquantitatively the depth of the high conductivity zone and the direction of flow. 4 references, 2 figures

  17. Vocanic Deformations During Repose Interval Revealed by GPS Measurements, Batur Volcano, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimae, K.; Fujii, N.; Kimata, F.; Murase, M.; Suganda, O. K.; Abidin, H. Z.

    2005-12-01

    Batur volcano is located north west of Bali Island in Indonesia.This volcano has two calderas with more than 10 km in diameter. Recent eruptions with lava flow occurred in 1963 and 1974. No effusion of lava has been observed since 1990, although steam explosions occurred August 1994, November 1997 and June 1998.This suggests that magmatic activity of this volcano would keep its high level since 1994.GPS observation network of this volcano has been kept by Institute Technology of Bandung (ITB) and Volcano Survey of Indonesia (VSI).The network was consisted of 10 observation points at the beginning in 1999, and now it becomes 23 observation points. We have made GPS campaign observations about five times from 2003 to 2005. Each campaign observation consisted of a couple of days of measurements for each observation point. In order to keep the quality of data as high as possible, observations have been made at least 12 hours of continuous data for each point. In this report, results of two campaign observations (December 2004 and July 2005) are used for the analysis. The data thus obtained are fitted to the Mogi source (i.e. a point source model) to locate the depth and amount of volume changes for 7 months. Location of the Mogi source was obtained about 4km southeast of the summit of central cone, and 3km depth with deflation volume change of 1.3_~106 m3 for about 7months. For the period from 1999 to 2004, estimated volume change suggests a continuous deflation throughout this period, although the reliability of data was not so high. Continuous deflations might be likely after the last effusive eruption in 1974, would suggest that shallow part of magma beneath the central cone would probably be drained down to further deep, or shrinkage of magma associated with the cooling or solidification. Further data are obviously needed to discriminate the mechanisms of the deformation process during the repose period in this volcano.

  18. q-Deformed Kink solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.F. de

    2003-01-01

    The q-deformed kink of the λφ 4 -model is obtained via the normalisable ground state eigenfunction of a fluctuation operator associated with the q-deformed hyperbolic functions. The kink mass, the bosonic zero-mode and the q-deformed potential in 1+1 dimensions are found. (author)

  19. A Theory-Grounded Measure of Adolescents' Response to a Media Literacy Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kathryn; Yanovitzky, Itzhak; Carpenter, Amanda; Banerjee, Smita C.; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Hecht, Michael L.; Elek, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Media literacy interventions offer promising avenues for the prevention of risky health behaviors among children and adolescents, but current literature remains largely equivocal about their efficacy. The primary objective of this study was to develop and test theoretically-grounded measures of audiences' degree of engagement with the content of…

  20. Device for the measurement and recording of the vertical temperature gradient close to the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassany, J. Ph.; Cottignies, S.

    1963-01-01

    The temperature measurement device described in this note is made of 2 series of 15 copper-constantan thermocouples each, disposed along a mast at 5 m and 20 m from the ground, respectively. Thermocouples are protected against direct sunlight and connected to a recorder

  1. Ground penetrating radar antenna measurements based on plane-wave expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of the system consisting of the ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna and the air-soil interface is measured using a loop buried in the soil. The plane-wave spectrum is used to determine various parameters characterizing the radiation of the GPR antenna...

  2. Ambulatory measurement of ground reaction force and estimation of ankle and foot dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Baten, Christian T.M.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    INTRODUCTION Traditionally, human body movement analysis is done in so-called ‘gait laboratories’. In these laboratories, body movement is measured by a camera system using optical markers, the ground reaction force by a force plate fixed in the floor, and the muscle activity by EMG. From the body

  3. Alaskan permafrost groundwater storage changes derived from GRACE and ground measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald R. Muskett; Vladimir E. Romanovsky

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic is in transition from climate-driven thawing of permafrost. We investigate satellite-derived water equivalent mass changes, snow water equivalent with in situ measurements of runoff and ground-survey derived geoid models from 1999 through 2009. The Alaskan Arctic coastal plain groundwater storage (including wetland bog, thaw pond and lake) is increasing by 1...

  4. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  5. Looking for Off-Fault Deformation and Measuring Strain Accumulation During the Past 70 years on a Portion of the Locked San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadman, M.; Bemis, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    Even at high tectonic rates, detection of possible off-fault plastic/aseismic deformation and variability in far-field strain accumulation requires high spatial resolution data and likely decades of measurements. Due to the influence that variability in interseismic deformation could have on the timing, size, and location of future earthquakes and the calculation of modern geodetic estimates of strain, we attempt to use historical aerial photographs to constrain deformation through time across a locked fault. Modern photo-based 3D reconstruction techniques facilitate the creation of dense point clouds from historical aerial photograph collections. We use these tools to generate a time series of high-resolution point clouds that span 10-20 km across the Carrizo Plain segment of the San Andreas fault. We chose this location due to the high tectonic rates along the San Andreas fault and lack of vegetation, which may obscure tectonic signals. We use ground control points collected with differential GPS to establish scale and georeference the aerial photograph-derived point clouds. With a locked fault assumption, point clouds can be co-registered (to one another and/or the 1.7 km wide B4 airborne lidar dataset) along the fault trace to calculate relative displacements away from the fault. We use CloudCompare to compute 3D surface displacements, which reflect the interseismic strain accumulation that occurred in the time interval between photo collections. As expected, we do not observe clear surface displacements along the primary fault trace in our comparisons of the B4 lidar data against the aerial photograph-derived point clouds. However, there may be small scale variations within the lidar swath area that represent near-fault plastic deformation. With large-scale historical photographs available for the Carrizo Plain extending back to at least the 1940s, we can potentially sample nearly half the interseismic period since the last major earthquake on this portion of

  6. A Quantitative Assessment of DInSAR Measurements of Interseismic Deformation: The Southern San Andreas Fault Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Mariarosaria; Fialko, Yuri; Casu, Francesco; Pepe, Antonio; Lanari, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the capabilities and limitations of the Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) techniques, in particular of the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) approach, to measure surface deformation in active seismogenetic areas. The DInSAR analysis of low-amplitude, long-wavelength deformation, such as that due to interseismic strain accumulation, is limited by intrinsic trade-offs between deformation signals and orbital uncertainties of SAR platforms in their contributions to the interferometric phases, the latter being typically well approximated by phase ramps. Such trade-offs can be substantially reduced by employing auxiliary measurements of the long-wavelength velocity field. We use continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a properly distributed set of stations to perform a pre-filtering operation of the available DInSAR interferograms. In particular, the GPS measurements are used to estimate the secular velocity signal, approximated by a spatial ramp within the azimuth-range radar imaging plane; the phase ramps derived from the GPS data are then subtracted from the available set of DInSAR interferograms. This pre-filtering step allows us to compensate for the major component of the long-wavelength range change that, within the SBAS procedure, might be wrongly interpreted and filtered out as orbital phase ramps. With this correction, the final results are obtained by simply adding the pre-filtered long-wavelength deformation signal to the SBAS retrieved time series. The proposed approach has been applied to a set of ERS-1/2 SAR data acquired during the 1992-2006 time interval over a 200 × 200 km area around the Coachella Valley section of the San Andreas Fault in Southern California, USA. We present results of the comparison between the SBAS and the Line Of Sight (LOS)—projected GPS time series of the USGC/PBO network, as well as the mean LOS velocity fields derived using SBAS, GPS and stacking techniques. Our

  7. Simultaneous measurement of erythrocyte deformability and blood viscoelasticity using micropillars and co-flowing streams under pulsatile blood flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yang Jun

    2017-01-01

    The biophysical properties of blood provide useful information on the variation in hematological disorders or diseases. In this study, a simultaneous measurement method of RBC (Red Blood Cell) deformability and blood viscoelasticity is proposed by evaluating hemodynamic variations through micropillars and co-flowing streams under sinusoidal blood flow. A disposable microfluidic device is composed of two inlets and two outlets, two upper side channels, and two lower side channels connected to one bridge channel. First, to measure the RBC deformability, the left-lower side channel has a deformability assessment chamber (DAC) with narrow-sized micropillars. Second, to evaluate the blood viscoelasticity in co-flowing streams, a phosphate buffered saline solution is supplied at a constant flow rate. By closing or opening a pinch valve connected to the outlet of DAC, blood flows in forward or back-and-forth mode. A time-resolved micro-particle image velocimetry technique and a digital image processing technique are used to quantify the blood velocity and image intensity. Then, RBC deformability is evaluated by quantifying the blood volume passing through the DAC under forward flow, and quantifying the variations of blood velocity and image intensity in the DAC under back-and-forth flow. Using a discrete circuit model, blood viscoelasticity is obtained by evaluating variations of blood velocity and co-flowing streams. The effect of several factors (period, hematocrit, and base solution) on the performance is quantitatively evaluated. Based on the experimental results, the period of sinusoidal flow and hematocrit are fixed at 30 s and 50%, respectively. As a performance demonstration, the proposed method is employed to detect the homogeneous and heterogeneous blood composed of normal RBCs and hardened RBCs. These experimental results show that the RBC deformability is more effective to detect minor subpopulations of heterogeneous bloods, compared with blood viscoelasticity

  8. Monitoring of rainfall by ground-based passive microwave systems: models, measurements and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A large set of ground-based multi-frequency microwave radiometric simulations and measurements during different precipitation regimes are analysed. Simulations are performed for a set of frequencies from 22 to 60 GHz, representing the channels currently available on an operational ground-based radiometric system. Results are illustrated in terms of comparisons between measurements and model data in order to show that the observed radiometric signatures can be attributed to rainfall scattering and absorption. An inversion algorithm has been developed, basing on the simulated data, to retrieve rain rate from passive radiometric observations. As a validation of the approach, we have analyzed radiometric measurements during rain events occurred in Boulder, Colorado, and at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP site in Lamont, Oklahoma, USA, comparing rain rate estimates with available simultaneous rain gauge data.

  9. Enhanced interfacial deformation in a Marangoni flow: A measure of the dynamical surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite Pinto, Rodrigo; Le Roux, Sébastien; Cantat, Isabelle; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the flows and deformations resulting from the deposition of a water soluble surfactant at a bare oil-water interface. Once the surfactant is deposited, we show that the oil-water interface is deformed with a water bump rising upward into the oil. For a given oil, the maximal deformation—located at the surfactant deposition point—decreases with the oil-layer thickness. We also observe a critical oil-layer thickness below which the deformation becomes as large as the oil layer, leading to the rupture of this layer and an oil-water dewetting. Experimentally, it is found that this critical thickness depends on the oil density and viscosity. We then provide an analytical modelization that explains quantitatively all these experimental features. In particular, our analysis allows us to derive an analytical relationship between the vertical profile of the oil-water interface and the in-plane surface tension profile. Therefore, we propose that the monitoring of the interface vertical shape can be used as a new spatially resolved tensiometry technique.

  10. Work flow of signal processing data of ground penetrating radar case of rigid pavement measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-01

    The signal processing of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) requires a certain work flow to obtain good results. Even though the Ground Penetrating Radar data looks similar with seismic reflection data, but the GPR data has particular signatures that the seismic reflection data does not have. This is something to do with coupling between antennae and the ground surface. Because of this, the GPR data should be treated differently from the seismic signal data processing work flow. Even though most of the processing steps still follow the same work flow of seismic reflection data such as: filtering, predictive deconvolution etc. This paper presents the work flow of GPR processing data on rigid pavement measurements. The processing steps start from raw data, de-Wow process, remove DC and continue with the standard process to get rid of noises i.e. filtering process. Some radargram particular features of rigid pavement along with pile foundations are presented.

  11. Work flow of signal processing data of ground penetrating radar case of rigid pavement measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handayani, Gunawan [The Earth Physics and Complex Systems Research Group (Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung Indonesia) gunawanhandayani@gmail.com (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    The signal processing of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) requires a certain work flow to obtain good results. Even though the Ground Penetrating Radar data looks similar with seismic reflection data, but the GPR data has particular signatures that the seismic reflection data does not have. This is something to do with coupling between antennae and the ground surface. Because of this, the GPR data should be treated differently from the seismic signal data processing work flow. Even though most of the processing steps still follow the same work flow of seismic reflection data such as: filtering, predictive deconvolution etc. This paper presents the work flow of GPR processing data on rigid pavement measurements. The processing steps start from raw data, de-Wow process, remove DC and continue with the standard process to get rid of noises i.e. filtering process. Some radargram particular features of rigid pavement along with pile foundations are presented.

  12. Work flow of signal processing data of ground penetrating radar case of rigid pavement measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-01-01

    The signal processing of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) requires a certain work flow to obtain good results. Even though the Ground Penetrating Radar data looks similar with seismic reflection data, but the GPR data has particular signatures that the seismic reflection data does not have. This is something to do with coupling between antennae and the ground surface. Because of this, the GPR data should be treated differently from the seismic signal data processing work flow. Even though most of the processing steps still follow the same work flow of seismic reflection data such as: filtering, predictive deconvolution etc. This paper presents the work flow of GPR processing data on rigid pavement measurements. The processing steps start from raw data, de-Wow process, remove DC and continue with the standard process to get rid of noises i.e. filtering process. Some radargram particular features of rigid pavement along with pile foundations are presented

  13. A comparative study of satellite estimation for solar insolation in Albania with ground measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrushi, Driada, E-mail: driadamitrushi@yahoo.com; Berberi, Pëllumb, E-mail: pellumb.berberi@gmail.com; Muda, Valbona, E-mail: vmuda@hotmail.com; Buzra, Urim, E-mail: rimibuzra@yahoo.com [Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering Mathematics and Engineering Physics, Polytechnic University of Tirana, Tirana (Albania); Bërdufi, Irma, E-mail: irmaberdufi@gmail.com [Institute of Applied Nuclear Physics, Tirana University, Street “Th. Filipeu”, Tirana (Albania); Topçiu, Daniela, E-mail: topciudaniela@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Physics, “Aleksander Xhuvani” University, Elbasan (Albania)

    2016-03-25

    The main objective of this study is to compare data provided by Database of NASA with available ground data for regions covered by national meteorological net NASA estimates that their measurements of average daily solar radiation have a root-mean-square deviation RMSD error of 35 W/m{sup 2} (roughly 20% inaccuracy). Unfortunately valid data from meteorological stations for regions of interest are quite rare in Albania. In these cases, use of Solar Radiation Database of NASA would be a satisfactory solution for different case studies. Using a statistical method allows to determine most probable margins between to sources of data. Comparison of mean insulation data provided by NASA with ground data of mean insulation provided by meteorological stations show that ground data for mean insolation results, in all cases, to be underestimated compared with data provided by Database of NASA. Converting factor is 1.149.

  14. Ground based measurements of particulate emissions from supersonic transports. Concorde olympus engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitefield, Ph.D.; Hagen, D.E. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Cloud and Aerosol Sciences Lab.; Lilenfeld, H.V. [McDonnell Douglas Corp., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The application of a mobile aerosol monitoring facility, the Mobile Aerosol Sampling System (MASS) is described to characterize engine aerosol emissions from the Rolls Royce Olympus Engine. The multi-configurational MASS has been employed in both ground and airborne field operations. It has been successfully flown on research aircrafts. In ground tests the MASS has participated in numerous jet engine related ground tests, and has been deployed to resolve aerosol generation problems in a high power chemical laser system. In all cases the measurements were made on samples taken from a harsh physical and chemical environment, with both high and low temperature and pressure, and in the presence of highly reactive gases. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  15. Specifying the Earth's Plasmasphere With Data Assimilation of Ground-Based Field-Line Resonance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Anders; McCarthy, Nicholas; Rivera, Samuell; Ober, Daniel; Zesta, Eftyhia; Chi, Peter; Moldwin, Mark; Ridley, Aaron

    The plasmasphere is an important medium for propagation of the waves which contribute to the decay and acceleration of energetic particles in the radiation belts and ring current. Accurate knowledge of the plasmasphere evolution is important for accurately predicting the evolution of the energetic particle populations. A variety of routine measurements provide information about the plasmasphere, including ground-based and space-based magnetic field-line resonance measurements, space based in-situ plasma density measurements, whistler wave measurements, TEC measurements from GPS receivers, and in some cases global EUV images. Combining these measurements with a physics-based model through a data assimilation scheme should, in principle, allow a better specification of the plasmasphere. Other information which can be used include information about the global magnetic and electric fields from a combination of measurements and models, for example AMIE. In this presentation we will discuss modeling the plasmasphere using these data. A particular advantage of ground-based measurements over space-based measurements are the longevity of the magnetometer and VLF stations, the potentially greater simultaneous coverage in local time and L-shell (as opposed to single-point satellite measurements), and the lower cost of maintaining the networks. In this paper we will explore using a network of ground-based magnetometers to constrain the evolution of the plas-masphere through a data assimilation scheme. We will use the Ober et al. [1997] plasmasphere model, a particle filter data assimilation scheme, and simulated or actual field-line resonance measurements from the McMAC, MEASURE, SAMBA, and CARISMA, magnetometer arrays.

  16. The SPARC water vapor assessment II: intercomparison of satellite and ground-based microwave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Kiefer, Michael; Lossow, Stefan; Gomez, R. Michael; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Lainer, Martin; Forkman, Peter; Christensen, Ole Martin; Oh, Jung Jin; Hartogh, Paul; Anderson, John; Bramstedt, Klaus; Dinelli, Bianca M.; Garcia-Comas, Maya; Hervig, Mark; Murtagh, Donal; Raspollini, Piera; Read, William G.; Rosenlof, Karen; Stiller, Gabriele P.; Walker, Kaley A.

    2017-12-01

    As part of the second SPARC (Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate) water vapor assessment (WAVAS-II), we present measurements taken from or coincident with seven sites from which ground-based microwave instruments measure water vapor in the middle atmosphere. Six of the ground-based instruments are part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and provide datasets that can be used for drift and trend assessment. We compare measurements from these ground-based instruments with satellite datasets that have provided retrievals of water vapor in the lower mesosphere over extended periods since 1996. We first compare biases between the satellite and ground-based instruments from the upper stratosphere to the upper mesosphere. We then show a number of time series comparisons at 0.46 hPa, a level that is sensitive to changes in H2O and CH4 entering the stratosphere but, because almost all CH4 has been oxidized, is relatively insensitive to dynamical variations. Interannual variations and drifts are investigated with respect to both the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS; from 2004 onwards) and each instrument's climatological mean. We find that the variation in the interannual difference in the mean H2O measured by any two instruments is typically ˜ 1%. Most of the datasets start in or after 2004 and show annual increases in H2O of 0-1 % yr-1. In particular, MLS shows a trend of between 0.5 % yr-1 and 0.7 % yr-1 at the comparison sites. However, the two longest measurement datasets used here, with measurements back to 1996, show much smaller trends of +0.1 % yr-1 (at Mauna Loa, Hawaii) and -0.1 % yr-1 (at Lauder, New Zealand).

  17. The SPARC water vapor assessment II: intercomparison of satellite and ground-based microwave measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Nedoluha

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of the second SPARC (Stratosphere–troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate water vapor assessment (WAVAS-II, we present measurements taken from or coincident with seven sites from which ground-based microwave instruments measure water vapor in the middle atmosphere. Six of the ground-based instruments are part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and provide datasets that can be used for drift and trend assessment. We compare measurements from these ground-based instruments with satellite datasets that have provided retrievals of water vapor in the lower mesosphere over extended periods since 1996. We first compare biases between the satellite and ground-based instruments from the upper stratosphere to the upper mesosphere. We then show a number of time series comparisons at 0.46 hPa, a level that is sensitive to changes in H2O and CH4 entering the stratosphere but, because almost all CH4 has been oxidized, is relatively insensitive to dynamical variations. Interannual variations and drifts are investigated with respect to both the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS; from 2004 onwards and each instrument's climatological mean. We find that the variation in the interannual difference in the mean H2O measured by any two instruments is typically  ∼  1%. Most of the datasets start in or after 2004 and show annual increases in H2O of 0–1 % yr−1. In particular, MLS shows a trend of between 0.5 % yr−1 and 0.7 % yr−1 at the comparison sites. However, the two longest measurement datasets used here, with measurements back to 1996, show much smaller trends of +0.1 % yr−1 (at Mauna Loa, Hawaii and −0.1 % yr−1 (at Lauder, New Zealand.

  18. Acquisition and deconvolution of seismic signals by different methods to perform direct ground-force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, Flavio; Schleifer, Andrea; Zgauc, Franco; Meneghini, Fabio; Petronio, Lorenzo

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of a novel borehole-seismic experiment in which we used different types of onshore-transient-impulsive and non-impulsive-surface sources together with direct ground-force recordings. The ground-force signals were obtained by baseplate load cells located beneath the sources, and by buried soil-stress sensors installed in the very shallow-subsurface together with accelerometers. The aim was to characterize the source's emission by its complex impedance, function of the near-field vibrations and soil stress components, and above all to obtain appropriate deconvolution operators to remove the signature of the sources in the far-field seismic signals. The data analysis shows the differences in the reference measurements utilized to deconvolve the source signature. As downgoing waves, we process the signals of vertical seismic profiles (VSP) recorded in the far-field approximation by an array of permanent geophones cemented at shallow-medium depth outside the casing of an instrumented well. We obtain a significant improvement in the waveform of the radiated seismic-vibrator signals deconvolved by ground force, similar to that of the seismograms generated by the impulsive sources, and demonstrates that the results obtained by different sources present low values in their repeatability norm. The comparison evidences the potentiality of the direct ground-force measurement approach to effectively remove the far-field source signature in VSP onshore data, and to increase the performance of permanent acquisition installations for time-lapse application purposes.

  19. Determining the location of buried plastic water pipes from measurements of ground surface vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Brennan, M. J.; Gao, Y.

    2011-09-01

    ‘Mapping the Underworld' is a UK-based project, which aims to create a multi-sensor device that combines complementary technologies for remote buried utility service detection and location. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics, and techniques for detecting buried infrastructure, in particular plastic water pipes, are being investigated. One of the proposed techniques involves excitation of the pipe at some known location with concurrent vibrational mapping of the ground surface in order to infer the location of the remainder of the pipe. In this paper, measurements made on a dedicated pipe rig are reported. Frequency response measurements relating vibrational velocity on the ground to the input excitation were acquired. Contour plots of the unwrapped phase revealed the location of the pipe to within 0.1-0.2 m. Magnitude contour plots revealed the excitation point and also the location of the pipe end. By examining the unwrapped phase gradients along a line above the pipe, it was possible to identify the wave-type within the pipe responsible for the ground surface vibration. Furthermore, changes in the ground surface phase speed computed using this method enabled the location of the end of the pipe to be confirmed.

  20. Comparison between different speckle tracking and color tissue Doppler techniques to measure global and regional myocardial deformation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Laurens P; Slorach, Cameron; Hui, Wei; Manlhiot, Cedric; McCrindle, Brian W; Friedberg, Mark K; Jaeggi, Edgar T; Mertens, Luc

    2010-09-01

    Myocardial deformation parameters obtained by speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) and color Doppler tissue imaging (CDTI) using two different ultrasound systems and three different software packages were compared. Apical four-chamber, short-axis grayscale, and color Doppler tissue images were prospectively acquired using Vivid 7 and iE33 ultrasound systems in 34 children and then analyzed using EchoPAC and QLAB (STE) and SPEQLE (CDTI). Measurement of myocardial deformation was feasible for all three modalities. Longitudinal strain (epsilon) measurements showed the lowest intraobserver and interobserver variability (intraobserver and interobserver coefficients of variation, 9% and 8% for EchoPAC, 5% and 6% for QLAB, and 14% and 16% for SPEQLE). In addition, longitudinal epsilon had a small bias and narrow limits of agreement when comparing different techniques. The coefficients of variation of circumferential epsilon by EchoPAC and QLAB were 12% and 11% (intraobserver) and 9% and 13% (interobserver), respectively. Circumferential epsilon by STE had a small systematic bias but relatively narrow limits of agreement. The reproducibility of radial epsilon measurements using STE was low, while CDTI epsilon provided better performance (intraobserver and interobserver coefficients of variation for radial posterior epsilon, 12% and 24% for EchoPAC, 39% and 56% for QLAB, and 12% and 14% for SPEQLE). Radial epsilon was on average 50% lower using QLAB compared with EchoPAC and SPEQLE. Systolic strain rate values obtained by STE were lower compared with CDTI-derived values. The limits of agreement for strain rate values among the three modalities were wide, and intraobserver and interobserver variability was poor for all three modalities. Some deformation measurements (e.g., longitudinal and circumferential epsilon) are comparable among different ultrasound machines and software packages, whereas others are significantly different (e.g., radial epsilon and strain rate

  1. Soil Moisture Characterization of the Valencia Anchor Station. Ground, Aircraft Measurements and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Baeza, E.; Antolin, M. C.; Balling, J.; Belda, F.; Bouzinac, C.; Camacho, F.; Cano, A.; Carbo, E.; Delwart, S.; Domenech, C.; Ferreira, A. G.; Fidalgo, A.; Juglea, S.; Kerr, Y.; Marco, J.; Millan-Scheiding, C.; Narbon, C.; Rodriguez, D.; Saleh, K.; Sanchis, J.; Skou, N.; Sobjaerg, S.; Soriano, P.; Tamayo, J.; Tauriainen, S.; Torre, E.; Velazquez-Blazquez, A.; Wigneron, J.-P.; Wursteisen, P.

    In the framework of ESA SMOS Mission, the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS) has been selected as a core validation site. Its reasonable homogeneous characteristics make it appropriate to undertake the validation of SMOS Level 2 land products before attempting other more complex areas. Close to SMOS launch (2nd Nov. 2009), ESA defined the SMOS Validation Rehearsal Campaign Plan with the aim of testing the readiness, ensemble coordination and speed of operations, to be able to avoid as far as possible any unexpected deficiencies of the plan and procedure during the real Commissioning Phase campaigns.For the rehearsal activity which successfully took place in April - May 2008, a control area of 10 x 10 km2 was chosen at the VAS study area where a network of ground soil moisture (SM) measuring stations is being set up based on an original definition of homogeneous physio-hydrological units attending to climatic, soil type, lithology, geology, elevation, slope and vegetation cover conditions. Complementary to the ground measurements, flight operations were performed over this control area using the Helsinki University of Technology TKK Short Skyvan research aircraft which contained onboard a payload constituted of the following instruments: (i) L-band EMIRAD radiometer (Technical University of Denmark, TUD), (ii) L-band HUT-2D imaging interferometric radiometer (TKK), (iii) PARIS GPS reflectrometry system (Institute for Space Studies of Catalonia, IEEC), (iv) IR sensor (Finnish Institute of Maritime Research, FIMR).Together with the ground SM measurements, other ground and meteorological measurements from the VAS area, kindly provided by other institutions, are currently been used to simulate passive microwave brightness temperature to obtain satellite "match ups" for validation purposes and to test the retrieval algorithms. The spatialization of the ground measurements up to a SMOS pixel is carried out by using the SURFace EXternalisée (SURFEX) model from Météo France

  2. Real-time structured light-based otoscopy for quantitative measurement of eardrum deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Jeught, Sam; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2017-01-01

    An otological profilometry device based on real-time structured light triangulation is presented. A clinical otoscope head is mounted onto a custom-handheld unit containing both a small digital light projector and a high-speed digital camera. Digital fringe patterns are projected onto the eardrum surface and are recorded at a rate of 120 unique frames per second. The relative angle between projection and camera axes causes the projected patterns to appear deformed by the eardrum shape, allowing its full-field three-dimensional (3-D) surface map to be reconstructed. By combining hardware triggering between projector and camera with a dedicated parallel processing pipeline, the proposed system is capable of acquiring a live stream of point clouds of over 300,000 data points per frame at a rate of 40 Hz. Real-time eardrum profilometry adds an additional dimension of depth to the standard two-dimensional otoscopy image and provides a noninvasive tool to enhance the qualitative depth perception of the clinical operator with quantitative 3-D data. Visualization of the eardrum from different perspectives can improve the diagnosis of existing and the detection of impending middle ear pathology. The capability of the device to detect small middle ear pressure changes by monitoring eardrum deformation in real time is demonstrated.

  3. A study on the degradation evaluation for Cr-Mo steel in power plants by grain deformation measuring and ultrasonic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Guk

    2002-01-01

    Boiler high-temperature pipelines such as main steam pipe, header and steam drum in fossil power plants are degraded by creep and thermal fatigue damage due to severe operating conditions such as high temperature and high pressure for an extended period time. Conventional measurement techniques for measuring creep damage have low practicality and applied only to component surfaces with good accessibility. In this paper, the grain deformation and ultrasonic measurement for degraded specimens were carried out for the purpose of a practical evaluation for creep damage. Relationships between the grain deformation and ultrasonic properties for material degradation were established through these two measuring methods. As a result of grain deformation and ultrasonic tests for crept specimens, we conformed that deformation index and sound velocity linearly decreased, and also attenuation coefficient and ultrasonic noise linearly increased in proportion to the increase of creep degradation, respectively.

  4. Soil moisture characterization of the Valencia anchor station. Ground, aircraft measurements and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Baeza, E; Antolin, M C; Balling, Jan E.

    2009-01-01

    . For the rehearsal activity which successfully took place in April - May 2008, a control area of 10 × 10 km2 was chosen at the VAS study area where a network of ground soil moisture (SM) measuring stations is being set up based on an original definition of homogeneous physio-hydrological units attending to climatic......, soil type, lithology, geology, elevation, slope and vegetation cover conditions. Complementary to the ground measurements, flight operations were performed over this control area using the Helsinki University of Technology TKK Short Skyvan research aircraft which contained onboard a payload constituted...... of the following instruments: (i) L-band EMIRAD radiometer (Technical University of Denmark, TUD), (ii) L-band HUT-2D imaging interferometric radiometer (TKK), (iii) PARIS GPS reflectrometry system (Institute for Space Studies of Catalonia, IEEC), (iv) IR sensor (Finnish Institute of Maritime Research, FIMR...

  5. Comparison of Experimentally Measured Deformation of the Plate on the Subsoil and the Results of 3D Numerical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labudková Jana

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to compare the measured subsidence of the foundation in experiments and subsidence obtained from FEM calculations. When using 3D elements for creation of a 3D model, it is, in particular, essential to choose correctly the size of the modelled area which represents the subsoil, the boundary conditions and the size of the finite element network. The parametric study evaluates impacts of those parameters on final deformation. The parametric study is conducted of 168 variant models.

  6. Model Deformation Measurements of Sonic Boom Models in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Garbeff, Theodore J.; Heineck, James T.

    2015-01-01

    The deformations of two sonic-boom models were measured by stereo photogrammetry during tests in the 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The models were geometrically similar but one was 2.75 times as large as the other. Deformation measurements were made by simultaneously imaging the upper surfaces of the models from two directions by calibrated cameras that were mounted behind windows of the test section. Bending and twist were measured at discrete points using conventional circular targets that had been marked along the leading and trailing edges of the wings and tails. In addition, continuous distributions of bending and twist were measured from ink speckles that had been applied to the upper surfaces of the model. Measurements were made at wind-on (M = 1.6) and wind-off conditions over a range of angles of attack between 2.5 deg. and 5.0 deg. At each condition, model deformation was determined by comparing the wind-off and wind-on coordinates of each measurement point after transforming the coordinates to reference coordinates tied to the model. The necessary transformations were determined by measuring the positions of a set of targets on the rigid center-body of the models whose model-axes coordinates were known. Smoothly varying bending and twist measurements were obtained at all conditions. Bending displacements increased in proportion to the square of the distance to the centerline. Maximum deflection of the wingtip of the larger model was about 5 mm (2% of the semispan) and that of the smaller model was 0.9 mm (1% of the semispan). The change in wing twist due to bending increased in direct proportion to distance from the centerline and reached a (absolute) maximum of about -1? at the highest angle of attack for both models. The measurements easily resolved bending displacements as small as 0.05 mm and bending-induced changes in twist as small as 0.05 deg.

  7. Identifying a hydraulic parameterization from on-ground GPR time lapse measurements of a pumping experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenbach, A.; Buchner, J.; Klenk, P.; Roth, K.

    2012-04-01

    We show the potential of on-ground Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) to identify the hydraulic parameterization model with a semi-quantitative analysis based on numerical simulations of the radar signal. A pumping experiment has been conducted at the ASSESS-GPR site to establish a fluctuating water table, while an on-ground GPR antenna recorded traces over time at a fixed location. These measurements allow the identification of the capillary fringe and its tracking through the soil. The typical dynamics of soil water content with a transient water table can be recovered from the recorded radargrams. The characteristic reflections from the capillary fringe parameterized by the commonly used hydraulic parameterization models are investigated by numerical simulations. The results for the van Genuchten parametrization, for its simplified version with m = 1 - 1/n, and for the Brooks-Corey parameterization are compared with the measured signal. This allows to identify the appropriate hydraulic parameterization model. We show that our measurements are not consistent with the commonly used simplified van Genuchten parameterization with m = 1 - 1/n.

  8. Intercomparison of ground-based ozone and NO2 measurements during the MANTRA 2004 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Strong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The MANTRA (Middle Atmosphere Nitrogen TRend Assessment 2004 campaign took place in Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, Canada (52° N, 107° W from 3 August to 15 September, 2004. In support of the main balloon launch, a suite of five zenith-sky and direct-Sun-viewing UV-visible ground-based spectrometers was deployed, primarily measuring ozone and NO2 total columns. Three Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs that were part of the balloon payload also performed ground-based measurements of several species, including ozone. Ground-based measurements of ozone and NO2 differential slant column densities from the zenith-viewing UV-visible instruments are presented herein. They are found to partially agree within NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change standards for instruments certified for process studies and satellite validation. Vertical column densities of ozone from the zenith-sky UV-visible instruments, the FTSs, a Brewer spectrophotometer, and ozonesondes are compared, and found to agree within the combined error estimates of the instruments (15%. NO2 vertical column densities from two of the UV-visible instruments are compared, and are also found to agree within combined error (15%.

  9. Field spectrometer measurement errors in presence of partially polarized light; evaluation of ground truth measurement accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, Martin P; Dissanska, Maria

    2016-11-28

    Considering that natural light is always partially polarized (reflection, Rayleigh scattering, etc.) and the alteration of the spectral response of spectrometers due to the polarization, some concerns were raised about the accuracy and variability of spectrometer outdoor measurements in field campaigns. We demonstrated by simple experiments that, in some circumstances, spectral measurements can be affected by the polarization. The signal variability due to polarization sensitivity of the spectrometer for the measured sample was about 5-10%. We noted that, measuring surfaces at right angle (a frequently used measurement protocol) minimized the problems due to polarization, producing valid results. On the other hand, measurements acquired with a slant angle are more or less accurate; an important proportion of the signal variability is due to the polarization. Direct sun reflection and reflection from close objects must be avoided.

  10. Ice nucleating particles over the Eastern Mediterranean measured at ground and by unmanned aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniel; Schrod, Jann; Drücke, Jaqueline; Keleshis, Christos; Pikridas, Michael; Ebert, Martin; Cvetkovic, Bojan; Nickovic, Slobodan; Baars, Holger; Marinou, Eleni; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Sciare, Jean; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Curtius, Joachim; Bingemer, Heinz G.

    2017-04-01

    During the intensive INUIT-BACCHUS-ACTRIS field campaign focusing on aerosols, clouds and ice nucleation in the Eastern Mediterranean in April 2016, we have measured the abundance of ice nucleating particles (INP) in the lower troposphere both with unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) as well as from the ground. Aerosol samples were collected by miniaturized electrostatic precipitators onboard the UAS and were analyzed immediately after collection on site in the ice nucleus counter FRIDGE for INP active at -20˚ C to -30˚ C in the deposition/condensation mode (INPD). Immersion freezing INP (INPI) were sampled on membrane filters and were analysed in aqueous extracts by the drop freezing method on the cold stage of FRIDGE. Ground samples were collected at the Cyprus Atmospheric Observatory (CAO) in Agia Marina Xyliatou (Latitude; 35˚ 2' 8" N; Longitude: 33˚ 3' 26" E; Altitude: 532 m a.s.l.). During the one-month campaign, we encountered a series of Saharan dust plumes that traveled at several kilometers altitude. Here we present INP data from 42 individual flights, together with OPC aerosol number concentrations, backscatter and depolarization retrievals from the Polly-XT Raman Lidar, dust concentrations derived by the dust transport model DREAM (Dust Regional Atmospheric Model), and results from scanning electron microscopy. The effect of the dust plumes is reflected by the coincidence of INP with the particulate mass (PM), the Lidar retrievals and the predicted dust mass of the model. This suggests that mineral dust or a constituent related to dust was a major contributor to the ice nucleating properties of the aerosol. Peak concentrations of above 100 INP std.l-1 were measured at -30˚ C. The INPD concentration in elevated plumes was on average a factor of 10 higher than at ground level. The INPI concentration at ground also agreed with PM levels and exceeded the ground-based INPD concentration by more than one order of magnitude. Since desert dust is transported

  11. Saturation of Deformation and Identical Bands in Very-Neutron Rich Sr Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The present proposal aims at establishing nuclear properties in an isotopic chain showing unique features. These features include the saturation of ground state deformation at its onset and the existence of ground state identical bands in neighbouring nuclei with the same deformation. The measurements should help to elucidate the role played by the proton-neutron residual interaction between orbitals with large spatial overlap, i.e. $\\pi g _{9/2} \

  12. The nuclear deformations of 148Sm, 150Sm, 152Sm and 154Sm determined from neutron scattering measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamu, R.; Haouat, G.; Lachkar, J.; Lagrange, C.; McEllistrem, M.; Patin, Y.; Sigaud, J.; Cocu, F.; Bernstein, E.; Ramirez, J.

    1975-01-01

    The neutron total cross section for 148 Sm and total cross section differences for ( 150 Sm, 148 Sm) and ( 152 Sm, 148 Sm) and ( 154 Sm, 148 Sm) were measured from 0.7 to 15MeV neutron energy and differential cross sections for 148 Sm, 150 Sm, 152 Sm and 154 Sm were measured at 7.0MeV neutron energy. The quadrupole deformation parameter of the nuclear potential, β2, was determined for each of the 148 Sm, 150 Sm, 152 Sm, 154 Sm nuclei from these measurements using nonspherical optical-potential coupled-channel calculations. The β2 values deduced for 152 Sm and 154 Sm are in good agreement with values determined from proton and α-particle scattering, but about 10% lower than β2 values of the nuclear charge distribution obtained from Coulomb excitation, electron scattering, and μ-meson scattering experiments [fr

  13. Identifying a parameterisation of the soil water retention curve from on-ground GPR measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dagenbach

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We show the potential of on-ground Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR to identify the parameterisation of the soil water retention curve, i.e. its functional form, with a semi-quantitative analysis based on numerical simulations of the radar signal. An imbibition and drainage experiment has been conducted at the ASSESS-GPR site to establish a fluctuating water table, while an on-ground GPR antenna recorded traces over time at a fixed location. These measurements allow to identify and track the capillary fringe in the soil. The typical dynamics of soil water content with a transient water table can be deduced from the recorded radargrams. The characteristic reflections from the capillary fringes in model soils that are described by commonly used hydraulic parameterisations are investigated by numerical simulations. The parameterisations used are (i full van Genuchten, (ii simplified van Genuchten with m = 1 − 1/n and (iii Brooks–Corey. All three yield characteristically different reflections, which allows the identification of an appropriate parameterisation by comparing to the measured signals. We show that for the sand used here, these signals are not consistent with the commonly used simplified van Genuchten parameterisation with m = 1 − 1/n.

  14. Identifying a parameterisation of the soil water retention curve from on-ground GPR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenbach, A.; Buchner, J. S.; Klenk, P.; Roth, K.

    2013-02-01

    We show the potential of on-ground Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) to identify the parameterisation of the soil water retention curve, i.e. its functional form, with a semi-quantitative analysis based on numerical simulations of the radar signal. An imbibition and drainage experiment has been conducted at the ASSESS-GPR site to establish a fluctuating water table, while an on-ground GPR antenna recorded traces over time at a fixed location. These measurements allow to identify and track the capillary fringe in the soil. The typical dynamics of soil water content with a transient water table can be deduced from the recorded radargrams. The characteristic reflections from the capillary fringes in model soils that are described by commonly used hydraulic parameterisations are investigated by numerical simulations. The parameterisations used are (i) full van Genuchten, (ii) simplified van Genuchten with m = 1 - 1/n and (iii) Brooks-Corey. All three yield characteristically different reflections, which allows the identification of an appropriate parameterisation by comparing to the measured signals. We show that for the sand used here, these signals are not consistent with the commonly used simplified van Genuchten parameterisation with m = 1 - 1/n.

  15. Estimating solar radiation using NOAA/AVHRR and ground measurement data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Somayeh; Amanollahi, Jamil; Tzanis, Chris G.; Ramli, Mohammad Firuz

    2018-01-01

    Solar radiation (SR) data are commonly used in different areas of renewable energy research. Researchers are often compelled to predict SR at ground stations for areas with no proper equipment. The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of the artificial neural network (ANN) and multiple linear regression (MLR) models for estimating monthly average SR over Kurdistan Province, Iran. Input data of the models were two data series with similar longitude, latitude, altitude, and month (number of months) data, but there were differences between the monthly mean temperatures in the first data series obtained from AVHRR sensor of NOAA satellite (DS1) and in the second data series measured at ground stations (DS2). In order to retrieve land surface temperature (LST) from AVHRR sensor, emissivity of the area was considered and for that purpose normalized vegetation difference index (NDVI) calculated from channels 1 and 2 of AVHRR sensor was utilized. The acquired results showed that the ANN model with DS1 data input with R2 = 0.96, RMSE = 1.04, MAE = 1.1 in the training phase and R2 = 0.96, RMSE = 1.06, MAE = 1.15 in the testing phase achieved more satisfactory performance compared with MLR model. It can be concluded that ANN model with remote sensing data has the potential to predict SR in locations with no ground measurement stations.

  16. Application of the global positioning system to crustal deformation measurements: 3. Result from the southern California borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristine M.

    1993-12-01

    Five years of measurements from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites collected between 1986 and 1991 are used to investigate deformation in the offshore regions of southern California. GPS provides the first practical technique to make precise geodetic measurements in the region. The geodetic network is situated along the California coastline from Vandenberg (120.6°W, 34.6°N) to San Diego, with additional sites on Santa Cruz, San Nicolas, Santa Catalina, Santa Rosa, and San Clemente Islands. The precision of horizontal interstation vectors is subcentimeter, and the interstation vector rate between OVRO and Vandenberg agrees with the very long baseline interferometry derived rate to within one standard deviation. No significant motion is observed in the western Santa Barbara Channel between Vandenberg and Santa Rosa Island, 0.5 ± 1.6 mm/yr, where the quoted uncertainties are one standard deviation. Motions in the eastern Santa Barbara Channel are consistent with compressional deformation of 6 ± 1 mm/yr at N16 ± 3°E. This motion is in agreement with seismicity and an independent geodetic analysis for the period 1971-1987 (Larsen, 1991). San Clemente Island is moving relative to San Diego at the rate of 5.9 ± 1.8 mm/yr at a direction of N38 ± 20°W. The motion between San Nicolas Island and San Clemente Island, 0.8 ± 1.5 mm/yr, is insignificant.

  17. Economic impact and effectiveness of radiation protection measures in aviation during a ground level enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthiä Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the omnipresent irradiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR and their secondary products, passengers and aircraft crew may be exposed to radiation from solar cosmic rays during ground level enhancements (GLE. In general, lowering the flight altitude and changing the flight route to lower latitudes are procedures applicable to immediately reduce the radiation exposure at aviation altitudes. In practice, however, taking such action necessarily leads to modifications in the flight plan and the consequential, additional fuel consumption constrains the mitigating measures. In this work we investigate in a case study of the ground level event of December 13th 2006 how potential mitigation procedures affect the total radiation exposure during a transatlantic flight from Seattle to Cologne taking into account constraints concerning fuel consumption and range.

  18. Measuring the electrical properties of soil using a calibrated ground-coupled GPR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, C.P.; Olhoeft, G.R.; Wright, D.L.; Powers, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional methods for estimating vadose zone soil properties using ground penetrating radar (GPR) include measuring travel time, fitting diffraction hyperbolae, and other methods exploiting geometry. Additional processing techniques for estimating soil properties are possible with properly calibrated GPR systems. Such calibration using ground-coupled antennas must account for the effects of the shallow soil on the antenna's response, because changing soil properties result in a changing antenna response. A prototype GPR system using ground-coupled antennas was calibrated using laboratory measurements and numerical simulations of the GPR components. Two methods for estimating subsurface properties that utilize the calibrated response were developed. First, a new nonlinear inversion algorithm to estimate shallow soil properties under ground-coupled antennas was evaluated. Tests with synthetic data showed that the inversion algorithm is well behaved across the allowed range of soil properties. A preliminary field test gave encouraging results, with estimated soil property uncertainties (????) of ??1.9 and ??4.4 mS/m for the relative dielectric permittivity and the electrical conductivity, respectively. Next, a deconvolution method for estimating the properties of subsurface reflectors with known shapes (e.g., pipes or planar interfaces) was developed. This method uses scattering matrices to account for the response of subsurface reflectors. The deconvolution method was evaluated for use with noisy data using synthetic data. Results indicate that the deconvolution method requires reflected waves with a signal/noise ratio of about 10:1 or greater. When applied to field data with a signal/noise ratio of 2:1, the method was able to estimate the reflection coefficient and relative permittivity, but the large uncertainty in this estimate precluded inversion for conductivity. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  19. Estimation of soil hydraulic properties based on time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, Stefan; Klenk, Patrick; Roth, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    Recent developments brought surface-based GPR measurements to a precision that make them useful for estimating soil hydraulic properties. For this study, we estimate Mualem-Brooks-Corey parameters for a layered subsurface material distribution employing the Levenberg-Marquardt inversion algorithm. The required measurement data were recorded at our artificial test site ASSESS, where we forced the hydraulic system with a fluctuating water table and observed the dynamic deformation of the capillary fringe with time-lapse GPR. Subsequently, these measurements were simulated based on a model comprising (i) the Richards equation describing the temporal evolution of the soil hydraulic system which was solved with MUPHI, (ii) the Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM) serving as petrophysical relationship which links the soil hydraulic model to (iii) the electrodynamic model consisting of Maxwell's equations which are solved with MEEP. For the objective function of the optimization algorithm, both measured and simulated GPR data were evaluated with a semi-automated wavelet feature detection algorithm allowing to directly compare the travel time and amplitude of the GPR signal. In this presentation, we discuss the results of the inversion based on the inversion of GPR data and we also discuss how including Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurement data influences the estimated parameters.

  20. Importance of methodological standardization for the ektacytometric measures of red blood cell deformability in sickle cell anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renoux, Céline; Parrow, Nermi; Faes, Camille; Joly, Philippe; Hardeman, Max; Tisdale, John; Levine, Mark; Garnier, Nathalie; Bertrand, Yves; Kebaili, Kamila; Cuzzubbo, Daniela; Cannas, Giovanna; Martin, Cyril; Connes, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) deformability is severely decreased in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), which plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. However, investigation of RBC deformability from SCA patients demands careful methodological considerations. We assessed RBC deformability by

  1. Combining satellite, aerial and ground measurements to assess forest carbon stocks in Democratic Republic of Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Benjamin; Bouvy, Alban; Stephenne, Nathalie; Mathoux, Pierre; Bastin, Jean-François; Baudot, Yves; Akkermans, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring tropical forest carbon stocks changes has been a rising topic in the recent years as a result of REDD+ mechanisms negotiations. Such monitoring will be mandatory for each project/country willing to benefit from these financial incentives in the future. Aerial and satellite remote sensing technologies offer cost advantages in implementing large scale forest inventories. Despite the recent progress made in the use of airborne LiDAR for carbon stocks estimation, no widely operational and cost effective method has yet been delivered for central Africa forest monitoring. Within the Maï Ndombe region of Democratic Republic of Congo, the EO4REDD project develops a method combining satellite, aerial and ground measurements. This combination is done in three steps: [1] mapping and quantifying forest cover changes using an object-based semi-automatic change detection (deforestation and forest degradation) methodology based on very high resolution satellite imagery (RapidEye), [2] developing an allometric linear model for above ground biomass measurements based on dendrometric parameters (tree crown areas and heights) extracted from airborne stereoscopic image pairs and calibrated using ground measurements of individual trees on a data set of 18 one hectare plots and [3] relating these two products to assess carbon stocks changes at a regional scale. Given the high accuracies obtained in [1] (> 80% for deforestation and 77% for forest degradation) and the suitable, but still to be improved with a larger calibrating sample, model (R² of 0.7) obtained in [2], EO4REDD products can be seen as a valid and replicable option for carbon stocks monitoring in tropical forests. Further improvements are planned to strengthen the cost effectiveness value and the REDD+ suitability in the second phase of EO4REDD. This second phase will include [A] specific model developments per forest type; [B] measurements of afforestation, reforestation and natural regeneration processes and

  2. Ground based mobile isotopic methane measurements in the Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, B. H.; Rella, C.; Petron, G.; Sherwood, O.; Mielke-Maday, I.; Schwietzke, S.

    2014-12-01

    Increased development of unconventional oil and gas resources in North America has given rise to attempts to monitor and quantify fugitive emissions of methane from the industry. Emission estimates of methane from oil and gas basins can vary significantly from one study to another as well as from EPA or State estimates. New efforts are aimed at reconciling bottom-up, or inventory-based, emission estimates of methane with top-down estimates based on atmospheric measurements from aircraft, towers, mobile ground-based vehicles, and atmospheric models. Attributing airborne measurements of regional methane fluxes to specific sources is informed by ground-based measurements of methane. Stable isotopic measurements (δ13C) of methane help distinguish between emissions from the O&G industry, Confined Animal Feed Operations (CAFO), and landfills, but analytical challenges typically limit meaningful isotopic measurements to individual point sampling. We are developing a toolbox to use δ13CH4 measurements to assess the partitioning of methane emissions for regions with multiple methane sources. The method was applied to the Denver-Julesberg Basin. Here we present data from continuous isotopic measurements obtained over a wide geographic area by using MegaCore, a 1500 ft. tube that is constantly filled with sample air while driving, then subsequently analyzed at slower rates using cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS). Pressure, flow and calibration are tightly controlled allowing precise attribution of methane enhancements to their point of collection. Comparisons with point measurements are needed to confirm regional values and further constrain flux estimates and models. This effort was made in conjunction with several major field campaigns in the Colorado Front Range in July-August 2014, including FRAPPÉ (Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment), DISCOVER-AQ, and the Air Water Gas NSF Sustainability Research Network at the University of Colorado.

  3. Ocean tidal loading affecting precise geodetic observations on Greenland: Error account of surface deformations by tidal gravity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jentzsch, G.; Knudsen, Per; Ramatschi, M.

    2000-01-01

    Air-borne and satellite based altimetry are used to monitor the Greenland ice-cap. Since these measurements are related to fiducial sites at the coast, the robustness of the height differences depends on the stability of these reference points. To benefit from the accuracy of these methods...... on the centimeter level, station corrections regarding the Earth tides and the ocean tidal loading have to be applied. Models for global corrections esp. for the body tides are available and sufficient, but local corrections regarding the effect of the adjacent shelf area still have to be inferred from additional...... observations. Near the coast ocean tidal loading causes additional vertical deformations in the order of 1 to 10 cm Therefore, tidal gravity measurements were carried out at four fiducial sites around Greenland in order to provide corrections for the kinematic part of the coordinates of these sites. Starting...

  4. Vertebral deformities and fractures are associated with MRI and pQCT measures obtained at the distal tibia and radius of postmenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, C. S.; Phillips, E. A.; Sun, W.; Wald, M. J.; Magland, J. F.; Snyder, P. J.; Wehrli, F. W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary We investigated the association of postmenopausal vertebral deformities and fractures with bone parameters derived from distal extremities using MRI and pQCT. Distal extremity measures showed variable degrees of association with vertebral deformities and fractures, highlighting the systemic nature of postmenopausal bone loss. Introduction Prevalent vertebral deformities and fractures are known to predict incident further fractures. However, the association of distal extremity measures and vertebral deformities in postmenopausal women has not been fully established. Methods This study involved 98 postmenopausal women (age range 60–88 years, mean 70 years) with DXA BMD T-scores at either the hip or spine in the range of −1.5 to −3.5. Wedge, biconcavity, and crush deformities were computed on the basis of spine MRI. Vertebral fractures were assessed using Eastell's criterion. Distal tibia and radius stiffness was computed using MRI-based finite element analysis. BMD at the distal extremities were obtained using pQCT. Results Several distal extremity MRI and pQCT measures showed negative association with vertebral deformity on the basis of single parameter correlation (r up to 0.67) and two-parameter regression (r up to 0.76) models involving MRI stiffness and pQCT BMD. Subjects who had at least one prevalent vertebral fracture showed decreased MRI stiffness (up to 17.9 %) and pQCT density (up to 34.2 %) at the distal extremities compared to the non-fracture group. DXA lumbar spine BMD T-score was not associated with vertebral deformities. Conclusions The association between vertebral deformities and distal extremity measures supports the notion of postmenopausal osteoporosis as a systemic phenomenon. PMID:24221453

  5. Deformation responses of slow moving landslides to seasonal rainfall in the Northern Apennines, measured by InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Benedikt; Simoni, Alessandro; Mulas, Marco; Corsini, Alessandro; Schmidt, David

    2018-05-01

    Slow moving landslides are widespread geomorphological features in the Northern Apennines of Italy where they represent one of the main landscape forming processes. The lithology of the Northern Apennines fold and thrust belt is characterized by alternations of sandstone, siltstone and clayshales, also known as flysch, and clay shales with a chaotic block in matrix fabric, which are often interpreted as tectonic or sedimentary mélanges. While flysch rocks with a high pelitic fraction host earthslides that occasionally evolve into flow like movements, earthflows are the dominant landslide type in chaotic clay shales. In the present work, we document the kinematic response to rainfall of landslides in these different lithologies using radar interferometry. The study area includes three river catchments in the Northern Apennines. Here, the Mediterranean climate is characterized by two wet seasons during autumn and spring respectively, separated by dry summers and winters with moderate precipitation. We use SAR imagery from the X-band satellite COSMO SkyMed and from the C-band satellite Sentinel 1 to retrieve spatial displacement measurements between 2009 and 2016 for 25 landslides in our area of interest. We also document detailed temporal and spatial deformation signals for eight representative landslides, although the InSAR derived deformation signal is only well constrained by our dataset during the years 2013 and 2015. In spring 2013, long enduring rainfalls struck the study area and numerous landslide reactivations were documented by the regional authorities. During 2013, we measured higher displacement rates on the landslides in pelitic flysch formations compared to the earthflows in the clay shales. Slower mean velocities were measured on most landslides during 2015. We analyse the temporal deformation signal of our eight representative landslides and compare the temporal response to precipitation. We show that earthslides in pelitic flysch formations

  6. Model and measurements of linear mixing in thermal IR ground leaving radiance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balick, Lee; Clodius, William; Jeffery, Christopher; Theiler, James; McCabe, Matthew; Gillespie, Alan; Mushkin, Amit; Danilina, Iryna

    2007-10-01

    Hyperspectral thermal IR remote sensing is an effective tool for the detection and identification of gas plumes and solid materials. Virtually all remotely sensed thermal IR pixels are mixtures of different materials and temperatures. As sensors improve and hyperspectral thermal IR remote sensing becomes more quantitative, the concept of homogeneous pixels becomes inadequate. The contributions of the constituents to the pixel spectral ground leaving radiance are weighted by their spectral emissivities and their temperature, or more correctly, temperature distributions, because real pixels are rarely thermally homogeneous. Planck's Law defines a relationship between temperature and radiance that is strongly wavelength dependent, even for blackbodies. Spectral ground leaving radiance (GLR) from mixed pixels is temperature and wavelength dependent and the relationship between observed radiance spectra from mixed pixels and library emissivity spectra of mixtures of 'pure' materials is indirect. A simple model of linear mixing of subpixel radiance as a function of material type, the temperature distribution of each material and the abundance of the material within a pixel is presented. The model indicates that, qualitatively and given normal environmental temperature variability, spectral features remain observable in mixtures as long as the material occupies more than roughly 10% of the pixel. Field measurements of known targets made on the ground and by an airborne sensor are presented here and serve as a reality check on the model. Target spectral GLR from mixtures as a function of temperature distribution and abundance within the pixel at day and night are presented and compare well qualitatively with model output.

  7. GROMOS-C, a novel ground-based microwave radiometer for ozone measurement campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, S.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-07-01

    Stratospheric ozone is of major interest as it absorbs most harmful UV radiation from the sun, allowing life on Earth. Ground-based microwave remote sensing is the only method that allows for the measurement of ozone profiles up to the mesopause, over 24 hours and under different weather conditions with high time resolution. In this paper a novel ground-based microwave radiometer is presented. It is called GROMOS-C (GRound based Ozone MOnitoring System for Campaigns), and it has been designed to measure the vertical profile of ozone distribution in the middle atmosphere by observing ozone emission spectra at a frequency of 110.836 GHz. The instrument is designed in a compact way which makes it transportable and suitable for outdoor use in campaigns, an advantageous feature that is lacking in present day ozone radiometers. It is operated through remote control. GROMOS-C is a total power radiometer which uses a pre-amplified heterodyne receiver, and a digital fast Fourier transform spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Among its main new features, the incorporation of different calibration loads stands out; this includes a noise diode and a new type of blackbody target specifically designed for this instrument, based on Peltier elements. The calibration scheme does not depend on the use of liquid nitrogen; therefore GROMOS-C can be operated at remote places with no maintenance requirements. In addition, the instrument can be switched in frequency to observe the CO line at 115 GHz. A description of the main characteristics of GROMOS-C is included in this paper, as well as the results of a first campaign at the High Altitude Research Station at Jungfraujoch (HFSJ), Switzerland. The validation is performed by comparison of the retrieved profiles against equivalent profiles from MLS (Microwave Limb Sounding) satellite data, ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast) model data, as well as our nearby NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric

  8. Applying measured reflection from the ground to simulations of thermal perfromance of solar collectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Solar radiation on tilted and vertical surfaces in the Arctic is, in large parts of the year, strongly influenced by reflection from snow. In connection with planning and optimization of energy efficient buildings and solar energy systems in the Arctic, it is important to have an accurate...... and the azimuth of the surface in question. The paper will present an analysis of simulations of the thermal performance of solar collectors using the standard description of the albedo and using the albedo determined by the measurements. It will be elucidated how important an accurate description...... of the reflection from the ground is for the thermal performance of solar collectors....

  9. Mapping and Measuring the Microrelief of Slope Deformations Using Modern Contactless Technologies and Practical Application in Territorial Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudý, František; Slámová, Martina; Tomaštík, Julián; Kardoš, Miroslav; Tunák, Daniel; Saloň, Šimon

    2017-04-01

    Slope deformations are risks limiting economic land use potential. A national database system keeps records of slope disturbances and deformations, however, it is important to update the information mainly from the point of view of practical territorial planning, especially in the high-risk areas presented in the study. The paper explains the possibilities of applying modern methods of mapping the microrelief of slope deformations of a lower extent (up to several hundreds of m2) and using not very well known contactless technologies, which could be applied in practice due to their low-cost and low-time consuming nature. In order to create a digital model of the microrelief used to carry out the measurements we applied the method of terrestrial photogrammetry, terrestrial scanning using Lenovo Phab 2Pro. It is the first device available for users that uses the Google Tango technology. So far there have been only prototypes of devices available for the developers only. The Tango technology consists of 3 partial technologies - "depth perception" (measuring the distance to objects, nowadays it uses mainly infrared radiation), "motion tracking" (tracking the position and motion of the device using embedded sensors) and "area learning" (simply learning the area, where the device looks for same objects within already existing 3D models and real space). Even though the technology utilisation is nowadays presented mainly in the field of augmented reality and navigation in the interior, there are already some applications for collecting the point clouds in real time, which can be used in a wide spectrum of applications in exterior, which was also applied in our research. Data acquired this way can be processed in readily available software products, what enabled a high degree of automation also in our case. After comparing with the reference point field that was measured using GNSS and electronic tachymeter, we reached accuracy of point position determination from a digital

  10. Ground Pollution Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jong Min; Bae, Jae Geun

    1997-08-01

    This book deals with ground pollution science and soil science, classification of soil and fundamentals, ground pollution and human, ground pollution and organic matter, ground pollution and city environment, environmental problems of the earth and ground pollution, soil pollution and development of geological features of the ground, ground pollution and landfill of waste, case of measurement of ground pollution.

  11. Inverse measurement of wall pressure field in flexible-wall wind tunnels using global wall deformation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kenneth; Brown, Julian; Patil, Mayuresh; Devenport, William

    2018-02-01

    The Kevlar-wall anechoic wind tunnel offers great value to the aeroacoustics research community, affording the capability to make simultaneous aeroacoustic and aerodynamic measurements. While the aeroacoustic potential of the Kevlar-wall test section is already being leveraged, the aerodynamic capability of these test sections is still to be fully realized. The flexibility of the Kevlar walls suggests the possibility that the internal test section flow may be characterized by precisely measuring small deflections of the flexible walls. Treating the Kevlar fabric walls as tensioned membranes with known pre-tension and material properties, an inverse stress problem arises where the pressure distribution over the wall is sought as a function of the measured wall deflection. Experimental wall deformations produced by the wind loading of an airfoil model are measured using digital image correlation and subsequently projected onto polynomial basis functions which have been formulated to mitigate the impact of measurement noise based on a finite-element study. Inserting analytic derivatives of the basis functions into the equilibrium relations for a membrane, full-field pressure distributions across the Kevlar walls are computed. These inversely calculated pressures, after being validated against an independent measurement technique, can then be integrated along the length of the test section to give the sectional lift of the airfoil. Notably, these first-time results are achieved with a non-contact technique and in an anechoic environment.

  12. Deformation and velocity measurements at elevated temperature in a fractured 0.5 M block of tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, S.C.; Berge, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of laboratory tests conducted on small block samples of Topopah Spring tuff, in support of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The overall objective of these tests is to investigate the thermal-mechanical, thermal-hydrological, and thermal-chemical response of the rock to conditions similar to the near-field environment (NFE) of a potential nuclear waste repository. We present preliminary results of deformation and elastic wave velocity measurements on a 0.5-m-scale block of Topopah Spring tuff tested in uniaxial compression to 8.5 MPa and at temperatures to 85 degree C. The Young's modulus was found to be about 7 to 31 GPa for vertical measurements parallel to the stress direction across parts of the block containing no fractures or a few fractures, and 0.5 to 0.9 GPA for measurements across individual fractures, at ambient temperature and 8.5 MPa maximum stress. During stress cycles between 5 and 8.5 MPa, the deformation modulus values for the matrix with fractures were near 15-20 GPa at ambient temperature but dropped to about 10 GPa at 85 degree C. Compressional wave velocities were found to be about 3.6 to 4.7 km/s at ambient temperature and stress. After the stress was cycled, velocities dropped to values as low as 2.6 km/s in the south end of the block where vertical cracks developed. Heating the block to about 85 degree C raised velocities to as much as 5.6 km/s in the upper third of the block

  13. Ground-Based Measurements of the 2014–2015 Holuhraun Volcanic Cloud (Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A. Pfeffer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2014–2015 Bárðarbunga fissure eruption at Holuhraun in central Iceland was distinguished by the high emission of gases, in total 9.6 Mt SO2, with almost no tephra. This work collates all ground-based measurements of this extraordinary eruption cloud made under particularly challenging conditions: remote location, optically dense cloud with high SO2 column amounts, low UV intensity, frequent clouds and precipitation, an extensive and hot lava field, developing ramparts, and high-latitude winter conditions. Semi-continuous measurements of SO2 flux with three scanning DOAS instruments were augmented by car traverses along the ring-road and along the lava. The ratios of other gases/SO2 were measured by OP-FTIR, MultiGAS, and filter packs. Ratios of SO2/HCl = 30–110 and SO2/HF = 30–130 show a halogen-poor eruption cloud. Scientists on-site reported extremely minor tephra production during the eruption. OPC and filter packs showed low particle concentrations similar to non-eruption cloud conditions. Three weather radars detected a droplet-rich eruption cloud. Top of eruption cloud heights of 0.3–5.5 km agl were measured with ground- and aircraft-based visual observations, web camera and NicAIR II infrared images, triangulation of scanning DOAS instruments, and the location of SO2 peaks measured by DOAS traverses. Cloud height and emission rate measurements were critical for initializing gas dispersal simulations for hazard forecasting.

  14. Ground level atmospheric gamma ray flux measurements in the 1 to 6 MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, P.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement of atmospheric gamma ray flux in the 1 to 6 MeV range at ground level is examined. These measurements were carried out using a Compton gamma ray telescope. It utilizes the Compton scattering principle to detect and image gamma ray sources. The telescope was used to measure ground level atmospheric gamma rays at four locations (Leadville (10200 ft), Boulder (5430 ft), Mt. Washington (6072 ft) and Durham (80 ft)) which ranged in atmospheric depth from 720 to 1033 sq cm and in local cutoff rigidity from 1.4 to 2.9 GV. Data was collected over a two week period at each location during 1987. The results yielded for the first time statistically atmospheric gamma ray flux values at large depths in the atmosphere. The analysis provided differential energy flux at various zenith angles in the 1 to 6 MeV energy range. The zenith angle dependence of the differential energy flux indicated a cos(sup n) theta dependence where n approximately 2.8 at higher altitudes (Leadville and Mt. Washington) and n approximately 2.0 deeper in the atmosphere (Boulder and Durham). The vertical intensity fitted a power law spectrum of index approximately 1.2, with the spectrum softening at large atmospheric depths. The atmospheric depth dependence shows an e-folding depth of 153 g/sq cm. Using this depth dependence, all existing measurements below 700 g/sq cm were normalized to sea level. Good agreement is seen among the normalized sea level flux corresponding to different experiments. Comparing experimental results with existing theoretical and Monte Carlo calculations in the 1 to 10 MeV range, the measurements indicate a softer power law spectrum, indicating the need to further examine the calculations. Combining UNH results with University of California (Riverside) measurements, indicate a weak rigidity dependence in the vertical atmospheric gamma ray intensity

  15. THE STRESS-STRAIN STATE OF AN INFINITELY LONG ELASTIC ARRAYS OF DIFFERENT WIDTHS AND LIMITED THICKNESS ON THE HARD GROUND WHEN THEY HAVE FLAT DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Badalakha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of solving several problems of a flat deformation of elastic infinitely long massifs of different width and limited thickness. Various cases of conditions at the massif/base contact. The relationships between stressed and strained states previously suggested by the author, which differ from the generalized Hooke’s law, are used in the solutions.

  16. The reliability of measurements taken from radiographs in the assessment of paediatric flat foot deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Stuart A; Bowling, Frank L; Baltzopoulos, V; Maganaris, C; Reeves, Neil D

    2012-09-01

    Radiographic charted values are widely applied in the assessment of paediatric flat foot and as quantitative markers of intervention success. Nearly all literature pertaining to the reliability of these measures relates to the adult foot. In view of the importance placed on these charted values we assessed the inter and intra-rater reliability of 10 key radiographic measures in children aged 7-14 years. We present the reliability of these measures in terms of intra class correlation and standard error based on repeated measures of 50 radiographs across five independent trained observers. Two new detailed methods are presented for the calculation of lateral and dorso-plantar talo-calcaneal overlap in an attempt to better define the talo-calcaneal inter-relationship. The results demonstrate wide variation of measurement reliability, with some measures being highly reproducible and others showing poor reproducibility. A strong negative correlation between reliability and the number of steps required for the measurement was demonstrated. Consistent with other studies intra-rater reliability tended to be higher than that of inter-rater reliability. In conclusion, we have provided evidence as to which radiographic charted measures may be reliably used in evaluating the paediatric flat foot in children aged 7-14 years, and which measures are not reliable and we advise against their application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Indirect deformation (strain) measurements and calibrations in Sandia triaxial apparatus for rock testing to 2500C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawersik, W.R.

    1979-09-01

    Indirect procedures for axial and radial strain measurements on rock in triaxial tests to 250 0 C are presented. The description of techniques includes discussions of all calibrations and of the accuracies of measurements. In addition, two examples are given to show how the techniques are implemented in triaxial compression and triaxial extension experiments. 10 figures

  18. Composite Match Index with Application of Interior Deformation Field Measurement from Magnetic Resonance Volumetric Images of Human Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penglin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Whereas a variety of different feature-point matching approaches have been reported in computer vision, few feature-point matching approaches employed in images from nonrigid, nonuniform human tissues have been reported. The present work is concerned with interior deformation field measurement of complex human tissues from three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR volumetric images. To improve the reliability of matching results, this paper proposes composite match index (CMI as the foundation of multimethod fusion methods to increase the reliability of these various methods. Thereinto, we discuss the definition, components, and weight determination of CMI. To test the validity of the proposed approach, it is applied to actual MR volumetric images obtained from a volunteer’s calf. The main result is consistent with the actual condition.

  19. A new analytical method for stress intensity factors based on insitu measurement of crack deformation under biaxial tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.G.; Ju, D.Y.; Sun, M.J.; Li, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    A new approach for the calculation of stress intensity factors (SIF) for isotropic and orthotropic materials under biaxial tension loading was proposed in this paper. In order to determine SIF from the full-field displacement data, an asymptotic expansion of the crack tip displacement field was performed. The deforming shape and surface residual stress of the crack tip was obtained at the early extended stage of the loading process by using optical microscope and X-ray diffraction measurement. During this stage, a modified Dugdale Model, which takes into account the coupled effect at the crack tip, was proposed for the open displacement of the crack tip. In this paper, the SIFs of two types of silicon steel sheet with isotropic and orthotropic properties were calculated using the modified Dugdale Model based on the biaxial tension experimental data. From the results, it was found that analysis using the modified Dugdale Model is an effective way to evaluate SIF under biaxial stress.

  20. Supporting the missions of the Mauna Kea Observatories with ground winds incoherent UV lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Businger, Steven; Cherubini, Tiziana; Dors, I.; McHugh, J.; McLaren, Robert A.; Moore, J. B.; Ryan, James M.; Nardell, Carl A.

    2003-02-01

    The recently commissioned GroundWinds LIDAR Observatory, based at ~3300 m on the slope of Mauna Loa, can measure altitude resolved line-of-sight wind velocities, turbulence power spectra, aerosol content and faint cirrus clouds among other things of interest to astronomers. The overarching goal of the GroundWinds program is to develop and demonstrate incoherent ultra-violet LIDAR technology for a future space-based system to measure the vertical structure of global winds from molecular backscatter. The LIDAR observatory employs spectral line profiling of incoherent backscattered 355 nm laser light. Rapid measurement of the Doppler shift (400 ns resolution) is accomplished by feeding the returned laser light into a combination of two Fabry-Pérot etalons and collapsing the interference fringes into a 1-dimensional interference pattern using a conical optic. This allows the system to obtain the maximum signal-to-noise ratio and best vertical resolution given the performance of the CCD. Each measurement takes 10 s. The molecular return is strong up to 15-km altitude. The YAG laser is pulsed at 10 Hz, and each pulse is stretched to 50 ns; the average power dissipated is 5 W. The outgoing beam is expanded to match the field of view of the telescope. The Doppler shift as a function of altitude, measured along two lines of sight orthogonal to one another, is then used to determine the horizontal wind velocity as a function of altitude. A recent intercomparison campaign demonstrated the accuracy of the GroundWinds instrument. In addition to average wind measurements intended for global winds, the LIDAR can be operated with a short integration time and used to directly measure turbulence spectra over a range of elevations. The turbulence spectra are used to approximate the velocity turbulence parameter, Cv2, and turbulent dissipation. A recent comparison with an independent measurement of CT2 has shown good agreement. Data from the incoherent LIDAR are used in a custom

  1. A case for using ground-based thermal inertia measurements to detect Martian caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groemer, Gernot; Foresta, Luca; Turetschek, Thomas; Bothe, Claudia; Boyd, Andrea; Dinkelaker, Aline; Dissertori, Markus; Fasching, David; Fischer, Monika; Föger, Daniel; Frischauf, Norbert; Fritsch, Lukas; Fuchs, Harald; Gautsch, Christoph; Gerard, Stephan; Goetzloff, Linda; Gołebiowska, Izabella; Gorur, Paavan; Groemer, Gerhard; Groll, Petra; Haider, Christian; Haider, Olivia; Hauth, Eva; Hauth, Stefan; Hettrich, Sebastian; Jais, Wolfgang; Jones, Natalie; Taj-Eddine, Kamal; Karl, Alexander; Kauerhoff, Tilo; Khan, Muhammad Shadab; Kjeldsen, Andreas; Klauck, Jan; Losiak, Anna; Luger, Markus; Luger, Thomas; Luger, Ulrich; McArthur, Jane; Moser, Linda; Neuner, Julia; Orgel, Csilla; Ori, Gian Gabriele; Paternesi, Roberta; Peschier, Jarno; Pfeil, Isabella; Prock, Silvia; Radinger, Josef; Ragonig, Christoph; Ramirez, Barbara; Ramo, Wissam; Rampey, Mike; Sams, Arnold; Sams, Elisabeth; Sams, Sebastian; Sandu, Oana; Sans, Alejandra; Sansone, Petra; Scheer, Daniela; Schildhammer, Daniel; Scornet, Quentin; Sejkora, Nina; Soucek, Alexander; Stadler, Andrea; Stummer, Florian; Stumptner, Willibald; Taraba, Michael; Tlustos, Reinhard; Toferer, Ernst; Winter, Egon; Zanella-Kux, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Martian caves are regarded as one of the most interesting locations in which to search for life on the planet. Data obtained during the MARS2013 expedition at Hamar Laghdad Ridge in the Tafilalt region of Morocco indicate that even small cavities can display thermal behavior that is characteristic for caves. For example, temperature in a cavity equaled 14°C±0.1°C before sunrise, which was higher than the temperature of the ambient air (10°C±0.1°C) and proximate rocks (9°C±0.1°C) at the same time. Within 30 min after sunrise, when the temperature of surrounding rocks corresponded to 15°C, this thermal relationship reversed. Measurements were conducted under simulated spaceflight conditions, including near-real-time interpretation of data that were acquired in a complex flight planning environment. We conclude that using ground-based thermal contrast measurements, in 7-14 μm band before and after sunset, is an effective method for Mars astronauts to identify caves, possibly superior to usage of space-based or ground-penetrating data.

  2. Carbon-14 measurements and characterization of dissolved organic carbon in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon-14 was measured in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in ground water and compared with 14 C analyses of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Two field sites were used for this study; the Stripa mine in central Sweden, and the Milk River Aquifer in southern Alberta, Canada. The Stripa mine consists of a Precambrian granite dominated by fracture flow, while the Milk River Aquifer is a Cretaceous sandstone aquifer characterized by porous flow. At both field sites, 14 C analyses of the DOC provide additional information on the ground-water age. Carbon-14 was measured on both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic organic fractions of the DOC. The organic compounds in the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions were also characterized. The DOC may originate from kerogen in the aquifer matrix, from soil organic matter in the recharge zone, of from a combination of these two sources. Carbon-14 analyses, along with characterization of the organics, were used to determine this origin. Carbon-14 analyses of the hydrophobic fraction in the Milk River Aquifer suggest a soil origin, while 14 C analyses of the hydrophilic fraction suggest an origin within the Cretaceous sediments (kerogen) or from the shale in contact with the aquifer

  3. Taking Stock of Circumboreal Forest Carbon With Ground Measurements, Airborne and Spaceborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neigh, Christopher S. R.; Nelson, Ross F.; Ranson, K. Jon; Margolis, Hank A.; Montesano, Paul M.; Sun, Guoqing; Kharuk, Viacheslav; Naesset, Erik; Wulder, Michael A.; Andersen, Hans-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The boreal forest accounts for one-third of global forests, but remains largely inaccessible to ground-based measurements and monitoring. It contains large quantities of carbon in its vegetation and soils, and research suggests that it will be subject to increasingly severe climate-driven disturbance. We employ a suite of ground-, airborne- and space-based measurement techniques to derive the first satellite LiDAR-based estimates of aboveground carbon for the entire circumboreal forest biome. Incorporating these inventory techniques with uncertainty analysis, we estimate total aboveground carbon of 38 +/- 3.1 Pg. This boreal forest carbon is mostly concentrated from 50 to 55degN in eastern Canada and from 55 to 60degN in eastern Eurasia. Both of these regions are expected to warm >3 C by 2100, and monitoring the effects of warming on these stocks is important to understanding its future carbon balance. Our maps establish a baseline for future quantification of circumboreal carbon and the described technique should provide a robust method for future monitoring of the spatial and temporal changes of the aboveground carbon content.

  4. Covariance estimation for dInSAR surface deformation measurements in the presence of anisotropic atmospheric noise

    KAUST Repository

    Knospe, Steffen H G

    2010-04-01

    We study anisotropic spatial autocorrelation in differential synthetic aperture radar interferometric (dInSAR) measurements and its impact on geophysical parameter estimations. The dInSAR phase acquired by the satellite sensor is a superposition of different contributions, and when studying geophysical processes, we are usually only interested in the surface deformation part of the signal. Therefore, to obtain high-quality results, we would like to characterize and/or remove other phase components. A stochastic model has been found to be appropriate to describe atmospheric phase delay in dInSAR images. However, these phase delays are usually modeled as being isotropic, which is a simplification, because InSAR images often show directional atmospheric anomalies. Here, we analyze anisotropic structures and show validation results using both real and simulated data. We calculate experimental semivariograms of the dInSAR phase in several European Remote Sensing satellite-1/2 tandem interferograms. Based on the theory of random functions (RFs), we then fit anisotropic variogram models in the spatial domain, employing Matérn-and Bessel-family correlation functions in nested models to represent complex dInSAR covariance structures. The presented covariance function types, in the statistical framework of stationary RFs, are consistent with tropospheric delay models. We find that by using anisotropic data covariance information to weight dInSAR measurements, we can significantly improve both the precision and accuracy of geophysical parameter estimations. Furthermore, the improvement is dependent on how similar the deformation pattern is to the dominant structure of the anisotropic atmospheric signals. © 2009 IEEE.

  5. Advancing a smart air cushion system for preventing pressure ulcers using projection Moiré for large deformation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheng-Lin; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Lee, Carina Jean-Tien; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    A pressure ulcer is one of the most important concerns for wheelchair bound patients with spinal cord injuries. A pressure ulcer is a localized injury near the buttocks that bear ischial tuberosity oppression over a long period of time. Due to elevated compression to blood vessels, the surrounding tissues suffer from a lack of oxygen and nutrition. The ulcers eventually lead to skin damage followed by tissue necrosis. The current medical strategy is to minimize the occurrence of pressure ulcers by regularly helping patients change their posture. However, these methods do not always work effectively or well. As a solution to fundamentally prevent pressure ulcers, a smart air cushion system was developed to detect and control pressure actively. The air cushion works by automatically adjusting a patient's sitting posture to effectively relieve the buttock pressure. To analyze the correlation between the dynamic pressure profiles of an air cell with a patient's weight, a projection Moiré system was adopted to measure the deformation of an air cell and its associated stress distribution. Combining a full-field deformation imaging with air pressure measured within an air cell, the patient's weight and the stress distribution can be simultaneously obtained. By integrating a full-field optical metrology with a time varying pressure sensor output coupled with different active air control algorithms for various designs, we can tailor the ratio of the air cells. Our preliminary data suggests that this newly developed smart air cushion has the potential to selectively reduce localized compression on the tissues at the buttocks. Furthermore, it can take a patient's weight which is an additional benefit so that medical personnel can reference it to prescribe the correct drug dosages.

  6. Shape Deformations in Atomic Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Hamamoto, Ikuko; Mottelson, Ben R.

    2011-01-01

    The ground states of some nuclei are described by densities and mean fields that are spherical, while others are deformed. The existence of non-spherical shape in nuclei represents a spontaneous symmetry breaking.

  7. Simultaneous Boundary-Layer Transition, Tip Vortex, and Blade Deformation Measurements of a Rotor in Hover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineck, James; Schairer, Edward; Ramasamy, Manikandan; Roozeboom, Nettie

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes simultaneous optical measurements of a sub-scale helicopter rotor in the U.S. Army Hover Chamber at NASA Ames Research Center. The measurements included thermal imaging of the rotor blades to detect boundary layer transition; retro-reflective background-oriented schlieren (RBOS) to visualize vortices; and stereo photogrammetry to measure displacements of the rotor blades, to compute spatial coordinates of the vortices from the RBOS data, and to map the thermal imaging data to a three-dimensional surface grid. The test also included an exploratory effort to measure flow near the rotor tip by tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo PIV)an effort that yielded valuable experience but little data. The thermal imaging was accomplished using an image-derotation method that allowed long integration times without image blur. By mapping the thermal image data to a surface grid it was possible to accurately locate transition in spatial coordinates along the length of the rotor blade.

  8. GOMOS ozone profile validation using ground-based and balloon sonde measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. E. van Gijsel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The validation of ozone profiles retrieved by satellite instruments through comparison with data from ground-based instruments is important to monitor the evolution of the satellite instrument, to assist algorithm development and to allow multi-mission trend analyses.

    In this study we compare ozone profiles derived from GOMOS night-time observations with measurements from lidar, microwave radiometer and balloon sonde. Collocated pairs are analysed for dependence on several geophysical and instrument observational parameters. Validation results are presented for the operational ESA level 2 data (GOMOS version 5.00 obtained during nearly seven years of observations and a comparison using a smaller dataset from the previous processor (version 4.02 is also included.

    The profiles obtained from dark limb measurements (solar zenith angle >107° when the provided processing flag is properly considered match the ground-based measurements within ±2 percent over the altitude range 20 to 40 km. Outside this range, the pairs start to deviate more and there is a latitudinal dependence: in the polar region where there is a higher amount of straylight contamination, differences start to occur lower in the mesosphere than in the tropics, whereas for the lower part of the stratosphere the opposite happens: the profiles in the tropics reach less far down as the signal reduces faster because of the higher altitude at which the maximum ozone concentration is found compared to the mid and polar latitudes. Also the bias is shifting from mostly negative in the polar region to more positive in the tropics

    Profiles measured under "twilight" conditions are often matching the ground-based measurements very well, but care has to be taken in all cases when dealing with "straylight" contaminated profiles.

    For the selection criteria applied here (data within 800 km, 3 degrees in equivalent latitude, 20 h (5 h above 50 km and a relative

  9. Exploring the relationship between monitored ground-based and satellite aerosol measurements over the City of Johannesburg

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Garland, Rebecca M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This project studied the relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on the Terra satellite, and ground-based monitored particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations measured...

  10. Measurement and interpretation of low levels of dissolved oxygen in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.; Solbau, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    A Rhodazine-D colorimetric technique was adapted to measure low-level dissolved oxygen concentrations in ground water. Prepared samples containing between 0 and 8.0 ??moles L-1 dissolved oxygen in equilibrium with known gas mixtures produced linear spectrophotometric absorbance with a lower detection limit of 0.2 ??moles L-1. Excellent reproducibility was found for solutions ranging in composition from deionized water to sea water with chemical interferences detected only for easily reduced metal species such as ferric ion, cupric ion, and hexavalent chromium. Such effects were correctable based on parallel reaction stoichiometries relative to oxygen. The technique, coupled with a downhole wire line tool, permitted low-level monitoring of dissolved oxygen in wells at the selenium-contaminated Kesterson Reservoir in California. Results indicated a close association between low but measurable dissolved oxygen concentrations and mobility of oxidized forms of selenium. -from Authors

  11. Chlorine oxide in the stratospheric ozone layer: ground-based detection and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, A; DE Zafra, R L; Solomon, P M; Barrett, J W; Carlson, E R

    1981-03-13

    Stratospheric chlorine oxide, a significant intermediate product in the catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic chlorine, has been detected and measured by a ground-based 204-gigahertz, millimeter-wave receiver. Data taken at latitude 42 degrees N on 17 days between 10 January and 18 February 1980 yield an average chlorine oxide column density of approximately 1.05 x 10(14) per square centimeter or approximately 2/3 that of the average of eight in situ balloon flight measurements (excluding the anomalously high data of 14 July 1977) made over the past 4 years at 32 degrees N. We find less chlorine oxide below 35 kilometers and a larger vertical gradient than predicted by theoretical models of the stratospheric ozone layer.

  12. A Theory-Grounded Measure of Adolescents’ Response to a Media Literacy Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kathryn; Yanovitzky, Itzhak; Carpenter, Amanda; Banerjee, Smita C.; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Hecht, Michael L.; Elek, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Media literacy interventions offer promising avenues for the prevention of risky health behaviors among children and adolescents, but current literature remains largely equivocal about their efficacy. The primary objective of this study was to develop and test theoretically-grounded measures of audiences’ degree of engagement with the content of media literacy programs based on the recognition that engagement (and not participation per se) can better explain and predict individual variations in the effects of these programs. We tested the validity and reliability of a measure of engagement with two different samples of 10th grade high school students who participated in a pilot and actual test of a brief media literacy curriculum. Four message evaluation factors (involvement, perceived novelty, critical thinking, personal reflection) emerged and demonstrate acceptable reliability. PMID:28042522

  13. Chlorine oxide in the stratospheric ozone layer Ground-based detection and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, A.; De Zafra, R. L.; Solomon, P. M.; Barrett, J. W.; Carlson, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    Stratospheric chlorine oxide, a significant intermediate product in the catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic chlorine, has been detected and measured by a ground-based 204 GHz, millimeter-wave receiver. Data taken at latitude 42 deg N on 17 days between January 10 and February 18, 1980 yield an average chlorine oxide column density of approximately 1.05 x 10 to the 14th/sq cm or approximately 2/3 that of the average of eight in situ balloon flight measurements (excluding the anomalously high data of July 14, 1977) made over the past four years at 32 deg N. Less chlorine oxide below 35 km and a larger vertical gradient than predicted by theoretical models of the stratospheric ozone layer are found.

  14. Measurement of installation deformation of the acetabulum during prosthetic replacement of a hip joint using digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Dong; Bai, Pengxiang; Zhu, Feipeng

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, acetabulum prosthesis replacement is widely used in clinical medicine. However, there is no efficient way to evaluate the implantation effect of the prosthesis. Based on a modern photomechanics technique called digital image correlation (DIC), the evaluation method of the installation effect of the acetabulum was established during a prosthetic replacement of a hip joint. The DIC method determines strain field by comparing the speckle images between the undeformed sample and the deformed counterpart. Three groups of experiments were carried out to verify the feasibility of the DIC method on the acetabulum installation deformation test. Experimental results indicate that the installation deformation of acetabulum generally includes elastic deformation (corresponding to the principal strain of about 1.2%) and plastic deformation. When the installation angle is ideal, the plastic deformation can be effectively reduced, which could prolong the service life of acetabulum prostheses.

  15. Polarization measurements through space-to-ground atmospheric propagation paths by using a highly polarized laser source in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takenaka, Hideki; Shoji, Yozo; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Koyama, Yoshisada; Kunimori, Hiroo

    2009-12-07

    The polarization characteristics of an artificial laser source in space were measured through space-to-ground atmospheric transmission paths. An existing Japanese laser communication satellite and optical ground station were used to measure Stokes parameters and the degree of polarization of the laser beam transmitted from the satellite. As a result, the polarization was preserved within an rms error of 1.6 degrees, and the degree of polarization was 99.4+/-4.4% through the space-to-ground atmosphere. These results contribute to the link estimation for quantum key distribution via space and provide the potential for enhancements in quantum cryptography worldwide in the future.

  16. Gravity reduction with three-dimensional atmospheric pressure data for precise ground gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeyer, Juergen; Hagedoorn, Jan; Leitloff, Jens; Schmidt, Torsten

    2004-10-01

    The redistribution of air masses induces gravity variations (atmospheric pressure effect) up to about 20 μgal. These variations are disturbing signals in gravity records and they must be removed very carefully for detecting weak gravity signals. In the past, different methods have been developed for modelling of the atmospheric pressure effect. These methods use local or two-dimensional (2D) surface atmospheric pressure data and a standard height-dependent air density distribution. The atmospheric pressure effect is consisting of the elastic deformation and attraction term. The deformation term can be well modelled with 2D surface atmospheric pressure data, for instance with the Green's function method. For modelling of the attraction term, three-dimensional (3D) data are required. Results with 2D data are insufficient. From European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 3D atmospheric pressure data are now available. The ECMWF data used here are characterised by a spacing of Δ ϕ and Δ λ = 0.5°, 60 pressure levels up to a height of 60 km and an interval of 6 h. These data are used for modelling of the atmospheric attraction term. Two attraction models have been developed based on the point mass attraction of air segments and the gravity potential of the air masses. The modelling shows a surface pressure-independent part of gravity variations induced by mass redistribution of the atmosphere in the order of some μgal. This part can only be determined by using 3D atmospheric pressure data. It has been calculated for the Vienna Superconducting Gravimeter site. From this follows that the gravity reduction can be improved by applying the 3D atmospheric attraction model for analysing long-periodic tidal waves including the polar tide. The same improvement is expected for reduction of long-term absolute gravity measurements or comparison of gravity measurements at different seasonal times. By using 3D atmospheric pressure data, the gravity correction can

  17. Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Current Technical Performance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, S.; Panas, M.; Jamilkowski, M. L.; Miller, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    ABSTRACT The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The Joint Polar Satellite System will replace the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). Developed and maintained by Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services (IIS), the CGS is a multi-mission enterprise system serving NOAA, NASA and their national and international partners. The CGS has demonstrated its scalability and flexibility to incorporate multiple missions efficiently and with minimal cost, schedule and risk, while strengthening global partnerships in weather and environmental monitoring. The CGS architecture is being upgraded to Block 2.0 in 2015 to "operationalize" S-NPP, leverage lessons learned to date in multi-mission support, take advantage of more reliable and efficient technologies, and satisfy new requirements and constraints in the continually evolving budgetary environment. To ensure the CGS meets these needs, we have developed 49 Technical Performance Measures (TPMs) across 10 categories, such as data latency, operational availability and scalability. This paper will provide an overview of the CGS Block 2.0 architecture, with particular focus on the 10 TPM categories listed above. We will provide updates on how we ensure the deployed architecture meets these TPMs to satisfy our multi-mission objectives with the deployment of Block 2.0.

  18. EXAMINATION ABOUT INFLUENCE FOR PRECISION OF 3D IMAGE MEASUREMENT FROM THE GROUND CONTROL POINT MEASUREMENT AND SURFACE MATCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Anai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available As the 3D image measurement software is now widely used with the recent development of computer-vision technology, the 3D measurement from the image is now has acquired the application field from desktop objects as wide as the topography survey in large geographical areas. Especially, the orientation, which used to be a complicated process in the heretofore image measurement, can be now performed automatically by simply taking many pictures around the object. And in the case of fully textured object, the 3D measurement of surface features is now done all automatically from the orientated images, and greatly facilitated the acquisition of the dense 3D point cloud from images with high precision. With all this development in the background, in the case of small and the middle size objects, we are now furnishing the all-around 3D measurement by a single digital camera sold on the market. And we have also developed the technology of the topographical measurement with the air-borne images taken by a small UAV [1~5]. In this present study, in the case of the small size objects, we examine the accuracy of surface measurement (Matching by the data of the experiments. And as to the topographic measurement, we examine the influence of GCP distribution on the accuracy by the data of the experiments. Besides, we examined the difference of the analytical results in each of the 3D image measurement software. This document reviews the processing flow of orientation and the 3D measurement of each software and explains the feature of the each software. And as to the verification of the precision of stereo-matching, we measured the test plane and the test sphere of the known form and assessed the result. As to the topography measurement, we used the air-borne image data photographed at the test field in Yadorigi of Matsuda City, Kanagawa Prefecture JAPAN. We have constructed Ground Control Point which measured by RTK-GPS and Total Station. And we show the results

  19. Examination about Influence for Precision of 3d Image Measurement from the Ground Control Point Measurement and Surface Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anai, T.; Kochi, N.; Yamada, M.; Sasaki, T.; Otani, H.; Sasaki, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kimoto, K.; Yasui, N.

    2015-05-01

    As the 3D image measurement software is now widely used with the recent development of computer-vision technology, the 3D measurement from the image is now has acquired the application field from desktop objects as wide as the topography survey in large geographical areas. Especially, the orientation, which used to be a complicated process in the heretofore image measurement, can be now performed automatically by simply taking many pictures around the object. And in the case of fully textured object, the 3D measurement of surface features is now done all automatically from the orientated images, and greatly facilitated the acquisition of the dense 3D point cloud from images with high precision. With all this development in the background, in the case of small and the middle size objects, we are now furnishing the all-around 3D measurement by a single digital camera sold on the market. And we have also developed the technology of the topographical measurement with the air-borne images taken by a small UAV [1~5]. In this present study, in the case of the small size objects, we examine the accuracy of surface measurement (Matching) by the data of the experiments. And as to the topographic measurement, we examine the influence of GCP distribution on the accuracy by the data of the experiments. Besides, we examined the difference of the analytical results in each of the 3D image measurement software. This document reviews the processing flow of orientation and the 3D measurement of each software and explains the feature of the each software. And as to the verification of the precision of stereo-matching, we measured the test plane and the test sphere of the known form and assessed the result. As to the topography measurement, we used the air-borne image data photographed at the test field in Yadorigi of Matsuda City, Kanagawa Prefecture JAPAN. We have constructed Ground Control Point which measured by RTK-GPS and Total Station. And we show the results of analysis made

  20. Deformation measurement in the wind tunnel for an UAV leading edge with a morphing mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radestock, M.; Riemenschneider, J.; Monner, H.P.; Huxdorf, O.; Werter, N.P.M.; De Breuker, R.

    2016-01-01

    In a wind tunnel experiment a morphing wing with span extension and camber morphing was investigated. The considered aircraft is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a span of 4 m. During the investigations a half wing model was analysed with pressure and structural measurement. The half wing model

  1. Calibration of Surveying Instruments and Tools – Means to the Quality Increase of Deformation Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Ježko

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: The use of a laser interferometer (laser measurement system XL 10 f. RENISHAW for the calibration of the code leveling rod, respectively of the system calibration (digital leveling device - code late prepared by the Department of Geodesy, SUT Bratislava with the help of European projects, will then be implemented in a unique facility in the Slovak Republic.

  2. CO2 Total Column Variability From Ground-Based FTIR Measurements Over Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylon, J. L.; Stremme, W.; Plaza, E.; Bezanilla, A.; Grutter, M.; Hase, F.; Blumenstock, T.

    2014-12-01

    There are now several space missions dedicated to measure greenhouse gases in order to improve the understanding of the carbon cycle. Ground based measurement sites are of great value in the validation process, however there are only a few stations in tropical latitudes. We present measurements of solar-absorption infrared spectra recorded on two locations over Central Mexico: the High-Altitude Station Altzomoni (19.12 N, 98.65 W), located in the Izta-Popo National Park outside of Mexico City; and the UNAM's Atmospheric Observatory (19.32 N, 99.17 W) in Mexico City. These measurements were performed using a high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer FTIR (Bruker, HR 120/5) at Altzomoni and a moderate resolution FTIR (Bruker, Vertex 80) within the city. In this work, we present the first results for total vertical columns of CO2 derived from near-infrared spectra recorded at both locations using the retrieval code PROFFIT. We present the seasonal cycle and variability from the measurements, as well as the full diagnostics of the retrieval in order assess its quality and discuss the differences of both instruments and locations (altitudes, urban vs remote). This work aims to contribute to generate high quality datasets for satellite validation.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF THE LOAD MEASURING DEVICES TO DETERMINE THE RESIDUAL DEFORMATION OF THE ELASTIC SENSING ELEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan V. Antonets

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main focus in the design of weighing and batching devices is to create a gravimetric technique, capable of providing not only mass measurement – weighing with the required accuracy and speed, but also automatic control of technological processes and their control and regulation. In this case, the opportunity of two-way communication with a computer when designing the load measuring devices is realized, allowing remote monitoring and solution of logical problems associated with the management process. Modern automatic weighing and batching devices are important parts of comprehensive automation in different branches of industry. Existing developments of electrical, electronic, computing and other branches of instrument engineering techniques allow to implement transformations of the measured quantity with a very high degree of accuracy. However, if the measured quantity in the weighing process is perceived by the elastic sensing element of low quality, then no matter how high the accuracy of further changes is; the characteristics of the elastic element will limit the accuracy of the instrument as a whole. Although the elastic elements are simple mechanical parts, and many types of elastic elements are known and are widely used for many decades, their performance often does not meet the requirements, and hampers the device creation of high accuracy classes. Growing requirements for primary transformer makes actual the problem solution of improving the quality of elastic sensing elements not only in the manufacture but in the design. This led to the appearance of projects aimed at the development of computational and experimental methods that have altered the methodology for the design of force measuring devices.

  4. Reproducibility of digital measurements of lower-limb deformity on plain radiographs and agreement with CT measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorin, G; Pasquier, G; Drumez, E; Arnould, A; Migaud, H; Putman, S

    2016-06-01

    Five angles (HKA, HKS, alpha, beta, tibial slope) are used for goniometry in total knee arthroplasty. The reproducibility of the measurement of these angles has been assessed on plain and digitized x-rays, but to our knowledge, this has not been confirmed on x-rays taken on the PACS system and they have not been compared to computed tomography (CT) measurements, the reference for angle measurement. This prospective study aimed to: (1) evaluate the inter- and intrarater reliability of the measurement of these angles on digital x-rays taken on a PACS; (2) determine the agreement of these measurements with those obtained using a CT protocol. The measurements of these five angles on digitized radiographs are reproducible and in agreement with CT values. Forty-two patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis and scheduled for total knee arthroplasty were included in the study. Each patient had a PACS digitized x-ray and a CT intended to produce patient-specific instrumentation (Symbios, Yverdon, Switzerland) including measurements of the angles evaluated. Four senior orthopaedic surgeon-raters measured all the angles twice. Inter- and intrarater reliability was then calculated as well as the agreement between the second measurement of each rater and the CT measurement using interclass correlation and kappa coefficients (data provided as means and 95% confidence intervals). The inter- and intrarater reliability values were excellent for the HKA, alpha, and beta angles (with, respectively, a coefficient of 0.99 [0.97-0.99], 0.84 [0.76-0.9], and 0.94 [0.86-0.96] interrater reliability and 0.98 [0.96-0.99], 0.86 [0.75-0.92], and 0.65 [0.44-0.8] intrarater reliability). Interrater reliability was low for HKS and tibial slope angles (coefficients allreliability and reliability). The x-ray/CT agreement was very good for the HKA, alpha, and beta angles (0.81 [0.67-0.99], 0.74 [0.56-0.91], and 0.74 [0.45-0.92], respectively) and low for the HKS and tibial slope angles (all<0

  5. Kinetic analysis of ski turns based on measured ground reaction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaverka, Frantisek; Vodickova, Sona; Elfmark, Milan

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to devise a method of kinetic analysis of the ground reaction force that enables the durations and magnitudes of forces acting during the individual phases of ski turns to be described exactly. The method is based on a theoretical analysis of physical forces acting during the ski turn. Two elementary phases were defined: (1) preparing to turn (initiation) and (2) actual turning, during which the center of gravity of the skier-ski system moves along a curvilinear trajectory (steering). The starting point of the turn analysis is a dynamometric record of the resultant acting ground reaction force applied perpendicularly on the ski surface. The method was applied to six expert skiers. They completed a slalom course comprising five gates arranged on the fall line of a 26° slope at a competition speed using symmetrical carving turns (30 evaluated turns). A dynamometric measurement system was placed on the carving skis (168 cm long, radius 16 m, data were recorded at 100 Hz). MATLAB procedures were used to evaluate eight variables during each turn: five time variables and three force variables. Comparison of the turn analysis results between individuals showed that the method is useful for answering various research questions associated with ski turns.

  6. Prediction and measurements of vibrations from a railway track lying on a peaty ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picoux, B.; Rotinat, R.; Regoin, J. P.; Le Houédec, D.

    2003-10-01

    This paper introduces a two-dimensional model for the response of the ground surface due to vibrations generated by a railway traffic. A semi-analytical wave propagation model is introduced which is subjected to a set of harmonic moving loads and based on a calculation method of the dynamic stiffness matrix of the ground. In order to model a complete railway system, the effect of a simple track model is taken into account including rails, sleepers and ballast especially designed for the study of low vibration frequencies. The priority has been given to a simple formulation based on the principle of spatial Fourier transforms compatible with good numerical efficiency and yet providing quick solutions. In addition, in situ measurements for a soft soil near a railway track were carried out and will be used to validate the numerical implementation. The numerical and experimental results constitute a significant body of useful data to, on the one hand, characterize the response of the environment of tracks and, on the other hand, appreciate the importance of the speed and weight on the behaviour of the structure.

  7. A new approach to measure the elasticity modulus for ceramics using the deformation energy method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foschini, Cesar R.; Souza, Edson A. [Dept. of EngineeringFeb-UNESPBauru (Brazil); Borges, Ana F. S. [Dept. of MaterialFOB-USP, Bauru (Brazil); Pintao, Carlos A. [Dept. of PhysicsFC-UNESP, Bauru (Brazil)

    2016-08-15

    This paper presents an alternative method to measure the modulus of elasticity to traction, E, for relatively limited sample sizes. We constructed a measurement system with a Force sensor (FS) and a Rotation movement sensor (RMS) to obtain a relationship between force (F) and bending (ΔL). It was possible by calculating the strain energy and the work of a constant force to establish a relationship between these quantities; the constant of proportionality in this relationship depends on E, I and L. I and L are the moment of inertia of the uniform cross-section in relation to an oriented axis and length, respectively, of the sample for bending. An expression that could achieve the value of E was deduced to study samples of Y-TZP ceramics. The advantages of this system compared to traditional systems are its low cost and practicality in determining E.

  8. Measurement and modeling of room temperature co-deformation in WC-10 wt.%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livescu, V. [MST-8/LANSCE, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: vlivescu@lanl.gov; Clausen, B. [MST-8/LANSCE, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Paggett, J.W. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Krawitz, A.D. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Drake, E.F. [REEDHycalogTM/Grant Prideco, Houston, TX 77252 (United States); Bourke, M.A.M. [MST-8/LANSCE, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    In situ neutron diffraction measurements were performed on a tungsten carbide (WC)-10 wt.% cobalt (Co) cemented carbide composite subjected to compressive loading. The sample was subjected to consecutive load/unload cycles to -500, -1000, -2000 and -2100 MPa. Thermal residual stresses measured before loading reflected large hydrostatic tensile stresses in the binder phase and compressive stresses in the carbide phase. The carbide phase behaved elastically at all but the highest load levels, whereas plasticity was present in the binder phase from values of applied stress as low as -500 MPa. A finite element simulation utilizing an interpenetrating microstructure model showed remarkable agreement with the complex mean phase strain response during the loading cycles despite its under-prediction of thermal residual strains.

  9. The geometric phase analysis method based on the local high resolution discrete Fourier transform for deformation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Xianglu; Xie, Huimin; Wang, Huaixi; Li, Chuanwei; Wu, Lifu; Liu, Zhanwei

    2014-01-01

    The geometric phase analysis (GPA) method based on the local high resolution discrete Fourier transform (LHR-DFT) for deformation measurement, defined as LHR-DFT GPA, is proposed to improve the measurement accuracy. In the general GPA method, the fundamental frequency of the image plays a crucial role. However, the fast Fourier transform, which is generally employed in the general GPA method, could make it difficult to locate the fundamental frequency accurately when the fundamental frequency is not located at an integer pixel position in the Fourier spectrum. This study focuses on this issue and presents a LHR-DFT algorithm that can locate the fundamental frequency with sub-pixel precision in a specific frequency region for the GPA method. An error analysis is offered and simulation is conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method; both results show that the LHR-DFT algorithm can accurately locate the fundamental frequency and improve the measurement accuracy of the GPA method. Furthermore, typical tensile and bending tests are carried out and the experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. (paper)

  10. Evaluation of the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) Using Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.; Habte, A.; Lopez, A.

    2017-12-01

    Solar resource is essential for a wide spectrum of applications including renewable energy, climate studies, and solar forecasting. Solar resource information can be obtained from ground-based measurement stations and/or from modeled data sets. While measurements provide data for the development and validation of solar resource models and other applications modeled data expands the ability to address the needs for increased accuracy and spatial and temporal resolution. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed and regular updates modeled solar resource through the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). The recent NSRDB dataset was developed using the physics-based Physical Solar Model (PSM) and provides gridded solar irradiance (global horizontal irradiance (GHI), direct normal irradiance (DNI), and diffuse horizontal irradiance) at a 4-km by 4-km spatial and half-hourly temporal resolution covering 18 years from 1998-2015. A comprehensive validation of the performance of the NSRDB (1998-2015) was conducted to quantify the accuracy of the spatial and temporal variability of the solar radiation data. Further, the study assessed the ability of NSRDB (1998-2015) to accurately capture inter-annual variability, which is essential information for solar energy conversion projects and grid integration studies. Comparisons of the NSRDB (1998-2015) with nine selected ground-measured data were conducted under both clear- and cloudy-sky conditions. These locations provide a high quality data covering a variety of geographical locations and climates. The comparison of the NSRDB to the ground-based data demonstrated that biases were within +/- 5% for GHI and +/-10% for DNI. A comprehensive uncertainty estimation methodology was established to analyze the performance of the gridded NSRDB and includes all sources of uncertainty at various time-averaged periods, a method that is not often used in model evaluation. Further, the study analyzed the inter

  11. Dynamic Measurements of Plastic Deformation in a Water-Filled Aluminum Tube in Response to Detonation of a Small Explosives Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Sandusky

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments have been conducted to benchmark computer code calculations for the dynamic interaction of explosions in water with structures. Aluminum cylinders with a length slightly more than twice their diameter were oriented vertically, sealed on the bottom by a thin plastic sheet, and filled with distilled water. An explosive charge suspended in the center of the tube plastically deformed but did not rupture the wall. Tube wall velocity, displacement, and strain were directly measured. The agreement among the three sets of dynamic data and the agreement of the terminal displacement measurements with the residual deformation were excellent.

  12. Propagation of sound through the Earth's atmosphere. 1: Measurement of sound absorption in the air: 2: Measurement of ground impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, R. W.; Becher, J.

    1981-01-01

    Parts were fabricated for the acoustic ground impedance meter and the instrument was tested. A rubber hose was used to connect the resonator neck to the chamber in order to suppress vibration from the volume velocity source which caused chatter. An analog to digital converter was successfully hardwired to the computer detection system. The cooling system for the resonant tube was modified to use liquid nitrogen cooling. This produced the required temperature for the tube, but the temperature gradients within each of the four tube sections reached unacceptable levels. Final measurements of the deexcitation of nitrogen by water vapor indicate that the responsible physical process is not the direct vibration-translation energy transfer, but is a vibration-vibration energy transfer.

  13. Optical measurement of thermal deformation of multilayer optics under synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, P.; Kazimirov, A.; Bazarov, I.

    2007-01-01

    An in situ optical technique to visualize surface distortions of the first monochromator crystal under synchrotron beam heat loading has been developed and applied to measure surface profiles of multilayer optics under white wiggler beam at the CHESS A2 beamline. Two identical multilayer structures deposited on Si and SiC substrates have been tested. Comparison of the reconstructed 3D heatbump profiles showed the surface distortions of the multilayer on SiC a factor of two smaller than the same multilayer on a Si substrate

  14. Towards Systematic Prediction of Urban Heat Islands: Grounding Measurements, Assessing Modeling Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Voelkel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available While there exists extensive assessment of urban heat, we observe myriad methods for describing thermal distribution, factors that mediate temperatures, and potential impacts on urban populations. In addition, the limited spatial and temporal resolution of satellite-derived heat measurements may limit the capacity of decision makers to take effective actions for reducing mortalities in vulnerable populations whose locations require highly-refined measurements. Needed are high resolution spatial and temporal information for urban heat. In this study, we ask three questions: (1 how do urban heat islands vary throughout the day? (2 what statistical methods best explain the presence of temperatures at sub-meter spatial scales; and (3 what landscape features help to explain variation in urban heat islands? Using vehicle-based temperature measurements at three periods of the day in the Pacific Northwest city of Portland, Oregon (USA, we incorporate LiDAR-derived datasets, and evaluate three statistical techniques for modeling and predicting variation in temperatures during a heat wave. Our results indicate that the random forest technique best predicts temperatures, and that the evening model best explains the variation in temperature. The results suggest that ground-based measurements provide high levels of accuracy for describing the distribution of urban heat, its temporal variation, and specific locations where targeted interventions with communities can reduce mortalities from heat events.

  15. The high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum (QASUMEFTS determined from ground-based solar irradiance measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gröbner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum has been determined from ground-based measurements of direct solar spectral irradiance (SSI over the wavelength range from 300 to 500 nm using the Langley-plot technique. The measurements were obtained at the Izaña Atmospheric Research Centre from the Agencia Estatal de Meteorología, Tenerife, Spain, during the period 12 to 24 September 2016. This solar spectrum (QASUMEFTS was combined from medium-resolution (bandpass of 0.86 nm measurements of the QASUME (Quality Assurance of Spectral Ultraviolet Measurements in Europe spectroradiometer in the wavelength range from 300 to 500 nm and high-resolution measurements (0.025 nm from a Fourier transform spectroradiometer (FTS over the wavelength range from 305 to 380 nm. The Kitt Peak solar flux atlas was used to extend this high-resolution solar spectrum to 500 nm. The expanded uncertainties of this solar spectrum are 2 % between 310 and 500 nm and 4 % at 300 nm. The comparison of this solar spectrum with solar spectra measured in space (top of the atmosphere gave very good agreements in some cases, while in some other cases discrepancies of up to 5 % were observed. The QASUMEFTS solar spectrum represents a benchmark dataset with uncertainties lower than anything previously published. The metrological traceability of the measurements to the International System of Units (SI is assured by an unbroken chain of calibrations leading to the primary spectral irradiance standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Germany.

  16. The Holy Grail of Resource Assessment: Low Cost Ground-Based Measurements with Good Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Bill; Smith, Benjamin

    2017-06-22

    Using performance data from some of the millions of installed photovoltaic (PV) modules with micro-inverters may afford the opportunity to provide ground-based solar resource data critical for developing PV projects. The method used back-solves for the direct normal irradiance (DNI) and the diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI) from the micro-inverter ac production data. When the derived values of DNI and DHI were then used to model the performance of other PV systems, the annual mean bias deviations were within +/- 4%, and only 1% greater than when the PV performance was modeled using high quality irradiance measurements. An uncertainty analysis shows the method better suited for modeling PV performance than using satellite-based global horizontal irradiance.

  17. Measurements and evaluation of building response to ground motion at various stages of construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, K.K.

    1976-01-01

    Architectural elements contribute significantly to the total seismic response of high-rise frame buildings. Although the characteristics of ground motion have considerable effect on the response of buildings, architectural elements increase the stiffness of the total system and reduce its period. The measurements also showed that partition influence is reduced over a period of time, as indicated by the lengthening of periods. At low levels of motion where the partitions contribute lateral stiffness to the system, they carry a proportional amount of the total lateral load and add sizable energy-absorbing capacity to the system. However, when the partitions are removed, the load formerly carried by the partitions is again transferred to the structural system. Because of the different response mode shapes of the models, the interstory drift at the first floor for the same roof displacement can vary significantly among models. In the models studied, the building without partitions at the first floor had the largest interstory drift

  18. Evaluation of ground-based particulate matter in association with measurements from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Makiko; Yoshida, Akihito; Sano, Itaru; Mukai, Sonoyo

    2017-10-01

    Air pollution is problem of deep concern to human health. In Japan, the air pollution levels experienced during the recent period of rapid economic growth have been reduced. However, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has not yet reached the environmental standards at many monitoring stations. The Japanese environmental quality standard for PM2.5 that was ratified in 2009 lags about four decades behind other air pollutants, including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, photochemical oxidants, and suspended particulate matter. Recently, trans-national air pollutants have been observed to cause high concentrations of PM2.5 in Japan. To obtain wide distribution of PM2.5, the satellite based PM2.5 products are extremely useful. We investigate PM2.5 concentrations measured using ground samplers in Japan and the satellite based PM2.5 products, taking into consideration various geographical and weather conditions.

  19. Measurement of internal electric field in coated grounded quartz irradiated by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorbel, N.; Hachicha, O.; Fakhfakh, S.; Jbara, O.; Fakhfakh, Z.; Kallel, A.

    2005-01-01

    Physical mechanisms involved in insulators submitted to electron irradiation inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) are investigated by combining some simple considerations of electron trapping mechanisms with basic equation of electrostatics. To understand such mechanisms, only widely irradiated samples having a uniform trapping sites distribution are considered. This hypothesis leads to develop simple models for the trapped charge distributions and subsequently for the distribution of the electric field build-up in ground coated specimens as investigated in electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). This enables us to study the distortion of the Φ(ρz) function (the depth distribution of characteristic X-ray production) as well as the modification of the specimen's local composition. In this paper, an experimental method, using a series of quartz samples, is described for evaluating the magnitude of the electric field build-up within specimens; thus allowing to establish clearly the electric field influence on the measured Φ(ρz) function

  20. Measurement of internal electric field in coated grounded quartz irradiated by an electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbel, N. [LASSI/DTI UMR CNRS 6107, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 REIMS CDX 2 (France) and LaMaCop, Faculte des sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 802, C.P. 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)]. E-mail: ghorbel_nouha@yahoo.fr; Hachicha, O. [LME, Faculte des sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 802, C.P. 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, S. [LASSI/DTI UMR CNRS 6107, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 REIMS CDX 2 (France); LaMaCop, Faculte des sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 802, C.P. 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Jbara, O. [LASSI/DTI UMR CNRS 6107, Faculte des Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 REIMS CDX 2 (France); Fakhfakh, Z. [LaMaCop, Faculte des sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 802, C.P. 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Kallel, A. [LaMaCop, Faculte des sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 802, C.P. 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2005-10-15

    Physical mechanisms involved in insulators submitted to electron irradiation inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) are investigated by combining some simple considerations of electron trapping mechanisms with basic equation of electrostatics. To understand such mechanisms, only widely irradiated samples having a uniform trapping sites distribution are considered. This hypothesis leads to develop simple models for the trapped charge distributions and subsequently for the distribution of the electric field build-up in ground coated specimens as investigated in electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). This enables us to study the distortion of the {phi}({rho}z) function (the depth distribution of characteristic X-ray production) as well as the modification of the specimen's local composition. In this paper, an experimental method, using a series of quartz samples, is described for evaluating the magnitude of the electric field build-up within specimens; thus allowing to establish clearly the electric field influence on the measured {phi}({rho}z) function.

  1. Strategy of thunderstorm measurement with super dense ground-based observation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.

    2014-12-01

    It's not easy to understand the inside structure and developing process of thunderstorm only with existing meteorological instruments since its horizontal extent of the storm cell is sometimes smaller than an order of 10 km while one of the densest ground network in Japan, AMEDAS, consists of sites located every 17 km in average and the resolution of meteorological radar is 1-2 km in general. Even the X-band radar realizes the resolution of 250 m or larger. Here we suggest a new super dense observation network with simple and low cost sensors that can be used for measurement both of raindrop and vertical electric field change caused by cloud-to-ground lightning discharge. This sensor consists of two aluminum plates with a diameter of 10-20 cm. We carried out an observation campaign in summer of 2013 in the foothills of Mt. Yastugatake, Yamanashi and Nagano prefectures in Japan, installing 6 plate-type sensors at a distance of about 4 km. Horizontal location, height and charge amount of each lightning discharge are estimated successfully based on the information of electric field changes at several observing sites. Moreover, it was found that the thunderstorm has a very narrow structure well smaller than 300 m that cannot be measured by any other ways, counting the positive and negative pulses caused by attachment of raindrop to the sensor plate, respectively. We plan to construct a new super dense observation network in the north Kanto region, Japan, where the lightning activity is most prominent in summer Japan, distributing more than several tens of sensors at every 4 km or shorter, such as an order of 100 m at minimum. This kind of new type network will reveal the unknown fine structures of thunderstorms and open the door for constructing real time alert system of torrential rainfall and lightning stroke especially in the city area.

  2. An evaluation of IASI-NH3 with ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dammers

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global distributions of atmospheric ammonia (NH3 measured with satellite instruments such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI contain valuable information on NH3 concentrations and variability in regions not yet covered by ground-based instruments. Due to their large spatial coverage and (bi-daily overpasses, the satellite observations have the potential to increase our knowledge of the distribution of NH3 emissions and associated seasonal cycles. However the observations remain poorly validated, with only a handful of available studies often using only surface measurements without any vertical information. In this study, we present the first validation of the IASI-NH3 product using ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR observations. Using a recently developed consistent retrieval strategy, NH3 concentration profiles have been retrieved using observations from nine Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC stations around the world between 2008 and 2015. We demonstrate the importance of strict spatio-temporal collocation criteria for the comparison. Large differences in the regression results are observed for changing intervals of spatial criteria, mostly due to terrain characteristics and the short lifetime of NH3 in the atmosphere. The seasonal variations of both datasets are consistent for most sites. Correlations are found to be high at sites in areas with considerable NH3 levels, whereas correlations are lower at sites with low atmospheric NH3 levels close to the detection limit of the IASI instrument. A combination of the observations from all sites (Nobs = 547 give a mean relative difference of −32.4 ± (56.3 %, a correlation r of 0.8 with a slope of 0.73. These results give an improved estimate of the IASI-NH3 product performance compared to the previous upper-bound estimates (−50 to +100 %.

  3. High-strain and deformation measurements using imaging and smart material sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Amanda; Niezrecki, Christopher; Buaka, Paulin; Chen, Julie; Niemi, Eugene

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present experimental testing results obtained by using a novel polymer high strain sensor, Metal Rubber TM. Dynamic, quasi-static tensile and quasi-static bending tests are performed to study the sensor's change in resistance as a result of the application of various mechanical loads. The strain signal generated by the Metal Rubber TM sensor is also compared to the strain measured by a set of optical imaging cameras during a high strain tensile test of a nylon fabric. The results of the aforementioned experiments indicate that the Metal Rubber TM sensor exhibits non-linearity and hysteresis as compared to a conventional metal foil strain gage. In addition, time varying, stress hardening was observed in the sensor. Results of the dynamic tests demonstrated that the sensor could be used to determine the resonant frequencies of a cantilever beam, when compared to using an accelerometer or a metal foil strain gage.

  4. Geodetic measurement of deformation east of the San Andreas Fault in Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Solomon, Sean C.; Lisowski, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The shear strain rates in the Diablo Range of California have been calculated, and the slip rate along the Calaveras and Paicines faults in Central California have been estimated, on the basis of triangulation and trilateration data from two geodetic networks located between the western edge of the Great Valley and the San Andreas Fault. The orientation of the principal compressive strain predicted from the azimuth of the major structures in the region is N 25 deg E, leading to an average shear strain value that corresponds to a relative shortening rate of 4.5 + or - 2.4 mm/yr. It is inferred that the measured strain is due to compression across the fold of this area. The hypothesized uniform, fault-normal compression within the Coast Ranges is not supported by these results.

  5. Sunrise-driven movements of dust on the Moon: Apollo 12 Ground-truth measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Brian J.; Hollick, Monique

    2015-12-01

    The first sunrise after Apollo 12 astronauts left the Moon caused dust storms across the site where rocket exhausts had disrupted about 2000 kg of smooth fine dust. The next few sunrises started progressively weaker dust storms, and the Eastern horizon brightened, adding to direct sunlight for half an hour. These Ground truth measurements were made 100 cm above the surface by the 270 g Apollo 12 Dust Detector Experiment we invented in 1966. Dust deposited on the horizontal solar cell during two lunar days after the first sunrise was almost 30% of the total it then measured over 6 years. The vertical east-facing solar cell measured horizon brightening on 14 of the first 17 lunations, with none detected on the following 61 Lunar Days. Based on over 2 million such measurements we propose a new qualitative model of sunrise-driven transport of individual dust particles freed by Apollo 12 activities from strong particle-to-particle cohesive forces. Each sunrise caused sudden surface charging which, during the first few hours, freshly mobilised and lofted the dust remaining free, microscopically smoothing the disrupted local areas. Evidence of reliability of measurements includes consistency among all 6 sensors in measurements throughout an eclipse. We caution Google Lunar XPrize competitors and others planning missions to the Moon and large airless asteroids that, after a spacecraft lands, dust hazards may occur after each of the first few sunrises. Mechanical problems in its first such period stranded Chinese lunar rover Yutu in 2014, although we would not claim yet that the causes were dust. On the other hand, sunrise-driven microscopic smoothing of disturbed areas may offer regular natural mitigations of dust consequences of mining lunar resources and reduce fears that many expeditions might cause excessive fine dust globally around the Moon.

  6. Critical examination of strain-rate sensitivity measurement by nanoindentation methods: Application to severely deformed niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkorta, Jon; Martinez-Esnaola, Jose Manuel; Gil Sevillano, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Two different techniques for measuring the strain-rate sensitivity (SRS) exponent, m, of the power law relating the equivalent flow stress and the equivalent plastic strain rate are analyzed, paying special attention to the errors induced by the thermal drift rate and by the indentation-size effect. It is shown that the resolution and accuracy of indentation-creep tests are affected by these factors. An alternative method of m determination, the rate-jump test, avoids the influence of both the thermal drift and the indentation-size effect. Both methods are applied to the SRS determination of pure niobium samples with different plastic strain levels imparted by equal channel angular pressing. The results show the advantages of the rate-jump test. The observed strong dependence of the room temperature SRS of niobium on its dislocation density and on the strain rate are satisfactorily explained by the relative contributions of the Peierls stress and the dislocation density hardening to the flow stress of the samples

  7. Surface energy budget and thermal inertia at Gale Crater: Calculations from ground-based measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, G M; Rennó, N; Fischer, E; Borlina, C S; Hallet, B; de la Torre Juárez, M; Vasavada, A R; Ramos, M; Hamilton, V; Gomez-Elvira, J; Haberle, R M

    2014-08-01

    The analysis of the surface energy budget (SEB) yields insights into soil-atmosphere interactions and local climates, while the analysis of the thermal inertia ( I ) of shallow subsurfaces provides context for evaluating geological features. Mars orbital data have been used to determine thermal inertias at horizontal scales of ∼10 4  m 2 to ∼10 7  m 2 . Here we use measurements of ground temperature and atmospheric variables by Curiosity to calculate thermal inertias at Gale Crater at horizontal scales of ∼10 2  m 2 . We analyze three sols representing distinct environmental conditions and soil properties, sol 82 at Rocknest (RCK), sol 112 at Point Lake (PL), and sol 139 at Yellowknife Bay (YKB). Our results indicate that the largest thermal inertia I  = 452 J m -2  K -1  s -1/2 (SI units used throughout this article) is found at YKB followed by PL with I  = 306 and RCK with I  = 295. These values are consistent with the expected thermal inertias for the types of terrain imaged by Mastcam and with previous satellite estimations at Gale Crater. We also calculate the SEB using data from measurements by Curiosity's Rover Environmental Monitoring Station and dust opacity values derived from measurements by Mastcam. The knowledge of the SEB and thermal inertia has the potential to enhance our understanding of the climate, the geology, and the habitability of Mars.

  8. Ground-based measurements of galactic cosmic ray fragmentation in shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1992-01-01

    The mean free path for nuclear interactions of galactic cosmic-rays is comparable to shielding and tissue thicknesses present in human interplanetary exploration, resulting in a significant fraction of nuclear reaction products at depth. In order to characterize the radiation field, the energy spectrum, the angular distribution, and the multiplicity of each type of secondary particles must also be known as a function of depth. Reactions can take place anywhere in a thick absorber; therefore, it is necessary to know these quantities as a function of particle energy for all particles produced. HZE transport methods are used to predict the radiation field; they are dependent on models of the interaction of man-made systems with the space environment to an even greater extent than methods used for other types of radiation. Hence, there is a major need to validate these transport codes by comparison with experimental data. The most cost-effective method of validation is a comparison with ground-based experimental measurements. A research program to provide such validation measurements using neon, iron and other accelerated heavy ion beams will be discussed and illustrated using results from ongoing experiments and their comparison with current transport codes. The extent to which physical measurements yield radiobiological predictions will be discussed.

  9. Evaluation of TRMM Ground-Validation Radar-Rain Errors Using Rain Gauge Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxin; Wolff, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Ground-validation (GV) radar-rain products are often utilized for validation of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spaced-based rain estimates, and hence, quantitative evaluation of the GV radar-rain product error characteristics is vital. This study uses quality-controlled gauge data to compare with TRMM GV radar rain rates in an effort to provide such error characteristics. The results show that significant differences of concurrent radar-gauge rain rates exist at various time scales ranging from 5 min to 1 day, despite lower overall long-term bias. However, the differences between the radar area-averaged rain rates and gauge point rain rates cannot be explained as due to radar error only. The error variance separation method is adapted to partition the variance of radar-gauge differences into the gauge area-point error variance and radar rain estimation error variance. The results provide relatively reliable quantitative uncertainty evaluation of TRMM GV radar rain estimates at various times scales, and are helpful to better understand the differences between measured radar and gauge rain rates. It is envisaged that this study will contribute to better utilization of GV radar rain products to validate versatile spaced-based rain estimates from TRMM, as well as the proposed Global Precipitation Measurement, and other satellites.

  10. Experimental Measurements of Permeability Evolution During Brittle Deformation of Crystalline Rocks and Implications for Fluid Flow in Fault Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, T.; Faulkner, D.

    2007-12-01

    Detailed experimental studies of the development of permeability of crustal rock during deformation are essential in helping to understand fault mechanics and constrain larger scale models that predict bulk fluid flow within the crust. The strength, permeability and pore fluid volume evolution of initially intact crystalline rock (Westerly granite and Cerro Cristales granodiorite) under increasing differential load leading to macroscopic failure has been measured in a triaxial deformation apparatus. Experiments were run under pore water pressures of 50 MPa and varying effective pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. Permeability is seen to increase by up to and over two orders of magnitude prior to macroscopic failure, from 3.5 x 10-21 to 9 x 10-19 m2 with the greatest increase seen at lowest effective pressures. Post-failure permeability is shown to be over 3 orders of magnitude higher than initial intact permeabilities, as high as 4 x 10-18 m2, and approaches lower the limit of measurements of in situ bulk crustal permeabilities. Increasing amplitude cyclic loading tests show permeability-stress hysteresis, with high permeabilities maintained as differential stress is reduced. The largest permeability increases are seen between 90-99% of the failure stress. Under hydrothermal conditions without further loading, it is suggested that much of this permeability can be recovered, and pre-macroscopic failure fracture damage may heal relatively faster than post-failure macroscopic fractures. Pre-failure permeabilities are nearly seven to nine orders of magnitude lower than that predicted by some high pressure diffusive models suggesting that microfracture matrix flow cannot dominate, and agrees with inferences that bulk fluid flow and dilatancy must be dominated by larger scale structures, such as macrofractures. It is suggested that the permeability of a highly stressed fault tip process zone in low-permeability crystalline rocks could increase by more than 2 orders of magnitude

  11. Experimental measurements of the ground cloud growth during the 11 February 1974, Titan-Centaur launch at Kennedy Space Center. [(measurement of rocket exhaust from rocket launching)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. B.; Sentell, R. J.; Gregory, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    The Titan-Centaur was launched from Kennedy Space Center on February 11, 1974 at 0948 eastern daylight time. Ground level effluent measurements were obtained from the solid rocket motors for comparison with NASA diffusion models for predicting effluent ground level concentrations and cloud behavior. The results obtained provide a basis for an evaluation of such key model inputs such as cloud rise rate, stabilization altitude, crosswind growth, volume expansion, and cloud trajectory. Ground level effluent measurements were limited because of changing meteorological conditions, incorrect instrument location, and operational problems. Based on the measurement results, operational changes are defined. Photographs of the ground exhaust clouds are shown. The chemical composition of the exhaust gases was analyzed and is given.

  12. Calibrating a ground-based backscatter lidar for continuous measurements of PM2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Markus; Oderbolz, Daniel

    2007-10-01

    One of the main issues of atmospheric research and air quality control is the reduction of harmful particulate matter (PM) in the atmosphere. Small particles can enter the human airways and cause serious health problems such as COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease), asthma or even lung cancer. Recently, interest has shifted from PM10 to finer fractions of particulate matter, e.g. PM2.5, because the health impact of finer particles is considered to be more severe. Up to now measurements of particulate matter were carried out mainly at ground level. However important atmospheric processes, i.e. particle formation, transport and vertical mixing processes, take place predominantly at higher altitudes in the planetary boundary layer. Lidar in principle provides the ability to observe these processes where they occur. The new method outlined in this paper demonstrates the use of a small sized and quite inexpensive lidar in stand-alone operation to investigate transport processes of particulate matter, and PM2.5 in particular. Continuous measurements of PM2.5 as a reference are gained with a conventional in-situ monitor, installed on a tower at an altitude of 325 m in the North of Berlin (Frohnauer Turm). These PM2.5 measurements will be compared with backscatter Lidar data (1064 nm) taken from approx. 60 m over ground up to an altitude of 15 km with a spatial resolution of 15 m. The vertical backscatter profiles at 325 m will be correlated to the concentrations obtained by the PM2,5 monitor on the tower. Both measurements have a time resolution of 180 s to observe also processes that take place at short time scales. The objective is to gain correlation functions for estimating PM2.5 concentrations from backscatter Lidar data. Such a calibrated Lidar system is a valuable instrument for environmental agencies and atmospheric research groups to observe and investigate causes of high level PM concentrations. First results show a reasonably good linear correlation

  13. Unattended instruments for ground-based hyperspectral measurements: development and application for plant photosynthesis monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliati, S.; Rossini, M.; Meroni, M.; Barducci, A.; Julitta, T.; Colombo, R.

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present work is the development of ground-based hyperspectral systems capable of collecting continuous and long-term hyperspectral measurements of the Earth-surface. The development of such instruments includes the optical design, the development of the data acquisition (Auto3S) and processing software as well as the definition of the calibration procedures. In particular an in-field calibration methodologie based on the comparison between field spectra and data modeled using Radiative Transfer (RT) approach has been proposed to regularly upgrade instrument calibration coefficients. Two different automatic spectrometric systems have been developed: the HyperSpectral Irradiometer (HSI) [Meroni et al., 2011] and the Multiplexer Radiometer Irradiometer (MRI) [Cogliati, 2011]. Both instruments are able to continuously measure: sun incoming irradiance (ETOT) and irradiance (ES, HSI)/radiance (LS, MRI) upwelling from the investigated surface. Both instruments employ two Ocean Optics HR4000 spectrometers sharing the same optical signal that allow to simultaneously collect "fine" (1 nm Full Width at Half Maximum, FWHM) spectra in the 400-1000 nm rangeand "ultra-fine" (0.1 nm FWHM) spectra within the 700-800 nm. The collected optical data allow to estimate biochemical/structural properties of vegetation (e.g. NDVI) as well as its photosynthetic efficiency through the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) and the analysis of sun-induced chlorophyll Fluorescence in the O2-A Fraunhofer line (F@760). The automatic instruments were operated in coordination with eddy covariance flux tower measurements of carbon exchange in the framework of several field campaigns: HSI was employed in a subalpine pasture (2009-ongoing) (www.phenoalp.eu) while MRI was employed in 2009 in the Sen3Exp field survey promoted by the European Space Agency as consolidation study to the future mission Sentinel-3. Results show that the proposed instruments succeeded in collecting continuous

  14. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 2. Coeruptive deflation, July-August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A hydrovolcanic eruption near Cone D on the floor of Okmok caldera, Alaska, began on 12 July 2008 and continued until late August 2008. The eruption was preceded by inflation of a magma reservoir located beneath the center of the caldera and ∼3 km below sea level (bsl), which began immediately after Okmok's previous eruption in 1997. In this paper we use data from several radar satellites and advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques to produce a suite of 2008 coeruption deformation maps. Most of the surface deformation that occurred during the eruption is explained by deflation of a Mogi-type source located beneath the center of the caldera and 2–3 km bsl, i.e., essentially the same source that inflated prior to the eruption. During the eruption the reservoir deflated at a rate that decreased exponentially with time with a 1/e time constant of ∼13 days. We envision a sponge-like network of interconnected fractures and melt bodies that in aggregate constitute a complex magma storage zone beneath Okmok caldera. The rate at which the reservoir deflates during an eruption may be controlled by the diminishing pressure difference between the reservoir and surface. A similar mechanism might explain the tendency for reservoir inflation to slow as an eruption approaches until the pressure difference between a deep magma production zone and the reservoir is great enough to drive an intrusion or eruption along the caldera ring-fracture system.

  15. Posture alteration as a measure to accommodate uneven ground in able-bodied gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminiaghdam, Soran; Blickhan, Reinhard; Muller, Roy; Rode, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Though the effects of imposed trunk posture on human walking have been studied, less is known about such locomotion while accommodating changes in ground level. For twelve able participants, we analyzed kinematic parameters mainly at touchdown and toe-off in walking across a 10-cm visible drop in ground level (level step, pre-perturbation step, step-down, step-up) with three postures (regular erect, ~30° and ~50° of trunk flexion from the vertical). Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs revealed step-specific effects of posture on the kinematic behavior of gait mostly at toe-off of the pre-perturbation step and the step-down as well as at touchdown of the step-up. In preparation to step-down, with increasing trunk flexion the discrepancy in hip-center of pressure distance, i.e. effective leg length, (shorter at toe-off versus touchdown), compared with level steps increased largely due to a greater knee flexion at toe-off. Participants rotated their trunk backwards during step-down (2- to 3-fold backwards rotation compared with level steps regardless of trunk posture) likely to control the angular momentum of their whole body. The more pronounced trunk backwards rotation in trunk-flexed walking contributed to the observed elevated center of mass (CoM) trajectories during the step-down which may have facilitated drop negotiation. Able-bodied individuals were found to recover almost all assessed kinematic parameters comprising the vertical position of the CoM, effective leg length and angle as well as hip, knee and ankle joint angles at the end of the step-up, suggesting an adaptive capacity and hence a robustness of human walking with respect to imposed trunk orientations. Our findings may provide clinicians with insight into a kinematic interaction between posture and locomotion in uneven ground. Moreover, a backward rotation of the trunk for negotiating step-down may be incorporated into exercise-based interventions to enhance gait stability in individuals who exhibit

  16. The Global Survey Method Applied to Ground-level Cosmic Ray Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A.; Eroshenko, E.; Yanke, V.; Oleneva, V.; Abunin, A.; Abunina, M.; Papaioannou, A.; Mavromichalaki, H.

    2018-04-01

    The global survey method (GSM) technique unites simultaneous ground-level observations of cosmic rays in different locations and allows us to obtain the main characteristics of cosmic-ray variations outside of the atmosphere and magnetosphere of Earth. This technique has been developed and applied in numerous studies over many years by the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation (IZMIRAN). We here describe the IZMIRAN version of the GSM in detail. With this technique, the hourly data of the world-wide neutron-monitor network from July 1957 until December 2016 were processed, and further processing is enabled upon the receipt of new data. The result is a database of homogeneous and continuous hourly characteristics of the density variations (an isotropic part of the intensity) and the 3D vector of the cosmic-ray anisotropy. It includes all of the effects that could be identified in galactic cosmic-ray variations that were caused by large-scale disturbances of the interplanetary medium in more than 50 years. These results in turn became the basis for a database on Forbush effects and interplanetary disturbances. This database allows correlating various space-environment parameters (the characteristics of the Sun, the solar wind, et cetera) with cosmic-ray parameters and studying their interrelations. We also present features of the coupling coefficients for different neutron monitors that enable us to make a connection from ground-level measurements to primary cosmic-ray variations outside the atmosphere and the magnetosphere. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the current version of the GSM as well as further possible developments and improvements. The method developed allows us to minimize the problems of the neutron-monitor network, which are typical for experimental physics, and to considerably enhance its advantages.

  17. The CdZnTe Detector with Slit Collimator for Measure Distribution of the Specific Activity Radionuclide in the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, V. E.; Volkovich, A. G.; Potapov, V. N.; Semin, I. A.; Stepanov, A. V.; Simirskii, Iu. N.

    2018-01-01

    From 2011 in the NRC "Kurchatov Institute" carry out the dismantling of the MR multiloop research reactor. Now the reactor and all technological equipment in the premises of the reactor were dismantled. Now the measurements of radioactive contamination in the reactor premises are made. The most contaminated parts of premises - floor and the ground beneath it. To measure the distribution of specific activity in the ground the CdZnTe detector (volume 500MM3) was used. Detector placed in a lead shielding with a slit collimation hole. The upper part of shielding is made movable to close and open the slit of the collimator. At each point two measurements carried out: with open and closed collimator. The software for determination specific activity of radionuclides in ground was developed. The mathematical model of spectrometric system based on the Monte-Carlo method. Measurements of specific activity of ground were made. Using the results of measurements the thickness of the removed layer of ground and the amount of radioactive waste were calculated.

  18. Performance evaluation of the Herschel/SPIRE imaging Fourier transform spectrometer through ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Locke D.; Naylor, David A.; Swinyard, Bruce M.

    2010-06-01

    The Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) is one of three scientific instruments onboard the European Space Agency (ESA)'s Herschel Space Observatory. Herschel was successfully launched on 14 May 2009; routine science observations commenced in late 2009. Medium resolution spectroscopy with SPIRE is accomplished via an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (IFTS) of the Mach-Zehnder configuration. Although pre-launch performance verification and calibration measurements were conducted with the SPIRE instrument mounted in an evacuated cryostat at cryogenic temperatures, it was not possible to simulate fully the expected in-flight conditions. This paper compares the performance of the SPIRE IFTS, as measured during ground-based tests, with theoretical simulations. In turn, these results are used to provide an estimate of the in-flight instrument performance. This paper includes a discussion of key aspects of the SPIRE IFTS including the spectrometer dual-input compensation scheme, instrument line shape and the overall instrument sensitivity. As a case study, the derived instrument performance is used to investigate SPIRE's utility in observing astronomical line emission from the starburst galaxy M82.

  19. Grounding measurement of protection system against electric discharges; Medicao do aterramento de sistemas de protecao contra descargas eletricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Evgeni; Knignik, Roman [Israel Electric (Israel)

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes a method for evaluation of performance of the protection system against electrical atmospheric discharges in high frequencies. The proposed procedure analyses the grounding conditions, allowing to perform fast and precise measurements, and identify defect conductors. Also are provided useful suggestions for field measurements and also described the practical tests performed in a installation. (author)

  20. GPS measurements of present day crustal deformation within the Lebanese restraining bend along the Dead Sea Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, R.; Gomez, F.; Abdallah, C.; Karam, G.; Reilinger, R.; Alchalbi, A.; Yassminh, R.; Daoud, M.

    2007-12-01

    The Lebanese restraining bend is a 200 km long bend with a left lateral sense of slip located along the Dead Sea fault system (DSFS) between 33.2 and 34.6 degrees north latitude. The DSFS is a transform plate boundary fault system accommodating the differential northward movement of Arabian and Sinai plates relative to the Eurasian plate. Within the Lebanese Restraining bend, The DSFS splays into several major left-lateral strike-slip faults, forming a positive flower structure. This study combines GPS measurements from Lebanon where surveys span for about 5.5 years with sites from the Anti Lebanon Mountains in SW Syria for a more complete view of crystal deformation in the Restraining bend. The GPS network includes Continuous GPS sites and 27 campaign sites: 14 sites in Lebanon installed in 2002, 8 sites in Lebanon installed in 2005, and 5 sites in southwestern Syria. Preliminary velocities for older campaign sites have uncertainties less than 1 mm/yr, whereas newer sites have around 1.5 mm/yr uncertainties. The improved spatial coverage and reduced uncertainties allow constructing elastic fault models that explore strain partitioning between two strike slip faults (representing the Yammouneh and Serghaya faults) and a generalized thrust fault to accommodate convergence in the Restraining bend. Preliminary velocities suggest around 4 - 4.5 mm/yr along the Yammouneh fault. This study provides an essential tool for assessing tool for assessing the seismic hazard in the vicinity of the Lebanese restraining bend.

  1. In Situ Tensile Deformation and Residual Stress Measurement by Neutron Diffraction in Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Triratna; Charit, Indrajit; Potirniche, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    The deformation behavior of monolithic modified 9Cr-1Mo (Grade 91) steel during uniaxial tensile loading was studied using the in situ neutron diffraction technique. The residual stress distribution across gas tungsten arc welds in the Grade 91 steel was measured by the time-of-flight neutron diffraction method using the SMARTS diffractometer at Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Grade 91 plates were welded using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) technique. The load sharing by different grain orientations was observed during the tensile loading. The residual stresses along three orthogonal directions were determined at the mid-thickness, 4.35 and 2.35 mm below the surface of both the as-welded and post-weld heat-treated plates. The residual stresses of the as-welded plates were compared with those of the post-weld heat-treated plates. The post-weld heat treatment significantly reduced the residual stress level in the base metal, the heat-affected zone, and the weld zone. Vickers microhardness across the weld zone of the as-welded and post-weld heat-treated specimens was evaluated and correlated with the observed residual stress profile and microstructure.

  2. A Hot-Stage Atomic Force Microscope for the Measurement of Plastic Deformation in Metallic Thin Films During Thermal Cycling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shultz, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    .... The system will allow future in-situ thermal cycling experiments on microelectronic devices in a protected environment to provide insight into the role of plastic deformation in metallic thin films...

  3. Ultraviolet radiation modelling from ground-based and satellite measurements on Reunion Island, southern tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lamy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface ultraviolet radiation (SUR is not an increasing concern after the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and the recovery of the ozone layer Morgenstern et al.(2008. However, large uncertainties remain in the prediction of future changes of SUR Bais et al.(2015. Several studies pointed out that UV-B impacts the biosphere Erickson et al.(2015, especially the aquatic system, which plays a central part in the biogeochemical cycle Hader et al.(2007. It can affect phytoplankton productivity Smith and Cullen(1995. This influence can result in either positive or negative feedback on climate (Zepp et al., 2007. Global circulation model simulations predict an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation over the next century (Butchart, 2014, which would lead to a decrease in ozone levels in the tropics and an enhancement at higher latitudes (Hegglin and Shepherd, 2009. Reunion Island is located in the tropics (21° S, 55° E, in a part of the world where the amount of ozone in the ozone column is naturally low. In addition, this island is mountainous and the marine atmosphere is often clean with low aerosol concentrations. Thus, measurements show much higher SUR than at other sites at the same latitude or at midlatitudes. Ground-based measurements of SUR have been taken on Reunion Island by a Bentham DTMc300 spectroradiometer since 2009. This instrument is affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. In order to quantify the future evolution of SUR in the tropics, it is necessary to validate a model against present observations. This study is designed to be a preliminary parametric and sensitivity study of SUR modelling in the tropics. We developed a local parameterisation using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Model (TUV; Madronich, 1993 and compared the output of TUV to multiple years of Bentham spectral measurements. This comparison started in early 2009 and continued until 2016

  4. Ultraviolet radiation modelling from ground-based and satellite measurements on Reunion Island, southern tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Kévin; Portafaix, Thierry; Brogniez, Colette; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Bencherif, Hassan; Morel, Béatrice; Pazmino, Andrea; Metzger, Jean Marc; Auriol, Frédérique; Deroo, Christine; Duflot, Valentin; Goloub, Philippe; Long, Charles N.

    2018-01-01

    Surface ultraviolet radiation (SUR) is not an increasing concern after the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and the recovery of the ozone layer (Morgenstern et al., 2008). However, large uncertainties remain in the prediction of future changes of SUR (Bais et al., 2015). Several studies pointed out that UV-B impacts the biosphere (Erickson et al., 2015), especially the aquatic system, which plays a central part in the biogeochemical cycle (Hader et al., 2007). It can affect phytoplankton productivity (Smith and Cullen, 1995). This influence can result in either positive or negative feedback on climate (Zepp et al., 2007). Global circulation model simulations predict an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation over the next century (Butchart, 2014), which would lead to a decrease in ozone levels in the tropics and an enhancement at higher latitudes (Hegglin and Shepherd, 2009). Reunion Island is located in the tropics (21° S, 55° E), in a part of the world where the amount of ozone in the ozone column is naturally low. In addition, this island is mountainous and the marine atmosphere is often clean with low aerosol concentrations. Thus, measurements show much higher SUR than at other sites at the same latitude or at midlatitudes. Ground-based measurements of SUR have been taken on Reunion Island by a Bentham DTMc300 spectroradiometer since 2009. This instrument is affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). In order to quantify the future evolution of SUR in the tropics, it is necessary to validate a model against present observations. This study is designed to be a preliminary parametric and sensitivity study of SUR modelling in the tropics. We developed a local parameterisation using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Model (TUV; Madronich, 1993) and compared the output of TUV to multiple years of Bentham spectral measurements. This comparison started in early 2009 and continued until 2016. Only

  5. Propagation of sound through the Earth's atmosphere. 1: Measurement of sound absorption in the air. 2: Measurement of ground impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, J.; Meredith, R. W.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    The fabrication of parts for the acoustic ground impedance meter was completed, and the instrument tested. Acoustic ground impedance meter, automatic data processing system, cooling system for the resonant tube, and final results of sound absorption in N2-H2O gas mixtures at elevated temperatures are described.

  6. Cam deformity and the omega angle, a novel quantitative measurement of femoral head-neck morphology: a 3D CT gender analysis in asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascarenhas, Vasco V.; Gaspar, Augusto [Hospital da Luz, MSK imaging Unit (UIME), Imaging Center, Lisbon (Portugal); Rego, Paulo [Hospital da Luz, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Lisbon (Portugal); Dantas, Pedro [Hospital CUF Descobertas, Lisbon (Portugal); Soldado, Francisco [Universitat de Barcelona, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona (Spain); Consciencia, Jose G. [NOVA Medical School, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2017-05-15

    Our objectives were to use 3D computed tomography (CT) to define head-neck morphologic gender-specific and normative parameters in asymptomatic individuals and use the omega angle (Ω ) to provide quantification data on the location and radial extension of a cam deformity. We prospectively included 350 individuals and evaluated 188 asymptomatic hips that underwent semiautomated CT analysis. Different thresholds of alpha angle (α ) were considered in order to analyze cam morphology and determine Ω . We calculated overall and gender-specific parameters for imaging signs of cam morphology (Ω and circumferential α ). The 95 % reference interval limits were beyond abnormal thresholds found in the literature for cam morphology. Specifically, α at 3/1 oclock were 46.9 /60.8 overall, 51.8 /65.4 for men and 45.7 /55.3 for women. Cam prevalence, magnitude, location, and epicenter were significantly gender different. Increasing α correlated with higher Ω , meaning that higher angles correspond to larger cam deformities. Hip morphometry measurements in this cohort of asymptomatic individuals extended beyond current thresholds used for the clinical diagnosis of cam deformity, and α was found to vary both by gender and measurement location. These results suggest that α measurement is insufficient for the diagnosis of cam deformity. Enhanced morphometric evaluation, including 3D imaging and Ω , may enable a more accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Cam deformity and the omega angle, a novel quantitative measurement of femoral head-neck morphology: a 3D CT gender analysis in asymptomatic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, Vasco V.; Gaspar, Augusto; Rego, Paulo; Dantas, Pedro; Soldado, Francisco; Consciencia, Jose G.

    2017-01-01

    Our objectives were to use 3D computed tomography (CT) to define head-neck morphologic gender-specific and normative parameters in asymptomatic individuals and use the omega angle (Ω ) to provide quantification data on the location and radial extension of a cam deformity. We prospectively included 350 individuals and evaluated 188 asymptomatic hips that underwent semiautomated CT analysis. Different thresholds of alpha angle (α ) were considered in order to analyze cam morphology and determine Ω . We calculated overall and gender-specific parameters for imaging signs of cam morphology (Ω and circumferential α ). The 95 % reference interval limits were beyond abnormal thresholds found in the literature for cam morphology. Specifically, α at 3/1 oclock were 46.9 /60.8 overall, 51.8 /65.4 for men and 45.7 /55.3 for women. Cam prevalence, magnitude, location, and epicenter were significantly gender different. Increasing α correlated with higher Ω , meaning that higher angles correspond to larger cam deformities. Hip morphometry measurements in this cohort of asymptomatic individuals extended beyond current thresholds used for the clinical diagnosis of cam deformity, and α was found to vary both by gender and measurement location. These results suggest that α measurement is insufficient for the diagnosis of cam deformity. Enhanced morphometric evaluation, including 3D imaging and Ω , may enable a more accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. Tissue Deformation Index as a Reliable Measure of Lateral Abdominal Muscle Activation on M-Mode Sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biały, Maciej; Adamczyk, Wacław; Gnat, Rafael; Stranc, Tomasz

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this article is to present a novel method of evaluating the activity of lateral abdominal muscles using M-mode sonography. The method leads to calculation of the tissue deformation index, representing the percent change in lateral abdominal muscle thickness over time. The objectives of this study were as follows: (1) to establish the mean tissue deformation index values for individual lateral abdominal muscles; and (2) to establish the reliability of the tissue deformation index. In a group of 34 healthy young volunteers (mean age, 24.03 years; body mass, 68.89 kg; body height, 174.25 cm), the reflex response of the lateral abdominal muscles to postural perturbation in the form of rapid arm abduction was recorded in 2 series, with 6 repetitions each, and the tissue deformation index was calculated. The mean tissue deformation index values formed a gradient, increasing from deep to superficial lateral abdominal muscles: 0.06%/ms for transversus abdominis, 0.11%/ms for oblique internal, and 0.16 for oblique external muscles. The tissue deformation index values differed significantly among individual lateral abdominal muscles (all paired comparisons, P  0.8). © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Characterizing GEO Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentations using Ground-Based and Telescopic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, Heather; Anz-Meador, Phillip; Reyes, Jacqueline A.

    2017-01-01

    In a continued effort to better characterize the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) environment, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) utilizes various ground-based optical assets to acquire photometric and spectral data of known debris associated with fragmentations in or near GEO. The Titan IIIC Transtage upper stage is known to have fragmented four times. Two of the four fragmentations were in GEO while the Transtage fragmented a third time in GEO transfer orbit. The forth fragmentation occurred in low Earth orbit. To better assess and characterize these fragmentations, the NASA ODPO acquired a Titan Transtage test and display article previously in the custody of the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) in Tucson, Arizona. After initial inspections at AMARG demonstrated that it was of sufficient fidelity to be of interest, the test article was brought to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to continue material analysis and historical documentation. The Transtage has undergone two separate spectral measurement campaigns to characterize the reflectance spectroscopy of historical aerospace materials. These data have been incorporated into the NASA Spectral Database, with the goal of using telescopic data comparisons for potential material identification. A Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system scan also has been completed and a scale model has been created for use in the Optical Measurement Center (OMC) for photometric analysis of an intact Transtage, including bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) measurements. An historical overview of the Titan IIIC Transtage, the current analysis that has been done to date, and the future work to be completed in support of characterizing the GEO and near GEO orbital debris environment will be discussed in the subsequent presentation.

  10. Measurement of the force–displacement response of in vivo human skin under a rich set of deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Flynn, Cormac

    2011-06-01

    The non-linear, anisotropic, and viscoelastic properties of human skin vary according to location on the body, age, and individual. The measurement of skin\\'s mechanical properties is important in several fields including medicine, cosmetics, and forensics. In this study, a novel force-sensitive micro-robot applied a rich set of three-dimensional deformations to the skin surface of different areas of the arms of 20 volunteers. The force-displacement response of each area in different directions was measured. All tested areas exhibited a non-linear, viscoelastic, and anisotropic force-displacement response. There was a wide quantitative variation in the stiffness of the response. For the right anterior forearm, the ratio of the maximum probe reaction force to maximum probe displacement ranged from 0.44Nmm-1 to 1.45Nmm-1. All volunteers exhibited similar qualitative anisotropic characteristics. For the anterior right forearm, the stiffest force-displacement response was when the probe displaced along the longitudinal axis of the forearm. The response of the anterior left forearm was stiffest in a direction 20° to the longitudinal axis of the forearm. The posterior upper arm was stiffest in a direction 90° to the longitudinal axis of the arm. The averaged posterior upper arm response was less stiff than the averaged anterior forearm response. The maximum probe force at 1.3mm probe displacement was 0.69N for the posterior upper arm and 1.1N for the right anterior forearm. The average energy loss during the loading-unloading cycle ranged from 11.9% to 34.2%. This data will be very useful for studying the non-linear, anisotropic, and viscoelastic behaviour of skin and also for generating material parameters for appropriate constitutive models. © 2011 IPEM.

  11. Measurement of soy contents in ground beef using near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Models for determining contents of soy products in ground beef were developed using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Samples were prepared by mixing four kinds of soybean protein products (Arconet, toasted soy grits, Profam and textured vegetable protein (TVP)) with ground beef (content from 0%–100...

  12. A study of the Oklahoma City urban heat island using ground measurements and remote sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M. J. (Michael J.); Ivey, A. (Austin); McPherson, T. N. (Timothy N.); Boswell, D. (David); Pardyjak, E. R. (Eric R.)

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of temperature and position were collected during the night from an instrumented van on routes through Oklahoma City and the rural outskirts. The measurements were taken as part of the Joint URBAN 2003 Tracer Field Experiment conducted in Oklahoma City from June 29, 2003 to July 30, 2003 (Allwine et al., 2004). The instrumented van was driven over four primary routes that included legs from the downtown core to four different 'rural' areas. Each route went through residential areas and most often went by a line of permanently fixed temperature probes (Allwine et al., 2004) for cross-checking purposes. Each route took from 20 to 40 minutes to complete. Based on seven nights of data, initial analyses indicate that there was a temperature difference of 0.5-6.5 C between the urban core and nearby 'rural' areas. Analyses also suggest that there were significant fine scale temperature differences over distances of tens of meters within the city and in the nearby rural areas. The temperature measurements that were collected are intended to supplement the meteorological measurements taken during the Joint URBAN 2003 Field Experiment, to assess the importance of the urban heat island phenomenon in Oklahoma City, and to test new urban canopy parameterizations that have been developed for regional scale meteorological codes (e.g., Chin et al., 2000; Holt and Shi, 2004). In addition to the ground measurements, skin temperature measurements were also analyzed from remotely sensed images taken from the Earth Observing System's Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). A surface kinetic temperature thermal infrared image captured by the ASTER of the Oklahoma City area on July 21, 2001 was analyzed within ESRI's ArcGIS 8.3 to correlate variations in temperature with land use type. Analysis of this imagery suggests distinct variations in temperature across different land use categories. Through the use of

  13. TEMIS UV product validation using NILU-UV ground-based measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempila, Melina-Maria; van Geffen, Jos H. G. M.; Taylor, Michael; Fountoulakis, Ilias; Koukouli, Maria-Elissavet; van Weele, Michiel; van der A, Ronald J.; Bais, Alkiviadis; Meleti, Charikleia; Balis, Dimitrios

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to cross-validate ground-based and satellite-based models of three photobiological UV effective dose products: the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) erythemal UV, the production of vitamin D in the skin, and DNA damage, using high-temporal-resolution surface-based measurements of solar UV spectral irradiances from a synergy of instruments and models. The satellite-based Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service (TEMIS; version 1.4) UV daily dose data products were evaluated over the period 2009 to 2014 with ground-based data from a Norsk Institutt for Luftforskning (NILU)-UV multifilter radiometer located at the northern midlatitude super-site of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (LAP/AUTh), in Greece. For the NILU-UV effective dose rates retrieval algorithm, a neural network (NN) was trained to learn the nonlinear functional relation between NILU-UV irradiances and collocated Brewer-based photobiological effective dose products. Then the algorithm was subjected to sensitivity analysis and validation. The correlation of the NN estimates with target outputs was high (r = 0. 988 to 0.990) and with a very low bias (0.000 to 0.011 in absolute units) proving the robustness of the NN algorithm. For further evaluation of the NILU NN-derived products, retrievals of the vitamin D and DNA-damage effective doses from a collocated Yankee Environmental Systems (YES) UVB-1 pyranometer were used. For cloud-free days, differences in the derived UV doses are better than 2 % for all UV dose products, revealing the reference quality of the ground-based UV doses at Thessaloniki from the NILU-UV NN retrievals. The TEMIS UV doses used in this study are derived from ozone measurements by the SCIAMACHY/Envisat and GOME2/MetOp-A satellite instruments, over the European domain in combination with SEVIRI/Meteosat-based diurnal cycle of the cloud cover fraction per 0. 5° × 0. 5° (lat × long) grid cells. TEMIS

  14. TEMIS UV product validation using NILU-UV ground-based measurements in Thessaloniki, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-M. Zempila

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to cross-validate ground-based and satellite-based models of three photobiological UV effective dose products: the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE erythemal UV, the production of vitamin D in the skin, and DNA damage, using high-temporal-resolution surface-based measurements of solar UV spectral irradiances from a synergy of instruments and models. The satellite-based Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service (TEMIS; version 1.4 UV daily dose data products were evaluated over the period 2009 to 2014 with ground-based data from a Norsk Institutt for Luftforskning (NILU-UV multifilter radiometer located at the northern midlatitude super-site of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (LAP/AUTh, in Greece. For the NILU-UV effective dose rates retrieval algorithm, a neural network (NN was trained to learn the nonlinear functional relation between NILU-UV irradiances and collocated Brewer-based photobiological effective dose products. Then the algorithm was subjected to sensitivity analysis and validation. The correlation of the NN estimates with target outputs was high (r = 0. 988 to 0.990 and with a very low bias (0.000 to 0.011 in absolute units proving the robustness of the NN algorithm. For further evaluation of the NILU NN-derived products, retrievals of the vitamin D and DNA-damage effective doses from a collocated Yankee Environmental Systems (YES UVB-1 pyranometer were used. For cloud-free days, differences in the derived UV doses are better than 2 % for all UV dose products, revealing the reference quality of the ground-based UV doses at Thessaloniki from the NILU-UV NN retrievals. The TEMIS UV doses used in this study are derived from ozone measurements by the SCIAMACHY/Envisat and GOME2/MetOp-A satellite instruments, over the European domain in combination with SEVIRI/Meteosat-based diurnal cycle of the cloud cover fraction per 0. 5° × 0. 5

  15. Measurement of Walking Ground Reactions in Real-Life Environments: A Systematic Review of Techniques and Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabpoor, Erfan; Pavic, Aleksandar

    2017-09-12

    Monitoring natural human gait in real-life environments is essential in many applications, including quantification of disease progression, monitoring the effects of treatment, and monitoring alteration of performance biomarkers in professional sports. Nevertheless, developing reliable and practical techniques and technologies necessary for continuous real-life monitoring of gait is still an open challenge. A systematic review of English-language articles from scientific databases including Scopus, ScienceDirect, Pubmed, IEEE Xplore, EBSCO and MEDLINE were carried out to analyse the 'accuracy' and 'practicality' of the current techniques and technologies for quantitative measurement of the tri-axial walking ground reactions outside the laboratory environment, and to highlight their strengths and shortcomings. In total, 679 relevant abstracts were identified, 54 full-text papers were included in the paper and the quantitative results of 17 papers were used for meta-analysis and comparison. Three classes of methods were reviewed: (1) methods based on measured kinematic data; (2) methods based on measured plantar pressure; and (3) methods based on direct measurement of ground reactions. It was found that all three classes of methods have competitive accuracy levels with methods based on direct measurement of the ground reactions showing highest accuracy while being least practical for long-term real-life measurement. On the other hand, methods that estimate ground reactions using measured body kinematics show highest practicality of the three classes of methods reviewed. Among the most prominent technical and technological challenges are: (1) reducing the size and price of tri-axial load-cells; (2) improving the accuracy of orientation measurement using IMUs; (3) minimizing the number and optimizing the location of required IMUs for kinematic measurement; (4) increasing the durability of pressure insole sensors, and (5) enhancing the robustness and versatility of the

  16. Measurement of Walking Ground Reactions in Real-Life Environments: A Systematic Review of Techniques and Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erfan Shahabpoor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring natural human gait in real-life environments is essential in many applications, including quantification of disease progression, monitoring the effects of treatment, and monitoring alteration of performance biomarkers in professional sports. Nevertheless, developing reliable and practical techniques and technologies necessary for continuous real-life monitoring of gait is still an open challenge. A systematic review of English-language articles from scientific databases including Scopus, ScienceDirect, Pubmed, IEEE Xplore, EBSCO and MEDLINE were carried out to analyse the ‘accuracy’ and ‘practicality’ of the current techniques and technologies for quantitative measurement of the tri-axial walking ground reactions outside the laboratory environment, and to highlight their strengths and shortcomings. In total, 679 relevant abstracts were identified, 54 full-text papers were included in the paper and the quantitative results of 17 papers were used for meta-analysis and comparison. Three classes of methods were reviewed: (1 methods based on measured kinematic data; (2 methods based on measured plantar pressure; and (3 methods based on direct measurement of ground reactions. It was found that all three classes of methods have competitive accuracy levels with methods based on direct measurement of the ground reactions showing highest accuracy while being least practical for long-term real-life measurement. On the other hand, methods that estimate ground reactions using measured body kinematics show highest practicality of the three classes of methods reviewed. Among the most prominent technical and technological challenges are: (1 reducing the size and price of tri-axial load-cells; (2 improving the accuracy of orientation measurement using IMUs; (3 minimizing the number and optimizing the location of required IMUs for kinematic measurement; (4 increasing the durability of pressure insole sensors, and (5 enhancing the robustness and

  17. Airborne measurement of submicron aerosol number concentration and CCN activity in and around the Korean Peninsula and their comparison to ground measurement in Seoul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M.; Kim, N.; Yum, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosols exert impact not only on human health and visibility but also on climate change directly by scattering or absorbing solar radiation and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus altering cloud radiative and microphysical properties. Aerosol indirect effects on climate has been known to have large uncertainty because of insufficient measurement data on aerosol and CCN activity distribution. Submicron aerosol number concentration (NCN, TSI CPC) and CCN number concentration (NCCN, DMT CCNC) were measured on board the NASA DC-8 research aircraft and at a ground site at Olympic Park in Seoul from May 2nd to June 10th, 2016. CCNC on the airborne platform was operated with the fixed internal supersaturation of 0.6% and CCNC at the ground site was operated with the five different supersaturations (0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%, and 1.0%). The NASA DC-8 conducted 20 research flights (about 150 hours) in and around the Korean Peninsula and the ground measurement at Olympic Park was continuously made during the measurement period. Both airborne and ground measurements showed spatially and temporally varied aerosol number concentration and CCN activity. Aerosol number concentration in the boundary layer measured on airborne platform was highly affected by pollution sources on the ground. The average diurnal distribution of ground aerosol number concentration showed distinct peaks are located at about 0800, 1500, and 2000. The middle peak indicates that new particle formation events frequently occurred during the measurement period. CCN activation ratio at 0.6% supersaturation (NCCN/NCN) of the airborne measurement ranged from 0.1 to 0.9, indicating that aerosol properties in and around the Korean Peninsula varied so much (e. g. size, hygroscopicity). Comprehensive analysis results will be shown at the conference.

  18. Ground truth measurements plan for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, A.J.

    2000-01-03

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) have developed a diverse group of algorithms for processing and analyzing the data that will be collected by the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) after launch late in 1999. Each of these algorithms must be verified by comparison to independent surface and atmospheric measurements. SRTC has selected 13 sites in the continental U.S. for ground truth data collections. These sites include a high altitude cold water target (Crater Lake), cooling lakes and towers in the warm, humid southeastern US, Department of Energy (DOE) climate research sites, the NASA Stennis satellite Validation and Verification (V and V) target array, waste sites at the Savannah River Site, mining sites in the Four Corners area and dry lake beds in the southwestern US. SRTC has established mutually beneficial relationships with the organizations that manage these sites to make use of their operating and research data and to install additional instrumentation needed for MTI algorithm V and V.

  19. Measurements of Forbush decreases at Mars: both by MSL on ground and by MAVEN in orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingnan; Lillis, Robert; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Zeitlin, Cary; Simonson, Patrick; Rahmati, Ali; Posner, Arik; Papaioannou, Athanasios; Lundt, Niklas; Lee, Christina O.; Larson, Davin; Halekas, Jasper; Hassler, Donald M.; Ehresmann, Bent; Dunn, Patrick; Böttcher, Stephan

    2018-04-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), on board Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) Curiosity rover, has been measuring ground level particle fluxes along with the radiation dose rate at the surface of Mars since August 2012. Similar to neutron monitors at Earth, RAD sees many Forbush decreases (FDs) in the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) induced surface fluxes and dose rates. These FDs are associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and/or stream/corotating interaction regions (SIRs/CIRs). Orbiting above the Martian atmosphere, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft has also been monitoring space weather conditions at Mars since September 2014. The penetrating particle flux channels in the solar energetic particle (SEP) instrument onboard MAVEN can also be employed to detect FDs. For the first time, we study the statistics and properties of a list of FDs observed in-situ at Mars, seen both on the surface by MSL/RAD and in orbit detected by the MAVEN/SEP instrument. Such a list of FDs can be used for studying interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICME) propagation and SIR evolution through the inner heliosphere. The magnitudes of different FDs can be well-fitted by a power-law distribution. The systematic difference between the magnitudes of the FDs within and outside the Martian atmosphere may be mostly attributed to the energy-dependent modulation of the GCR particles by both the pass-by ICMEs/SIRs and the Martian atmosphere.

  20. Evidence of Urban Precipitation Anomalies from Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Manyin, M.; Negri, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme cases of land use change. Most of world's population has moved to urban areas. Although currently only 1.2% of the land is considered urban, the spatial coverage and density of cities are expected to rapidly increase in the near future. It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world's population will live in cities. Human activity in urban environments also alters weather and climate processes. However, our understanding of urbanization on the total Earth-weather-climate system is incomplete. Recent literature continues to provide evidence that anomalies in precipitation exist over and downwind of major cities. Current and future research efforts are actively seeking to verify these literature findings and understand potential cause-effect relationships. The novelty of this study is that it utilizes rainfall data from multiple satellite data sources (e.g. TRMM precipitation radar, TRMM-geosynchronous-rain gauge merged product, and SSM/I) and ground-based measurements to identify spatial anomalies and temporal trends in precipitation for cities around the world. Early results will be presented and placed within the context of weather prediction, climate assessment, and societal applications.

  1. Quantitative measurements of ground state atomic oxygen in atmospheric pressure surface micro-discharge array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Kong, M. G.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Leys, C.; Nikiforov, A.

    2017-06-01

    The generation of atomic oxygen in an array of surface micro-discharge, working in atmospheric pressure He/O2 or Ar/O2 mixtures, is investigated. The absolute atomic oxygen density and its temporal and spatial dynamics are studied by means of two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. A high density of atomic oxygen is detected in the He/O2 mixture with up to 10% O2 content in the feed gas, whereas the atomic oxygen concentration in the Ar/O2 mixture stays below the detection limit of 1013 cm-3. The measured O density near the electrode under the optimal conditions in He/1.75% O2 gas is 4.26  ×  1015 cm-3. The existence of the ground state O (2p 4 3 P) species has been proven in the discharge at a distance up to 12 mm away from the electrodes. Dissociative reactions of the singlet O2 with O3 and deep vacuum ultraviolet radiation, including the radiation of excimer \\text{He}2\\ast , are proposed to be responsible for O (2p 4 3 P) production in the far afterglow. A capability of the surface micro-discharge array delivering atomic oxygen to long distances over a large area is considered very interesting for various biomedical applications.

  2. Alaskan Permafrost Groundwater Storage Changes Derived from GRACE and Ground Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir E. Romanovsky

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is in transition from climate-driven thawing of permafrost. We investigate satellite-derived water equivalent mass changes, snow water equivalent with in situ measurements of runoff and ground-survey derived geoid models from 1999 through 2009. The Alaskan Arctic coastal plain groundwater storage (including wetland bog, thaw pond and lake is increasing by 1.15 ± 0.65 km3/a (area-average 1.10 ± 0.62 cm/a, and Yukon River watershed groundwater storage is decreasing by 7.44 ± 3.76 km3/a (area‑average 0.79 ± 0.40 cm/a. Geoid changes show increases within the Arctic coastal region and decreases within the Yukon River watershed. We hypothesize these changes are linked to the development of new predominately closed- and possibly open-talik in the continuous permafrost zone under large thaw lakes with increases of lakes and new predominately open-talik and reduction of permafrost extent in the discontinuous and sporadic zones with decreases of thaw lakes.

  3. Comparative Study of Ground Measured, Satellite-Derived, and Estimated Global Solar Radiation Data in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boluwaji M. Olomiyesan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the performance of three global solar radiation models and the accuracy of global solar radiation data derived from three sources were compared. Twenty-two years (1984–2005 of surface meteorological data consisting of monthly mean daily sunshine duration, minimum and maximum temperatures, and global solar radiation collected from the Nigerian Meteorological (NIMET Agency, Oshodi, Lagos, and the National Aeronautics Space Agency (NASA for three locations in North-Western region of Nigeria were used. A new model incorporating Garcia model into Angstrom-Prescott model was proposed for estimating global radiation in Nigeria. The performances of the models used were determined by using mean bias error (MBE, mean percentage error (MPE, root mean square error (RMSE, and coefficient of determination (R2. Based on the statistical error indices, the proposed model was found to have the best accuracy with the least RMSE values (0.376 for Sokoto, 0.463 for Kaduna, and 0.449 for Kano and highest coefficient of determination, R2 values of 0.922, 0.938, and 0.961 for Sokoto, Kano, and Kaduna, respectively. Also, the comparative study result indicates that the estimated global radiation from the proposed model has a better error range and fits the ground measured data better than the satellite-derived data.

  4. Measurements for monitoring ground motion resulting from mining operations in the Rhenish brown coal district; Messungen zur Ueberwachung von bergbaubedingten Bodenbewegungen im rheinischen Braunkohlenbergbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duddek, H.; Schaefer, W. [Rheinbraun AG, Koeln (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Coal mining in the Rhenish brown coal district resulted in loose rock slopes with a total height of more than 350 m. Mining operations caused ground motion in open-cast mines, in the slopes and in the region ahead of the face. Internal dumping caused motions of the floors, the overburden tip and te slopes of the open-cast mines. The deformations were measured by different methods, and the evaluations are presented here. As examples, permanent monitoring of a slope using the GEOROBOT measuring system and continuous subsidence measurements in an overburdan dump by means of hydrostatic measuring systems are presented. GEOROBOT ensures quasi-continuous measurements of slope motion with an error of 5-7 mm. Hydrostatic measuring systems on the basis of pressure sensors were developed for measurements of single overburden dump strata and the overburden dump basis during dumping. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den rheinischen Braunkohlentagebauen entstehen Lockergesteinsboeschungen mit Gesamthoehen von mehr als 350 m. Die Gewinnungstaetigkeiten verursachen Entlastungsbewegungen im Tagebau, in den Boeschungen und im Tagebauvorfeld. Die Innenverkippung fuehrt erneut zu Bodenbewegungen im Liegenden, im Kippenkoerper und im Bereich der Tagebauraender. Die auftretenden Deformationen werden mit verschiedenen Messverfahren erfasst, ausgewertet und dargestellt. Beispielhaft werden die permanente Ueberwachung einer Boeschung mittels des automatischen Messsystems GEOROBOT und kontinuierliche Setzungsmessungen in einer Tagebaukippe mit hydrostatischen Messsystemen vorgestellt. Mit GEOROBOT werden quasi kontinuierlich Boeschungsbewegungsmessungen mit einer Genauigkeit von {+-}5 bis 7 mm durchgefuehrt. Auf der Basis von Drucksensoren wurden hydrostatische Messsysteme konzipiert, mit denen Setzungen einzelner Kippscheiben und der Kippenbasis waehrend des Kippenaufbaues ermittelt werden. (orig.)

  5. Optical depth retrievals from Delta-T SPN1 measurements of broadband solar irradiance at ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelles, Victor; Serrano, David; Segura, Sara; Wood, John; Webb, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The SPN1 radiometer, manufactured by Delta-T Devices Ltd., is an instrument designed for the measurement of global solar irradiance and its components (diffuse, direct) at ground level. In the present study, the direct irradiance component has been used to retrieve an effective total optical depth, by applying the Beer-Lambert law to the broadband measurements. The results have been compared with spectral total optical depths derived from two Cimel CE318 and Prede POM01 sun-sky radiometers, located at the Burjassot site in Valencia (Spain), during years 2013 - 2015. The SPN1 is an inexpensive and versatile instrument for the measurement of the three components of the solar radiation without any mobile part and without any need to azimuthally align the instrument to track the sun (http://www.delta-t.co.uk). The three components of the solar radiation are estimated from a combination of measurements performed by 7 different miniature thermopiles. In turn, the Beer-Lambert law has been applied to the broadband direct solar component to obtain an effective total optical depth, representative of the total extinction in the atmosphere. For the assessment of the total optical depth values retrieved with the SPN1, two different sun-sky radiometers (Cimel CE318 and Prede POM01L) have been employed. Both instruments belong to the international networks AERONET and SKYNET. The modified SUNRAD package has been applied in both Cimel and Prede instruments. Cloud affected data has been removed by applying the Smirnov cloud-screening procedure in the SUNRAD algorithm. The broadband SPN1 total optical depth has been analysed by comparison with the spectral total optical depth from the sun-sky radiometer measurements at wavelengths 440, 500, 675, 870 and 1020 nm. The slopes and intercepts have been estimated to be 0.47 - 0.98 and 0.055 - 0.16 with increasing wavelength. The average correlation coefficients and RMSD were 0.80 - 0.83 and 0.034 - 0.036 for all the channels. The

  6. Long-term ground deformation patterns of Bucharest using multi-temporal InSAR and multivariate dynamic analyses: a possible transpressional system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaş, Iuliana; Mendes, Diana A.; Popa, Răzvan-Gabriel; Gheorghe, Mihaela; Popovici, Diana

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this exploratory research is to capture spatial evolution patterns in the Bucharest metropolitan area using sets of single polarised synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite data and multi-temporal radar interferometry. Three sets of SAR data acquired during the years 1992-2010 from ERS-1/-2 and ENVISAT, and 2011-2014 from TerraSAR-X satellites were used in conjunction with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and persistent scatterers (PS) high-resolution multi-temporal interferometry (InSAR) techniques to provide maps of line-of-sight displacements. The satellite-based remote sensing results were combined with results derived from classical methodologies (i.e., diachronic cartography) and field research to study possible trends in developments over former clay pits, landfill excavation sites, and industrial parks. The ground displacement trend patterns were analysed using several linear and nonlinear models, and techniques. Trends based on the estimated ground displacement are characterised by long-term memory, indicated by low noise Hurst exponents, which in the long-term form interesting attractors. We hypothesize these attractors to be tectonic stress fields generated by transpressional movements.

  7. Confronting remote sensing product with ground base measurements across time and scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmokhtarian, A.; Dietze, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem models are essential tools in forecasting ecosystem responses to global climate change. One of the most challenging issues in ecosystem modeling is scaling while preserving landscape characteristics and minimizing loss of information, when moving from point observation to regional scale. There is a keen interest in providing accurate inputs for ecosystem models which represent ecosystem initial state conditions. Remote sensing land cover products, such as Landsat NLCD and MODIS MCD12Q1, provide extensive spatio-temporal coverage but do not capture forest composition and structure. Lidar and hyperspectral have the potential to meet this need but lack sufficient spatial and historical coverage. Forest inventory measurements provide detailed information on the landscape but in a very small footprint. Combining inventory and land cover could improve estimates of ecosystem state and characteristic across time and space. This study focuses on the challenges associated with fusing and scaling the US Forest Service FIA database and NLCD across regional scales to quantify ecosystem characteristics and reduce associated uncertainties. Across Southeast of U.S. 400 stratified random samples of 10x10 km2 landscapes were selected. Data on plant density, species, age, and DBH of trees in FIA plots within each site were extracted. Using allometry equations, the canopy cover of different plant functional types (PFTs) was estimated using a PPA-style canopy model and used to assign each inventory plot to a land cover class. Inventory and land cover were fused in a Bayesian model that adjusts the fractional coverage of inventory plots while accounting for multiple sources of uncertainty. Results were compared to estimates derived from inventory alone, land cover alone, and model spin-up alone. Our findings create a framework of data assimilation to better interpret remote sensing data using ground-based measurements.

  8. In vivo measures of cartilage deformation: patterns in healthy and osteoarthritic female knees using 3T MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotofana, Sebastian; Eckstein, Felix; Wirth, Wolfgang [Paracelsus Medical University, Institute of Anatomy and Musculoskeletal Research, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ainring (Germany); Souza, Richard B.; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas; Majumdar, Sharmila [University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Wyman, Bradley; Hellio-Le Graverand, Marie-Pierre [Pfizer, Groton, CT (United States)

    2011-06-15

    To explore and to compare the magnitude and spatial pattern of in vivo femorotibial cartilage deformation in healthy and in osteoarthritic (OA) knees. One knee each in 30 women (age: 55 {+-} 6 years; BMI: 28 {+-} 2.4 kg/m{sup 2}; 11 healthy and 19 with radiographic femorotibial OA) was examined at 3Tesla using a coronal fat-suppressed gradient echo SPGR sequence. Regional and subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness was determined under unloaded and loaded conditions, with 50% body weight being applied to the knee in 20 knee flexion during imaging. Cartilage became significantly (p < 0.05) thinner during loading in the medial tibia (-2.7%), the weight-bearing medial femur (-4.1%) and in the lateral tibia (-1.8%), but not in the lateral femur (+0.1%). The magnitude of deformation in the medial tibia and femur tended to be greater in osteoarthritic knees than in healthy knees. The subregional pattern of cartilage deformation was similar for the different stages of radiographic OA. Osteoarthritic cartilage tended to display greater deformation upon loading than healthy cartilage, suggesting that knee OA affects the mechanical properties of cartilage. The pattern of in vivo deformation indicated that cartilage loss in OA progression is mechanically driven. (orig.)

  9. Semi-automatic handling of meteorological ground measurements using WeatherProg: prospects and practical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langella, Giuliano; Basile, Angelo; Bonfante, Antonello; De Mascellis, Roberto; Manna, Piero; Terribile, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    WeatherProg is a computer program for the semi-automatic handling of data measured at ground stations within a climatic network. The program performs a set of tasks ranging from gathering raw point-based sensors measurements to the production of digital climatic maps. Originally the program was developed as the baseline asynchronous engine for the weather records management within the SOILCONSWEB Project (LIFE08 ENV/IT/000408), in which daily and hourly data where used to run water balance in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum or pest simulation models. WeatherProg can be configured to automatically perform the following main operations: 1) data retrieval; 2) data decoding and ingestion into a database (e.g. SQL based); 3) data checking to recognize missing and anomalous values (using a set of differently combined checks including logical, climatological, spatial, temporal and persistence checks); 4) infilling of data flagged as missing or anomalous (deterministic or statistical methods); 5) spatial interpolation based on alternative/comparative methods such as inverse distance weighting, iterative regression kriging, and a weighted least squares regression (based on physiography), using an approach similar to PRISM. 6) data ingestion into a geodatabase (e.g. PostgreSQL+PostGIS or rasdaman). There is an increasing demand for digital climatic maps both for research and development (there is a gap between the major of scientific modelling approaches that requires digital climate maps and the gauged measurements) and for practical applications (e.g. the need to improve the management of weather records which in turn raises the support provided to farmers). The demand is particularly burdensome considering the requirement to handle climatic data at the daily (e.g. in the soil hydrological modelling) or even at the hourly time step (e.g. risk modelling in phytopathology). The key advantage of WeatherProg is the ability to perform all the required operations and

  10. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  11. a Compact Dial LIDAR for Ground-Based Ozone Atmospheric Profiling Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, R.; Carrion, W.; Pliutau, D.; Ganoe, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    A compact differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone campaigns. This lidar will be integrated into the Air Quality lidar Network (AQLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver box with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consist of a Coherent Evolution 30 TEM00 1-kHz diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. A custom-designed Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser has a wavelength range of 282 to 300-nm that is selectable between two or more wavelengths. The current wavelengths are online 286.4 nm and offline 293.1 nm. The 527-nm visible beam is transmitted into the atmosphere for aerosol measurements. The fourth harmonic 262 nm beam is split by a beamsplitter into two pump beams that pump each face of the Ce:LiCAF crystal. A short laser cavity consisting of a 60% reflective (1m radius of curvature) output mirror, a dispersive prism and a flat HR mirror is used to produce the UV wavelengths. In order to produce different wavelengths, the high-reflectivity rear mirror is mounted on a servo controlled galvanometer motor to allow rapid tuning between the on and offline ozone wavelengths. Typical laser results are 6.8-W at 527-nm, 800-mW at 262-nm and 130-mW at the UV transmitted wavelengths. The lidar receiver system consists of a receiver telescope with a 40-cm diameter parabolic mirror. A fiber optic cable transmits the received signal from the telescope to the receiver box, which houses the detectors. A separate one inch diameter telescope with PMT and filter is used to sample the very near field to allow

  12. Flexible Adult Acquired Flatfoot Deformity: Comparison Between Weight-Bearing and Non-Weight-Bearing Measurements Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cesar Netto, Cesar; Schon, Lew C; Thawait, Gaurav K; da Fonseca, Lucas Furtado; Chinanuvathana, Apisan; Zbijewski, Wojciech B; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Demehri, Shadpour

    2017-09-20

    The 3-dimensional nature of adult acquired flatfoot deformity can be challenging to characterize using radiographs. We tested the hypothesis that measurements on weight-bearing (WB) cone-beam computed tomography (CT) images were more useful for demonstrating the severity of the deformity than non-weight-bearing (NWB) measurements. We prospectively enrolled 12 men and 8 women (mean age, 52 years; range, 20 to 88 years) with flexible adult acquired flatfoot deformity. The subjects underwent cone-beam CT while standing (WB) and seated (NWB), and images were assessed in the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes by 3 independent observers who performed multiple measurements. Intraobserver and interobserver reliabilities were assessed with the Pearson or Spearman correlation and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively. Measurements were compared using paired Student t tests or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. P cone-beam CT images, with more pronounced deformities on the WB images. The most reliable measurements, based on intraobserver and interobserver reliabilities and the difference between WB and NWB images, were the medial cuneiform-to-floor distance, which averaged 29 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] = 28 to 31 mm) on the NWB images and 18 mm (95% CI = 17 to 19 mm) on the WB images, and the forefoot arch angle (mean, 13° [95% CI = 12° to 15°] and 3.0° [95% CI = 1.4° to 4.6°], respectively) in the coronal view and the cuboid-to-floor distance (mean, 22 mm [95% CI = 21 to 23 mm] and 17 mm [95% CI = 16 to 18 mm], respectively) and the navicular-to-floor distance (mean, 38 mm [95% CI = 36 to 40 mm] and 23 mm [95% CI = 22 to 25 mm], respectively) in the sagittal view. Measurements analogous to traditional radiographic parameters of adult acquired flatfoot deformity are obtainable using high-resolution cone-beam CT. Compared with NWB images, WB images better demonstrated the severity of osseous derangement in patients with flexible adult acquired flatfoot

  13. Pre-ABoVE: Ground-penetrating Radar Measurements of ALT on the Alaska North Slope

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes estimates of permafrost Active Layer Thickness (ALT; cm), and calculated uncertainties, derived using a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system...

  14. Ground Water Level Measurements in Selected Boreholes Near the Site of the Proposed Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, H. Scott

    2007-11-29

    The Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies (HRC) at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) acquired quarterly and continuous data on water levels from approximately 26 boreholes that comprise a periodic monitoring network (Table 1) between October 2003 and September 2007. During this period we continued to observe and analyze short and long-term ground water level trends in periodically monitored boreholes. In this report we summarize and discuss four key findings derived from analysis of water level data acquired during this period: 1. Rapid ground water level rise after storm events in Forty Mile Canyon; 2. Seismically-induced ground water level fluctuations; 3. A sample of synoptic observations and barometric influences on short term fluctuations; and 4. Long term ground water level trends observed from mid-2001 through late-2005.

  15. Quantifying the impact of cloud cover on ground radiation flux measurements using hemispherical images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roupioz, L.; Colin, J.; Jia, L.; Nerry, F.; Menenti, M.

    2015-01-01

    Linking observed or estimated ground incoming solar radiation with cloud coverage is difficult since the latter is usually poorly described in standard meteorological observation protocols. To investigate the benefits of detailed observation and characterization of cloud coverage and

  16. Tunnel Face Stability and the Effectiveness of Advance Drainage Measures in Water-Bearing Ground of Non-uniform Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, Sara; Anagnostou, Georg

    2018-01-01

    Non-uniform permeability may result in complex hydraulic head fields with potentially very high hydraulic gradients close to the tunnel face, which may be adverse for stability depending on the ground strength. Pore pressure relief by drainage measures in advance of the tunnel excavation improves stability, but the effectiveness of drainage boreholes may be low in the case of alternating aquifers and aquitards. This paper analyses the effects of hydraulic heterogeneity and advance drainage quantitatively by means of limit equilibrium computations that take account of the seepage forces acting upon the ground in the vicinity the tunnel face. The piezometric field is determined numerically by means of steady-state, three-dimensional seepage flow analyses considering the heterogeneous structure of the ground and a typical advance drainage scheme consisting of six axial boreholes drilled from the tunnel face. A suite of stability analyses was carried out covering a wide range of heterogeneity scales. The computational results show the effect of the orientation, thickness, location, number and permeability ratio of aquifers and aquitards and provide valuable indications about potentially critical situations, the effectiveness of advance drainage and the adequate arrangement of drainage boreholes. The paper shows that hydraulic heterogeneity results in highly variable face behaviour, even if the shear strength of the ground is constant along the alignment, but ground behaviour is considerably less variable in the presence of advance drainage measures.

  17. Radiative Energetics of Mineral Dust Aerosols from Ground-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Hansell, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne dust aerosols worldwide contribute a significant part to air quality problems and, to some extent, regional climatic issues (e.g., radiative forcing, hydrological cycle, and primary biological productivity in oceans). Evaluating the direct solar radiative effect of dust aerosols is relatively straightforward due in part to the relatively large SIN ratio in broadband irradiance measurements. The longwave (LW) impact, on the other hand, is rather difficult to ascertain since the measured dust signal level (approx.10 W/sq m) is on the same order as the instrumental uncertainties. Although the magnitude of the LW impact is much smaller than that of the shortwave (SW), it can still have a noticeable influence on the energy distribution of Earth-atmosphere system, particularly due to the strong light-absorptive properties commonly found in many terrestrial minerals. The current effort is part of an ongoing research study to perform a global assessment of dust direct aerosol radiative effects (DARE) during major field deployments of key dust source regions worldwide. In this work we present results stemming from two previous field deployments: the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities and the 2008 Asian Monsoon Years, both utilizing NASA Goddard's mobile ground-based facility. The former study focused on transported Saharan dust at Sal (16.73degN, 22.93degW), Cape Verde along the west coast of Africa while the latter focused on Asian dust at Zhangye (39.082degN, 100.276degE), China near the source between the Taklimakan and Gobi deserts. Due to the compelling variability in spatial and temporal scale of dust properties during field experiments, a deterministic I-D radiative transfer model constrained by local measurements (i.e., spectral photometry/interferometry and lidar for physical/microphysical, mineralogy, and single-scattering properties) is employed to evaluate dust's local instantaneous SW/LW DARE both at the surface and at the top of

  18. Measuring Mid- and Near-Field Rotational Ground Motions in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B. S.; Liu, C. C.; Lin, C. R.; Wu, C. F.; Lee, W. H.

    2006-12-01

    Large rotational motions (about 200 micro-radians) excited by the 1999 Chi-Chi (Mw=7.6), Taiwan, earthquake were inferred from a dense accelerometer array 6 km from the northern end of the fault where large surface slips were observed (Huang, 2003). In December, 2000, C. C. Liu and B. S. Huang began measuring rotation motions using a PVC-5 transducer (0.2V/rad/sec) and a GyroChip sensor (1.43 V/rad/sec) at station HRLT near Hualien. However, no significant rotation motions were observed in the 5 years since, probably due to the low sensor sensitivity although many earthquakes occurred nearby. In July, 2004, Liu and Huang began measuring rotation motions using a far more sensitive triaxial sensor, R-1, made by eentec/PMD (50 V/rad/sec) at station HGSD near Cheng-Kung. At 18:50, September 26, 2005, an Mw=4.7 earthquake occurred 29 km south of station HGSD. The observed maximum rotation velocity for the EW, NS and Z component is 306, 499, and 1863 micro-rad/s, respectively. At 17:01, January 8, 2006, an Mw=4.6 earthquake occurred 36 km south of station HGSD. The observed maximum rotation velocity for the EW, NS and Z component is 98, 183, and 217 micro-rad/s, respectively. In both cases, the observed rotation waveforms (prominent frequency about 3 Hz) are far above the background noise (signal-to-noise ratio is usually greater than 100), and imply rotational motions of a few tens of micro- radians. However, the R-1 sensor has not been rigorously calibrated, and Liu and Huang are not sure of these measurements, which are orders of magnitude larger than a simple theoretical model by Bouchon and Aki (1982) would predict for these small earthquakes. To further investigate the question whether rotational ground motions are significant or not in the mid- and near- field of earthquakes, we are now planning a more careful experiment at two sites in Taiwan. Two R-1 and two RSB-20 (made by PMD) rotational velocity sensors are now being tested and calibrated by Robert Nigbor of

  19. The 183-WSL Fast Rain Rate Retrieval Algorithm. Part II: Validation Using Ground Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviola, Sante; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The Water vapour Strong Lines at 183 GHz (183-WSL) algorithm is a method for the retrieval of rain rates and precipitation type classification (convectivestratiform), that makes use of the water vapor absorption lines centered at 183.31 GHz of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit module B (AMSU-B) and of the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) flying on NOAA-15-18 and NOAA-19Metop-A satellite series, respectively. The characteristics of this algorithm were described in Part I of this paper together with comparisons against analogous precipitation products. The focus of Part II is the analysis of the performance of the 183-WSL technique based on surface radar measurements. The ground truth dataset consists of 2.5 years of rainfall intensity fields from the NIMROD European radar network which covers North-Western Europe. The investigation of the 183-WSL retrieval performance is based on a twofold approach: 1) the dichotomous statistic is used to evaluate the capabilities of the method to identify rain and no-rain clouds; 2) the accuracy statistic is applied to quantify the errors in the estimation of rain rates.The results reveal that the 183-WSL technique shows good skills in the detection of rainno-rain areas and in the quantification of rain rate intensities. The categorical analysis shows annual values of the POD, FAR and HK indices varying in the range 0.80-0.82, 0.330.36 and 0.39-0.46, respectively. The RMSE value is 2.8 millimeters per hour for the whole period despite an overestimation in the retrieved rain rates. Of note is the distribution of the 183-WSL monthly mean rain rate with respect to radar: the seasonal fluctuations of the average rainfalls measured by radar are reproduced by the 183-WSL. However, the retrieval method appears to suffer for the winter seasonal conditions especially when the soil is partially frozen and the surface emissivity drastically changes. This fact is verified observing the discrepancy distribution diagrams where2the 183-WSL

  20. How Cities Breathe: Ground-Referenced, Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging Precursor Measurements To Space-Based Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Ira; Tratt, David; Quattrochi, Dale; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John

    2013-01-01

    the complex and often aerosol laden, humid, urban microclimates, atmospheric transport and profile monitoring, spatial resolution, temporal cycles (diurnal and seasonal which involve interactions with the surrounding environment diurnal and seasonal cycles) and representative measurement approaches given traffic realities. Promising approaches incorporate contemporaneous airborne remote sensing and in situ measurements, nocturnal surface surveys, with ground station measurement

  1. Validation and downscaling of Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) soil moisture using ground measurements in the Western Cape, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moller, J

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ) soil moisture product on METOP satellite (12.5 km and downscaled to 1 km resolution), against ground measurements of SWC taken with a Hydrosense II probe along transects of 360–820 m on agricultural and natural land at locations in the Western Cape...

  2. From the Ground Up: Modeling, Measuring, and Constructing Houses. Seeing and Thinking Mathematically in the Middle Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    In this unit, part of the Seeing and Thinking Mathematically in the Middle Grades series, students use mathematics to design and construct a model home from the ground up. Through the process of designing floor plans, constructing walls and roofs, and making cost estimates, students explore key concepts in geometry and measurement and engage in…

  3. Adaptation of the S-5-S Pendulím Seismometer for Measurement of Rotational Ground Motion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knejzlík, Jaromír; Kaláb, Zdeněk; Rambouský, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 4 (2012), s. 649-656 ISSN 1383-4649 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : rotation al ground motion * experimental measurement * mining induced seismicity * S-5-S seismometer Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.388, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10950-012-9279-6

  4. Ground measurements of fuel and fuel consumption from experimental and operational prescribed fires at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek; Clinton S. Wright; Andrew T. Hudak

    2014-01-01

    Ground-level measurements of fuel loading, fuel consumption, and fuel moisture content were collected on nine research burns conducted at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida in November, 2012. A grass or grass-shrub fuelbed dominated eight of the research blocks; the ninth was a managed longleaf pine (Pinus palustrus) forest. Fuel loading ranged from 1.7 Mg ha-1 on a...

  5. Precise ground motion measurements to support multi-hazard analysis in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudogbo, Fifamè; Duro, Javier; Garcia Robles, Javier; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.

    2015-04-01

    Jakarta is the capital of Indonesia and is home to approximately 10 million people on the coast of the Java Sea. The Capital District of Jakarta (DKI) sits in the lowest lying areas of the basin. Its topography varies, with the northern part just meters above current sea level and lying on a flood plain. Subsequently, this portion of the city frequently floods. Flood events have been increasing in severity during the past decade. The February 2007 event inundated 235 Km2 (about 36%) of the city, by up to seven meters in some areas. This event affected more than 2.6 million people; the estimated financial and economic losses from this event amounted to US900 million [1][2]. Inundations continue to occur under any sustained rainfall conditions. Flood events in Jakarta are expected to become more frequent in coming years, with a shift from previously slow natural processes with low frequency to a high frequency process resulting in severe socio-economic damage. Land subsidence in Jakarta results in increased vulnerability to flooding due to the reduced gravitational capacity to channel storm flows to the sea and an increased risk of tidal flooding. It continues at increasingly alarming rates, principally caused by intensive deep groundwater abstraction [3]. Recent studies have found typical subsidence rates of 7.5-10 cm a year. In localized areas of north Jakarta subsidence in the range 15-25 cm a year is occurring which, if sustained, would result in them sinking to 4-5 m below sea level by 2025 [3]. ALTAMIRA INFORMATION, company specialized in ground motion monitoring, has developed GlobalSARTM, which combines several processing techniques and algorithms based on InSAR technology, to achieve ground motion measurements with millimetric precision and high accuracy [4]. Within the RASOR (Rapid Analysis and Spatialisation and Of Risk) project, ALTAMIRA INFORMATION will apply GlobalSARTM to assess recent land subsidence in Jakarta, based on the processing of Very High

  6. Measurement of in vitro and in vivo stent geometry and deformation by means of 3D imaging and stereo-photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierzak, Iwona; Cosentino, Daria; Narracott, Andrew J; Bonhoeffer, Philipp; Diaz, Vanessa; Fenner, John W; Schievano, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    To quantify variability of in vitro and in vivo measurement of 3D device geometry using 3D and biplanar imaging. Comparison of stent reconstruction is reported for in vitro coronary stent deployment (using micro-CT and optical stereo-photogrammetry) and in vivo pulmonary valve stent deformation (using 4DCT and biplanar fluoroscopy). Coronary stent strut length and inter-strut angle were compared in the fully deployed configuration. Local (inter-strut angle) and global (dog-boning ratio) measures of stent deformation were reported during stent deployment. Pulmonary valve stent geometry was assessed throughout the cardiac cycle by reconstruction of stent geometry and measurement of stent diameter. Good agreement was obtained between methods for assessment of coronary stent geometry with maximum disagreement of +/- 0.03 mm (length) and +/- 3 degrees (angle). The stent underwent large, non-uniform, local deformations during balloon inflation, which did not always correlate with changes in stent diameter. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the pulmonary valve stent was feasible for all frames of the fluoroscopy and for 4DCT images, with good correlation between the diameters calculated from the two methods. The largest compression of the stent during the cardiac cycle was 6.98% measured from fluoroscopy and 7.92% from 4DCT, both in the most distal ring. Quantitative assessment of stent geometry reconstructed from biplanar imaging methods in vitro and in vivo has shown good agreement with geometry reconstructed from 3D techniques. As a result of their short image acquisition time, biplanar methods may have significant advantages in the measurement of dynamic 3D stent deformation.

  7. Measurements of Forbush decreases at Mars: both by MSL on ground and by MAVEN in orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Lillis, R. J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Posner, A.; Halekas, J. S.; Zeitlin, C.; Hassler, D.; Lundt, N.; Simonson, P.; Lee, C. O.; Appel, J. K.; Boehm, E.; Boettcher, S. I.; Burmeister, S.; Brinza, D. E.; Cucinotta, F.; Ehresmann, B.; Lohf, H.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Matthiae, D.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.; weigle, G., II

    2017-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), on board Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) rover Curiosity, has been measuring the ground level particle fluxes along with the radiation dose rate at the surface of Mars since August 2012. Similar to neutron monitors at Earth, RAD sees many Forbush decreases (FDs) in the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) induced surface fluxes and dose rates. These FDs are associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and/or streaming/corotating interaction regions (SIRs/CIRs). Orbiting above the Martian atmosphere, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft has also been monitoring space weather conditions at Mars since its arrival in September 2014. The penetrating particle flux channel in the Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) instrument aboard can also be employed to detect FDs. For the first time, we study the statistics and properties of a list of FDs observed in-situ at Mars, seen both on the surface by MSL/RAD and in orbit detected by the MAVEN/SEP instrument. Such a list of FDs can be used for studying ICME propagations and SIR evolutions through the inner-heliosphere. The magnitudes of different FDs can be well-fitted by a power-law distribution. The systematic difference between the magnitudes of the FDs within and outside the Martian atmosphere may be attributed to the energy-dependent modulation of the GCR particles by not only the pass-by ICMEs/SIRs but also the Martian atmosphere. Such an effect has been modeled via transporting particles of differently modulated GCR spectra through the Martian atmosphere.

  8. Ground-based and airborne measurements of volcanic gas emissions at White Island in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirpitz, Jan-Lukas; Poehler, Denis; Bobrowski, Nicole; Christenson, Bruce; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative understanding of volcanic gas emissions has twofold relevance for nature and society: 1) Variation in gas emission and/or in emitted gas ratios are tracers of the dynamic processes in the volcano interior indicating its activity. 2) Volcanic degassing plays an important role for the Earth's climate, for local sometimes even regional air quality and atmospheric chemistry. In autumn 2015, a campaign to White Island Volcano in New Zealand was organized to perform ground-based as well as airborne in-situ and remote sensing gas measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and bromine monoxide (BrO). For all three gases the ratios and total emission rates were determined in different plume types and ages. An overview over the data will be presented with focus on the two most notable outcomes: 1) The first determination of the BrO/SO2 ratio in the White Island plume and a minimum estimate of the volcano's bromine emission rate; two of many parameters, which are important to assess the impact of volcanic degassing on the atmospheric halogen chemistry. 2) In-situ SO2 data was very successfully recorded with the PITSA, a prototype of a portable and cost-effective optical instrument. It is based on the principle of non-dispersive UV absorption spectroscopy and features different advantages over the customary electrochemical sensors, including a sub second response time, negligible cross sensitivities to other gases, and inherent calibration. The campaign data demonstrates the capabilities and limitations of the PITSA and shows, that it can be well applied as substitute for conventional electrochemical systems.

  9. Validation of GOME (ERS-2) NO2 vertical column data with ground-based measurements at Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, D.; Sinyakov, V.; Semenov, V.

    Starting from 1995 the global monitoring of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide is carried out by the measurements of nadir-viewing GOME spectrometer aboard ERS-2 satellite. Continuous validation of that data by means of comparisons with well-controlled ground-based measurements is important to ensure the quality of GOME data products and improve related retrieval algorithms. At the station of Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan) the ground-based spectroscopic observations of NO2 vertical column have been started since 1983. The station is located on the northern shore of Issyk-Kul lake, 1650 meters above the sea level (42.6 N, 77.0 E). The site is equipped with grating spectrometer for the twilight measurements of zenith-scattered solar radiation in the visible range, and applies the DOAS technique to retrieve NO2 vertical column. It is included in the list of NDSC stations as a complementary one. The present study is focused on validation of GOME NO2 vertical column data, based on 8-year comparison with correlative ground-based measurements at Issyk-Kul station in 1996-2003. Within the investigation, an agreement of both individual and monthly averaged GOME measurements with corresponding twilight ground-based observations is examined. Such agreement is analyzed with respect to different conditions (season, sun elevation), temporal/spatial criteria choice (actual overpass location, correction for diurnal variation) and data processing (GDP version 2.7, 3.0). In addition, NO2 vertical columns were integrated from simultaneous stratospheric profile measurements by NASA HALOE and SAGE-II/III satellite instruments and introduced to explain the differences with ground-based observations. In particular cases, NO2 vertical profiles retrieved from the twilight ground-based measurements at Issuk-Kul were also included into comparison. Overall, summertime GOME NO2 vertical columns were found to be systematicaly lower than ground-based data. This work was supported by International Association

  10. A Study on Distribution Measurement and Mechanism of Deformation due to Water Loss of Overburden Layer in Vertical Shaft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunde Piao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on FBG fiber Bragg grating technology and BOTDA distributed optical fiber sensing technology, this study uses fine sand to simulate overburden layer in vertical shaft model equipment. It studies the placing technique and test method for optical fiber sensors in the overburden layer, combined with MODFLOW software to simulate the change of the water head value when the overburden layer is losing water, and obtains the deformation features of overburden layer. The results show, at the beginning of water loss, the vertical deformation increases due to larger hydraulic pressure drop, while the deformation decreases gradually and tends to be stable with the hydraulic pressure drop reducing. The circumferential deformation is closely related to such factors as the distance between each drainage outlet, the variations of water head value, and the method of drainage. The monitoring result based on optical fiber sensing technology is consistent with the characteristics of water loss in overburden layer simulated by MODFLOW software, which shows that the optical fiber sensing technology applied to monitor shaft overburden layer is feasible.

  11. Deformation microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Hughes, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructural characterization and modeling has shown that a variety of metals deformed by different thermomechanical processes follows a general path of grain subdivision, by dislocation boundaries and high angle boundaries. This subdivision has been observed to very small structural scales...

  12. A calibration system for measuring 3D ground truth for validation and error analysis of robot vision algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolkin, R.; Greig, A.; Gilby, J.

    2006-10-01

    An important task in robot vision is that of determining the position, orientation and trajectory of a moving camera relative to an observed object or scene. Many such visual tracking algorithms have been proposed in the computer vision, artificial intelligence and robotics literature over the past 30 years. However, it is seldom possible to explicitly measure the accuracy of these algorithms, since the ground-truth camera positions and orientations at each frame in a video sequence are not available for comparison with the outputs of the proposed vision systems. A method is presented for generating real visual test data with complete underlying ground truth. The method enables the production of long video sequences, filmed along complicated six-degree-of-freedom trajectories, featuring a variety of objects and scenes, for which complete ground-truth data are known including the camera position and orientation at every image frame, intrinsic camera calibration data, a lens distortion model and models of the viewed objects. This work encounters a fundamental measurement problem—how to evaluate the accuracy of measured ground truth data, which is itself intended for validation of other estimated data. Several approaches for reasoning about these accuracies are described.

  13. A survey on ground water by gamma-ray measurement in civil engineering works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Toshio

    1982-01-01

    In the fractured zones where ground water exists, the water permeability is generally large, so that the radioactive elements in the depths of the earth rise relatively easily. The high intensity of the gamma-ray from such elements is thus exhibited in the air. A survey on ground water made possible in this way by the aerial method using a helicopter is described. The method has various advantages including the free setting of courses of traverse, low-speed flying at low altitude, which raises the survey accuracy, communication with those on the ground by easy landin