WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground cover effects

  1. Effects of ground cover from branches of arboreal species on weed growth and maize yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Lima e Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTCultivating maize under systems of alley cropping results in improvements to the soil, a reduction in weeds and an increase in yield. Studies using ground cover from tree shoots produce similar results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on weed growth and maize yield of ground cover made up of 30 t ha-1 (fresh matter of branches from the tree species: neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss, gliricidia [Gliricidia sepium(Jacq. Kunth ex Walp.], leucaena [Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit.] and sabiá (Mimosa caesalpiniifolia Benth.. Two treatment groups (cultivars and weed control were evaluated. The cultivars AG 1041 and AL Bandeirantes were subjected to the following treatments: no hoeing, double hoeing, and ground a cover of branches of the above species when sowing the maize. A randomised block design was used with split lots (cultivars in the lots and ten replications. The cultivars did not differ for green ear or grain yield. Double hoeing was more effective than ground cover at reducing the growth of weeds. However, both weeding and ground cover resulted in similar yields for green ears and grain, which were greater than those obtained with the unweeded maize.

  2. Is ground cover vegetation an effective biological control enhancement strategy against olive pests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paredes

    Full Text Available Ground cover vegetation is often added or allowed to generate to promote conservation biological control, especially in perennial crops. Nevertheless, there is inconsistent evidence of its effectiveness, with studies reporting positive, nil or negative effects on pest control. This might arise from differences between studies at the local scale (e.g. orchard management and land use history, the landscape context (e.g. presence of patches of natural or semi-natural vegetation near the focal orchard, or regional factors, particularly climate in the year of the study. Here we present the findings from a long-term regional monitoring program conducted on four pest species (Bactrocera oleae, Prays oleae, Euphyllura olivina, Saissetia oleae in 2,528 olive groves in Andalusia (Spain from 2006 to 2012. Generalized linear mixed effect models were used to analyze the effect of ground cover on different response variables related to pest abundance, while accounting for variability at the local, landscape and regional scales. There were small and inconsistent effects of ground cover on the abundance of pests whilst local, landscape and regional variability explained a large proportion of the variability in pest response variables. This highlights the importance of local and landscape-related variables in biological control and the potential effects that might emerge from their interaction with practices, such as groundcover vegetation, implemented to promote natural enemy activity. The study points to perennial vegetation close to the focal crop as a promising alternative strategy for conservation biological control that should receive more attention.

  3. Is ground cover vegetation an effective biological control enhancement strategy against olive pests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Daniel; Cayuela, Luis; Gurr, Geoff M; Campos, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Ground cover vegetation is often added or allowed to generate to promote conservation biological control, especially in perennial crops. Nevertheless, there is inconsistent evidence of its effectiveness, with studies reporting positive, nil or negative effects on pest control. This might arise from differences between studies at the local scale (e.g. orchard management and land use history), the landscape context (e.g. presence of patches of natural or semi-natural vegetation near the focal orchard), or regional factors, particularly climate in the year of the study. Here we present the findings from a long-term regional monitoring program conducted on four pest species (Bactrocera oleae, Prays oleae, Euphyllura olivina, Saissetia oleae) in 2,528 olive groves in Andalusia (Spain) from 2006 to 2012. Generalized linear mixed effect models were used to analyze the effect of ground cover on different response variables related to pest abundance, while accounting for variability at the local, landscape and regional scales. There were small and inconsistent effects of ground cover on the abundance of pests whilst local, landscape and regional variability explained a large proportion of the variability in pest response variables. This highlights the importance of local and landscape-related variables in biological control and the potential effects that might emerge from their interaction with practices, such as groundcover vegetation, implemented to promote natural enemy activity. The study points to perennial vegetation close to the focal crop as a promising alternative strategy for conservation biological control that should receive more attention.

  4. [Diversity and stability of arthropod community in peach orchard under effects of ground cover vegetation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jie-xian; Wan, Nian-feng; Ji, Xiang-yun; Dan, Jia-gui

    2011-09-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the arthropod community in peach orchards with and without ground cover vegetation. In the orchard with ground cover vegetation, the individuals of beneficial, neutral, and phytophagous arthropods were 1.48, 1.84 and 0.64 times of those in the orchard without ground cover vegetation, respectively, but the total number of arthropods had no significant difference with that in the orchard without ground cover vegetation. The species richness, Shannon's diversity, and Pielou's evenness index of the arthropods in the orchard with ground cover vegetation were 83.733 +/- 4.932, 4.966 +/- 0.110, and 0.795 +/- 0.014, respectively, being significantly higher than those in the orchard without ground cover vegetation, whereas the Berger-Parker's dominance index was 0.135 +/- 0.012, being significantly lower than that (0.184 +/- 0.018) in the orchard without ground cover vegetation. There were no significant differences in the stability indices S/N and Sd/Sp between the two orchards, but the Nn/Np, Nd/Np, and Sn/Sp in the orchard with ground cover vegetation were 0.883 +/- 0.123. 1714 +/- 0.683, and 0.781 +/- 0.040, respectively, being significantly higher than those in the orchard without ground cover vegetation. Pearson's correlation analysis indicated that in the orchard with ground cover vegetation, the Shannon's diversity index was significantly negatively correlated with Nd/Np, Sd/Sp, and S/N but had no significant correlations with Nn/Np and Sn/Sp, whereas in the orchard without ground cover vegetation, the diversity index was significantly positively correlated with Nn/Np and Nd/Np and had no significant correlations with Sd/Sp, Sn/Sp, and S/N.

  5. [Effects of ground cover and water-retaining agent on winter wheat growth and precipitation utilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ji-Cheng; Guan, Xiu-Juan; Yang, Yong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    An investigation was made at a hilly upland in western Henan Province to understand the effects of water-retaining agent (0, 45, and 60 kg x hm(-2)), straw mulching (3000 and 6000 kg x hm(-2)), and plastic mulching (thickness straw- or plastic mulching was combined with the use of water-retaining agent. Comparing with the control, all the measures increased the soil moisture content at different growth stages by 0.1%-6.5%. Plastic film mulching had the best water-retention effect before jointing stage, whereas water-retaining agent showed its best effect after jointing stage. Soil moisture content was the lowest at flowering and grain-filling stages. Land cover increased the grain yield by 2.6%-20.1%. The yield increment was the greatest (14.2%-20.1%) by the combined use of straw mulching and water-retaining agent, followed by plastic mulching combined with water-retaining agent (11.9% on average). Land cover also improved the precipitation use efficiency (0.4-3.2 kg x mm(-1) x hm(-2)) in a similar trend as the grain yield. This study showed that land cover and water-retaining agent improved soil moisture and nutrition conditions and precipitation utilization, which in turn, promoted the tillering of winter wheat, and increased the grain number per ear and the 1000-grain mass.

  6. Effect of heavy metals on seed germination and seedling growth of common ragweed and roadside ground cover legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jichul; Benoit, Diane L; Watson, Alan K

    2016-06-01

    In southern Québec, supplement roadside ground covers (i.e. Trifolium spp.) struggle to establish near edges of major roads and thus fail to assist turf recruitment. It creates empty niches vulnerable to weed establishment such as common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia). We hypothesized that heavy metal stresses may drive such species shifts along roadside edges. A growth chamber experiment was conducted to assess effects of metals (Zn, Pb, Ni, Cu, and Cd) on germination and seedling behaviors of roadside weed (A. artemisiifolia) and ground cover legumes (Coronilla varia, Lotus corniculatus, and Trifolium arvense). All metals inhibited T. arvense germination, but the effect was least on A. artemisiifolia. Low levels of Pb and Ni promoted germination initiation of A. artemisiifolia. Germination of L. corniculatus was not affected by Zn, Pb, and Ni, but inhibited by Cu and Cd. Germination of C. varia was decreased by Ni, Cu, and Cd and delayed by Zn and Pb. Metal additions hindered seedling growth of all test species, and the inhibitory effect on the belowground growth was greater than on the aboveground growth. Seedling mortality was lowest in A. artemisiifolia but highest in T. arvense when exposed to the metal treatments. L. corniculatus and C. varia seedlings survived when subjected to high levels of Zn, Pb, and Cd. In conclusion, the successful establishment of A. artemisiifolia along roadside edges can be associated with its greater tolerance of heavy metals. The findings also revealed that L. corniculatus is a potential candidate for supplement ground cover in metal-contaminated roadside edges in southern Québec, especially sites contaminated with Zn and Pb.

  7. Effects of post-fire salvage logging and a skid trail treatment on ground cover, soils, and sediment production in the interior western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph W. Wagenbrenner; Lee H. MacDonald; Robert N. Coats; Peter R. Robichaud; Robert E. Brown

    2015-01-01

    Post-fire salvage logging adds another set of environmental effects to recently burned areas, and previous studies have reported varying impacts on vegetation, soil disturbance, and sediment production with limited data on the underlying processes. Our objectives were to determine how: (1) ground-based post-fire logging affects surface cover, soil water repellency,...

  8. Effect of Polythene-covering on Above-ground tuberization and storage roots yield in Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi N

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of polythene-covering on activation of dormant auxiliary buds on the stem for lateral tuber formation and the resultant effect on total storage roots yield. Three time intervals i.e. 1 day after planting, 30 days after planting and 60 days after planting used as treatment, and uncovered stem used as control. Treatments were tested in randomized complete block design with three replications. Regardless of the variety, stem polythene-covering at day 1 after planting showed the highest effect with respect to storage roots production and yield components tested. However, the effect of stem polythene-covering at day 1 after planting in terms of dry mass partitioning to storage roots was the lowest across all the treatments (25.50 to 27.37% of the biomass compared to that of stem covering at day 60 after planting (33.10 to 37.20%. This study opens new perspectives in cassava yield improvement which hitherto has not been exploited.

  9. Intensity of Ground Cover Crop Arachis pintoi, Rhizobium Inoculation and Phosphorus Application and Their Effects on Field Growth and Nutrient Status of Cocoa Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bako Baon

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Arachis pintoiis potentially as a cover crop for cocoa (Theobroma cacaoL. farm, however information regarding its effect on the growth of cocoa plants in the field is very limited. The objective of this experiment is to investigate the combined influence of ground cover crop A. pintoi, rhizobial bacterial inoculation and phosphorus (P fertilizer on the growth of cocoa in the field and nutrient status. This experiment laid out in split-split plot design consisted of three levels of cover crop (without, A. pintoiand Calopogonium caeruleum, two levels of rhizobium inoculation (not inoculated and inoculated and two levels of phosphorus application (no P added and P added. The results showed that in field condition the presence of A. pintoias cover crop did not affect the growth of cocoa. On the other hand, C. caeruleumas cover crop tended to restrict cocoa growth compared to A. pintoi. Application of P increased leaf number of cocoa plant. Biomass production of A. pintoiwas 40% higher than C. caeruleum. Soil organic carbon and nitrogen contents were not affected by ground cover crops, though higher value (0.235% N and 1.63% organic C was obtained from combined treatments of inoculation and P addition or neither inoculation nor P addition. In the case of no rhizobium inoculation, soil N content in cocoa farm with A. pintoicover crop was lower than that of without cover crop or with C. caeruleum. Cover crop increased plant N content when there was no inoculation, on the other hand rhizobium inoculation decreased N content of cocoa tissue. Tissue P content of cocoa plant was not influenced by A. Pintoicover crop or by rhizobium inoculation, except that the P tissue content of cocoa was 28% higher when the cover crop was C. caeruleumand inoculated. Key words : Arachis pintoi, Theobroma cacao, Calopogonium caeruleum, rhizobium, nitrogen, phosphorus.

  10. Effects of spatially variable snow cover on thermal regime and hydrology of an Arctic ice wedge polygon landscape identified using ground penetrating radar and LIDAR datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmeroli, A.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Peterson, J. E.; Hubbard, S. S.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2012-12-01

    Ice wedge polygons are common in Arctic terrains underlain by permafrost. Permafrost degradation could transform low- into high centered polygons, causing profound changes in the hydrologic regime of Arctic lands, which in turn, could affect the energy balance and subsurface biodegradation of organic carbon responsible for greenhouse gas production. Understanding the linkages between microtopography, snow cover, thermal properties, and thaw depth is critical for developing a predictive understanding of terrestrial ecosystems and their feedbacks to climate. In this study, we use high frequency (500-1000 MHz) ground penetrating radar (GPR) data acquired in spring 2012 within the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE) study site in Barrow, AK to characterize the spatial variability of snow distribution. We compare it's distribution to microtopography, estimated using LIDAR data, and thaw depth, also estimated using ground penetrating radar collected at different times during the year and simulated over time using mechanistic thermal-hydrologic modeling. The high spatial resolution offered by LIDAR and ground penetrating radar permit detailed investigations of the control of microtopography on snow and thaw layer depth. Results suggest that microtopographical variations are responsible for substantial differences in snow accumulation. In low centered polygons, snow depth can be up to four times greater in the troughs than on the rims. Both modeling and observations suggest that the microtopography-governed snow thickness affects the thermal properties of the subsurface and thus the thaw layer thickness; regions with thicker snowpack generally correspond to regions of greater thaw depth. We conclude that a transition from low- to high centered polygons will not only impact watershed runoff but, since snow accumulation is sensitive to the microtopography, it will also impact snow distribution. In turn, snow distribution affects thaw depth thickness, and the

  11. Estimating ground water recharge from topography, hydrogeology, and land cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkauer, Douglas S; Ansari, Sajjad A

    2005-01-01

    Proper management of ground water resources requires knowledge of the rates and spatial distribution of recharge to aquifers. This information is needed at scales ranging from that of individual communities to regional. This paper presents a methodology to calculate recharge from readily available ground surface information without long-term monitoring. The method is viewed as providing a reasonable, but conservative, first approximation of recharge, which can then be fine-tuned with other methods as time permits. Stream baseflow was measured as a surrogate for recharge in small watersheds in southeastern Wisconsin. It is equated to recharge (R) and then normalized to observed annual precipitation (P). Regression analysis was constrained by requiring that the independent and dependent variables be dimensionally consistent. It shows that R/P is controlled by three dimensionless ratios: (1) infiltrating to overland water flux, (2) vertical to lateral distance water must travel, and (3) percentage of land cover in the natural state. The individual watershed properties that comprise these ratios are now commonly available in GIS data bases. The empirical relationship for predicting R/P developed for the study watersheds is shown to be statistically viable and is then tested outside the study area and against other methods of calculating recharge. The method produces values that agree with baseflow separation from streamflow hydrographs (to within 15% to 20%), ground water budget analysis (4%), well hydrograph analysis (12%), and a distributed-parameter watershed model calibrated to total streamflow (18%). It has also reproduced the temporal variation over 5 yr observed at a well site with an average error < 12%.

  12. A review of the developments of self-etching primers and adhesives -Effects of acidic adhesive monomers and polymerization initiators on bonding to ground, smear layer-covered teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Kadoma, Yoshinori; Endo, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the developments of self-etching primers and adhesives, with a special focus on the effect of acidic adhesive monomers and polymerization initiators on bonding to ground, smear layer-covered teeth. Ionized acidic adhesive monomers chemically interact with tooth substrates and facilitate good bonding to ground dentin. Polymerization initiators in self-etching primers further promote effective bonding to ground dentin. To promote bonding to both dentin and enamel, phosphonic acid monomers such as 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA) were developed. These novel adhesive monomers also have a water-soluble nature and are hence endowed with sufficient demineralization capability. A new single-bottle, self-etching, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-free adhesive comprising 6-MHPA and 4-acryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-AET) was developed. This novel adhesive enabled strong adhesion to both ground enamel and dentin, but its formulation stability was influenced by pH value of the adhesive. To develop hydrolytically stable, single-bottle, self-etching adhesives, hydrolytically stable, radical-polymerizable acidic monomers with amide or ether linkages have been developed.

  13. Database for estimating tree responses of walnut and other hardwoods to ground cover management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.W. Van Sambeek

    2010-01-01

    The ground cover in plantings of walnut and other hardwoods can substantially affect tree growth and seed production. The number of alternative ground covers that have been suggested for establishment in tree plantings far exceeds the number that have already been tested with walnut and other temperate hardwoods. Knowing how other hardwood species respond to ground...

  14. Estimation of snow cover distribution in Beas basin, Indian Himalaya using satellite data and ground measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Negi; A V Kulkarni; B S Semwal

    2009-10-01

    In the present paper,a methodology has been developed for the mapping of snow cover in Beas basin,Indian Himalaya using AWiFS (IRS-P6)satellite data.The complexities in the mapping of snow cover in the study area are snow under vegetation,contaminated snow and patchy snow. To overcome these problems,field measurements using spectroradiometer were carried out and reflectance/snow indices trend were studied.By evaluation and validation of different topographic correction models,it was observed that,the normalized difference snow index (NDSI)values remain constant with the variations in slope and aspect and thus NDSI can take care of topography effects.Different snow cover mapping methods using snow indices are compared to find the suitable mapping technique.The proposed methodology for snow cover mapping uses the NDSI (estimated using planetary re flectance),NIR band reflectance and forest/vegetation cover information.The satellite estimated snow or non-snow pixel information using proposed methodology was validated with the snow cover information collected at three observatory locations and it was found that the algorithm classify all the sample points correctly,once that pixel is cloud free.The snow cover distribution was estimated using one year (2004 –05)cloud free satellite data and good correlation was observed between increase/decrease areal extent of seasonal snow cover and ground observed fresh snowfall and standing snow data.

  15. Ground cover influence on evaporation and stable water isotopes in soil water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalena Warter, Maria; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Cesar D.; Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Teuling, Adriaan J. Ryan

    2017-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are characterized by complex structures which influence hydrological processes such as evaporation. The vertical stratification of the forest modifies the effect of the evaporation process due to the composition and local distribution of species within the forest. The evaluation of it will improve the understanding of evaporation in forest ecosystems. To determine the influence of forest understory on the fractionation front, four ground cover types were selected from the Speulderbos forest in the Netherlands. The native species of Thamariskmoss (Thuidium thamariscinum), Rough Stalked Feathermoss (Brachythecium rutabulum), and Haircapmoss (Polytrichum commune) as well as one type of litter made up of Douglas-Fir needles (Pseudotsuga menziesii) were used to analyse the rate of evaporation and changes on the isotopic concentration of the soil water on an in-situ basis in a controlled environment. Over a period of 4 weeks soil water content and atmospheric conditions were continuously measured, while the rainfall simulations were performed with different amounts and timings. The reference water added to the boxes keeps a stable composition along the trial period with a δ ^2H value of -42.59±1.15 \\permil} and δ 18O of -6.01±0.21 \\permil}. The evaporation front in the four ground covers is located between 5 and 10 cm depth and deuterium excess values are bigger than 5 \\permil. The litter layer of Douglas-Fir needles is the cover with higher fractionation in respect to the added water at 10 cm depth (δ ^2H: -29.79 \\permil), while the Haircapmoss keeps the lower fractionation rate at 5 cm and 10 cm (δ ^2H: -33.62 and δ ^2H: -35.34 \\permil). The differences showed by the soil water beneath the different ground covers depict the influence of ground cover on fractionation rates of the soil water, underlining the importance of the spatial heterogeneity of the evaporation front in the first 15 cm of soil.

  16. Legume ground covers alter defoliation response of black walnut saplings to drought and anthracnose

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Van Sambeek

    2003-01-01

    Growth and premature defoliation of black walnut saplings underplanted 5 or 6 years earlier with six different ground covers were quantified in response to a summer drought or anthracnose. Walnut saplings growing with ground covers of hairy vetch, crownvetch, and to a lesser extent sericea lespedeza continued to have more rapid height and diameter growth than saplings...

  17. 氯盐融雪剂对4种地被植物种子萌发的影响%Effect of chloride deicing salts on seed germination of four ground covers species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨冬; 周广柱

    2015-01-01

    The effects of deicing salts on seed germination and growth of shoots and roots of four kinds of ground covers (Poa pratensts, Bromus inermis Layss,Coreopsis basalis,Cosmos bipinnatus Cav. ) were studied. The length of roots and shoots of ground covers were also determined in this paper. The results showed that the inhibition effect on seed germination and growth response in the four kinds of ground covers was increased with increasing concentration of deicing salts. Cosmos bipinnatus Cav.showed the highest tolerance to deicing salts, followed by Bromus inermis Layss, Coreopsis basalis and Poa pratensis. The critical value of tolerance to deicing salts were 14.69 g/L, 10.04 g/L, 7.38 g/L and 7.31 g/L forCosmos bipinnatus Cav, Bromus inermis Layss, Coreopsis basalis and Poa pratensis,respectively and the maximum value were 21.08 g/L, 16.51 g/L, 14.67 g/L and 13.50 g/L, respectively.%以草地早熟禾、无芒雀麦、金鸡菊、波斯菊4种地被植物种子为研究材料,探讨不同浓度氯盐类融雪剂对其发芽的影响。结果表明:随着融雪剂浓度的增加,4种地被植物种子萌发、幼芽、幼根生长受到的抑制作用增强。4种地被植物对融雪剂胁迫的耐受能力大小依次为波斯菊>无芒雀麦>金鸡菊>草地早熟禾,耐受临界值分别为14.69 g/L、10.04 g/L、7.38 g/L和7.31 g/L,极限值分别为21.08 g/L、16.51 g/L、14.67 g/L和13.50 g/L。

  18. Diversity and stability of arthropod community in peach orchard under effects of ground cover vegetation%桃园生草对桃树节肢动物群落多样性与稳定性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋杰贤; 万年峰; 季香云; 淡家贵

    2011-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the arthropod community in peach orchards with and without ground cover vegetation. In the orchard with ground cover vegetation, the individuals of beneficial, neutral, and phytophagous arthropods were 1. 48, 1. 84 and 0. 64 times of those in the orchard without ground cover vegetation, respectively, but the total number of arthropods had no significant difference with that in the orchard without ground cover vegetation. The species richness, Shannon' s diversity, and Pielou' s evenness index of the arthropods in the orchard with ground cov-er vegetation were 83. 733±4. 932, 4. 966±0. 110, and 0. 795±0. 014, respectively, being signifi-cantly higher than those in the orchard without ground cover vegetation, whereas the Berger-Parker' s dominance index was 0. 135±0. 012, being significantly lower than that (0. 184±0. 018) in the orchard without ground cover vegetation. There were no significant differences in the stability indices S/N and Sd/Sp between the two orchards, but the Nn/Np, Nd/Np, and Sn/Sp in the orchard with ground cover vegetation were 0. 883±0. 123. 1714±0. 683, and 0. 781 ±0. 040, respectively, being significantly higher than those in the orchard without ground cover vegetation. Pearson' s cor-relation analysis indicated that in the orchard with ground cover vegetation, the Shannon' s diversity index was significantly negatively correlated with Nd/Np, Sd/Sp, and S/N but had no significant correlations with Nn/Np and Sn/Sp, whereas in the orchard without ground cover vegetation, the di-versity index was significantly positively correlated with Nn/Np and Nd/Np and had no significant correlations with Sd/Sp ,Sn/Sp, and S/N.%对种植白三叶草的桃园(生草桃园)和非生草桃园的桃树节肢动物群落进行分析比较.结果表明:生草桃园桃树天敌、中性类群和植食类群数量分别是非生草桃园的1.48、1.84和0.64倍,而节肢动物群落个体总数无显著差异;与非

  19. Law school design blends functionalism, energy conservation. [Earth-covered with ground-cover growing on roof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    Construction is under way on a new University of Minnesota Law School Building, whose distinctive features include a stepped design on its southern elevation and an earth-covered roof to promote energy conservation. The design is described with emphasis on the library facilities. Energy conservation was a major design factor. The portion of the earth-covered roof will be 15 inches thick planted with low ground-cover vegetation. Overall ..mu.. value of the building envelope will be 0.11. (MCW)

  20. Interannual changes in snow cover and its impact on ground surface temperatures in Livingston Island (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwendam, Alexandre; Ramos, Miguel; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2015-04-01

    In permafrost areas the seasonal snow cover is an important factor on the ground thermal regime. Snow depth and timing are important in ground insulation from the atmosphere, creating different snow patterns and resulting in spatially variable ground temperatures. The aim of this work is to characterize the interactions between ground thermal regimes and snow cover and the influence on permafrost spatial distribution. The study area is the ice-free terrains of northwestern Hurd Peninsula in the vicinity of the Spanish Antarctic Station "Juan Carlos I" and Bulgarian Antarctic Station "St. Kliment Ohridski". Air and ground temperatures and snow thickness data where analysed from 4 sites along an altitudinal transect in Hurd Peninsula from 2007 to 2012: Nuevo Incinerador (25 m asl), Collado Ramos (110 m), Ohridski (140 m) and Reina Sofia Peak (275 m). The data covers 6 cold seasons showing different conditions: i) very cold with thin snow cover; ii) cold with a gradual increase of snow cover; iii) warm with thick snow cover. The data shows three types of periods regarding the ground surface thermal regime and the thickness of snow cover: a) thin snow cover and short-term fluctuation of ground temperatures; b) thick snow cover and stable ground temperatures; c) very thick snow cover and ground temperatures nearly constant at 0°C. a) Thin snow cover periods: Collado Ramos and Ohridski sites show frequent temperature variations, alternating between short-term fluctuations and stable ground temperatures. Nuevo Incinerador displays during most of the winter stable ground temperatures; b) Cold winters with a gradual increase of the snow cover: Nuevo Incinerador, Collado Ramos and Ohridski sites show similar behavior, with a long period of stable ground temperatures; c) Thick snow cover periods: Collado Ramos and Ohridski show long periods of stable ground, while Nuevo Incinerador shows temperatures close to 0°C since the beginning of the winter, due to early snow cover

  1. Effects of ground cover on the niches of main insect pests and their natural enemies in peach orchard%桃园生草对桃树上主要害虫及天敌生态位的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万年峰; 季香云; 蒋杰贤; 淡家贵

    2011-01-01

    horizontal niche (0. 996) , widest vertical niche (0. 983 ) , and widest time niche ( 0. 932) , while the corre sponding values in the peach orchard without T. repens were 0. 900, 0. 800, and 0. 818, respec tively. The three-dimensional niche of the mam msect pests in peach orchard with ground covei T. repens was Halyomorpha halys > Cicadellidae > Fulgoridae > Aphididae > Lyonetia clerkella > Dichocrocis punctiferalis > Aromia bungii > Grapholitha molesta > Pseudaulacaspis pentagona, while that in the peach orchard without T. repens was Aphididae > Cicadellidae > Halyomorpha halys > Aromia bungii > Grapholitha molesta > Fulgoridae > Pseudaulacaspis pentagona > Lyone tia clerkella > Dichocrocis punctiferalis. The three-dimensional niche of the main natural enemies in peach orchard with ground cover T. repens was spider > Orius spp. > Chrysopa > parasitic wasp > Coccinellidae > Syrphidae, while that in the peach orchard without T. repens was spider > Chrysopa > Coccinellidae > Parasitic wasp > OriuS spp. > Syrphidae. The OriuS spp. , Coc cinellidae, Syrphidae, and parasitic wasp in the peach orchard without T. repens all showed an evidence of delayed activity. The three-dimensional niches of natural enemy Orius spp. and main insect-pests overlapped greater in the orchard with T. repens than in that without T. repens, and the temporal synchrony and spatial similarity of natural enemies and insect-pests were overall su perior in the orchard with T. repens. Our results showed the positive effect of planting clover as ground cover on the biological control of insect pests in peach orchard.

  2. Diseases of Ornamental and Shade Trees, Shrubs, Vines, and Ground Covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Lester P.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University covers the identification and control of common ornamental trees, shrubs, and ground cover diseases. The publication is divided into sections. The first section discusses the diseases of ornamental and shade trees, including general diseases and diseases of specific…

  3. Effects of Different Concentrations of Gibberellin on the Flowering of Ground-cover Chrysanthemum 'Zichonglou'%不同浓度赤霉素对地被菊‘紫重楼’开花特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王媛; 崔雁汇; 孔一昌; 张强; 吕晋慧

    2012-01-01

    The effects of different concentrations of gibberellin on plant height, crown breadth, flowering characteristic (flowering season, flower number, petals number, flower diameter) and the pollen germination viability of ground-cover Chrysanthemum ' Zichonglou' were studied, which could provided substantial base for the hybrid breeding and regulating flower season of ground-cover Chrysanthemum. The results showed that 100-500 mg/L of gibberellin might cause the dewing color season 6-10 days ahead of time, the starting flower season 7-12 days ahead of time, and the abundant flowering season 2-7 days ahead of time. With the increase of gibberellin concentration ranging from 0 to 500 mg/L, internode and plant height were increased, but the flower number, petals number, crown breadth, and flower diameter were inhibited. The longest internode and plant height occurred with 500 mg/L gibberellin treatment. The pollen germination viability were improved by 100-300 mg/L of gibberellin, and impressed by 500 mg/L gibberellin.%笔者探讨不同浓度赤霉素(GA3)对地被菊‘紫重楼’株高、冠幅、开花特性(花期、开花量、花朵重瓣性、花径)和花粉生活力的影响,旨在为地被菊杂交育种、花期调控提供参考依据.试验结果表明,喷施100~500 mg/L GA3后,‘紫重楼’露色期、始花期及盛花期分别提前6~10天、7~12天和2~7天;GA3有利于节间伸长和株高增加,但植株开花量和花瓣重瓣性降低,冠幅、花径减小.其中,500 mg/L GA3处理下的地被菊节间长度与株高显著高于其他水平;100~300 mg/L GA3处理可促进花粉生活力,500 mg/L对花粉生活力有抑制作用.

  4. Effects of environmental chemicals on useful insects and pests. Studies on the aluminium tolerance of some forest ground cover species. Nutz- und Schadinsekten in Abhaengigkeit von Umweltchemikalien. Aluminiumtoleranz von Waldbodenpflanzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, A.; Bogenschuetz, H.; Buecking, W.; Hradetzky, J.; Koenig, E.; Kublin, E.

    1986-01-01

    In the present issue one of four contributions deals with the aluminium tolerance of some forest ground cover species. Growth results are indicated for the forest ground cover species Poa nemoralis, Luzula luzuloides, Deschampsia flexuosa, Nardus stricta, Milium effusum and Melica uniflora as potted cultures on sand receiving nitrogen in different ratios of form and in different concentrations, the aluminium concentration being variable in the culture broths with a pH-value of 4.0. Low aluminium concentrations (10.8 mg/l Al) in the culture broths enhanced the growth of all species, some species were adversely affected and showed impaired growth (Poa nemoralis, Milium effusum, Melica uniflora) from high aluminium-ion concentrations (108 mg/l Al), but others had their best growth results - varying according to the form of nitrogen offered - only if aluminium concentrations in the culture broth were high. The species examined accumulate aluminium in their above-ground biomass to varying extents. With 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Unsteady propulsion in ground effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Goon; Kim, Boyoung; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    Many animals in nature experience hydrodynamic benefits by swimming or flying near the ground, and this phenomenon is commonly called 'ground effect'. A flexible fin flapping near the ground was modelled, inspired by animals swimming. A transverse heaving motion was prescribed at the leading edge, and the posterior parts of the fin were passively fluttering by the fin-fluid interaction. The fin moved freely horizontally in a quiescent flow, by which the swimming speed was dynamically determined. The fin-fluid interaction was considered by using the penalty immersed boundary method. The kinematics of the flexible fin was altered by flapping near the ground, and the vortex structures generated in the wake were deflected upward, which was qualitatively analyzed by using the vortex dipole model. The swimming speed and the thrust force of the fin increased by the ground effects. The hydrodynamic changes from flapping near the ground affected the required power input in two opposite ways; the increased and decreased hydrodynamic pressures beneath the fin hindered the flapping motion, increasing the power input, while the transversely reduced flapping motion induced the decreased power input. The Froude propulsive efficiency was increased by swimming in the ground effects Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  6. Fractional Vegetation Cover of East African Wetlands Observed on Ground and from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Amler, E.; Guerschmann, J. P.; Scarth, P.; Behn, K.; Thonfeld, F.

    2016-08-01

    Wetlands are important ecosystems providing numerous ecosystem services. They are of particular importance to communities in East Africa where agriculture is the most important economic sector and where food availability to households critical. During an intensive field campaign in the dry season of 2013 were Fractional Vegetation Cover (FVC) measurements, botanical vegetation cover and vegetation structure estimates acquired in three wetland test sites within the East African region. FVC cover data were collated in three strata: ground layer, midstorey and overstorey (woody vegetation greater than 2 m). Fractional cover estimates for the green and no-green vegetative fraction were calculated for Landsat MODIS imagery. These FVC data products were evaluated a) with FVC field data and b) relative to each other for their usability in the East African region. First results show some promise for further studies.

  7. Modeling increasing effect of soil temperature through plastic film mulch in ground cover rice production system using CERES-Rice%基于CERES-Rice模型的覆膜旱作稻田增温效应模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马雯雯; 金欣欣; 石建初; 宁松瑞; 李森; 陶玥玥; 张亚男; 左强

    2015-01-01

    水稻覆膜旱作技术具有显著的节水、增温、防污和减排效应,是节水稻作技术体系的重要措施之一,将CERES-Rice模型用于覆膜旱作条件时,必须首先解决覆膜增温效应的准确模拟问题。该文拟应用热量传输理论及目前旱地作物生产系统中采用的覆膜增温效应模拟方法,来模拟水稻覆膜旱作生产体系中的增温效应,从而为完善 CERES-Rice 模型并使其能用于覆膜旱作水稻的生长模拟奠定基础。参数调校与模型检验验证通过2013、2014年在湖北房县开展的2 a水稻覆膜旱作田间试验来进行,共涉及淹水(对照)、覆膜湿润栽培和覆膜旱作共3个水分处理,分别对2个生长季、2个覆膜处理地表5 cm及地下10、20 cm处温度的变化过程进行了模拟,结果表明:经过参数调校后,所建立的覆膜增温模型可较好地模拟覆膜稻田地表和剖面上土壤温度的变化规律,地表5 cm处土壤温度模拟值与实测值的均方根差、相对均方根差分别低于1.8℃和10%,相关系数在0.89以上(P<0.01);尽管地下10、20 cm处的模拟误差稍大,也基本可满足要求,相应的均方根误差<3.2℃,相对均方根差<15%,相关系数>0.65(P<0.01)。%As one of the most promising water-saving rice production technologies, the ground cover rice production system (GCRPS) has been found to save water application, increase soil temperature, and reduce nitrogen pollution and methane emission. However, the feasibility of CERES-Rice, a software package widely and successfully applied in the traditional paddy rice production system (TPRPS), for simulating the rice growth in the GCRPS still remains unknown and needs further research. Undoubtedly, it should be based on accurately quantifying the effect of soil temperature enhancement caused by the ground cover material (chosen as the plastic film in this study). Therefore, the objective of

  8. The role of snow cover in ground thermal conditions in three sites with contrasted topography in Sierra Nevada (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Marc; Salvador, Ferran; Gómez Ortiz, Antonio; Salvà, Montserrat

    2014-05-01

    Snow cover has a high capacity to insulate the soil from the external thermal influences. In regions of high snowfall, such as the summit areas of the highest Iberian mountain ranges, the presence of a thick snow cover may condition the existence or inexistence of permafrost conditions. In order to analyze the impact of the thickness, duration and interannual variability of snow cover on the ground thermal regime in the massif of Sierra Nevada, we have analyzed soil temperatures at a depth of 2 cm for the period 2006-2012 in three sites of contrasting topography as well as air temperatures for the same period: (a) Corral del Veleta (3100 m) in a rock glacier located in the northern Veleta cirque, with high and persistent snow cover. (b) Collado de los Machos (3300 m), in a summit area with relict stone circles, with little snow accumulation due to wind effect. (c) Río Seco (3000 m), in a solifluction lobe located in this southern glacial cirque with moderate snowfall. Considering the air and 2 cm depth soil temperature records, the freezing degree-days were calculated for each year from November to May in order to characterize the role of snow as a thermal insulator of the ground during the cold season (Frauenfeld et al., 2007). In all cases, the highest values of freezing degree-days correspond to years with little snowfall (2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2011-2012), while in years with a thicker snow cover (2008-2009, 2009-2010, 2010-2011) the total freezing degree-days were significantly lower. The accumulation of freezing degree-days is maximum at the wind-exposed site of Collado de los Machos, where the wind redistributes snow and favours the penetration of cold into the ground. The opposite pattern occurs in the Veleta cirque, where most persistent snow cover conditions determine lower accumulated freezing degree-days than in Collado de los Machos and Rio Seco.

  9. Assessing post-fire ground cover in Mediterranean shrublands with field spectrometry and digital photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montorio Llovería, Raquel; Pérez-Cabello, Fernando; García-Martín, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Fire severity can be assessed by identifying and quantifying the fractional abundance of post-fire ground cover types, an approach with great capacity to predict ecosystem response. Focused on shrubland formations of Mediterranean-type ecosystems, three burned areas (Ibieca and Zuera wildfires and Peñaflor experimental fire) were sampled in the summers of 2006 and 2007. Two different ground measurements were made for each of the 356 plots: (i) 3-band high spatial resolution photography (HSRP) and (ii) the hemispherical-conical reflectance factor (HCRF) in the visible to near-infrared spectral range (VNIR, 400-900 nm). Stepwise multiple lineal regression (SMLR) models were fitted to spectral variables (HCRF, first derivative spectra or FDS, and four absorption indices) to estimate the fractional cover of seven post-fire ground cover types (vegetation and soil - unburned and charred components - and ash - char and ash, individually and as a combined category). Models were developed and validated at the Peñaflor site (training, n = 217; validation, n = 88) and applied to the samples from the Ibieca and Zuera sites (n = 51). The best results were observed for the abundance estimations of green vegetation (Radj.20.70-0.90), unburned soil (Radj.20.40-0.75), and the combination of ashes (Radj.20.65-0.80). In comparison of spectral data, FDS outperforms reflectance or absorption data because of its higher accuracy levels and, importantly, its greater capacity to yield generalizable models. Future efforts should be made to improve the estimation of intermediate severity levels and upscaling the developed models. In the context of fire severity assessment, our study demonstrates the potential of hyperspectral data to estimate in a quick and objective manner post-fire ground cover fractions and thus provide valuable information to guide management responses.

  10. Land cover for Ukraine: the harmonization of remote sensing and ground-based data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiv, M.; Shchepashchenko, D.; Shvidenko, A.; See, L. M.; Bun, R.

    2012-12-01

    This study focuses on the development of a land cover map of the Ukraine through harmonization of remote sensing and ground-based data. At present there is no land cover map of the Ukraine available that is of sufficient accuracy for use in environmental modeling. The existing remote sensing data are not enough accurate. In this study we compare the territory of the Ukraine from three global remote sensing products (GlobCover 2009, MODIS Land Cover and GLC-2000) using a fuzzy logic methodology in order to capture the uncertainty in the classification of land cover. The results for the Ukraine show that GlobCover 2009, MODIS Land Cover and GLC-2000 have a fuzzy agreement of 65%. We developed a weighted algorithm for the creation of a land cover map based on an integration of a number of global land cover and remote sensing products including the GLC-2000, GlobCover 2009, MODIS Land Cover, the Vegetation Continuous Fields product, digital map of administrative units and forest account data at the local level. This weighted algorithm is based on the results of comparing these products and an analysis of a dataset of validation points for different land cover types in the Ukraine. We applied this algorithm to generate a forest land cover type map. This raster map contains a forest expectation index that was calculated for each pixel. Forest land was then allocated based on forest statistics at the local level. Areas with a higher forest expectation index were allocated with forest first until the results matched the forest statistics. The result is the first digital map of forest (with a spatial resolution of 300m) for the Ukraine, which consistent with forest and land accounts, remote sensing datasets and GIS products. The forest land was well defined in forest rich areas (i.e. in the northern part of the Ukraine, the Carpathians and the Crimea); well less accurate areas were identified in the steppe due to heterogeneous land cover. Acknowledgements. This research was

  11. Covering of heating load of object by using ground heat as a renewable energy source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čenejac Aleksandra R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rational use of energy, improving energy performance of buildings and use of renewable energy sources are the most important measures for reducing consumption of non-renewable primary energy (solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels, environmental protection and for the future sustainable development of mankind. In the total primary energy consumption great part is related to building industry, for heating spaces in which people stay and live. Renewable energy sources (RES present natural resources and they are one of the alternatives that allow obtaining heat for heating buildings, and by that they provide a significant contribution to the energy balance of a country. This paper analyzes the participation of ground source as RES, when the vertical (the probe in the ground and horizontal (registry in the ground heat exchangers are used for covering heating load of the building.

  12. Effect of intercropping wheat with forage legumes on wheat production and ground cover Efeito do consórcio entre trigo e leguminosas forrageiras na produção de trigo e na cobertura de solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Omar Tomm

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of winter legumes in southern Brazil is hindered by the slow growth of these species during establishment exposing soil surface to erosion. Introduction of these species along with spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. was studied as a means of increasing ground cover during their initial establishment period, without reducing wheat grain yield. Two experiments were conducted in nearby areas, one in each year. Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L., red clover (Trifolium pratense L. cultivar Quiñequelli, white clover (T. repens L., and arrowleaf clover (T. vesiculosum Savi did not reduce cereal yield in either year. Wheat yield was reduced by intercropped red clover cultivar Kenland and by subclover (T. subterraneum L. in the first year. No grain yield differences due to intercropping with any legume were detected in the second year, when rainfall was below normal. Intercropping with wheat showed to be a practical alternative to enhance ground cover at establishing forage legumes.O uso de leguminosas forrageiras no sul do Brasil é dificultado pelo lento crescimento dessas espécies no ano de estabelecimento, o que expõe o solo à erosão. Estudou-se a introdução dessas leguminosas concomitantemente ao trigo (Triticum aestivum L. com o objetivo de aumentar a cobertura de solo durante o seu desenvolvimento inicial, sem reduzir o rendimento de grãos de trigo. Foram realizados dois experimentos em áreas próximas, um em cada ano. O cornichão (Lotus corniculatus L., o trevo-vermelho (Trifolium pratense L., cultivar Quiñequelli, o trevo-branco (T. repens L. e o trevo-vesiculoso (T. vesiculosum Savi não reduziram o rendimento de trigo em nenhum dos anos. O rendimento de grãos de trigo foi reduzido pelo trevo-vermelho, cultivar Kenland, e pelo trevo subterrâneo (T. subterraneum L., no primeiro ano. No segundo ano, em que, durante o período de desenvolvimento de trigo, a precipitação pluvial foi inferior à normal, não se

  13. Impact of the variability of the seasonal snow cover on the ground surface regimes in Hurd Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwendam, Alexandre; Ramos, Miguel; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2014-05-01

    Seasonally snow cover has a great impact on the thermal regime of the active layer and permafrost. Ground temperatures over a year are strongly affected by the timing, duration, thickness, structure and physical and thermal properties of snow cover. The purpose of this communication is to characterize the shallow ground thermal regimes, with special reference to the understanding of the influence snow cover in permafrost spatial distribution, in the ice-free areas of the north western part of Hurd Peninsula in the vicinity of the Spanish Antarctic Station "Juan Carlos I" and Bulgarian Antarctic Station "St. Kliment Ohridski". We have analyzed and ground temperatures as well as snow thickness data in four sites distributed along an altitudinal transect in Hurd Peninsula from 2007 to 2013: Nuevo Incinerador (25 m asl), Collado Ramos (110 m), Ohridski (140 m) and Reina Sofia Peak (275 m). At each study site, data loggers were installed for the monitoring of air temperatures (at 1.5 m high), ground temperatures (5, 20 and 40 cm depth) and for snow depth (2, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 and 160 cm) at 4-hour intervals. The winter data suggests the existence of three types of seasonal stages regarding the ground surface thermal regime and the thickness of snow cover: (a) shallow snow cover with intense ground temperatures oscillations; (b) thick snow cover and low variations of soil temperatures; and (c) stability of ground temperatures. Ground thermal conditions are also conditioned by a strong variability. Winter data indicates that Nuevo Incinerador site experiences more often thicker snow cover with higher ground temperatures and absence of ground temperatures oscillations. Collado Ramos and Ohridski show frequent variations of snow cover thickness, alternating between shallow snow cover with high ground temperature fluctuation and thick snow cover and low ground temperature fluctuation. Reina Sofia in all the years has thick snow cover with little variations in soil

  14. Mechanizing Weakly Ground Termination Proving of Term Rewriting Systems by Structural and Cover-Set Inductions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Feng

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents three formal proving methods for generalized weakly ground terminating property, i.e.,weakly terminating property in a restricted domain of a term rewriting system, one with structural induction, one with cover-set induction, and the third without induction, and describes their mechanization based on a meta-computation model for term rewriting systems-dynamic term rewriting calculus. The methods can be applied to non-terminating, nonconfluent and/or non-left-linear term rewriting systems. They can do "forward proving" by applying propositions in the proof, as well as "backward proving" by discovering lemmas during the proof.

  15. Evidence of wintertime CO2 emission from snow-covered grounds in high latitudes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方精云; 唐艳鸿KOIZUMI; Hiroshi(Division; of; Plant; Ecology; National; Institute; of; Agro-Environmental; Sciences; Tsukuba; 305; Japan)BEKKU; Yukiko(National; Polar; Institute; Tokyo; 192; Japan)

    1999-01-01

    In order to measure CO2 flux in wintertime arctic ecosystems, CO2 gas was sampled from various snow-covered grounds by using a closed chamber method during the First China Arctic Scientific Expedition from March to May in 1995. The CO2 gas samples were measured by using an infra-red analyzer (IRGA). The results showed that (ⅰ) CO2 emission was detected from all kinds of the snow-covered grounds, which provides direct evidence that the arctic tundra is functioning as a source of atmospheric CO2; (ⅱ) CO2 release was also detected from the permanent ice profile and icecap, and (ⅲ) CO2 evolution from terrestrial ecosystems in higher latitudes increased with an increase of surface temperature in accordance with the exponential function. This indicates a close coincidence with that under normal temperature conditions, and provides a useful method for predicting change in CO2 flux in the arctic ecosystems with the global climate change.

  16. Cover Crops Effects on Soil Chemical Properties and Onion Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Assis de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cover crops contribute to nutrient cycling and may improve soil chemical properties and, consequently, increase crop yield. The aim of this study was to evaluate cover crop residue decomposition and nutrient release, and the effects of these plants on soil chemical properties and on onion (Allium cepa L. yield in a no-tillage system. The experiment was carried out in an Inceptisol in southern Brazil, where cover crops were sown in April 2012 and 2013. In July 2013, shoots of weeds (WD, black oats (BO, rye (RY, oilseed radish (RD, oilseed radish + black oats (RD + BO, and oilseed radish + rye (RD + RY were cut at ground level and part of these material from each treatment was placed in litter bags. The litter bags were distributed on the soil surface and were collected at 0, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 days after distribution (DAD. The residues in the litter bags were dried, weighed, and ground, and then analyzed to quantify lignin, cellulose, non-structural biomass, total organic carbon (TOC, N, P, K, Ca, and Mg. In November 2012 and 2013, onion crops were harvested to quantify yield, and bulbs were classified according to diameter, and the number of rotted and flowering bulbs was determined. Soil in the 0.00-0.10 m layer was collected for chemical analysis before transplanting and after harvesting onion in December 2012 and 2013. The rye plant residues presented the highest half-life and they released less nutrients until 90 DAD. The great permanence of rye residue was considered a protection to soil surface, the opposite was observed with spontaneous vegetation. The cultivation and addition of dry residue of cover crops increased the onion yield at 2.5 Mg ha-1.

  17. Experimental evaluation of ALS point cloud ground extraction over different land cover in the Malopolska Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniowska, Karolina; Mandlburger, Gottfried; Klimczyk, Agata

    2013-04-01

    The paper presents an evaluation of different terrain point extraction algorithms for Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point clouds. The research area covers eight test sites in the Małopolska Province (Poland) with varying point density between 3-15points/m² and surface as well as land cover characteristics. In this paper the existing implementations of algorithms were considered. Approaches based on mathematical morphology, progressive densification, robust surface interpolation and segmentation were compared. From the group of morphological filters, the Progressive Morphological Filter (PMF) proposed by Zhang K. et al. (2003) in LIS software was evaluated. From the progressive densification filter methods developed by Axelsson P. (2000) the Martin Isenburg's implementation in LAStools software (LAStools, 2012) was chosen. The third group of methods are surface-based filters. In this study, we used the hierarchic robust interpolation approach by Kraus K., Pfeifer N. (1998) as implemented in SCOP++ (Trimble, 2012). The fourth group of methods works on segmentation. From this filtering concept the segmentation algorithm available in LIS was tested (Wichmann V., 2012). The main aim in executing the automatic classification for ground extraction was operating in default mode or with default parameters which were selected by the developers of the algorithms. It was assumed that the default settings were equivalent to the parameters on which the best results can be achieved. In case it was not possible to apply an algorithm in default mode, a combination of the available and most crucial parameters for ground extraction were selected. As a result of these analyses, several output LAS files with different ground classification were achieved. The results were described on the basis of qualitative and quantitative analyses, both being in a formal description. The classification differences were verified on point cloud data. Qualitative verification of ground extraction was

  18. AN ASSESSMENT OF CITIZEN CONTRIBUTED GROUND REFERENCE DATA FOR LAND COVER MAP ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Foody

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that an accuracy assessment should be part of a thematic mapping programme. Authoritative good or best practices for accuracy assessment have been defined but are often impractical to implement. Key reasons for this situation are linked to the ground reference data used in the accuracy assessment. Typically, it is a challenge to acquire a large sample of high quality reference cases in accordance to desired sampling designs specified as conforming to good practice and the data collected are normally to some degree imperfect limiting their value to an accuracy assessment which implicitly assumes the use of a gold standard reference. Citizen sensors have great potential to aid aspects of accuracy assessment. In particular, they may be able to act as a source of ground reference data that may, for example, reduce sample size problems but concerns with data quality remain. The relative strengths and limitations of citizen contributed data for accuracy assessment are reviewed in the context of the authoritative good practices defined for studies of land cover by remote sensing. The article will highlight some of the ways that citizen contributed data have been used in accuracy assessment as well as some of the problems that require further attention, and indicate some of the potential ways forward in the future.

  19. Ground penetrating radar detection of subsnow liquid overflow on ice-covered lakes in interior Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gusmeroli

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lakes are abundant throughout the pan-Arctic region. For many of these lakes ice cover lasts for up to two thirds of the year. This frozen cover allows human access to these lakes, which are therefore used for many subsistence and recreational activities, including water harvesting, fishing, and skiing. Safe access to these lakes may be compromised, however, when, after significant snowfall, the weight of the snow acts on the ice and causes liquid water to spill through weak spots and overflow at the snow-ice interface. Since visual detection of subsnow liquid overflow (SLO is almost impossible our understanding on SLO processes is still very limited and geophysical methods that allow SLO detection are desirable. In this study we demonstrate that a commercially available, lightweight 1GHz, ground penetrating radar system can detect and map extent and intensity of SLO. Radar returns from wet snow-ice interfaces are at least twice as much in strength than returns from dry snow-ice interface. The presence of SLO also affects the quality of radar returns from the base of the lake ice. During dry conditions we were able to profile ice thickness of up to 1 m, conversely, we did not retrieve any ice-water returns in areas affected by SLO.

  20. Temporal monitoring of the soil freeze-thaw cycles over snow-cover land by using off-ground GPR

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2013-07-01

    We performed off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR) measurements over a bare agricultural field to monitor the freeze-thaw cycles over snow-cover. The GPR system consisted of a vector network analyzer combined with an off-ground monostatic horn antenna, thereby setting up an ultra-wideband stepped-frequency continuous-wave radar. Measurements were performed during nine days and the surface of the bare soil was exposed to snow fall, evaporation and precipitation as the GPR antenna was mounted 110 cm above the ground. Soil surface dielectric permittivity was retrieved using an inversion of time-domain GPR data focused on the surface reflection. The GPR forward model used combines a full-waveform solution of Maxwell\\'s equations for three-dimensional wave propagation in planar layered media together with global reflection and transmission functions to account for the antenna and its interactions with the medium. Temperature and permittivity sensors were installed at six depths to monitor the soil dynamics in the top 8 cm depth. Significant effects of soil dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR, temperature and permittivity data and in particular freeze and thaw events were clearly visible. A good agreement of the trend was observed between the temperature, permittivity and GPR time-lapse data with respect to five freeze-thaw cycles. The GPR-derived permittivity was in good agreement with sensor observations. The proposed method appears to be promising for the real-time mapping and monitoring of the frozen layer at the field scale. © 2013 IEEE.

  1. Ground cover rice production system facilitates soil carbon and nitrogen stocks at regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Liu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rice production is increasingly challenged by irrigation water scarcity, however covering paddy rice soils with films (ground cover rice production system: GCRPS can significantly reduce water demand as well as overcome temperature limitations at the beginning of the vegetation period resulting in increased grain yields in colder regions of rice production with seasonal water shortages. It has been speculated that the increased soil aeration and temperature under GCRPS may result in losses of soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks. Here we report on a regional scale experiment, conducted by sampling paired adjacent Paddy and GCRPS fields at 49 representative sites in the Shiyan region, which is typical for many mountainous areas across China. Parameters evaluated included soil C and N stocks, soil physical and chemical properties, potential carbon mineralization rates, fractions of soil organic carbon and stable carbon isotopic composition of plant leaves. Furthermore, root biomass was quantified at maximum tillering stage at one of our paired sites. Against expectations the study showed that: (1 GCRPS significantly increased soil organic C and N stocks 5–20 years following conversion of production systems, (2 there were no differences between GCRPS and Paddy in soil physical and chemical properties for the various soil depths with the exception of soil bulk density, (3 GCRPS had lower mineralization potential for soil organic C compared with Paddy over the incubation period, (4 GCRPS showed lower δ15N in the soils and plant leafs indicating less NH3 volatilization in GCRPS than in Paddy; and (5 GCRPS increased yields and root biomass in all soil layers down to 40 cm depth. Our results suggest that GCRPS is an innovative rice production technique that not only increases yields using less irrigation water, but that it also is environmentally beneficial due to increased soil C and N stocks at regional scale.

  2. Crop Ground Cover Fraction and Canopy Chlorophyll Content Mapping using RapidEye imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillmann, E.; Schonert, M.; Lilienthal, H.; Siegmann, B.; Jarmer, T.; Rosso, P.; Weichelt, T.

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing is a suitable tool for estimating the spatial variability of crop canopy characteristics, such as canopy chlorophyll content (CCC) and green ground cover (GGC%), which are often used for crop productivity analysis and site-specific crop management. Empirical relationships exist between different vegetation indices (VI) and CCC and GGC% that allow spatial estimation of canopy characteristics from remote sensing imagery. However, the use of VIs is not suitable for an operational production of CCC and GGC% maps due to the limited transferability of derived empirical relationships to other regions. Thus, the operational value of crop status maps derived from remotely sensed data would be much higher if there was no need for reparametrization of the approach for different situations. This paper reports on the suitability of high-resolution RapidEye data for estimating crop development status of winter wheat over the growing season, and demonstrates two different approaches for mapping CCC and GGC%, which do not rely on empirical relationships. The final CCC map represents relative differences in CCC, which can be quickly calibrated to field specific conditions using SPAD chlorophyll meter readings at a few points. The prediction model is capable of predicting SPAD readings with an average accuracy of 77%. The GGC% map provides absolute values at any point in the field. A high R2 value of 80% was obtained for the relationship between estimated and observed GGC%. The mean absolute error for each of the two acquisition dates was 5.3% and 8.7%, respectively.

  3. Citizen science land cover classification based on ground and satellite imagery: Case study Day River in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Son Tung; Minkman, Ellen; Rutten, Martine

    2016-04-01

    Citizen science is being increasingly used in the context of environmental research, thus there are needs to evaluate cognitive ability of humans in classifying environmental features. With the focus on land cover, this study explores the extent to which citizen science can be applied in sensing and measuring the environment that contribute to the creation and validation of land cover data. The Day Basin in Vietnam was selected to be the study area. Different methods to examine humans' ability to classify land cover were implemented using different information sources: ground based photos - satellite images - field observation and investigation. Most of the participants were solicited from local people and/or volunteers. Results show that across methods and sources of information, there are similar patterns of agreement and disagreement on land cover classes among participants. Understanding these patterns is critical to create a solid basis for implementing human sensors in earth observation. Keywords: Land cover, classification, citizen science, Landsat 8

  4. Estimating Cotton Nitrogen Nutrition Status Using Leaf Greenness and Ground Cover Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrah Melissa Muharam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessing nitrogen (N status is important from economic and environmental standpoints. To date, many spectral indices to estimate cotton chlorophyll or N content have been purely developed using statistical analysis approach where they are often subject to site-specific problems. This study describes and tests a novel method of utilizing physical characteristics of N-fertilized cotton and combining field spectral measurements made at different spatial scales as an approach to estimate in-season chlorophyll or leaf N content of field-grown cotton. In this study, leaf greenness estimated from spectral measurements made at the individual leaf, canopy and scene levels was combined with percent ground cover to produce three different indices, named TCCLeaf, TCCCanopy, and TCCScene. These indices worked best for estimating leaf N at early flowering, but not for chlorophyll content. Of the three indices, TCCLeaf showed the best ability to estimate leaf N (R2 = 0.89. These results suggest that the use of green and red-edge wavelengths derived at the leaf scale is best for estimating leaf greenness. TCCCanopy had a slightly lower R2 value than TCCLeaf (0.76, suggesting that the utilization of yellow and red-edge wavelengths obtained at the canopy level could be used as an alternative to estimate leaf N in the absence of leaf spectral information. The relationship between TCCScene and leaf N was the lowest (R2 = 0.50, indicating that the estimation of canopy greenness from scene measurements needs improvement. Results from this study confirmed the potential of these indices as efficient methods for estimating in-season leaf N status of cotton.

  5. Water consumption and water-saving characteristics of a ground cover rice production system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xinxin; Zuo, Qiang; Ma, Wenwen; Li, Sen; Shi, Jianchu; Tao, Yueyue; Zhang, Yanan; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiaofei; Lin, Shan; Ben-Gal, Alon

    2016-09-01

    The ground cover rice production system (GCRPS) offers a potentially water-saving alternative to the traditional paddy rice production system (TPRPS) by furrow irrigating mulched soil beds and maintaining soils under predominately unsaturated conditions. The guiding hypothesis of this study was that a GCRPS would decrease both physiological and non-physiological water consumption of rice compared to a TPRPS while either maintaining or enhancing production. This was tested in a two-year field experiment with three treatments (TPRPS, GCRPSsat keeping root zone average soil water content near saturated, and GCRPS80% keeping root zone average soil water content as 80-100% of field water capacity) and a greenhouse experiment with four treatments (TPRPS, GCRPSsat, GCRPSfwc keeping root zone average soil water content close to field water capacity, and GCRPS80%). The water-saving characteristics of GCRPS were analyzed as a function of the measured soil water conditions, plant parameters regarding growth and production, and water input and consumption. In the field experiment, significant reduction in both physiological and non-physiological water consumption under GCRPS lead to savings in irrigation water of ∼61-84% and reduction in total input water of ∼35-47%. Compared to TPRPS, deep drainage was reduced ∼72-88%, evaporation was lessened ∼83-89% and transpiration was limited ∼6-10% under GCRPS. In addition to saving water, plant growth and grain yield were enhanced under GCRPS due to increased soil temperature in the root zone. Therefore, water use efficiencies (WUEs), based on transpiration, irrigation and total input water, were respectively improved as much as 27%, 609% and 110% under GCRPS. Increased yield attributed to up to ∼19%, decreased deep drainage accounted for ∼75%, decreased evaporation accounted for ∼14% and reduced transpiration for ∼5% of the enhancement in WUE of input water under GCRPS, while increased runoff and water storage had

  6. Effective UV surface albedo of seasonally snow-covered lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanskanen, A.; Manninen, T.

    2007-05-01

    At ultraviolet wavelengths the albedo of most natural surfaces is small with the striking exception of snow and ice. Therefore, snow cover is a major challenge for various applications based on radiative transfer modelling. The aim of this work was to determine the characteristic effective UV range surface albedo of various land cover types when covered by snow. First we selected 1 by 1 degree sample regions that met three criteria: the sample region contained dominantly subpixels of only one land cover type according to the 8 km global land cover classification product from the University of Maryland; the average slope of the sample region was less than 2 degrees according to the USGS's HYDRO1K slope data; the sample region had snow cover in March according to the NSIDC Northern Hemisphere weekly snow cover data. Next we generated 1 by 1 degree gridded 360 nm surface albedo data from the Nimbus-7 TOMS Lambertian equivalent reflectivity data, and used them to construct characteristic effective surface albedo distributions for each land cover type. The resulting distributions showed that each land cover type experiences a characteristic range of surface albedo values when covered by snow. The result is explained by the vegetation that extends upward beyond the snow cover and masks the bright snow covered surface.

  7. Assessing alternative measures of tree canopy cover: Photo-interpreted NAIP and ground-based estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Toney; Greg Liknes; Andy Lister; Dacia Meneguzzo

    2012-01-01

    In preparation for the development of the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2011 tree canopy cover layer, a pilot project for research and method development was completed in 2010 by the USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program and Remote Sensing Applications Center (RSAC).This paper explores one of several topics investigated during the NLCD...

  8. (AJST) EFFECTS OF GROUND INSULATION AND GREENHOUSE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NORBERT OPIYO AKECH

    of plastic digester to produce biogas under natural and greenhouse microenvironment. The specific ... and hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Biogas ... the effect of ground insulation on biogas production. ..... Methane Generation from Human, Animal.

  9. Propagation of Sound Through the Atmosphere: Effects of Ground Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-19

    surface. The impedance measurements were limited to the -f -quency range 220 Hz to 1000 Hz due to the experimental saometry. In this region, however...frequency limit of 100 Hz. In this range, the surface wave predicted by the theory used to analyze the data was not calculated to be a significant fraction...RETURN rND FUNCION EAST611101,D31*1 DIME~ýIOW 11M(4 LEAST52 =IS MAE IS BXZST QUALITY FRLI=40 C D)UNA4I𔃻 AS TEVFITF 1,FD)AN4fN C(~r PHECTLO T( US AI

  10. Quantifying the impact of cloud cover on ground radiation flux measurements using hemispherical images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roupioz, L.; Colin, J.; Jia, L.; Nerry, F.; Menenti, M.

    2015-01-01

    Linking observed or estimated ground incoming solar radiation with cloud coverage is difficult since the latter is usually poorly described in standard meteorological observation protocols. To investigate the benefits of detailed observation and characterization of cloud coverage and distribution

  11. The In-Transit Vigilant Covering Tour Problem of Routing Unmanned Ground Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    15 Figure 2. A classic VRP ...17 Figure 3. Solution for a VRP ........................................................................................18 Figure 4. Solution...of NP-hard problems, such as the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP), Vehicle Routing Problem ( VRP ), and Covering Salesman Problem (CSP) etc. We will

  12. Trends of six month nighttime ground-based cloud cover values over Manila Observatory (14.64N, 121.07E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacal, G. F. B.; Lagrosas, N.

    2016-12-01

    The ground reflects thermal radiation during nighttime. Clouds reflect this radiation to the ground and cause increase in ambient temperature. In this study, trends of nighttime cloud cover are analyzed using a commercial camera (Canon Powershot A2300) that is operated continuously to capture images of clouds at 5 minute interval. The camera is situated inside a rain-proof box with a glass oculus and is placed on the rooftop of the Manila Observatory building. To detect pixels with clouds, the pictures are converted from its native JPEG format to grayscale format. The pixels are then screened for clouds by looking at the values of pixels with and without clouds. In grayscale format, pixels with clouds have greater pixel values than pixels without clouds. Based on the observations, a threshold pixel value of 17 is employed to discern pixels with clouds from pixels without clouds. When moon is present in the image, the grayscale image, which is in 8-bit unsigned integer format, is converted into double format. The moon signals are modelled using a two dimensional Gaussian function and is subtracted from the converted image (Gacal et al, 2016). This effectively removes the moon signals but preserves the cloud signals. This method is applied to the data collected from the months of January, February, March, October, November and December 2015. In Manila, dry months are from November to April. Wet months are from May to October. The trends of nighttime cloud cover values over Manila Observatory are shown in the figure below. Frequency distribution of cloud cover values of the first and last three months of the year show that dry and wet months have higher and lower frequency of low cloud cover values, respectively. The trend also exhibits a decrease of cloud cover from October to December but increases back from January until March. This is exhibited in the decrease in the frequency of cloud cover values in the 20%-100% range from October to December. This can be

  13. Mapping wind erosion hazard in Australia using MODIS-derived ground cover, soil moisture and climate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Leys, J.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes spatial modeling methods to identify wind erosion hazard (WEH) areas across Australia using the recently available time-series products of satellite-derived ground cover, soil moisture and wind speed. We implemented the approach and data sets in a geographic information system to produce WEH maps for Australia at 500 m ground resolution on a monthly basis for the recent thirteen year period (2000-2012). These maps reveal the significant wind erosion hazard areas and their dynamic tendencies at paddock and regional scales. Dust measurements from the DustWatch network were used to validate the model and interpret the dust source areas. The modeled hazard areas and changes were compared with results from a rule-set approach and the Computational Environmental Management System (CEMSYS) model. The study demonstrates that the time series products of ground cover, soil moisture and wind speed can be jointly used to identify landscape erodibility and to map seasonal changes of wind erosion hazard across Australia. The time series wind erosion hazard maps provide detailed and useful information to assist in better targeting areas for investments and continuous monitoring, evaluation and reporting that will lead to reduced wind erosion and improved soil condition.

  14. Temporal Monitoring of the Soil Freeze-Thaw Cycles over a Snow-Covered Surface by Using Air-Launched Ground-Penetrating Radar

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2015-09-18

    We tested an off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system at a fixed location over a bare agricultural field to monitor the soil freeze-thaw cycles over a snow-covered surface. The GPR system consisted of a monostatic horn antenna combined with a vector network analyzer, providing an ultra-wideband stepped-frequency continuous-wave radar. An antenna calibration experiment was performed to filter antenna and back scattered effects from the raw GPR data. Near the GPR setup, sensors were installed in the soil to monitor the dynamics of soil temperature and dielectric permittivity at different depths. The soil permittivity was retrieved via inversion of time domain GPR data focused on the surface reflection. Significant effects of soil dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR, temperature and dielectric permittivity measurements. In particular, five freeze and thaw events were clearly detectable, indicating that the GPR signals respond to the contrast between the dielectric permittivity of frozen and thawed soil. The GPR-derived permittivity was in good agreement with sensor observations. Overall, the off-ground nature of the GPR system permits non-invasive time-lapse observation of the soil freeze-thaw dynamics without disturbing the structure of the snow cover. The proposed method shows promise for the real-time mapping and monitoring of the shallow frozen layer at the field scale.

  15. Temporal Monitoring of the Soil Freeze-Thaw Cycles over a Snow-Covered Surface by Using Air-Launched Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Zaib Jadoon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We tested an off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR system at a fixed location over a bare agricultural field to monitor the soil freeze-thaw cycles over a snow-covered surface. The GPR system consisted of a monostatic horn antenna combined with a vector network analyzer, providing an ultra-wideband stepped-frequency continuous-wave radar. An antenna calibration experiment was performed to filter antenna and back scattered effects from the raw GPR data. Near the GPR setup, sensors were installed in the soil to monitor the dynamics of soil temperature and dielectric permittivity at different depths. The soil permittivity was retrieved via inversion of time domain GPR data focused on the surface reflection. Significant effects of soil dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR, temperature and dielectric permittivity measurements. In particular, five freeze and thaw events were clearly detectable, indicating that the GPR signals respond to the contrast between the dielectric permittivity of frozen and thawed soil. The GPR-derived permittivity was in good agreement with sensor observations. Overall, the off-ground nature of the GPR system permits non-invasive time-lapse observation of the soil freeze-thaw dynamics without disturbing the structure of the snow cover. The proposed method shows promise for the real-time mapping and monitoring of the shallow frozen layer at the field scale.

  16. Permafrost, Seasonally Frozen Ground, Snow Cover and Vegetation in the USSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Late Quaternary History and the Formation of Sedi- ments in the Marginal and Inland Seas (Pozdnechetvertichnaia Istorlia i Sedimentogenez...rasprostraneniia snezhnogo pokrova na poverkhnosti sushi zemnogo shara). In Geography of Snow Cover (Geo- grafiya Snezhnogo Prokrova). Moscow: Izdat...Papers, 18(3): 198-202. (36-1668) Vigdorchik, M.E. (1980) Arctic Pleistocene History and the Development of Submarine Permafrost. Boulder

  17. The Impact of Time Difference between Satellite Overpass and Ground Observation on Cloud Cover Performance Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jędrzej S. Bojanowski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloud property data sets derived from passive sensors onboard the polar orbiting satellites (such as the NOAA’s Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer have global coverage and now span a climatological time period. Synoptic surface observations (SYNOP are often used to characterize the accuracy of satellite-based cloud cover. Infrequent overpasses of polar orbiting satellites combined with the 3- or 6-h SYNOP frequency lead to collocation time differences of up to 3 h. The associated collocation error degrades the cloud cover performance statistics such as the Hanssen-Kuiper’s discriminant (HK by up to 45%. Limiting the time difference to 10 min, on the other hand, introduces a sampling error due to a lower number of corresponding satellite and SYNOP observations. This error depends on both the length of the validated time series and the SYNOP frequency. The trade-off between collocation and sampling error call for an optimum collocation time difference. It however depends on cloud cover characteristics and SYNOP frequency, and cannot be generalized. Instead, a method is presented to reconstruct the unbiased (true HK from HK affected by the collocation differences, which significantly (t-test p < 0.01 improves the validation results.

  18. Smoke and Pollution Aerosol Effect on Cloud Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Koren, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    Pollution and smoke aerosols can increase or decrease the cloud cover. This duality in the effects of aerosols forms one of the largest uncertainties in climate research. Using solar measurements from Aerosol Robotic Network sites around the globe, we show an increase in cloud cover with an increase in the aerosol column concentration and an inverse dependence on the aerosol absorption of sunlight. The emerging rule appears to be independent of geographical location or aerosol type, thus increasing our confidence in the understanding of these aerosol effects on the clouds and climate. Preliminary estimates suggest an increase of 5% in cloud cover.

  19. Black carbon absorption effects on cloud cover, review and synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Absorbing aerosols (AA's such as black carbon (BC or dust absorb incoming solar radiation, perturb the temperature structure of the atmosphere, and influence cloud cover. Previous studies have described conditions where AA's either increase or decrease cloud cover. The effect depends on several factors, including the altitude of the AA relative to the cloud and on the cloud type. Cloud cover is decreased if the AA's are embedded in the cloud layer. AA's below cloud may enhance convection and cloud cover. AA's over cloud-level stabilize the underlying layer and tend to enhance stratocumulus clouds but may reduce cumulus clouds. AA's can also promote cloud cover in convergent regions as they enhance deep convection and low level convergence as it draws in moisture from ocean to land regions. Most global model studies indicate a regional variation in the cloud response but generally increased cloud cover over oceans and some land regions, with net increased low-level and/or reduced upper level cloud cover. The result is net negative radiative forcing from cloud response to AA's. In some of these climate model studies, the cooling effect of BC due to cloud changes was strong enough to essentially cancel the warming direct effects.

  20. Comparing distinct ground-based lightning location networks covering the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Lotte; Leijnse, Hidde; Schmeits, Maurice; Beekhuis, Hans; Poelman, Dieter; Evers, Läslo; Smets, Pieter

    2015-04-01

    Lightning can be detected using a ground-based sensor network. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) monitors lightning activity in the Netherlands with the so-called FLITS-system; a network combining SAFIR-type sensors. This makes use of Very High Frequency (VHF) as well as Low Frequency (LF) sensors. KNMI has recently decided to replace FLITS by data from a sub-continental network operated by Météorage which makes use of LF sensors only (KNMI Lightning Detection Network, or KLDN). KLDN is compared to the FLITS system, as well as Met Office's long-range Arrival Time Difference (ATDnet), which measures Very Low Frequency (VLF). Special focus lies on the ability to detect Cloud to Ground (CG) and Cloud to Cloud (CC) lightning in the Netherlands. Relative detection efficiency of individual flashes and lightning activity in a more general sense are calculated over a period of almost 5 years. Additionally, the detection efficiency of each system is compared to a ground-truth that is constructed from flashes that are detected by both of the other datasets. Finally, infrasound data is used as a fourth lightning data source for several case studies. Relative performance is found to vary strongly with location and time. As expected, it is found that FLITS detects significantly more CC lightning (because of the strong aptitude of VHF antennas to detect CC), though KLDN and ATDnet detect more CG lightning. We analyze statistics computed over the entire 5-year period, where we look at CG as well as total lightning (CC and CG combined). Statistics that are considered are the Probability of Detection (POD) and the so-called Lightning Activity Detection (LAD). POD is defined as the percentage of reference flashes the system detects compared to the total detections in the reference. LAD is defined as the fraction of system recordings of one or more flashes in predefined area boxes over a certain time period given the fact that the reference detects at least one

  1. Ground-water flow and the possible effects of remedial actions at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, W.B.

    1995-01-01

    J-Field, located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md, has been used since World War II to test and dispose of explosives, chemical warfare agents, and industrial chemicals resulting in ground-water, surface-water, and soil contami- nation. The U.S. Geological Survey finite-difference model was used to better understand ground-water flow at the site and to simulate the effects of remedial actions. A surficial aquifer and a confined aquifer were simulated with the model. A confining unit separates these units and is represented by leakance between the layers. The area modeled is 3.65 mi2; the model was constructed with a variably spaced 40 X 38 grid. The horizontal and lower boundaries of the model are all no-flow boundaries. Steady-state conditions were used. Ground water at the areas under investigation flows from disposal pit areas toward discharge areas in adjacent estuaries or wetlands. Simulations indicate that capping disposal areas with an impermeable cover effectively slows advective ground water flow by 0.7 to 0.5 times. Barriers to lateral ground-water flow were simulated and effectively prevented the movement of ground water toward discharge areas. Extraction wells were simulated as a way to contain ground-water contamination and to extract ground water for treatment. Two wells pumping 5 gallons per minute each at the toxic-materials disposal area and a single well pumping 2.5 gallons per minute at the riot-control-agent disposal area effectively contained contamination at these sites. A combi- nation of barriers to horizontal flow east and south of the toxic-materials disposal area, and a single extraction well pumping at 5 gallons per minute can extract contaminated ground water and prevent pumpage of marsh water.

  2. After the fire: benefits of reduced ground cover for vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Karin Enstam; Isbell, Lynne A

    2009-03-01

    Here we describe changes in ranging behavior and other activities of vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) after a wildfire eliminated grass cover in a large area near the study group's home range. Soon after the fire, the vervets ranged farther away from tall trees that provide refuge from mammalian predators, and moved into the burned area where they had never been observed to go before the fire occurred. Visibility at vervet eye-level was 10 times farther in the burned area than in unburned areas. They traveled faster, and adult females spent more time feeding and less time scanning bipedally in the burned area than in the unburned area. The burned area's greater visibility may have lowered the animals' perceived risk of predation there, and may have provided them with an unusual opportunity to eat acacia ants.

  3. A probabilistic framework for the cover effect in bedrock erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turowski, Jens; Hodge, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    Bedrock erosion rates in mountain rivers are driven by impacting bedload particles and are modulated by two conflicting affects. Rising sediment flux leads to an increasing number of impacts and thus larger erosion rates (the tools effect). However, when sediment supply gets too large, sediment particles sit on the bed protecting it from impacts and thereby decreasing the erosion rate (the cover effect). Previous flume experiments and numerical models have predicted a wide range of formulations for the relationship between sediment flux and sediment cover. Here, we propose a simple probabilistic framework to mathematically describe the cover effect, in which the development of cover is as a function of the probability of sediment deposition on bedrock or sediment-covered areas of the bed. The framework can incorporate empirical or modelling results and provides a neat link to process interpretations. We compare model predictions with results from both a cellular automaton model of grain dynamics, and from flume experiments. The framework is able to reproduce many of the observed behaviours, and thus provides a way of unifying the range of different results that have previously been reported. Further, we present a simple first order model for the dynamic evolution of bed cover over time that could be incorporated into channel morphodynamic models.

  4. Ground-water, surface-water, and bottom-sediment contamination in the O-field area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and the possible effects of selected remedial actions on ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Oliveros, James P.

    1995-01-01

    Disposal of munitions and chemical-warfare substances has introduced inorganic and organic contaminants to the ground water, surface water, and bottom sediment at O-Field, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Contaminants include chloride, arsenic, transition metals, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, and organosulfur and organophosphorus compounds. The hydrologic effects of several remedial actions were estimated by use of a ground-water-flow model. The remedial actions examined were an impermeable covering, encapsulation, subsurface barriers, a ground-water drain, pumping of wells to manage water levels or to remove contaminated ground water for treatment, and no action.

  5. Ground effects on magnetooptic Bragg cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Feng; WU BaoJian; QIU Kun

    2008-01-01

    Propagation equation of magnetostatic waves in an arbitrarily magnetized yttrium-iron-garnet/gadolinium-gallium-garnet waveguide coated with perfect metal planes is obtained using the method of the surface magnetic permeability. And ground effects on magnetooptic Bragg cells are investigated with the magnetooptic coupled-mode theory. Theoretical analysis indicates that, diffraction efficiency of guided optical waves can be improved by adjusting the spacing of the metal plane from the ferrite film, and ground effects on the diffraction efficiency will be enhanced using an appropriately tilted bias magnetic field. In the metal clad waveguide system, the magnetostatic wave frequency at which the diffraction efficiency peak is obtained corresponds to the "zero-dispersion" point. Performance of RF spectrum analyzers in this system can also be improved by comparing with the case of the sandwich waveguide. Therefore, magnetooptic Bragg cells with the metal clad waveguide are potential applications to the microwave communication and optical signal processing.

  6. Tillage System and Cover Crop Effects on Soil Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    Information about the quantitative effect of conservation tillage combined with a cover crop on soil structure is still limited. This study examined the effect of these management practices on soil pore characteristics of a sandy loam soil in a long-term field trial. The tillage treatments (main...

  7. Crop cover the principal influence on non-crop ground beetle (Coleoptera, Carabidae) activity and assemblages at the farm scale in a long-term assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, M D; Sanderson, R A; McMillan, S D; Critchley, C N R

    2016-04-01

    Ground beetle data were generated using pitfall traps in the 17-year period from 1993 to 2009 and used to investigate the effects of changes in surrounding crop cover on beetle activity and assemblages, together with the effects of weather variability. Beetles were recorded from non-crop field margins (overgrown hedges). Crop cover changes explained far more variation in the beetle assemblages recorded than did temperature and rainfall variation. A reduction in management intensity and disturbance in the crops surrounding the traps, especially the introduction and development of willow coppice, was concomitant with changes in individual species activity and assemblage composition of beetles trapped in non-crop habitat. There were no consistent patterns in either overall beetle activity or in the number of species recorded over the 17-year period, but there was a clear change from assemblages dominated by smaller species with higher dispersal capability to ones with larger beetles with less dispersal potential and a preference for less disturbed agroecosystems. The influence of surrounding crops on ground beetle activity in non-crop habitat has implications for ecosystem service provision by ground beetles as pest predators. These results are contrary to conventional assumptions and interpretations, which suggest activity of pest predators in crops is influenced primarily by adjacent non-crop habitat. The long-term nature of the assessment was important in elucidation of patterns and trends, and indicated that policies such as agri-environment schemes should take cropping patterns into account when promoting management options that are intended to enhance natural pest control.

  8. The effects of plant cover on population of pear psylla (Cacopsylla pyricola and its predators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saeed Emami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cacopsylla pyricola (Förster, 1848 (Hemiptera: Psyllidae is a serious pest of pear in all pear growing areas. In the scope of an integrated pest management, a two consecutive years study was carried out to determine the effects of plant cover on pear psyllid population and its predators. Two treatments including plant cover and bare ground were applied in a randomized complete block design with three replicates. The sampling of the pest and its predators were done weekly by beating technique and leaf sampling. The data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA. The results showed that plant cover had significant effect on the increase of predators on the trees (P < 0.001. The psyllid specialist predator, Anthocoris nemoralis (Fabricius, 1794, had the highest population among the pear psyllid predators (0.29 per sample. Plant cover had no significant effect on reducing the population of eggs, nymphs and adults of the pear psyllid. Despite the increase in the population of predators led by plant cover, lack of their effectiveness to reduce the pear psyllid population is discussed.

  9. Effects of different scale land cover maps in watershed modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Antonio; Araújo, Antonio; Alexandridis, Thomas; Chambel, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    Water management is a rather complex process that usually involves multiple stakeholder, multiple data and sources, and complex mathematical modelling. One of the key data sets to understand a particular water system is the characterization of the land cover. Land cover maps are essential for the estimation of environmental variables (e.g. LAI, ETa) related to water quantity. Also, land cover maps are used for modelling the water quality. For instance, watersheds that have intensive agriculture can have poor water quality due to increase of nutrients loading; forest fires have a significant negative impact over the water quality by increasing the sediment loads; forest fires can increase flood risks. The land cover dynamics can as well severely affect the water quantity and quality in watersheds. In the MyWater project we are conducting a study to supply water quantity and quality information services for five study areas in five different countries (Brazil, Greece, Mozambique, Netherlands, and Portugal). In this project several land cover maps were produced both at regional and local scales, based on the exploitation of medium and high resolution satellite images (MERIS and SPOT 4). These maps were produced through semi-automatic supervised classification procedures, using an LCCS based nomenclature of 15 classes. Validation results pointed to global accuracy values greater than 80% for all maps. In this paper we focus on studying the effect of using different scale land cover maps in the watershed modelling and its impact in results. The work presented is part of the FP7-EU project "Merging hydrological models and Earth observation data for reliable information on water - MyWater".

  10. Effects of Tillage Management Systems on Residue Cover and Decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGZHIGUO; XUQI; 等

    1998-01-01

    The effects of tillage methods on percent surface residue cover remaining and decomposition rates of crop residues were evaluated in this study.The line transect method was used to measure residue cover percentage on continuumous corn(Zea mays L.) plots under no tillage (NT),Conventional tillage(CT),chisel plow(CH),and disk tillage (DT).Samples of rye (Secale cereale L.) and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) were used for residue decompostion study,Results showed that the percentage of residue cover remaining was significantly higher for NT than for CH and DT and that for CT was the lowest(<10%),For the same tillage system ,the percent residue cover remaining was significantly higher in the higher fertilizer N rate treatments relative to the lower fertilizer N treatments.weight losses of rye and vetch residues followed a similar pattern under CT and DT ,and they were significantly faster in CT and DT than in NT system ,Alo ,the amounts of residue N remaining during the first 16 weeks were alway higher under NT than under CT and DT.

  11. Effects of bryophyte and lichen cover on permafrost soil temperature at large scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porada, Philipp; Ekici, Altug; Beer, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Bryophyte and lichen cover on the forest floor at high latitudes exerts an insulating effect on the ground. In this way, the cover decreases mean annual soil temperature and can protect permafrost soil. Climate change, however, may change bryophyte and lichen cover, with effects on the permafrost state and related carbon balance. It is, therefore, crucial to predict how the bryophyte and lichen cover will react to environmental change at the global scale. To date, current global land surface models contain only empirical representations of the bryophyte and lichen cover, which makes it impractical to predict the future state and function of bryophytes and lichens. For this reason, we integrate a process-based model of bryophyte and lichen growth into the global land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere-Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg). The model simulates bryophyte and lichen cover on upland sites. Wetlands are not included. We take into account the dynamic nature of the thermal properties of the bryophyte and lichen cover and their relation to environmental factors. Subsequently, we compare simulations with and without bryophyte and lichen cover to quantify the insulating effect of the organisms on the soil. We find an average cooling effect of the bryophyte and lichen cover of 2.7 K on temperature in the topsoil for the region north of 50° N under the current climate. Locally, a cooling of up to 5.7 K may be reached. Moreover, we show that using a simple, empirical representation of the bryophyte and lichen cover without dynamic properties only results in an average cooling of around 0.5 K. This suggests that (a) bryophytes and lichens have a significant impact on soil temperature in high-latitude ecosystems and (b) a process-based description of their thermal properties is necessary for a realistic representation of the cooling effect. The advanced land surface scheme, including a dynamic bryophyte and lichen model, will be the basis for an improved

  12. Effects of historical land cover changes on climate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI ZhengGuo; YAN XiaoDong; YIN ChongHua; WANG ZhaoMin

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the influence of anthropogenic land use on the climate system during the last millennium, a set of experiments is performed with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity--the McGill Paleoclimate Model (MPM-2). The present paper mainly focuses on biogeophysical effects of historical land cover changes. A dynamic scenario of deforestation is described based on changes in cropland fraction (RF99). The model simulates a decrease in global mean annual temperature in the range of 0.09-0.16℃, especially 0.14-0.22℃ in Northern Hemisphere during the last 300 years. The responses of climate system to GHGs concentration changes are also calculated for comparisons. Now, afforestation is becoming an important choice for the enhancement of terrestrial carbon sequestration and adjustment of regional climate. The results indicate that biogeophysical effects of land cover changes cannot be neglected in the assessments of climate change.

  13. Study of seasonal snow cover influencing the ground thermal regime on western flank of Da Xing'anling Mountains, northeastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoLi Chang; HuiJun Jin; YanLin Zhang; HaiBin Sun

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies relevant to snow cover and permafrost have focused on alpine, arctic, and subarctic areas, there is still a lack of understanding of the influences of seasonal snow cover on the thermal regime of the soils in permafrost regions in the mid-latitudes and boreal regions, such as that on the western flank of the Da Xing'anling (Hinggan) Mountains, northeastern China. This paper gives a detailed analysis on meteorological data series from 2001 to 2010 provided by the Gen'he Weather Station, which is located in a talik of discontinuous permafrost zone and with sparse meadow on the observation field. It is inferred that snow cover is important for the ground thermal regime in the middle Da Xing'anling Mountains. Snow cover of 10-cm in thickness and five to six months in duration (generally November to next March) can reduce the heat loss from the ground to the atmosphere by 28%, and by 71% if the snow depth increases to 36 cm. Moreover, the occurrence of snow cover resulted in mean annual ground surface temperatures 4.7–8.2°C higher than the mean annual air temperatures recorded at the Gen'he Weather Station. The beginning date for stable snow cover establishment (SE date) and the initial snow depth (SDi) also had a great influences on the ground freezing process. Heavy snowfall before ground surface freeze-up could postpone and retard the freezing process in Gen'he. As a result, the duration of ground freezing was shortened by at least 20 days and the maximum depth of frost penetration was as much as 90 cm shallower.

  14. Unmasking the soil cover's disruption by use of a dynamic model of measurement aerospace parameters of ground vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Vysotskaya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The "Introduction" describes topicality and importance of revealing the soil cover's disruption for a wide range of fields. It was shown that spectral brightness and colorimetric parameters of ground vegetation can be used for this task. However, a traditional scheme of data processing for remote sensing requires a long-term observations and can not always be applied, if quick decision-making is necessary or there is lack of information. Such cases require the use of special methods, one of which is a dynamic model developed with authors' participation based on the following basic relationships: (+,- (-, - (+, 0, (-, 0 (0,0. The section "Brief description of a dynamic model" describes the basic principles of dynamic systems used to solve the problem. Using above-mentioned relationships, the dynamics of a system consisting of several components is constructed and its main properties are listed. The main feature of this model is that the identification of structure and parameters of the dynamic system does not required sequential order of observations (as for models based on time series. This feature of the model enables for identifying the system's parameters of dynamics of the natural system to use information from a single picture taken from the spacecraft rather than long-term observations. The section "Materials and Methods" describes specific colorimetric parameters used to analyze the vegetation cover. The section "Obtained results" contains an example of the model's application to a satellite image for detecting the differences in two sites of a field with vegetation. One site is a recultivated area near the liquidated gas-oil well, another site is non-recultivated area at a considerable distance from the well (500-1000 m. The simulation results are described by eight signed graphs (4 graphs for each sites, whose structure allows to identify the system differences between the two cases. The section "Conclusions" summarizes the results of

  15. A comparison of ground and satellite observations of cloud cover to saturation pressure differences during a cold air outbreak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliss, R.J.; Raman, S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The role of clouds in the atmospheric general circulation and the global climate is twofold. First, clouds owe their origin to large-scale dynamical forcing, radiative cooling in the atmosphere, and turbulent transfer at the surface. In addition, they provide one of the most important mechanisms for the vertical redistribution of momentum and sensible and latent heat for the large scale, and they influence the coupling between the atmosphere and the surface as well as the radiative and dynamical-hydrological balance. In existing diagnostic cloudiness parameterization schemes, relative humidity is the most frequently used variable for estimating total cloud amount or stratiform cloud amount. However, the prediction of relative humidity in general circulation models (GCMs) is usually poor. Even for the most comprehensive GCMs, the predicted relative humidity may deviate greatly from that observed, as far as the frequency distribution of relative humidity is concerned. Recently, there has been an increased effort to improve the representation of clouds and cloud-radiation feedback in GCMs, but the verification of cloudiness parameterization schemes remains a severe problem because of the lack of observational data sets. In this study, saturation pressure differences (as opposed to relative humidity) and satellite-derived cloud heights and amounts are compared with ground determinations of cloud cover over the Gulf Stream Locale (GSL) during a cold air outbreak.

  16. The effect of eurasian snow cover on global climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, T P; Dümenil, L; Schlese, U; Roeckner, E

    1988-01-29

    Numerical simulations with a global atmospheric circulation model suggest that largescale variations in the amount of snowfall over Eurasia in the springtime are linked to the subsequent strength of the Asian summer monsoon. Large-scale changes in Eurasian snow cover are coupled to larger scale changes in the global climate system. There is a large, strong teleconnection to the atmospheric field over North America. The model results also show snow cover effects to subsequently alter other climatic fields known to be intimately associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. Thus the model results seem to challenge the current dogma that the ENSO phenomenon is solely the result of close coupling between the atmosphere and ocean by suggesting that processes over continental land masses may also have to be considered.

  17. Tillage System and Cover Crop Effects on Soil Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    Optimal use of management systems including tillage and winter cover crops is recommended to improve soil quality and sustain agricultural production. The effects on soil properties of three tillage systems (as main plot) including direct drilling (D), harrowing to a depth of 8 to 10 cm (H......), and moldboard plowing (MP) with and without a cover crop were evaluated in a long-term experiment on a sandy loam soil in Denmark. Chemical, physical, and biological soil properties were measured in the spring of 2012. The field measurements included mean weight diameter (MWD) after the drop-shatter test......, penetration resistance, and visual evaluation of soil structure (VESS). In the laboratory, aggregate strength, water-stable aggregates (WSA), and clay dispersibility were measured. The analyzed chemical and biological properties included soil organic C (SOC), total N, microbial biomass C, labile P and K...

  18. Effective medium theory for graphene-covered metallic gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Babak; Bagheri, Amirmasood; Khavasi, Amin; Mehrany, Khashayar

    2016-10-01

    We propose an effective medium theory for a one-dimensional periodic array of rectangular grooves covered by a graphene sheet. Parameters of the effective medium model are given by explicit analytical expressions for both major polarizations TM and TE, and for all incident angles. In extraction of this model, we assumed single mode approximation inside the grooves. The effect of non-specular diffraction orders outside the grating, as well as the plasmonic response of the graphene sheet in the far-infrared spectrum, is addressed by introducing an effective surface conductivity at the interface of the metallic grating and the ambient environment. It is shown that surface plasmons in graphene effectively capture diffracted waves in the metallic grating leading to near total absorption. Results of this work may pave the way for designing wide-band absorbers for terahertz applications.

  19. Land cover changes and their biogeophysical effects on climate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahmood, Rezaul; Pielke, Roger A; Hubbard, Kenneth G; Niyogi, Dev; Dirmeyer, Paul A; McAlpine, Clive; Carleton, Andrew M; Hale, Robert; Gameda, Samuel; Beltrán‐Przekurat, Adriana; Baker, Bruce; McNider, Richard; Legates, David R; Shepherd, Marshall; Du, Jinyang; Blanken, Peter D; Frauenfeld, Oliver W; Nair, U.S; Fall, Souleymane

    2014-01-01

    Land cover changes ( LCCs ) play an important role in the climate system. Research over recent decades highlights the impacts of these changes on atmospheric temperature, humidity, cloud cover, circulation, and precipitation...

  20. Wake Vortex Transport and Decay in Ground Effect: Vortex Linking with the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Han, Jongil

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out with a three-dimensional Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model to explore the sensitivity of vortex decay and transport in ground effect (IGE). The vortex decay rates are found to be strongly enhanced following maximum descent into ground effect. The nondimensional decay rate is found to be insensitive to the initial values of circulation, height, and vortex separation. The information gained from these simulations is used to construct a simple decay relationship. This relationship compares well with observed data from an IGE case study. Similarly, a relationship for lateral drift due to ground effect is constructed from the LES data. In the second part of this paper, vortex linking with the ground is investigated. Our numerical simulations of wake vortices for IGE show that a vortex may link with its image beneath the ground, if the intensity of the ambient turbulence is moderate to high. This linking with the ground (which is observed in real cases)gives the appearance of a vortex tube that bends to become vertically oriented and which terminates at the ground. From the simulations conducted, the linking time for vortices in the free atmosphere; i.e., a function of ambient turbulence intensity.

  1. Epiphyte-cover on seagrass (Zostera marina L. leaves impedes plant performance and radial O2 loss from the below-ground tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Elgetti Brodersen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The O2 budget of seagrasses is a complex interaction between several sources and sinks, which is strongly regulated by light availability and mass transfer over the diffusive boundary layer (DBL surrounding the plant. Epiphyte growth on leaves may thus strongly affect the O2 availability of the seagrass plant and its capability to aerate its rhizosphere as a defence against plant toxins.We used electrochemical and fiber-optic microsensors to quantify the O2 flux, DBL and light microclimate around leaves with and without filamentous algal epiphytes. We also quantified the below-ground radial O2 loss from roots (~1 mm from the root-apex to elucidate how this below-ground oxic microzone was affected by the presence of epiphytes.Epiphyte-cover on seagrass leaves (~21% areal cover resulted in reduced light quality and quantity for photosynthesis, thus leading to reduced plant fitness. A ~4 times thicker diffusive boundary layer around leaves with epiphyte-cover impeded gas (and nutrient exchange with the surrounding water-column and thus the amount of O2 passively diffusing into the leaves in darkness. During light exposure of the leaves, radial oxygen loss from the below-ground tissue was ~2 times higher from plants without epiphyte-cover. In contrast, no O2 was detectable at the surface of the root-cap tissue of plants with epiphyte-cover during darkness, leaving the plants more susceptible to sulphide intrusion.Epiphyte growth on seagrass leaves thus negatively affects the light climate and O2 uptake in darkness, hampering the plants performance and thereby reducing the oxidation capability of its below-ground tissue.

  2. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE GROUND EFFECT ON INSECT HOVERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Tong; LIU Nan-sheng; LU Xi-yun

    2008-01-01

    The ground effect on insect hovering is investigated using an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method to solve the two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. A virtual model of an elliptic foil with oscillating translation and rotation near a ground is used. The objective of this study is to deal with the ground effect on the unsteady forces and vortical structures and to get the physical insights in the relevant mechanisms. Two typical insect hovering modes, I.e., normal and dragonfly hovering mode, are examined. Systematic computations have been carried out for some parameters, and the ground effect on the unsteady forces and vortical structures is analyzed.

  3. Testing the enemies hypothesis in peach orchards in two different geographic areas in eastern China: the role of ground cover vegetation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian-Feng Wan

    Full Text Available Many studies have supported the enemies hypothesis, which suggests that natural enemies are more efficient at controlling arthropod pests in polyculture than in monoculture agro-ecosystems. However, we do not yet have evidence as to whether this hypothesis holds true in peach orchards over several geographic locations. In the two different geographic areas in eastern China (Xinchang a town in the Shanghai municipality, and Hudai, a town in Jiangsu Province during a continuous three-year (2010-2012 investigation, we sampled arthropod pests and predators in Trifolium repens L. and in tree canopies of peach orchards with and without the ground cover plant T. repens. No significant differences were found in the abundances of the main groups of arthropod pests and predators in T. repens between Hudai and Xinchang. The abundance, richness, Simpson's index, Shannon-Wiener index, and Pielou evenness index of canopy predators in ground cover areas increased by 85.5, 27.5, 3.5, 16.7, and 7.9% in Xinchang, and by 87.0, 27.6, 3.5, 17.0 and 8.0% in Hudai compared to those in the controls, respectively. The average abundance of Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Homoptera, true bugs and Acarina canopy pests in ground cover areas decreased by 9.2, 10.2, 17.2, 19.5 and 14.1% in Xinchang, and decreased by 9.5, 8.2, 16.8, 20.1 and 16.6% in Hudai compared to that in control areas, respectively. Our study also found a higher density of arthropod species resources in T. repens, as some omnivorous pests and predators residing in T. repens could move between the ground cover and the orchard canopy. In conclusion, ground cover in peach orchards supported the enemies hypothesis, as indicated by the fact that ground cover T. repens promoted the abundance and diversity of predators and reduced the number of arthropod pests in tree canopies in both geographical areas.

  4. Phytoseiidae (Acari: Mesostigmata) within citrus orchards in Florida: species distribution, relative and seasonal abundance within trees, associated vines and ground cover plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Carl C; Denmark, Harold A

    2011-08-01

    Seven citrus orchards on reduced- to no-pesticide spray programs were sampled for predacious mites in the family Phytoseiidae (Acari: Mesostigmata) in central and south central Florida. Inner and outer canopy leaves, open flowers, fruit, twigs, and trunk scrapings were sampled monthly between September 1994 and January 1996. Vines and ground cover plants were sampled monthly between September 1994 and January 1996 in five of these orchards. The two remaining orchards were on full herbicide programs and ground cover plants were absent. Thirty-three species of phytoseiid mites were identified from 35,405 specimens collected within citrus tree canopies within the seven citrus orchards, and 8,779 specimens from vines and ground cover plants within five of the seven orchards. The six most abundant phytoseiid species found within citrus tree canopies were: Euseius mesembrinus (Dean) (20,948), Typhlodromalus peregrinus (Muma) (8,628), Iphiseiodes quadripilis (Banks) (2,632), Typhlodromips dentilis (De Leon) (592), Typhlodromina subtropica Muma and Denmark (519), and Galendromus helveolus (Chant) (315). The six most abundant species found on vines or ground cover plants were: T. peregrinus (6,608), E. mesembrinus (788), T. dentilis (451), I. quadripilis (203), T. subtropica (90), and Proprioseiopsis asetus (Chant) (48). The remaining phytoseiids included: Amblyseius aerialis (Muma), A. herbicolus (Chant), A. largoensis (Chant), A. multidentatus (Chant), A. sp. near multidentatus, A. obtusus (Koch), Chelaseius vicinus (Muma), Euseius hibisci Chant, Galendromus gratus (Chant), Metaseiulus mcgregori (Chant), Neoseiulus mumai (Denmark), N. vagus (Denmark), Phytoscutus sexpilis (Muma), Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks), Proprioseiopsis detritus (Muma), P. dorsatus (Muma), P. macrosetae (Banks), P. rotundus (Muma), P. solens (De Leon), Typhlodromips deleoni (Muma), T. dillus (De Leon), T. dimidiatus (De Leon), T. mastus Denmark and Muma, T. simplicissimus (De Leon), and T. sp

  5. Testing the enemies hypothesis in peach orchards in two different geographic areas in eastern China: the role of ground cover vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Nian-Feng; Ji, Xiang-Yun; Jiang, Jie-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have supported the enemies hypothesis, which suggests that natural enemies are more efficient at controlling arthropod pests in polyculture than in monoculture agro-ecosystems. However, we do not yet have evidence as to whether this hypothesis holds true in peach orchards over several geographic locations. In the two different geographic areas in eastern China (Xinchang a town in the Shanghai municipality, and Hudai, a town in Jiangsu Province) during a continuous three-year (2010-2012) investigation, we sampled arthropod pests and predators in Trifolium repens L. and in tree canopies of peach orchards with and without the ground cover plant T. repens. No significant differences were found in the abundances of the main groups of arthropod pests and predators in T. repens between Hudai and Xinchang. The abundance, richness, Simpson's index, Shannon-Wiener index, and Pielou evenness index of canopy predators in ground cover areas increased by 85.5, 27.5, 3.5, 16.7, and 7.9% in Xinchang, and by 87.0, 27.6, 3.5, 17.0 and 8.0% in Hudai compared to those in the controls, respectively. The average abundance of Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Homoptera, true bugs and Acarina canopy pests in ground cover areas decreased by 9.2, 10.2, 17.2, 19.5 and 14.1% in Xinchang, and decreased by 9.5, 8.2, 16.8, 20.1 and 16.6% in Hudai compared to that in control areas, respectively. Our study also found a higher density of arthropod species resources in T. repens, as some omnivorous pests and predators residing in T. repens could move between the ground cover and the orchard canopy. In conclusion, ground cover in peach orchards supported the enemies hypothesis, as indicated by the fact that ground cover T. repens promoted the abundance and diversity of predators and reduced the number of arthropod pests in tree canopies in both geographical areas.

  6. Effect of surface BRDF of various land cover types on geostationary observations of tropospheric NO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, K.; Richter, A.; Rozanov, V.; Rozanov, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Irie, H.; Kita, K.

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the effect of surface reflectance anisotropy, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), on satellite retrievals of tropospheric NO2. We assume the geometry of geostationary measurements over Tokyo, which is one of the worst air-polluted regions in East Asia. We calculated air mass factors (AMF) and box AMFs (BAMF) for tropospheric NO2 to evaluate the effect of BRDF by using the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN. To model the BRDF effect, we utilized the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products (MOD43B1 and MOD43B2), which provide three coefficients to express the RossThick-LiSparse reciprocal model, a semi-empirical and kernel-based model of BRDF. Because BRDF depends on the land cover type, we also utilized the High Resolution Land-Use and Land-Cover Map of the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS)/Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2), which classifies the ground pixels over Tokyo into six main types: water, urban, paddy, crop, deciduous forest, and evergreen forest. We first develop an empirical model of the three BRDF coefficients for each land cover type over Tokyo and then apply the model to the calculation of land-cover-type-dependent AMFs and BAMFs. Results show that the variability of AMF among the land types is up to several tens of percent, and if we neglect the reflectance anisotropy, the difference with AMFs based on BRDF reaches 10% or more. The evaluation of the BAMFs calculated shows that not considering BRDF will cause large errors if the concentration of NO2 is high close to the surface, although the importance of BRDF for AMFs decreases for large aerosol optical depth (AOD).

  7. Cover crop frequency and compost effects on a legume-rye cover crop during 8 years of organic vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic matter inputs from compost or cover crops (CC) are important to maintain or improve soil quality, but their impact in high-value vegetable production systems are not well understood. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of CC frequency (every winter versus every 4th winter) and yard-waste co...

  8. Fertilizer effects on a winter cereal cover crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benefits associated with conservation tillage in the Southeast are improved by using a winter cereal cover crop. In general, cover crop benefits increase as biomass production is increased, but the infertile soils typically require additional N (inorganic or organic). Currently, limited informatio...

  9. Land cover changes and their biogeophysical effects on climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaul Mahmood; Roger A. Pielke; Kenneth G. Hubbard; Dev Niyogi; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Clive McAlpine; Andrew M. Carleton; Robert Hale; Samuel Gameda; Adriana Beltrán-Przekurat; Bruce Baker; Richard McNider; David R. Legates; Marshall Shepherd; Jinyang Du; Peter D. Blanken; Oliver W. Frauenfeld; U.S. Nair; Souleymane. Fall

    2013-01-01

    Land cover changes (LCCs) play an important role in the climate system. Research over recent decades highlights the impacts of these changes on atmospheric temperature, humidity, cloud cover, circulation, and precipitation. These impacts range from the local- and regional-scale to sub-continental and global-scale. It has been found that the impacts of regional-scale...

  10. Effects of Conservation Policies on Forest Cover Change in Giant Panda Habitat Regions, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Viña, Andrés; Yang, Wu; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jindong; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Liang, Zai; Liu, Jianguo

    2013-07-01

    After long periods of deforestation, forest transition has occurred globally, but the causes of forest transition in different countries are highly variable. Conservation policies may play important roles in facilitating forest transition around the world, including China. To restore forests and protect the remaining natural forests, the Chinese government initiated two nationwide conservation policies in the late 1990s -- the Natural Forest Conservation Program (NFCP) and the Grain-To-Green Program (GTGP). While some studies have discussed the environmental and socioeconomic effects of each of these policies independently and others have attributed forest recovery to both policies without rigorous and quantitative analysis, it is necessary to rigorously quantify the outcomes of these two conservation policies simultaneously because the two policies have been implemented at the same time. To fill the knowledge gap, this study quantitatively evaluated the effects of the two conservation policies on forest cover change between 2001 and 2008 in 108 townships located in two important giant panda habitat regions -- the Qinling Mountains region in Shaanxi Province and the Sichuan Giant Panda Sanctuary in Sichuan Province. Forest cover change was evaluated using a land-cover product (MCD12Q1) derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). This product proved to be highly accurate in the study region (overall accuracy was ca. 87%, using 425 ground truth points collected in the field), thus suitable for the forest change analysis performed. Results showed that within the timeframe evaluated, most townships in both regions exhibited either increases or no changes in forest cover. After accounting for a variety of socioeconomic and biophysical attributes, an Ordinary Least Square (OLS) regression model suggests that the two policies had statistically significant positive effects on forest cover change after seven years of implementation, while

  11. STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF TI-AL-NI SYSTEM COVERING, APPLIED ON THE STEEL GROUND USING ELECTRON-BEAM HEATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Murashova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of the system Ti-Al-Ni covering, received by means of self-distributing high-temperature synthesis, initiated by electron-beam heating, on the basis of steel St3 is investigated.

  12. Performance and Stability of a Winged Vehicle in Ground Effect

    CERN Document Server

    de Divitiis, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    Present work deals with the dynamics of vehicles which intentionally operate in the ground proximity. The dynamics in ground effect is influenced by the vehicle orientation with respect to the ground, since the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients, which in turn depend on height and angle of attack, also vary with the Euler angles. This feature, usually neglected in the applications, can be responsible for sizable variations of the aircraft performance and stability. A further effect, caused by the sink rate, determines unsteadiness that modifies the aerodynamic coefficients. In this work, an analytical formulation is proposed for the force and moment calculation in the presence of the ground and taking the aircraft attitude and sink rate into account. The aerodynamic coefficients are firstly calculated for a representative vehicle and its characteristics in ground effect are investigated. Performance and stability characteristics are then discussed with reference to significant equilibrium conditions, w...

  13. Eupalopsellidae and Stigmaeidae (Acari: Prostigmata) within citrus orchards in Florida: species distribution, relative and seasonal abundance within trees, associated vines, and ground cover plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Carl C; Ueckermann, Eduard A

    2014-10-01

    Seven citrus orchards on reduced- to no-pesticide spray programs were sampled for predacious mites in the families Eupalopsellidae and Stigmaeidae (Acari: Prostigmata) in central and south central Florida. Inner and outer canopy leaves, fruit, twigs, and trunk scrapings were sampled monthly between August 1994 and January 1996. Open flowers were sampled in March from five of the sites. Two species of eupalopsellid mites (Exothorhis caudata Summers and Saniosulus harteni (van-Dis and Ueckermann)) were identified from 252 specimens collected within citrus tree canopies within the seven citrus orchards of which 249 were E. caudata. Only two E. caudata were collected from ground cover plants within five of the seven orchards. Eight species of Stigmaeidae were identified from 5,637 specimens: Agistemus floridanus Gonzalez, A. terminalis Gonzalez, Eustigmaeus arcuata (Chandhri), E. sp. near arcuata, E. segnis (Koch), Mediostigmaeus citri (Rakha and McCoy), Stigmaeus seminudus Wood, and Zetzellia languida Gonzalez were collected from within citrus tree canopies from seven orchard sites. Agistemus floridanus was the only species in either family that was abundant with 5,483 collected from within citrus tree canopies compared with only 39 from vine or ground cover plants. A total of 431 samples from one or more of 82 vines and ground cover plants were sampled monthly between September 1994 and January 1996 in five of these orchards and one or more eupalopsellids or stigmaeids were collected from 19 of these plants. Richardia brasiliensis (Meg.) Gomez had nine A. floridanus from 5 of 25 samples collected from this plant. Solanum sp. had five A. floridanus from three samples taken. Both eupalopsellid and stigmaeid species numbers represented orchards were on full herbicide programs and ground cover plants were absent. Agistemus floridanus was more abundant in the citrus orchards with on-going or recent herbicide programs compared with orchards having well-developed ground

  14. Ground motions and its effects in accelerator design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1984-07-01

    This lecture includes a discussion of types of motion, frequencies of interest, measurements at SLAC, some general comments regarding local sources of ground motion at SLAC, and steps that can be taken to minimize the effects of ground motion on accelerators. (GHT)

  15. Effect of water content and organic carbon on remote sensing of crop residue cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbin, G.; Hunt, E. R., Jr.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; McCarty, G. W.; Brown, D. J.; Doraiswamy, P. C.

    2009-04-01

    Crop residue cover is an important indicator of tillage method. Remote sensing of crop residue cover is an attractive and efficient method when compared with traditional ground-based methods, e.g., the line-point transect or windshield survey. A number of spectral indices have been devised for residue cover estimation. Of these, the most effective are those in the shortwave infrared portion of the spectrum, situated between 1950 and 2500 nm. These indices include the hyperspectral Cellulose Absorption Index (CAI), and advanced multispectral indices, i.e., the Lignin-Cellulose Absorption (LCA) index and the Shortwave Infrared Normalized Difference Residue Index (SINDRI), which were devised for the NASA Terra Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor. Spectra of numerous soils from U.S. Corn Belt (Indiana and Iowa) were acquired under wetness conditions varying from saturation to oven-dry conditions. The behavior of soil reflectance with water content was also dependent on the soil organic carbon content (SOC) of the soils, and the location of the spectral bands relative to significant water absorptions. High-SOC soils showed the least change in spectral index values with increase in soil water content. Low-SOC soils, on the other hand, showed measurable difference. For CAI, low-SOC soils show an initial decrease in index value followed by an increase, due to the way that water content affects CAI spectral bands. Crop residue CAI values decrease with water content. For LCA, water content increases decrease crop residue index values and increase them for soils, resulting in decreased contrast. SINDRI is also affected by SOC and water content. As such, spatial information on the distribution of surface soil water content and SOC, when used in a geographic information system (GIS), will improve the accuracy of remotely-sensed crop residue cover estimates.

  16. Effects of cryptogamic covers on the global carbon and nitrogen balance as investigated by different approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bettina; Porada, Philipp; Elbert, Wolfgang; Burrows, Susannah; Caesar, Jennifer; Steinkamp, Jörg; Tamm, Alexandra; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Büdel, Burkhard; Kleidon, Axel; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Cryptogamic covers are composed of cyanobacteria, green algae, lichens, bryophytes, fungi and bacteria in varying proportions. As cryptogamic ground covers, comprising biological soil and rock crusts they occur on many terrestrial ground surfaces. Cryptogamic plant covers, containing epiphytic and epiphyllic crusts as well as foliose or fruticose lichens and bryophytes spread over large portions of terrestrial plant surfaces. Photoautotrophic organisms within these crusts sequester atmospheric CO2 and many of them include nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, utilizing atmospheric N2 to form ammonium which can be readily used by vascular plants. In a large-scale data analysis approach, we compiled all available data on the physiological properties of cryptogamic covers and developed a model to calculate their annual nitrogen fixation and net primary production. Here, we obtained a total value of 3.9 Pg a-1 for the global net uptake of carbon by cryptogamic covers, which corresponds to approximately 7% of the estimated global net primary production of terrestrial vegetation. Nitrogen assimilation of cryptogamic covers revealed a global estimate of ~49 Tg a-1, accounting for as much as about half the estimated total terrestrial biological nitrogen fixation. In a second approach, we calculated the global carbon uptake by lichens and bryophytes by means of a process-based model. In this model, we used gridded climate data combined with key habitat properties (as e.g. disturbance intervals) to predict the processes which control net carbon uptake, i.e. photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake and evaporation. The model relies on equations frequently used in dynamic vegetation models, which were combined with concepts specific to lichens and bryophytes. As this model only comprises lichens and bryophytes, the predicted terrestrial net uptake of 0.34 to 3.3 Gt a-1 is in accordance with our empirically-derived estimate. Based on this result, we quantified the amount of nitrogen

  17. EFFECTS OF EDGE COVERING ON TENSILE STRENGTH OF MDF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın ÖRS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Dowels, 6, 8 and 10 mm ? diameters were bonded with PVAc adhesive on Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF. Edges were covered with 5, 8 and 12 mm beech wood materials, drilled 25 mm depth. Tensile strength measurments were made on the samples. The highest tensile strength value was given as 6 mm ? dowel and MDF covered with 8 mm thickness beech wood material (2.294 N/mm2, the lowest value was obtained with 10 mm ? dowel and with unprocessed MDF (1.314 N/mm2.

  18. Investigation of topographical effects on rupture dynamics and ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Chen, X.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Using the curved grid finite-difference method (CG-FDM), we model spontaneous dynamic rupture on vertical strike-slip faults with irregular free surfaces to investigate the effect of topography on near-source ground motion. Four groups of simulations, in which the epicentral distances from the topographical perturbations of the nucleation patch were varied, are modeled in this work. The simulated results show that the presence of irregular topography along the fault trace may increase the ground motion. Whether the irregular topography exhibits higher ground motion overall depends on the irregular topography's ability to prevent the sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear transition. When irregular topography prevents this transition, sub-Rayleigh rupture produces stronger ground motions than those of the sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear transition, although the moment magnitudes does not differ substantially between the two cases. To thoroughly understand the effects of irregular topography on near-source ground motion, we also model spontaneous dynamic rupture on a planar fault in full-space and half-space with varying initial shear stresses, and the corresponding modeling results indicate that the effect of initial shear stress on near-source ground motion is strong. These results may have implications for ground-motion prediction in future earthquakes involving geometrically complex faults.

  19. Effects of interannual climate variability on tropical tree cover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmgren, M.; Hirota, M.; Nes, van E.H.; Scheffer, M.

    2013-01-01

    Climatic warming is substantially intensifying the global water cycle1 and is projected to increase rainfall variability2. Using satellite data, we show that higher climatic variability is associated with reduced tree cover in the wet tropics globally. In contrast, interannual variability in rainfal

  20. Monitoring of a debris-covered and avalanche-fed glacier in the Eastern Italian Alps using ground-based SfM-MVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Livia; Carturan, Luca; Cazorzi, Federico; Colucci, Renato R.; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo; Forte, Emanuele

    2015-04-01

    The Montasio Occidentale glacier is a 0.07 km2 wide, avalanche-fed glacier located at very low-altitude (1860-2050 m a.s.l.) in the Eastern Italian Alps. The glacier is still active and shows a detectable mass transfer from the accumulation area to the lower ablation area, which is covered by a thick debris mantle. Geometric changes and mass balance have been monitored starting in 2010, combining glaciological methods and high-resolution geodetic surveying with a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). The TLS technique has proved to be very effective in determining the volume change of this glacier, but presents several limitations as high costs, high level of specialized training and low portability. On the other hand, the recent improvements in close-range photogrammetric techniques like the Structure from Motion (SfM), combined with dense image matching algorithms as Multi View Stereo (MVS), make them competitive for high quality 3D models production. The purpose of this work was to apply ground-based photogrammetric surveys for the monitoring of the annual mass balance and surface processes of Montasio Occidentale glacier. A consumer-grade SLR camera and the SfM-MVS software PhotoScan were used to detect the changes in the surface topography of the glacier from 2012 to 2014. Different data acquisition settings were tested, in order to optimize the quality and the spatial coverage of the 3D glacier model. The accuracy of the image-based 3D models was estimated in stable areas outside the glacier, using the TLS 3D model as reference. A ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey was carried out in 2014, simultaneously to the photogrammetric survey, that was used to compare the snow height estimations obtained by photogrammetry with those obtained by geophysics. The achieved results indicate that the resolution and accuracy of the 3D models generated by the SfM-MVS technique are comparable with those obtained from TLS surveys. Consequently, almost identical volumetric changes

  1. Effect of rock fragment embedding on the aeolian deposition of dust on stone-covered surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, D.

    2005-01-01

    Many stone-covered surfaces on Earth are subject to aeolian deposition of atmospheric dust. This study investigates how the deposition of dust is affected when rock fragments become gradually more embedded in the ground or, inversely, become more concentrated on the surface. Experiments were execute

  2. Effect of ground stress on hydraulic fracturing of methane well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Chun-zhi; MAO Xian-biao; MIAO Xie-xing; WANG Peng

    2008-01-01

    Most of the coal reservoirs in China are of low-permeability, so hydraulic fracturing is widely used to improve the permeability in the extraction of gas by ground drilling. The ground stress around the well was analyzed by using theory of elasticity. The pressure when the well fractured is formulated and the effect of ground stress on pressure is discussed. The effect of ground-stress-differences on hydraulic fracturing was analyzed by using the numerical software RFPA2D-Flow in reference to the tectonic stress in Jincheng coal area. The results show that: 1) the position where initial fracture appears is random and fracture branches emerge when the fractures expand if ground stresses in any two directions within a horizontal plane are equal; 2) otherwise, the fractures expand in general along the direction of maximum ground stress and the critical pressure decreases with increasing ground-stress-differences and 3) the preferred well-disposition pattern is diamond shaped. The preferred well spacing is 250 m×300 m. This study can provide a reference for the design of wells.

  3. Potential reciprocal effect between land use / land cover change and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daham, Afrah; Han, Dawei; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Land use/land cover (LULC) activity influences climate change and one way to explore climate change is to analyse the change in LULC patterns. Modelling the Spatio-temporal pattern of LULC change requires the use of satellite remote sensing data and aerial photographs with different pre-processing steps. The aim of this research is to analyse the reciprocal effects of LUCC (Land Use and Cover Change) and the climate change on each other in the study area which covers part of Bristol, South Gloucestershire, Bath and Somerset in England for the period (1975-2015). LUCC is assessed using remote sensing data. Three sets of remotely sensed data, LanSAT-1 Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data obtained in (1975 and 1976), LanSAT-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data obtained in (1984 and 1997), and LandSAT-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) acquired in (2003 and 2015), with a time span of forty years were used in the study. One of the most common problems in the satellite images is the presence of cloud covers. In this study, the cloud cover problem is handled using a novel algorithm, which is capable of reducing the cloud coverage in the classified images significantly. This study also examines a suite of possible photogrammetry techniques applicable to detect the change in LULC. At the moment photogrammertic techniques are used to derive the ground truth for supervised classification from the high resolution aerial photos which were provided by Ordnance Survey (contract number: 240215) and global mapper for the years in (2001 and 2014). After obtaining the classified images almost free of clouds, accuracy assessment is implemented with the derived classified images using confusion matrix at some ground truth points. Eight classes (Improved grassland, Built up areas and gardens, Arable and horticulture, Broad-leaved / mixed woodland, Coniferous woodland, Oceanic seas, Standing open water and reservoir, and Mountain; heath; bog) have been classified in the chosen study area. Also

  4. Study of growth and development features of ten ground cover plants in Kish Island green space in warm season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shooshtarian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Having special ecological condition, Kish Island has a restricted range of native species of ornamental plants. Expansion of urban green space in this Island is great of importance due to its outstanding touristy position in the South of Iran. The purpose of this study was to investigate the growth and development of groundcover plants planted in four different regions of Kish Island and to recommend the most suitable and adaptable species for each region. Ten groundcover species included Festuca ovina L., Glaucium flavum Crantz., Frankenia thymifolia Desf., Sedum spurium Bieb., Sedum acre L., .Potentilla verna L., Carpobrotus acinaciformis (L. L. Bolus., Achillea millefolium L., Alternanthera dentata Moench. and Lampranthus spectabilis Haw. Evaluation of growth and development had been made by measurement of morphological characteristics such as height, covering area, leaf number and area, dry and fresh total weights and visual scoring. Physiological traits included proline and chlorophyll contents evaluated. This study was designed in factorial layout based on completely randomized blocks design with six replicates. Results showed that in terms of indices such as covering area, visual quality, height, total weight, and chlorophyll content, Pavioon and Sadaf plants had the most and the worst performances, respectively in comparison to other regions’ plants. Based on evaluated characteristics, C. acinaciformis, L. spectabilis and F. thymifolia had the most expansion and growth in all quadruplet regions and are recommend for planting in Kish Island and similar climates.

  5. Investigating Hydrogeologic Controls on Sandhill Wetlands in Covered Karst with 2D Resistivity and Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C. M.; Nowicki, R. S.; Rains, M. C.; Kruse, S.

    2015-12-01

    In west-central Florida, wetland and lake distribution is strongly controlled by karst landforms. Sandhill wetlands and lakes are sand-filled upland basins whose water levels are groundwater driven. Lake dimensions only reach wetland edges during extreme precipitation events. Current wetland classification schemes are inappropriate for identifying sandhill wetlands due to their unique hydrologic regime and ecologic expression. As a result, it is difficult to determine whether or not a wetland is impacted by groundwater pumping, development, and climate change. A better understanding of subsurface structures and how they control the hydrologic regime is necessary for development of an identification and monitoring protocol. Long-term studies record vegetation diversity and distribution, shallow ground water levels and surface water levels. The overall goals are to determine the hydrologic controls (groundwater, seepage, surface water inputs). Most recently a series of geophysical surveys was conducted at select sites in Hernando and Pasco County, Florida. Electrical resistivity and ground penetrating radar were employed to image sand-filled basins and the top of the limestone bedrock and stratigraphy of wetland slopes, respectively. The deepest extent of these sand-filled basins is generally reflected in topography as shallow depressions. Resistivity along inundated wetlands suggests the pools are surface expressions of the surficial aquifer. However, possible breaches in confining clay layers beneath topographic highs between depressions are seen in resistivity profiles as conductive anomalies and in GPR as interruptions in otherwise continuous horizons. These data occur at sites where unconfined and confined water levels are in agreement, suggesting communication between shallow and deep groundwater. Wetland plants are observed outside the historic wetland boundary at many sites, GPR profiles show near-surface layers dipping towards the wetlands at a shallower

  6. Dynamic Ground Effects Simulation Using OVERFLOW-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Bill

    1999-01-01

    This presentation is broken into 5 logical sections. The Background Information section describes the technical issues being address by this study. The Approach section describes the organization of the contract effort which was laid out as the most effective means of quantifying, with validated methods, the magnitude of dynamic ground effects for the TCA (Technology Concept Aircraft) configuration. The Validation Case section describes the analysis of the XB-70 configuration in both static and dynamic ground effect, with comparisons to wind tunnel and flight test data. The TCA Analysis section then describes the application of the same codes and methodologies to the TCA in both static and dynamic ground effect. Comparisons are made between the static and dynamic, as well as to early static data from a recent wind tunnel test on the TCA configuration. Finally, the work to date is summarized and the future direction of this study is outlined.

  7. Land Use and Land Cover, Existing land use derived from orthoimagery. Ground-truthing from discussion with local plan commission members., Published in 2000, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Portage County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Land Use and Land Cover dataset current as of 2000. Existing land use derived from orthoimagery. Ground-truthing from discussion with local plan commission members..

  8. [Pediatric cases in preclinical emergency medicine: critical aspects in the range of missions covered by ground ambulance and air rescue services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlechtriemen, T; Masson, R; Burghofer, K; Lackner, C K; Altemeyer, K H

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate differences in structure and severity of pediatric emergencies treated by aeromedical (air rescue) or ground ambulances services. Conclusions for the training of emergency physicians are discussed. In a 3-year study period, a total of 9,274 pediatric emergencies covered by the ADAC air rescue service are compared to 4,344 pediatric patients of ground ambulance services in Saarland. In aeromedical services pediatric emergencies are more frequent (12.9% vs. 6.4%), trauma predominates (59.9% vs. 35.6%) and severe injuries or diseases occur more frequently (30.5% vs. 15.0%). In both groups pediatric emergency cases are concentrated into very few diagnostic groups: more than one third of the cases involving pre-school children is due to convulsions. Respiratory diseases and intoxication are the next most frequent causes and are more common in ground ambulance patients. Head trauma is the most common diagnosis in cases of pediatric trauma, followed by musculoskeletal and thoracoabdominal trauma. All types of severe trauma are more frequent in pediatric patients of the aeromedical services. Training of emergency physicians should include pediatric life support and specific information about frequent pediatric emergency situations. For emergency physicians in aeromedical services, an intensive training in pediatric trauma life support is also necessary.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Rotorcraft Outwash in Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Philip E.; Overmeyer, Austin D.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The wake characteristics of a rotorcraft are affected by the proximity of a rotor to the ground surface, especially during hover. Ground effect is encountered when the rotor disk is within a distance of a few rotor radii above the ground surface and results in an increase in thrust for a given power relative to that same power condition with the rotor out of ground effect. Although this phenomenon has been highly documented and observed since the beginning of the helicopter age, there is still a relatively little amount of flow-field data existing to help understand its features. Joint Army and NASA testing was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center using a powered rotorcraft model in hover at various rotor heights and thrust conditions in order to contribute to the complete outwash data set. The measured data included outwash velocities and directions, rotor loads, fuselage loads, and ground pressures. The researchers observed a linear relationship between rotor height and percent download on the fuselage, peak mean outwash velocities occurring at radial stations between 1.7 and 1.8 r/R regardless of rotor height, and the measurement azimuthal dependence of the outwash profile for a model incorporating a fuselage. Comparisons to phase-locked PIV data showed similar contours but a more contracted wake boundary for the PIV data. This paper describes the test setup and presents some of the averaged results.

  10. Spatiotemporal analysis of the effects of forest covers on water yield in the Western Ghats of peninsular India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sunita; Mishra, Arabinda

    2012-06-01

    SummaryBiotic interference has greatly disturbed the forest cover, the forest soils and, therefore, the hydrological functioning of the forest (Bonell and Bruijnzeel, 2005). Though widely debated, reduction in water yield (Water Yield: Total quantity of surface water that can be expected in a given period from a stream at the outlet of its catchment (Subramanya, 2008)) appears to be one such consequence. Scientific understanding of how this contentious issue affects the benefits of forests for water is critical to avoid unintended consequences (IUFRO, 2007). Gaps in research exist for tropical forest areas that are now a general mix of primary forest and secondary vegetation interspersed with patches cleared for agriculture or other non-forest uses (Bruijnzeel, 2004; Giambelluca, 2002). For this reason, research on spatiotemporal variations in the effects of a mix of primary forest (Primary Forests: Old forests with no or inconsequential human disturbance), mature secondary forests (Secondary Forests: Forests regenerating largely through natural processes after significant human and/or natural disturbance of the original forest vegetation at a single point in time or over an extended period, and displaying a major difference in forest structure and/or canopy species composition with respect to nearby primary forests on similar sites (Chokkalingam and Jong, 2001)) and disturbed forests (Disturbed Forests: Forests that have been exploited on moderate to large scale for timber, fuel wood, fodder, shifting cultivation and other tangible benefits. Reforestation activities may or may not have been undertaken in them) on runoff coefficients was conducted in four watersheds in the Western Ghats of peninsular India. Forest cover (Forest Cover: All lands with tree cover of canopy density of 10% and above when projected vertically on the horizontal ground with minimum areal extent of one Ha) significantly (0.01 forest cover, the Tulsi Watershed having mainly primary forests

  11. Water-saving ground cover rice production system reduces net greenhouse gas fluxes in an annual rice-based cropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To safeguard food security and preserve precious water resources, the technology of water-saving ground cover rice production system (GCRPS is being increasingly adopted for the rice cultivation. However, changes in soil water status and temperature under GCRPS may affect soil biogeochemical processes that control the biosphere–atmosphere exchanges of methane (CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2. The overall goal of this study is to better understand how net ecosystem greenhouse gas exchanges (NEGE and grain yields are affected by GCRPS in an annual rice-based cropping system. Our evaluation was based on measurements of the CH4 and N2O fluxes and soil heterotrophic respiration (CO2 emission over a complete year, as well as the estimated soil carbon sequestration intensity for six different fertilizer treatments for conventional paddy and GCRPS. The fertilizer treatments included urea application and no N fertilization for both conventional paddy (CUN and CNN and GCRPS (GUN and GNN, solely chicken manure (GCM and combined urea and chicken manure applications (GUM for GCRPS. Averaging across all the fertilizer treatments, GCRPS increased annual N2O emission and grain yield by 40% and 9%, respectively, and decreased annual CH4 emission by 69%, while GCRPS did not affect soil CO2 emissions relative to the conventional paddy. The annual direct emission factors of N2O were 4.01, 0.087 and 0.50% for GUN, GCM and GUM, respectively, and 1.52% for the conventional paddy (CUN. The annual soil carbon sequestration intensity under GCRPS was estimated to be an average of −1.33 Mg C ha−1 yr−1, which is approximately 44% higher than the conventional paddy. The annual NEGE were 10.80–11.02 Mg CO2-eq ha−1 yr−1 for the conventional paddy and 3.05–9.37 Mg CO2-eq ha−1 yr−1 for the GCRPS, suggesting the potential feasibility of GCRPS in reducing net greenhouse effect from rice cultivation. Using organic fertilizers for GCRPS

  12. Effects of a covering layer in a circular-arc canyon on incident plane SV waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An analytical solution for scattering of incident plane SV waves by a circular-arc canyon with a covering layer was derived by Fourier-Bessel series expansion technique, and the solution was utilized to analyze the effects of the covering layer on incident plane SV waves. It was shown that the covering layer in a canyon, even if it is very thin, amplifies incident plane SV waves tremendously, and the amplification can be two and half times more than that for a simple canyon; the stiffness and thickness of the covering layer also have great effects on incident plane SV waves.

  13. Aerodynamic ground effect in fruitfly sized insect takeoff

    CERN Document Server

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling, considering the voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore the possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. The numerical method is based on a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver and a simple flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia, and the leg thrust. Forces, power and displacements are compared for takeoffs with and without ground effect. Natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly, modified takeoffs and hovering are analyzed. The results show that the ground effect during the natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, the ground effect does not produce any significant increase of the vertical force neither. Moreover, the vertical force even drops in most of the cases considered. There is a consistent increase of the horizontal force, and a decrease of the aerodynamic power, if the rate of climb is suff...

  14. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Kolomenskiy

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering.

  15. Effectiveness of helicopter versus ground ambulance services for interfacility transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, C L; Shapiro, M J; Bessey, P Q; Littenberg, B

    1998-10-01

    Helicopters provide rapid interfacility transport, but the effect on patients is largely unknown. Patients requested to be transported between facilities by helicopter were followed prospectively to determine survival, disability, health status, and health care utilization. A total of 1,234 patients were transported by the primary aeromedical company; 153 patients were transported by ground and 25 patients were transported by other aeromedical services because of weather or unavailability of aircraft. There were no differences at 30 days for survivors in disability, health status, or health care utilization. Nineteen percent of helicopter-transported patients died compared with 15% of those transported by ground (p=0.21). The patients transported by helicopter did not have improved outcomes compared with patients transported by ground. These data argue against a large advantage of helicopters for interfacility transport. A randomized trial is needed to address these issues conclusively.

  16. Effectiveness of Africa's tropical protected areas for maintaining forest cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, J N; De Vos, A; Ament, J M; Cumming, G S

    2017-06-01

    The effectiveness of parks for forest conservation is widely debated in Africa, where increasing human pressure, insufficient funding, and lack of management capacity frequently place significant demands on forests. Tropical forests house a substantial portion of the world's remaining biodiversity and are heavily affected by anthropogenic activity. We analyzed park effectiveness at the individual (224 parks) and national (23 countries) level across Africa by comparing the extent of forest loss (as a proxy for deforestation) inside parks to matched unprotected control sites. Although significant geographical variation existed among parks, the majority of African parks had significantly less forest loss within their boundaries (e.g., Mahale Park had 34 times less forest loss within its boundary) than control sites. Accessibility was a significant driver of forest loss. Relatively inaccessible areas had a higher probability (odds ratio >1, p < 0.001) of forest loss but only in ineffective parks, and relatively accessible areas had a higher probability of forest loss but only in effective parks. Smaller parks less effectively prevented forest loss inside park boundaries than larger parks (T = -2.32, p < 0.05), and older parks less effectively prevented forest loss inside park boundaries than younger parks (F2,154 = -4.11, p < 0.001). Our analyses, the first individual and national assessment of park effectiveness across Africa, demonstrated the complexity of factors (such as geographical variation, accessibility, and park size and age) influencing the ability of a park to curb forest loss within its boundaries. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  17. Characterization of the Aerodynamic Ground Effect and Its Influence in Multirotor Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pedro Sanchez-Cuevas; Guillermo Heredia; Anibal Ollero

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes the ground effect in multirotors, that is, the change in the thrust generated by the rotors when flying close to the ground due to the interaction of the rotor airflow with the ground surface...

  18. The Differential Effects of Two Self-Managed Math Instruction Procedures: Cover, Copy, and Compare versus Copy, Cover, and Compare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafman, Joel M.; Cates, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the fluency and error rates produced when using the Cover, Copy, and Compare (CCC) and a modified CCC procedure (MCCC) called Copy, Cover, and Compare to complete subtraction math problems. Two second-grade classrooms consisting of 47 total students participated in the study. The following items were administered to…

  19. Ground measurements of the hemispherical-directional reflectance of Arctic snow covered tundra for the validation of satellite remote sensing products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, C. P.; Marks, A. A.; Green, P.; Mac Arthur, A.; Fox, N.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface albedo is the hemispherical and wavelength integrated reflectance over the visible, near infrared and shortwave infrared regions of the solar spectrum. The albedo of Arctic snow can be in excess of 0.8 and it is a critical component in the global radiation budget because it determines the proportion of solar radiation absorbed, and reflected, over a large part of the Earth's surface. We present here our first results of the angularly resolved surface reflectance of Arctic snow at high solar zenith angles (~80°) suitable for the validation of satellite remote sensing products. The hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF) of Arctic snow covered tundra was measured using the GonioRAdiometric Spectrometer System (GRASS) during a three-week field campaign in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, in March/April 2013. The measurements provide one of few existing HDRF datasets at high solar zenith angles for wind-blown Arctic snow covered tundra (conditions typical of the Arctic region), and the first ground-based measure of HDRF at Ny-Ålesund. The HDRF was recorded under clear sky conditions with 10° intervals in view zenith, and 30° intervals in view azimuth, for several typical sites over a wavelength range of 400-1500 nm at 1 nm resolution. Satellite sensors such as MODIS, AVHRR and VIIRS offer a method to monitor the surface albedo with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, snow reflectance is anisotropic and is dependent on view and illumination angle and the wavelength of the incident light. Spaceborne sensors subtend a discrete angle to the target surface and measure radiance over a limited number of narrow spectral bands. Therefore, the derivation of the surface albedo requires accurate knowledge of the surfaces bidirectional reflectance as a function of wavelength. The ultimate accuracy to which satellite sensors are able to measure snow surface properties such as albedo is dependant on the accuracy of the BRDF model, which can only be assessed

  20. Effects of Bahia Grass Cover and Mulch on Runoff and Sediment Yield of Sloping Red Soil in Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin-Hu; ZHANG Zhan-Yu; YANG Jie; ZHANG Guo-Hua; WANG Bin

    2011-01-01

    Rainfall, runoff (surface runoff, interflow and groundwater runoff) and soil loss from 5 m × 15 m plots were recorded for 5 years (2001-2005) in an experiment with three treatments (cover, mulch and bare ground) on sloping red soil in southern China. Surface runoff and erosion from the Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) cover plot (A) and mulch plot (B) during the 5 years were low,despite the occurrence of potentially erosive rains. In contrast, the bare plot (C) had both the highest surface runoff coefficient and the highest sediment yield. There were significant differences in interflow and surface runoff and no significant difference in groundwater runoff among plots. The runoff coefficients and duration of interflow and groundwater runoff were in the order plot B > plot A > plot C. Effects of Bahia grass cover were excellent, indicating that the use of Bahia grass cover can be a simple and feasible practice for soil and water conservation on sloping red soil in the region.

  1. Field evaluation of the effectiveness of engineered soil covers for reactive tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanful, E.K.; Woyshner, M.R.; Aube, B.C.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose is to design, construct, and evaluate the effectiveness of soil covers and a geomembrane, or plastic cover, to reduce acid generation in reactive mine tailings. The evaluation involves performance monitoring of field test plots at the decommissioned Waite Amulet tailings site and laboratory experiments. Gaseous oxygen concentrations, water content, suction, temperature, and pore water quality at various depths were measured at plots set up to test two soil covers, the geomembrane cover, and as a control. The results from the four tests are reported and evaluated. 43 refs., 98 figs., 27 tabs.

  2. Effect of winter cover crops on nematode population levels in north Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K-H; McSorley, R; Gallaher, R N

    2004-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted in north-central Florida to examine the effects of various winter cover crops on plant-parasitic nematode populations through time. In the first experiment, six winter cover crops were rotated with summer corn (Zea mays), arranged in a randomized complete block design. The cover crops evaluated were wheat (Triticum aestivum), rye (Secale cereale), oat (Avena sativa), lupine (Lupinus angustifolius), hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum). At the end of the corn crop in year 1, population densities of Meloidogyne incognita were lowest on corn following rye or oat (P cover crops: soybean (Glycine max), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), sorghum-sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor x S. sudanense), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea), and corn. Population densities of M. incognita and Helicotylenchus dihystera were affected by previous tropical cover crops (P winter cover crops present at the time of sampling. Plots planted to sunn hemp in the fall maintained the lowest M. incognita and H. dihystera numbers. Results suggest that winter cover crops tested did not suppress plant-parasitic nematodes effectively. Planting tropical cover crops such as sunn hemp after corn in a triple-cropping system with winter cover crops may provide more versatile nematode management strategies in northern Florida.

  3. Ruminant Grazing of Cover Crops: Effects on Soil Properties and Agricultural Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poffenbarger, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    Integrating livestock into a cropping system by allowing ruminant animals to graze cover crops may yield economic and environmental benefits. The effects of grazing on soil physical properties, soil organic matter, nitrogen cycling and agricultural production are presented in this literature review. The review found that grazing cover crops…

  4. Snow cover manipulation effects on microbial community structure and soil chemistry in a mountain bog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robroek, B.J.M.; Heijboer, A.; Jassey, V.E.J.; Hefting, M.M.; Rouwenhorst, T.G.; Buttler, A.; Bragazza, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Alterations in snow cover driven by climate change may impact ecosystem functioning, including biogeochemistry and soil (microbial) processes. We elucidated the effects of snow cover manipulation (SCM) on above-and belowground processes in a temperate peatland. Methods In a Swiss

  5. Cover crop effects on soil carbon and nitrogen under bioenergy sorghum crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops can increase soil C and N storage and reduce the potential for N leaching under agronomic crops, but information on their benefits under bioenergy crops is scanty due to the removal of aboveground biomass. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of cover crops on soil organ...

  6. Tillage effects on N2O emissions as influenced by a winter cover crop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O; Mutegi, James; Hansen, Elly Møller

    2011-01-01

    Conservation tillage practices are widely used to protect against soil erosion and soil C losses, whereas winter cover crops are used mainly to protect against N losses during autumn and winter. For the greenhouse gas balance of a cropping system the effect of reduced tillage and cover crops on N2O...

  7. Snow cover manipulation effects on microbial community structure and soil chemistry in a mountain bog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robroek, B.J.M.; Heijboer, A.; Jassey, V.E.J.; Hefting, M.M.; Rouwenhorst, T.G.; Buttler, A.; Bragazza, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Alterations in snow cover driven by climate change may impact ecosystem functioning, including biogeochemistry and soil (microbial) processes. We elucidated the effects of snow cover manipulation (SCM) on above-and belowground processes in a temperate peatland. Methods In a Swiss

  8. Effects of cyclic chloride exposure on penetration of concrete cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, K.; Hooton, R.D.

    1999-09-01

    Concretes are in a state of flux between saturated and partially saturated conditions as they undergo continuous cycles of wetting and drying. In saturated concrete, dissolved ions enter through diffusion, whereas in partially saturated concrete, ion-containing fluids are absorbed by capillary suction and concentrated by evaporation of water. The primary focus of this study was to examine the effects of cyclic wetting and drying with sodium chloride solution on chloride ingress into concrete. Chloride profiles of samples exposed to various lengths and numbers of cycles were determined for three mixtures of concrete: two containing slag and/or silica fume with a 0.4 w/cm (water to cementing materials ratio) and one with a 0.3 w/cm. It was found that longer drying times increase the rate of chloride ingress. A good relationship exists between the depth of chloride penetration and the square root of the number of cycles.

  9. Colored polyethylene soil covers and grafting effects on cucumber flowering and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Inês Cristina de Batista

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. is one of the most cultivated vegetable crops in plastic greenhouses in Brazil because of the short cycle and its high economic value in off-season harvests. To better understand this management technique the effect of different colored polyethylene soil covers was evaluated in relation to flowering and yield of the hybrid cucumber 'Yoshinari' grafted or not on the hybrid squash 'Ikky'. The polyethylene cover colors were black, white on black and green plus a control without cover. Covered but not grafted crops had a more uniform flowering distribution. The number of flowers was greater for the white/black grafted treatment. All the polyethylene covers favored flowering for the non grafted plants. Grafting reduced flowering for the black or green polyethylene covers treatments. The fruit set increased with the use of polyethylene cover but was not influenced by grafting. The uniform distribution of flowering remained during fruiting only for grafted plants and soil covered with black or green polyethylene. Both polyethylene cover and grafting favored early harvesting. The 'Yoshinari'/'Ikky' graft caused taller plants but fruit were thicker and smaller and did not meet the commercial standard. The best quality fruit and highest yields were obtained in the black and white/black treatments, without grafting.

  10. Cloud Cover Increase with Increasing Aerosol Absorptivity: A Counterexample to the Conventional Semidirect Aerosol Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlwitz, Jan; Miller, Ron L.

    2010-01-01

    We reexamine the aerosol semidirect effect using a general circulation model and four cases of the single-scattering albedo of dust aerosols. Contrary to the expected decrease in low cloud cover due to heating by tropospheric aerosols, we find a significant increase with increasing absorptivity of soil dust particles in regions with high dust load, except during Northern Hemisphere winter. The strongest sensitivity of cloud cover to dust absorption is found over land during Northern Hemisphere summer. Here even medium and high cloud cover increase where the dust load is highest. The cloud cover change is directly linked to the change in relative humidity in the troposphere as a result of contrasting changes in specific humidity and temperature. More absorption by aerosols leads to larger diabatic heating and increased warming of the column, decreasing relative humidity. However, a corresponding increase in the specific humidity exceeds the temperature effect on relative humidity. The net effect is more low cloud cover with increasing aerosol absorption. The higher specific humidity where cloud cover strongly increases is attributed to an enhanced convergence of moisture driven by dust radiative heating. Although in some areas our model exhibits a reduction of low cloud cover due to aerosol heating consistent with the conventional description of the semidirect effect, we conclude that the link between aerosols and clouds is more varied, depending also on changes in the atmospheric circulation and the specific humidity induced by the aerosols. Other absorbing aerosols such as black carbon are expected to have a similar effect.

  11. Black carbon semi-direct effects on cloud cover: review and synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Absorbing aerosols (AAs such as black carbon (BC or dust absorb incoming solar radiation, perturb the temperature structure of the atmosphere, and influence cloud cover. Previous studies have described conditions under which AAs either increase or decrease cloud cover. The effect depends on several factors, including the altitude of the AA relative to the cloud and the cloud type. We attempt to categorize the effects into several likely regimes. Cloud cover is decreased if the AAs are embedded in the cloud layer. AAs below cloud may enhance convection and cloud cover. AAs above cloud top stabilize the underlying layer and tend to enhance stratocumulus clouds but may reduce cumulus clouds. AAs can also promote cloud cover in convergent regions as they enhance deep convection and low level convergence as it draws in moisture from ocean to land regions. Most global model studies indicate a regional variation in the cloud response but generally increased cloud cover over oceans and some land regions, with net increased low-level and/or reduced upper level cloud cover. The result is a net negative semi-direct effect feedback from the cloud response to AAs. In some of these climate model studies, the cooling effect of BC due to cloud changes is strong enough to essentially cancel the warming direct effects.

  12. Effect of cover crop extracts on cotton and radish radicle elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy L. Raper

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that some cover crops are allelopathic and can inhibit weed germination and growth. Additionally, negative allelopathic effects have been documented in cash crops planted into cover crop residue. However, little literature exists comparing relative the allelopathic potential of cover crops producers utilize in conservation-agriculture systems. This study assessed the effects of twelve cover crop extracts on radish (Raphanus sativus L. and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. radicle elongation, in three trials, using an extract-agar bioassay. In Trial 1 the cover crops were black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb cv. SoilSaver, crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L. cv. AU Robin, white lupin (Lupinus albus L. cvs. AU Homer and AU Alpha, rye (Secale cereale L. cv. Elbon, wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Vigoro Grazer, and triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack cv. Trical 2700. In Trial 2 the cover crops were forage rape (Brassica napus L. var. napus cv. Licapo, sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L., Austrian winter field pea (Pisum sativum spp. arvense L. Poir, black medic (Medicago lupilina L., hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth, black oat cv. SoilSaver, and crimson clover cv. AU Robin. Cotton was evaluated using the same bioassay and all of the cover crops mentioned above in a single trial (Trial 3. All cover crop extracts inhibited radicle elongation compared to water. Allelopathic potential was highly variable among cultivars within a cover crop species, and within a cultivar. Allelopathic differences among cover crops give an additional weed control tool in conservation systems. However, winter cover selection may impact on cash crop performance if producers plant their crop into green residue.

  13. Effect of ground motion from nuclear excavation: interim canal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, C. Y.; Nadolski, M. E.

    1969-09-01

    The effect of ground motion due to nuclear excavation of a sea-level canal at two alternative routes, 17A and 25E, are discussed from the aspects of motion prediction and structural response. The importance of the high-rise building problem is stressed because of its complexity. Several damage criteria are summarized for advance planning of excavation and operation. The 1964 shot schedule and the latest revised schedule are included for comparison.

  14. Detect ground motion effects on the trajectory at ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Rénier, Yves; Garcia, Rogelio

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) commissioning group aims to demonstrate the feasibility of the Beam Delivery System (BDS) of the next linear colliders (ILC and CLIC) as well as to define and to test the tunning methods. As the design vertical beam sizes of the linear colliders are about few nanometers, the stability of the trajectory as well as the control of the aberrations are very critical. The magnet displacements induced by ground motion are large enough for CLIC to perturb the beam stability above requirements. It is planned to measure the displacement of the magnets and implement a feed-forward correcting the effects on the beam trajectory with correctors (dipoles). This article studies the possibility to detect ground motion effects on the beam trajectory at ATF2. Characteristics of the ground motion at ATF2 are presented, the effects of the magnet displacements on the beam trajectory are simulated and an algorithm predicting the induced trajectory fluctuations is evaluated. After the estimated...

  15. Differences in plant cover and species composition of semiarid grassland communities of Central Mexico and its effects on net ecosystem exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Delgado-Balbuena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in land use across the semiarid grasslands of Northern Mexico have driven a decline of plant cover and alteration of plant species composition. A number of different plant communities have resulted from these changes, however, their implications on the carbon cycle and regional carbon balance are still poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of plant cover loss and changes in species composition on net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE and their biotic and abiotic controls. Five typical plant community types were examined in the semiarid grassland by encasing the entire above-ground ecosystem using the geodesic dome method. Sites included an oat crop (crop, a moderately grazed grassland (moderate grazing, a 28 yr-old grazing exclosure (exclosure, an overgrazed site with low perennial grass cover (overgrazed, and an overgrazed site presenting shrub encroachment (shrub encroachment. For natural vegetation, rates of daytime NEE for sites with a high plant cover (exclosure and moderate grazing were similar (P>0.05 as compared to sites with low plant cover (overgrazed and shrub encroachment. However, night time NEE (carbon loss was more than double (P<0.05 for sites with high plant cover compared to sites with low cover, resulting into slight C sinks for the low plant cover sites and neutral or sources for the high plant cover sites on an annual basis. Differences in plant cover and its associated biomass defined the sensitivity to environmental controls. Thus, daytime NEE in low plant cover sites reached light compensation points at lower PPFD values than those from high plant cover sites. Differences in species composition did not influence NEE rates even though there were transient or permanent changes in C3 vs. C4 functional groups.

  16. Estimating spatial distribution of daily snow depth with kriging methods: combination of MODIS snow cover area data and ground-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurately measuring the spatial distribution of the snow depth is difficult because stations are sparse, particularly in western China. In this study, we develop a novel scheme that produces a reasonable spatial distribution of the daily snow depth using kriging interpolation methods. These methods combine the effects of elevation with information from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS snow cover area (SCA products. The scheme uses snow-free pixels in MODIS SCA images with clouds removed to identify virtual stations, or areas with zero snow depth, to compensate for the scarcity and uneven distribution of stations. Four types of kriging methods are tested: ordinary kriging (OK, universal kriging (UK, ordinary co-kriging (OCK, and universal co-kriging (UCK. These methods are applied to daily snow depth observations at 50 meteorological stations in northern Xinjiang Province, China. The results show that the spatial distribution of snow depth can be accurately reconstructed using these kriging methods. The added virtual stations improve the distribution of the snow depth and reduce the smoothing effects of the kriging process. The best performance is achieved by the OK method in cases with shallow snow cover and by the UCK method when snow cover is widespread.

  17. Effects of Ground Conditions on Microbial Cementation in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehyeon Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of ground conditions on microbial cementation in cohesionless soils. Since the method of microbial cementation is still at the experimental stage, for its practical use in the field, a number of laboratory experiments are required for the quantification of microbial cementation under various ground conditions, such as relative densities, relative compactions and particle size distributions. In this study, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of microbial cementation in treated sands and silts, an experiment was performed for different relative densities of silica sands, for different relative compactions of silts and for different particle size distributions of weathered soils sampled from the field. Scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy and mapping analyses were implemented for the quantification of the levels of microbial cementations for sand, silt and weathered soil specimens. Based on the test results, a considerable microbial cementation was estimated depending on the soil conditions; therefore, an implementation of this new type of bio-grouting on a weak foundation may be possible to increase the strength and stiffness of weak ground.

  18. SIMULATION OF WAKE VORTEX AIRCRAFT IN GROUND EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamfil ŞOMOIAG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem developed in this paper is encountered in airplane aerodynamics and concernsthe influence of long life longitudinal wake vortices generated by wing tips or by external obstaclessuch as reactors or landing gears. More generally it concerns 3D bodies of finite extension in crossflow. At the edge of such obstacles, longitudinal vortices are created by pressure differences inside theboundary layers and rotate in opposite senses. It can constitute a danger to another aircraft that fliesin this wake, especially during takeoff and landing. In this case the wake vortex trajectories andstrengths are altered by ground interactions. This study presents the results of a Large EddySimulation of wake vortex in ground effect providing the vorticity flux behavior.

  19. Grounding Effect on Common Mode Interference of Underground Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHENG Qiang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available For the neutral point not grounded characteristics of underground power supply system in coal mine, this paper studied common mode equivalent circuit of underground PWM inverter, and extracted parasitic parameters of interference propagation path. The author established a common mode and differential mode model of underground inverter. Taking into account the rise time of PWM, the simulation results of conducted interference by Matlab software is compared with measurement spectrum on the AC side and motor side of converter, the difference is consistent showing that the proposed method has some validity. After Comparison of calculation results by Matlab simulation ,it can be concluded that ungrounded neutral of transformer could redue common mode current in PWM system, but not very effective, the most efficient way is to increase grounding  impedance of  inverter and motor.

  20. Effects of shrub and tree cover increase on the near-surface atmosphere in northern Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydsaa, Johanne H.; Stordal, Frode; Bryn, Anders; Tallaksen, Lena M.

    2017-09-01

    Increased shrub and tree cover in high latitudes is a widely observed response to climate change that can lead to positive feedbacks to the regional climate. In this study we evaluate the sensitivity of the near-surface atmosphere to a potential increase in shrub and tree cover in the northern Fennoscandia region. We have applied the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with the Noah-UA land surface module in evaluating biophysical effects of increased shrub cover on the near-surface atmosphere at a fine resolution (5.4 km × 5.4 km). Perturbation experiments are performed in which we prescribe a gradual increase in taller vegetation in the alpine shrub and tree cover according to empirically established bioclimatic zones within the study region. We focus on the spring and summer atmospheric response. To evaluate the sensitivity of the atmospheric response to inter-annual variability in climate, simulations were conducted for two contrasting years, one warm and one cold. We find that shrub and tree cover increase leads to a general increase in near-surface temperatures, with the highest influence seen during the snowmelt season and a more moderate effect during summer. We find that the warming effect is stronger in taller vegetation types, with more complex canopies leading to decreases in the surface albedo. Counteracting effects include increased evapotranspiration, which can lead to increased cloud cover, precipitation, and snow cover. We find that the strength of the atmospheric feedback is sensitive to snow cover variations and to a lesser extent to summer temperatures. Our results show that the positive feedback to high-latitude warming induced by increased shrub and tree cover is a robust feature across inter-annual differences in meteorological conditions and will likely play an important role in land-atmosphere feedback processes in the future.

  1. The effect of covering and mulching on the soil temperature, growth and yield of tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosterna Edyta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available By improving the thermal and moisture conditions in the immediate vicinity of plants, plastic covers influenced the growth and development and increased the yield of vegetables. Soil mulching with organic material is one method of soil water protection and also helps maintain a constant soil temperature within the root system of crops. This study investigated the effect of plant covering and the type of straw applied to soil mulching (rye, corn, rape or buckwheat on the soil temperature, development of the plant and the yield of ‘Polfast’ F1 tomato. The effect of the straw was compared to a control plot without mulch. Soil temperature at a depth of 10 cm was higher in covered plots than in the plot without covers. The increase in soil temperature as a result of covering amounted to 1.3°C at 8:00 a.m. and 1.7°C at 2:00 p.m. Both in the morning and in the afternoon, the soil temperature in the plots without straw and without covers and under polypropylene fibre was higher than in the plots with straw. The application of covers resulted in higher aboveground parts of plants and higher leaf area compared to cultivation without covers. Irrespective of whether a covering was used, all of the types of straw investigated in the experiment caused the acceleration of growth and development of tomato plants. Simultaneous plant covering and soil mulching increased the total yield of fruits but did not have an influence on the share of marketable yield of the total yield.

  2. Effects of Floor Covering Resistance of a Radiant Floor on System Energy and Exergy Performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Shukuya, Masanori; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2016-01-01

    Floor covering resistance (material and thickness) can be influenced by subjective choices (architectural design, interior design, texture, etc.) with significant effects on the performance of a radiant heating and cooling system. To study the effects of floor covering resistance on system...... performance, a water-based radiant floor heating and cooling system (dry, wooden construction) was considered to be coupled to an air-to-water heat pump, and the effects of varying floor covering resistances (0.05 m2K/W, 0.09 m2K/W and 0.15 m2K/W) on system performance were analyzed in terms of energy...... and exergy. In order to achieve the same heating and cooling outputs, higher average water temperatures are required in the heating mode (and lower temperatures in the cooling mode) with increasing floor covering resistance. These temperature requirements decrease the heat pump’s performance (lower...

  3. Effect of surface BRDF of various land cover types on the geostationary observations of tropospheric NO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Noguchi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of surface reflectance anisotropy, Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF, on satellite retrievals of tropospheric NO2. We assume the geometry of geostationary measurements over Tokyo, which is one of the worst air-polluted regions in the East Asia. We calculated air mass factors (AMF and box AMFs (BAMF for tropospheric NO2 to evaluate the effect of BRDF by using the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN. To model the BRDF effect, we utilized the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS products (MOD43B1 and MOD43B2, which provide three coefficients to express the RossThick-LiSparseReciprocal model, a semi-empirical and kernel-based model of BRDF. Because BRDF depends on the land cover type, we also utilized the High Resolution Land-Use and Land-Cover Map by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS/Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2, which classifies the ground pixels over Tokyo into six main types: water, urban, paddy, crop, deciduous forest and evergreen forest. We first develop an empirical model of the three BRDF coefficients for each land cover type over Tokyo, and then apply the model to the calculation of land cover type dependent AMFs and BAMFs. Results show that the variability of AMF among the land types is up to several tens percent, and if we neglect the reflectance anisotropy, the difference from BRDF's AMF reaches 10% or more. The evaluation of the BAMFs calculated shows that not to consider variations in BRDF will cause large errors if the concentration of NO2 is high close to the surface, although the importance of BRDF for AMFs decreases for large aerosol optical depth (AOD.

  4. Effect of surface BRDF of various land cover types on the geostationary observations of tropospheric NO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, K.; Richter, A.; Rozanov, V.; Rozanov, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Irie, H.; Kita, K.

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the effect of surface reflectance anisotropy, Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF), on satellite retrievals of tropospheric NO2. We assume the geometry of geostationary measurements over Tokyo, which is one of the worst air-polluted regions in the East Asia. We calculated air mass factors (AMF) and box AMFs (BAMF) for tropospheric NO2 to evaluate the effect of BRDF by using the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN. To model the BRDF effect, we utilized the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products (MOD43B1 and MOD43B2), which provide three coefficients to express the RossThick-LiSparseReciprocal model, a semi-empirical and kernel-based model of BRDF. Because BRDF depends on the land cover type, we also utilized the High Resolution Land-Use and Land-Cover Map by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS)/Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2), which classifies the ground pixels over Tokyo into six main types: water, urban, paddy, crop, deciduous forest and evergreen forest. We first develop an empirical model of the three BRDF coefficients for each land cover type over Tokyo, and then apply the model to the calculation of land cover type dependent AMFs and BAMFs. Results show that the variability of AMF among the land types is up to several tens percent, and if we neglect the reflectance anisotropy, the difference from BRDF's AMF reaches 10% or more. The evaluation of the BAMFs calculated shows that not to consider variations in BRDF will cause large errors if the concentration of NO2 is high close to the surface, although the importance of BRDF for AMFs decreases for large aerosol optical depth (AOD).

  5. Expression profile analysis of genes involved in horizontal gravitropism bending growth in the creeping shoots of ground-cover chrysanthemum by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shengjun; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Guan, Zhiyong; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying gravitropic bending of shoots are poorly understood and how genes related with this growing progress is still unclear. To identify genes related to asymmetric growth in the creeping shoots of chrysanthemum, suppression subtractive hybridization was used to visualize differential gene expression in the upper and lower halves of creeping shoots of ground-cover chrysanthemum under gravistimulation. Sequencing of 43 selected clones produced 41 unigenes (40 singletons and 1 unigenes), which were classifiable into 9 functional categories. A notable frequency of genes involve in cell wall biosynthesis up-regulated during gravistimulation in the upper side or lower side were found, such as beta tubulin (TUB), subtilisin-like protease (SBT), Glutathione S-transferase (GST), and expensing-like protein (EXP), lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), glycine-rich protein (GRP) and membrane proteins. Our findings also highlighted the function of some metal transporter during asymmetric growth, including the boron transporter (BT) and ZIP transporter (ZT), which were thought primarily for maintaining the integrity of cell walls and played important roles in cellulose biosynthesis. CmTUB (beta tubulin) was cloned, and the expression profile and phylogeny was examined, because the cytoskeleton of plant cells involved in the plant gravitropic bending growth is well known.

  6. Modelling Effects of Cover Material and Cover Depth on Hydrological Regime and Salt Redistribution in Reclaimed Oil Sand Landscapes in Northern Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welegedara, N.; Grant, R. F.; Quideau, S.; Lloret, E.

    2014-12-01

    Large-Scale surface mining is continuing in the Athabasca oil sands region in northern Alberta, Canada, causing significant ecosystem disturbances and changes in hydrology. Reclamation efforts in this region require understanding processes that control water, nutrient and salt fluxes through reclaimed landscapes which is critical to restoring their productivity. These processes were tested in a comprehensive mathematical model, ecosys, which was used to determine the effect of different cover thicknesses on water balance, water buffering capacity, salinity and the productivity in the South Bison Hills reclamation site of Syncrude Canada (SCL). This site was constructed in 1999 by capping peat mineral mix and secondary (glacial till) soil over saline sodic overburden. The site was constructed with three different soil cover thicknesses: 35 cm (thin), 50 cm (intermediate) and 100 cm (thick) along a 20% north facing slope. Model outputs were validated with field measured volumetric water content, runoff, snow data, electrical conductivity (EC) and plant productivity data recorded from 1999 to 2013. Model and field results show differences in horizontal and vertical water transport among the three reclaimed prototype covers. Lower water retention capacity in the 35 cm cover compared to the 50 cm and 100 cm covers caused greater soil moisture variation so that permanent wilting point was reached during dry years, decreasing plant growth due to water stress. In addition, the modeled and field-measured EC values indicated some upward salt movement from overburden to cover material over the time. This movement caused higher EC values (6 - 8 dS m-1) to be reached in the shallow rooting zone of the 35 cm and 50 cm covers than of the 100 cm cover several years after the covers were established. The determination of cost effective but ecologically sustainable cover depth is a challenge and will be a focus in future simulations.

  7. Effect of Covers and Rainfall on Soil and Water Conservation Using a Tilting Flume Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Compliew

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of stone and vegetative covers was evaluated for soil and water conservation in a waterway on salty soils in the Northeast of Thailand. Experiments were conducted on a hydraulic tilting flume under simulated unit flow (120 and 45 cm2s-1, rainfall (120 mm/hr and slope (0, 1.2,1.4,1.6,1.8,2.0, 2.2, 2.4, 2.6, 2.8 and 3.0% conditions. The depth of soil was maintained at 0.20 m. over a perforated bed to facilitate deep drainage. A comparative study of bare soil, stone cover (50% and vegetative cover (50% is made to evaluate soil loss, deep drainage, Manning’s roughness coefficient. The study has revealed that stone cover is more effective than vegetative cover at lower discharge in reducing the flow velocity and thereby soil erosion. Deep drainage has been reduced from lower discharge to higher discharge for all the slopes with cover measures, including bare soil. It is also found that cover measures are necessary beyond 2.6% bed slope in order to prevent rill erosion in salty soils.

  8. Propagation of Sound through the Atmosphere: Effects of Ground Cover II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-30

    N vratik hcv a I ikc amomnt. Al so, qtince intteorference, rolo.s Oi cohenut’elv between the diret’t and refletcted waves. when tht, ’et flet ioa...Plowed) 200-350 (moisure epenent)This work Institutional Grass 150-300 This Work, Roadside Dirt, Ill-Defined, SmallRe. 8 Rocks Up to 4" 300-800 Ref

  9. Residue cover effects on soil erosion and the infiltration in black soil under simulated rainfall experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yan; Xie, Yun; Liu, Yuxin; Liu, Hongyuan; Ren, Xiaoyu

    2016-12-01

    Residue cover is widely used in the Northeastern China Black Soil Region for soil erosion control due to the large annual production of crop residues. Quantitative evaluations of the residue cover effects on preventing soil loss and on the cumulative infiltration amount are thus desirable. Herein, rainfall simulation experiments were conducted using simulators and soil flumes to study the effects of residue cover on soil erosion and infiltration under various rainfall events. Laboratory experiments were designed utilizing five levels of residue cover (bare, 15%, 35%, 55% and 75%), four rainfall intensities (30 mm/h, 60 mm/h, 90 mm/h and 120 mm/h), two soil moistures (dry and wet run) and a fixed slope of 7%. The results indicated that residue cover strongly affects runoff, soil loss and infiltration. Equations for predicting the soil loss ratio and infiltration ratio (the ratio of residue cover soil to bare soil) are herein proposed based on nonlinear curve regression. An empirical approach presented as the infiltration ratios multiplied Philip's equation derived from bare soil was established for estimating the cumulative infiltration amounts under various residue covers. The equation was demonstrated to be suitable for infiltration prediction for black soil by the root mean square error value and 1:1 line method. In addition, the relationship between the residue cover and biomass of corn residues was provided in order to enable accurate measurement of the residue coverage. These derived equations could be used for soil erosion and infiltration prediction under no-till and residue cover management conditions in the black soil region.

  10. Effects of bryophyte and lichen cover on permafrost soil temperature at large scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porada, Philipp; Ekici, Altug; Beer, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Bryophytes and lichens covering the soil surface at high latitudes act as an insulating layer, which has a net cooling effect on the soil and thereby protects permafrost. Climate change, however, may lead to changes in the average surface coverage of bryophytes and lichens. This can result in thawing of permafrost and an associated release of soil carbon to the atmosphere, which may cause a positive feedback on atmospheric CO2 concentration. Hence, it is crucial to predict the future large-scale response of bryophyte and lichen cover to climatic change at high latitudes. Current global land surface models, however, contain mostly empirical approaches to represent the surface cover of bryophytes and lichens, which makes it difficult to quantify its future extent and dynamics. Therefore, we integrate a process-based model of bryophyte and lichen growth into the global land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere-Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg). Thereby, we explicitly simulate dynamic thermal properties of the bryophyte and lichen cover and their relation to environmental factors. To quantify the insulating effect of the cover on the soil, we compare simulations with and without simulated bryophyte and lichen cover. We estimate that the bryophyte and lichen cover exerts an average cooling effect of 2.7 K on temperature in the topsoil for the region north of 50o N under current climatic conditions. Locally, a cooling of up to 5.7 K may be reached. Furthermore, we show that using a simple, empirical representation of the bryophyte and lichen cover instead of a dynamic one results only in an average cooling of around 0.5 K. We conclude that bryophytes and lichens have a significant impact on soil temperature in high-latitude ecosystems and that dynamic thermal properties are necessary for a realistic representation of the cooling effect.

  11. Effects of over-winter green cover on soil solution nitrate concentrations beneath tillage land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premrov, Alina; Coxon, Catherine E; Hackett, Richard; Kirwan, Laura; Richards, Karl G

    2014-02-01

    There is a growing need to reduce nitrogen losses from agricultural systems to increase food production while reducing negative environmental impacts. The efficacy of vegetation cover for reducing nitrate leaching in tillage systems during fallow periods has been widely investigated. Nitrate leaching reductions by natural regeneration (i.e. growth of weeds and crop volunteers) have been investigated to a lesser extent than reductions by planted cover crops. This study compares the efficacy of natural regeneration and a sown cover crop (mustard) relative to no vegetative cover under both a reduced tillage system and conventional plough-based system as potential mitigation measures for reducing over-winter soil solution nitrate concentrations. The study was conducted over three winter fallow seasons on well drained soil, highly susceptible to leaching, under temperate maritime climatic conditions. Mustard cover crop under both reduced tillage and conventional ploughing was observed to be an effective measure for significantly reducing nitrate concentrations. Natural regeneration under reduced tillage was found to significantly reduce the soil solution nitrate concentrations. This was not the case for the natural regeneration under conventional ploughing. The improved efficacy of natural regeneration under reduced tillage could be a consequence of potential stimulation of seedling germination by the autumn reduced tillage practices and improved over-winter plant growth. There was no significant effect of tillage practices on nitrate concentrations. This study shows that over winter covers of mustard and natural regeneration, under reduced tillage, are effective measures for reducing nitrate concentrations in free draining temperate soils.

  12. Land Cover Heterogeneity Effects on Sub-Pixel and Per-Pixel Classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung V. Tran

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Per-pixel and sub-pixel are two common classification methods in land cover studies. The characteristics of a landscape, particularly the land cover itself, can affect the accuracies of both methods. The objectives of this study were to: (1 compare the performance of sub-pixel vs. per-pixel classification methods for a broad heterogeneous region; and (2 analyze the impact of land cover heterogeneity (i.e., the number of land cover classes per pixel on both classification methods. The results demonstrated that the accuracy of both per-pixel and sub-pixel classification methods were generally reduced by increasing land cover heterogeneity. Urban areas, for example, were found to have the lowest accuracy for the per-pixel method, because they had the highest heterogeneity. Conversely, rural areas dominated by cropland and grassland had low heterogeneity and high accuracy. When a sub-pixel method was used, the producer’s accuracy for artificial surfaces was increased by more than 20%. For all other land cover classes, sub-pixel and per-pixel classification methods performed similarly. Thus, the sub-pixel classification was only advantageous for heterogeneous urban landscapes. Both creators and users of land cover datasets should be aware of the inherent landscape heterogeneity and its potential effect on map accuracy.

  13. Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Mr. Jim Parker Associate Director Ground Vehicle Robotics Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Report Documentation Page...Briefing 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2012 to 01-08-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ABSTRACT Provide Transition-Ready, Cost-Effective, and Innovative Robotics and Control System Solutions for Manned, Optionally-Manned, and Unmanned

  14. Non-phytoseiid Mesostigmata within citrus orchards in Florida: species distribution, relative and seasonal abundance within trees, associated vines and ground cover plants and additional collection records of mites in citrus orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Carl C; Ueckermann, Eduard A

    2015-03-01

    Seven citrus orchards on reduced- to no-pesticide spray programs in central and south central Florida were sampled for non-phytoseiid mesostigmatid mites. Inner and outer canopy leaves, fruits, twigs and trunk scrapings were sampled monthly between August 1994 and January 1996. Open flowers were sampled in March from five of the sites. A total of 431 samples from one or more of 82 vine or ground cover plants were sampled monthly in five of the seven orchards. Two of the seven orchards (Mixon I and II) were on full herbicide programs and vines and ground cover plants were absent. A total of 2,655 mites (26 species) within the families: Ascidae, Blattisociidae, Laelapidae, Macrochelidae, Melicharidae, Pachylaelapidae and Parasitidae were identified. A total of 685 mites in the genus Asca (nine species: family Ascidae) were collected from within tree samples, 79 from vine or ground cover plants. Six species of Blattisociidae were collected: Aceodromus convolvuli, Blattisocius dentriticus, B. keegani, Cheiroseius sp. near jamaicensis, Lasioseius athiashenriotae and L. dentatus. A total of 485 Blattisociidae were collected from within tree samples compared with 167 from vine or ground cover plants. Low numbers of Laelapidae and Macrochelidae were collected from within tree samples. One Zygoseius furciger (Pachylaelapidae) was collected from Eleusine indica. Four species of Melicharidae were identified from 34 mites collected from within tree samples and 1,190 from vine or ground cover plants: Proctolaelaps lobatus was the most abundant species with 1,177 specimens collected from seven ground cover plants. One Phorytocarpais fimetorum (Parasitidae) was collected from inner leaves and four from twigs. Species of Ascidae, Blattisociidae, Melicharidae, Laelapidae and Pachylaelapidae were collected from 31 of the 82 vine or ground cover plants sampled, representing only a small fraction of the total number of Phytoseiidae collected from the same plants. Including the

  15. The Investigation of Species and Application of Ground Cover Plants in Jiaozuo%焦作市地被植物种类及应用调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩红军; 张桂芝; 马君丽; 孔德政

    2012-01-01

    根据对焦作市建成区地被植物进行实地调查,统计得出焦作市作为地被植物应用的灌木,藤本,一、二年生花卉,宿根、球根花卉、草类共有192种65科151属.灌木应用较多,宿根、球根花卉,一、二年生花卉应用较少;提出了应用频率最高的地被植物有:马棘、月季、剑麻、铺地柏、迎春等;焦作地被植物应用形式主要有以下几种;模纹花坛和绿篱,旷地造景,路缘造景等.最后提出优化灌草比例,引进新优品种的建议.%Based on the investigation of ground cover plants, which be divided into Bush, Fujimoto, one or two annual flower, Perennial and bulbs flowers and grasses, which we proposes 192 species in the Building area in the city of Jiaozuo belong to 65 families and 151 genera. Bush is widely used, on the contrary, one or two annual flowers and Perennial and bulbs flowers used very seldom. And we discover these plants as indigofera and rose and jasmine and sisal and winter juniper etc are used the most frequently. There are these kinds of application forms as follows: mode pattern flower and hedgerow, open areas landscaping, road edge landscaping. At the last, we proposed that Optimization the Proportion of bush and grass and introduction new and excellent variety.

  16. Optimizing placements of ground-based snow sensors for areal snow cover estimation using a machine-learning algorithm and melt-season snow-LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroza, C.; Zheng, Z.; Glaser, S. D.; Bales, R. C.; Conklin, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    We present a structured, analytical approach to optimize ground-sensor placements based on time-series remotely sensed (LiDAR) data and machine-learning algorithms. We focused on catchments within the Merced and Tuolumne river basins, covered by the JPL Airborne Snow Observatory LiDAR program. First, we used a Gaussian mixture model to identify representative sensor locations in the space of independent variables for each catchment. Multiple independent variables that govern the distribution of snow depth were used, including elevation, slope, and aspect. Second, we used a Gaussian process to estimate the areal distribution of snow depth from the initial set of measurements. This is a covariance-based model that also estimates the areal distribution of model uncertainty based on the independent variable weights and autocorrelation. The uncertainty raster was used to strategically add sensors to minimize model uncertainty. We assessed the temporal accuracy of the method using LiDAR-derived snow-depth rasters collected in water-year 2014. In each area, optimal sensor placements were determined using the first available snow raster for the year. The accuracy in the remaining LiDAR surveys was compared to 100 configurations of sensors selected at random. We found the accuracy of the model from the proposed placements to be higher and more consistent in each remaining survey than the average random configuration. We found that a relatively small number of sensors can be used to accurately reproduce the spatial patterns of snow depth across the basins, when placed using spatial snow data. Our approach also simplifies sensor placement. At present, field surveys are required to identify representative locations for such networks, a process that is labor intensive and provides limited guarantees on the networks' representation of catchment independent variables.

  17. 19 CFR 173.5 - Review of entry covering household or personal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Review of entry covering household or personal effects. 173.5 Section 173.5 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... personal effects may be corrected by the port director even though a timely protest was not filed if...

  18. 28 CFR 55.4 - Effective date; list of covered jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROVISIONS OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Nature of Coverage § 55.4 Effective date; list of covered jurisdictions. (a) The minority language provisions of the Voting Rights Act were added by the Voting Rights Act Amendments of 1975. (1) The requirements of section 4(f)(4) take effect...

  19. The effect of vegetation cover on the formation of glide-snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feistl, Thomas; Bebi, Peter; Bartelt, Perry

    2014-05-01

    Glide snow avalanches release on steep, smooth slopes and can be prevented either by protection forests or by artificial defense structures. To minimize the risk for people and infrastructure, guidelines have been formulated concerning structure, height and distance between avalanche prevention bridges. These guidelines assure the major functions of the defense structures: first to prevent the release of avalanches and second to withstand the static and dynamic forces of the moving snow cover. The major functions of protection forests are generally similar and therefore guidelines on the maximum tolerable size of forest gaps exist in Switzerland. These guidelines are based on a static relationship between the pressure of the snow cover and the resistance of the defense structure and on empirical observations (forest). Whereas ground friction is only qualitatively taken into account, we assume it to play a crucial role in glide snow avalanche formation. To prove this assumption we collected data on the predominant vegetation cover of 67 release areas in the region of Davos, Switzerland. Our observations reveal a strong relationship between vegetation cover type, slope angle and slab length. We were able to quantify the Coulomb friction parameter μ by applying a physical model that accounts for the dynamic forces of the moving snow on the stauchwall, the fixed snow cover below the release area. The stauchwall resists the dynamic forces of the snow cover, until a critical strain rate is reached and then fails in brittle compression. This failure strongly depends on the friction between snow cover and soil. A typical value of μ for grassy slopes is 0.2. Snow characteristics like density are implemented in the model as constants. We compared the model results with the guidelines for defense structures and forest gap sizes and found accordance for certain friction parameter values. Forest gaps of 40 meter length and a 35° slope angle require friction values of 0

  20. Local site effects on weak and strong ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, Keiiti

    1993-02-01

    This is a review of the current state of the art in characterizing effects of local geology on ground motion. A new horizon is clear in this aspect of strong motion studies. Non-linear amplification at sediment sites appears to be more pervasive than seismologists used to think. Several recent observations about the weak motion and the strong motion suggest that the non-linear amplification at sediment sites may be very common. First, on average, the amplification is always greater at the younger sediment sites for all frequencies up to 12 Hz, in the case of weak motion; while the relation is reversed for frequencies higher than 5 Hz, in the case of strong motion. Secondly, the application of the amplification factor determined from weak motion overestimates significantly the strong motion at sediment sites observed during the Loma Prieta earthquake within the epicentral distance of about 50 km. Thirdly, the variance of peak ground acceleration around the mean curve decreases with the increasing earthquake magnitude. Finally, the above non-linear effects are expected from geotechnical studies both in the magnitude of departure from the linear prediction and in the threshold acceleration level beyond which the non-linearity begins.

  1. Effects of fertilization on the vascular ground vegetation of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Lieb.) stands

    OpenAIRE

    Misson, Laurent; Gaëtan Du Bus De Warnaffe,; Jonard, Mathieu

    2001-01-01

    International audience; The objective of this study was to assess the effects of base cation (Ca, Mg, K) and phosphorous (P) fertilization on the vascular ground vegetation in mature European beech and sessile oak stands located on acid brown soils. Two types of treatment were applied next to control plots (dolomite lime, dolomite lime + natural phosphate + potassium sulphate). Specific richness, total cover (% ), equitability coefficient as well as the Ecological Group of the ground vegetati...

  2. Effect of retreating sea ice on Arctic cloud cover in simulated recent global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Manabu; Nozawa, Toru; Ogura, Tomoo; Takata, Kumiko

    2016-11-01

    This study investigates the effect of sea ice reduction on Arctic cloud cover in historical simulations with the coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model MIROC5. Arctic sea ice has been substantially retreating since the 1980s, particularly in September, under simulated global warming conditions. The simulated sea ice reduction is consistent with satellite observations. On the other hand, Arctic cloud cover has been increasing in October, with about a 1-month lag behind the sea ice reduction. The delayed response leads to extensive sea ice reductions because the heat and moisture fluxes from the underlying open ocean into the atmosphere are enhanced. Sensitivity experiments with the atmospheric part of MIROC5 clearly show that sea ice reduction causes increases in cloud cover. Arctic cloud cover increases primarily in the lower troposphere, but it decreases in the near-surface layers just above the ocean; predominant temperature rises in these near-surface layers cause drying (i.e., decreases in relative humidity), despite increasing moisture flux. Cloud radiative forcing due to increases in cloud cover in autumn brings an increase in the surface downward longwave radiation (DLR) by approximately 40-60 % compared to changes in clear-sky surface DLR in fall. These results suggest that an increase in Arctic cloud cover as a result of reduced sea ice coverage may bring further sea ice retreat and enhance the feedback processes of Arctic warming.

  3. Emissions of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane from cattle manure heaps: effect of compaction and covering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, D. R.

    The effect of compaction and covering during storage of beef cattle ( Bos taurus) farmyard manure (FYM) on ammonia (NH 3), nitrous oxide (N 2O) and methane (CH 4) emissions was determined. Gaseous emission measurements were made over three separate storage periods of between 90 and 109 days. The effect of the different storage treatments on manure chemical composition was also determined. Compaction was carried out as the manure was put into store and the compacted manures covered with plastic sheeting. Compaction and covering significantly reduced NH 3 emissions from manure by over 90% during the first summer storage period (Ppersistent rainfall during heap establishment and the following week appeared to reduce NH 3 emissions markedly. The low ammonium-N content of the FYM in the third storage period may have reduced the risk of NH 3 emission and reduced the relative effect of the compaction/covering treatment. Compaction and covering also significantly reduced N 2O emissions from cattle FYM (Pbenefits are that N and K are retained in the manure heap for agronomic benefit.

  4. Effect of leguminous cover crops on soil biological activity in pots of Citrus unshiu Marcovitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Abbate

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effects of cover crops on soil properties in citrus orchards. To fill this gap, this work was aimed to determine the effects of leguminous cover crops on the chemical and biological properties of the soil and on the structure of the microbial community in pots of Citrus unshiu (Marcovitch. After amendment with cover crops, an increase in total organic C (TOC, total extractable C (TEC, and total N (TN contents were observed irrespective of the type of soil. Substrate induced respiration (SIR, and potentially mineralisable nitrogen (PMN, tested three times in one year, were higher in soils with leguminous cover crops while no significant differences were observed in protease and deaminase activity. The effect on the chemical and biochemical properties of the soil was more evident in plots containing Trifolium subterraneum. No changes were observed in the microbial communities studied (_-proteobacteria, _-proteobacteria, nitrogen-fixing, and ammonia oxidizers irrespective of the kind of cover crop or type of soil, neither were variations noted during the trial.

  5. Effect of Ground Waste Concrete Powder on Cement Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianwei Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paste/mortar attached to the recycled aggregate decreases the quality of the aggregate and needs to be stripped. The stripped paste/mortar is roughly 20% to 50% in waste concrete, but relevant research is very limited. In this paper, the effects of ground waste concrete (GWC powder, coming from the attached paste/mortar, on water demand for normal consistency, setting time, fluidity, and compressive strength of cement were analyzed. The results show that the 20% of GWC powder (by the mass of binder has little effect on the above properties and can prepare C20 concrete; when the sand made by waste red clay brick (WRB replaces 20% of river sand, the strength of the concrete is increased by 17% compared with that without WRB sand.

  6. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. These effects can inform electromagnetic follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  7. Earthquake Ground Motion in the Valley of Mexico: Basin Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, L.; Contreras, M.; Bielak, J.; Aguirre, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present a study of the ground motion and resulting amplification in the Mexico City Basin due to strong earthquakes in the Mexican Pacific Coast. We propose an approximation of the regional structure and Mexico City's basin and analyze their response to two shallow earthquakes generated near the coast. We compare two sets of three dimensional simulations: the first includes a soft structure similar in shape and properties to the Valley of Mexico, while the second excludes the soft soil deposits. Our 3D computations, with a maximum resolution of 0.75 Hz, reproduce the amplitude and long durations characteristics usually observed in the basin. We confirm that stations inside the Mexican Volcanic Belt experience amplification. In the frequency band 0.2-0.4 Hz additional amplification occurs inside the valley due to the shallow soil deposits in the lake bed region. We compare the normalized durations of the ground motion at several stations against observed data, and speculate on the durations of the soil motion as being a local effect due to the basin's shape and low velocities.

  8. Cover crops effect on farm benefits and nitrate leaching: linking economic and environmental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, José Luis; Vanclooster, Marnik; Garrido, Alberto; Quemada, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Introducing cover crops interspersed with intensively fertilized crops in rotation has the potential to reduce nitrate leaching. However, despite the evident environmental services provided and the range of agronomic benefits documented in the literature, farmers' adoption of the technique is still limited because growing CC could lead to extra costs for the farm in three different forms: direct, indirect, and opportunity costs. Environmental studies are complex, and evaluating the indicators that are representative of the environmental impact of an agricultural system is a complicated task that is conducted by specialized groups and methodologies. Multidisciplinary studies may help to develop reliable approaches that would contribute to choosing the best agricultural strategies based on linking economic and environmental benefits. This study evaluates barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Vanessa), vetch (Vicia villosa L., cv. Vereda) and rapeseed (Brassica napus L., cv. Licapo) as cover crops between maize, leaving the residue in the ground or selling it for animal feeding, and compares the economic and environmental results with respect to a typical maize-fallow rotation. Nitrate leaching for different weather conditions was calculated using the mechanistic-deterministic WAVE model, using the Richards equation parameterised with a conceptual model for the soil hydraulic properties for describing the water flow in the vadose zone, combined with field observed data. The economic impact was evaluated through stochastic (Monte-Carlo) simulation models of farms' profits using probability distribution functions of maize yield and cover crop biomass developed fitted with data collected from various field trials (during more than 5 years) and probability distribution functions of maize and different cover crop forage prices fitted from statistical sources. Stochastic dominance relationships are obtained to rank the most profitable strategies from a farm financial perspective

  9. Effects of Forest Cover Change on Flood Characteristics in the Upper Citarum Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Dwi Dasanto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Information on the effect of forest cover changes on streamflow (river discharge in large-scale catchment is important to be studied. The rate of forest cover change in the Upper Citarum Watershed as a large-scale catchment is high enough to drive streamflow change, such as increase of discharge level, or flood volume. Within the research area, flood would occur when the volume of streamflow exceeded the canal capacity and inundated areas that were normally dry. Therefore, this research focused on identifying the effects of forest cover change on flood events and its distribution. The research consisted of 2 main stages; firstly, building geometric data of river and performing frequency analysis of historical and scenario discharges using an approach of probability distribution; and, secondly, flood inundation mapping using HEC-RAS model. The results showed that forest reduction have affected water yield in the downstream of Upper Citarum Watershed. In each return period, this reduction have increased river discharge level and affected the spread of flooded areas. In 2-year return period, the extent of flood as an impact of forest reduction was estimated to decrease slowly. However, in the return period of more than 2 years, the spread of flooded areas increased sharply. These proved that forest cover reduction would always increase the discharge value, but it did not always expand the inundated area.Keywords: geometric data, forest cover, water yield, return period

  10. The effect of Thematic Mapper spectral properties on land cover mapping for hydrologic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervin, J. C.; Lu, Y. C.; Gauthier, R. L.; Miller, J. R.; Irish, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The accuracy of unsupervised land-cover classification from all seven Landsat TM bands and from six combinations of three or four bands is evaluated using images of the Clinton River Basin, a suburban watershed near Detroit. Data from aerial TMS photography, USGS topographic maps, and ground surveys are employed to determine the classification accuracy. The mapping accuracy of all seven bands is found to be significantly better (6 percent overall, 12 percent for residential areas, and 13 percent for commercial districts) than that with bands 2, 3, and 4; but almost the same accuracy is obtained by including at least one band from each major spectral region (visible, NIR, and mid-IR).

  11. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over $80\\%$ of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to $70\\%$. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can obser...

  12. Tillage and cover cropping effects on soil properties and crop production in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops (CCs) have been heralded for their potential to improve soil properties, retain nutrients in the field, and increase subsequent crop yields yet support for these claims within the state of Illinois remains limited. We assessed the effects of integrating five sets of CCs into a corn-soybe...

  13. The effect of different tillage and cover crops on soil quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    This paper examines the effect of different tillage treatments and cover crop on soil physical, chemical and biological properties of a sandy loam soil in a long-term field trial set up in 2007 at Foulum, Denmark. The experimental design is a split plot design with different tillage practices...

  14. The combined effects of cover design parameters on tomato production of a passive greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanthoor, B.H.E.; Stanghellini, C.; Henten, van E.; Gazquez, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the need of a multiple design parameter approach to greenhouse design. To illustrate this need, we determined the combined effects of cover design parameters on tomato production of a passive greenhouse, that is a greenhouse with only natural ventilation

  15. Effects of covering highland banana stumps with soil on banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) oviposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masanza, M.; Gold, C.S.; Huis, van A.; Ragama, P.E.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of covering post-harvest banana stumps with soil on banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) oviposition levels was investigated at three locations, Sendusu, Kawanda Agricultural Research Institute (KARI) and Ntungamo district of southwestern Uganda. In the first experiment ovipositio

  16. The effect of nitrogen fertilization and cover cropping systems on sorghum grain characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The practice of no-till farming has become an increasingly popular cropping system, due to increased water and soil conservation. Recently, cover cropping has been added to the system to aid in weed prevention and also increase soil fertility. The objective of this study was to determine the effect ...

  17. The effect of floating covers on gas emissions from liquid pig manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundas Matulaitis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Livestock manure is the source of different pollutant gases that can generate soil acidification, eutrophication, and contribute to global warming, or have a negative impact on health. Covers can control gas emissions from manure, but their impact is still under discussion. The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of different covers on methane (CH4, nitric oxide (NO, hydrogen sulfide (H2S, ammonia (NH3, carbon monoxide (CO, and carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions from liquid pig manure. Six types of floating covers were tested: light expanded clay aggregate (leca, peat, sunflower oil, sawdust, straw, and plastic film. Manure was stored at 5, 15, and 25 °C for 37 d. Gas emissions were measured from the headspaces of the dynamic chambers. The results of our study showed that both cover and temperature have a noticeable impact on gas emissions from liquid pig manure. The plastic film cover was the most efficient at all tested temperatures because it reduced emissions of all the measured gases. In this case, mean emission reductions were: CH4 91.5% (P < 0.01, NO 92.0% (P < 0.05, H2S 78.1% (P < 0.05, NH3 54.7% (P < 0.01, CO 98.4% (P < 0.01, and CO2 67.1% (P < 0.01. Other covers had an inconsistent impact on separate gas emissions. However, covers generally helped to decrease NH3, H2S, and CO2 emissions.

  18. Characterization of the Aerodynamic Ground Effect and Its Influence in Multirotor Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Sanchez-Cuevas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the ground effect in multirotors, that is, the change in the thrust generated by the rotors when flying close to the ground due to the interaction of the rotor airflow with the ground surface. This effect is well known in single-rotor helicopters but has been assumed erroneously to be similar for multirotors in many cases in the literature. In this paper, the ground effect for multirotors is characterized with experimental tests in several cases and the partial ground effect, a situation in which one or some of the rotors of the multirotor (but not all are under the ground effect, is also characterized. The influence of the different cases of ground effect in multirotor control is then studied with several control approaches in simulation and validated with experiments in a test bench and with outdoor flights.

  19. Effects of mixing and covering with mature compost on gaseous emissions during composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen Hai; Yuan, Jing; Luo, Yi Ming; Li, Guo Xue; Nghiem, Long D; Price, William E

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated effects of mature compost on gaseous emissions during composting using pig manure amended with corn stalks. Apart from a control treatment, three treatments were conducted with the addition of 5% (wet weight of raw materials) of mature compost: (a) mixing raw materials with mature compost at the beginning of composting; (b) covering raw materials with mature compost throughout the experimental period; and (c) covering raw materials with mature compost at the start of composting, but incorporating it into composting pile on day 6 of composting. Mature compost used for the last treatment was inoculated with 2% (wet weight) of raw materials of strain M5 (a methanotrophic bacterium) solution. During 30-d of composting, three treatments with the addition of mature compost could reduce CH4 emission by 53-64% and N2O emission by 43-71%. However, covering with mature compost throughout the experimental period increased cumulative NH3 emission by 61%, although it could reduce 34% NH3 emission in the first 3d. Inoculating strain M5 in mature compost covered on the top of composting pile within first 6d enhanced CH4 oxidation, but simultaneously increased N2O emission. In addition, mixing with mature compost could improve compost maturity. Given the operational convenience in practice, covering with mature compost and then incorporating it into composting pile is a suitable approach to mitigate gaseous emissions during composting.

  20. Effectiveness Evaluation of Skin Covers against Intravascular Brachytherapy Sources Using VARSKIN3 Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baghani HR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The most common intravascular brachytherapy sources include 32P, 188Re, 106Rh and 90Sr/90Y. In this research, skin absorbed dose for different covering materials in dealing with these sources were evaluated and the best covering material for skin protection and reduction of absorbed dose by radiation staff was recognized and recommended. Method: Four materials including polyethylene, cotton and two different kinds of plastic were proposed as skin covers and skin absorbed dose at different depths for each kind of the materials was calculated separately using the VARSKIN3 code. Results: The results suggested that for all sources, skin absorbed dose was minimized when using polyethylene. Considering this material as skin cover, maximum and minimum doses at skin surface were related to 90Sr/90Y and 106Rh, respectively. Conclusion: polyethylene was found the most effective cover in reducing skin dose and protecting the skin. Furthermore, proper agreement between the results of VARSKIN3 and other experimental measurements indicated that VRASKIN3 is a powerful tool for skin dose calculations when working with beta emitter sources. Therefore, it can be utilized in dealing with the issue of radiation protection.

  1. Benchmarking Controlled Trial--a novel concept covering all observational effectiveness studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2015-06-01

    The Benchmarking Controlled Trial (BCT) is a novel concept which covers all observational studies aiming to assess effectiveness. BCTs provide evidence of the comparative effectiveness between health service providers, and of effectiveness due to particular features of the health and social care systems. BCTs complement randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as the sources of evidence on effectiveness. This paper presents a definition of the BCT; compares the position of BCTs in assessing effectiveness with that of RCTs; presents a checklist for assessing methodological validity of a BCT; and pilot-tests the checklist with BCTs published recently in the leading medical journals.

  2. Land-cover effects on soil organic carbon stocks in a European city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Davies, Zoe G; McCormack, Sarah A; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2014-02-15

    Soil is the vital foundation of terrestrial ecosystems storing water, nutrients, and almost three-quarters of the organic carbon stocks of the Earth's biomes. Soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks vary with land-cover and land-use change, with significant losses occurring through disturbance and cultivation. Although urbanisation is a growing contributor to land-use change globally, the effects of urban land-cover types on SOC stocks have not been studied for densely built cities. Additionally, there is a need to resolve the direction and extent to which greenspace management such as tree planting impacts on SOC concentrations. Here, we analyse the effect of land-cover (herbaceous, shrub or tree cover), on SOC stocks in domestic gardens and non-domestic greenspaces across a typical mid-sized U.K. city (Leicester, 73 km(2), 56% greenspace), and map citywide distribution of this ecosystem service. SOC was measured in topsoil and compared to surrounding extra-urban agricultural land. Average SOC storage in the city's greenspace was 9.9 kg m(-2), to 21 cm depth. SOC concentrations under trees and shrubs in domestic gardens were greater than all other land-covers, with total median storage of 13.5 kg m(-2) to 21 cm depth, more than 3 kg m(-2) greater than any other land-cover class in domestic and non-domestic greenspace and 5 kg m(-2) greater than in arable land. Land-cover did not significantly affect SOC concentrations in non-domestic greenspace, but values beneath trees were higher than under both pasture and arable land, whereas concentrations under shrub and herbaceous land-covers were only higher than arable fields. We conclude that although differences in greenspace management affect SOC stocks, trees only marginally increase these stocks in non-domestic greenspaces, but may enhance them in domestic gardens, and greenspace topsoils hold substantial SOC stores that require protection from further expansion of artificial surfaces e.g. patios and driveways.

  3. Effect of Winter Cover Crops on Soil Nitrogen Availability, Corn Yield, and Nitrate Leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kuo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Biculture of nonlegumes and legumes could serve as cover crops for increasing main crop yield, while reducing NO3 leaching. This study, conducted from 1994 to 1999, determined the effect of monocultured cereal rye (Secale cereale L., annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum, and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa, and bicultured rye/vetch and ryegrass/vetch on N availability in soil, corn (Zea mays L. yield, and NO3-N leaching in a silt loam soil. The field had been in corn and cover crop rotation since 1987. In addition to the cover crop treatments, there were four N fertilizer rates (0, 67, 134, and 201 kg N ha-1, referred to as N0, N1, N2, and N3, respectively applied to corn. The experiment was a randomized split-block design with three replications for each treatment. Lysimeters were installed in 1987 at 0.75 m below the soil surface for leachate collection for the N0, N2, and N3 treatments. The result showed that vetch monoculture had the most influence on soil N availability and corn yield, followed by the bicultures. Rye or ryegrass monoculture had either no effect or an adverse effect on corn yield and soil N availability. Leachate NO3-N concentration was highest where vetch cover crop was planted regardless of N rates, which suggests that N mineralization of vetch N continued well into the fall and winter. Leachate NO3-N concentration increased with increasing N fertilizer rates and exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standard of 10 mg N l�1 even at recommended N rate for corn in this region (coastal Pacific Northwest. In comparisons of the average NO3-N concentration during the period of high N leaching, monocultured rye and ryegrass or bicultured rye/vetch and ryegrass/vetch very effectively decreased N leaching in 1998 with dry fall weather. The amount of N available for leaching (determined based on the presidedress nitrate test, the amount of N fertilizer applied, and N uptake correlated well with average NO3

  4. Effect of winter cover crops on soil nitrogen availability, corn yield, and nitrate leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, S; Huang, B; Bembenek, R

    2001-10-25

    Biculture of nonlegumes and legumes could serve as cover crops for increasing main crop yield, while reducing NO3 leaching. This study, conducted from 1994 to 1999, determined the effect of monocultured cereal rye (Secale cereale L.), annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), and bicultured rye/vetch and ryegrass/vetch on N availability in soil, corn (Zea mays L.) yield, and NO3-N leaching in a silt loam soil. The field had been in corn and cover crop rotation since 1987. In addition to the cover crop treatments, there were four N fertilizer rates (0, 67, 134, and 201 kg N ha(-1), referred to as N0, N1, N2, and N3, respectively) applied to corn. The experiment was a randomized split-block design with three replications for each treatment. Lysimeters were installed in 1987 at 0.75 m below the soil surface for leachate collection for the N 0, N 2, and N 3 treatments. The result showed that vetch monoculture had the most influence on soil N availability and corn yield, followed by the bicultures. Rye or ryegrass monoculture had either no effect or an adverse effect on corn yield and soil N availability. Leachate NO3-N concentration was highest where vetch cover crop was planted regardless of N rates, which suggests that N mineralization of vetch N continued well into the fall and winter. Leachate NO3-N concentration increased with increasing N fertilizer rates and exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's drinking water standard of 10 mg N l(-1) even at recommended N rate for corn in this region (coastal Pacific Northwest). In comparisons of the average NO3-N concentration during the period of high N leaching, monocultured rye and ryegrass or bicultured rye/vetch and ryegrass/vetch very effectively decreased N leaching in 1998 with dry fall weather. The amount of N available for leaching (determined based on the presidedress nitrate test, the amount of N fertilizer applied, and N uptake) correlated well with average NO3-N during

  5. The effect of cover geometry on the productivity of a modified solar still desalination unit

    KAUST Repository

    Malaeb, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Desalination methods based on renewable energy offer a promising solution to both water shortage and environmental degradation problems that continue to grow globally. The solar still is one such method that uses a sustainable energy source to produce potable water albeit at a relatively low productivity rate. A new modification has been introduced to the conventional solar still to enhance its productivity. The modification consists of a light weight, black finished, slowly-rotating drum, which leads to a sustainable, cost-effective, and low-tech amendment that preserves the key features of the still while considerably increasing its yield compared to a control still that does not include the drum. In this paper, three different cover geometries of the modified still are studied and the effect of cover design on the performance of the still in terms of measured temperatures and productivity is considered. The three cover designs are as follows: double-sloped or triangular, single-sloped and curved cover. In addition, a conventional double-sloped still without the rotating drum is operated in parallel as a control and the findings of this study are reported and discussed. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Effects of Forest Cover Change on Flood Characteristics in the Upper Citarum Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Dwi Dasanto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Information on the effect of forest cover changes on streamflow (river discharge in large-scale catchment is important to be studied. The rate of forest cover change in the Upper Citarum Watershed as a large-scale catchment is high enough to drive streamflow change, such as increase of discharge level, or flood volume. Within the research area, flood would occur when the volume of streamflow exceeded the canal capacity and inundated areas that were normally dry. Therefore, this research focused on identifying the effects of forest cover change on flood events and its distribution. The research consisted of 2 main stages; firstly, building geometric data of river and performing frequency analysis of historical and scenario discharges using an approach of probability distribution; and, secondly, flood inundation mapping using HEC-RAS model. The results showed that forest reduction have affected water yield in the downstream of Upper Citarum Watershed. In each return period, this reduction have increased river discharge level and affected the spread of flooded areas. In 2-year return period, the extent of flood as an impact of forest reduction was estimated to decrease slowly. However, in the return period of more than 2 years, the spread of flooded areas increased sharply. These proved that forest cover reduction would always increase the discharge value, but it did not always expand the inundated area.

  7. Study on Water Adaptability of Seven Common Species of Ground Cover Plants in South China%华南地区7种常见园林地被植物水分适应性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱瑭璜; 雷江丽; 庄雪影

    2012-01-01

    Water adaptability of seven common ground cover plants in South China were studied by pot experiment. The effect of biomass increment, root-crown ratio, florescence, diurnal variations of net photosynthetic rate and diurnal variations of net transpiration rate were determined in different soil water content. The experimental results showed that 7 ground cover plants could grow strongly in the soil w ith the water holding rate above 70% to 75%. Schefflera arboricola, Rhoeo discolor (L'He'rit.) Hance and Syngonium podophyllum Schott 'White Butterfly' could grow well and possess good ornamental value in the soil with minimum water holding rates of 30% to 35%; lxora coccinea L., Excoecaria cochinchinensis, Hymenocallis littoralis and Nephrolepis auriculata could grow well in the soil with minimum water holding rates of 50% to 55%.%以华南地区7种常见园林地被植物为研究对象,通过盆栽控水试验研究,综合比较了不同水分条件下植株的生长量、根冠比、花期、花量、净光合速率日变化、净蒸腾速率日变化等生长及光合指标的变化趋势.结果表明:1)在水分条件下限为土壤持水率的70%~75%时,7种参试植物均有较旺盛的生长势;2)在满足各参试植物园林观赏性的前提下,鹅掌藤(Schefflera arboricola)、蚌花[Rhoeo discolor (L’Hérit.)Hance]和[白蝶合果芋(Syngonium podophyllum Schott ‘White Butterfly’)在水分条件下限为土壤持水率的30%~35%时可以正常生长;而红花龙船化(Ixora coceinea L.)、红背桂(Excoecaria cochinchinensis)、水鬼蕉(Hymenocallis littoralis)和肾蕨(Nephrolepis auriculata)在水分条件下限为土壤持水率的50%~55%时可以正常生长.

  8. The short term influence of aboveground biomass cover crops on C sequestration and β–glucosidase in a vineyard ground under semiarid conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Peregrina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tillage and semiarid Mediterranean climatic conditions accelerate soil organic matter losses in Spanish vineyards. Previous studies showed that cover crops can increase soil organic carbon (SOC in Mediterranean vineyards. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of two different cover crops in the short term on soil C sequestration in a semiarid vineyard and to study the potential use of both β–glucosidase enzimatic activity (GLU and the GLU/SOC ratio in order to assess the SOC increase. The experiment was carried out in a cv. Tempranillo (Vitis vinifera L. vineyard on a Oxyaquic Xerorthent soil in Rioja winegrowing region (NE, Spain. The experimental design was established in 2009 with three treatments: conventional tillage; sown barley cover crop (Hordeum vulgare, L.; sown Persian clover cover crop (Trifolium resupinatum L.. Carbon in the aboveground biomass with each cover crop was monitored. Soil was sampled in June 2011 and June 2012, and SOC, GLU and the GLU/SOC ratio were determined. After 3 years both cover crops increased SOC at soil surface with C sequestration rates of 0.47 and 1.19 t C ha-1 yr-1 for BV and CV respectively. GLU and GLU/SOC ratio increased in both cover crops at 0-5 cm soil depth. The C sequestration rates and GLU were related to the cover crops aboveground biomass. In consequence, in semiarid vineyards under cover crops GLU could be an appropriate indicator to asses the increase of SOC and the soil quality improvement in the short-term (2-3 years.

  9. Effect of using different cover image quality to obtain robust selective embedding in steganography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Karwan Asaad; Al-Jawad, Naseer; Abdulla, Alan Anwer

    2014-05-01

    One of the common types of steganography is to conceal an image as a secret message in another image which normally called a cover image; the resulting image is called a stego image. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of using different cover image quality, and also analyse the use of different bit-plane in term of robustness against well-known active attacks such as gamma, statistical filters, and linear spatial filters. The secret messages are embedded in higher bit-plane, i.e. in other than Least Significant Bit (LSB), in order to resist active attacks. The embedding process is performed in three major steps: First, the embedding algorithm is selectively identifying useful areas (blocks) for embedding based on its lighting condition. Second, is to nominate the most useful blocks for embedding based on their entropy and average. Third, is to select the right bit-plane for embedding. This kind of block selection made the embedding process scatters the secret message(s) randomly around the cover image. Different tests have been performed for selecting a proper block size and this is related to the nature of the used cover image. Our proposed method suggests a suitable embedding bit-plane as well as the right blocks for the embedding. Experimental results demonstrate that different image quality used for the cover images will have an effect when the stego image is attacked by different active attacks. Although the secret messages are embedded in higher bit-plane, but they cannot be recognised visually within the stegos image.

  10. A tool to evaluate local biophysical effects on temperature due to land cover change transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugini, Lucia; Caporaso, Luca; Duveiller, Gregory; Cescatti, Alessandro; Abad-Viñas, Raul; Grassi, Giacomo; Quesada, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Land Cover Changes (LCC) affect local, regional and global climate through biophysical variations of the surface energy budget mediated by albedo, evapotranspiration, and roughness. Assessment of the full climate impacts of anthropogenic LCC are incomplete without considering biophysical effects, but the high level of uncertainties in quantifying their impacts to date have made it impractical to offer clear advice on which policy makers could act. To overcome this barrier, we provide a tool to evaluate the biophysical impact of a matrix of land cover transitions, following a tiered methodological approach similar to the one provided by the IPCC to estimate the biogeochemical effects, i.e. through three levels of methodological complexity, from Tier 1 (i.e. default method and factors) to Tier 3 (i.e. specific methods and factors). In particular, the tool provides guidance for quantitative assessment of changes in temperature following a land cover transition. The tool focuses on temperature for two main reasons (i) it is the main variable of interest for policy makers at local and regional level, and (ii) temperature is able to summarize the impact of radiative and non-radiative processes following LULCC. The potential changes in annual air temperature that can be expected from various land cover transitions are derived from a dedicated dataset constructed by the JRC in the framework of the LUC4C FP7 project. The inputs for the dataset are air temperature values derived from satellite Earth Observation data (MODIS) and land cover characterization from the ESA Climate Change Initiative product reclassified into their IPCC land use category equivalent. This data, originally at 0.05 degree of spatial resolution, is aggregated and analysed at regional level to provide guidance on the expected temperature impact following specific LCC transitions.

  11. Launch and Landing Effects Ground Operations (LLEGO) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    LLEGO is a model for understanding recurring launch and landing operations costs at Kennedy Space Center for human space flight. Launch and landing operations are often referred to as ground processing, or ground operations. Currently, this function is specific to the ground operations for the Space Shuttle Space Transportation System within the Space Shuttle Program. The Constellation system to follow the Space Shuttle consists of the crewed Orion spacecraft atop an Ares I launch vehicle and the uncrewed Ares V cargo launch vehicle. The Constellation flight and ground systems build upon many elements of the existing Shuttle flight and ground hardware, as well as upon existing organizations and processes. In turn, the LLEGO model builds upon past ground operations research, modeling, data, and experience in estimating for future programs. Rather than to simply provide estimates, the LLEGO model s main purpose is to improve expenses by relating complex relationships among functions (ground operations contractor, subcontractors, civil service technical, center management, operations, etc.) to tangible drivers. Drivers include flight system complexity and reliability, as well as operations and supply chain management processes and technology. Together these factors define the operability and potential improvements for any future system, from the most direct to the least direct expenses.

  12. Orientation effect on ground motion measurement for Mexican subduction earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.P Hong; A. Pozos-Estrada; R. Gomez

    2009-01-01

    The existence of the principal directions of the ground motion based on Arias intensity is well-known. These principal directions do not necessarily coincide with the orientations of recording sensors or with the orientations along which the ground motion parameters such as the peak ground acceleration and the pseudo-spectral acceleration (PSA) are maximum. This is evidenced by the fact that the maximum PSA at different natural vibration periods for horizontal excitations do not correspond to the same orientation. A recent analysis carried out for California earthquake records suggests that an orientation-dependent ground motion measurement for horizontal excitations can be developed. The main objective of this study is to investigate and provide seismic ground motion measurements in the horizontal plane, including bidirectional horizontal ground motions, for Mexican interplate and inslab earthquake records. Extensive statistical analyses of PSA are conducted for the assessment, The analysis results suggest that similar to the case of California records, the average behavior of the ratio of the PSA to the maximum resulting PSA can be approximated by a quarter of an ellipse in one quadrant; and that the ratio can be considered to be independent of the value of the maximum resulting PSA, earthquake magnitude, earthquake distance and the focal depth. Sets of response ratios and attenuation relationships that can be used to represent a bidirectional horizontal ground motion measurement for Mexican interplate and inslab earthquakes were also developed.

  13. Effective dose in the manufacturing process of rutile covered welding electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, M; Rozas, S; Pérez, C; Idoeta, R; Núñez-Lagos, R; Legarda, F

    2013-03-01

    Shielded metal arc welding using covered electrodes is the most common welding process. Sometimes the covering contains naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs). In Spain the most used electrodes are those covered with rutile mixed with other materials. Rutile contains some detectable natural radionuclides, so it can be considered a NORM. This paper mainly focuses on the use of MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) as a predictive tool to obtain doses in a factory which produces this type of electrode and assess the radiological impact in a specific facility after estimating the internal dose.To do this, in the facility, areas of highest radiation and positions of workers were identified, radioactive content of rutile and rutile covered electrodes was measured, and, considering a worst possible scenario, external dose at working points has been calculated using MCNP. This procedure has been validated comparing the results obtained with those from a pressurised ionisation chamber and TLD dosimeters. The internal dose has been calculated using DCAL (dose and risk calculation). The doses range between 8.8 and 394 μSv yr(-1), always lower than the effective dose limit for the public, 1 mSv yr(-1). The highest dose corresponds to the mixing area.

  14. Environmental Effect / Impact Assessment of Industrial Effulent on Ground Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Parmod Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the aim of investigation is physical and chemical parameters of ground water and soil. By selected Physical and chemical parameters it is found that (1.Biological oxygen demand (BOD and chemical oxygen demand (COD are directly proportional to each other where dissolved oxygen (DO is indirectly proportional to BOD and COD. (2. Total dissolved solids, alkalinity and hardness are significantly higher in pre monsoon and winter season as compared to monsoon season.(3. High values of different parameters of ground water sources indicate the influence of industrial wastes on ground water.

  15. Surface treatment systems for concrete in marine environment: Effect of concrete cover thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Henrique Farias de Medeiros

    Full Text Available Abstract There are some ways to extend the service life of a reinforced concrete structure. This paper focuses on the extension of the service life by treating the surface of reinforced concrete, specifically on the effect of the concrete cover thickness on the surface treatment system efficacy. Thus, chloride migration tests were performed and diffusion chloride coefficients were calculated. The service life of each case (treated or non-treated concrete was estimated using these data and Fick's second law of diffusion. Results indicated that the thicker the concrete cover is, the greater the efficacy of the concrete surface treatment system will be. The dissemination of this information is important, since it is almost intuitive to think that the effect of a surface treatment system depends only on itself and this study shows the opposite.

  16. Ground state energy of dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order in lattice chiral effective field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2008-01-01

    We present lattice calculations for the ground state energy of dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order in chiral effective field theory. This study follows a series of recent papers on low-energy nuclear physics using chiral effective field theory on the lattice. In this work we introduce an improved spin- and isospin-projected leading-order action which allows for a perturbative treatment of corrections at next-to-leading order and smaller estimated errors. Using auxiliary fields and Euclidean-time projection Monte Carlo, we compute the ground state of 8, 12, and 16 neutrons in a periodic cube, covering a density range from 2% to 10% of normal nuclear density.

  17. Effect of black polyethylene shade covers on the evaporation rate of agricultural reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Álvarez, Víctoriano; Baille, Alain Daniel; Molina Martínez, José Miguel; González Real, María Milagros

    2006-01-01

    [ENG] The potential use of shade covers to reduce evaporation from agricultural reservoirs motivated this study on the effect of black polyethylene shade on the evaporation rate from a small water body (Class-A pan) and of its driving variables. Evaporation was measured hourly in two pans during the summer in Cartagena (Spain), along with the measurements of air temperature and humidity, water temperature, solar radiation and wind speed. The first pan was uncovered whereas the sec...

  18. Winter annual cover crop has only minor effects on major corn arthropod pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Holly N; Currie, Randall S; Klocke, Norman L; Buschman, Lawrent L

    2010-04-01

    We studied the effects of downy brome, Bromus tectorum L., winter cover crop on several corn, Zea mays L., pests in the summer crop after the cover crop. An experiment was conducted that consisted of two trials with two levels of irrigation, two levels of weed control, and two levels of downy brome. Corn was grown three consecutive years after the downy brome grown during the winter. Banks grass mites, Oligonychus pratensis (Banks), twospotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae Koch, and predatory mites from the genus Neoseiulus were present in downy brome at the beginning of the growing season. They moved into corn, but their numbers did not differ significantly across the treatments. Larval western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, feeding on corn roots was evaluated the second and third years of corn, production. Irrigation and herbicide treatments had no significant effects on rootworm injury levels. In one trial, rootworm injury ratings were significantly greater in treatments with a history of high versus low brome, but this effect was not significant in the other trial. Rootworm injury seemed to be similar across plots with different surface soil moistures. This suggests that the use of a winter cover crop such as downy brome will not have a major negative impact the arthropods studied.

  19. EFFECT OF GROUND-WATER REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES ON INDIGENOUS MICROFLORA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), working with the Interagency DNAPL Consortium, completed an independent evaluation of microbial responses to ground-water remediation technology demonstrations at Launch Pad 34 at Cape Canaveral Air Station in Brevard Count...

  20. Effect of electrode shape on grounding resistances - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Tomaskovicova, Sonia; Dahlin, Torleif

    2016-01-01

    . The focus-one protocol is a new method for estimating single electrode grounding resistances by measuring the resistance between a single electrode in an ERT array and all the remaining electrodes connected in parallel. For large arrays, the measured resistance is dominated by the grounding resistance...... of the electrode under test, the focus electrode. We have developed an equivalent circuit model formulation for the resistance measured when applying the focus-one protocol. Our model depends on the individual grounding resistances of the electrodes of the array, the mutual resistances between electrodes......, and the instrument input impedance. Using analytical formulations for the potentials around prolate and oblate spheroidal electrode models (as approximations for rod and plate electrodes), we have investigated the performance and accuracy of the focus-one protocol in estimating single-electrode grounding resistances...

  1. Management Effectiveness and Land Cover Change in Dynamic Cultural Landscapes - Assessing a Central European Biosphere Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Ohnesorge

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Protected areas are a central pillar of efforts to safeguard biodiversity and ecosystem services, but their contribution to the conservation and management of European cultural landscapes that have complex spatial-temporal dynamics is unclear. The conservation strategy of biosphere reserves aims at integrating biodiversity and ecosystem service conservation with economic development by designating zones of differing protection and use intensities. It is applied worldwide to protect and manage valuable cultural landscapes. Using the example of a German biosphere reserve, we developed a framework to assess the effectiveness of Central European reserves in meeting their land cover related management goals. Based on digital biotope maps, we defined and assessed land cover change processes that were relevant to the reserve management's goals over a period of 13 years. We then compared these changes in the reserve's core, buffer, and transition zones and in a surrounding reference area by means of a geographical information system. (Un-desirable key processes related to management aims were defined and compared for the various zones. We found that - despite an overall land cover persistence of approximately 85% across all zones - differences in land cover changes can be more prominent across zones inside the reserve than between the areas inside and outside of it. The reserve as a whole performed better than the surrounding reference area when using land cover related management goals as a benchmark. However, some highly desirable targets, such as the conversion of coniferous plantations into seminatural forests or the gain of valuable biotope types, affected larger areas in the nonprotected reference area than in the transition zone.

  2. Ground-water flow and the potential effects of remediation at Graces Quarters, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenbus, F.J.; Fleck, W.B.

    1996-01-01

    Ground water in the east-central part of Graces Quarters, a former open-air chemical-agent test facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds. The U.S. Geological Survey's finite- difference model was used to help understand ground-water flow and simulate the effects of alternative remedial actions to clean up the ground water. Scenarios to simulate unstressed conditions and three extraction well con- figurations were used to compare alternative remedial actions on the contaminant plume. The scenarios indicate that contaminants could migrate from their present location to wetland areas within 10 years under unstressed conditions. Pumping 7 gal/min (gallons per minute) from one well upgradient of the plume will not result in containment or removal of the highest contaminant concentrations. Pumping 7 gal/min from three wells along the central axis of the plume should result in containment and removal of dissolved contami- nants, as should pumping 7 gal/min from three wells at the leading edge of the plume while injecting 7 gal/min back into an upgradient well.

  3. Including the effects of debris cover in a distributed glacier energy balance model (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicciotti, F.; Reid, T.; Carenzo, M.; Brock, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    Distributed models of glacier energy balance, which make use of digital elevation models and extensive spatial data on local meteorology, have become very useful tools for predicting glacial ablation and runoff in recent years. They generally function by running a one-dimensional energy balance model at every point on a grid on the glacier surface - for each point in the grid the ablation is calculated based on the balance of heat fluxes at the ice-air boundary. However, one key component has been missing from distributed models to date, namely the effects of debris cover. Many glacier ablation zones are mantled in near-continuous blankets of rock debris, and debris-covered glaciers are important drivers of the water cycle in the European Alps, Andes and Himalayas. Moreover, debris covers have been seen to expand in recent years, so it is essential to assess exactly how the presence of debris may affect a glacier’s surface energy balance and potential responses to climate changes. The effects of a debris cover are complicated by the varying surface roughness, albedo and thermal properties of the debris in question, but generally a debris cover reduces glacier melt rate by insulating the glacier surface from direct solar radiation. Even on glaciers where the debris cover is not continuous, isolated patches of debris caused by rockfalls can affect the glacier evolution by introducing differential ablation across the glacier surface, thus creating ice-cored moraines that may persist after ‘clean’ parts of the glacier have wasted away. This paper presents the results of incorporating a one-dimensional ‘debris energy balance model’ called DEB-Model (Reid and Brock 2010) into a distributed melt model for Haut Glacier d’Arolla, Switzerland. DEB-Model numerically estimates debris surface temperature by considering the balance of heat fluxes at the air-debris interface, then calculates heat conduction through the debris in order to estimate melt rates at the

  4. Current climate change effects on the ground thermal regime in Central Yakutia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stepan Varlamov; Yuri Skachkov; Pavel Skryabin

    2014-01-01

    The-evolution-of-ground-thermal-state-has-been-studied-to-assess-impacts-of-current-climatic-warming-on-permafrost-in-Central-Yakutia.-The-analysis-of-long-term-data-of-regional-weather-stations-has-revealed-one-of-the-highest-increasing-trends-in-mean-annual-air-temperature-in-northern-Russia.-A-forecast-of-surface-air-temperature-fluctuations-has-been-made-by-applying-a-frequency-analysis-method.-Monitoring-of-ground-thermal-conditions-allows-us-to-identify-inter-annual-and-long-term-variability-among-a-wide-range-of-natural-conditions.-Experimental-research-has-indicated-a-long-term-dynamics-of-ground-thermal-state-evolution:-ground-temperatures-at-the-depth-of-zero-annual-amplitude-and-seasonally-thawed-layer-depth.-Long-term-variability-of-thaw-depth-shows-near-zero-to-weak-positive-trends-in-small-valleys-in-contrast-to-weak-negative-trends-on-slopes.-With-significant-climatic-warming,-the-thermal-state-of-near-surface-layers-of-permafrost-demonstrates-steadiness.-Anthropogenic-impacts-on-ground-thermal-regime-in-various-terrain-types-have-been-qualitatively-evaluated.-Clear-cutting,-ground-cover-stripping,-and-post-fire-deforestation-in-inter-alas-type-terrains-result-in-a-significant-increase-of-temperature-and-seasonal-ground-thaw-depth,-as-well-as-adverse-cryogenic-processes.-The-dynamics-of-mean-annual-ground-temperature-in-slash-and-burn-sites-have-been-evaluated-in-reference-to-stages-of-successive-vegetation-recovery.

  5. Trawling bats exploit an echo-acoustic ground effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor eZsebok

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A water surface acts not only as an optic mirror but also as an acoustic mirror. Echolocation calls emitted by bats at low heights above water are reflected away from the bat, and hence the background clutter is reduced. Moreover, targets on the surface create an enhanced echo. Here, we formally quantified the effect of the substrate and target height on both target detection and –discrimination in a combined laboratory and field approach with Myotis daubentonii. In a two-alternative, forced-choice paradigm, the bats had to detect a mealworm and discriminate it from an inedible dummy (20 mm PVC disc. Psychophysical performance was measured as a function of height above either smooth substrates (water or PVC or above a clutter substrate (artificial grass. At low heights above the clutter substrate (10, 20 or 35 cm, the bats’ detection performance was worse than above a smooth substrate. At a height of 50 cm, the substrate structure had no influence on target detection. Above the clutter surface, also target discrimination was significantly impaired with decreasing target height. A detailed analysis of the bats’ echolocation calls during target approach shows that above the clutter substrate, the bats produce calls with significantly higher peak frequency. Flight-path reconstruction revealed that the bats attacked an object from below over water but from above over a clutter substrate.These results are consistent with the hypothesis that trawling bats exploit an echo-acoustic ground effect, in terms of a spatio-temporal integration of direct reflections with indirect reflections from the water surface, to optimize prey detection and –discrimination not only for prey on the water but also for some range above.

  6. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  7. Trawling bats exploit an echo-acoustic ground effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsebok, Sandor; Kroll, Ferdinand; Heinrich, Melina; Genzel, Daria; Siemers, Björn M; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    A water surface acts not only as an optic mirror but also as an acoustic mirror. Echolocation calls emitted by bats at low heights above water are reflected away from the bat, and hence the background clutter is reduced. Moreover, targets on the surface create an enhanced echo. Here, we formally quantified the effect of the surface and target height on both target detection and -discrimination in a combined laboratory and field approach with Myotis daubentonii. In a two-alternative, forced-choice paradigm, the bats had to detect a mealworm and discriminate it from an inedible dummy (20 mm PVC disc). Psychophysical performance was measured as a function of height above either smooth surfaces (water or PVC) or above a clutter surface (artificial grass). At low heights above the clutter surface (10, 20, or 35 cm), the bats' detection performance was worse than above a smooth surface. At a height of 50 cm, the surface structure had no influence on target detection. Above the clutter surface, also target discrimination was significantly impaired with decreasing target height. A detailed analysis of the bats' echolocation calls during target approach shows that above the clutter surface, the bats produce calls with significantly higher peak frequency. Flight-path reconstruction revealed that the bats attacked an target from below over water but from above over a clutter surface. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that trawling bats exploit an echo-acoustic ground effect, in terms of a spatio-temporal integration of direct reflections with indirect reflections from the water surface, to optimize prey detection and -discrimination not only for prey on the water but also for some range above.

  8. Management effects on greenhouse gas emissions from a fen covered with riverine silt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräuer, Melanie; Gatersleben, Peter; Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2017-04-01

    Drainage is necessary to use peatlands for conventional agriculture, but this practice causes high emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O). The effect of hydrological conditions and management on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from "true" peat soils is relatively well examined, but there is little data on GHG emissions from organic soils covered with mineral soil. Such a cover may either be man-made to improve the trafficability of the fields or natural, e.g. due to the deposition of riverine silt. Such mineral covers are widespread in North-Western Germany and other regions with intensively used peatlands. Here, we aim to evaluate the effect of management, water table depth and properties of the mineral cover on the emissions of CO2, N2O and methane (CH4). As the majority of peatlands in North-Western Germany, the study area is used as grassland. The area is artificially drained and intensively used (4 to 5 cuts per year, annual nitrogen fertilisation of 112 to 157 kg/ha). The fen peat with a thickness of 0.6 to 1.50 m is covered by riverine silt deposited by the river Weser. Six measurement sites have been chosen to represent typical agricultural management, soil properties and hydrological conditions of one hydrological management unit. The sites differ in the soil organic carbon (SOC) content of the riverine silt (4 - 15 % SOC), the occurrence of a ploughed horizon as well as water and agricultural management. We use static closed chambers to measure CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes. CO2 measurement campaigns using transparent and opaque chambers and a portable IRGA take place every third or fourth week depending on season. CH4 and N2O samples are taken every second week and, in addition, on the first, third and seventh day after fertilizer application. Samples are analyzed by gas chromatography. First results show negligible CH4 fluxes due to low groundwater levels. Total N2O emissions reflected mainly the different fertilizer

  9. New evidence for effects of land cover in China on summer climate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The effects of land cover in different regions of China on summer climate are studied by lagged correlation analysis using NOAA/AVHRR normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data for the period of 1981-1994 and temperature,precipitation data of 160 meteorological stations in China. The results show that the correlation coefficients between NDVI in previous season and summer precipitation are positive in most regions of China, and the lagged correlations showa significant difference between regions. The stronger correlations between NDVI in previous winter and precipitation in summer occur in Central China and the Tibetan Plateau, and the correlations between spring NDVI and summer precipitation in the eastern arid/semi- arid region and the Tibetan Plateau are more significant. Vegetation changes have more sensitive feedback effects on climate in thethree regions (eastern arid/semi-arid region, Central China and Tibetan Plateau). The lagged correlations between NDVI and precipitation suggest that, on interannual time scales, land cover affects summer precipitation to a certain extent.The correlations between NDVI in previous season and summer temperature show more complex, and the lagged responses of temperature to vegetation are weaker compared with precipitation, and they are possibly related to the global warming which partly cover up the correlations.

  10. Effects of sediment cover on survival and development of white sturgeon embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, T.J.; Congleton, J.L.; Anders, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive apparatus (embryo incubation unit [EIU]) was developed and used to assess the relationship between sediment cover (Kootenai River sediments, 97% by weight in the 0.83-mm- to 1.0-mm-diameter range) and survival of white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus embryos in the laboratory. An apparatus-testing trial assessed the effects of two sediment depths (5 and 20 mm), three EIU ventilation hole sizes (4.8, 6.8, and 9.5 mm) providing three levels of intrasediment flow, and EIU location (upstream or downstream in laboratory troughs) on embryo survival at two above-substrate flow velocities (0.05 and 0.15 m/s). A second trial assessed the effects of sediment cover duration (5-mm sediment cover for 4, 7, 9, 11, or 14 d, with a ventilation hole size of 9.5 mm and a flow velocity of 0.17 m/s) on mean embryo survival and larval length and weight. In the apparatus-testing trial, embryo survival was reduced (P white sturgeon spawn over fine-sediment substrates. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  11. Assessing land use and cover change effects on hydrological response in the river C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A.

    2009-04-01

    runoff plots (8×2 m) that drain to a modified Gerlach trough. Regarding the hydrological analysis at basin scale, a study of the temporal evolution of the monthly and annual discharges (Dam3) was made at two measuring stations, between 1956 and 1999. During this period the river was not subjected to the effects of large reservoir and its data on discharges can be considered representative of the natural functioning under a natural regimen. After 2000, the Côa river functioning was submitted to the effect of a large dam. For the analysis of temperatures and precipitation, the monthly and annual series recorded between 1956 and 1999 were used. To check the degree of significance of the trend with a certain level of confidence and to detect correlations among observed variables, a non-parametric test and Pearson coefficient were applied. The obtained results show that an important increase occurred on plant covers between 1960 and 2000; scrub plant communities became the most extensive land cover and the most important vegetation type. When a permanent vegetated cover is dominant surface runoff are very well controlled at plot scale. The major part of rainfall is infiltrated. On a catchment scale, the temporal evolution of the annual discharges has been negative and statistically significant (p-value < 0.05). The correlation coefficient between rainfall and discharges was quite significant for the studied period, which means that river discharges are very sensitive to rainfall amount. Nevertheless, the relationship between the variables seems to have a significant change throughout the analysed period, which is confirmed by the observation of temporal trend in residuals, the product of the year-by-year correlation between rainfall and discharge, and time. In general, residuals behaviour are clearly positive before the 80`s and negative after this date. This temporal variability could be related with changes occurred in land use and land cover.

  12. Removal of snow cover inhibits spring growth of Arctic ice algae through physiological and behavioral effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Hansen, L.C.; Hawes, Ian; Sorrell, Brian Keith

    2014-01-01

    The snow cover of Arctic sea ice has recently decreased, and climate models forecast that this will continue and even increase in future. We therefore tested the effect of snow cover on the optical properties of sea ice and the biomass, photobiology, and species composition of sea ice algae...... at Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland, during March 2011, using a snow-clearance experiment. Sea ice algae in areas cleared of snow was compared with control areas, using imaging variable fluorescence of photosystem II in intact, unthawed ice sections. The study coincided with the onset of spring growth of ice algae......) and filling of brine channels with fluorescing cells. In contrast, in the minus snow area, PAR transmittance increased sixfold and there was an exponential decrease in chl-a and no increase in F o, and the area of fluorescing biomass declined to become undetectable. This study suggests that the onset...

  13. Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosol Behavior and Climatic Effects by Analysis of SAGE 2 and Other Space, Air, and Ground Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents the research performed under NASA Ames Cooperative Agreement NCC 2-991, which covered the period 1 April 1997 through 31 March 1999. Previously, an interim technical report (Technical Report No. 1, 20 March 1998) summarized the work completed during the period 1 April 1997 through 31 March 1998. The objective of the proposed research was to advance our understanding of atmospheric aerosol behavior, aerosol-induced climatic effects, and the remote measurement and retrieval capabilities of spaceborne sensors such as SAGE II by combining and comparing data from these instruments and from airborne and ground-based instruments.

  14. Effective Installations Technique of Grounding Conductors for Metal Oxide Surge Arresters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.H.; Kang, S.M. [Inha University, Inchon (Korea); Ryu, I.S. [Korea Electric Power Corporation, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-06-01

    This paper deals with the effects of grounding conductors for metal oxide surge arresters. When surge arresters are improperly installed, the results can cause costly damage of electrical equipments. In particular, the route of surge arrester connection is very important because bends and links of leads increase the impedances to lightning surges and tend to nullify the effectiveness of a grounding conductor. Therefore, there is a need to know how effective installation of lightning surge arresters is made in order to control voltage and to absorb energy at high lightning currents. The effectiveness of a grounding conductor and 18 [kV] metal oxide distribution line arresters was experimentally investigated under the lightning and oscillatory impulse voltages. Thus, the results are as follows; (1) The induced voltage of a grounding conductor is drastically not affected by length of a connecting line, but it is very sensitive to types of grounding conductor. (2) The coaxial cable having a low characteristic impedance is suitable as a grounding conductor. (3) It is also clear from these results that bonding the metal raceway enclosing the grounding conductor to the grounding electrode is very effective because of skin effect. (4) The induced voltages of grounding conductors for the oscillatory impulse voltages are approximately twice as large as those for the lightning impulse voltages. (author). 9 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The effect of atmospheric and topographic correction methods on land cover classification accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanonckelen, Steven; Lhermitte, Stefaan; Van Rompaey, Anton

    2013-10-01

    Mapping of vegetation in mountain areas based on remote sensing is obstructed by atmospheric and topographic distortions. A variety of atmospheric and topographic correction methods has been proposed to minimize atmospheric and topographic effects and should in principle lead to a better land cover classification. Only a limited number of atmospheric and topographic combinations has been tested and the effect on class accuracy and on different illumination conditions is not yet researched extensively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of coupled correction methods on land cover classification accuracy. Therefore, all combinations of three atmospheric (no atmospheric correction, dark object subtraction and correction based on transmittance functions) and five topographic corrections (no topographic correction, band ratioing, cosine correction, pixel-based Minnaert and pixel-based C-correction) were applied on two acquisitions (2009 and 2010) of a Landsat image in the Romanian Carpathian mountains. The accuracies of the fifteen resulting land cover maps were evaluated statistically based on two validation sets: a random validation set and a validation subset containing pixels present in the difference area between the uncorrected classification and one of the fourteen corrected classifications. New insights into the differences in classification accuracy were obtained. First, results showed that all corrected images resulted in higher overall classification accuracies than the uncorrected images. The highest accuracy for the full validation set was achieved after combination of an atmospheric correction based on transmittance functions and a pixel-based Minnaert topographic correction. Secondly, class accuracies of especially the coniferous and mixed forest classes were enhanced after correction. There was only a minor improvement for the other land cover classes (broadleaved forest, bare soil, grass and water). This was explained by the position

  16. Effects of land cover change on the tropical circulation in a GCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonko, Alexandra Karolina [Universitaet Bonn, Meteorologisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR (United States); Hense, Andreas [Universitaet Bonn, Meteorologisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Feddema, Johannes Jan [University of Kansas, Department of Geography, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Multivariate statistics are used to investigate sensitivity of the tropical atmospheric circulation to scenario-based global land cover change (LCC), with the largest changes occurring in the tropics. Three simulations performed with the fully coupled Parallel Climate Model (PCM) are compared: (1) a present day control run; (2) a simulation with present day land cover and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) A2 greenhouse gas (GHG) projections; and (3) a simulation with SRES A2 land cover and GHG projections. Dimensionality of PCM data is reduced by projection onto a priori specified eigenvectors, consisting of Rossby and Kelvin waves produced by a linearized, reduced gravity model of the tropical circulation. A Hotelling T {sup 2} test is performed on projection amplitudes. Effects of LCC evaluated by this method are limited to diabatic heating. A statistically significant and recurrent signal is detected for 33% of all tests performed for various combinations of parameters. Taking into account uncertainties and limitations of the present methodology, this signal can be interpreted as a Rossby wave response to prescribed LCC. The Rossby waves are shallow, large-scale motions, trapped at the equator and most pronounced in boreal summer. Differences in mass and flow fields indicate a shift of the tropical Walker circulation patterns with an anomalous subsidence over tropical South America. (orig.)

  17. A conceptual framework for dryland aeolian sediment transport along the grassland-forest continuum: Effects of woody plant canopy cover and disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, David D.; Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Zou, Chris B.; Field, Jason P.; Allen, Craig D.

    2009-04-01

    Aeolian processes are of particular importance in dryland ecosystems where ground cover is inherently sparse because of limited precipitation. Dryland ecosystems include grassland, shrubland, savanna, woodland, and forest, and can be viewed collectively as a continuum of woody plant cover spanning from grasslands with no woody plant cover up to forests with nearly complete woody plant cover. Along this continuum, the spacing and shape of woody plants determine the spatial density of roughness elements, which directly affects aeolian sediment transport. Despite the extensiveness of dryland ecosystems, studies of aeolian sediment transport have generally focused on agricultural fields, deserts, or highly disturbed sites where rates of transport are likely to be greatest. Until recently, few measurements have been made of aeolian sediment transport over multiple wind events and across a variety of types of dryland ecosystems. To evaluate potential trends in aeolian sediment transport as a function of woody plant cover, estimates of aeolian sediment transport from recently published studies, in concert with rates from four additional locations (two grassland and two woodland sites), are reported here. The synthesis of these reports leads to the development of a new conceptual framework for aeolian sediment transport in dryland ecosystems along the grassland-forest continuum. The findings suggest that: (1) for relatively undisturbed ecosystems, shrublands have inherently greater aeolian sediment transport because of wake interference flow associated with intermediate levels of density and spacing of woody plants; and (2) for disturbed ecosystems, the upper bound for aeolian sediment transport decreases as a function of increasing amounts of woody plant cover because of the effects of the height and density of the canopy on airflow patterns and ground cover associated with woody plant cover. Consequently, aeolian sediment transport following disturbance spans the largest

  18. Impact of no-till cover cropping of Italian ryegrass on above and below ground faunal communities inhabiting a soybean field with special emphasis on soybean cyst nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two field trials were conducted in Maryland to evaluate the ability of an Italian ryegrass (IR) (Lolium multiflorum) cover crop in a no-till soybean (Glycine max) planting to 1) reduce populations of plant-parasitic nematodes (i.e., the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines and lesion nematodes...

  19. Detection of irrigation timing using MODIS and SAR: Effect of land cover heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seungtaek, J.; Keunchang, J.; Lee, H.; Seokyeong, H.; Kang, S.

    2010-12-01

    Rice is one of the world’s major staple foods. Paddy rice fields had unique biophysical characteristics that the rice is grown on flooded soils unlike other crops. Distribution and timing of irrigation of paddy rice fields are of importance to determine hydrological balance and efficiency of water resource. In this paper, we detected the distribution and timing of irrigation of paddy rice fields using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor onboard the NASA EOS Aqua satellite. Previous researches demonstrated that MODIS data can be utilized to detect timing of irrigation by combining vegetation index and Land Surface Water Index (LSWI). Land cover heterogeneity, however, causes considerable uncertainty of the satellite-based detections. To evaluate and quantify the effect of land cover heterogeneity, Radarsat-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images were applied together with the MODIS images. Sub-pixel heterogeneity of MODIS image on land cover and irrigation was evaluated and quantified by using the Radarsat-1 SAR images. The degree of sub-pixel heterogeneity was related with detection of a threshold value of LSWI to determine the timing of irrigation. The threshold value with the degree of heterogeneity increased (R2=0.95), which was applied to detect the timing of irrigation over complex land cover areas. Reliable detecting of timing of irrigation could enhance reliability of MODIS-based estimation on evapotranspiration from paddy rice fields. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the enhancement of MODIS-based evapotranspiration by using our new algorithm on detection of timing of irrigation. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by National Academy of Agricultural Science, RDA, Republic of Korea.

  20. Analysis of landslide mitigation effects using Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Aleksandar; Govedarica, Miro; Vrtunski, Milan; Petrovacki, Dusan

    2013-04-01

    Area of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technology applications becomes wider nowadays. It includes utility mapping as important part of civil engineering applications, geological structure and soil analyses, applications in agriculture, etc. Characteristics of the technology make it suitable for structure analysis of shallow landslides, whose number and impact on environment is dominant in the region. Especially when shallow landslide endangers some man-made structures such as buildings, roads or bridges, analysis of GPR data can yield very useful results. The results of GPR data analysis of the shallow landslide are represented here. It is situated on the mountain Fruska Gora in Serbia. Despite its dimensions (50x20m) this landslide was interesting for analysis for two reasons: - The landslide occurred at the part of the single road between the cement factory and the marl mine. The cement factory "Lafarge" in Beocin (Fruska Gora) is the largest cement manufacturer in the country. One of major priorities of the factory management is to keep the function of this road. The road is heavily exploited and over the years it led to landslide movements and damaging of the road itself. - The landslide dates back to earlier period and the mitigation measures were performed twice. Laying the foundation of the retaining wall was not performed during the first mitigation measures. The second mitigation measures were performed in 2010 and included detailed geotechnical analysis of the location with the appropriate foundation laying. Since the GPR technology can produce high resolution images of subsurface it provides clear insight into the current state of surveyed location. That kind of analysis is necessary to maintain permanent functionality of the road and to check the status of mitigation measures. Furthermore, the location characteristics do not allow easy access so the possibilities of other analysis technologies application are limited. In order to assess the effects of

  1. Wind effects on snow cover in Pascua-Lama, Dry Andes of Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Gascoin, Simon; Lhermitte, Stefaan; Kinnard, Christophe; Borstel, Kirsten; Glen E. Liston

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We present the first application of a distributed snow model (SnowModel) in the instrumented site of Pascua-Lama in the Dry Andes (2600-5630 m above sea level, 29°S). A model experiment was performed to assess the effect of wind on the snow cover patterns. A particular objective was to evaluate the role of blowing snow on the glacier formation. The model was run using the data from 11 weather stations over a complete snow season. First, a cross-validation of the meteor...

  2. Monitoring snow cover and its effect on runoff regime in the Jizera Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasova, Alena

    2015-04-01

    The Jizera Mountains in the northern Bohemia are known by its rich snow cover. Winter precipitation represents usually a half of the precipitation in the hydrological year. Gradual snow accumulation and melt depends on the course of the particular winter period, the topography of the catchments and the type of vegetation. During winter the snow depth, and especially the snow water equivalent, are affected by the changing character of the falling precipitation, air and soil temperatures and the wind. More rapid snowmelt occurs more on the slopes without forest oriented to the South, while a gradual snowmelt occurs on the locations turned to the North and in forest. Melting snow recharges groundwater and affects water quality in an important way. In case of extreme situation the snowmelt monitoring is important from the point of view of flood protection of communities and property. Therefore the immediate information on the amount of water in snow is necessary. The way to get this information is the continuous monitoring of the snow depth and snow water equivalent. In the Jizera Mountains a regular monitoring of snow cover has been going on since the end of the 19th century. In the 80s of the last century the Jizera Mountains were affected by the increased fallout of pollutants in the air. There followed a gradual dieback of the forest cover and cutting down the upper part of the ridges. In order to get data for the quantification of runoff regime changes in the changing natural environment, the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute (CHMI) founded in the upper part of the Mountains several experimental catchments. One of the activities of the employees of the experimental basis is the regular measurement of snow cover at selected sites from 1982 up to now. At the same time snow cover is being observed using snow pillows, where its mass is monitored with the help of pressure sensors. In order to improve the reliability of the continuous measurement of the snow water

  3. An enhanced temperature index model for debris-covered glaciers accounting for thickness effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenzo, M; Pellicciotti, F; Mabillard, J; Reid, T; Brock, B W

    2016-08-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are increasingly studied because it is assumed that debris cover extent and thickness could increase in a warming climate, with more regular rockfalls from the surrounding slopes and more englacial melt-out material. Debris energy-balance models have been developed to account for the melt rate enhancement/reduction due to a thin/thick debris layer, respectively. However, such models require a large amount of input data that are not often available, especially in remote mountain areas such as the Himalaya, and can be difficult to extrapolate. Due to their lower data requirements, empirical models have been used extensively in clean glacier melt modelling. For debris-covered glaciers, however, they generally simplify the debris effect by using a single melt-reduction factor which does not account for the influence of varying debris thickness on melt and prescribe a constant reduction for the entire melt across a glacier. In this paper, we present a new temperature-index model that accounts for debris thickness in the computation of melt rates at the debris-ice interface. The model empirical parameters are optimized at the point scale for varying debris thicknesses against melt rates simulated by a physically-based debris energy balance model. The latter is validated against ablation stake readings and surface temperature measurements. Each parameter is then related to a plausible set of debris thickness values to provide a general and transferable parameterization. We develop the model on Miage Glacier, Italy, and then test its transferability on Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland. The performance of the new debris temperature-index (DETI) model in simulating the glacier melt rate at the point scale is comparable to the one of the physically based approach, and the definition of model parameters as a function of debris thickness allows the simulation of the nonlinear relationship of melt rate to debris thickness, summarised by the

  4. An enhanced temperature index model for debris-covered glaciers accounting for thickness effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenzo, M.; Pellicciotti, F.; Mabillard, J.; Reid, T.; Brock, B. W.

    2016-08-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are increasingly studied because it is assumed that debris cover extent and thickness could increase in a warming climate, with more regular rockfalls from the surrounding slopes and more englacial melt-out material. Debris energy-balance models have been developed to account for the melt rate enhancement/reduction due to a thin/thick debris layer, respectively. However, such models require a large amount of input data that are not often available, especially in remote mountain areas such as the Himalaya, and can be difficult to extrapolate. Due to their lower data requirements, empirical models have been used extensively in clean glacier melt modelling. For debris-covered glaciers, however, they generally simplify the debris effect by using a single melt-reduction factor which does not account for the influence of varying debris thickness on melt and prescribe a constant reduction for the entire melt across a glacier. In this paper, we present a new temperature-index model that accounts for debris thickness in the computation of melt rates at the debris-ice interface. The model empirical parameters are optimized at the point scale for varying debris thicknesses against melt rates simulated by a physically-based debris energy balance model. The latter is validated against ablation stake readings and surface temperature measurements. Each parameter is then related to a plausible set of debris thickness values to provide a general and transferable parameterization. We develop the model on Miage Glacier, Italy, and then test its transferability on Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland. The performance of the new debris temperature-index (DETI) model in simulating the glacier melt rate at the point scale is comparable to the one of the physically based approach, and the definition of model parameters as a function of debris thickness allows the simulation of the nonlinear relationship of melt rate to debris thickness, summarised by the

  5. Effect of management systems and cover crops on organic matter dynamics of soil under vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fernandes de Souza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable production in conservation tillage has increased in Brazil, with positive effects on the soil quality. Since management systems alter the quantity and quality of organic matter, this study evaluated the influence of different management systems and cover crops on the organic matter dynamics of a dystrophic Red Latosol under vegetables. The treatments consisted of the combination of three soil tillage systems: no-tillage (NT, reduced tillage (RT and conventional tillage (CT and of two cover crops: maize monoculture and maize-mucuna intercrop. Vegetables were grown in the winter and the cover crops in the summer for straw production. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with four replications. Soil samples were collected between the crop rows in three layers (0.0-0.05, 0.05-0.10, and 0.10-0.30 m twice: in October, before planting cover crops for straw, and in July, during vegetable cultivation. The total organic carbon (TOC, microbial biomass carbon (MBC, oxidizable fractions, and the carbon fractions fulvic acid (C FA, humic acid (C HA and humin (C HUM were determined. The main changes in these properties occurred in the upper layers (0.0-0.05 and 0.05-0.10 m where, in general, TOC levels were highest in NT with maize straw. The MBC levels were lowest in CT systems, indicating sensitivity to soil disturbance. Under mucuna, the levels of C HA were lower in RT than NT systems, while the C FA levels were lower in RT than CT. For vegetable production, the C HUM values were lowest in the 0.05-0.10 m layer under CT. With regard to the oxidizable fractions, the tillage systems differed only in the most labile C fractions, with higher levels in NT than CT in the 0.0-0.05 m layer in both summer and winter, with no differences between these systems in the other layers. The cabbage yield was not influenced by the soil management system, but benefited from the mulch production of the preceding maize-mucuna intercrop as cover

  6. 地被植物在郑州都市区园林绿化中的组成结构及管理对策研究%The investigation and analysis about common ground cover plants of metropolitan area parks in Zhengzhou City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪进; 杨旭; 高闪闪; 何瑞珍

    2014-01-01

    The ground cover plants in the major urban parks and plazas of Zhengzhou City were investigated by using on‐the‐spot statistical investigation in this paper ,and the vegeta‐tion characteristics , selection criteria , and maintenance management , etc . w ere discussed and analysed .The results showed that the species of ground cover plants are simplex ,with smaller size plantation and often separatly planted with many bare grounds and extensive management at late stage . T herefore , some effective measurs are proposed by reasonable planting according to the viewing characteristis of different species in different growth seasonsand enhancing their management in time ,which can greatly improve their ornamental value ,and hence increase the level of ground cover plants landscaping .%采用实地调查统计的方法对郑州市各大公园及路边广场的地被植物及其特点、选择标准、养护管理等进行了研究分析。结果表明:当前地被植物品种单一,种植面积较小,且多单独种植,混合应用较少,较多地段没有地被植物覆盖,后期管理粗放。建议充分利用每种地被植物不同时期的观赏特点,种植时合理搭配,及时管理,以大大提高观赏价值,从而提高地被植物的造景水平。

  7. What land covers are effective in mitigating a heat island in urban building rooftop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Ryu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Since the 20th century, due to the rapid urbanization many urban environment problems have got blossomed and above all heat island has been recognized as an important issue. There are several causes of urban heat island, but land cover change occupies the largest portion of them. Owing to urban expansion, vegetation is changed into asphalt pavements and concrete buildings, which reduces latent heat flux. To mitigate the problems, people enlarge vegetation covers such as planting street trees, making rooftop gardens and constructing parks or install white roofs that feature high albedo on a building. While the white roofs reflect about 70% of solar radiation and absorb less radiation, vegetation has low albedo but cools the air through transpiration and fixes carbon dioxide through photosynthesis. There are some studies concerning which one is more effective to mitigate heat island between the green roof and white roof. This study compares the green roof and white roof and additionally considers carbon fixation that has not been treated in other studies. Furthermore, this study ascertains an efficiency of solar-cell panel that is used for building roof recently. The panel produces electric power but has low albedo which could warm the air. The experiment is conducted at the rooftop in Seoul, Korea and compares green roof (grass), white roof (painted cover), black roof (solar panel) and normal painted roof. Surface temperature and albedo are observed for the four roof types and incoming shortwave, outgoing longwave and carbon flux are measured in green roof solely. In the case of solar panels, the electricity generation is calculated from the incoming radiation. We compute global warming potentials for the four roof types and test which roof type is most effective in reducing global warming potential.

  8. Algorithm for Detection of Ground and Canopy Cover in Micropulse Photon-Counting Lidar Altimeter Data in Preparation for the ICESat-2 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzfeld, Ute Christina; McDonald, Brian W.; Neumann, Thomas Allen; Wallin, Bruce F.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Markus, Thorsten; Brenner, Anita; Field, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-II (ICESat-2) mission is a decadal survey mission (2016 launch). The mission objectives are to measure land ice elevation, sea ice freeboard, and changes in these variables, as well as to collect measurements over vegetation to facilitate canopy height determination. Two innovative components will characterize the ICESat-2 lidar: 1) collection of elevation data by a multibeam system and 2) application of micropulse lidar (photon-counting) technology. A photon-counting altimeter yields clouds of discrete points, resulting from returns of individual photons, and hence new data analysis techniques are required for elevation determination and association of the returned points to reflectors of interest. The objective of this paper is to derive an algorithm that allows detection of ground under dense canopy and identification of ground and canopy levels in simulated ICESat-2 data, based on airborne observations with a Sigma Space micropulse lidar. The mathematical algorithm uses spatial statistical and discrete mathematical concepts, including radial basis functions, density measures, geometrical anisotropy, eigenvectors, and geostatistical classification parameters and hyperparameters. Validation shows that ground and canopy elevation, and hence canopy height, can be expected to be observable with high accuracy by ICESat-2 for all expected beam energies considered for instrument design (93.01%-99.57% correctly selected points for a beam with expected return of 0.93 mean signals per shot (msp), and 72.85%-98.68% for 0.48 msp). The algorithm derived here is generally applicable for elevation determination from photoncounting lidar altimeter data collected over forested areas, land ice, sea ice, and land surfaces, as well as for cloud detection.

  9. Sunn hemp cover cropping and organic fertilizer effects on the nematode community under temperate growing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Jermaine; Wang, Koon-Hui; Marahatta, Sharadchandra P; Meyer, Susan L F; Hooks, Cerruti R R

    2013-12-01

    Field experiments were conducted in Maryland to investigate the influence of sunn hemp cover cropping in conjunction with organic and synthetic fertilizers on the nematode community in a zucchini cropping system. Two field treatments, zucchini planted into a sunn hemp living and surface mulch (SH) and zucchini planted into bare-ground (BG) were established during three field seasons from 2009 to 2011. In 2009, although SH slightly increased nematode richness compared with BG by the first harvest (P < 0.10), it reduced nematode diversity and enrichment indices (P < 0.01 and P < 0.10, respectively) and increased the channel index (P < 0.01) compared to BG at the final harvest. This suggests a negative impact of SH on nematode community structure. The experiment was modified in 2010 and 2011 where the SH and BG main plots were further split into two subplots to investigate the added influence of an organic vs. synthetic fertilizer. In 2010, when used as a living and surface mulch in a no-till system, SH increased bacterivorous, fungivorous, and total nematodes (P < 0.05) by the final zucchini harvest, but fertilizer type did not influence nematode community structure. In 2011, when incorporated into the soil before zucchini planting, SH increased the abundance of bacterivorous and fungivorous nematodes early in the cropping season. SH increased species richness also at the end of the season (P < 0.05). Fertilizer application did not appear to influence nematodes early in the season. However, in late season, organic fertilizers increased enrichment and structure indices and decreased channel index by the end of the zucchini cropping cycle.

  10. Simulating the effect of vegetation cover on the sediment yield of mediterranean catchments using SHETRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukey, B. T.; Sheffield, J.; Bathurst, J. C.; Lavabre, J.; Mathys, N.; Martin, C.

    1995-08-01

    The sediment yield of two catchments in southern France was modelled using the newly developed sediment code of SHETRAN. A fire in August 1990 denuded the Rimbaud catchment, providing an opportunity to study the effect of vegetation cover on sediment yield by running the model for both pre-and post-fire cases. Model output is in the form of upper and lower bounds on sediment discharge, reflecting the uncertainty in the erodibility of the soil. The results are encouraging since measured sediment discharge falls largely between the predicted bounds, and simulated sediment yield is dramatically lower for the catchment before the fire which matches observation. SHETRAN is also applied to the Laval catchment, which is subject to Badlands gulley erosion. Again using the principle of generating upper and lower bounds on sediment discharge, the model is shown to be capable of predicting the bulk sediment discharge over periods of months. To simulate the effect of reforestation, the model is run with vegetation cover equivalent to a neighbouring fully forested basin. The results obtained indicate that SHETRAN provides a powerful tool for predicting the impact of environmental change and land management on sediment yield.

  11. Development of a ground hydrology model suitable for global climate modeling using soil morphology and vegetation cover, and an evaluation of remotely sensed information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobler, L.; Lewis, R.

    1988-01-01

    The long-term purpose was to contribute to scientific understanding of the role of the planet's land surfaces in modulating the flows of energy and matter which influence the climate, and to quantify and monitor human-induced changes to the land environment that may affect global climate. Highlights of the effort include the following: production of geo-coded, digitized World Soil Data file for use with the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model; contribution to the development of a numerical physically-based model of ground hydrology; and assessment of the utility of remote sensing for providing data on hydrologically significant land surface variables.

  12. An Algorithm for Detection of Ground and Canopy Cover in Micropulse Photon-Counting Lidar Altimeter Data in Preparation of the ICESat-2 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzfeld, Ute C.; McDonald, Brian W.; Wallins, Bruce F.; Markus, Thorsten; Neumann, Thomas A.; Brenner, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-II (ICESat-2) mission has been selected by NASA as a Decadal Survey mission, to be launched in 2016. Mission objectives are to measure land ice elevation, sea ice freeboard/ thickness and changes in these variables and to collect measurements over vegetation that will facilitate determination of canopy height, with an accuracy that will allow prediction of future environmental changes and estimation of sea-level rise. The importance of the ICESat-2 project in estimation of biomass and carbon levels has increased substantially, following the recent cancellation of all other planned NASA missions with vegetation-surveying lidars. Two innovative components will characterize the ICESat-2 lidar: (1) Collection of elevation data by a multi-beam system and (2) application of micropulse lidar (photon counting) technology. A micropulse photon-counting altimeter yields clouds of discrete points, which result from returns of individual photons, and hence new data analysis techniques are required for elevation determination and association of returned points to reflectors of interest including canopy and ground in forested areas. The objective of this paper is to derive and validate an algorithm that allows detection of ground under dense canopy and identification of ground and canopy levels in simulated ICESat-2-type data. Data are based on airborne observations with a Sigma Space micropulse lidar and vary with respect to signal strength, noise levels, photon sampling options and other properties. A mathematical algorithm is developed, using spatial statistical and discrete mathematical concepts, including radial basis functions, density measures, geometrical anisotropy, eigenvectors and geostatistical classification parameters and hyperparameters. Validation shows that the algorithm works very well and that ground and canopy elevation, and hence canopy height, can be expected to be observable with a high accuracy during the ICESat

  13. The Effects of Copy, Cover, and Compare with and without Additional Error Drill on Multiplication Fact Fluency and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Angela; McLaughlin, Thomas; Weber, Kimberly P.; Gower, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The use of copy, cover and compare has been suggested as an effective class-room intervention procedure. The present case report examined the use of copy, cover, and compare with math facts for an elementary student with learning disabilities. Objectives: The purpose of this research was to increase the correct rate and decrease the…

  14. Mechanical wounding under field conditions: A potential tool to increase the allelopathic inhibitory effect of cover crops on weeds?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.M.; Dam, van N.M.; Ritz, C.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Kropff, M.J.; Bastiaans, L.

    2014-01-01

    To increase the inhibitory effect of soil-incorporated cover crop residues on germination and early growth of weeds, the allelochemical content of the cover crop at the time of soil incorporation should be maximal. We investigated whether mechanical damaging in spring induced the production of allel

  15. Effects of winter cover crop, soil amendment, and variety on organic rice production and greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen supply and disease are two main challenges in organic rice production. Cover crop and soil amendment can be options to increase soil N while keeps rice health. The objective of this study was to test the effects of cover crop and soil amendment on the production of organic rice. Three popul...

  16. Effects of rainfall patterns and land cover on the subsurface flow generation of sloping Ferralsols in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian; Yang, Jie; Tang, Chongjun; Chen, Lihua; Liu, Yaojun; Wang, Lingyun

    2017-01-01

    Rainfall patterns and land cover are two important factors that affect the runoff generation process. To determine the surface and subsurface flows associated with different rainfall patterns on sloping Ferralsols under different land cover types, observational data related to surface and subsurface flows from 5 m × 15 m plots were collected from 2010 to 2012. The experiment was conducted to assess three land cover types (grass, litter cover and bare land) in the Jiangxi Provincial Soil and Water Conservation Ecological Park. During the study period, 114 natural rainfall events produced subsurface flow and were divided into four groups using k-means clustering according to rainfall duration, rainfall depth and maximum 30-min rainfall intensity. The results showed that the total runoff and surface flow values were highest for bare land under all four rainfall patterns and lowest for the covered plots. However, covered plots generated higher subsurface flow values than bare land. Moreover, the surface and subsurface flows associated with the three land cover types differed significantly under different rainfall patterns. Rainfall patterns with low intensities and long durations created more subsurface flow in the grass and litter cover types, whereas rainfall patterns with high intensities and short durations resulted in greater surface flow over bare land. Rainfall pattern I had the highest surface and subsurface flow values for the grass cover and litter cover types. The highest surface flow value and lowest subsurface flow value for bare land occurred under rainfall pattern IV. Rainfall pattern II generated the highest subsurface flow value for bare land. Therefore, grass or litter cover are able to convert more surface flow into subsurface flow under different rainfall patterns. The rainfall patterns studied had greater effects on subsurface flow than on total runoff and surface flow for covered surfaces, as well as a greater effect on surface flows associated

  17. Shrub encroachment in Arctic tundra: Betula nana effects on above- and below-ground litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Jennie R; Buckeridge, Kate M; van de Weg, Martine J; Shaver, Gaius R; Schimel, Joshua P; Gough, Laura

    2017-03-06

    Rapid arctic vegetation change as a result of global warming includes an increase in the cover and biomass of deciduous shrubs. Increases in shrub abundance will result in a proportional increase of shrub litter in the litter community, potentially affecting carbon turnover rates in arctic ecosystems. We investigated the effects of leaf and root litter of a deciduous shrub, Betula nana, on decomposition, by examining species-specific decomposition patterns, as well as effects of Betula litter on the decomposition of other species. We conducted a two-year decomposition experiment in moist acidic tundra in northern Alaska, where we decomposed three tundra species (Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Rhododendron palustre, and Eriophorum vaginatum) alone and in combination with Betula litter. Decomposition patterns for leaf and root litter were determined using three different measures of decomposition (mass loss, respiration, extracellular enzyme activity). We report faster decomposition of Betula leaf litter compared to other species, with support for species differences coming from all three measures of decomposition. Mixing effects were less consistent among the measures, with negative mixing effects shown only for mass loss. In contrast, there were few species differences or mixing effects for root decomposition. Overall, we attribute longer-term litter mass loss patterns in to patterns created by early decomposition processes in the first winter. We note numerous differences for species patterns between leaf and root decomposition, indicating that conclusions from leaf litter experiments should not be extrapolated to below-ground decomposition. The high decomposition rates of Betula leaf litter aboveground, and relatively similar decomposition rates of multiple species below, suggest a potential for increases in turnover in the fast-decomposing carbon pool of leaves and fine roots as the dominance of deciduous shrubs in the Arctic increases, but this outcome may be tempered

  18. [Effects of winter cover crop on methane and nitrous oxide emission from paddy field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hai-ming; Tang, Wen-guang; Shuai, Xi-qiang; Yang, Guang-li; Tang, Hai-tao; Xiao, Xiao-Ping

    2010-12-01

    Static chamber-GC technique was employed to study the effects of different treatment winter cover crops, including no-tillage and directly sowing ryegrass (T1), no-tillage and directly sowing Chinese milk vetch (T2), tillage and transplanting rape (T3), no-tillage and directly sowing rape (T4), and fallowing (CK), on the CH4 and N2O emission from double cropping rice paddy field. During the growth period of test winter cover crops, the CH4 and N2O emission in treatments T1-T4 was significantly higher than that in CK (P winter cover crops returned to field, the CH4 emission from early and late rice fields in treatments T1, T2, T3, and T4 was larger than that in CK. In early rice field, treatments T1 and T2 had the largest CH4 emission (21.70 and 20.75 g x m(-2)); while in late rice field, treatments T3 and T4 had the largest one (58.90 and 54.51 g x m(-2) respectively). Treatments T1-T4 also had larger N2O emission from early and late rice fields than the CK did. The N2O emission from early rice field in treatments T1, T2, T3, and T4 was increased by 53.7%, 12.2%, 46.3%, and 29.3%, and that from late rice field in corresponding treatments was increased by 28.6%, 3.8%, 34.3%, and 27.6%, respectively, compared with CK.

  19. Experimental Investigation Into the Aerodynamic Ground Effect of a Tailless Chevron and Lambda-shaped UCAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Significant advances during the last quarter-century in computing capabilities, electronics miniaturization, communications , guidance, navigation, and...Grumman X-47. The X-45 will combine advance air vehicle hardware, including integrated sensors, communication , navigation equipment and low...USNR for UCAV Ground Effects Test**** %****** Re-adapted by Won In, Capt, USAF for UCAV Ground Efects Test ****** %******************* Calculation

  20. Unsteady Computations of a Jet in a Crossflow with Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Shishir; Murman, Scott; Venkateswaran, Sankaran; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A numerical study of a jet in crossflow with ground effect is conducted using OVERFLOW with dual time-stepping and low Mach number preconditioning. The results of the numerical study are compared to an experiment to show that the numerical methods are capable of capturing the dominant features of the flow field as well as the unsteadiness associated with the ground vortex.

  1. Winter pasture and cover crops and their effects on soil and summer grain crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvadi Antonio Balbinot Junior

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of winter land use on the amount of residual straw, the physical soil properties and grain yields of maize, common bean and soybean summer crops cultivated in succession. The experiment was carried out in the North Plateau of Santa Catarina state, Brazil, from May 2006 to April 2010. Five strategies of land use in winter were evaluated: intercropping with black oat + ryegrass + vetch, without grazing and nitrogen (N fertilization (intercropping cover; the same intercropping, with grazing and 100 kg ha-1 of N per year topdressing (pasture with N; the same intercropping, with grazing and without nitrogen fertilization (pasture without N; oilseed radish, without grazing and nitrogen fertilization (oilseed radish; and natural vegetation, without grazing and nitrogen fertilization (fallow. Intercropping cover produces a greater amount of biomass in the system and, consequently, a greater accumulation of total and particulate organic carbon on the surface soil layer. However, land use in winter does not significantly affect soil physical properties related to soil compaction, nor the grain yield of maize, soybean and common bean cultivated in succession.

  2. Effect of land use land cover change on soil erosion potential in an agricultural watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arabinda; Tiwari, Kamlesh N; Bhadoria, P B S

    2011-02-01

    Universal soil loss equation (USLE) was used in conjunction with a geographic information system to determine the influence of land use and land cover change (LUCC) on soil erosion potential of a reservoir catchment during the period 1989 to 2004. Results showed that the mean soil erosion potential of the watershed was increased slightly from 12.11 t ha(-1) year(-1) in the year 1989 to 13.21 t ha(-1) year(-1) in the year 2004. Spatial analysis revealed that the disappearance of forest patches from relatively flat areas, increased in wasteland in steep slope, and intensification of cultivation practice in relatively more erosion-prone soil were the main factors contributing toward the increased soil erosion potential of the watershed during the study period. Results indicated that transition of other land use land cover (LUC) categories to cropland was the most detrimental to watershed in terms of soil loss while forest acted as the most effective barrier to soil loss. A p value of 0.5503 obtained for two-tailed paired t test between the mean erosion potential of microwatersheds in 1989 and 2004 also indicated towards a moderate change in soil erosion potential of the watershed over the studied period. This study revealed that the spatial location of LUC parcels with respect to terrain and associated soil properties should be an important consideration in soil erosion assessment process.

  3. Effects of turbidity, light level, and cover on predation of white sturgeon larvae by prickly sculpins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadomski, D.M.; Parsley, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    White sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus occur in rivers of the western United States and southwestern Canada, but some populations are in decline because of recruitment failure. Many river systems in this area have been altered as a result of development that has caused major environmental changes. Our goal was to examine how three changes - lower turbidity levels, higher light levels, and altered substrates - might affect predation by prickly sculpin Cottus asper on white sturgeon larvae. We experimentally investigated predation at various turbidity levels and found that significantly more white sturgeon yolk sac larvae were eaten at lower turbidity levels. The effects of light level (1-4 and 7-15 1x), the presence or absence of rocks as cover, and prey size (14-17 mm and 20-24 mm total length) on the outcome of predator-prey interactions were also examined. Significantly fewer white sturgeon were eaten during trials that combined the lowest light level, cover, and the smallest larvae. Our results suggest that altered river conditions caused by impoundment and other factors have increased predation on white sturgeon larvae. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  4. Effect of Dust and Anthropogenic Activities on the Himalayan Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramesh; Senthil Kumar, J.; Gautam, Ritesh; Mehdi, Waseem; Prasad, Anup; Kafatos, M.; Hsu, Christina

    The snow cover of the Himalayas, north of the Indo-Gangetic (IG) plains, and its characteristics are highly variable in space and time. In recent years, dust events and anthropogenic pollution activities have significantly affected the air quality and even climate of the Indo-Gangetic plains. Enhancements of water vapor and carbon monoxide are found during the passage of dust events. In the last three decades, aerosol loading over the IG plains is found to increase continuously. The cause of this increase is attributed to the growing urbanization, industrialization, and associated energy demand and use of fossil fuels. In the present work , we show the detailed analysis of satellite data, namely TOMS, MODIS, MISR, SSM/I, AMSU, NOAA AVHRR, LANDSAT, OMI AURA and CALIPSO to study the impact of dust during pre-monsoon/summer season (April - June) and anthropogenic activities during winter (December - January) on the snow, atmospheric and meteorological parameters in the last three decades. Pronounced effect of dust on the snow albedo and atmospheric/meteorological parameters are examined which may be associated with the receding Himalayan snow cover over the last three decades. This would clearly provide further evidence of regional impacts of global climate change.

  5. Biophysical effects on temperature and precipitation due to land cover change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugini, Lucia; Caporaso, Luca; Marconi, Sergio; Cescatti, Alessandro; Quesada, Benjamin; de Noblet-Ducoudré, Nathalie; House, Johanna I.; Arneth, Almut

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic land cover changes (LCC) affect regional and global climate through biophysical variations of the surface energy budget mediated by albedo, evapotranspiration, and roughness. This change in surface energy budget may exacerbate or counteract biogeochemical greenhouse gas effects of LCC, with a large body of emerging assessments being produced, sometimes apparently contradictory. We reviewed the existing scientific literature with the objective to provide an overview of the state-of-the-knowledge of the biophysical LCC climate effects, in support of the assessment of mitigation/adaptation land policies. Out of the published studies that were analyzed, 28 papers fulfilled the eligibility criteria, providing surface air temperature and/or precipitation change with respect to LCC regionally and/or globally. We provide a synthesis of the signal, magnitude and uncertainty of temperature and precipitation changes in response to LCC biophysical effects by climate region (boreal/temperate/tropical) and by key land cover transitions. Model results indicate that a modification of biophysical processes at the land surface has a strong regional climate effect, and non-negligible global impact on temperature. Simulations experiments of large-scale (i.e. complete) regional deforestation lead to a mean reduction in precipitation in all regions, while air surface temperature increases in the tropics and decreases in boreal regions. The net global climate effects of regional deforestation are less certain. There is an overall consensus in the model experiments that the average global biophysical climate response to complete global deforestation is atmospheric cooling and drying. Observed estimates of temperature change following deforestation indicate a smaller effect than model-based regional estimates in boreal regions, comparable results in the tropics, and contrasting results in temperate regions. Regional/local biophysical effects following LCC are important for

  6. Ground state of a confined Yukawa plasma including correlation effects

    CERN Document Server

    Henning, C; Filinov, A; Piel, A; Bonitz, M

    2007-01-01

    The ground state of an externally confined one-component Yukawa plasma is derived analytically using the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, the radial density profile is computed. The results are compared with the recently obtained mean-field (MF) density profile \\cite{henning.pre06}. While the MF results are more accurate for weak screening, LDA with correlations included yields the proper description for large screening. By comparison with first-principle simulations for three-dimensional spherical Yukawa crystals we demonstrate that both approximations complement each other. Together they accurately describe the density profile in the full range of screening parameters.

  7. Role of snow cover on urban heat island intensity investigated by urban canopy model with snow effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T.; Mori, K.

    2015-12-01

    Urban heat islands have been investigated around the world including snowy regions. However, the relationship between urban heat island and snow cover remains unclear. This study examined the effect of snow cover in urban canopy on energy budget in urban areas of Sapporo, north Japan by 1km mesh WRF experiments. The modified urban canopy model permits snow cover in urban canopy by the modification of surface albedo, surface emissivity, and thermal conductivity for roof and road according to snow depth and snow water equivalent. The experiments revealed that snow cover in urban canopy decreases urban air temperature more strongly for daily maximum temperature (0.4-0.6 K) than for daily minimum temperature (0.1-0.3 K). The high snow albedo reduces the net radiation at building roof, leading to decrease in sensible heat flux. Interestingly, the cooling effect of snow cover compensates the warming effect by anthropogenic heat release in Sapporo, suggesting the importance of snow cover treatment in urban canopy model as well as estimating accurate anthropogenic heat distributions. In addition, the effect of road snow clearance tends to increase nocturnal surface air temperature in urban areas. A possible role of snow cover on urban heat island intensity was evaluated by two experiments with snow cover (i.e., realistic condition) and without snow cover in entire numerical domain. The snow cover decreases surface air temperature more in rural areas than in urban areas, which was commonly seen throughout a day, with stronger magnitude during nighttime than daytime, resulting in intensifying urban heat island by 4.0 K for daily minimum temperature.

  8. Effect of sewage sludge on formation of acidic ground water at a reclaimed coal mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Data on rock, ground water, vadose water, and vadose gas chemistry were collected for two years after sewage sludge was applied at a reclaimed surface coal mine in Pennsylvania to determine if surface-applied sludge is an effective barrier to oxygen influx, contributes metals and nutrients to ground water, and promotes the acidification of ground water. Acidity, sulfate, and metals concentrations were elevated in the ground water (6- to 21-m depth) from spoil relative to unmined rock because of active oxidation of pyrite and dissolution of aluminosilicate, carbonate, and Mn-Fe-oxide minerals in the spoil. Concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals (Fe, Mn, Al, Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn), and nitrate, and abundances of iron-oxidizing bacteria were elevated in the ground water from sludge-treated spoil relative to untreated spoil having a similar mineral composition; however, gaseous and dissolved oxygen concentrations did not differ between the treatments. Abundances of iron-oxidizing bacteria in the ground water samples were positively correlated with concentrations of ammonia, nitrate, acidity, metals, and sulfate. Concentrations of metals in vadose water samples (iron-oxidizing bacteria, the oxidation of pyrite, and the acidification of ground water. Nevertheless, the overall effects on ground water chemistry from the sludge were small and probably short-lived relative to the effects from mining only.

  9. Effect of the different cover crops on the soil moisture in a Hungarian vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkó, Ádám; Miglécz, Tamás; Valkó, Orsolya; Deák, Balázs; Kelemen, András; Török, Péter; Tóthmérész, Béla; Drexler, Dóra

    2017-04-01

    Since many years it is well known that the one-sided mechanical soil cultivation of vineyard inter-rows has many disadvantages. Growers can choose from alternative tillage technologies, such as the usage of green manure, or covering the inter-rows with straw mulch. Another possible technology is tto cover the inter-rows with species-rich seed mixtures. However, selection of the most suitable species is crucial; we have to take into consideration the age of the vines, and the specific characteristics of the vineyards involved. Species rich cover crop technology has many advantages: 1) it helps to prevent erosion and creates easier cultivation circumstances, 2) it has a positive effect on soil structure, soil fertility and ecosystem services, 3) we can create native mixtures from local provenance, adapted to the local climate/vine region/vineyard which enhances the nature conservation value of our site. But, they should not compete significantly with the grapevines, or negatively influence produce quality. In the year of 2012 we created, and started to study three different cover-crop mixtures in Hungarian wine regions under on-farm conditions: Biocont-Ecovin mixture, Mixture of Legumes, Mixture of Grass and Herbs. The results of the botanical surveys, yield and pruning weight were published in many papers and presentations before (e.g. Miglécz et al. 2015, Donkó et al. 2016). Besides the above measures, one key point of the effectiveness and sustainability of the living mulch vegetation is the level of soil moisture. That is why we started to investigate the soil moisture (vol %) of different treatments (Biocont-Ecovin mixture, Mixture of Legumes, Mixture of Grass and Herbs, coverage with Lolium perenne, and Control (spontaneous weed flora)) in at the Feind Winery in Balatonfőkajár (Hungary). The investigated variety is Welschriesling on loamy soil (Tihany Formation), planted in 2010. The seed mixtures were sown in the spring of 2013. We measured soil moisture

  10. Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Land Cover database depicts 10 general land cover classes for the State of Kansas. The database was compiled from a digital classification of Landsat Thematic...

  11. Aerodynamics of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda v, Krishne; Vengadesan, S.

    2014-11-01

    This work presents the time-varying aerodynamic forces and the unsteady flow structures of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect. Two-dimensional dragonfly model wing is chosen and the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically by using immersed boundary method. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the ground effect on the unsteady forces and vortical structures for the inclined stroke plane motions. We also investigate the influences of kinematics parameters such as Reynolds number (Re), stroke amplitude, wing rotational timing, for various distances between the airfoil and the ground. The effects of aforementioned parameters together with ground effect, on the stroke averaged force coefficients and regimes of force behavior are similar in both normal (horizontal) and inclined stroke plane motions. However, the evolution of the vortex structures which produces the effects are entirely different.

  12. Effects of ground fires on element dynamics in mountainous coniferous forest in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Näthe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances such as fires are a natural phenomenon of forested ecosystems, having a different impact on (micro- climate (e.g. emissions of gases and aerosols, ecology (destruction of flora and fauna and nutrient cycles especially in the soils. Forest fires alter the spatial distribution (forest floor vs. mineral soil, binding forms (organic vs. inorganic and availability (water solubility of organic substances and nutrients. The effects of fires on chemical, biological and physical soil properties in forested ecosystems have been intensively studied in the last decades, especially in the Mediterranean area and North America. However, differences in fire intensity, forest type (species, age and location (climate, geological substrate, nutrient status lead to divergent results. Furthermore, only a few case studies focused on the effects of ground fires in hilly landscapes, on the vertical and lateral water-driven fluxes of elements (C, N, nutrients, as well as on the input of fire-released terrestrial nutrients into aquatic ecosystems. Thus, this study will evaluate the effects of low-severity fires on nutrient cycling in a coniferous forest in a hilly landscape connected to an aquatic system. At three spatially independent sites three paired plots (control and manipulated were chosen at a forested site in Thuringia, Germany. All plots are similar in the vegetation cover and pedogenetic properties.In relation to control sites, this study will examine the effects of low-severity fires on:a the mobilization of organic carbon and nutrients (released from ash material and the forest floor via leachate and erosion paths,b the binding form (inorganic/organic of elements and organic compounds, and c the particle size fraction (DOM/POM of elements and organic compounds.The goal of this study is a better understanding of the impact of forest fires on element cycling and release in a hilly landscape connected to an aquatic system, supposedly driven by

  13. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiong; Grunwald, Sabine; Myers, D Brenton; Ross, C Wade; Harris, Willie G; Comerford, Nicolas B

    2014-09-15

    Historically, Florida soils stored the largest amount of soil organic carbon (SOC) among the conterminous U.S. states (2.26 Pg). This region experienced rapid land use/land cover (LULC) shifts and climate change in the past decades. The effects of these changes on SOC sequestration are unknown. The objectives of this study were to 1) investigate the change in SOC stocks in Florida to determine if soils have acted as a net sink or net source for carbon (C) over the past four decades and 2) identify the concomitant effects of LULC, LULC change, and climate on the SOC change. A total of 1080 sites were sampled in the topsoil (0-20 cm) between 2008 and 2009 representing the current SOC stocks, 194 of which were selected to collocate with historical sites (n = 1251) from the Florida Soil Characterization Database (1965-1996) for direct comparison. Results show that SOC stocks significantly differed among LULC classes--sugarcane and wetland contained the highest SOC, followed by improved pasture, urban, mesic upland forest, rangeland, and pineland while crop, citrus and xeric upland forest remained the lowest. The surface 20 cm soils acted as a net sink for C with the median SOC significantly increasing from 2.69 to 3.40 kg m(-2) over the past decades. The SOC sequestration rate was LULC dependent and controlled by climate factors interacting with LULC. Higher temperature tended to accelerate SOC accumulation, while higher precipitation reduced the SOC sequestration rate. Land use/land cover change observed over the past four decades also favored the C sequestration in soils due to the increase in the C-rich wetland area by ~140% and decrease in the C-poor agricultural area by ~20%. Soils are likely to provide a substantial soil C sink considering the climate and LULC projections for this region.

  14. Management effectiveness and land cover change in dynamic cultural landscapes-assessing a central European biosphere reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohnesorge, B.; Plieninger, Tobias; Hostert, P.

    2013-01-01

    to assess the effectiveness of Central European reserves in meeting their land cover related management goals. Based on digital biotope maps, we defined and assessed land cover change processes that were relevant to the reserve management's goals over a period of 13 years. We then compared these changes...... 85% across all zones-differences in land cover changes can be more prominent across zones inside the reserve than between the areas inside and outside of it. The reserve as a whole performed better than the surrounding reference area when using land cover related management goals as a benchmark...... in the reserve's core, buffer, and transition zones and in a surrounding reference area by means of a geographical information system. (Un-)desirable key processes related to management aims were defined and compared for the various zones. We found that-despite an overall land cover persistence of approximately...

  15. Simulation of regional temperature change effect of land cover change in agroforestry ecotone of Nenjiang River Basin in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingxiang; Zhang, Shuwen; Yu, Lingxue; Bu, Kun; Yang, Jiuchun; Chang, Liping

    2016-02-01

    The Northeast China is one of typical regions experiencing intensive human activities within short time worldwide. Particularly, as the significant changes of agriculture land and forest, typical characteristics of pattern and process of agroforestry ecotone change formed in recent decades. The intensive land use change of agroforestry ecotone has made significant change for regional land cover, which had significant impact on the regional climate system elements and the interactions among them. This paper took agroforestry ecotone of Nenjiang River Basin in China as study region and simulated temperature change based on land cover change from 1950s to 1978 and from 1978 to 2010. The analysis of temperature difference sensitivity to land cover change based on Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model showed that the land cover change from 1950s to 1978 induced warming effect over all the study area, including the change of grassland to agriculture land, grassland to deciduous broad-leaved forest, and deciduous broad-leaved forest to shrub land. The land cover change from 1978 to 2010 induced cooling effect over all the study area, including the change of deciduous broad-leaved forest to agriculture land, grassland to agriculture land, shrub land to agriculture land, and deciduous broad-leaved forest to grassland. In addition, the warming and cooling effect of land cover change was more significant in the region scale than specific land cover change area.

  16. Simulation of regional temperature change effect of land cover change in agroforestry ecotone of Nenjiang River Basin in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingxiang; Zhang, Shuwen; Yu, Lingxue; Bu, Kun; Yang, Jiuchun; Chang, Liping

    2017-05-01

    The Northeast China is one of typical regions experiencing intensive human activities within short time worldwide. Particularly, as the significant changes of agriculture land and forest, typical characteristics of pattern and process of agroforestry ecotone change formed in recent decades. The intensive land use change of agroforestry ecotone has made significant change for regional land cover, which had significant impact on the regional climate system elements and the interactions among them. This paper took agroforestry ecotone of Nenjiang River Basin in China as study region and simulated temperature change based on land cover change from 1950s to 1978 and from 1978 to 2010. The analysis of temperature difference sensitivity to land cover change based on Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model showed that the land cover change from 1950s to 1978 induced warming effect over all the study area, including the change of grassland to agriculture land, grassland to deciduous broad-leaved forest, and deciduous broad-leaved forest to shrub land. The land cover change from 1978 to 2010 induced cooling effect over all the study area, including the change of deciduous broad-leaved forest to agriculture land, grassland to agriculture land, shrub land to agriculture land, and deciduous broad-leaved forest to grassland. In addition, the warming and cooling effect of land cover change was more significant in the region scale than specific land cover change area.

  17. Effect of Antioxidants on DC Tree and Grounded DC Tree in XLPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanami, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Isao; Sekii, Yasuo; Saito, Mitsugu; Sugi, Kazuyuki

    To study the effects of antioxidants on the initiation of the DC tree and the grounded DC tree, experiments were conducted using XLPE specimens containing phenolic and sulfur type antioxidants. Experimental results showed that sulfur type antioxidants in XLPE have the effect of increasing inception voltages of both the DC tree and the grounded DC tree. Based on results of those experiments, the mechanism of increase in the inception voltage of the DC tree and the grounded DC tree by antioxidants was examined along with the mechanism of polarity effects on those trees. Results showed a promotional effect of charge injection from a needle electrode by antioxidants, which are responsible for the increased inception voltages of the DC tree. Charge trapping by antioxidants explains the increase of inception voltages of the grounded DC tree.

  18. Effects of Color Reversal of Figure and Ground Drawing Materials on Drawing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Deborah C.

    1978-01-01

    Studied were the effects of reversing the color of white and black figure and ground drawings on Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test performance of 21 cerebral palsied and 21 normal children (all 5 to 18 years old). (Author/SBH)

  19. Predicting plant diversity patterns in Madagascar: understanding the effects of climate and land cover change in a biodiversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kerry A; Parks, Katherine E; Bethell, Colin A; Johnson, Steig E; Mulligan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Climate and land cover change are driving a major reorganization of terrestrial biotic communities in tropical ecosystems. In an effort to understand how biodiversity patterns in the tropics will respond to individual and combined effects of these two drivers of environmental change, we use species distribution models (SDMs) calibrated for recent climate and land cover variables and projected to future scenarios to predict changes in diversity patterns in Madagascar. We collected occurrence records for 828 plant genera and 2186 plant species. We developed three scenarios, (i.e., climate only, land cover only and combined climate-land cover) based on recent and future climate and land cover variables. We used this modelling framework to investigate how the impacts of changes to climate and land cover influenced biodiversity across ecoregions and elevation bands. There were large-scale climate- and land cover-driven changes in plant biodiversity across Madagascar, including both losses and gains in diversity. The sharpest declines in biodiversity were projected for the eastern escarpment and high elevation ecosystems. Sharp declines in diversity were driven by the combined climate-land cover scenarios; however, there were subtle, region-specific differences in model outputs for each scenario, where certain regions experienced relatively higher species loss under climate or land cover only models. We strongly caution that predicted future gains in plant diversity will depend on the development and maintenance of dispersal pathways that connect current and future suitable habitats. The forecast for Madagascar's plant diversity in the face of future environmental change is worrying: regional diversity will continue to decrease in response to the combined effects of climate and land cover change, with habitats such as ericoid thickets and eastern lowland and sub-humid forests particularly vulnerable into the future.

  20. Predicting plant diversity patterns in Madagascar: understanding the effects of climate and land cover change in a biodiversity hotspot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry A Brown

    Full Text Available Climate and land cover change are driving a major reorganization of terrestrial biotic communities in tropical ecosystems. In an effort to understand how biodiversity patterns in the tropics will respond to individual and combined effects of these two drivers of environmental change, we use species distribution models (SDMs calibrated for recent climate and land cover variables and projected to future scenarios to predict changes in diversity patterns in Madagascar. We collected occurrence records for 828 plant genera and 2186 plant species. We developed three scenarios, (i.e., climate only, land cover only and combined climate-land cover based on recent and future climate and land cover variables. We used this modelling framework to investigate how the impacts of changes to climate and land cover influenced biodiversity across ecoregions and elevation bands. There were large-scale climate- and land cover-driven changes in plant biodiversity across Madagascar, including both losses and gains in diversity. The sharpest declines in biodiversity were projected for the eastern escarpment and high elevation ecosystems. Sharp declines in diversity were driven by the combined climate-land cover scenarios; however, there were subtle, region-specific differences in model outputs for each scenario, where certain regions experienced relatively higher species loss under climate or land cover only models. We strongly caution that predicted future gains in plant diversity will depend on the development and maintenance of dispersal pathways that connect current and future suitable habitats. The forecast for Madagascar's plant diversity in the face of future environmental change is worrying: regional diversity will continue to decrease in response to the combined effects of climate and land cover change, with habitats such as ericoid thickets and eastern lowland and sub-humid forests particularly vulnerable into the future.

  1. Ice Cover Effects on Scour in Narrow Rivers (Ice Engineering, April 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    responding to changes in water level. In these situations, any increase in the discharge above the level at freezeup will necessarily be accompanied...open water, a floating ice cover, and a restrained ice cover with hydrostatic head conditions simulating discharge increased above freezeup level...responding to changes in discharge conditions. The ice cover forms at the stage corresponding to the freezeup discharge, defining the freezeup datum

  2. Selective withdrawal to reduce regulation effects on ice cover downstream outlet of Alta power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asvall, R.P. [Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate, Oslo (Norway)

    2007-07-01

    Norway's controversial Alta hydroelectric power plant was constructed on one of the richest salmon rivers in Norway. There were serious concerns regarding how the power plant would influence ice conditions and fish habitat in the river. It was commissioned in 1987 following extensive environmental impact studies. Studies on water temperature, ice conditions and fish population have continued after commissioning in order to document changes caused by the power plant. The power station has two intakes in the dam. The storage capacity is 6 per cent of yearly inflow to the reservoir. The outlet of the power plant is located 2 km downstream the dam. The power plant discharge has been limited to 30 m{sup 3}/s in winter and as close as possible to natural flow during the fishing season. The reservoir is filled over a 2 to 3 week period during spring flood. Initially, only one intake to the power station was planned, but an upper intake was subsequently built to minimize the impact on fish, although the effect has been marginal. Before flow regulation, the river was ice covered except for limited leads. Flow regulation has reduced the ice cover considerably, and the water temperature has been slightly lower in summer and higher in fall and winter. After flow regulation, the amount of fish near the power station outlet decreased considerably, due in part to less shelter resulting from reduced ice cover. In order to improve conditions for the fish, the licence for the power plant is being modified to use the upper intake in winter to reduce water temperatures and make it possible for ice to form between the outlet of the power plant and Savko Lake. There are strong limitations on reductions in discharge in spring to protect the fish habitat. A new scheme of regulation based on use of the upper intake in winter will be implemented. The discharge must be increased in such a way that the ice release will be as close to thermal as possible. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Effect of land cover change on snow free surface albedo across the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, J.; Nash, M. S.; Barnes, C. A.

    2016-11-01

    Land cover changes (e.g., forest to grassland) affect albedo, and changes in albedo can influence radiative forcing (warming, cooling). We empirically tested albedo response to land cover change for 130 locations across the continental United States using high resolution (30 m-×-30 m) land cover change data and moderate resolution (~ 500 m-×-500 m) albedo data. The land cover change data spanned 10 years (2001 - 2011) and the albedo data included observations every eight days for 13 years (2001 - 2013). Empirical testing was based on autoregressive time series analysis of snow free albedo for verified locations of land cover change. Approximately one-third of the autoregressive analyses for woody to herbaceous or forest to shrub change classes were not significant, indicating that albedo did not change significantly as a result of land cover change at these locations. In addition, ~ 80% of mean differences in albedo arising from land cover change were less than ± 0.02, a nominal benchmark for precision of albedo measurements that is related to significant changes in radiative forcing. Under snow free conditions, we found that land cover change does not guarantee a significant albedo response, and that the differences in mean albedo response for the majority of land cover change locations were small.

  4. Screening Green Manure Cover Crops for their Allelopathic Effects on Some Important Weeds Found in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runzika, M.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Weed control is a serious problem in smallholder conservation agriculture farming areas in Zimbabwe. Green Manure Cover Crops (GMCCs, which improve soil fertility and reduce weeds through allelopathy, are likely to reduce the cost of weed control in these areas. A laboratory study was conducted at the University of Zimbabwe to investigate the effect of extracts of eleven GMCCs on the germination percentage, radicle and plumule length of Bidens pilosa, Eleusine indica and Pennisatum glaucum (pearl millet. A green house experiment was also done to determine the allelopathic potential of these GMCC extracts applied as soil incorporated residues on the emergence and dry matter production of E. indica, B. pilosa and Acanthospermum hispidum. GMCC extracts significantly reduced germination, radicle and plumule length of Pennisatum glaucum (P < 0.05 except for Crotalaria grahamiana and Raphanus sativas which had no effect on germination of Pearl millet. The emergence and dry matter of B. pilosa, E. indica and A. hispidum were significantly reduced by these legumes (P < 0.05 with the exception of common vetch (Vicia sativa which stimulated the emergence of A. hispidum. Most of the legumes that were used in this study have allelopathic effects on B. pilosa, E. indica and A. hispidum.

  5. [Effects of sand-covering on apple trees transpiration and fruit quality in dry land orchards of Longdong, Gansu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Yin, Xiao-ning; Liu, Xiao-yong; Wang, Fa-lin

    2010-11-01

    Aiming at the seasonal drought in the dry land orchards of Longdong, Gansu Province, a sand-covering experiment was conducted with 15-year-old Nagafu No. 2 apple trees, with the soil water content, temperature, stem sap flow velocity, leaf stomatal conductance, and fruit quality measured. In the orchard covered with 5-cm-thick riversand, the increment of soil temperature in February-April was lower than 1 degrees C, while in June-July, it was 2.44 degrees C and 2.61 degrees C on sunny and cloudy days, respectively. The soil water content was over 60% of field capacity throughout the growing season. On sunny days with high soil water content (H season), the stem sap flow curve presented a wide peak. Under sand- covering, the sap flow started 0.6 h earlier, and the maximum sap flow velocity was 25.5% higher than the control. On cloudy days of H season, the maximum sap flow velocity was 165.6% higher than the control. On sunny days with low soil water content (L season), the sap flow curve had a single peak, and under sand covering, the sap flow started 0.5-1 h earlier than the control on sunny days. The maximum sap flow velocity was 794 g x h(-1). On cloudy days of L season, the sap flow started 1 h earlier, and the maximum sap flow velocity was 311.0% higher than the control. The evaporation of the control was 156.0% higher than that of sand-covering from March to July, suggesting that excessive ground water evaporation was the main reason to cause soil drought. Under sand-covering, single fruit mass was improved obviously whereas fruit firmness was reduced slightly, and soluble solids, vitamin C, total sugar, and organic acid contents were somewhat promoted.

  6. Performance and Carbon Emission Analysis on Glass-covering Greenhouse Heating with Ground Source Heat Pump Technology%玻璃温室地源热泵供暖性能与碳排放分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴立龙; 马承伟

    2012-01-01

    The heating test was conducted in a glass-covering multi-span greenhouse ( 756 m ) with groundwater-style GSHP technology. The heat quantity estimating models based on air enthalpy difference method ( AEDM) were developed according to the heating characteristics of GSHP. The economical performance and carbon footprint ( greenhouse gas emission level) of the GSHP was analyzed and compared with currently widely used coal fired heating system ( CFHs) and natural gas fired heating system (GFHs) based on investigated various energy sources price during heating tests. According to the compared results, the GSHPs heating cost is higher than CFHs, but lower than GFHs. Meanwhile, GSHPs CO2 emission during heating is higher than GFHs, but lower than CFHs.In view of the strong coupling between temperature and relative humidity in the greenhouse simulation system, an adaptive decoupling method based on dynamic matrix control was proposed. Taking the measure of feedforward compensation to eliminate interaction between channels of temperature and humidity, an adaptive decoupling algorithm by weighting was designed. The proposed method can adjust the decoupling parameters online under different operating modes, effectively overcome the effect of model severe mismatch to control accuracy. Compared with the traditional PID control, simulation and experimental results both indicated the proposed strategy greatly improved the control performance.%在北京地区一栋玻璃连栋温室(756 m2)中采用地下水式地源热泵(ground source heat pump,简称GSHP)技术进行了冬季供暖试验,并结合GSHP技术的供热特点构建了基于供热末端空气焓差法的供热量计算模型以及供热系统性能分析方法.根据供暖期北京地区能源价格水平,对比当前广泛使用的燃煤供暖系统和天然气供暖系统,系统地评价了GSHP技术的碳排放(温室气体排放水平)和供暖经济性.GSHP供暖成本低于同期燃气供暖,但

  7. Investigating the Effects of Hanna Dam Construction on Long-Term Land Use/ Cover Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hadian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Hana’s dam (constructed in 1996 on land use and cover changes using Landsat satellite images. Three images over 35 years (taken in 1976, 1998, and 2011 were obtained and geometric, atmospheric and topographic corrections were applied. The dam’s affected area was selected based on the interpretation of satellite imagery and local expert knowledge. Maximum likelihood and post-classification techniques were used to detect land use/ cover changes and their accuracy then was assessed using field works. The overall classification accuracy and Kappa statistics for all the maps were more than 83% and 79%, respectively. The classification map of year 1998 indicated that about 703 hectares of rangelands and agricultural lands were destroyed due to Hanna dam construction. In year 1998, the agricultural irrigated lands increased about100% due to Hanna dam construction in 1996 but in 2011 their extent decreased up to 69% and 36% in comparison with year 1998 and 1976, respectively. There was also a decrease about 10 percent in rangeland land use from 1976 (195906 ha to 2011 (176827ha. The results of 2011 classified map revealed that 425 hectares of the water reservoir has changed to bare land because of severe drought conditions and over-exploitation in recent years. Overall, the results confirmed that in a short period of time after dam construction, the extent of agricultural irrigated lands has been increased, but a sharp decline was observed in agricultural areas after 15 years which can be as a result of population growth and water consumption in residential, commercial and industrial sectors in the region.

  8. The effect of cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum burmanii) essential oil microcapsules on vacuumed ground beef quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilliana, I. N.; Manuhara, G. J.; Utami, R.; Khasanah, L. U.

    2017-04-01

    Ground beef has a short shelf life because it is susceptible to damage due to microbial contamination and lipid oxidation. So some sort of preservation method such as refrigerated storage, vacuum packaging or natural preservative addition is needed to extend the shelf life of ground beef. A natural preservative that can be used as a food preservative is the cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum burmanii) essential oil microcapsules. The aim of the research was to determine the influence of a cinnamon bark essential oil microcapsules (0%;0.5% and 1% w/w of the ground beef) on the Total Plate Count (TPC), Thiobarbituric Acid (TBA), pH and color of ground beef during refrigerated storage (4±1°C). The result showed that cinnamon bark essential oil microcapsules affected the TPC, TBA, pH and color of ground beef. The addition of the cinnamon bark essential oil microcapsules on ground beef can inhibit microbial growth, inhibit lipid oxidation, inhibit discoloration and lowering pH of fresh ground beef during refrigerated storage compared to the control sample. The higher of the microcapsules were added, the higher the inhibition of microbial growth, lipid oxidation and discoloration of ground beef, indicating better preservation effects.

  9. Land-use change outweighs projected effects of changing rainfall on tree cover in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Julie C; Blarquez, Olivier; Staver, Carla A

    2016-09-01

    Global change will likely affect savanna and forest structure and distributions, with implications for diversity within both biomes. Few studies have examined the impacts of both expected precipitation and land use changes on vegetation structure in the future, despite their likely severity. Here, we modeled tree cover in sub-Saharan Africa, as a proxy for vegetation structure and land cover change, using climatic, edaphic, and anthropic data (R(2)  = 0.97). Projected tree cover for the year 2070, simulated using scenarios that include climate and land use projections, generally decreased, both in forest and savanna, although the directionality of changes varied locally. The main driver of tree cover changes was land use change; the effects of precipitation change were minor by comparison. Interestingly, carbon emissions mitigation via increasing biofuels production resulted in decreases in tree cover, more severe than scenarios with more intense precipitation change, especially within savannas. Evaluation of tree cover change against protected area extent at the WWF Ecoregion scale suggested areas of high biodiversity and ecosystem services concern. Those forests most vulnerable to large decreases in tree cover were also highly protected, potentially buffering the effects of global change. Meanwhile, savannas, especially where they immediately bordered forests (e.g. West and Central Africa), were characterized by a dearth of protected areas, making them highly vulnerable. Savanna must become an explicit policy priority in the face of climate and land use change if conservation and livelihoods are to remain viable into the next century.

  10. The Effect of Illumination and Viewing Geometry and Forest Canopies on the Estimation of Snow Cover Using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Woodcock, C. E.; Melloh, R. A.; Davis, R. E.

    2003-12-01

    With the exception of cloud cover, the largest obstacle to producing a global daily snow cover product using remotely sensed data is the presence of the forests, which cover much of the seasonally snow-covered portion of the world. The presence of the forest canopy influences the radiance received by the sensor in such a way that the proportion of viewable snow within a pixel changes as a function of forest properties, topography and viewing position. To explore the potential effects of sun angle and viewing geometry of satellite systems such as NOAA AVHRR and MODIS on snow cover estimation, a program has been written to estimate viewable gap fractions (VGF) across landscapes based on the Li-Strahler geometric-optical (GO) bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model. It computes a VGF map for a specified illumination and viewing geometry using maps of forest cover and species and terrain images of slope and aspect. This study explores the effect of illumination and viewing geometry and forest properties on the VGF for the Fool's Creek Intensive Study Area (ISA) in Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado. Intensive field measurements of the required parameters for the GO model and maps of forest properties are used to generate maps of viewable gap fractions. Hemispherical photos are used to validate model results. The results improve our understanding of the way forest canopies influence the estimation of snow cover using remotely sensed data.

  11. The bright side of snow cover effects on PV production - How to lower the seasonal mismatch between electricity supply and demand in a fully renewable Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Annelen; Dujardin, Jérôme; Dupuis, Sonia; Lehning, Michael

    2017-04-01

    One of the major problems with solar PV in the context of a fully renewable electricity production at mid-latitudes is the trend of higher production in summer and lower production in winter. This trend is most often exactly opposite to demand patterns, causing a seasonal mismatch that requires extensive balancing power from other production sources or large storage capacities. Which possibilities do we have to bring PV production into closer correlation with demand? This question motivated our research and in response we investigated the effects of placing PV panels at different tilt angles in regions with extensive snow cover to increase winter production from ground reflected short wave radiation. The aim of this project is therefore to quantify the effect of varying snow cover duration (SCD) and of panel tilt angle on the annual total production and on production during winter months when electricity is most needed. We chose Switzerland as ideal test site, because it has a wide range of snow cover conditions and a high potential for renewable electricity production. But methods can be applied to other regions of comparable conditions for snow cover and irradiance. Our analysis can be separated into two steps: 1. A systematic, GIS and satellite-based analysis for all of Switzerland: We use time series of satellite-derived irradiance, and snow cover characteristics together with land surface cover types and elevation information to quantify the environmental conditions and to estimate potential production and ideal tilt angles. 2. A scenario-based analysis that contrasts the production patterns of different placement scenarios for PV panels in urban, rural and mountainous areas. We invoke a model of a fully renewable electricity system (including Switzerland's large hydropower system) at national level to compute the electricity import and storage capacity that will be required to balance the remaining mismatch between production and demand to further illuminate

  12. Prediction of Tonal Underwater Noise Pattern from Cavitating Propellers with Special Attention to Ice Cover Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streckwall Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To predict underwater noise spectra associated to regular occurrence of propeller cavitation we have extended an existing method [1] (used for the prediction of fluctuating hull pressures to become applicable for effects that are linked to a finite speed of sound. In [2] an intermediate approach was realized where (besides the hull far field boundaries were introduced but the incompressible flow assumption was kept. However compressibility effects become noticeable in the far field, which may be judged to start at some 2-3 propeller-diameters distance from the centre of the cavitation events, if we confine to emissions at 1st-4th blade frequency. It was a logical continuation of our former efforts to realize a compressible flow model and integrate the propeller as a noise source. Having increased the functionality of our approach by referencing the speed of sound, the precision of the method was also somehow reduced. In our former approach, like in comparable approaches (see for instance [3] and [4], the singularity system generating the near field propeller induced pressures involved various sources and vortices distributed on the propeller blades. With our current compressible approach this complexity was dropped, as a single point source substitutes the cavitating propeller. Such a simplification correlates with the assumption, that the monopole character of a noise source is decisive for the far field noise levels. In this contribution we outline the steps characterizing the procedure for predicting tonal underwater noise from cavitating propellers. In the first step a Vortex Lattice Method (VLM is used to access the cavitation pattern on the propeller with special focus on the cavity volume attached to one blade. The second step accumulates the distributed cavities to establish a fluctuating point source of equivalent far field noise characteristic. As relevant limits the hull, the free surface, the sea bottom and an ice cover are

  13. Repeatability in photo-interpretation of tree canopy cover and its effect on predictive mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. Jackson; Gretchen G. Moisen; Paul L. Patterson; John Tipton

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we explore repeatability in photo-interpreted imagery from the National Agriculture Imagery Program that was sampled as part of the National Land Cover Database 2011 Tree Canopy Cover pilot project. Data were collected in 5 diverse pilot areas in the US, including one each in Oregon, Utah, Kansas, Michigan and Georgia. Repeatability metrics. The intra-...

  14. Effect of land cover data on nitrous oxide inventory in fen meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nol, L.; Verburg, P.H.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Molenaar, K.

    2008-01-01

    Landscape representations based on land cover databases differ significantly from the real landscape. Using a land cover database with high uncertainty as input for emission inventory analyses can cause propagation of systematic and random errors. The objective of this study was to analyze how diffe

  15. Effect of land cover change on snow free surface albedo across the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land cover changes (e.g., forest to grassland) affect albedo, and changes in albedo can influence radiative forcing (warming, cooling). We empirically tested albedo response to land cover change for 130 locations across the continental United States using high resolution (30 m-&t...

  16. Effect of land cover change on snow free surface albedo across the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land cover changes (e.g., forest to grassland) affect albedo, and changes in albedo can influence radiative forcing (warming, cooling). We empirically tested albedo response to land cover change for 130 locations across the continental United States using high resolution (30 m-&t...

  17. The effects of changing land cover on streamflow simulation in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.E. Van Beusekom; L.E. Hay; R.J. Viger; W.A. Gould; J.A. Collazo; A. Henareh Khalyani

    2014-01-01

    This study quantitatively explores whether land cover changes have a substantive impact on simulated streamflow within the tropical island setting of Puerto Rico. The Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) was used to compare streamflow simulations based on five static parameterizations of land cover with those based on dynamically varying parameters derived from...

  18. 9种多年生地被植物在华北高寒区的抗寒性%Study on Cold -resistance of Several Ground Cover Plants in the Cold Plateau of North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓磊; 马建平; 宋国亮; 李欣儒; 张立峰

    2012-01-01

    The study with introduced ground cover plants as meterials. Through observations on their natural growth conditions and growth morphology and demonstration tests of artificial low-temperature stress root cold physiological changes and physical growth of strain recovery validation studies, the results showed that 0 - -18℃ low temperature processing, the relative conductivity, soluble sugar and praline contents of nine perennial ground cover plants were all on the rise, while in the - 18- - 36℃ processing, soluble sugar and free proline content of Platycodon grandiforus. Hemerocallis stella remained rise after fall. The Hosta plantaginea, Aster novibelgii, Lilium brownii var. viridulum showed continuous downward trend. Combination of winter cold stress, sexual and physical strain to restore growth status showed that nine perennial ground cover plants could be successful overwintering in north China. Basis of resistance to the cold, the orders were Platycodon grandiforus 〉 HemerocaUis stella 〉 Hemerocallis middenclorffii 〉 Paeonia lactiflora 〉 P. lactiflora 〉 Sedum spectabile 〉 Hosta plantaginea 〉 Lilium brownii var. viridulum.%以引种的9种多年生地被植物为材料,通过对其在华北高寒区自然生长条件下的越冬性与生长形态观测,以及人工低温胁迫下根系抗寒生理指标变化与株体生长恢复的实证研究表明,0-18℃处理温段,9种地被植物的相对电导率、可溶性糖和游离脯氨酸含量均呈上升趋势;在-18--6℃处理温段,桔梗、金娃娃萱草可溶性搪和游离脯氨酸含量仍保持上升而后再下降,而玉椿、荷兰菊、百合则呈持续下降趋势。结合越冬性与低温胁迫下株体恢复生长状况认为,9种地被植物在华北高寒区常年环境下均可越冬,其抗寒能力依次为:桔梗〉金娃娃萱草〉大花萱草〉单瓣芍药〉重瓣芍药〉八宝景天〉玉簪〉荷兰菊〉百合。

  19. Ground-Wave Propagation Effects on Transmission Lines through Error Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe-Campos Felipe Alejandro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic transient calculation of overhead transmission lines is strongly influenced by the natural resistivity of the ground. This varies from 1-10K (Ω·m depending on several media factors and on the physical composition of the ground. The accuracy on the calculation of a system transient response depends in part in the ground return model, which should consider the line geometry, the electrical resistivity and the frequency dependence of the power source. Up to date, there are only a few reports on the specialized literature about analyzing the effects produced by the presence of an imperfectly conducting ground of transmission lines in a transient state. A broad range analysis of three of the most often used ground-return models for calculating electromagnetic transients of overhead transmission lines is performed in this paper. The behavior of modal propagation in ground is analyzed here into effects of first and second order. Finally, a numerical tool based on relative error images is proposed in this paper as an aid for the analyst engineer to estimate the incurred error by using approximate ground-return models when calculating transients of overhead transmission lines.

  20. Land Use and Land Cover, WI Agricultural Statistics Service (WASS) WI Cropland Data Layer. Agriculture and non-ag land cover categories based on survey data (ground truth), satellite imagery classification, FSA common land unit, and 2001 National Land Cover dataset., Published in 2008, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2008. It is...

  1. Land-Cover Legacy Effects on Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Abundance in Human and Wildlife Dominated Systems in Tropical Savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geofrey E. Soka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF can be important mutualists to plant hosts in acquiring soil nutrients. Past work has not explored whether previous land-cover history influences current AMF abundance in croplands and whether different land-cover histories in grazed but not cultivated areas influence AMF. This study was conducted to assess the effects of land-cover history in and near Serengeti National Park on AMF abundance in areas with three different land uses. The results showed that land-cover history influenced a number of soil physicochemical properties following conversion of grassland to cropland or woodland to cropland during the past 27 years. Different original land cover generally did not significantly influence current AMF abundance in croplands or livestock-grazed soils. However, livestock-grazed current grasslands that were formerly woodlands had lower AMF abundance than sites that had been grasslands since 1984. These results suggest that lower AMF abundance in livestock-grazed and cropland areas as compared to protected wildlife-grazed areas may reflect reduced total carbon inputs and higher disturbance and are not strongly influenced by the legacy of previous land cover. Given that recent studies have detected legacy effects on AMF, such effects may reflect more the impact on the taxonomic composition of AMF rather than their total abundance.

  2. Evaluation of the effect of a cover layer on radon exhalation from uranium mill tailings: transient radon flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Cécile; Richon, Patrick; Beneito, Alain; Robé, Marie-Christine

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study concerning the transport of 222Rn in uranium mill tailings (UMTs) and in the cover layer was launched in 1997 with the participation of the French uranium mining company (COGEMA). Evaluation of the cover layer's effectiveness in reducing 222Rn flux emanating from UMTs was one of its objectives. In the first phase, the 222Rn flux densities were measured regularly on a UMT layer. In the second phase, the UMT was covered with a one-meter layer of compacted material consisting of crushed waste rock derived from mining activities. Radon-222 flux was then measured at the surface of this cover layer. Observations were compared with radon flux calculated using TRACI, a model for vertical water and gas flow and radon transport. The results show that the calculations bear a fair resemblance to the observations in both cases. They also show that the effectiveness of the cover layer calculated with TRACI, using the thickness and textural properties of the cover material, is very close to the measured effectiveness.

  3. A Critical Review of the Transport and Decay of Wake Vortices in Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpkaya, T.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the transport and decay of wake vortices in ground effect and cites a need for a physics-based parametric model. The encounter of a vortex with a solid body is always a complex event involving turbulence enhancement, unsteadiness, and very large gradients of velocity and pressure. Wake counter in ground effect is the most dangerous of them all. The interaction of diverging, area-varying, and decaying aircraft wake vortices with the ground is very complex because both the vortices and the flow field generated by them are altered to accommodate the presence of the ground (where there is very little room to maneuver) and the background turbulent flow. Previous research regarding vortex models, wake vortex decay mechanisms, time evolution within in ground effect of a wake vortex pair, laminar flow in ground effect, and the interaction of the existing boundary layer with a convected vortex are reviewed. Additionally, numerical simulations, 3-dimensional large-eddy simulations, a probabilistic 2-phase wake vortex decay and transport model and a vortex element method are discussed. The devising of physics-based, parametric models for the prediction of (operational) real-time response, mindful of the highly three-dimensional and unsteady structure of vortices, boundary layers, atmospheric thermodynamics, and weather convective phenomena is required. In creating a model, LES and field data will be the most powerful tools.

  4. Effect of aerobics exercise on self-esteem in Iranian female adolescents covered by welfare organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanpour, Marzieh; Tabatabaei, Mansooreh; Alavi, Mousa; Zolaktaf, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Deprivation of parents might decrease self-esteem (SE) and result in affective and social incompatibility. In this randomized control trial, we examined the effect of aerobics exercise on SE among female adolescents living with no natural family. The sample consisted of all female adolescents aged 13 to 19 years (n: 72) who were covered by Isfahan Welfare organization. Participants were assigned into intervention and control groups by matched random sampling. Intervention included 8 weeks of aerobics exercise. Coppersmith SE inventory was administered before and after intervention as well as after one month follow-up. No significant difference was seen between pre-SE scores of intervention (32.7 ± 8.4) and control (33.0 ± 6.7) groups (t = .16, P = .87). A significant difference was obtained in post-SE scores (40.2 ± 5.7 versus 34.7 ± 6.8, t = 3.58, P = .001) and in one month follow-up scores (36.4 ± 5.2 versus 33.0 ± 5.2, t = 2.25, P = .03). The results demonstrated a low level of pre-SE in both groups. However, a significant improvement was seen in posttest of intervention group which persisted even one month after intervention. It supports the use of aerobics for female adolescents deprived from family life.

  5. Land Cover and Seasonality Effects on Biomass Burning Emissions and Air Quality Impacts Observed from Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoogman, P.; Hoffman, A.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Miller, C. E.; Nowlan, C. R.; Huang, G.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.

    2016-12-01

    Trace gas emissions from biomass burning can vary greatly both regionally and from event to event, but our current scientific understanding is unable to fully explain this variability. The large uncertainty in ozone formation resulting from fire emissions has posed a great challenge for assessing fire impacts on air quality and atmospheric composition. Satellite observations from OMI offer a powerful tool to observe biomass burning events by providing observations globally over a range of environmental conditions that effect emissions of NOx, formaldehyde, and glyoxal. We have investigated the seasonal relationship of biomass burning enhancements of these trace gases derived from OMI observations over tropical South America, Africa, and Indonesia. Land cover type (also derived from satellite observations) has a significant impact on formaldehyde and glyoxal enhancements from fire activity. We have found that the chemical ratio between formaldehyde and glyoxal is dependent on the burned land type and will present our current hypotheses for the spatial variation of this ratio in the tropics. Furthermore, in individual case studies we will investigate how these chemical ratios can inform our knowledge of the secondary formation of ozone, particularly during exceptional pollution events.

  6. Effectiveness of compacted soil liner as a gas barrier layer in the landfill final cover system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seheum; Nam, Kyoungphile; Kim, Jae Young; Hwan, Shim Kyu; Chung, Moonkyung

    2008-01-01

    A compacted soil liner (CSL) has been widely used as a single barrier layer or a part of composite barrier layer in the landfill final cover system to prevent water infiltration into solid wastes for its acceptable hydraulic permeability. This study was conducted to test whether the CSL was also effective in prohibiting landfill gas emissions. For this purpose, three different compaction methods (i.e., reduced, standard, and modified Proctor methods) were used to prepare the soil specimens, with nitrogen as gas, and with water and heptane as liquid permeants. Measured gas permeability ranged from 2.03 x 10(-10) to 4.96 x 10(-9) cm(2), which was a magnitude of two or three orders greater than hydraulic permeability (9.60 x 10(-13) to 1.05 x 10(-11) cm(2)). The difference between gas and hydraulic permeabilities can be explained by gas slippage, which makes gas more permeable, and by soil-water interaction, which impedes water flow and then makes water less permeable. This explanation was also supported by the result that a liquid permeability measured with heptane as a non-polar liquid was similar to the intrinsic gas permeability. The data demonstrate that hydraulic requirement for the CSL is not enough to control the gas emissions from a landfill.

  7. Effect of Aerobics Exercise on Self-Esteem in Iranian Female Adolescents Covered by Welfare Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Mansooreh; Alavi, Mousa; Zolaktaf, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Deprivation of parents might decrease self-esteem (SE) and result in affective and social incompatibility. In this randomized control trial, we examined the effect of aerobics exercise on SE among female adolescents living with no natural family. Materials and Methods. The sample consisted of all female adolescents aged 13 to 19 years (n: 72) who were covered by Isfahan Welfare organization. Participants were assigned into intervention and control groups by matched random sampling. Intervention included 8 weeks of aerobics exercise. Coppersmith SE inventory was administered before and after intervention as well as after one month follow-up. Results. No significant difference was seen between pre-SE scores of intervention (32.7 ± 8.4) and control (33.0 ± 6.7) groups (t = .16, P = .87). A significant difference was obtained in post-SE scores (40.2 ± 5.7 versus 34.7 ± 6.8, t = 3.58, P = .001) and in one month follow-up scores (36.4 ± 5.2 versus 33.0 ± 5.2, t = 2.25, P = .03). Discussion. The results demonstrated a low level of pre-SE in both groups. However, a significant improvement was seen in posttest of intervention group which persisted even one month after intervention. It supports the use of aerobics for female adolescents deprived from family life. PMID:25610905

  8. Effect of Aerobics Exercise on Self-Esteem in Iranian Female Adolescents Covered by Welfare Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Hasanpour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Deprivation of parents might decrease self-esteem (SE and result in affective and social incompatibility. In this randomized control trial, we examined the effect of aerobics exercise on SE among female adolescents living with no natural family. Materials and Methods. The sample consisted of all female adolescents aged 13 to 19 years (n: 72 who were covered by Isfahan Welfare organization. Participants were assigned into intervention and control groups by matched random sampling. Intervention included 8 weeks of aerobics exercise. Coppersmith SE inventory was administered before and after intervention as well as after one month follow-up. Results. No significant difference was seen between pre-SE scores of intervention (32.7±8.4 and control (33.0±6.7 groups (t=.16, P=.87. A significant difference was obtained in post-SE scores (40.2±5.7 versus 34.7±6.8, t=3.58, P=.001 and in one month follow-up scores (36.4±5.2 versus 33.0±5.2, t=2.25, P=.03. Discussion. The results demonstrated a low level of pre-SE in both groups. However, a significant improvement was seen in posttest of intervention group which persisted even one month after intervention. It supports the use of aerobics for female adolescents deprived from family life.

  9. Effects of grazing on leaf area index, fractional cover and evapotranspiration by a desert phreatophyte community at a former uranium mill site on the Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresloff, Cynthia J.; Nguyen, Uyen; Glenn, Edward P.; Waugh, Jody; Nagler, Pamela L.

    2013-01-01

    This study employed ground and remote sensing methods to monitor the effects of grazing on leaf area index (LAI), fractional cover (fc) and evapotranspiration (ET) of a desert phreatophyte community over an 11 year period at a former uranium mill site on the Colorado Plateau, U.S. Nitrate, ammonium and sulfate are migrating away from the mill site in a shallow alluvial aquifer. The phreatophyte community, consisting of Atriplex canescens (ATCA) and Sarcobatus vermiculatus (SAVE) shrubs, intercepts groundwater and could potentially slow the movement of the contaminant plume through evapotranspiration (ET). However, the site has been heavily grazed by livestock, reducing plant cover and LAI. We used livestock exclosures and revegetation plots to determine the effects of grazing on LAI, fc and ET, then projected the findings over the whole site using multi-platform remote sensing methods. We show that ET is approximately equal to annual precipitation at the site, but when ATCA and SAVE are protected from grazing they can develop high fc and LAI values, and ET can exceed annual precipitation, with the excess coming from groundwater discharge. Therefore, control of grazing could be an effective method to slow migration of contaminants at this and similar sites in the western U.S.

  10. On the unsteady motion and stability of a heaving airfoil in ground effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Molina; Xin Zhang; David Angland

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the fluid mechanics and force generation capabilities of an inverted heaving airfoil placed close to a moving ground using a URANS solver with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. By varying the mean ground clearance and motion frequency of the airfoil, it was possible to construct a frequency-height diagram of the various forces acting on the airfoil. The ground was found to enhance the downforce and reduce the drag with respect to freestream. The unsteady motion induces hysteresis in the forces' behaviour. At moderate ground clearance, the hysteresis increases with frequency and the airfoil loses energy to the flow, resulting in a stabilizing motion. By analogy with a pitching motion, the airfoil stalls in close proximity to the ground. At low frequencies, the motion is unstable and could lead to stall flutter. A stall flutter analysis was undertaken. At higher frequencies, inviscid effects overcome the large separation and the motion becomes stable. Forced trailing edge vortex shedding appears at high frequencies. The shedding mechanism seems to be independent of ground proximity.However, the wake is altered at low heights as a result of an interaction between the vortices and the ground.

  11. The possible effect on personnel dose by two copper filters covering Element 1 of the Harshaw 8814 TLD badge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reciniello, R N; Sengupta, S; Thompson, R L

    2009-08-01

    Ongoing uncertainties have existed regarding possible effects at low photon energies of two copper filters covering Element 1 of the Harshaw Type-8814 thermoluminescent dosimeter badge casing. To address these, Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Personnel Monitoring Group conducted a test in which Type-8814 badges with one copper filter covering Element 1 were irradiated at several low-energy levels side-by-side with the same number of badges with two copper filters covering Element 1. A review of exposures to personnel at Brookhaven Laboratory to possible low-energy photon flux was also conducted. From both the test and the review of exposures, it can be concluded that, for radiological work under the conditions at BNL, there is no apparent dosimetric difference if one or two copper filters cover Element 1 of the Type-8814 badge.

  12. Green manuring effect of pure and mixed barley - hairy vetch winter cover crops on maize and processing tomato N nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosti, Giacomo; Benincasa, Paolo; Farneselli, Michela;

    2012-01-01

    with the appropriate critical N dilution curves. The results highlight the effectiveness of mixtures for the management of the winter cover crop practice. In the two considered years, the species proportion influences the aboveground biomass (ranging from 2.90 to 5.94 Mg ha-1) and N accumulation (ranging from 73......Adopting mixtures between legumes and non legumes can be an efficient tool to merge the advantages of the single species in the fall-sown cover crop practice. Nevertheless there is a lack of information on how the species proportion may affect N accumulation and C/N of the cover crops and how...... tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Cover crop N accumulation and C/N ratio were monitored during the whole growing cycle, and CO2 flux from the soil was measured after their incorporation into the soil. N status of the following cash crops was evaluated by comparing the observed data...

  13. The Effect of Conservation Tillage and Cover Crop Residue on Beneficial Arthropods and Weed Seed Predation in Acorn Squash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, N F; Brainard, D C; Szendrei, Z

    2016-12-01

    Conservation tillage combined with cover crops or mulching may enhance natural enemy activity in agroecosystems by reducing soil disturbance and increasing habitat structural complexity. In particular, weed seed predation can increase with vegetation cover and reduced tillage, indicating that mulches may improve the quality of the habitat for weed seed foraging. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of tillage and mulching for conservation biological control in cucurbit fields. The effects of mulch and reduced tillage on arthropods and rates of weed seed loss from arenas were examined in field trials on sandy soils in 2014 and 2015. Experimental factors included tillage and cover crop, each with two levels: strip-tillage or full-tillage, and cover crop mulch (rye residue) or no cover crop mulch (unmulched). Arthropod abundance on the crop foliage was not affected by tillage or cover crops. Contrary to expectations, epigeal natural enemies of insects and rates of weed seed removal either did not respond to treatments or were greater in full-tilled plots and plots without mulch. Our study demonstrates the potential importance of weed seed predators in reducing weed seedbanks in vegetable agroecosystems, and suggests that early-season tillage may not be detrimental to epigeal predator assemblages. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Effect of multi-temporal forest cover change trajectories on forest plant diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the principal tenets of landscape ecology is that forest loss and fragmentation negatively affects biodiversity. However, historical fluctuations in forest cover resulting from repeated cycles of deforestation and reforestation are likely important in influencing patterns ...

  15. Effect of tillage and planting date on seasonal abundance and diversity of predacious ground beetles in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R B; Parajulee, M N

    2010-01-01

    A 2-year field study was conducted in the southern High Plains region of Texas to evaluate the effect of tillage system and cotton planting date window on seasonal abundance and activity patterns of predacious ground beetles. The experiment was deployed in a split-plot randomized block design with tillage as the main-plot factor and planting date as the subplot factor. There were two levels for each factor. The two tillage systems were conservation tillage (30% or more of the soil surface is covered with crop residue) and conventional tillage. The two cotton planting date window treatments were early May (normal planting) and early June (late planting). Five prevailing predacious ground beetles, Cicindela sexguttata F., Calosoma scrutator Drees, Pasimachus spp., Pterostichus spp., and Megacephala Carolina L. (Coleoptera: Carabidae), were monitored using pitfall traps at 2-week intervals from June 2002 to October 2003. The highest total number of ground beetles (6/trap) was observed on 9 July 2003. Cicindela sexguttata was the dominant ground dwelling predacious beetle among the five species. A significant difference between the two tillage systems was observed in the abundances of Pterostichus spp. and C. sexguttata. In 2002. significantly more Pterostichus spp. were recorded from conventional plots (0.27/trap) than were recorded from conservation tillage plots (0.05/trap). Significantly more C. sexguttata were recorded in 2003 from conservation plots (3.77/trap) than were recorded from conventional tillage plots (1.04/trap). There was a significant interaction between year and tillage treatments. However, there was no significant difference in the abundances of M. Carolina and Pasimachus spp. between the two tillage practices in either of the two years. M. Carolina numbers were significantly higher in late-planted cotton compared with those observed in normal-planted cotton. However, planting date window had no significant influence on the activity patterns of the

  16. Soft Soil Site Characterization on the Coast of Yantai and Its Effect on Ground Motion Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Yuejun; Tang Rongyu; Peng Yanju

    2005-01-01

    According to the Chinese GB50011-2001 code and the recommended provisions of FEMANEHRP and EUROCODE 8, by using shear wave velocity and borehole data, the site classification is evaluated for a typical soft soil site on the Yantai seacoast. The site seismic ground motion effect is analyzed and the influence of the coastal soil on design ground motion parameters is discussed. The results show that the brief site classification can not represent the real conditions of a soft soil site; the soft soil on the coast has a remarkable impact on the magnitude and spectrum of ground motion acceleration. The magnification on peak acceleration is bigger, however, due to the nonlinear deformation of the soil. The magnification is reduced nonlinearly with the increase of input ground motion; the spectrum is broadened and the characteristic period elongated on the soft soil site.

  17. Effects of aging on figure-ground perception: Convexity context effects and competition resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Jordan W; Bennett, Patrick J; Peterson, Mary A; Sekuler, Allison B

    2017-02-01

    We examined age-related differences in figure-ground perception by exploring the effect of age on Convexity Context Effects (CCE; Peterson & Salvagio, 2008). Experiment 1, using Peterson and Salvagio's procedure and black and white stimuli consisting of 2 to 8 alternating concave and convex regions, established that older adults exhibited reduced CCEs compared to younger adults. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrated that this age difference was found at various stimulus durations and sizes. Experiment 4 compared CCEs obtained with achromatic stimuli, in which the alternating convex and concave regions were each all black or all white, and chromatic stimuli in which the concave regions were homogeneous in color but the convex regions varied in color. We found that the difference between CCEs measured with achromatic and colored stimuli was larger in older than in younger adults. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the senescent visual system is less able to resolve the competition among various perceptual interpretations of the figure-ground relations among stimulus regions.

  18. Modeling the effect of reflective calf hutch covers on reducing heat loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binion, W. R.; Friend, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    This study determined if a reflective film could theoretically be useful in moderating the rate of heat loss from calves housed in polyethylene hutches during cold weather. An engineering approach was used in which rate of heat loss was modeled using 38-l steel drums filled with body temperature water and covered by fresh calf hide. The reflective film (cover) consisted of aluminized 0.0635 mm low-density olive color polyethylene. The non-reflective olive side was sprayed with flat black paint. Covers were 1.8 × 3 m with the aluminized side facing the hutch. Two of four hutches were either uncovered or had covers across the top and sides. During the night, (mean temperature ± SE -13.6 ± 0.29 °C), the rate of temperature loss was -0.21 °C per 5-min interval over 28 temperature readings in the covered and -0.25 °C in the uncovered ( R 2 = 0.99). During the daytime (mean ± SE 14.3 ± 0.52 °C), rate of heat loss was -0.15 °C per 5-min interval over 33 temperature readings in the covered and -0.11 °C in the uncovered ( R 2 = 0.99). Reflective film reduced the rate of heat loss during cold nights, but when the sun was shining on the hutches during midday, the uncovered hutches warmed up more and, hence, reduced the rate of heat loss when compared to the covered. Further research is needed on the orientation of hutches in relationship to the sun and with live calves because calves would be able to move into the sun during cold sunny days.

  19. Adding structure to land cover - using fractional cover to study animal habitat use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevanda, Mirjana; Horning, Ned; Reineking, Bjoern; Heurich, Marco; Wegmann, Martin; Mueller, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Linking animal movements to landscape features is critical to identify factors that shape the spatial behaviour of animals. Habitat selection is led by behavioural decisions and is shaped by the environment, therefore the landscape is crucial for the analysis. Land cover classification based on ground survey and remote sensing data sets are an established approach to define landscapes for habitat selection analysis. We investigate an approach for analysing habitat use using continuous land cover information and spatial metrics. This approach uses a continuous representation of the landscape using percentage cover of a chosen land cover type instead of discrete classes. This approach, fractional cover, captures spatial heterogeneity within classes and is therefore capable to provide a more distinct representation of the landscape. The variation in home range sizes is analysed using fractional cover and spatial metrics in conjunction with mixed effect models on red deer position data in the Bohemian Forest, compared over multiple spatio-temporal scales. We analysed forest fractional cover and a texture metric within each home range showing that variance of fractional cover values and texture explain much of variation in home range sizes. The results show a hump-shaped relationship, leading to smaller home ranges when forest fractional cover is very homogeneous or highly heterogeneous, while intermediate stages lead to larger home ranges. The application of continuous land cover information in conjunction with spatial metrics proved to be valuable for the explanation of home-range sizes of red deer.

  20. Effects of Variations in East Asian Snow Cover on Modulating Atmospheric Circulation over the North Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Martyn P.; Serreze, Mark C.

    2000-10-01

    At least four different modeling studies indicate that variability in snow cover over Asia may modulate atmospheric circulation over the North Pacific Ocean during winter. Here, satellite data on snow extent for east Asia for 1971-95 along with atmospheric fields from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis are used to examine whether the circulation signals seen in model results are actually observed in nature. Anomalies in snow extent over east Asia exhibit a distinct lack of persistence. This suggests that understanding the effects of east Asian snow cover is more germane for short- to medium-range weather forecasting applications than for problems on longer timescales. While it is impossible to attribute cause and effect in the empirical study, analyses of composite fields demonstrate relationships between snow cover extremes and atmospheric circulation downstream remarkably similar to those identified in model results. Positive snow cover extremes in midwinter are associated with a small decrease in air temperatures over the transient snow regions, a stronger east Asian jet, and negative geopotential height anomalies over the North Pacific Ocean. Opposing responses are observed for negative snow cover extremes. Diagnosis of storm track feedbacks shows that the action of high-frequency eddies does not reinforce circulation anomalies in positive snow cover extremes. However, in negative snow cover extremes, there are significant decreases in high-frequency eddy activity over the central North Pacific Ocean, and a corresponding decrease in the mean cyclonic effect of these eddies on the geopotential tendency, contributing to observed positive height anomalies over the North Pacific Ocean. The circulation signals over the North Pacific Ocean are much more pronounced in midwinter (January-February) than in the transitional seasons (November-December and March-April).

  1. Effects of Ground Motion Input on the Derived Fragility Functions: Case study of 2010 Haiti Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancilar, Ufuk; Harmandar, Ebru; Çakti, Eser

    2014-05-01

    Empirical fragility functions are derived by statistical processing of the data on: i) Damaged and undamaged buildings, and ii) Ground motion intensity values at the buildings' locations. This study investigates effects of different ground motion inputs on the derived fragility functions. The previously constructed fragility curves (Hancilar et al. 2013), which rely on specific shaking intensity maps published by the USGS after the 2010 Haiti Earthquake, are compared with the fragility functions computed in the present study. Building data come from field surveys of 6,347 buildings that are grouped with respect to structural material type and number of stories. For damage assessment, the European Macroseismic Scale (EMS-98) damage grades are adopted. The simplest way to account for the variability in ground motion input could have been achieved by employing different ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and their standard variations. However, in this work, we prefer to rely on stochastically simulated ground motions of the Haiti earthquake. We employ five different source models available in the literature and calculate the resulting strong ground motion in time domain. In our simulations we also consider the local site effects by published studies on NEHRP site classes and micro-zoning maps of the city of Port-au-Prince. We estimate the regional distributions from the waveforms simulated at the same coordinates that we have damage information from. The estimated spatial distributions of peak ground accelerations and velocities, PGA and PGV respectively, are then used as input to fragility computations. The results show that changing the ground motion input causes significant variability in the resulting fragility functions.

  2. Cover Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuning; Ruben; Lehn; Renz; Garcia; Ksenofontov; Gütlich; Wegelius; Rissanen

    2000-07-17

    The cover picture shows how both, fine arts and science, avail themselves of a system of intertwined symbolic and iconic languages. They make use of a common set of abstracted signs to report on their results. Thus, already in 1925, Wassily Kandinsky painted a masterpiece (bottom), which now, 75 years later, might be regarded as a blueprint for a scientific project. In his painting, Kandinsky pictured a grid-shaped sign that resembles in effect an actual molecular switch. Apparently following an enigmatic protocol, the groups of Lehn and Gütlich (see p. 2504 ff. for more details) constructed a grid-type inorganic architecture that operates as a three-level magnetic switch (center) triggered by three external perturbations (p, T, hnu). The switching principle is based on the spin-crossover phenomenon of Fe(II) ions and can be monitored by Mössbauer spectroscopy (left) and magnetic measurements (rear). Maybe not by chance, the English translation of the title of the painting "signs" is a homonym of "science", since both presented works are a product of the insatiable curiosity of man and his untiring desire to recognize his existence.

  3. Study on the effect of ground motion direction on the response of engineering structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Menghan; Fan, Feng; Sun, Baitao; Zhi, Xudong

    2016-12-01

    Due to the randomness of earthquake wave magnitude and direction, and the uncertain direction of strong axis and weak axis in the construction of engineering structures, the effect of the direction of ground motion on a structure are studied herein. Ground motion records usually contain three vertical ground motion data, which are obtained by sensors arranged in accordance with the EW (East -West) direction, NS (South- North) direction and perpendicular to the surface ( z) direction, referring to the construction standard of seismic stations. The seismic records in the EW and NS directions are converted to Cartesian coordinates in accordance with the rotation of θ = 0°-180°, and consequently, a countless group of new ground motion time histories are obtained. Then, the characteristics of the ground motion time history and response spectrum of each group were studied, resulting in the following observations: (1) the peak and phase of ground motion are changed with the rotation of direction θ, so that the direction θ of the maximum peak ground motion can be determined; (2) response spectrum values of each group of ground motions change along with the direction θ, and their peak, predominant period and declining curve are also different as the changes occur; then, the angle θ in the direction of the maximum peak value or the widest predominant period can be determined; and (3) the seismic response of structures with different directions of ground motion inputs has been analyzed under the same earthquake record, and the results show the difference. For some ground motion records, such as the Taft seismic wave, these differences are significant. Next, the Lushan middle school gymnasium structure was analyzed and the calculation was checked using the proposed method, where the internal force of the upper space truss varied from 25% to 28%. The research results presented herein can be used for reference in choosing the ground motion when checking the actual damage

  4. The effect of using a geotextile in a monolithic (evapotranspiration) alternative landfill cover on the resulting water balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianlei; Yuen, Samuel T S; Fourie, Andy B

    2010-11-01

    This paper examines the potential effects of a geotextile layer used in a lysimeter pan experiment conducted in a monolithic (evapotranspiration) soil cover trial on its resulting water balance performance. The geotextile was added to the base of the lysimeter to serve as a plant root barrier in order to delineate the root zone depth. Both laboratory data and numerical modelling results indicated that the geotextile creates a capillary barrier under certain conditions and retains more water in the soil above the soil/geotextile interface than occurs without a geotextile. The numerical modelling results also suggested that the water balance of the soil cover could be affected by an increase in plant transpiration taking up this extra water retained above the soil/geotextile interface. This finding has a practical implication on the full-scale monolithic cover design, as the absence of the geotextile in the full-scale cover may affect the associated water balance and hence cover performance. Proper consideration is therefore required to assess the final monolithic cover water balance performance if its design is based on the lysimeter results.

  5. Effects of rainfall intensity and intermittency on woody vegetation cover and deep soil moisture in dryland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ding-Hai; Li, Xin-Rong; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Chen, Yong-Le

    2016-12-01

    Identifying the relationship between the stochastic daily rainfall regime and the dynamics of plants and soil moisture is fundamental for the sustainable management of dryland ecosystems in a context of global climate change. An eco-hydrological model that couples the dynamics of woody vegetation cover and deep soil moisture (typically with a depth interval of 30-150 cm) was used to investigate the effect of stochastic intensity and the intermittency of precipitation on soil moisture in this deep interval, which affects woody vegetation cover. Our results suggest that the precipitation intensity and intermittency play an important role in the dynamics of wood vegetation cover and deep soil moisture. In arid and semiarid regions, as the annual precipitation increased, the rate of woody vegetation cover increased as a power-law function, and the deep soil moisture increased exponentially. For a given annual rainfall, there were positive correlations between the rainfall intensity (or rainfall intermittency) and both the woody vegetation cover and deep soil moisture. The positive correlations between wood vegetation cover and both rainfall intensity and intermittency may decrease with increases in the precipitation intensity or precipitation intermittency. The positive correlations between deep soil moisture and both rainfall intensity and rainfall intermittency increase as the precipitation intensity or precipitation intermittency increases. Moreover, these positive correlations may increase with increases in the mean annual rainfall. Our results emphasize the importance of daily precipitation variations in controlling the responses of woody vegetation cover and deep soil moisture to climate variations in arid and semiarid regions. Our model can aid the understanding of rainfall processes and indicates that increases in rainfall intensity or rainfall intermittency may lead to an increase in woody vegetation cover and deep soil moisture given an invariable annual

  6. The effect of leaf litter cover on surface runoff and soil erosion in Northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    Full Text Available The role of leaf litter in hydrological processes and soil erosion of forest ecosystems is poorly understood. A field experiment was conducted under simulated rainfall in runoff plots with a slope of 10%. Two common types of litter in North China (from Quercus variabilis, representing broadleaf litter, and Pinus tabulaeformis, representing needle leaf litter, four amounts of litter, and five rainfall intensities were tested. Results revealed that the litter reduced runoff and delayed the beginning of runoff, but significantly reduced soil loss (p<0.05. Average runoff yield was 29.5% and 31.3% less than bare-soil plot, and for Q. variabilis and P. tabulaeformis, respectively, and average sediment yield was 85.1% and 79.9% lower. Rainfall intensity significantly affected runoff (R = 0.99, p<0.05, and the efficiency in runoff reduction by litter decreased considerably. Runoff yield and the runoff coefficient increased dramatically by 72.9 and 5.4 times, respectively. The period of time before runoff appeared decreased approximately 96.7% when rainfall intensity increased from 5.7 to 75.6 mm h-1. Broadleaf and needle leaf litter showed similarly relevant effects on runoff and soil erosion control, since no significant differences (p≤0.05 were observed in runoff and sediment variables between two litter-covered plots. In contrast, litter mass was probably not a main factor in determining runoff and sediment because a significant correlation was found only with sediment in Q. variabilis litter plot. Finally, runoff yield was significantly correlated (p<0.05 with sediment yield. These results suggest that the protective role of leaf litter in runoff and erosion processes was crucial, and both rainfall intensity and litter characteristics had an impact on these processes.

  7. The effect of surface cover on infiltration rate in steep forest plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, M.; Onda, Y.; Kato, H.; Ito, S.; Mizugaki, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Japanese cypress (Hinoki; Chamaecyparis obtusa) is a major commercial tree species in Japan, and without thinning of high-density stands, canopy closure prevents development of understory vegetation. Therefore there is a concern for overlandflow and sediment yield due to infiltration rate lowering from steep hillslopes of Japanese cypress plantation. We developed a light-weight rainfall simulator based on the design of Meyer and Harmon (1979). A flat fan Veejet 80150 spraying nozzle (Spraying systems Co., USA) is mounted on the manifold at 2.13 m high from the plot surface. The nozzle oscillates so that the spray fans swept across the targeting 1m x 1m plot. The Veejet 80150 spraying nozzle produces large raindrops larger than 2 mm in diameter, and can simulate the high raindrop kinetic energy of natural storm. A targeted rainfall rate is 180 mm/h. Total 25 sprinkling experiments have been conducted on 35-degree hillslopes with varying surface cover. We obtained the minimum infiltration rate of 14 mm/h where the surface cover is very little. The infiltration rates were plotted against the total understory vegetation and dry weight of total surface cover including litter. The infiltration rate increased with the increasing total surface cover, and higher regression coefficient is obtained for the case of the total surface cover. These results will contribute to the future modeling studies of overlandflow occurrences for the catchment scales.

  8. Benthic Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic cover (habitat) maps are derived from aerial imagery, underwater photos, acoustic surveys, and data gathered from sediment samples. Shallow to moderate-depth...

  9. The effect of a thin weak layer covering a basalt block on the impact cratering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Koji; Arakawa, Masahiko; Okamoto, Chisato; Hasegawa, Sunao; Yasui, Minami

    2012-04-01

    To clarify the effect of a surface regolith layer on the formation of craters in bedrock, we conducted impact-cratering experiments on two-layered targets composed of a basalt block covered with a mortar layer. A nylon projectile was impacted on the targets at velocities of 2 and 4 km s-1, and we investigated the crater size formed on the basalt. The crater size decreased with increased mortar thickness and decreased projectile mass and impact velocity. The normalized crater volume, πV, of all the data was successfully scaled by the following exponential equation with a reduction length λ0: π=b0πY-b1exp(-λ/λ0), where λ is the normalized thickness T/Lp, T and Lp are the mortar thickness and the projectile length, respectively, b0 and b1 are fitted parameters obtained for a homogeneous basalt target, 10-2.7±0.7 and -1.4 ± 0.3, respectively, and λ0 is obtained to be 0.38 ± 0.03. This empirical equation showing the effect of the mortar layer was physically explained by an improved non-dimensional scaling parameter, πY∗, defined by πY∗=Y/(ρup2), where up was the particle velocity of the mortar layer at the boundary between the mortar and the basalt. We performed the impact experiments to obtain the attenuation rate of the particle velocity in the mortar layer and derived the empirical equation of {u}/{v}=0.50exp-{λ}/{1.03}, where vi is the impact velocity of the projectile. We propose a simple model for the crater formation on the basalt block that the surface mortar layer with the impact velocity of up collides on the surface of the basalt block, and we confirmed that this model could reproduce our empirical equation showing the effect of the surface layer on the crater volume of basalt.

  10. Estimating photosynthetic vegetation, non-photosynthetic vegetation and bare soil fractions using Landsat and MODIS data: Effects of site heterogeneity, soil properties and land cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerschman, J. P.; Scarth, P.; McVicar, T.; Malthus, T. J.; Stewart, J.; Rickards, J.; Trevithick, R.; Renzullo, L. J.

    2013-12-01

    Vegetation fractional cover is a key indicator for land management monitoring, both in pastoral and agricultural settings. Maintaining adequate vegetation cover protects the soil from the effects of water and wind erosion and also ensures that carbon is returned to soil through decomposition. Monitoring vegetation fractional cover across large areas and continuously in time needs good remote sensing techniques underpinned by high quality ground data to calibrate and validate algorithms. In this study we used Landsat and MODIS reflectance data together with field measurements from 1476 observations across Australia to produce estimates of vegetation fractional cover using a linear unmixing technique. Specifically, we aimed at separating fractions of photosynthetic vegetation (PV), non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) and bare soil (B). We used Landsat reflectance averaged over a 3x3 pixel window representing the area actually measured on the ground and also a 'degraded' Landsat reflectance 40x40 pixel window to simulate the effect of a coarser sensor. Using these two Landsat reflectances we quantified the heterogeneity of each site. We used data from two MODIS-derived reflectance products: the Nadir BRDF-Adjusted surface Reflectance product (MCD43A4) and the MODIS 8-day surface reflectance (MOD09A1). We derived endmembers from the data and estimated fractional cover using a linear unmixing technique. Log transforms and band interaction terms were added to account for non-linearities in the spectral mixing. For each reflectance source we investigated if the residuals were correlated with site heterogeneity, soil colour, soil moisture and land cover type. As expected, the best model was obtained when Landsat data for a small region around each site was used. We obtained root mean square error (RMSE) values of 0.134, 0.175 and 0.153 for PV, NPV and B respectively. When we degraded the Landsat data to an area of ~1 km2 around each site the model performance decreased to

  11. Effects Of Land Cover Change On The Hydrologic Regime Of Kabompo River Basin, Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampata, J. M.; Rientjes, T. H. M.; Timmermans, J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past decades, the Kabompo River Basin in Zambia is affected by deforestation and land degradation as a consequence of intensified agriculture and mining. Changes presumably have affected the hydrological catchment behaviour and related seasonal flow regimes. Impact assessments are unknown for the basin. In this study multi-decadal time series of rainfall and stream flow were evaluated by trend analysis, change point detection methods and analysis on high and low flow exceedance probabilities. Results are combined with satellite based land cover observations for 1984, 1994, 2001 and 2009. Unsupervised classification of the Landsat images indicate pronounced land cover changes. Preliminary results of this study show that i) precipitation time series are not directly affected by climate change and ii) changes in stream flow can be linked to changes in land cover.

  12. Effect of a Terminated Cover Crop and Aldicarb on Cotton Yield and Meloidogyne incognita Population Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, T A; Leser, J F; Keeling, J W; Mullinix, B

    2008-06-01

    Terminated small grain cover crops are valuable in light textured soils to reduce wind and rain erosion and for protection of young cotton seedlings. A three-year study was conducted to determine the impact of terminated small grain winter cover crops, which are hosts for Meloidogyne incognita, on cotton yield, root galling and nematode midseason population density. The small plot test consisted of the cover treatment as the main plots (winter fallow, oats, rye and wheat) and rate of aldicarb applied in-furrow at-plant (0, 0.59 and 0.84 kg a.i./ha) as subplots in a split-plot design with eight replications, arranged in a randomized complete block design. Roots of 10 cotton plants per plot were examined at approximately 35 days after planting. Root galling was affected by aldicarb rate (9.1, 3.8 and 3.4 galls/root system for 0, 0.59 and 0.84 kg aldicarb/ha), but not by cover crop. Soil samples were collected in mid-July and assayed for nematodes. The winter fallow plots had a lower density of M. incognita second-stage juveniles (J2) (transformed to Log(10) (J2 + 1)/500 cm(3) soil) than any of the cover crops (0.88, 1.58, 1.67 and 1.75 Log(10)(J2 + 1)/500 cm(3) soil for winter fallow, oats, rye and wheat, respectively). There were also fewer M. incognita eggs at midseason in the winter fallow (3,512, 7,953, 8,262 and 11,392 eggs/500 cm(3) soil for winter fallow, oats, rye and wheat, respectively). Yield (kg lint per ha) was increased by application of aldicarb (1,544, 1,710 and 1,697 for 0, 0.59 and 0.84 kg aldicarb/ha), but not by any cover crop treatments. These results were consistent over three years. The soil temperature at 15 cm depth, from when soils reached 18 degrees C to termination of the grass cover crop, averaged 9,588, 7,274 and 1,639 centigrade hours (with a minimum threshold of 10 degrees C), in 2005, 2006 and 2007, respectively. Under these conditions, potential reproduction of M. incognita on the cover crop did not result in a yield penalty.

  13. Effect of Covered Metallic Stents Compared With Plastic Stents on Benign Biliary Stricture Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, Gregory A.; Slivka, Adam; Tarnasky, Paul; Mullady, Daniel K.; Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Elta, Grace; Fogel, Evan; Lehman, Glen; McHenry, Lee; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Menon, Shyam; Siddiqui, Uzma D.; Watkins, James; Lynch, Sheryl; Denski, Cheryl; Xu, Huiping; Sherman, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    null hypothesis that cSEMS is less effective than plastic stents was rejected. The mean number of ERCPs to achieve resolution was lower for cSEMS (2.14) vs plastic (3.24; mean difference, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.46; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among patients with benign biliary strictures and a bile duct diameter 6 mm or more in whom the covered metallic stent would not overlap the cystic duct, cSEMS were not inferior to multiple plastic stents after 12 months in achieving stricture resolution. Metallic stents should be considered an appropriate option in patients such as these. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01221311 PMID:27002446

  14. Near-fault directivity pulse-like ground motion effect on high-speed railway bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈令坤; 张楠; 蒋丽忠; 曾志平; 陈格威; 国巍

    2014-01-01

    The vehicle-track-bridge (VTB) element was used to investigate how a high-speed railway bridge reacted when it was subjected to near-fault directivity pulse-like ground motions. Based on the PEER NAG Strong Ground Motion Database, the spatial analysis model of a vehicle-bridge system was developed, the VTB element was derived to simulate the interaction of train and bridge, and the elasto-plastic seismic responses of the bridge were calculated. The calculation results show that girder and pier top displacement, and bending moment of the pier base increase subjected to near-fault directivity pulse-like ground motion compared to far-field earthquakes, and the greater deformation responses in near-fault shaking are associated with fewer reversed cycles of loading. The hysteretic characteristics of the pier subjected to a near-fault directivity pulse-like earthquake should be explicitly expressed as the bending moment-rotation relationship of the pier base, which is characterized by the centrally strengthened hysteretic cycles at some point of the loading time-history curve. The results show that there is an amplification of the vertical deflection in the girder’s mid-span owing to the high vertical ground motion. In light of these findings, the effect of the vertical ground motion should be used to adjust the unconservative amplification constant 2/3 of the vertical-to-horizontal peak ground motion ratio in the seismic design of bridge.

  15. Bonding effectiveness of different adhesion approaches to unground versus ground primary tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knirsch, M S; Bonifácio, C C; Shimaoka, A M; Andrade, A P; Carvalho, R C R

    2009-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the bonding effectiveness of self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesive systems in on intact and ground primary tooth enamel. Sixty primary incisors were divided into 6 groups according to the adhesive system (etch-and-rinse - Adper Single Bond 2 - SB, 2 steps self-etch -Clearfil SE Bond - SE, and 1 step self-etch - One Up Bond F Plus OBF) and to the substrate (ground or intact enamel): G1-SB/intact enamel; G2-SE/intact enamel; G3- OBF/intact enamel; G4-SB/ground enamel; G5- SE/ground enamel and G6-OBF/ground enamel. Microshear bond test specimens were prepared with microhybrid composite and after 24h of water storage the microshear test was performed. Data were submitted to statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (penamel characteristics (ground or intact) only when SE was used a statistically significant difference was found, as G2 (21.12+/-4.52) was statistically lower than G5 (33.29+/-5.44). Among the intact enamel groups, SB (26.11+/-7.56) was statistically superior to SE (21.12+/-4.52) and OBF (17.01+/-3.96). However, when comparisons were made among groups of ground enamel, SE (33.29+/-5.44) was significantly higher than SB (26.35+/-8.18) and OBF (17.52+/-3.46). The two-step self-etch adhesive system is a reliable alternative to etch and rinse adhesive systems on both ground and intact primary enamel.

  16. Ground effect on the aerodynamics of a two-dimensional oscillating airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Lua, K. B.; Lim, T. T.; Yeo, K. S.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports results of an experimental investigation into ground effect on the aerodynamics of a two-dimensional elliptic airfoil undergoing simple harmonic translation and rotational motion. Ground clearance ( D) ranging from 1 c to 5 c (where c is the airfoil chord length) was investigated for three rotational amplitudes ( α m) of 30°, 45° and 60° (which respectively translate to mid-stroke angle of attack of 60°, 45° and 30°). For the lowest rotational amplitude of 30°, results show that an airfoil approaching a ground plane experiences a gradual decrease in cycle-averaged lift and drag coefficients until it reaches D ≈ 2.0 c, below which they increase rapidly. Corresponding DPIV measurement indicates that the initial force reduction is associated with the formation of a weaker leading edge vortex and the subsequent force increase below D ≈ 2.0 c may be attributed to stronger wake capture effect. Furthermore, an airfoil oscillating at higher amplitude lessens the initial force reduction when approaching the ground and this subsequently leads to lift distribution that bears striking resemblance to the ground effect on a conventional fixed wing in steady translation.

  17. Effects of ascorbic acid and antioxidants on color, lipid oxidation and volatiles of irradiated ground beef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, D. U.; Nam, K. C.

    2004-09-01

    Beef loins with 3 different aging times after slaughter were ground, added with none, 0.1% ascorbic acid, 0.01% sesamol+0.01% α-tocopherol, or 0.1% ascorbic acid+0.01% sesamol+0.01% tocopherol. The meats were packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, irradiated at 2.5 kGy, and color, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), lipid oxidation and volatile profiles were determined. Irradiation decreased the redness of ground beef, and visible color of beef changed from a bright red to a green/brown depending on the age of meat. Addition of ascorbic acid prevented color changes in irradiated beef, and the effect of ascorbic acid became greater as the age of meat or storage time after irradiation increased. The ground beef added with ascorbic acid had lower ORP than control, and the low ORP of meat helped maintaining the heme pigments in reduced form. During aerobic storage, S-volatiles disappeared while volatile aldehydes significantly increased in irradiated beef. Addition of ascorbic acid at 0.1% or sesamol+α-tocopherol at each 0.01% level to ground beef prior to irradiation were effective in reducing lipid oxidation and S-volatiles. As storage time increased, however, the antioxidant effect of sesamol+tocopherol in irradiated ground beef was superior to that of ascorbic acid.

  18. Effects of ascorbic acid and antioxidants on color, lipid oxidation and volatiles of irradiated ground beef

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, D.U. E-mail: duahn@iastate.edu; Nam, K.C

    2004-10-01

    Beef loins with 3 different aging times after slaughter were ground, added with none, 0.1% ascorbic acid, 0.01% sesamol+0.01% {alpha}-tocopherol, or 0.1% ascorbic acid+0.01% sesamol+0.01% tocopherol. The meats were packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, irradiated at 2.5 kGy, and color, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), lipid oxidation and volatile profiles were determined. Irradiation decreased the redness of ground beef, and visible color of beef changed from a bright red to a green/brown depending on the age of meat. Addition of ascorbic acid prevented color changes in irradiated beef, and the effect of ascorbic acid became greater as the age of meat or storage time after irradiation increased. The ground beef added with ascorbic acid had lower ORP than control, and the low ORP of meat helped maintaining the heme pigments in reduced form. During aerobic storage, S-volatiles disappeared while volatile aldehydes significantly increased in irradiated beef. Addition of ascorbic acid at 0.1% or sesamol+{alpha}-tocopherol at each 0.01% level to ground beef prior to irradiation were effective in reducing lipid oxidation and S-volatiles. As storage time increased, however, the antioxidant effect of sesamol+tocopherol in irradiated ground beef was superior to that of ascorbic acid.

  19. Soil water repellency and ground cover effects on infiltration in response to prescribed burning of steeply-sloped sagebrush hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangeland managers and scientists are in need of predictive tools to accurately simulate post-fire hydrologic responses and provide hydrologic risk assessment. Rangeland hydrologic modeling has advanced in recent years; however, model advancements have largely been associated with data from gently ...

  20. The effects of different soil cover management practices on plant biodiversity and soil properties in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzaric, Suzana; Aly, Adel; Ladisa, Gaetano; Calabrese, Generosa

    2014-05-01

    The effects of different soil cover management practices on plant biodiversity and soil properties in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards Madzaric S., Aly A., Ladisa G. and Calabrese G. The loss of natural plant cover due to the inappropriate soil cover management is often a decisive factor for soil degradation in Mediterranean area. This accompanied with typical climate, characterized by cool, wet winters and hot and dry summers leads to soil erosion and loss of productivity. Due to simplification of agricultural practice and to the attempt to decrease cost of production, keeping soil bare is a widespread agricultural practice in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards (AOOs). The consequences of this are degradation of soil quality and reduction of plant biodiversity. In last year's some alternative practices are proposed in order to protect soil and biodiversity. One of these practices is the "grassing" i.e. covering the soil by selected autochthonous plant species. Objectives of our study are: (1) to evaluate impact of different soil cover management practices on soil properties and plant biodiversity in AOOs and (2) to define a minimum indicators' set (Minimum Data Set - MDS) to evaluate the effectiveness of different agricultural practices in environmental performance of AOOs. A comparison was carried on considering two management systems (conventional vs. organic) and three agricultural practices: conventional with bare soil (CON), organic with soil covered by selected autochthonous species (MIX) and organic left to the native vegetation (NAT). In general a clear positive influence of organic management system was recognized. Some soil quality indicators (physical, chemical and biological) showed responsiveness in describing the effects of management system and agricultural practices on soil properties. The both approaches with vegetation cover on the soil surface (either sowing of mixture or soil left to the natural plant cover) performed better than

  1. Longitudinal static stability requirements for wing in ground effect vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhigang; Collu, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    The issue of the longitudinal stability of a WIG vehicle has been a very critical design factor since the first experimental WIG vehicle has been built. A series of studies had been performed and focused on the longitudinal stability analysis. However, most studies focused on the longitudinal stability of WIG vehicle in cruise phase, and less is available on the longitudinal static stability requirement of WIG vehicle when hydrodynamics are considered: WIG vehicle usually take off from water. The present work focuses on stability requirement for longitudinal motion from taking off to landing. The model of dynamics for a WIG vehicle was developed taking into account the aerodynamic, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces, and then was analyzed. Following with the longitudinal static stability analysis, effect of hydrofoil was discussed. Locations of CG, aerodynamic center in pitch, aerodynamic center in height and hydrodynamic center in heave were illustrated for a stabilized WIG vehicle. The present work will further improve the longitudinal static stability theory for WIG vehicle.

  2. Longitudinal static stability requirements for wing in ground effect vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the longitudinal stability of a WIG vehicle has been a very critical design factor since the first experimental WIG vehicle has been built. A series of studies had been performed and focused on the longitudinal stability analysis. However, most studies focused on the longitudinal stability of WIG vehicle in cruise phase, and less is available on the longitudinal static stability requirement of WIG vehicle when hydrodynamics are considered: WIG vehicle usually take off from water. The present work focuses on stability requirement for longitudinal motion from taking off to landing. The model of dynamics for a WIG vehicle was developed taking into account the aerodynamic, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces, and then was analyzed. Following with the longitudinal static stability analysis, effect of hydrofoil was discussed. Locations of CG, aerodynamic center in pitch, aerodynamic center in height and hydrodynamic center in heave were illustrated for a stabilized WIG vehicle. The present work will further improve the longitudinal static stability theory for WIG vehicle.

  3. Longitudinal static stability requirements for wing in ground effect vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the longitudinal stability of a WIG vehicle has been a very critical design factor since the first experimental WIG vehicle has been built. A series of studies had been performed and focused on the longitudinal stability analysis. However, most studies focused on the longitudinal stability of WIG vehicle in cruise phase, and less is available on the longitudinal static stability requirement of WIG vehicle when hydrodynamics are considered: WIG vehicle usually take off from water. The present work focuses on stability requirement for longitudinal motion from taking off to landing. The model of dynamics for a WIG vehicle was developed taking into account the aerodynamic, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces, and then was analyzed. Following with the longitudinal static stability analysis, effect of hydrofoil was discussed. Locations of CG, aerodynamic center in pitch, aerodynamic center in height and hydrodynamic center in heave were illustrated for a stabilized WIG vehicle. The present work will further improve the longitudinal static stability theory for WIG vehicle.

  4. A Digital Ground Distance Relaying Algorithm to Reduce the Effect of Fault Resistance during Single Phase to Ground and Simultaneous Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Razaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an algorithm of fault resistance compensation for digital ground distance relay considering the voltage and current transformer effects. Performance of the conventional ground distance relaying manner is adversely affected by different ground faults and also typical type, called a simultaneous open conductor and ground fault. The proposed scheme by using local-end data only, has shown satisfactory performances under wide variations in fault location, with different values of fault resistance and having positive and negative of power transfer angle. The presented method which has been carried out on the IEEE 14 bus benchmark is executed in PSCAD/EMTDC and MATLAB software, and the results show the accurate performance of mentioned configuration.

  5. Acoustic Characterization of Grass-cover Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    for noise and rever- beration control. Examples of porous media are cements, ceramics, rocks, building insulation , foams and soil. Characterizing the... air is consid- ered as lossless fluid and Eqs. 2.1 and 2.2 can be applied without approximations. However, when acoustic waves travel in narrow...3.1) In Eq. 3.1, P1 and P2 are the acoustic pressures measured at each respective microphone, Pi is the incident pressure, k0 is wave number in air , ω

  6. Cover Crop and Liquid Manure Effects on Soil Quality Indicators in a Corn Silage System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to a lack of surface residue and organic matter inputs, continuous corn (Zea mays L.) silage production is one of the most demanding cropping systems imposed on our soil resources. In this study, our objective was to determine if using cover/companion crops and/or applying low-solids liquid dair...

  7. Multiple microbial activity-based measures reflect effects of cover cropping and tillage on soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural producers, conservation professionals, and policy makers are eager to learn of soil analytical techniques and data that document improvement in soil health by agricultural practices such as no-till and incorporation of cover crops. However, there is considerable uncertainty within the r...

  8. Cover crop effects on soil microbial communities and enzyme activity in semiarid agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare a fallow-winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) rotation to several cover crop-winter wheat rotations under dryland and irrigated conditions in the semiarid US High Plains. We carried out a study that included two sites (Sidney, NE, and Akron, CO), and three s...

  9. Effects of organic fertilization and cover crops on organic pepper production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The requirement for certified organic vegetable producers to implement a soil-building plan has led to the development of soil fertility systems based on combinations of organic fertilizers and cover crops. In order to determine optimal soil fertility combinations, conventional and organic bell pepp...

  10. Effects of cover crops on the nitrogen fluxes in a silage maize production system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, J.J.; Dijk, van W.; Groot, de W.J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Rye and grass cover crops can potentially intercept residual soil mineral nitrogen (SMN), reduce overwinter leaching, transfer SMN to next growing seasons and reduce the fertilizer need of subsequent crops. These aspects were studied for 6 years in continuous silage maize cv. LG 2080 production syst

  11. Sunn Hemp cover cropping and organic fertilizer effects on the nematode community under temperate growing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantings of sunn hemp as a cover crop have been experimentally shown to improve soil health, reduce plant-parasitic nematodes, and increase nematode-antagonistic microorganisms. However, these studies have been largely conducted in tropical and subtropical regions. To investigate the impacts of sun...

  12. Long-term effects of compost and cover crops on soil phosphorus in two California agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inefficient P use in agriculture results in soil P accumulation and losses to surrounding ecosystems, highlighting the need to reduce external inputs and use them more efficiently. Composts reduce the need for mineral fertilizers by recycling P from wastes at the regional scale, whereas cover crops ...

  13. Effect of cover crops management in aggregate stability of a vineyard in Central Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Colmenero, Marta; Bienes, Ramon; Marques, Maria-Jose

    2010-05-01

    Our research focuses in cover crop treatments used to avoid soil degradation in hillsides. The soil-plant interaction can influence the soil structure. In this study we pay special attention to the soil aggregates in a hillside vineyard (average slope of 14%), under Mediterranean semiarid climatic conditions (average annual temperature 14°C, annual rainfall around 400 mm), in the South East of Madrid located at an altitude of 800 masl. The soil classification according to USDA (2006) is Calcic Haploxeralf. Its particle size yields 58% sand, 18% silt and 24% clay, so that according to USDA classification it is a sandy clay loam soil. The bulk density of the first 10 cm of topsoil is 1.2 g cm-3 and its real density is 2.4 g cm-3. It has low organic matter content: 1.3 ± 0.1% (Walkley and Black, 1934). Three treatments were tested: i) traditional tillage ii) soil covered by Brachypodium distachyon allowing self-sowing, and iii) soil covered by Secale cereale, mown in early spring. In each treatment the aggregate stability was measured. These cover crops were established in a 2m wide strip at the center of the rows. We have collected samples of soil for each treatment along 2 years and we analyzed the aggregates, trying to find changes in their stability. Aggregates of 4 to 4.75 mm diameter were selected by dry sieving. The stability was measured with Drop-test: CND and TDI (Imeson and Vis, 1984). An improvement in the stability of aggregates was observed after two years of cover crop treatment. There are significant differences among the treatments analyzed with Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, being Brachypodium distachyon the treatment with more stable aggregates, it is necessary a mean higher than 8 drops to disintegrate every aggregate completely. Organic carbon was also measured by Loss on Ignition method (Schulte and Hopkins, 1996). This method can lead to an overestimation of the organic matter in soil samples but is considered suitable for aggregates. Again, those

  14. Rye cover crop and gamagrass strip effects on NO3 concentration and load in tile drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, T C; Jaynes, D B; Parkin, T B; Moorman, T B

    2007-01-01

    A significant portion of the NO3 from agricultural fields that contaminates surface waters in the Midwest Corn Belt is transported to streams or rivers by subsurface drainage systems or "tiles." Previous research has shown that N fertilizer management alone is not sufficient for reducing NO3 concentrations in subsurface drainage to acceptable levels; therefore, additional approaches need to be devised. We compared two cropping system modifications for NO3 concentration and load in subsurface drainage water for a no-till corn (Zea mays L.)-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) management system. In one treatment, eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides L.) was grown in permanent 3.05-m-wide strips above the tiles. For the second treatment, a rye (Secale cereale L.) winter cover crop was seeded over the entire plot area each year near harvest and chemically killed before planting the following spring. Twelve 30.5x42.7-m subsurface-drained field plots were established in 1999 with an automated system for measuring tile flow and collecting flow-weighted samples. Both treatments and a control were initiated in 2000 and replicated four times. Full establishment of both treatments did not occur until fall 2001 because of dry conditions. Treatment comparisons were conducted from 2002 through 2005. The rye cover crop treatment significantly reduced subsurface drainage water flow-weighted NO3 concentrations and NO3 loads in all 4 yr. The rye cover crop treatment did not significantly reduce cumulative annual drainage. Averaged over 4 yr, the rye cover crop reduced flow-weighted NO3 concentrations by 59% and loads by 61%. The gamagrass strips did not significantly reduce cumulative drainage, the average annual flow-weighted NO3 concentrations, or cumulative NO3 loads averaged over the 4 yr. Rye winter cover crops grown after corn and soybean have the potential to reduce the NO3 concentrations and loads delivered to surface waters by subsurface drainage systems.

  15. Effects of soil amplification ratio and multiple wave interference for ground motion due to earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhixin; XU Jiren; Ryuji Kubota

    2004-01-01

    Influences on the ground motion simulations by soil amplification effects and multiple seismic wave interferences in the heterogeneous medium are investigated. Detailed velocity structure obtained from the microtremor array survey is adopted in the ground motion simulation. Analyses for amplification ratios of core samples of ten drill holes with 40 m deep in the sedimentary layers show that the soil amplification ratio influences nonlinearly the seismic ground motion. Based on the above analysis results, the ground motion in the heavily damaged zone in the Japanese Kobe earthquake of 1995 is simulated in a digital SH seismic wave model by using the pseudospectral method with the staggered grid RFFT differentiation (SGRFFTD). The simulated results suggest that the heterogeneous velocity structure results in a complicated distribution of the maximum amplitudes of acceleration waveforms with multiple peaks at the surface. Spatial distribution of the maximum amplitudes coincides well with that of collapse ratios of buildings in Kobe. The dual peaks of the collapse ratios away from the earthquake fault coincide well with the double peak amplitudes of simulated seismic acceleration waves also. The cause for the first peak amplitude of the ground motion is attributable to the interference of the secondary surface wave from the bedrock propagating horizontally along the surface sedimentary layer and the body wave from the basin bottom according to analyses of wave snapshots propagating in inhomogeneous structure of the Osaka group layers. The second peak amplitude of the ground motion may be attributive to the interference of the secondary surface wave from the tunneling waves in the shallow sediments and the body wave. It is important for the study on complicated distributions of earthquake damages to investigate influences on the ground motion by soil amplification effects and multiple seismic wave interferences due to the structure. Explorations of the structure to the

  16. The Effects of Cover, Copy, and Compare to Teach Spelling to Middle School Students with Learning Disabilities and OHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Michelle; Hochstetler, Elizabeth; McLaughlin, T. F.; Derby, K. Mark

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of cover, copy, and compare (CCC) on the spelling performance of three male middle school students. Two of the participants had learning disabilities and the third was health impaired. The study was conducted in a public school resource room in the Pacific Northwest. A multiple-baseline across…

  17. The Effects of Cover, Copy, and Compare to Teach Spelling to Middle School Students with Learning Disabilities and OHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Michelle; Hochstetler, Elizabeth; McLaughlin, T. F.; Derby, K. Mark

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of cover, copy, and compare (CCC) on the spelling performance of three male middle school students. Two of the participants had learning disabilities and the third was health impaired. The study was conducted in a public school resource room in the Pacific Northwest. A multiple-baseline across…

  18. The effects of moon illumination, moon angle, cloud cover, and sky glow on night vision goggle flight performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loro, Stephen Lee

    This study was designed to examine moon illumination, moon angle, cloud cover, sky glow, and Night Vision Goggle (NVG) flight performance to determine possible effects. The research was a causal-comparative design. The sample consisted of 194 Fort Rucker Initial Entry Rotary Wing NVG flight students being observed by 69 NVG Instructor Pilots. The students participated in NVG flight training from September 1992 through January 1993. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Observations were analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance and a Wilcox matched pairs signed-ranks test for difference. Correlations were analyzed using Pearson's r. The analyses results indicated that performance at high moon illumination levels is superior to zero moon illumination, and in most task maneuvers, superior to >0%--50% moon illumination. No differences were found in performance at moon illumination levels above 50%. Moon angle had no effect on night vision goggle flight performance. Cloud cover and sky glow have selective effects on different maneuvers. For most task maneuvers, cloud cover does not affect performance. Overcast cloud cover had a significant effect on seven of the 14 task maneuvers. Sky glow did not affect eight out of 14 task maneuvers at any level of sky glow.

  19. RESOLUTION AND ERROR IN MEASURING LAND-COVER CHANGE: EFFECTS ON ESTIMATING NET CARBON RELEASE FROM MEXICAN TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reliable estimates of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere due to land-use change have become increasingly important. One source of land-use changes estimates comes from comparing multi-date remote sensing imagery, though the effect of land-cover clas...

  20. Effects of River Discharge and Land Use and Land Cover (LULC) on Water Quality Dynamics in Migina Catchment, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uwimana, Brigitte; Dam, van Anne; Gettel, Gretchen; Bigirimana, Bonfils; Irvine, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Agricultural intensification may accelerate the loss of wetlands, increasing the concentrations of nutrients and sediments in downstream water bodies. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of land use and land cover and river discharge on water quality in the Migina catchment,

  1. Effect of Ground Motion Directionality on Fragility Characteristics of a Highway Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Banerjee Basu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to incorporate multidimensional effect of the ground motion in the design and response analysis of structures. The motion trajectory in the corresponding multi-dimensional space results in time variant principal axes of the motion and defies any meaningful definition of directionality of the motion. However, it is desirable to consider the directionality of the ground motion in assessing the seismic damageability of bridges which are one of the most vulnerable components of highway transportation systems. This paper presents a practice-oriented procedure in which the structure can be designed to ensure the safety under single or a pair of independent orthogonal ground motions traveling horizontally with an arbitrary direction to structural axis. This procedure uses nonlinear time history analysis and accounts for the effect of directionality in the form of fragility curves. The word directionality used here is different from “directivity” used in seismology to mean a specific characteristic of seismic fault movement.

  2. Experimental Study on Effects of Ground Roughness on Flow Characteristics of Tornado-Like Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Cao, Shuyang; Pang, Weichiang; Cao, Jinxin

    2017-02-01

    The three-dimensional wind velocity and dynamic pressure for stationary tornado-like vortices that developed over ground of different roughness categories were investigated to clarify the effects of ground roughness. Measurements were performed for various roughness categories and two swirl ratios. Variations of the vertical and horizontal distributions of velocity and pressure with roughness are presented, with the results showing that the tangential, radial, and axial velocity components increase inside the vortex core near the ground under rough surface conditions. Meanwhile, clearly decreased tangential components are found outside the core radius at low elevations. The high axial velocity inside the vortex core over rough ground surface indicates that roughness produces an effect similar to a reduced swirl ratio. In addition, the pressure drop accompanying a tornado is more significant at elevations closer to the ground under rough compared with smooth surface conditions. We show that the variations of the flow characteristics with roughness are dependent on the vortex-generating mechanism, indicating the need for appropriate modelling of tornado-like vortices.

  3. The Effect of Degradation of Ground water Resources on Capital of Pistachio Growers in Kerman Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Mortazavi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Real cost evaluation of water is necessary in agricultural products depending on obtained value by this input. In most areas of world especially in arid and semiarid areas, exist over pumping of ground water because the real value of water is much most than the costs of water supply and the lack of fit management water resources. In this study, using a sample of 110 farmers, water dealing value of over using of groundwater in Rafsanjan pistachio production area were investigated. Analysis and regression methods were used in this regard. The average determined value obtained 24 cents, for each share of water in this region which with over drafting of ground water, and decreasing quality and quantity of water has had significant relationship in the one percent significance level. Finally, for elimination or reduction of ground water degradation and its effects, this paper recommended in addition to reduction of licenses for ground water pumping. Determination of optimal economic water/land ratio in new and old pistachio producing areas is the other proposal of this research for alleviation groundwater over drafting effects. Permission for water conduction between wells and combination of fresh and saline water and also using desalination systems are methods for solving low quality of ground water.

  4. Evaluating the effects of historical land cover change on summertime weather and climate in New Jersey: Land cover and surface energy budget changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichansky, P.S.; Steyaert, L.T.; Walko, R.L.; Waever, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    The 19th-century agrarian landscape of New Jersey (NJ) and the surrounding region has been extensively transformed to the present-day land cover by urbanization, reforestation, and localized areas of deforestation. This study used a mesoscale atmospheric numerical model to investigate the sensitivity of the warm season climate of NJ to these land cover changes. Reconstructed 1880s-era and present-day land cover data sets were used as surface boundary conditions for a set of simulations performed with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Three-member ensembles with historical and present-day land cover were compared to examine the sensitivity of surface air and dew point temperatures, rainfall, and the individual components of the surface energy budget to these land cover changes. Mean temperatures for the present-day landscape were 0.3-0.6??C warmer than for the historical landscape over a considerable portion of NJ and the surrounding region, with daily maximum temperatures at least 1.0??C warmer over some of the highly urbanized locations. Reforested regions, however, were slightly cooler. Dew point temperatures decreased by 0.3-0.6??C, suggesting drier, less humid near-surface air for the present-day landscape. Surface warming was generally associated with repartitioning of net radiation from latent to sensible heat flux, and conversely for cooling. While urbanization was accompanied by strong surface albedo decreases and increases in net shortwave radiation, reforestation and potential changes in forest composition have generally increased albedos and also enhanced landscape heterogeneity. The increased deciduousness of forests may have further reduced net downward longwave radiation. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Effect of grass cover on water and pesticide transport through undisturbed soil columns, comparison with field study (Morcille watershed, Beaujolais)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dousset, S., E-mail: sylvie.dousset@limos.uhp-nancy.f [Nancy-Universite, CNRS, LIMOS, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Thevenot, M. [Universite de Lille 1, CNRS, Geosystemes, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Schrack, D. [INRA-SAD ASTER, 88500 Mirecourt (France); AFSSA, Laboratoire d' Etudes et de Recherches en Hydrologie, 54000 Nancy (France); Gouy, V.; Carluer, N. [UR Milieux Aquatiques, Ecologie et Pollution, Cemagref, 69336 Lyon Cedex (France)

    2010-07-15

    The purpose of this work is to assess the effectiveness of two grass covers (buffer zone and grass-covered inter-row), to reduce pesticide leaching, and subsequently to preserve groundwater quality. Lower amounts of pesticides leached through grass-cover soil columns (2.7-24.3% of the initial amount) than the bare soil columns (8.0-55.1%), in correspondence with their sorption coefficients. Diuron was recovered in higher amounts in leachates (8.9-32.2%) than tebuconazole (2.7-12.9%), in agreement with their sorption coefficients. However, despite having a sorption coefficient similar to that of diuron, more procymidone was recovered in the leachates (10.2-55.1%), probably due to its facilitated transport by dissolved organic matter. Thus even in this very permeable soil, higher organic matter contents associated with grass-cover reduce the amount of pesticide leaching and limit the risk of groundwater contamination by the pesticides. The results of diuron and tebuconazole transfer through undisturbed buffer zone soil columns are in agreement with field observations on the buffer zone. - Grass-covered soils reduce the amount of pesticide leaching, due mainly to their higher organic matter contents, thereby reducing the risk of groundwater contamination.

  6. Effect of partial covering of the visitor viewing area window on positioning and orientation of zoo orangutans: A preference test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Rachel C; Gillespie, Graeme R; Kerswell, Keven J; Butler, Kym L; Hemsworth, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    The window of the visitor viewing area adjacent to an animal platform in an orangutan enclosure was altered to produce three viewing treatments in a randomized controlled experiment. These treatments were window uncovered, left side of the window covered or right side of the window covered. Observations were conducted on the orangutans present on the platform, and on their location (left or right side), and orientation (towards or away from the window) while on the platform. The partial covering of the window had little effect on the proportion of time orangutans spent on the viewing platform, or on the direction they faced when on the platform. When the orangutans were facing towards the window, and the right side was uncovered, irrespective of whether the left side was covered, they spent about three quarters of the time on the right side, suggesting a preference for the right side of the platform. However, when the right side was covered and the left side uncovered, the animals facing towards the window spent only about a quarter of the time on the right side, that is, they spent more time on the uncovered side. The results suggest that the orangutans have a preference to position themselves to face the window of the visitor viewing area.

  7. Upright nanopyramid structured cover glass with light harvesting and self-cleaning effects for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalathas, Amalraj Peter; Alkaisi, Maan M.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the effect of upright nanopyramid (UNP) structured cover glass with light harvesting and self-cleaning functions on the device performance of monocrystalline Si solar cells. The UNP structures were fabricated on the surface of the glass substrate by simple, high throughput and low cost UV nanoimprint lithography, using a Si master mold with inverted nanopyramid (INP) structures. The diffuse transmittance and haze ratio values were significantly increased for UNP patterned glass, especially in the wavelength range 300-600 nm compared to the bare glass; this implies that antireflection and strong light scattering are due to the UNP structures. By replacing a bare cover glass with UNP patterned glass, the power conversion efficiency of the monocrystalline Si solar cell was substantially enhanced by about 10.97%; this is mainly due to the increased short-circuit current density J SC of 32.39 mA cm-2 compared to the reference cell with bare cover glass (i.e. J SC  =  31.60 mA cm-2). In addition, unlike the bare cover glass (i.e. θ CA ~ 36°), the fluorinated UNP structured cover glass exhibited a hydrophobic surface with a water contact angle (θ CA) of ~132° and excellent self-cleaning of dust particles by rolling down water droplets.

  8. The effect of surface cover and soil devastation on infiltration rate in steep forest plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Y.; Hiraoka, M.; Kato, H.; Gomi, T.; Miyata, S.; Mizugaki, S.

    2008-12-01

    The Japanese cypress (Hinoki; Chamaecyparis obtusa) is a major commercial tree species in Japan, and without thinning of high-density stands, canopy closure prevents development of understory vegetation. Therefore there is a concern for overlandflow and sediment yield due to infiltration rate lowering. We developed a light-weight rainfall simulator based on the design of Meyer and Harmon (1979). A flat fan Veejet 80150 spraying nozzle (Spraying systems Co., USA) is mounted on the manifold at 2.13 m high from the plot surface. The nozzle oscillates so that the spray fan sweeps across the targeting 1 m x 1 m plot. The Veejet 80150 spraying nozzle produces large raindrops larger than 2 mm in diameter, and can simulate the high raindrop kinetic energy of natural throughfall. A targeted rainfall rate is 180 mm/h. About 30 sprinkling experiments have been conducted on 35-degree hillslopes with varying surface cover in 5 locations in Japan. We obtained the minimum infiltration rate of 14 mm/h where the surface cover is very little. The infiltration rates were plotted against the total understory vegetation and dry weight of total surface cover including litter. The infiltration rate increased with the increasing total surface cover, and generally higher regression coefficient was found for the case of the total surface cover. In some cases, high infiltration rates were obtained where surface cover is low. Two possible explanations can be made; 1) surface soil (especially fine particles) has been washed away, where soil is mostly composed of gravel and the percentage of fine fraction is low, or 2) because of long-term soil loss by raindrop detachment, remaining soil looks like "ghanging"h between exposed fine root networks of Japanese cypress, where soil bulk density is significantly lower than other site. Therefore the infiltration rate in the devastated Japanese cypress plantations is not only controlled by loss of surface vegetation by low light condition, but soil

  9. The Effect of Plastic Cover on Regulation of Vital Signs in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Cross-over Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Valizadeh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the susceptibility of preterm infants to disturbances of vital signs, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of using plastic covers on regulation of vital signs in preterm neonates.Methods: This randomized, cross-over, clinical trial was carried out on 80 preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The study was conducted in two days (on the second and third days of the infants’ life. In group 1, plastic cover was used during the first day followed by the use of blanket on the second day, while the order was reversed in group 2. Digital thermometer was used to measure the infants’ axillary temperature. Heart rate and oxygen saturation were measured through monitoring. To analyze the data, descriptive (Mean and SE, 95%CI and inferential statistics (repeated measurement and ANCOVA tests were used in SPSS version 13 and MiniTab software.Results: Fourteen infants who were covered with blanket were found to suffer from hypothermia, while no infant with a plastic cover encountered this problem. The percentage of arterial blood oxygen saturation in the group with plastic covers was higher, and as a result, the infants received less oxygen supplements. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in heart rate between the groups.Conclusion: Use of plastic cover during NICU stay prevented hypothermia in premature infants, with the arterial blood oxygen saturation being within the normal limits. Yet, it did not seem to have a significant effect on other vital signs.

  10. Effects of Fucus vesiculosus covering intertidal mussel beds in the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, A.; Reise, K.

    1994-06-01

    The brown alga Fucus vesiculosus forma mytili (Nienburg) Nienhuis covered about 70% of mussel bed ( Mytilus edulis) surface area in the lower intertidal zone of Königshafen, a sheltered sandy bay near the island of Sylt in the North Sea. Mean biomass in dense patches was 584 g ash-free dry weight m-2 in summer. On experimental mussel beds, fucoid cover enhanced mud accumulation and decreased mussel density. The position of mussels underneath algal canopy was mainly endobenthic (87% of mussels with >1/3 of shell sunk into mud). In the absence of fucoids, mussels generated epibenthic garlands (81% of mussels with Fucus vesiculosus on mussel beds in the intertidal Wadden Sea affects mussels and their epibionts negatively, but supports various herbivores and increases overall benthic diversity.

  11. Analysis on effect of surface fault to site ground motion using finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹炳政; 罗奇峰

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic contact theory is applied to simulate the sliding of surface fault. Finite element method is used to analyze the effect of surface fault to site ground motions. Calculated results indicate that amplification effect is obvious in the area near surface fault, especially on the site that is in the downside fault. The results show that the effect of surface fault should be considered when important structure is constructed in the site with surface fault.

  12. Stimulation of methane oxidation potential and effects on vegetation growth by bottom ash addition in a landfill final evapotranspiration cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gil Won; Ho, Adrian; Kim, Pil Joo; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2016-09-01

    The landfilling of municipal solid waste is a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4), contributing up to 20% of total anthropogenic CH4 emissions. The evapotranspiration (ET) cover system, an alternative final cover system in waste landfills, has been considered to be a promising way to mitigate CH4 emissions, as well as to prevent water infiltration using vegetation on landfill cover soils. In our previous studies, bottom ash from coal-fired power plants was selected among several industrial residues (blast furnace slag, bottom ash, construction waste, steel manufacture slag, stone powder sludge, and waste gypsum) as the best additive for ET cover systems, with the highest mechanical performance achieved for a 35% (wtwt(-1)) bottom ash content in soil. In this study, to evaluate the field applicability of bottom ash mixed soil as ET cover, four sets of lysimeters (height 1.2m×width 2m×length 6m) were constructed in 2007, and four different treatments were installed: (i) soil+bottom ash (35% wtwt(-1)) (SB); (ii) soil+compost (2% wtwt(-1), approximately corresponding to 40Mgha(-1) in arable field scale) (SC); (iii) soil+bottom ash+compost (SBC); and (iv) soil only as the control (S). The effects of bottom ash mixing in ET cover soil on CH4 oxidation potential and vegetation growth were evaluated in a pilot ET cover system in the 5th year after installation by pilot experiments using the treatments. Our results showed that soil properties were significantly improved by bottom ash mixing, resulting in higher plant growth. Bottom ash addition significantly increased the CH4 oxidation potential of the ET cover soil, mainly due to improved organic matter and available copper concentration, enhancing methanotrophic abundances in soil amended with bottom ash. Conclusively, bottom ash could be a good alternative as a soil additive in the ET cover system to improve vegetation growth and mitigate CH4 emission impact in the waste landfill system. Copyright © 2016

  13. Analysing the Effects of Different Land Cover Types on Land Surface Temperature Using Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şekertekin, A.; Kutoglu, Ş. H.; Kaya, S.; Marangoz, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring Land Surface Temperature (LST) via remote sensing images is one of the most important contributions to climatology. LST is an important parameter governing the energy balance on the Earth and it also helps us to understand the behavior of urban heat islands. There are lots of algorithms to obtain LST by remote sensing techniques. The most commonly used algorithms are split-window algorithm, temperature/emissivity separation method, mono-window algorithm and single channel method. In this research, mono window algorithm was implemented to Landsat 5 TM image acquired on 28.08.2011. Besides, meteorological data such as humidity and temperature are used in the algorithm. Moreover, high resolution Geoeye-1 and Worldview-2 images acquired on 29.08.2011 and 12.07.2013 respectively were used to investigate the relationships between LST and land cover type. As a result of the analyses, area with vegetation cover has approximately 5 ºC lower temperatures than the city center and arid land., LST values change about 10 ºC in the city center because of different surface properties such as reinforced concrete construction, green zones and sandbank. The temperature around some places in thermal power plant region (ÇATES and ZETES) Çatalağzı, is about 5 ºC higher than city center. Sandbank and agricultural areas have highest temperature due to the land cover structure.

  14. ANALYSING THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT LAND COVER TYPES ON LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE USING SATELLITE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Şekertekin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring Land Surface Temperature (LST via remote sensing images is one of the most important contributions to climatology. LST is an important parameter governing the energy balance on the Earth and it also helps us to understand the behavior of urban heat islands. There are lots of algorithms to obtain LST by remote sensing techniques. The most commonly used algorithms are split-window algorithm, temperature/emissivity separation method, mono-window algorithm and single channel method. In this research, mono window algorithm was implemented to Landsat 5 TM image acquired on 28.08.2011. Besides, meteorological data such as humidity and temperature are used in the algorithm. Moreover, high resolution Geoeye-1 and Worldview-2 images acquired on 29.08.2011 and 12.07.2013 respectively were used to investigate the relationships between LST and land cover type. As a result of the analyses, area with vegetation cover has approximately 5 ºC lower temperatures than the city center and arid land., LST values change about 10 ºC in the city center because of different surface properties such as reinforced concrete construction, green zones and sandbank. The temperature around some places in thermal power plant region (ÇATES and ZETES Çatalağzı, is about 5 ºC higher than city center. Sandbank and agricultural areas have highest temperature due to the land cover structure.

  15. Plant cover effect on Bolson tortoise (Gopherus flavomarginatus Legler 1959, Testudinidae burrow use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Becerra-López

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Bolson tortoise, Gopherus flavomarginatus, occurs within a restricted geographical area in the Mexican Chihuahuan Desert. We analyzed the variation in surface microhabitat with relation to the burrow occupancy for this tortoise at the Mapimí Biosphere Reserve, Mexico. In summer 2010, we monitored burrow activity (active, inactive, or abandoned and measured environmental factors that might influence the burrow’s occupancy by tortoises (air temperature, relative humidity and substrate temperature, both inside and outside the burrow, and the plant cover around it. Discriminant analysis was used to identify the importance of these variables influencing burrow occupancy. Correlation and linear regression analyses were performed to quantify the relation between environmental factors in the sampled burrows. Results. Sixty-one burrows were identified at the Tortugas locality. The first function’s auto-value analysis indicates that this function explains 97.9% of the variation in burrow activity status; high occupancy scores were associated with low substrate temperature inside the burrow. Plant cover was inversely proportional to substrate temperature inside the burrow. These results suggest the importance the density of plants surrounding the tortoise’s burrow as a key factor influencing the burrow microclimate and occupancy by the tortoises. Conclusions. Gopherus flavomarginatus inhabits burrows, in part, based on microhabitat structure, with plant cover being a main factor influencing burrow occupancy. Our findings indicate that human land use and vegetation management are important for conserving Bolson tortoises, and for understanding habitat conditions necessary for the successful establishment of populations elsewhere.

  16. Effects of substrate induced respiration on the stability of bottom ash in landfill cover environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, A; Lovat, E; Persson, K M

    2014-12-01

    The municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash is being increasingly used to construct landfill covers in Sweden. In post-closure, owing to increased cover infiltration, the percolating water can add external organic matter to bottom ash. The addition and subsequent degradation of this external organic matter can affect metal mobility through complexation and change in redox conditions. However, the impacts of such external organic matter addition on bottom ash stability have not been fully evaluated yet. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of external organic matter on bottom ash respiration and metal leaching. The samples of weathered bottom ash were mixed with oven dried and digested wastewater sludge (1%-5% by weight). The aerobic respiration activity (AT4), as well as the leaching of metals, was tested with the help of respiration and batch leaching tests. The respiration and heavy metal leaching increased linearly with the external organic matter addition. Based on the results, it was concluded that the external organic matter addition would negatively affect the quality of landfill cover drainage. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Quantifying the effect of lichen and bryophyte cover on permafrost soil within a global land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porada, Philipp; Ekici, Altug; Beer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation near the surface, such as bryophytes and lichens, has an insulating effect on the soil at high latitudes and it can therefore protect permafrost conditions. Warming due to climate change, however, may change the average surface coverage of bryophytes and lichens. This can result in permafrost thawing associated with a release of soil carbon to the atmosphere, which may lead to a positive feedback on atmospheric CO2. Thus, it is important to predict how the bryophyte and lichen cover at high latitudes will react to environmental change. However, current global land surface models so far contain mostly empirical approaches to represent bryophytes and lichens, which makes it impractical to predict their future state and function. For this reason, we integrate a process-based model of bryophyte and lichen growth into the global land surface model JSBACH. We explicitly represent dynamic thermal properties of the bryophyte and lichen cover and their relation to climate. Subsequently, we compare simulations with and without bryophyte and lichen cover to quantify the insulating effect. We estimate an annual average cooling effect of the bryophyte and lichen cover of 2.7 K on topsoil temperature for the northern high latitudes under current climate. Locally, the cooling may reach up to 5.7 K. Moreover, we show that neglecting dynamic properties of the bryophyte and lichen cover by using a simple, empirical scheme only results in an average cooling of around 0.5 K. This suggests that bryophytes and lichens have a significant impact on soil temperature in high-latitude ecosystems and also that a process-based description of their thermal properties is necessary for a realistic representation of the cooling effect.

  18. Ground Motion Prediction for the Vicinity by Using the Microtremor Site-effect Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. M.; Wen, K. L.; Kuo, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    This study develops a method analyzing the seismograms of a strong-motion station and the microtremor site effects (H/V ratios) around it to predict the ground motion of its vicinity. The Hsinchu Science Park (HSP) in Taiwan was chosen as our study site. The horizontal S-wave seismograms of the TCU017 strong-motion station, which locates at the center of the HSP, were convoluted by the difference of the microtremor H/V ratio between various sites to synthesize the seismograms of several strong-motion stations around the HSP. The comparisons between synthetic and observed seismograms show that this method of ground motion prediction for the vicinity is feasible for far-field earthquakes. However, the seismic source and attenuation effects make this method ineffectual for near-field earthquakes. Because the microtremor H/V ratios at about 200 sites, which are densely distributed in the HSP, were conducted, the seismic ground motion distributions of some historical earthquakes were synthesized by this study. The synthetic ground motion distributions ignore the seismic source and attenuation effects but still show notable variations in the HSP because of the seismic site effects.

  19. Effect of low-temperature aging on the mechanical behavior of ground Y-TZP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, G.K.R.; Amaral, M.; Cesar, P.F.; Bottino, M.C.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Valandro, L.F.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of low-temperature aging on the surface topography, phase transformation, biaxial flexural strength, and structural reliability of a ground Y-TZP ceramic. Disc-shaped specimens were manufactured and divided according to two factors: "grinding" - without grinding

  20. A Grounded Theory Study of Effective Global Leadership Development Strategies: Perspectives from Brazil, India, and Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokkesmoe, Karen Jane

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative, grounded theory study focuses on global leadership and global leadership development strategies from the perspective of people from three developing countries, Brazil, India, and Nigeria. The study explores conceptualizations of global leadership, the skills required to lead effectively in global contexts, and recommended…

  1. Leading Effective Educational Technology in K-12 School Districts: A Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Lara Gillian C.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic grounded theory qualitative study was conducted investigating the process of effectively leading educational technology in New Jersey public K-12 school districts. Data were collected from educational technology district leaders (whether formal or non-formal administrators) and central administrators through a semi-structured online…

  2. Effects of Outdoor School Ground Lessons on Students' Science Process Skills and Scientific Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Kan Lin; Siew, Nyet Moi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of outdoor school ground lessons on Year Five students' science process skills and scientific curiosity. A quasi-experimental design was employed in this study. The participants in the study were divided into two groups, one subjected to the experimental treatment, defined as…

  3. Single Phase-to-Ground Fault Line Identification and Section Location Method for Non-Effectively Grounded Distribution Systems Based on Signal Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Zhencun; WANG Chengshan; CONG Wei; ZHANG Fan

    2008-01-01

    A diagnostic signal current trace detecting based single phase-to-ground fault line identifica- tion and section location method for non-effectively grounded distribution systems is presented in thisi oaper. A special diagnostic signal current is injected into the fault distribution system, and then it is de- tected at the outlet terminals to identify the fault line and at the sectionalizing or branching point along the fault line to locate the fault section. The method has been put into application in actual distribution network and field experience shows that it can identify the fault line and locate the fault section correctly and effectively.

  4. Effect of Passive Pile on 3D Ground Deformation and on Active Pile Response

    OpenAIRE

    Bingxiang Yuan; Rui Chen; Jun Teng; Tao Peng; Zhongwen Feng

    2014-01-01

    Using a series of model tests, this study investigated the effect of a passive pile on 3D ground deformation around a laterally loaded pile and on that laterally loaded pile’s response in sand. The active pile head was subjected to lateral loads, and the passive pile was arranged in front of the active pile. In the model tests, the distance between the two pile centers was set to zero (i.e., a single pile test), 2.5, 4, and 6 times the pile width (B). The 3D ground surface deformations around...

  5. Viscous flowfields induced by three-dimensional lift jets in ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, W. W.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulent flowfields associated with single and multiple jets impinging on a ground plane are relevant to the aerodynamics of VTOL aircraft in ground effect. These flowfields are computed using the Reynolds equations and a two-equation turbulence model to describe an isolated jet and two interacting jets with fountain formation. Coordinate transformations are employed to apply the boundary conditions for the governing equations in the far field, and a third-order-accurate upwind-difference scheme is used to discretize the resulting system. Flowfield properties calculated for these impinging-jet configurations are presented and compared with experimental data.

  6. Effect of ship structure and size on grounding and collision damage distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    2000-01-01

    of the ship have the same probability density distributions regardless of a particular structural design and ship size.The present paper explores analytical methods for assessing the overall effect of structural design on the damage distributions in accidental grounding and collisions. The results...... of a larger relative damage length than that of a smaller ship in grounding damage. On the other hand, the damages to the side structure caused by ship collisions are found to be relatively smaller for large ships.The main conclusion is that the existing IMO damage distributions will severely underestimate...

  7. The anti-obesity effect of natural vanadium-containing Jeju ground water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Joo; Youn, Cha-Kyung; Hyun, Jin Won; You, Ho Jin

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the anti-obesity effects of Jeju ground water containing the vanadium components S1 (8.0 ± 0.9 μg/l) and S3 (26.0 ± 2.09 μg/l) on the differentiation of 3 T3-L1 preadipocytes and obesity in mice that were fed a high-fat diet (HFD). The 3 T3-L1 preadipocyte cells were cultured and differentiated in media consisting of Jeju ground water (S1, S3) or deionized water (DW) containing dexamethasone, isobutylmethylxanthine, and insulin. Oil Red O staining showed that lipid accumulation was attenuated in adipocyte cells treated with Jeju ground water. S3 significantly decreased peroxisome-activated receptor γ and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α mRNA expression levels, which play major roles in the transcriptional control of adipogenesis, compared to DW. Furthermore, mRNA expression levels of targeted genes, such as adipocyte fatty acid, lipoprotein lipase, and leptin, were decreased by S3 treatment compared with the control group. In mice with HFD-induced obesity, Jeju ground water decreased HFD-induced body weight gain and reduced total cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose levels in the plasma compared to control mice. Taken together, Jeju ground water inhibits preadipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis in obesity animal models.

  8. Effects of 3D random correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional, finite-difference simulations of a realistic finite-fault rupture on the southern Hayward fault are used to evaluate the effects of random, correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions. Velocity perturbations are added to a three-dimensional (3D) regional seismic velocity model of the San Francisco Bay Area using a 3D von Karman random medium. Velocity correlation lengths of 5 and 10 km and standard deviations in the velocity of 5% and 10% are considered. The results show that significant deviations in predicted ground velocities are seen in the calculated frequency range (≤1 Hz) for standard deviations in velocity of 5% to 10%. These results have implications for the practical limits on the accuracy of scenario ground-motion calculations and on retrieval of source parameters using higher-frequency, strong-motion data.

  9. EFFECT OF SANTA ROSA LAKE ON GROUND WATER FLOW TO THE PECOS RIVER, NEW MEXICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Dennis W.

    1985-01-01

    In 1980, Santa Rosa Dam began impounding water on the Pecos River about 7 miles (11 kilometers) north of Santa Rosa, New Mexico, to provide flood control and storage for irrigation. Santa Rosa Lake has caused changes in the ground water flow system, which may cause changes in the streamflow of the Pecos River that cannot be detected at the present streamflow-gaging stations, which are used to administer water rights along the Pecos River. The effect of the lake on streamflow was investigated using a three-dimensional ground water flow model. These simulations indicated that the net change in ground water flow to the river would be almost zero if the lake were maintained at its flood control pool for 90 days.

  10. Temperature and energy deficit in the ground during operation and recovery phases of closed-loop ground source heat pump system: Effect of the groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Selcuk; Francois, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The advection/dispersion mechanism of the groundwater flow in the ground has a significant effect on a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) to enhance its thermal performance. However, the amount of energy extracted from the ground never disappears and only shifts with the magnitude of the effective thermal velocity in the infinite domain. In this work, we focus on the temperature and the energy balance of the ground in an advection/dispersion dominated heat transfer system during the operation period of a BHE and the subsequent recovery phase when the system is idle. The problem is treated with single BHE and multi-BHEs systems, for different representative geology and different groundwater flow velocity. In order to assess the thermal energy deficit due to heat extraction from the ground, we used the finite line source analytical model, developed recently (Erol et al., 2015) that provides the temperature distributions around the boreholes for discontinuous heat extraction. The model is developed based on the Green's function, which is the solution of heat conduction/advection/dispersion equation in porous media, for discontinuous heat extraction by analytically convoluting rectangular function or pulses in time domain. The results demonstrate the significant positive impact of the groundwater flow for the recovery in terms of temperature deficit at the location of the borehole. However, the total thermal energy deficit is not affected by the groundwater movement. The energy balance of the ground is the same no matter the prevailing heat transfer system, which can be only conduction or advection/dispersion. In addition, the energy balance of the ground is not based on either the duration of the production period operation or of the recovery phase, but depends on the total amount of heat that is extracted and on the bulk volumetric heat capacity of the ground.

  11. Cover plants and mineral nitrogen: effects on organic matter fractions in an oxisol under no-tillage in the cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isis Lima dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cover plants are essential for the sustainability of no-tillage systems in tropical regions. However, information on the effects of these plants and N fertilization on soil organic matter fractions is still scarce. This study evaluated the effect of cover crops with different chemical composition and of N topdressing on the labile and humified organic matter fractions of an Oxisol of the Cerrado (savanna-like vegetation. The study in a randomized complete block design was arranged in split-plots with three replications. Four cover species were tested in the plots and the presence or absence of N topdressing in the subplot. The following cover species were planted in succession to corn for eight years: Urochloa ruziziensis; Canavalia brasiliensis M. ex Benth; Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp; and Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench. In general, the cultivation of U. ruziziensis increased soil C levels, particularly of C in the humic acid and particulate organic C fractions, which are quality indicators of soil organic matter. The C in humic substances and mineral organic C accounted for the highest proportions of total organic C, demonstrating the strong interaction between organic matter, Fe and Al oxides and kaolinite, which are predominant in these weathered soils of the Cerrado.

  12. Clinical effectiveness of a mite allergen-impermeable bed-covering system in asthmatic mite-sensitive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bemt, Lisette; van Knapen, Lieke; de Vries, Marjolein P; Jansen, Margreet; Cloosterman, Sonja; van Schayck, Constant P

    2004-10-01

    Exposure to allergens plays a role in the development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and in the chronic inflammatory response seen in asthmatic patients. House dust mites (HDMs) are an important source of allergen. Reduction of these allergens might lead to better lung function and reduction of asthma symptoms. The effect of HDM-impermeable covers on HDM allergen levels, peak flow values, and asthma symptoms were measured. Therefore a randomized clinical trial was carried out. Fifty-two allergic asthmatic patients were randomly allocated to use the HDM-impermeable or placebo covers. During the study period, daily peak flow and asthma symptom scores were recorded. Dust samples were taken from the mattresses. We observed a significant reduction in HDM allergen levels on the mattresses after encasing them with HDM-impermeable covers (reduction of 87% of Der p 1 in micrograms per gram of dust; P impermeable covers significantly decreased the level of HDM allergens. Furthermore, morning peak flow was significantly increased during the intervention period. This study indicates that HDM allergen-avoidance measures might have beneficial effects on allergen reduction and asthma outcome.

  13. Experimental Study of Ground Effect on Three-Dimensional Insect-Like Flapping Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohu; Lua, Kim Boon; Chang, Rong; Lim, Tee Tai; Yeo, Khoon Seng

    2014-11-01

    This paper focuses on an experimental investigation aimed at evaluating the aerodynamics force characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) insect-like flapping motion in the vicinity of ground. The purpose is to establish whether flapping wing insects can derive aerodynamic benefit from ground effect similar to that experienced by a fixed wing aircraft. To evaluate this, force measurements were conducted in a large water tank using a 3D flapping mechanism capable of executing various insect flapping motions. Here, we focus on three types of flapping motions, namely simple harmonic flapping motion, hawkmoth-like hovering motion and fruitfly-like hovering motion, and two types of wing planforms (i.e. hawkmoth-like wing and fruitfly-like wing). Results show that hawkmoth-like wing executing simple harmonic flapping motion produces average lift to drag ratio (\\bar C\\bar L/\\bar C\\bar D) similar to that of fruitfly wing executing the same motion. In both cases, they are relatively independent of the wing distance from the ground. On the other hand, a hawkmoth wing executing hawkmoth flapping motion produces (\\bar C\\bar L/\\bar C\\bar D) characteristic different from that of fruitfly wing executing fruitfly motion. While the (\\bar C\\bar L/\\bar C\\bar D) value of the former is a function of the wing distance from the ground, the latter is minimally affected by ground effect. Unlike fixed wing aerodynamics, all the flapping wing cases considered here do not show a monotonic increase in (\\bar C\\bar L/\\bar C\\bar D) with decreasing wing distance from the ground.

  14. A Modeling Study of the Effects of Anomalous Snow Cover over the Tibetan Plateau upon the South Asian Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华强; 孙照渤; 王举; 闵锦忠

    2004-01-01

    The effect of anomalous snow cover over the Tibetan Plateau upon the South Asian summer monsoon is investigated by numerical simulations using the NCAR regional climate model (RegCM2) into which gravity wave drag has been introduced. The simulations adopt relatively realistic snow mass forcings based on Scanning Multi-channel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) pentad snow depth data. The physical mechanism and spatial structure of the sensitivity of the South Asian early summer monsoon to snow cover anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau are revealed. The main results are summarized as follows. The heavier than normal snow cover over the Plateau can obviously reduce the shortwave radiation absorbed by surface through the albedo effect, which is compensated by weaker upward sensible heat flux associated with colder surface temperature, whereas the effects of snow melting and evaporation are relatively smaller.The anomalies of surface heat fluxes can last until June and become unobvions in July. The decrease of the Plateau surface temperature caused by heavier snow cover reaches its maximum value from late April to early May. The atmospheric cooling in the mid-upper troposphere over the Plateau and its surrounding areas is most obvious in May and can keep a fairly strong intensity in June. In contrast, there is warming to the south of the Plateau in the mid-lower troposphere from April to June with a maximum value in May.The heavier snow cover over the Plateau can reduce the intensity of the South Asian summer monsoon and rainfall to some extent, but this influence is only obvious in early summer and almost disappears in later stages.

  15. Study on Introduction and Cultivation Techniques of Four Color--leafed Plants of Ground Cover%四种地被类彩叶植物引种栽培技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王太平

    2011-01-01

    对引进的4个地被类植物优良品种进行了引种试验,结果表明:红叶石楠和金森女贞在高度生长和冠幅增长方面优势明显,其次为红花檀木、洒金珊瑚;栽培试验表明:4个地被类植物经过几个生长期的栽培试验,形成了一套较完整的栽培技术措施,为4个优良品种的推广应用提供了技术保障。%In this paper, four species of ground cover were studied through introduction experiment and cul- tivation experiment. The results of introduction experiment show that Photinia serru alta and Ligustrum japonicum 'Howardii" have clear advantages on high-growth and crown-growth, followed by Lorpetalum Chinese Oliv. var. rubrum Yieh and Var. variegata D'ombr. The results of cultivation experiment show that after the experiment of several growth periods, a complete cultivation technique of these four species has been formed,which provides technical support for applying these four fine varieties.

  16. Effects of a Group of High-Rise Structures on Ground Motions under Seismic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-jun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional simulation was created to determine the seismic performance of coupled systems with a group of up to 100 pile-high-rise structures resting on soil layers using system modal, harmonic, and time domain analysis. The results demonstrated that the existence of a structural group mitigates the structural responses with respect to the single-structure-soil interaction (SSI and results in significantly nonuniform ground seismic motions. Due to the influence of a structural group, adjacent structures can exhibit fully alternating mechanical behavior, and buildings in the urban fringe are subjected to stronger shaking than downtown buildings. The overall trend of the influence of structural groups is that ground motions are lessened inside an urban area, and ground motions at the locations between structures differ from those at the locations of the structures. Moreover, the effective distance of a structural group on ground motions is associated with the urban width. Less distance between structures enhances the interaction effect. In addition, the soil properties can greatly influence the system’s seismic responses and can even completely change the effect trends. The results in our paper are consistent with the phenomena observed in the Mexico City earthquake and the 1976 earthquake in Friuli, Italy.

  17. Effect of vehicle front end profiles leading to pedestrian secondary head impact to ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Yang, King H

    2013-11-01

    Most studies of pedestrian injuries focus on reducing traumatic injuries due to the primary impact between the vehicle and the pedestrian. However, based on the Pedestrian Crash Data Study (PCDS), some researchers concluded that one of the leading causes of head injury for pedestrian crashes can be attributed to the secondary impact, defined as the impact of the pedestrian with the ground after the primary impact of the pedestrian with the vehicle. The purpose of this study is to understand if different vehicle front-end profiles can affect the risk of pedestrian secondary head impact with the ground and thus help in reducing the risk of head injury during secondary head impact with ground. Pedestrian responses were studied using several front-end profiles based off a mid-size vehicle and a SUV that have been validated previously along with several MADYMO pedestrian models. Mesh morphing is used to explore changes to the bumper height, bonnet leading-edge height, and bonnet rear reference-line height. Simulations leading up to pedestrian secondary impact with ground are conducted at impact speeds of 40 and 30 km/h. In addition, three pedestrian sizes (50th, 5th and 6yr old child) are used to enable us to search for a front-end profile that performs well for multiple sizes of pedestrians, not just one particular size. In most of the simulations, secondary ground impact with pedestrian head/neck/shoulder region occurred. However, there were some front-end profiles that promoted secondary ground impact with pedestrian lower extremities, thus avoiding pedestrian secondary head impact with ground. Previous pedestrian safety research work has suggested the use of active safety methods, such as 'pop up hood', to reduce pedestrian head injury during primary impact. Accordingly, we also conducted simulations using a model with the hood raised to capture the effect of a pop-up hood. These simulations indicated that even though pop-up hood helped reducing the head injury

  18. Statistical evaluation of effects of riparian buffers on nitrate and ground water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruill, T.B.

    2000-01-01

    A study was conducted to statistically evaluate the effectiveness of riparian buffers for decreasing nitrate concentrations in ground water and for affecting other chemical constituents. Values for pH, specific conductance, alkalinity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), silica, ammonium, phosphorus, iron, and manganese at 28 sites in the Contentnea Creek Basin were significantly higher (p 20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dssolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dissolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (water samples from buffer and nonbuffer areas indicated significantly higher specific conductance, calcium, chloride, and nitrate nitrogen in nonbuffer areas. Riparian buffers along streams can affect the composition of the hyporheic zone by providing a source of organic carbon to the streambed, which creates reducing geochemical conditions that consequently can affect the chemical quality of old ground water discharging through it. Buffer zones between agricultural fields and streams facilitate dilution of conservative chemical constituents in young ground water that originate from fertilizer applications and also allow denitrification in ground water by providing an adequate source of organic carbon generated by vegetation in the buffer zone. Based on the median chloride and nitrate values for young ground water in the Contentnea Creek Basin, nitrate was 95% lower in buffer areas compared with nonbuffer areas, with a 30 to 35% reduction estimated to be due to

  19. Effects of Land Cover on the Movement of Frugivorous Birds in a Heterogeneous Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Movement is a key spatiotemporal process that enables interactions between animals and other elements of nature. The understanding of animal trajectories and the mechanisms that influence them at the landscape level can yield insight into ecological processes and potential solutions to specific ecological problems. Based upon optimal foraging models and empirical evidence, we hypothesized that movement by thrushes is highly tortuous (low average movement speeds and homogeneous distribution of turning angles) inside forests, moderately tortuous in urban areas, which present intermediary levels of resources, and minimally tortuous (high movement speeds and turning angles next to 0 radians) in open matrix types (e.g., crops and pasture). We used data on the trajectories of two common thrush species (Turdus rufiventris and Turdus leucomelas) collected by radio telemetry in a fragmented region in Brazil. Using a maximum likelihood model selection approach we fit four probability distribution models to average speed data, considering short-tailed, long-tailed, and scale-free distributions (to represent different regimes of movement variation), and one distribution to relative angle data. Models included land cover type and distance from forest-matrix edges as explanatory variables. Speed was greater farther away from forest edges and increased faster inside forest habitat compared to urban and open matrices. However, turning angle was not influenced by land cover. Thrushes presented a very tortuous trajectory, with many displacements followed by turns near 180 degrees. Thrush trajectories resembled habitat and edge dependent, tortuous random walks, with a well-defined movement scale inside each land cover type. Although thrushes are habitat generalists, they showed a greater preference for forest edges, and thus may be considered edge specialists. Our results reinforce the importance of studying animal movement patterns in order to understand ecological processes such as

  20. Effect of spatial coherence on laser beam self-focusing from orbit to the ground in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hanling; Ji, Xiaoling; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xianqu; Zhang, Yuqiu

    2016-06-27

    The effect of spatial coherence on laser beam self-focusing in the atmosphere to assist delivering powerful laser beams from orbit to the ground is studied. It is found that a fully coherent beam is more strongly compressed on the ground than a partially (spatial) coherent beam (PCB), even so, for a PCB the compressed spot size on the ground may be reduced below the diffraction limit due to self-focusing effect, and a PCB has higher threshold critical power than a fully coherent beam. Furthermore, an effective design rule for maximal compression without beam splitting of the transported PCB from orbit to the ground is presented.

  1. Parasitic Effects of Grounding Paths on Common-Mode EMI Filter's Performance in Power Electronics Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuo [ORNL; Maillet, Yoann [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Wang, Fei [ORNL; Lai, Rixin [General Electric; Luo, Fang [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Boroyevich, Dushan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency common-mode (CM) electromagnetic-interference (EMI) noise is difficult to suppress in electronics systems. EMI filters are used to suppress CM noise, but their performance is greatly affected by the parasitic effects of the grounding paths. In this paper, the parasitic effects of the grounding paths on an EMI filter's performance are investigated in a motor-drive system. The effects of the mutual inductance between two grounding paths are explored. Guidelines for the grounding of CM EMI filters are derived. Simulations and experiments are finally carried out to verify the theoretical analysis.

  2. Natural vegetation cover in the landscape and edge effects: differential responses of insect orders in a fragmented forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ezequiel; Salvo, Adriana; Valladares, Graciela

    2017-10-01

    Human activities have led to global simplification of ecosystems, among which Neotropical dry forests are some of the most threatened. Habitat loss as well as edge effects may affect insect communities. Here, we analyzed insects sampled with pan traps in 9 landscapes (at 5 scales, in 100-500 m diameter circles) comprising cultivated fields and Chaco Serrano forests, at overall community and taxonomic order level. In total 7043 specimens and 456 species of hexapods were captured, with abundance and richness being directly related to forest cover at 500 m and higher at edges in comparison with forest interior. Community composition also varied with forest cover and edge/interior location. Different responses were detected among the 8 dominant orders. Collembola, Hemiptera, and Orthoptera richness and/or abundance were positively related to forest cover at the larger scale, while Thysanoptera abundance increased with forest cover only at the edge. Hymenoptera abundance and richness were negatively related to forest cover at 100 m. Coleoptera, Diptera, and Hymenoptera were more diverse and abundant at the forest edge. The generally negative influence of forest loss on insect communities could have functional consequences for both natural and cultivated systems, and highlights the relevance of forest conservation. Higher diversity at the edges could result from the simultaneous presence of forest and matrix species, although "resource mapping" might be involved for orders that were richer and more abundant at edges. Adjacent crops could benefit from forest proximity since natural enemies and pollinators are well represented in the orders showing positive edge effects. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Functional decay in tree community within tropical fragmented landscapes: Effects of landscape-scale forest cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Santos, Larissa; Benchimol, Maíra; Mayfield, Margaret M; Faria, Deborah; Pessoa, Michaele S; Talora, Daniela C; Mariano-Neto, Eduardo; Cazetta, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    As tropical rainforests are cleared, forest remnants are increasingly isolated within agricultural landscapes. Understanding how forest loss impacts on species diversity can, therefore, contribute to identifying the minimum amount of habitat required for biodiversity maintenance in human-modified landscapes. Here, we evaluate how the amount of forest cover, at the landscape scale, affects patterns of species richness, abundance, key functional traits and common taxonomic families of adult trees in twenty Brazilian Atlantic rainforest landscapes. We found that as forest cover decreases, both tree community richness and abundance decline, without exhibiting a threshold. At the family-level, species richness and abundance of the Myrtaceae and Sapotaceae were also negatively impacted by the percent forest remaining at the landscape scale. For functional traits, we found a reduction in shade-tolerant, animal-dispersed and small-seeded species following a decrease in the amount of forest retained in landscapes. These results suggest that the amount of forest in a landscape is driving non-random losses in phylogenetic and functional tree diversity in Brazil's remaining Atlantic rainforests. Our study highlights potential restraints on the conservation value of Atlantic rainforest remnants in deforested landscapes in the future.

  4. Effects of methane on the microbial populations and oxidation rates in different landfill cover soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Ruan, Aidong; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2007-05-01

    A considerable fraction of methane produced in landfills is oxidized by landfill cover soils. In this work, microbial populations and oxidation rates developed in response to the presence of methane were studied in three soil columns simulated landfill cover soil environments. The population of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria was highest in the waste soil, middle in the clay soil, and lowest in the red soil. After exposure to methane-rich environments, the populations of methanotrophic bacteria showed increases in the waste and clay soils. The population of methanotrophic bacteria increased from 30.77x10(4) to 141.77x10(4) cfu g d.w.-1 in the middle layer of the waste soil column as a function of exposure to methane for 120 days. The populations of methanotrophic bacteria were correlated with the potential methane oxidation rates in the waste and clay soils, respectively. The topsoil was observed to be dried in the three soil columns. Most of methane oxidation occurred at the depth of between 10 and 20 cm in the waste soil column, while it took place mainly at the depth of between 20 and 30 cm in the clay soil column.

  5. Bioerosion of gastropod shells: with emphasis on effects of coralline algal cover and shell microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Miriam J.

    1989-12-01

    Organisms boring into fifty nine species of gastropod shells on reefs around Guam were the bryozoan Penetrantia clionoides; the acrothoracian barnacles Cryptophialus coronorphorus, Cryptophialus zulloi and Lithoglyptis mitis; the foraminifer Cymbaloporella tabellaeformis, the polydorid Polydora sp. and seven species of clionid sponge. Evidence that crustose coralline algae interfere with settlement of larvae of acrothoracian barnacles, clionid sponges, and boring polychaetes came from two sources: (1) low intensity of boring in limpet shells, a potentially penetrable substrate that remains largely free of borings by virtue of becoming fully covered with coralline algae at a young age and (2) the extremely low levels of boring in the algal ridge, a massive area of carbonate almost entirely covered by a layer of living crustose corallines. There was a strong negative correlation between microstructural hardness and infestation by acrothoracian barnacles and no correlation in the case of the other borers. It is suggested that this points to a mechanical rather than a chemical method of boring by the barnacles. The periostracum, a layer of organic material reputedly a natural inhibitor of boring organisms, was bored by acrothoracican barnacles and by the bryozoan. The intensity of acrothoracican borings is shown to have no correlation with the length of the gastropod shell.

  6. The effects of water parameters on monthly seagrass percentage cover in Lawas, East Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad-Kamil, E I; Ramli, R; Jaaman, S A; Bali, J; Al-Obaidi, J R

    2013-01-01

    Seagrass is a valuable marine ecosystem engineer. However, seagrass population is declining worldwide. The lack of seagrass research in Malaysia raises questions about the status of seagrasses in the country. The seagrasses in Lawas, which is part of the coral-mangrove-seagrass complex, have never been studied in detail. In this study, we examine whether monthly changes of seagrass population in Lawas occurred. Data on estimates of seagrass percentage cover and water physicochemical parameters (pH, turbidity, salinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen) were measured at 84 sampling stations established within the study area from June 2009 to May 2010. Meteorological data such as total rainfall, air temperature, and Southern Oscillation Index were also investigated. Our results showed that (i) the monthly changes of seagrass percentage cover are significant, (ii) the changes correlated significantly with turbidity measurements, and (iii) weather changes affected the seagrass populations. Our study indicates seagrass percentage increased during the El-Nino period. These results suggest that natural disturbances such as weather changes affect seagrass populations. Evaluation of land usage and measurements of other water physicochemical parameters (such as heavy metal, pesticides, and nutrients) should be considered to assess the health of seagrass ecosystem at the study area.

  7. Effect of spin-orbit coupling on the ground state structure of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vinayak; Gyanchandani, Jyoti; Chaturvedi, Shashank; Sikka, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    Near zero kelvin ground state structure of mercury is the body centered tetragonal (BCT) structure (β Hg). However, in all previously reported density functional theory (DFT) calculations, either the rhombohedral or the HCP structure has been found to be the ground state structure. Based on the previous calculations it was predicted that the correct treatment of the SO effects would improve the result. We have performed FPLAPW calculations, with and without inclusion of the SO coupling, for determining the ground state structure. These calculations determine rhombohedral structure as the ground state structure instead of BCT structure. The calculations, without inclusion of SO effect, predict that the energies of rhombohedral and BCT structures are very close to each other but the energy of rhombohedral structure is lower than that of BCT structure at ambient as well as high pressure. On the contrary, the SO calculations predict that though at ambient conditions the rhombohedral structure is the stable structure but on applying a pressure of 3.2 GPa, the BCT structure becomes stable. Hence, instead of predicting the stability of BCT structure at zero pressure, the SO calculations predict its stability at 3.2 GPa. This small disagreement is expected when the energy differences between the structures are small.

  8. Effect of removal of hesperis matronalis (Dame's rocket) on species cover of forest understory vegetation in NW indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, N.B.; Leicht-Young, S. A.; Frohnapple, K.J.; Grundel, R.

    2009-01-01

    Exotic invasive plant species differ in their effects on indigenous vegetation as evidenced by research evaluating community response to their removal. We used a removal approach to quantify the response of a mesic woodland to the removal versus retention of an invasive plant, Hesperis matronalis (dame's rocket) from paired treatment plots over 3 y. Cover of H. matronalis did not differ between control and treatment plots prior to removal, declined in the removal plots and remained significantly lower in cover compared to the control plots. Removal did not significantly affect species richness and species diversity (evenness, Shannon and Simpson) at the plot scale, but did result in increased species richness overall in the removal plots in the last sampling year when compared to control plots. Non-metric multidimensional scaling ordination analysis indicated a significant compositional change in the spring plant composition of plots over the 3 y, reflecting an increase in exotic woody species. Exotic woody plants, especially Rosa multiflora and Euonymus alatus, increased in cover in response to H. matronalis removal. In the 3 y, neither native nor exotic forbs, nor native woody plants responded to the removal of H. matronalis in a statistically significant manner. The increasing cover of woody invasive plants in response to the removal of H. matronalis has important management implications for restoration of degraded communities.

  9. Hydrologic effects of potential changes in climate, water use, and land cover in the Upper Scioto River Basin, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Andrew D.; Koltun, G.F.; Ostheimer, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to provide information on the hydrologic effects of potential 21st-century changes in climate, water use, and land cover in the Upper Scioto River Basin, Ohio (from Circleville, Ohio, to the headwaters). A precipitation-runoff model, calibrated on the basis of historical climate and streamflow data, was used to simulate the effects of climate change on streamflows and reservoir water levels at several locations in the basin. Two levels of simulations were done. The first level of simulation (level 1) accounted only for anticipated 21st-century changes in climate and operations of three City of Columbus upground reservoirs located in northwest Delaware County, Ohio. The second level of simulation (level 2) accounted for development-driven changes in land cover and water use in addition to changes in climate and reservoir operations.

  10. Effect of snow cover on pan-Arctic permafrost thermal regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hotaek; Fedorov, Alexander N.; Zheleznyak, Mikhail N.; Konstantinov, Pavel Y.; Walsh, John E.

    2015-05-01

    This study quantitatively evaluated how insulation by snow depth (SND) affected the soil thermal regime and permafrost degradation in the pan-Arctic area, and more generally defined the characteristics of soil temperature (TSOIL) and SND from 1901 to 2009. This was achieved through experiments performed with the land surface model CHANGE to assess sensitivity to winter precipitation as well as air temperature. Simulated TSOIL, active layer thickness (ALT), SND, and snow density were generally comparable with in situ or satellite observations at large scales and over long periods. Northernmost regions had snow that remained relatively stable and in a thicker state during the past four decades, generating greater increases in TSOIL. Changes in snow cover have led to changes in the thermal state of the underlying soil, which is strongly dependent on both the magnitude and the timing of changes in snowfall. Simulations of the period 2001-2009 revealed significant differences in the extent of near-surface permafrost, reflecting differences in the model's treatment of meteorology and the soil bottom boundary. Permafrost loss was greater when SND increased in autumn rather than in winter, due to insulation of the soil resulting from early cooling. Simulations revealed that TSOIL tended to increase over most of the pan-Arctic from 1901 to 2009, and that this increase was significant in northern regions, especially in northeastern Siberia where SND is responsible for 50 % or more of the changes in TSOIL at a depth of 3.6 m. In the same region, ALT also increased at a rate of approximately 2.3 cm per decade. The most sensitive response of ALT to changes in SND appeared in the southern boundary regions of permafrost, in contrast to permafrost temperatures within the 60°N-80°N region, which were more sensitive to changes in snow cover. Finally, our model suggests that snow cover contributes to the warming of permafrost in northern regions and could play a more important role

  11. Effect of mustard seed and sodium isoascorbate on lipid oxidation and colour of ground beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Karwowska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the mustard seed in reducing lipid oxidation in ground beef compared to sodium isoascorbate. The research material were meat samples, prepared in four variants. The differentiating addition was ground white mustard (Sinapis alba, used in the native and autoclaved form. Reference were a control sample and a sample with the addition of sodium isoascorbate. The following were assayed during the study: TBARS value, redox potential, pH and colour parameters CIE L*a*b*. The addition of mustard had no effect on the pH value in comparison to the control sample and sodium isoascorbate. It has been shown that the use of mustard either native and autoclaved, decreased the value of TBARS ratio, and showed a similar effectiveness in preventing the oxidation of lipids as sodium isoascorbate.

  12. Species composition and fire: non-additive mixture effects on ground fuel flammability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra eVan Altena

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity effects on many aspects of ecosystem function have been well documented. However, fire is an exception: fire experiments have mainly included single species, bulk litter, or vegetation, and, as such, the role of biodiversity as a determinant of flammability, a crucial aspect of ecosystem function, is poorly understood. This study is the first to experimentally test whether flammability characteristics of two-species mixtures are non-additive, i.e. differ from expected flammability based on the component species in monoculture. In standardized fire experiments on ground fuels, including monocultures and mixtures of five contrasting subarctic plant fuel types in a controlled laboratory environment, we measured flame speed, flame duration and maximum temperature. Broadly half of the mixture combinations showed non-additive effects for these flammability indicators; these were mainly enhanced dominance effects, where the fuel types with the more flammable value for a characteristic determined the flammability of the whole mixture. The high incidence of species non-additive effects on ground fuel flammability suggest that the combinations of fuel types may have important effects on ground fire regimes in vegetations differing or changing in species composition.

  13. Effects of discontinuing cover gowns on a postpartal ward upon cord colonization of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, M T

    1983-01-01

    To determine if the incidence of bacterial cord colonization in neonates increased when cover gowns were discontinued on a postpartal ward, a study was conducted. All infants who were admitted to and discharged from the well infant nursery at an Army medical center in Denver, Colorado, were cultured at the umbilicus at the time of admission and at discharge. The control group (N = 74) continued to gown as usual; the experimental group (N = 50) did not wear gowns. Visitors in both groups received the same instructions regarding handwashing. For all organisms, the control group demonstrated 80% colonization of infants who were negative on admission, and the experimental group demonstrated a colonization rate of 62%. When the chi square is applied, these data are statistically significant for P = 0.02 and P = 0.05. The experimental group had less colonization than the control group.

  14. Correlation or Causality between Land Cover Patterns and the Urban Heat Island Effect? Evidence from Brisbane, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Deilami

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have identified associations between the surface urban heat island (SUHI effect (i.e., SUHI, hereinafter is referred to as UHI and urban growth, particularly changes in land cover patterns. This research questions their causal links to answer a key policy question: If cities restrict urban expansion and encourage people to live within existing urban areas, will that help in controlling UHI? The question has been answered by estimating four models using data from Brisbane, Australia: Model 1—cross-sectional ordinary least square (OLS regression—to examine the association between the UHI effect and land cover patterns in 2013; Model 2—cross-sectional geographically weighted regression (GWR—to examine whether the outputs generated from Model 1 possess significant spatial variations; Model 3—longitudinal OLS—to examine whether changes in land cover patterns led to changes in UHI effects between 2004 and 2013; and Model 4—longitudinal GWR—to examine whether the outputs generated from Model 3 vary significantly over space. All estimations were controlled for potential confounding effects (e.g., population, employment and dwelling densities. Results from the cross-sectional OLS and GWR models were consistent with previous findings and showed that porosity is negatively associated with the UHI effect in 2013. In contrast, population density has a positive association. Results from the longitudinal OLS and GWR models confirm their causal linkages and showed that an increase in porosity level reduced the UHI effect, whereas an increase in population density increased the UHI effect. The findings suggest that even a containment of population growth within existing urban areas will lead to the UHI effect. However, this can be significantly minimized through proper land use planning, by creating a balance between urban and non-urban uses of existing urban areas.

  15. Modeling the effects of vegetation on methane oxidation and emissions through soil landfill final covers across different climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abichou, Tarek; Kormi, Tarek; Yuan, Lei; Johnson, Terry; Francisco, Escobar

    2015-02-01

    Plant roots are reported to enhance the aeration of soil by creating secondary macropores which improve the diffusion of oxygen into soil as well as the supply of methane to bacteria. Therefore, methane oxidation can be improved considerably by the soil structuring processes of vegetation, along with the increase of organic biomass in the soil associated with plant roots. This study consisted of using a numerical model that combines flow of water and heat with gas transport and oxidation in soils, to simulate methane emission and oxidation through simulated vegetated and non-vegetated landfill covers under different climatic conditions. Different simulations were performed using different methane loading flux (5-200 g m(-2) d(-1)) as the bottom boundary. The lowest modeled surface emissions were always obtained with vegetated soil covers for all simulated climates. The largest differences in simulated surface emissions between the vegetated and non-vegetated scenarios occur during the growing season. Higher average yearly percent oxidation was obtained in simulations with vegetated soil covers as compared to non-vegetated scenario. The modeled effects of vegetation on methane surface emissions and percent oxidation were attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) increase in methane oxidation associated with the change of the physical properties of the upper vegetative layer and (2) increase in organic matter associated with vegetated soil layers. Finally, correlations between percent oxidation and methane loading into simulated vegetated and non-vegetated covers were proposed to allow decision makers to compare vegetated versus non-vegetated soil landfill covers. These results were obtained using a modeling study with several simplifying assumptions that do not capture the complexities of vegetated soils under field conditions.

  16. Ground-Water Resources in Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, Island of Hawaii, and Numerical Simulation of the Effects of Ground-Water Withdrawals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Tribble, Gordon W.; Souza, William R.; Bolke, Edward L.

    1999-01-01

    Within the Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, which was established in 1978, the ground-water flow system is composed of brackish water overlying saltwater. Ground-water levels measured in the Park range from about 1 to 2 feet above mean sea level, and fluctuate daily by about 0.5 to 1.5 feet in response to ocean tides. The brackish water is formed by mixing of seaward flowing fresh ground water with underlying saltwater from the ocean. The major source of fresh ground water is from subsurface flow originating from inland areas to the east of the Park. Ground-water recharge from the direct infiltration of precipitation within the Park area, which has land-surface altitudes less than 100 feet, is small because of low rainfall and high rates of evaporation. Brackish water flowing through the Park ultimately discharges to the fishponds in the Park or to the ocean. The ground water, fishponds, and anchialine ponds in the Park are hydrologically connected; thus, the water levels in the ponds mark the local position of the water table. Within the Park, ground water near the water table is brackish; measured chloride concentrations of water samples from three exploratory wells in the Park range from 2,610 to 5,910 milligrams per liter. Chromium and copper were detected in water samples from the three wells in the Park and one well upgradient of the Park at concentrations of 1 to 5 micrograms per liter. One semi-volatile organic compound, phenol, was detected in water samples from the three wells in the Park at concentrations between 4 and 10 micrograms per liter. A regional, two-dimensional (areal), freshwater-saltwater, sharp-interface ground-water flow model was used to simulate the effects of regional withdrawals on ground-water flow within the Park. For average 1978 withdrawal rates, the estimated rate of fresh ground-water discharge to the ocean within the Park is about 6.48 million gallons per day, or about 3 million gallons per day per mile of coastline

  17. Pilot Study on the Effect of Grounding on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dick; Hill, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether there are markers that can be used to study the effects of grounding on delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and subjects Eight (8) healthy subjects were exposed to an eccentric exercise that caused DOMS in gastrocnemius muscles of both legs. Four (4) subjects were grounded with electrode patches and patented conductive sheets connected to the earth. Four (4) control subjects were treated identically, except that the grounding systems were not connected to the earth. Outcome measures Complete blood counts, blood chemistry, enzyme chemistry, serum and saliva cortisols, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy and pain levels were taken at the same time of day before the eccentric exercise and 24, 48, and 72 hours afterwards. Parameters consistently differing by 10% or more, normalized to baseline, were considered worthy of further study. Results Parameters that differed by these criteria included white blood cell counts, bilirubin, creatine kinase, phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate ratios, glycerolphosphorylcholine, phosphorylcholine, the visual analogue pain scale, and pressure measurements on the right gastrocnemius. Conclusions In a pilot study, grounding the body to the earth alters measures of immune system activity and pain. Since this is the first intervention that appears to speed recovery from DOMS, the pilot provides a basis for a larger study. PMID:20192911

  18. Kin effects on energy allocation in group-living ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viblanc, Vincent A; Saraux, Claire; Murie, Jan O; Dobson, F Stephen

    2016-09-01

    The social environment has potent effects on individual phenotype and fitness in group-living species. We asked whether the presence of kin might act on energy allocation, a central aspect of life-history variation. Using a 22-year data set on reproductive and somatic allocations in Columbian ground squirrels (Urocitellus columbianus), we tested the effects of co-breeding and non-breeding kin on the fitness and energy allocation balance between reproduction and personal body condition of individual females. Greater numbers of co-breeding kin had a positive effect on the number of offspring weaned, through the mechanism of altering energy allocation patterns. On average, females with higher numbers of co-breeding kin did not increase energy income but biased energy allocation towards reproduction. Co-breeding female kin ground squirrels maintain close nest burrows, likely providing a social buffer against territorial invasions from non-kin ground squirrels. Lower aggressiveness, lower risks of infanticide from female kin and greater protection of territorial boundaries may allow individual females to derive net fitness benefits via their energy allocation strategies. We demonstrated the importance of kin effects on a fundamental life-history trade-off.

  19. Ground shock from multiple earth penetrator bursts: Effects for hexagonal weapon arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Yarrington, P.

    1990-08-01

    Calculations have been performed with the HULL hydrocode to study ground shock effects for multiple earth penetrator weapon (EPW) bursts in hexagonal-close-packed (HCP) arrays. Several different calculational approaches were used to treat this problem. The first simulations involved two-dimensional (2D) calculations, where the hexagonal cross-section of a unit-cell in an effectively-infinite HCP array was approximated by an inscribed cylinder. Those calculations showed substantial ground shock enhancement below the center of the array. To refine the analysis, 3D unit-cell calculations were done where the actual hexagonal cross-section of the HCP array was modelled. Results of those calculations also suggested that the multiburst array would enhance ground shock effects over those for a single burst of comparable yield. Finally, 3D calculations were run in which an HCP array of seven bursts was modelled explicitly. In addition, the effects of non-simultaneity were investigated. Results of the seven-burst HCP array calculations were consistent with the unit-cell results and, in addition, provided information on the 3D lethal contour produced by such an array.

  20. Effects of slope gradient on hydro-erosional processes on an aeolian sand-covered loess slope under simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. B.; Yang, M. Y.; Li, B. B.; Li, Z. B.; Shi, W. Y.

    2017-10-01

    The aeolian sand-covered loess slope of the Wind-Water Erosion Crisscross Region of the Loess Plateau in China may play a key role in contributing excessive sediment to the Yellow River. Understanding its hydro-erosional processes is crucial to assessing, controlling and predicting soil and water losses in this region and maintaining the ecological sustainability of the Yellow River. Simulated rainfall (intensity 90 mm h-1) was used to investigate the runoff and soil loss from loess slopes with different slope gradients (18%, 27%, 36%, 47%, and 58%) and overlying sand layer thicknesses (0, 5 and 10 cm). As compared with uncovered loess slopes, an overlying sand layer delayed runoff production, reduced cumulative runoff and increased cumulative soil loss, as well as enhancing variations among slope gradients. Cumulative runoff and soil loss from the sand-covered loess slopes increased with increasing slope gradients and then slightly decreased, with a peak at about 47% gradient; they both were greater from the 10-cm sand-covered loess slope than from the 5-cm except for with 18% slope gradient. In general, differences in cumulative runoff between sand layer thicknesses became smaller, while those in cumulative soil loss became larger, with increasing slope gradient. Runoff and soil loss rates on the sand-covered loess slopes exhibited unimodal distributions during the rainstorms. Maximum values tended to occur at the same rain duration, and increased considerably with increasing slope gradient and sand layer thickness on slopes that were less than 47%. Liquefaction process might occur on the lower loess slopes covered with thinner sand layers but failures similar to shallow landslides might occur when the sand layer was thicker on steeper slopes. The presence of an overlying sand layer changed the relationship between runoff and soil loss rates during intense rainstorms and this change varied with different slope gradients. Our results demonstrated that the effects

  1. Effect Of Age And Concrete Cover Thickness On Steel Reinforcement Corrosion At Splash Zone In Reinforced Concrete Hydraulic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada M. Al- Galawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of reinforcing steel bars in reinforced concrete is considered as one of the biggest problems that face countries overlooking to the Arabian Gulf including Iraq. The research aims to study the effect of the corrosion of steel bars in concrete structures that are exposed to wetting and drying via waves. Reinforced concrete samples were exposed to marine simulated environment for 90 days using prepared system for this purpose. At the end of exposure period polarization test was implemented to measure the actual corrosion rate in each sample. After that the corrosion process was accelerated using impressed current technique by applying a constant electric current DC to the reinforcing bars. Depending on the corrosion current in natural conditions which was measured in polarization test periods of exposing samples to accelerated corrosion current so as to maintain virtual exposure ages of 5 and 25 years of exposure to natural corrosion were calculated. The results showed a remarkable increase in the corrosion current of steel bars in samples that had lower concrete cover thickness. The increase in the cover thickness from 20mm to 40 and 65 mm had a significant effect on reducing the corrosion current at the age of 90 days to about 70 of its original value in both cases. At the virtual exposure age of 5 years the reduction percentage in the corrosion current resulted from increasing cover thickness from 20mm to 40 and 65 mm were 43 and 79 respectively.

  2. Effect of different polyethylene covers and shade on morphological and physiological characteristics of dwarf Lisianthus cv. Matador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rezai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the effective environmental factors on plant growth is proper lighting condition during its growth period. Planting bedding varieties of dwarf Lisianthus is developing due to its various colors and long flowering-period. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of shade and different polyethylene covers on quantitative and qualitative characteristics of dwarf Lisianthus (Eustoma grandiflorum cv. Matador, as a template plant which spends its primary growth stage under greenhouse conditions. Treatments included polyethylene plastic with different percents of UV-stabilizer additive (0, 3, 5 and 8%, 50% shading cover, and open space (control. Results showed that the highest number of flowering stems, open flowers and flowering stem diameter were observed by 8% UV- stabilizer (20% shade, and had significant difference with 50% shade treatment. Maximum photosynthesis rate was obtained in control and was decreased with reduction of light intensity. To sum up, the results suggest that since no significant difference was observed in flowering characteristics between various coverings with UV-stabilizer ability and control, thus, growing dwarf Lisianthus cv. Matador could be recommended in open spaces.

  3. Allelopathic effects of two cover crops Commelina diffusa Burm. F. and Tradescantia zebrina Shunltz on Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Berroa Navarro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathic effect of the cover crops Tradescantia zebrina Shunltz (cucaracha and Commelina diffusa Burm. F. (canutillo were evaluated on Coffea arabica Lin. seeds Caturra Rojo variety. Germination tests were carried out “in vitro” and it was evaluated the root longitude, percentage of total germination and period of germination, as well as the height of the plant and the emergency percentage for the incorporation tests to the soil. It was also carried out, to both over crops, the preliminary chemical qualitative characterization. The results showed that the extracts of T. zebrina and of C. diffusa stimulated the “in vitro” germination and growth of C. arabica at different concentration levels. The incorporation to the soil of the extracts of C. diffusa stimulated the development of the plants of C. arabica, in a significant way, that supposes a considerable advantage in that concerns to the employment of these cover crops, when not implying noxious effects beside all the benefits implied when using cover crops. These last ones go from the protection and improvement of the properties of the soil, to the control of the spontaneous flora in the coffee agroecosystems.

  4. Causes and effects of long periods of ice cover on a remote high Alpine lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael STURM

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The response of the physical and chemical limnology of Hagelseewli (2339 m a.s.l. to local meteorological forcing was investigated from 1996 to 1998 using an automatic weather station, thermistor chains, water samples and sediment traps. On-site meteorological measurements revealed the paramount importance of local topographic shading for the limnology of the lake. A high cliff to the south diminishes incident radiation by 15% to 90%, resulting in a long period of ice cover. Hence, the spring and summer seasons are extremely condensed, allowing only about 2 months per year for mixing, oxygen uptake, nutrient inflow, water exchange and phytoplankton growth. Regular measurements of water temperature, chemistry and diatom composition show that Hagelseewli responds very rapidly to changes in nutrient concentrations and light conditions. This response is restricted mainly to an extremely short productivity pulse, which takes place as soon as the lake is completely free of ice. Ice-free conditions are indicated by the occurrence of planktonic diatoms. In contrast to most low-altitude lakes, maximum productivity occurs in the middle of the water column (6-9 m, where first light, and then soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP, are the limiting factors. During the period of thawing, large amounts of ammonium enter the lake. Nevertheless, allochthonous nutrient input is not important because SRP, the limiting nutrient for algal growth, originates from the sediments. Water chemistry data and data from sediment traps show that, although autochthonous calcite precipitation does occur, the calcite crystals are redissolved completely in the bottom waters during the extended period of ice cover. Thus, the most important factor for changes in the nutrient budget, primary production and preservation of calcite is the bottom water oxygen status, which is governed by the occurrence of an ice-free period. We hypothesise that the duration of the ice-free period is of

  5. Computer predictions of ground storage effects on performance of Galileo and ISPM generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, A.

    1983-01-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) that will supply electrical power to the Galileo and International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM) spacecraft are exposed to several degradation mechanisms during the prolonged ground storage before launch. To assess the effect of storage on the RTG flight performance, a computer code has been developed which simulates all known degradation mechanisms that occur in an RTG during storage and flight. The modeling of these mechanisms and their impact on the RTG performance are discussed.

  6. The antioxidant epazote effect (Chenopodium ambrosioides L.) on raw ground beef

    OpenAIRE

    Luz H. Villalobos-Delgado; Edith G. Gonzalez-Mondragon; Alma Yadira Salazar-Govea; Joaquin T. Santiago-Castro; Juana Ramirez-Andrade

    2016-01-01

    For this paper, solid-liquid extractions of epazote (Chenopodium ambrosioides L.) were carried out using water (IE) and ethanol (EtOHE) as solvents, with the objective of evaluating its antioxidant effect on raw ground beef stored at 4 °C for 9 days. The analysis was carried out under the following treatments: CTL (meat without antioxidants), CIE (meat with infusion of epazote), CEtOHE (meat with ethanolic extract of epazote) and ASC (meat with sodium ascorbate solution). The characteristics ...

  7. Use of LANDSAT images of vegetation cover to estimate effective hydraulic properties of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleson, Peter S.; Jasinski, Michael F.

    1988-01-01

    The estimation of the spatially variable surface moisture and heat fluxes of natural, semivegetated landscapes is difficult due to the highly random nature of the vegetation (e.g., plant species, density, and stress) and the soil (e.g., moisture content, and soil hydraulic conductivity). The solution to that problem lies, in part, in the use of satellite remotely sensed data, and in the preparation of those data in terms of the physical properties of the plant and soil. The work was focused on the development and testing of a stochastic geometric canopy-soil reflectance model, which can be applied to the physically-based interpretation of LANDSAT images. The model conceptualizes the landscape as a stochastic surface with bulk plant and soil reflective properties. The model is particularly suited for regional scale investigations where the quantification of the bulk landscape properties, such as fractional vegetation cover, is important on a pixel by pixel basis. A summary of the theoretical analysis and the preliminary testing of the model with actual aerial radiometric data is provided.

  8. The effect of leaf litter cover on surface runoff and soil erosion in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Niu, Jianzhi; Xie, Baoyuan

    2014-01-01

    The role of leaf litter in hydrological processes and soil erosion of forest ecosystems is poorly understood. A field experiment was conducted under simulated rainfall in runoff plots with a slope of 10%. Two common types of litter in North China (from Quercus variabilis, representing broadleaf litter, and Pinus tabulaeformis, representing needle leaf litter), four amounts of litter, and five rainfall intensities were tested. Results revealed that the litter reduced runoff and delayed the beginning of runoff, but significantly reduced soil loss (psoil plot, and for Q. variabilis and P. tabulaeformis, respectively, and average sediment yield was 85.1% and 79.9% lower. Rainfall intensity significantly affected runoff (R = 0.99, psoil erosion control, since no significant differences (p≤0.05) were observed in runoff and sediment variables between two litter-covered plots. In contrast, litter mass was probably not a main factor in determining runoff and sediment because a significant correlation was found only with sediment in Q. variabilis litter plot. Finally, runoff yield was significantly correlated (perosion processes was crucial, and both rainfall intensity and litter characteristics had an impact on these processes.

  9. Laser spectroscopy of finite size and covering effects in magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, V. N.; Ignatenko, A. N.; Ivanov, A. V.; Irkhin, V. Yu

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on the impact of the size of magnetite clusters on various magnetic properties (magnetic moment, Curie temperature, blocking temperature etc) have been carried out. The methods of magnetic separation and centrifugation of water suspensions of biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) allow one to produce fractions with diameters of nanoparticles in the range of 4-22 nm. The size of the NPs is controlled by the methods of dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For the first time the DLS method is applied in real time to control the size during the process of the separation of the NPs in aqueous suspensions. The changes of the size of NPs cause a shift in the Curie temperature and changes in the specific magnetic properties of the iron NPs. The experimental data is interpreted on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations for the classical Heisenberg model with different bulk and surface magnetic moments. It is demonstrated experimentally and by theoretical modeling that the magnetic properties of magnetite NPs are determined not only by their sizes, but also by their surface spin states, while both growing and falling dependences of the magnetic moment (per Fe3O4 formula unit) are possible, depending on the number of magnetic atoms in the nanoparticle. NPs that are both clean and covered with bioresorbable layer clusters have been investigated.

  10. Effect of Land Use and Cover Change on Air Quality in Urban Sprawl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the frequent urban air pollution episodes worldwide recently, decision-makers and government agencies are struggling for sustainable strategies to optimize urban land use/cover change (LUCC and improve the air quality. This study, thus, aims to identify the underlying relationships between PM10 concentration variations and LUCC based on the simulated PM10 surfaces in 2006 and 2013 in the Changsha-Zhuzhou-Xiangtan agglomeration (CZT, using a regression modeling approach. LUCC variables and associated landscape indexes are developed and correlated with PM10 concentration variations at grid level. Results reveal that the overall mean PM10 concentrations in the CZT declined from 106.74 μg/m3 to 94.37 μg/m3 between 2006 and 2013. Generally, variations of PM10 concentrations are positively correlated with the increasing built-up area, and negatively correlated with the increase in forests. In newly-developed built-up areas, PM10 concentrations declined with the increment of the landscape shape index and the Shannon diversity index and increased with the growing Aggregation index and Contagion index. In other areas, however, the reverse happens. These results suggest that LUCC caused by urban sprawl might be an important factor for the PM10 concentration variation in the CZT. The influence of the landscape pattern on PM10 concentration may vary in different stages of urban development.

  11. Effect of land use/cover change on land surface temperatures - The Nile Delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereher, Mohamed E.

    2017-02-01

    In this study remote sensing techniques were employed to investigate the impact of land use/cover change on land surface temperatures (LST) for a highly dynamic landscape, i.e. the Nile Delta. Land use change was determined from analyzing a 15 years of bi-monthly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) dataset acquired from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra satellite along with a synchronized 13 years of bi-monthly LST dataset retrieved from MODIS Aqua satellite. Time series analysis for NDVI and LST data was carried out at selected locations experiencing land use change. Mean LST change was determined for each location before and after the land use change. Results indicate that NDVI composite data for 15 years proved sufficient for delineating land use change. Significant spatial changes include the transformation from agriculture to urban land, which increased the LST by 1.7 °C during the 13 years and the transformation of bare land to agriculture, which decreased the LST by 0.52 °C for the same period. Due to the explosive population growth in the Nile Delta, urban encroachment upon agricultural land could, hence, promote a prolonged regional warming by modifying the micro-climate and other climate-related phenomena.

  12. Effects of large-scale wildfire on ground foraging ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tritia; Turschak, Greta; Brehme, Cheryl; Rochester, Carlton; Mitrovich, Milan; Fisher, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effect of broad-scale wildfire on ground foraging ants within southern California. In October and November of 2003, two wildfires burned large portions of the wildlands within San Diego County. Between January 2005 and September 2006, we surveyed 63 plots across four sites to measure the effect of the fires on the ant assemblages present in four vegetation types: 1) coastal sage scrub, 2) chaparral, 3) grassland, and 4) woodland riparian. Thirty-six of the 63 plots were sampled before the fires between March 2001 and June 2003. Mixed model regression analyses, accounting for the burn history of each plot and our pre- and postfire sampling efforts, revealed that fire had a negative effect on ant species diversity. Multivariate analyses showed that ant community structure varied significantly among the four vegetation types, and only the ant assemblage associated with coastal sage scrub exhibited a significant difference between burned and unburned samples. The most notable change detected at the individual species level involved Messor andrei (Mayr), which increased from ant samples to 32.1% in burned plots postfire. We theorize that M. andrei responded to the increase of bare ground and postfire seed production, leading to an increase in the detection rate for this species. Collectively, our results suggest that wildfires can have short-term impacts on the diversity and community structure of ground foraging ants in coastal sage scrub. We discuss these findings in relation to management implications and directions for future research.

  13. Application of Ground Phosphate Rock to Diminish the Effects of Simulated Acid Rain of Soil Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGYUAN-YAN; LIXUE-YUAN

    1992-01-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain retained in soil on the properties of acid soil and its diminishing by application of ground phosphate rock were investigated by using the sorption method.Results show as follows:(1)For yellow brown soil,the effect of simulated acid rain on the properties of soil with a pH value of 5.9 was relatively small,except a great quantity of acid rain deposited on it.(2) for red soil,the effect of simulated acid rain on the properties of soil was significant.With the increase of the amount of acid deposition,the pH value of soil was declined,but the contents of exchangeable H+,Al3+ and Mn2+ and the amount of SO41- retention were increased.(3) Many properties of acid soils could be improved by applying ground phosphate rock.For example,pH value of soils and the amounts of available P and exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ were increased,and the amounts of exchangeable H+ and Al3+ and SO42- retained was reduced.The application of ground posphate rock could effctively diminish the pollution of acid rain to soil.

  14. Ground Vehicle Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Ground Vehicle Robotics Jim Parker Associate Director, Ground Vehicle Robotics UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...DATE 20 AUG 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED 09-05-2013 to 15-08-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics 5a...Willing to take Risk on technology -User Evaluated -Contested Environments -Operational Data Applied Robotics for Installation & Base Ops -Low Risk

  15. Integrating the effects of forest cover on slope stability in a deterministic landslide susceptibility model (TRIGRS 2.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieher, T.; Rutzinger, M.; Bremer, M.; Meissl, G.; Geitner, C.

    2014-12-01

    The potentially stabilizing effects of forest cover in respect of slope stability have been the subject of many studies in the recent past. Hence, the effects of trees are also considered in many deterministic landslide susceptibility models. TRIGRS 2.0 (Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability; USGS) is a dynamic, physically-based model designed to estimate shallow landslide susceptibility in space and time. In the original version the effects of forest cover are not considered. As for further studies in Vorarlberg (Austria) TRIGRS 2.0 is intended to be applied in selected catchments that are densely forested, the effects of trees on slope stability were implemented in the model. Besides hydrological impacts such as interception or transpiration by tree canopies and stems, root cohesion directly influences the stability of slopes especially in case of shallow landslides while the additional weight superimposed by trees is of minor relevance. Detailed data on tree positions and further attributes such as tree height and diameter at breast height were derived throughout the study area (52 km²) from high-resolution airborne laser scanning data. Different scenarios were computed for spruce (Picea abies) in the study area. Root cohesion was estimated area-wide based on published correlations between root reinforcement and distance to tree stems depending on the stem diameter at breast height. In order to account for decreasing root cohesion with depth an exponential distribution was assumed and implemented in the model. Preliminary modelling results show that forest cover can have positive effects on slope stability yet strongly depending on tree age and stand structure. This work has been conducted within C3S-ISLS, which is funded by the Austrian Climate and Energy Fund, 5th ACRP Program.

  16. Cruising the rain forest floor: butterfly wing shape evolution and gliding in ground effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespedes, Ann; Penz, Carla M; DeVries, Philip J

    2015-05-01

    Flight is a key innovation in the evolutionary success of insects and essential to dispersal, territoriality, courtship and oviposition. Wing shape influences flight performance and selection likely acts to maximize performance for conducting essential behaviours that in turn results in the evolution of wing shape. As wing shape also contributes to fitness, optimal shapes for particular flight behaviours can be assessed with aerodynamic predictions and placed in an ecomorphological context. Butterflies in the tribe Haeterini (Nymphalidae) are conspicuous members of understorey faunas in lowland Neotropical forests. Field observations indicate that the five genera in this clade differ in flight height and behaviour: four use gliding flight at the forest floor level, and one utilizes flapping flight above the forest floor. Nonetheless, the association of ground level gliding flight behaviour and wing shape has never been investigated in this or any other butterfly group. We used landmark-based geometric morphometrics to test whether wing shapes in Haeterini and their close relatives reflected observed flight behaviours. Four genera of Haeterini and some distantly related Satyrinae showed significant correspondence between wing shape and theoretical expectations in performance trade-offs that we attribute to selection for gliding in ground effect. Forewing shape differed between sexes for all taxa, and male wing shapes were aerodynamically more efficient for gliding flight than corresponding females. This suggests selection acts differentially on male and female wing shapes, reinforcing the idea that sex-specific flight behaviours contribute to the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Our study indicates that wing shapes in Haeterini butterflies evolved in response to habitat-specific flight behaviours, namely gliding in ground effect along the forest floor, resulting in ecomorphological partitions of taxa in morphospace. The convergent flight behaviour and wing morphology

  17. How well do we characterize the biophysical effects of vegetation cover change? Benchmarking land surface models against satellite observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duveiller, Gregory; Forzieri, Giovanni; Robertson, Eddy; Georgievski, Goran; Li, Wei; Lawrence, Peter; Ciais, Philippe; Pongratz, Julia; Sitch, Stephen; Wiltshire, Andy; Arneth, Almut; Cescatti, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Changes in vegetation cover can affect the climate by altering the carbon, water and energy cycles. The main tools to characterize such land-climate interactions for both the past and future are land surface models (LSMs) that can be embedded in larger Earth System models (ESMs). While such models have long been used to characterize the biogeochemical effects of vegetation cover change, their capacity to model biophysical effects accurately across the globe remains unclear due to the complexity of the phenomena. The result of competing biophysical processes on the surface energy balance varies spatially and seasonally, and can lead to warming or cooling depending on the specific vegetation change and on the background climate (e.g. presence of snow or soil moisture). Here we present a global scale benchmarking exercise of four of the most commonly used LSMs (JULES, ORCHIDEE, JSBACH and CLM) against a dedicated dataset of satellite observations. To facilitate the understanding of the causes that lead to discrepancies between simulated and observed data, we focus on pure transitions amongst major plant functional types (PFTs): from different tree types (evergreen broadleaf trees, deciduous broadleaf trees and needleleaf trees) to either grasslands or crops. From the modelling perspective, this entails generating a separate simulation for each PFT in which all 1° by 1° grid cells are uniformly covered with that PFT, and then analysing the differences amongst them in terms of resulting biophysical variables (e.g net radiation, latent and sensible heat). From the satellite perspective, the effect of pure transitions is obtained by unmixing the signal of different 0.05° spatial resolution MODIS products (albedo, latent heat, upwelling longwave radiation) over a local moving window using PFT maps derived from the ESA Climate Change Initiative land cover map. After aggregating to a common spatial support, the observation and model-driven datasets are confronted and

  18. Effects of continuous cover forestry on soil moisture pattern - Beginning steps of a Hungarian study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicz, Péter; Bartha, Dénes; Brolly, Gábor; Csáfordi, Péter; Csiszár, Ágnes; Eredics, Attila; Gribovszki, Zoltán; Király, Géza; Kollár, Tamás; Korda, Márton; Kucsara, Mihály; Nótári, Krisztina; Kornél Szegedi, Balázs; Tiborcz, Viktor; Zagyvai, Gergely; Zagyvai-Kiss, Katalin Anita

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays Hungarian foresters encounter a new challenge. The traditional management practices do not meet anymore with the demand of the civil society. The good old clearcut is no more a supported technology in forest regeneration. The transition to the continuous cover forestry induces much higher spatial variability compared to the even aged, more or less homogeneous, monoculture stands. The gap cutting is one of the proposed key methods in the Hungarian forestry. There is an active discussion among forest professionals how to determine the optimal gap size to maintain ideal conditions for the seedlings. Among other open questions for example how the surrounding trees modify the moisture pattern of the forest floor in the gap? In the early steps of a multidisciplinary project we established four research plots to study the spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture in the forest gap and the surrounding undisturbed stand. Each plot is located in oak (Quercus spp.) stands. Natural regeneration of oak stands is more problematic in our climate compared to the beech (Fagus sylvatica) which is located in the more humid or semi-humid areas of our country. All plots are located in the western part of Hungary: close to Sopron, Bejcgyertyános, Vép and Vajszló settlements. The last plot is an extensive research area, which is located in the riparian zone of a tributary of Feketevíz River. We monitor here the close-to-surface groundwater level fluctuation with pressure transducers. With a diurnal fluctuation based method it is possible to quantify the evapotranspiration differences between the gap and the stand. In two of the remaining stands (Bejcgyertyános and Vép) the gaps were opened in 2010. The monitoring of soil moisture began in 2013. A mobile sensor is used to monitor soil-moisture in a regular grid. The spatial variability of soil-moisture time-series shows a characteristic pattern during the growing-season. The plot in Sopron was established in 2013

  19. Effects of green manure cover crops on Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Shu-Jen; Li, Nian-Jhen; Yeh, Chih-Chun; Tang, Li-Cheng; Chi, Hsin

    2014-06-01

    Spodoptera litura (F.) is an important pest of numerous agro-economic crops, including green manure cover crops. In Taiwan, sesbania (Sesbanin roxburghii Merr.), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.), and rapeseed (Brassicae campestris L. variety chinensis) are the most popular green manure crops; sesbania and sunn hemp are commonly planted in warm seasons, whereas rapeseed is grown in the winter. In this study, life-table data for S. litura reared on these three green manures were collected to evaluate their roles as refuges of this pest. The net reproductive rate, intrinsic rate of increase, and finite rate of increase of S. litura were the highest when reared on sesbania (1428.1 offspring, 0.2327 d(-1), 1.2621 d(-1)), followed by sunn hemp (778.4 offspring, 0.2070 d(-1), 1.2300 d(-1)) and rapeseed (737.6 offspring, 0.2040 d(-1), 1.2263 d(-1)). The high growth rates on these green manure crops show that they can serve as potential breeding sites for S. litura. Population projection demonstrated the rapid growth of S. litura on sesbania, sunn hemp, and rapeseed as well. Because most growers have traditionally ignored pest management in green manure fields, the mass emergence of S. litura in these fields may cause unexpected infestations in nearby vegetable, corn, and peanut crops. This study shows that the use of green manures as sources of nutrients should be critically reassessed and an area-wide pest management program should be instituted by taking the population of S. litura in green manure fields into consideration.

  20. Effects of land cover change on temperature and rainfall extremes in multi-model ensemble simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Pitman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of historical land use induced land cover change (LULCC on regional-scale climate extremes is examined using four climate models within the Land Use and Climate, IDentification of robust impacts project. To assess those impacts, multiple indices based on daily maximum and minimum temperatures and daily precipitation were used. We contrast the impact of LULCC on extremes with the impact of an increase in atmospheric CO2 from 280 ppmv to 375 ppmv. In general, consistent changes in both high and low temperature extremes are similar to the simulated change in mean temperature caused by LULCC and are restricted to regions of intense modification. The impact of LULCC on both means and on most temperature extremes is statistically significant. While the magnitude of the LULCC-induced change in the extremes can be of similar magnitude to the response to the change in CO2, the impacts of LULCC are much more geographically isolated. For most models, the impacts of LULCC oppose the impact of the increase in CO2 except for one model where the CO2-caused changes in the extremes are amplified. While we find some evidence that individual models respond consistently to LULCC in the simulation of changes in rainfall and rainfall extremes, LULCC's role in affecting rainfall is much less clear and less commonly statistically significant, with the exception of a consistent impact over South East Asia. Since the simulated response of mean and extreme temperatures to LULCC is relatively large, we conclude that unless this forcing is included, we risk erroneous conclusions regarding the drivers of temperature changes over regions of intense LULCC.

  1. Land cover and future climate effects on the provision of hydrological services: SWAT applied to a medium-sized watershed of northern Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Santos, Claudia; Nunes, João Pedro; Monteiro, António T.; Hein, Lars; Honrado, João

    2015-04-01

    Land cover change and future climate conditions may influence the provision of hydrological services. Therefore, it is important to understand how these drivers will affect water supplies and water hazards mitigation, in order to support the planning and management of water resources. In this study, the separated and combined effects of land cover and future climate on the hydrology of the Vez watershed, northern Portugal, were evaluated. The Vez watershed (252 Km2) has a humid climate regime where precipitation is abundant all over the year (1500mm/yr), with exception of a summer with almost no rain. The SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model was calibrated against daily discharge, sediments and nitrates, with good agreements between model predictions and field observations related with discharge; the calibration of sediments and nitrates can be considered adequate given the limitations of observed data. Four hypothetical land cover scenarios were applied under current climate conditions (eucalyptus/pine, oak, agriculture/vine and low vegetation). Results for land cover revealed that the option for one particular scenario would not compromise the overall provision of hydrological services. However, the eucalyptus/pine scenario could reduce the annual water quantity by 7%, and up to 17% in the summer period; and the agriculture/vine scenario could increase soil erosion and nitrate exports. For the future climate scenario, a statistical downscaling of four ensemble GCMs (General Circulation Models), bias-corrected with ground observations was done for 2021-40 and 2041-60, using the RCP 4.5 medium emissions scenario. An increase in temperature (annual: 1.6°C; summer: 2.02°C) and a decrease in precipitation (annual: -3.9%), more pronounced in summer (-25%) are expected in the Vez watershed. Although climate change has only a modest effect in the reduction of the total annual discharge (-7%), the effect on streamflow during summer can be more pronounced (between

  2. The Effects of Cover, Copy, and Compare, Performance Feedback and Rewards on the Mathematical Calculation Skills of Students Identified with Math Difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Geetal

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the isolated effects of Cover, Copy and Compare (CCC) and the effects of CCC paired with performance feedback (CCC + PF) and rewards (CCC + RW) on the mathematical calculation skills of first grade students identified with math difficulty. Four research questions were addressed in this study. 1. Does Cover, Copy, and Compare…

  3. Effects and implications of fault zone heterogeneity and anisotropy on earthquake strong ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Jou

    This thesis consists of two parts. Part one is concerned with the effect of fault zone heterogeneity on the strong ground motion of the Loma Preita earthquake. Part two is concerned with the effect of the effective hexagonal anisotropy of a fault zone on strong ground motion. A superposition of Gaussian beams is used to analyze these problems because it can account for both the rupture history of the fault plane and the fault zone heterogeneity. We also extend this method to investigate the combined effects of the rupture process on a fault plane and medium anisotropy on the synthetic seismograms. The strong ground motion of the Loma Prieta Earthquake is synthesized using a known three-dimensional crustal model of the region, a rupture model determined under the assumption of laterally homogeneous structure, and Green's functions computed by superposition of Gaussian beams. Compared to results obtained assuming a laterally homogeneous crust, stations lying to the northeast of the rupture zone are predicted to be defocused, while stations lying to the west of the fault trace are predicted to be focused. The defocusing is caused by a zone of high velocity material between the San Andreas and Sargent faults, and the focusing is caused by a region of low velocity lying between the Zayantes and San Andreas faults. If lateral homogeneity is assumed, the net effect of the predicted focusing and defocusing is to bias estimates of the relative slip of two high slip regions found in inversions of local and teleseismic body waves. These biases are similar in magnitude to those estimated for waveform inversions from the effects of using different subsets of data and/or different misfit functions and are similar in magnitude to the effects predicted for non-linear site responses.

  4. Effectiveness and Safety of Endoscopic Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures Using a New Fully Covered Self Expandable Metal Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir S. Wagh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In patients with benign biliary strictures, the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMS has been proposed as an alternative to plastic stenting, but high quality prospective data are sparse. This study was performed to evaluate the long-term effectiveness and safety of a new fully covered SEMS for benign biliary strictures. Methods. All consecutive patients with benign biliary strictures were treated with placement of a fully covered SEMS (WallFlex for 6 months. Short- and long-term stricture resolution, adverse events, and ease of stent removal were recorded. Results. 23 patients were enrolled. Stricture etiology was chronic pancreatitis (14, postorthotopic liver transplant (4, idiopathic (4, and biliary stones (1. All ERCPs were technically successful. All stents were successfully removed. Short-term stricture resolution was seen in 22/23 (96% patients. Long-term success was 15/18 (83.3%. All 3 failures were patients with biliary strictures in the setting of chronic calcific pancreatitis. Conclusions. The use of the new SEMS for the treatment of benign biliary strictures led to short-term stricture resolution in the vast majority of patients. Over a long-term followup the success rate appears favorable compared to historical results achieved with multiple plastic stenting, particularly in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01238900.

  5. [Effect of operational modes on community structure of type I methanotroph in the cover soil of municipal solid waste landfill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ting; He, Pin-Jing; Lü, Fan; Shao, Li-Ming

    2008-10-01

    Type I methanotroph is crucial for methane oxidization and it responses fast to the changes in environment. In this study, 16S rDNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) gene fingerprint technology was applied to investigate the effect of operational modes, i. e. high-density polyethylene liner (HDPE) isolation or subsurface irrigation of landfill leachate and vegetation, on community structure and diversity of type I methanotroph in soils covering municipal solid waste landfill. 16S rDNA based phylogenetic analysis reveals type I methanotroph in all tested soils belongs to Methylobacter. According to Shannon-Wiener diversity index and principal component analysis, landfill leachate subsurface irrigation and vegetation have more impact on type I methanotroph community structure and diversity than HDPE liner isolation does, and they reduce type I methanotroph diversity. Leachate irrigation is supposed to inhibit the growth of Methylobacter population. Community structure of type I methanotroph in landfill cover soil isolated by HDPE, i.e. invaded by landfill gas, shifts during long-term gas interference. When cover age is 1.5 years old, Shannon-Wiener diversity index of type I methanotroph reaches its maximum.

  6. Temporal assessment on land use land cover of Somalia after the effect of the civil war using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulle, Abdinur; Tan, Adhwa Amir; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Abdullahi, Saleh

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse land use and cover changes for the studied area during 1992-2015 and particularly evaluate the effect of civil war on these changes. Three Landsat images were used; Landsat 4 (1992), Landsat 7 (2000) and Landsat 8 (2015). Assessment of changes has been applied through three supervised classification algorithms, support vector machine, minimum classifier, and mahalanobis classifier. The result shows that SVM is providing highest overall accuracy of 98.5% for the years 2000 and 2015 with kappa coefficient of 0.9803 in year 2015. The change detection result show that the higher changes is between year 1992-2000 where vegetation land cover has dropped down to 11.1% and undeveloped area has increased to 11.4%. Whereas for year 2000-2015, higher changes belongs to build up area by 3.30% while undeveloped area and vegetation land cover keep decreasing by 2.64% and 1.93% respectively.

  7. Effect of Snow-cover Duration on Plant Species Diversity of Alpine Meadows on the Eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Although snow cover plays an important role in structuring plant diversity in the alpine zone, there are few studies on the relationship between snow cover and species diversity of alpine meadows on the eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. To assess the effect of snow cover on plant species diversity of alpine meadows, we used ten parallel transects of 60 m × 1 m for this study and described the changes in species diversity and composition associated with snow depth. With the division of snow depth into six classes, the highest species richness (S) and species diversity (H') occurred with an intermediate snow depth, i.e., class Ⅲ and class Ⅳ, showing a unimodal curve with the increase in snow depth. The relationship between snow depth and plant diversity (both richness and Shannon index) could be depicted by quadratic equations. There was no evident relationship between diversity (both S and H') and soil water content, which implied that other more important factors influenced species diversity. The patterns of diversity found in our study were largely attributed to freeze-thaw alteration, length of growing season and disturbances of livestock grazing. Furthermore, snow depth affected species composition, as evaluated by the Sorensen's index of similarity. In addition, almost all species limited to one snow depth class were found only in class Ⅲ and class Ⅳ, indicating that intermediate snow depth was suitable for the survival and growth of many alpine species.

  8. Hydro-peaking at Tonstad power plant in Norway Modelled effects on currents, temperatures and ice cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjomsland, Torulv; Bakken, Tor Haakon.

    2012-07-01

    Hydro-peaking ing was done by pumping water from Sirdalsvatn to Homstoelvatn by night and using it for production the following day. The effect of the hydro-peaking was simulated by mathematical modelling. Hydro-peaking led to considerably changes in water level in Homstoelvatn, 3.5 m up and down each day. For Sirdalsvatn the difference was around 3/4 m. Hydro-peaking increased the current speed and current pattern especially near the openings of the tunnels in Sirdalsvatn and Homstoelvatn. The vertical mixing was increased throughout the lake. In Sirdalsvatn the hydro-peaking led to reduced temperatures near surface and increased temperatures at greater depths due to increased vertical mixing, especially during the autumn and the first part of winter. The circulation period was delayed and prolonged by a week or two. In Sirdalsvatn hydro-peaking resulted in a shorter period with ice cover. In both Sirdalsvatn and Homstoelvatn reduced ice cover formation may be connected to areas near the tunnel due to increased current velocities. Rapid water level changes may break up continuous ice cover along the shores.(Author)

  9. In-situ ground gamma spectrometry — an effective tool for geological mapping (the Male Karpaty Mts., Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojzeš Andrej

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents the results of profile in-situ gamma spectrometry measurements that sought to determine the content of natural radionuclides 40K, 238U and 232Th in a near surface horizon of rocks, their weathering cover and soils in the area of the Malé Karpaty Mts. It is widely established that the exploration of radioactivity of bedrocks and cover rocks can be a very effective and useful tool for both geological mapping, for identifying deposits of mineral resources, and even addressing the issues of structural and tectonic geology. This assertion is equally confirmed by the ground gamma spectrometry measurements carried out as part of this case study on larger scales, seeking more detailed geological structure solutions. The results obtained provide a welcome addition to an already existing database, which monitors the content of naturally occurring radionuclides individually for every rock lithotype of the Western Carpathians, by elaborating on the data collected by previous research and by updating this database for any future needs. The presented results confirmed the low to medium radioactivity levels of rocks and soils in the studied area. The highest values were detected in granitoids and metamorfic phyllitic rocks of the Malé Karpaty Mts. core; the lowest values were detected in carbonates, arenaceous sediments and, above all, amphibolite bodies. In this way, the presented results of the interpreted profile (P5 confirm the model of local geological structure as represented on the most up-to-date edition of the geological map of the Male Karpaty Mts. (Polak et al. 2011.

  10. Effect of land cover and green space on land surface temperature of a fast growing economic region in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, A.; Kanniah, K. D.; Ho, C. H.

    2015-10-01

    Green space must be increased in the development of new cities as green space can moderate temperature in the cities. In this study we estimated the land surface temperature (LST) and established relationships between LST and land cover and various vegetation and urban surface indices in the Iskandar Malaysia (IM) region. IM is one of the emerging economic gateways of Malaysia, and is envisaged to transform into a metropolis by 2025. This change may cause increased temperature in IM and therefore we conducted a study by using Landsat 5 image covering the study region (2,217 km2) to estimate LST, classify different land covers and calculate spectral indices. Results show that urban surface had highest LST (24.49 °C) and the lowest temperature was recorded in, forest, rubber and water bodies ( 20.69 to 21.02°C). Oil palm plantations showed intermediate mean LST values with 21.65 °C. We further investigated the relationship between vegetation and build up densities with temperature. We extracted 1000 collocated pure pixels of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Normalized Difference Built-up Index (NDBI), Urban Index (UI) and LST in the study area. Results show a strong and significant negative correlation with (R2= -0.74 and -0.79) respectively between NDVI, NDWI and LST . Meanwhile a strong positive correlation (R2=0.8 and 0.86) exists between NDBI, UI and LST. These results show the importance of increasing green cover in urban environment to combat any adverse effects of climate change.

  11. The 8-year follow-up of the PIAMA intervention study assessing the effect of mite-impermeable mattress covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, U; de Jongste, J C; Kerkhof, M; Oldewening, M; Postma, D; van Strien, R T; Wijga, A H; Willers, S M; Wolse, A; Gerritsen, J; Smit, H A; Brunekreef, B

    2012-02-01

    Exposure to high levels of house dust mite (HDM) allergens is associated with the development of allergic sensitization to HDM, a risk factor for the development of asthma, rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis. We studied the effect of an early intervention with mite-impermeable mattress covers on HDM allergen levels and the development of asthma and mite allergy throughout the first 8 years of life. High-risk children (allergic mother) were prenatally recruited and randomly allocated to two groups receiving mite allergen-impermeable (n = 416) and placebo mattress covers (n = 394) or no intervention (n = 472). Asthma and allergies were assessed yearly by questionnaire. Specific immunoglobulin E and bronchial hyper-responsiveness were measured at the age of 8 years. Mattress dust samples collected at different time points were analyzed for HDM allergens. At the age of 8 years, levels of HDM allergen Der f1 but not Der p1 were lower in the active than the placebo mattress cover group. In repeated measures analyses, we found a temporary decreased risk of asthma symptoms at the age of 2 years in the intervention group compared to the placebo group and a temporary association between higher HDM allergen exposure at the age of 3 months and more asthma symptoms. Early intervention with mite-impermeable mattress covers is successful in reducing exposure to Der f1; it only temporarily reduces the risk of asthma symptoms and does not reduce the risk of hay fever, eczema, and allergic sensitization. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. The effect of short ground vegetation on terrestrial laser scans at a local scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lei; Powrie, William; Smethurst, Joel; Atkinson, Peter M.; Einstein, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can record a large amount of accurate topographical information with a high spatial accuracy over a relatively short period of time. These features suggest it is a useful tool for topographical survey and surface deformation detection. However, the use of TLS to survey a terrain surface is still challenging in the presence of dense ground vegetation. The bare ground surface may not be illuminated due to signal occlusion caused by vegetation. This paper investigates vegetation-induced elevation error in TLS surveys at a local scale and its spatial pattern. An open, relatively flat area vegetated with dense grass was surveyed repeatedly under several scan conditions. A total station was used to establish an accurate representation of the bare ground surface. Local-highest-point and local-lowest-point filters were applied to the point clouds acquired for deriving vegetation height and vegetation-induced elevation error, respectively. The effects of various factors (for example, vegetation height, edge effects, incidence angle, scan resolution and location) on the error caused by vegetation are discussed. The results are of use in the planning and interpretation of TLS surveys of vegetated areas.

  13. How flexibility and dynamic ground effect could improve bio-inspired propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Swimming animals use complex fin motions to reach remarkable levels of efficiency, maneuverability, and stealth. Propulsion systems inspired by these motions could usher in a new generation of advanced underwater vehicles. Two aspects of bio-inspired propulsion are discussed here: flexibility and near-boundary swimming. Experimental work on flexible propulsors shows that swimming efficiency depends on wake vortex timing and boundary layer attachment, but also on fluid-structure resonance. As a result, flexible vehicles or animals could potentially improve their performance by tracking their resonance properties. Bio-inspired propulsors were also found to produce more thrust with no loss in efficiency when swimming near a solid boundary. Higher lift-to-drag ratios for near-ground fixed-wing gliders is commonly known as ground effect. This newly observed "dynamic ground effect" suggests that bio-inspired vehicles and animals could save energy by harnessing the performance gains associated with near-boundary swimming. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research (MURI N00014-08-1-0642, Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzolara) and the National Science Foundation (DBI-1062052, PI Lisa Fauci; EFRI-0938043, PI George Lauder).

  14. Effects of Land Cover / Land Use, Soil Texture, and Vegetation on the Water Balance of Lake Chad Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babamaaji, R. A.; Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Chad Basin (LCB) has experienced drastic changes of land cover and poor water management practices during the last 50 years. The successive droughts in the 1970s and 1980s resulted in the shortage of surface water and groundwater resources. This problem of drought has a devastating implication on the natural resources of the Basin with great consequence on food security, poverty reduction and quality of life of the inhabitants in the LCB. Therefore, understanding the effects of land use / land cover must be a first step to find how they disturb cycle especially the groundwater in the LCB. The abundance of groundwater is affected by the climate change through the interaction with surface water, such as lakes and rivers, and disuse recharge through an infiltration process. Quantifying the impact of climate change on the groundwater resource requires reliable forecasting of changes in the major climatic variables and other spatial variations including the land use/land cover, soil texture, topographic slope, and vegetation. In this study, we employed a spatially distributed water balance model WetSpass to simulate a long-term average change of groundwater recharge in the LCB of Africa. WetSpass is a water balance-based model to estimate seasonal and spatial distribution of surface runoff, interception, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge. The model is especially suitable for studying the effect of land use/land cover change on the water regime in the LCB. The present study describes the concept of the model and its application to the development of recharge map of the LCB. The study shows that major role in the water balance of LCB. The mean yearly actual evapotranspiration (ET) from the basin range from 60mm - 400 mm, which is 90 % (69mm - 430) of the annual precipitation from 2003 - 2010. It is striking that about 50 - 60 % of the total runoff is produced on build-up (impervious surfaces), while much smaller contributions are obtained from vegetated

  15. Ground-water system, estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties, and effects of pumping on ground-water flow in Triassic sedimentary rocks in and near Lansdale, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Ground water in Triassic-age sedimentary fractured-rock aquifers in the area of Lansdale, Pa., is used as drinking water and for industrial supply. In 1979, ground water in the Lansdale area was found to be contaminated with trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and other man-made organic compounds, and in 1989, the area was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) National Priority List as the North Penn Area 6 site. To assist the USEPA in the hydrogeological assessment of the site, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in 1995 to describe the ground-water system and to determine the effects of changes in the well pumping patterns on the direction of ground-water flow in the Lansdale area. This determination is based on hydrologic and geophysical data collected from 1995-98 and on results of the simulation of the regional ground-water-flow system by use of a numerical model.Correlation of natural-gamma logs indicate that the sedimentary rock beds strike generally northeast and dip at angles less than 30 degrees to the northwest. The ground-water system is confined or semi-confined, even at shallow depths; depth to bedrock commonly is less than 20 feet (6 meters); and depth to water commonly is about 15 to 60 feet (5 to 18 meters) below land surface. Single-well, aquifer-interval-isolation (packer) tests indicate that vertical permeability of the sedimentary rocks is low. Multiple-well aquifer tests indicate that the system is heterogeneous and that flow appears primarily in discrete zones parallel to bedding. Preferred horizontal flow along strike was not observed in the aquifer tests for wells open to the pumped interval. Water levels in wells that are open to the pumped interval, as projected along the dipping stratigraphy, are drawn down more than water levels in wells that do not intersect the pumped interval. A regional potentiometric map based on measured water levels indicates that ground water flows from Lansdale towards discharge

  16. Effectiveness of porous covers for control of ammonia, reduced sulfur compounds, total hydrocarbons, selected volatile organic compounds, and odor from hog manure storage lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Shekhar; Ongwandee, Maneerat; Morrison, Glenn; Fitch, Mark; Surampalli, Rao

    2007-06-01

    Anaerobic lagoons are a major source of odor at concentrated animal feeding operations. Seven different kinds of artificial (geotextile and polyethylene foam) and natural (straw and redwood) permeable lagoon covers were evaluated for their potential to reduce odorous emissions generated by anaerobic waste lagoons. A novel floating sampling raft was constructed and used to simultaneously evaluate the effectiveness of lagoon covers on an operating swine waste lagoon. The air collected from the raft was evaluated for odor, total reduced sulfur (TRS) compounds, ammonia, total hydrocarbons, dimethyldisulfide, and trimethylamine. The emission rates from the lagoon were highly variable both temporally and spatially. All of the lagoon covers substantially reduced TRS emissions and odor. Geotextile fabric and a recycled foam cover exhibited the greatest reduction in total hydrocarbon emissions; natural covers were less effective. Because of consistently low emission rates of ammonia, no statistically significant reduction of ammonia emissions were observed from any of the lagoon covers.

  17. Sganzerla Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor da Rosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7917.2014v19n1p158 Neste artigo, realizo uma leitura do cinema de Rogério Sganzerla, desde o clássico O bandido da luz vermelha até os documentários filmados na década de oitenta, a partir de duas noções centrais: cover e over. Para isso, parto de uma controvérsia com o ensaio de Ismail Xavier, Alegorias do subdesenvolvimento, em que o crítico realiza uma leitura do cinema brasileiro da década de sessenta através do conceito de alegoria; depois releio uma série de textos críticos do próprio Sganzerla, publicados em Edifício Sganzerla, procurando repensar as ideias de “herói vazio” ou “cinema impuro” e sugerindo assim uma nova relação do seu cinema com o tempo e a representação; então busco articular tais ideias com certos procedimentos de vanguarda, como a falsificação, a cópia, o clichê e a colagem; e finalmente procuro mostrar que, no cinema de Sganzerla, a partir principalmente de suas reflexões sobre Orson Welles, a voz é usada de maneira a deformar a interpretação naturalista.

  18. Comparative evaluation of the effects of climate and land-cover changes on hydrologic responses of the Muskeg River, Alberta, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Hyung-Il Eum; Yonas Dibike; Terry Prowse

    2016-01-01

    Study region: The Muskeg River Basin located in the Oil-Sands region of northern Alberta, Canada. Study focus: An integrated modelling framework, which combines a process-based distributed hydrologic model with a dynamic land-cover simulation model is used to evaluate the effects of climate and land-cover changes on the hydrological regime in the basin. Land-cover types corresponding to three hypothetical levels of future industrial expansion are synthesized based on the current lease hold...

  19. Estimating pinyon and juniper cover across Utah using NAIP imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell B. Roundy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of Pinus L. (pinyon and Juniperus L. (juniper (P-J trees into sagebrush (Artemisia L. steppe communities can lead to negative effects on hydrology, loss of wildlife habitat, and a decrease in desirable understory vegetation. Tree reduction treatments are often implemented to mitigate these negative effects. In order to prioritize and effectively plan these treatments, rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods are needed to estimate tree canopy cover at the landscape scale. We used object based image analysis (OBIA software (Feature AnalystTM for ArcMap 10.1®, ENVI Feature Extraction®, and Trimble eCognition Developer 8.2® to extract tree canopy cover using NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program imagery. We then compared our extractions with ground measured tree canopy cover (crown diameter and line point intercept on 309 plots across 44 sites in Utah. Extraction methods did not consistently over- or under-estimate ground measured P-J canopy cover except where tree cover was >45%. Estimates of tree canopy cover using OBIA techniques were strongly correlated with estimates using the crown diameter method (r = 0.93 for ENVI, 0.91 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.92 for eCognition. Tree cover estimates using OBIA techniques had lower correlations with tree cover measurements using the line-point intercept method (r = 0.85 for ENVI, 0.83 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.83 for eCognition. All software packages accurately and inexpensively extracted P-J canopy cover from NAIP imagery when the imagery was not blurred, and when P-J cover was not mixed with Amelanchier alnifolia (Utah serviceberry and Quercus gambelii (Gambel’s oak, which had similar spectral values as P-J.

  20. Effect of plant cover on distribution of soil organic matter pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Ryzhova, Irina

    2013-04-01

    Numerous studies reported that quality and quantity of primary production and also the rate of litter decomposition determine the carbon (C) content and its distribution in soils. Our objective was to examine how the type of plant cover affects C sequestration in the following pools: unprotected, spatial inaccessible, interacting with silt and clay, and biochemically protected SOM. The large lysimeters of Moscow State University allowed quantification of C stocks under broadleaf forest (Acer platanoides and Quercus robur), coniferous forest (Picea abies) and agricultural crops (9-field rotation), while other soil forming factors affecting SOC content were identical. In 1965 the lysimeters (S=9 m2, depth=1.5 m) were filled with carbonate free clay loam taken in Moscow region, originated from the Valday glaciation, and plant communities listed above were planted. We collected soil samples from the mineral horizons, from 0-5 cm depth, in spring 2012. The soils were physically separated by combination of the particle size and density fractionations (8 fractions in total), and C and N contents were analyzed. The total C and N contents in non-fractionated soil were higher under broadleaf forest (66 and 3.1 g kg-1), than under coniferous forest (34.5 and 1.23 g kg-1) and agricultural crops (13.7 and 0.9 g kg-1). Under forests 45-50% of Ctotal and 30% of Ntotal were in the unprotected pool, in agricultural soil these percentages were in 3 times less. The greatest portions of protected C were in spatial inaccessible pool: 28, 32 and 40% of the Ctotal for broadleaf forest, coniferous forest and agricultural crops, respectively. However, the total C amount in this pool under agricultural crops was in 3 times less, than under forests. This is indicative for the loss of C-rich macroaggregates and an increase of C-depleted microaggregates in agricultural soils due to the plowing. The amounts of C, stabilized by interactions with silt and clay, were nearly the same (3-6 g kg-1

  1. The effect of coverings, including plastic bags and wraps, on mortality and morbidity in preterm and full-term neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatley, H K; Blencowe, H; Lawn, J E

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal hypothermia is an important risk factor for mortality and morbidity, and is common even in temperate climates. We conducted a systematic review to determine whether plastic coverings, used immediately following delivery, were effective in reducing the incidence of mortality, hypothermia and morbidity. A total of 26 studies (2271 preterm and 1003 term neonates) were included. Meta-analyses were conducted as appropriate. Plastic wraps were associated with a reduction in hypothermia in preterm (⩽29 weeks; risk ratio (RR)=0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46 to 0.71) and term neonates (RR=0.76; 95% CI 0.60 to 0.96). No significant reduction in neonatal mortality or morbidity was found; however, the studies were underpowered for these outcomes. For neonates, especially preterm, plastic wraps combined with other environmental heat sources are effective in reducing hypothermia during stabilization and transfer within hospital. Further research is needed to quantify the effects on mortality or morbidity, and investigate the use of plastic coverings outside hospital settings or without additional heat sources.

  2. The effect of coverings, including plastic bags and wraps, on mortality and morbidity in preterm and full-term neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatley, H K; Blencowe, H; Lawn, J E

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hypothermia is an important risk factor for mortality and morbidity, and is common even in temperate climates. We conducted a systematic review to determine whether plastic coverings, used immediately following delivery, were effective in reducing the incidence of mortality, hypothermia and morbidity. A total of 26 studies (2271 preterm and 1003 term neonates) were included. Meta-analyses were conducted as appropriate. Plastic wraps were associated with a reduction in hypothermia in preterm (⩽29 weeks; risk ratio (RR)=0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46 to 0.71) and term neonates (RR=0.76; 95% CI 0.60 to 0.96). No significant reduction in neonatal mortality or morbidity was found; however, the studies were underpowered for these outcomes. For neonates, especially preterm, plastic wraps combined with other environmental heat sources are effective in reducing hypothermia during stabilization and transfer within hospital. Further research is needed to quantify the effects on mortality or morbidity, and investigate the use of plastic coverings outside hospital settings or without additional heat sources. PMID:27109095

  3. Cover Your Cough! A Short and Simple Activity to Demonstrate the Antimicrobial Effect of Desiccation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Cook Easterwood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Many undergraduate microbiology laboratory manuals include exercises demonstrating the antimicrobial effects of physical agents, such as UV light and heat, and chemical agents, such as disinfectants and antibiotics (3, 4. There is, however, a lack of exercises examining the effects of desiccation on bacterial growth and survival. This particular form of antimicrobial control is especially relevant today with an increased emphasis on coughing and sneezing into one’s sleeve or a tissue, where microbes will not contaminate hands and will eventually desiccate and die (2. Desiccation can have bacteriostatic or bactericidal effects depending on the species, the material on which the organism has desiccated, and the length of time. The absence of water can damage many cellular components, including enzymes, nucleic acids, and cell membranes (1. However, many prokaryotes have some degree of resistance to desiccation, with Escherichia coli surviving around 24 hours and Bacillus species surviving upwards of 300 years, though these numbers can vary due to a number of confounding factors (5. Some of these factors include the method by which desiccation occurred, whether desiccation occurred in a natural or laboratory situation, and the species itself (5. To address the effects of desiccation on bacterial growth and survival, a short, simple exercise was developed. By inoculating various materials with bacterial cultures and allowing them to air-dry for 24 hours, students can visualize the effects of desiccation by analyzing the growth, or lack thereof, when organisms are transferred to nutrient agar plates. This exercise has been used in a health professions microbiology course as well as a microbiology course for biology and biochemistry majors. It is short enough to be conducted during a standard lecture period or during a longer laboratory period in conjunction with other experiments demonstrating the effectiveness of physical agents on microbial

  4. Structure of Ground state Wave Functions for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect: A Variational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sutirtha; Mandal, Sudhansu

    The internal structure and topology of the ground states for fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) are determined by the relative angular momenta between all the possible pairs of electrons. Laughlin wave function is the only known microscopic wave function for which these relative angular momenta are homogeneous (same) for any pair of electrons and depend solely on the filling factor. Without invoking any microscopic theory, considering only the relationship between number of flux quanta and particles in spherical geometry, and allowing the possibility of inhomogeneous (different) relative angular momenta between any two electrons, we develop a general method for determining a closed-form ground state wave function for any incompressible FQHE state. Our procedure provides variationally obtained very accurate wave functions, yet having simpler structure compared to any other known complex microscopic wave functions for the FQHE states. This method, thus, has potential in predicting a very accurate ground state wave function for the puzzling states such as the state at filling fraction 5/2. We acknowledge support from Department of Science and Technology, India.

  5. Effects of surfactant treatments on the wettability of a water repellent grass-covered dune sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Oostindie, K.; Kostka, S.J.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an important micronutrient and trace amounts are essential for crop growth. However, high concentrations of copper will produce toxic effects. Australia is increasingly developing production of crops in water repellent soils. Clay amendment, a common amelioration techniques used in Austral

  6. A Mesoscale Meteorological Model of Modified Land Cover to the Effect of Urban Heat Island in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yopi Ilhamsyah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A mesoscale meteorological model of modified land cover to the effect of urban heat island (UHI in Jakarta was done. Although higher temperature in the city has been generally known, factors and issues that result in the increase of temperature particularly nighttime temperature over the city, however, are not well-understood. Jakarta, the capital of Indonesia, is encountering urbanization problems foremost. The increasing demand of housing as well as rapid development of sky crapper building, market places and highway diminishes the vegetation which in turn trap heat in the troposphere throughout the year, particularly during dry season on June-August. The fifth-generation mesoscale meteorological model (MM5 was employed in the study. The model involves medium range forecast planetary boundary layer (MRF PBL scheme and land surface with two following parameters: i.e. roughness length over land and thermal inertia of land. These two parameters are chosen to enhance the characteristics of land surface. The simulation was carried out for 3 days on August 5-7, 2004 during dry season. The results showed that the simulation of surface temperature done by MM5 modified land cover described a good comparison to that of weather observation data. As a result, the effect of UHI was also well-observed during day-time. In addition, MM5 modified land cover simulation also illustrated a well-development of sea-breeze and country-breeze during mid-day and nighttime, respectively. However, long-term simulation is still required. Thus, daily diurnal cycles of air temperature and their differences can be well-observed in detail.

  7. Modeling the effects of land cover and use on landscape capability for urban ungulate populations: Chapter 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Harold; Kilheffer, Chellby R.; Francis, Robert A.; Millington, James D. A.; Chadwick, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Expanding ungulate populations are causing concerns for wildlife professionals and residents in many urban areas worldwide. Nowhere is the phenomenon more apparent than in the eastern US, where urban white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) populations are increasing. Most habitat suitability models for deer have been developed in rural areas and across large (>1000 km2) spatial extents. Only recently have we begun to understand the factors that contribute to space use by deer over much smaller spatial extents. In this study, we explore the concepts, terminology, methodology and state-of-the-science in wildlife abundance modeling as applied to overabundant deer populations across heterogeneous urban landscapes. We used classified, high-resolution digital orthoimagery to extract landscape characteristics in several urban areas of upstate New York. In addition, we assessed deer abundance and distribution in 1-km2 blocks across each study area from either aerial surveys or ground-based distance sampling. We recorded the number of detections in each block and used binomial mixture models to explore important relationships between abundance and key landscape features. Finally, we cross-validated statistical models of abundance and compared covariate relationships across study sites. Study areas were characterized along a gradient of urbanization based on the proportions of impervious surfaces and natural vegetation which, based on the best-supported models, also distinguished blocks potentially occupied by deer. Models performed better at identifying occurrence of deer and worse at predicting abundance in cross-validation comparisons. We attribute poor predictive performance to differences in deer population trajectories over time. The proportion of impervious surfaces often yielded better predictions of abundance and occurrence than did the proportion of natural vegetation, which we attribute to a lack of certain land cover classes during cold and snowy winters

  8. Large-scale biotic interaction effects - tree cover interacts with shade toler-ance to affect distribution patterns of herb and shrub species across the Alps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieto-Lugilde, Diego; Lenoir, Jonathan; Abdulhak, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    distributions has scarcely been investigated. Here, we used species distribution modeling (SDM) to assess the effect of tree cover on the elevational range limits of 1,378 herb and shrub species across the Alps, based on 18,798 vegetation plots. We hypothesize that tree cover will have a negative effect......, we simulated a removal experiment by comparing the elevational distribution of each species under high and low tree cover. Tree cover improved model performances and species’ response curves to a tree cover gradient varied depending on their shade tolerance, supporting the hypothesized antagonistic...... patterns, with varying effects according to shade tolerances. These findings have strong implications for the biotic responses of herbs and shrubs to future climate change with expected range-shift debts. Keywords: facilitation, light competition, size-asymmetric competition, species distribution models...

  9. Effect of channelling on water balance, oxygen diffusion and oxidation rate in mine waste rock with an inclined multilayer soil cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing; Yanful, Ernest K.

    2010-05-01

    Engineered soil covers provide an option to mitigate acid rock drainage through reduced water flow and gaseous oxygen influx to underlying mine waste. Channels such as fissures, cracks or fractures developed in the barrier may influence the long-term performance of the soil cover. However, limited published information is available on the extent to which soil cover performance is impacted by these fissures and cracks. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of channelling in a barrier layer on water flow and oxygen transport in a soil cover. Two inclined (a slope of 20%) multilayer soil covers were examined under laboratory conditions. One cover had a 10-cm wide sand-filled channel in a compacted barrier layer (silty clay) at the upslope section, while the other cover was a normal one without the channel pathway. The soil covers were installed in plastic boxes measuring 120 cm × 120 cm × 25 cm (width × height × thickness). The sand-filled channel was designed to represent the aggregate of fissures and cracks that may be present in the compacted barrier. The soil covers were subjected to controlled drying and wetting periods selected to simulate field situation at the Whistle mine site near Capreol, Ontario, Canada. The measured results indicated that interflow decreased from 72.8% of the total precipitation in the soil cover without channel flow to 35.3% in the cover with channel flow, and percolation increased from zero in the normal soil cover to 43.0% of the total precipitation in the cover with channel flow. Gaseous oxygen transfer into the waste rock below the cover soils was 1091 times greater in the cover with channel than in the soil cover without channel. The channel pathway present in the barrier layer acted as a major passage for water movement and gaseous oxygen diffusion into the waste rock layer, thus decreasing the performance of the soil cover. The spacing of the channel with respect to the length of the test box is similar to those

  10. Cost-Effective Control of Ground-Level Ozone Pollution in and around Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Xuxuan; Zhang Shiqiu; Xu Jianhua; Wu Dan; Zhu Tong

    2012-01-01

    Ground level ozone pollution has become a significant air pollution problem in Beijing. Because of the complex way in which ozone is formed, it is difficult for policy makers to identify optimal control options on a cost-effective basis. This paper identi- fies and assesses a range of options for addressing this problem. We apply the Ambient Least Cost Model and compare the eco- nomic costs of control options, then recommend the most effective sequence to realize pollution control at the lowest cost. The study finds that installing of Stage II gasoline vapor recovery system at Beijing's 1446 gasoline stations would be the most cost-effective option. Overall, options to reduce ozone pollution by cutting ve- hicular emissions are much more cost-effective than options to "clean up" coal-fired power plants.

  11. Analysis of the Effects of Different Land Use and Land Cover Classification on Surface Meteorological Variables using WRF Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sati, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    The continuous population growth and the subsequent economic expansion over centuries have been the primary drivers of land use /land cover (LULC) changes resulting in the environmental changes across the globe. Most of the urban areas being developed today are on the expense of agricultural or barren lands and the changes result from various practices such as deforestation, changing agriculture practices, rapid expansion of urban centers etc.For modeling applications, classification of land use is important and periodic updates of land cover are necessary to capture change due to LULC changes.Updated land cover and land use data derived from satellites offer the possibility of consistent and regularly collected information on LULC. In this study we explore the application of Landsat based LULC classification inWeather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in predicting the meteorology over Delhi, India. The supervised classification of Landsat 8 imagery over Delhi region is performed which update the urban extent as well as other Land use for the region. WRF model simulations are performed using LULC classification from Landsat data, United States Geological Survey (USGS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for various meteorological parameters. Modifications in LULC showed a significant effect on various surface meteorological parameters such as temperature, humidity, wind circulations and other underlying surface parameters. There is a considerable improvement in the spatial distribution of the surface meteorological parameters with correction in input LULC. The study demonstrates the improved LULC classification from Landsat data than currently in vogue and their potential to improve numerical weather simulations especially for expanding urban areas.The continuous population growth and the subsequent economic expansion over centuries have been the primary drivers of land use /land cover (LULC) changes resulting in the environmental changes

  12. Spatial Based Integrated Assessment of Bedrock and Ground Motions, Fault Offsets, and Their Effects for the October-November 2002 Earthquake Sequence on the Denali Fault, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, T. S.; Carlson, R.; Hansen, R.; Hulsey, L.; Ma, J.; White, D.; Barnes, D.; Shur, Y.

    2003-12-01

    A National Science Foundation (NSF) Small Grant Exploratory Research Grant was awarded to the University of Alaska Fairbanks to archive bedrock and ground motions and fault offsets and their effects for the October-November 2002 earthquake sequence on the Denali Fault, Alaska. The scope of work included the accumulation of all strong motion records, satellite imagery, satellite remote sensing data, aerial and ground photographs, and structural response (both measured and anecdotal) that would be useful to achieve the objective. Several interesting data sets were archived including ice cover, lateral movement of stream channels, landslides, avalanches, glacial fracturing, "felt" ground motions, and changes in water quantity and quality. The data sources may be spatially integrated to provide a comprehensive assessment of the bedrock and ground motions and fault offsets for the October-November 2002 earthquake sequence. In the aftermath of the October-November 2002 earthquake sequence on the Denali fault, the Alaskan engineering community expressed a strong interest to understand why their structures and infrastructure were not substantially damaged by the ground motions they experienced during the October-November 2002 Earthquake Sequence on the Denali Fault. The research work proposed under this NSF Grant is a necessary prerequisite to this understanding. Furthermore, the proposed work will facilitate a comparison of Denali events with the Loma Prieta and recent Kocelli and Dozce events in Turkey, all of which were associated with strike-slip faulting. Finally, the spatially integrated data will provide the basis for research work that is truly innovative. For example, is may be possible to predict the observed (1) landsliding and avalanches, (2) changes in water quantity and quality, (3) glacial fracturing, and (4) the widespread liquefaction and lateral spreading, which occurred along the Tok cutoff and Northway airport, with the bedrock and ground motions and

  13. Effectiveness of adaptive optics system in satellite-to-ground coherent optical communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Huang; Ke, Deng; Chao, Liu; Peng, Zhang; Dagang, Jiang; Zhoushi, Yao

    2014-06-30

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems can suppress the signal fade induced by atmospheric turbulence in satellite-to-ground coherent optical communication. The lower bound of the signal fade under AO compensation was investigated by analyzing the pattern of aberration modes for a one-stage imaging AO system. The distribution of the root mean square of the residual aberration is discussed on the basis of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the residual aberration of the AO system. The effectiveness of the AO system for improving the performance of coherent optical communication is presented in terms of the bit error rate and system availability.

  14. Numerical Study of a Long-Lived, Isolated Wake Vortex in Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a case observed during the 1990 Idaho Falls Test program, in which a wake vortex having an unusually long lifetime was observed while in ground effect. A numerical simulation is performed with a Large Eddy Simulation model to understand the response of the environment in affecting this event. In the simulation, it was found that one of the vortices decayed quickly, with the remaining vortex persisting beyond the time-bound of typical vortex lifetimes. This unusual behavior was found to be related to the first and second vertical derivatives of the ambient crosswind.

  15. Effectiveness of mite-impermeable covers: a hypothesis-generating meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boven, F E

    2014-12-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease. The subject of mite allergen control has evolved into a debate dominated by a Cochrane review by Gøtzsche and Johansen (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2008, Art. No: CD001187). A not well-discussed aspect of that study is the selection by those authors of a univariate meta-analysis including various interventions. This study extends the meta-analysis by Gøtzsche and Johansen and aims to generate hypotheses on the effectiveness of various bedding interventions, including the coverage of all bedding elements. Trials were selected based on environmental criteria. The interventions were classified according to the number of barriers used. Standardized mean differences yielded the mite load, three physiological outcomes and asthma symptom scores. The influence of covariates was examined with a mixed-effect model using the metafor package for meta-analysis in R. Twelve trials included 1187 observations. The interventions included one barrier or product (six trials), two barriers or partial control (four trials) and three barriers or integral control (two trials). The exposure data showed considerable heterogeneity (I(2) = 93%). The risk of bias significantly (P = 0.04) influenced the final load, the square root of the interaction between the baseline load and the type of intervention as well (95% CI: -0.66 to -0.07 μg/g; P = 0.02). Changes in load showed similar tendencies. Health outcomes showed moderate to considerable heterogeneity (physiological outcomes I(2) = 44-94%; symptom score I(2) = 93%). A meta-regression of bedding interventions indicates that integral control most significantly reduced mite load when the load was high at baseline. The number of trials was too small to allow an appropriate examination of health outcomes. Future studies are suggested to test the hypothesis that allergic patients benefit from integral control when the baseline mite load is high. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Reciprocity principle-based model for shielding effectiveness prediction of a rectangular cavity with a covered aperture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦重庆; 李月月

    2015-01-01

    According to the reciprocity principle, we propose an efficient model to compute the shielding effectiveness of a rectangular cavity with apertures covered by conductive sheet against an external incident electromagnetic wave. This problem is converted into another problem of solving the electromagnetic field leakage from the cavity when the cavity is excited by an electric dipole placed within it. By the combination of the unperturbed cavity field and the transfer impedance of the sheet, the tangential electric field distribution on the outer surface of the sheet is obtained. Then, the field distribution is regarded as an equivalent surface magnetic current source responsible for the leakage field. The validation of this model is verified by a comparison with the circuital model and the full-wave simulations. This time-saving model can deal with arbitrary aperture shape, various wave propagation and polarization directions, and the near-field effect.

  17. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a powered NASP-like configuration in ground effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a simplified NASP (for National Aerospace Plane Program)-like configuration, obtained in the NASA-Langley 14-by-22-foot subsonic tunnel. The model consisted of a triangular wedge forebody, a rectangular midsection housing the propulsion simulation system, and a rectangular wedge aftbody; it also included a delta wing, exhaust flow deflectors, and aftbody fences. Flow visualization was obtained by injecting water into the engine simulator inlets and using a laser light sheet to illuminate the resulting exhaust flow. It was found that power-on ground effects for NASP-like configuration can be substantial; these effects can be reduced by increasing the angle-of-attack to the value of the aftbody ramp angle. Power-on lift losses in ground effect increased with increasing thrust, but could be reduced by the addition of a delta wing to the configuration. Power-on lift losses also increased with use of aftbody fences.

  18. Direct effects of tillage on the activity density of ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) weed seed predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearin, A F; Reberg-Horton, S C; Gallandt, E R

    2007-10-01

    Ground beetles are well known as beneficial organisms in agroecosystems, contributing to the predation of a wide range of animal pests and weed seeds. Tillage has generally been shown to have a negative effect on ground beetles, but it is not known whether this is because of direct mortality or the result of indirect losses resulting from dispersal caused by habitat deterioration. In 2005, field experiments measured direct, tillage-induced mortality, of four carabid weed seed predators, Harpalus rufipes DeGeer, Agonum muelleri Herbst, Anisodactylus merula Germar, and Amara cupreolata Putzeys, and one arthropod predator, Pterostichus melanarius Illiger, common to agroecosystems in the northeastern United States. Three tillage treatments (moldboard plow, chisel plow, and rotary tillage) were compared with undisturbed controls at two sites (Stillwater and Presque Isle) and at two dates (July and August) in Maine. Carabid activity density after disturbance was measured using fenced pitfall traps installed immediately after tillage to remove any effects of dispersal. Rotary tillage and moldboard plowing reduced weed seed predator activity density 52 and 54%, respectively. Carabid activity density after chisel plowing was similar to the undisturbed control. This trend was true for each of the weed seed predator species studied. However, activity density of the arthropod predator P. melanarius was reduced by all tillage types, indicating a greater sensitivity to tillage than the four weed seed predator species. These results confirm the need to consider both direct and indirect effects of management in studies of invertebrate seed predators.

  19. Effects of two trimming methods of dairy cattle on concrete or rubber-covered slatted floors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouweltjes, W; Holzhauer, M; van der Tol, P P J; van der Werf, J

    2009-03-01

    This study monitored claw health, claw conformation, locomotion, activity, and step traits of cows from a single dairy herd that were trimmed according to the standard Dutch method or with an alternative "concave" trimming method. Half of the cows were kept in a stall section with concrete slatted floors in the alleys. The other cows were kept in a pen within the same housing with an identical concrete slatted floor in the alleys, but with a rubber top layer. All experimental cows were kept in the same environment for at least 3 mo before and after trimming. It was hypothesized that trimming for more-concave soles (i.e., with 3 to 5 mm of sole dug out under the claw bone) was preferred to the standard Dutch trimming with flat sole surfaces for cows kept in stalls with soft alley floors. None of the claw health or locomotion traits differed for the trimming methods. No interactions were found between flooring and trimming method. Floor effects were significant for several traits. Cows on the rubber-topped floors had significantly fewer sole hemorrhages (prevalence of 22 vs. 48% in mo 3) and larger claws (claw length 76.1 +/- 5.0 vs. 72.5 +/- 4.9 mm; heel height 49.3 +/- 6.3 vs. 46.0 +/- 6.4 mm; claw diagonal 129 +/- 6.4 vs. 125 +/- 6.9 mm), spent more time standing in the alleys (55.4 +/- 2.8 vs. 49.6 +/- 2.8%), and had higher activity (61.0 +/- 3.7 vs. 53.0 +/- 3.7 steps/h). This suggests greater claw comfort on rubber flooring compared with concrete flooring. Kinetic patterns during claw-floor contact while walking were similar for all treatments. During the double-support (stance) phase, claw-floor contact area increased to a maximum in the first 30% of double-support phase time, remained more or less stable until 80% of double-support phase time, and sharply decreased as the animal pushed off as shown by the change in center of pressure. A gradual change of center of pressure in the medial direction during double-support phase time was shown. The research

  20. Ecological weed management by cover cropping : effects on weed growth in autumn and weed establishment in spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.M.; Bastiaans, L.; Kropff, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Cover crops grown in the period between two main crops have potential as an important component of a system-oriented ecological weed management strategy. In late summer and autumn, the cover crop can suppress growth and seed production of weeds, whereas the incorporation of cover crop residues in sp

  1. Effects of land use/land cover on diurnal temperature range in the temperate grassland region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiangjin; Liu, Binhui; Lu, Xianguo

    2017-01-01

    As a fragile ecological zone, the temperate grassland region of China has experienced dramatic land use/land cover (LULC) changes due to human disturbances. So far, the impacts of LULC change on climate especially the diurnal temperature range (DTR) in this region are still not well understood. Based on the OMR (observation minus reanalysis) method, this study investigated the effects of LULC on DTR in the temperate grassland region of China. Considering the possible uncertainty of the results due to spatial resolution of the reanalysis dataset, two reanalysis datasets with different spatial resolutions were utilized. Results showed that LULC generally contributed to the decline of DTR in the temperate grassland region of China during 1980 to 2005. Due to different warming effects on monthly maximum temperature (Tmax) and minimum temperature (Tmin), grassland and forest tend to slightly decrease monthly DTR (approximately -0.053 to -0.050°C/decade and approximately -0.059 to -0.055°C/decade, respectively), while bare land has a slightly positive effect on DTR (approximately 0.018-0.021°C/decade). By contrast, cropland and urban tend to slightly decrease Tmax, obviously increase Tmin and thus result in a rapid decline of DTR (approximately -0.556 to -0.503°C/decade and approximately -0.617 to -0.612°C/decade, respectively). In the temperate grassland region of China, grassland vegetation changes due to human disturbances can have some effects on DTR mainly by changing the Tmax. Conversion from grassland to cropland could decrease the DTR by slowing down the increase of Tmax. But the conversion from grassland to bare land, as well as the reduction of grassland vegetation cover will increase Tmax, and consequently the DTR. The results suggest that grassland degradation is likely to result in daylight warming and increased DTR in the temperate grassland region of China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Scale-dependent effects of post-fire canopy cover on snowpack depth in montane coniferous forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jens T

    2017-09-01

    Winter snowpack in dry montane regions provides a valuable ecosystem service by storing water into the growing season. Wildfire in coniferous montane forests has the potential to indirectly affect snowpack accumulation and ablation (mass loss) rates by reducing canopy cover, which reduces canopy interception of snow but also increases solar radiation and wind speed. These counteracting effects create uncertainty regarding the canopy conditions that maximize post-fire snowpack duration, which is of concern as montane regions across the western United States experience increasingly warm, dry winters with below-average snowpack. The net effect of wildfire on snowpack depth and duration across the landscape is uncertain, and likely scale dependent. In this study, I tested whether intermediate levels of wildfire severity maximize snowpack depth by increasing accumulation while slowing ablation, using gridded, repeated snow depth measurements from three fires in the Sierra Nevada of California. Increasing fire severity had a strong negative effect on snowpack depth, suggesting that increased ablation after fire, rather than increased accumulation, was the dominant control over snowpack duration. Contrary to expectations, the unburned forest condition had the highest overall snowpack depth, and mean snow depth among all site visits was reduced by 78% from unburned forest to high-severity fire. However, at the individual tree scale, snowpack depth was greater under canopy openings than underneath canopy, controlling for effects of fire severity and aspect. This apparent paradox in snowpack response to fire at the stand vs. individual tree scales is likely due to greater variation in canopy cover within unburned and very low severity areas, which creates smaller areas for snow accumulation while reducing ablation via shading. Management efforts to maximize snowpack duration in montane forests should focus on retaining fine-scale heterogeneity in forest structure. © 2017 by

  3. Land cover effects on thresholds for surface runoff generation in Eastern Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meerveld, Ilja H. J.; Prasad Ghimire, Chandra; Zwartendijk, Bob W.; Ravelona, Maafaka; Lahitiana, Jaona; Bruijnzeel, L. Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Reforestation and natural regrowth in the tropics are promoted for a wide range of benefits, including carbon sequestration, land rehabilitation and streamflow regulation. However, their effects on runoff generation mechanisms and streamflow are still poorly understood. Evaporative losses (transpiration and interception) likely increase with forest regrowth, while infiltration rates are expected to increase and surface runoff occurrence is, therefore, expected to decrease. As part of a larger project investigating the effects of land use on hydrological processes in upland Eastern Madagascar, this presentation reports on a comparison of the thresholds for surface runoff generation at a degraded grassland site, a young secondary forest site (5-7 years; LAI 1.83) and a mature secondary forest site (ca. 20 years; LAI 3.39). Surface runoff was measured on two (young and mature secondary forest) or three (degraded site) 3 m by 10 m plots over a one-year period (October 2014-September 2015). Soil moisture was measured at four (degraded site) to six depths (both forests), while perched groundwater levels were measured in piezometers installed at 30 cm below the soil surface. Soil hydraulic conductivity was measured in situ at the surface and at 10-20 and 20-30 cm depths at three locations in each plot. Porosity, moisture content at field capacity and bulk density were determined from soil cores taken at 2.5-7.5, 12.5-17.5 and 22.5-27.5 cm depth. The porosity and texture of the different plots were comparable. The hydraulic conductivity of the soil differed between the different land uses and declined sharply at 20-30 cm below the soil surface. Total surface runoff during the study period was 11% of incident rainfall at the degraded site vs. 2% for the two secondary forest sites. Maximum monthly runoff coefficients were 22%, 3.5% and 2.7% for the degraded site, the young forest site and the mature forest site, respectively, but individual event runoff coefficients could be

  4. Effect of music therapy on oncologic staff bystanders: a substantive grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare; Magill, Lucanne

    2009-06-01

    Oncologic work can be satisfying but also stressful, as staff support patients and families through harsh treatment effects, uncertain illness trajectories, and occasional death. Although formal support programs are available, no research on the effects of staff witnessing patients' supportive therapies exists. This research examines staff responses to witnessing patient-focused music therapy (MT) programs in two comprehensive cancer centers. In Study 1, staff were invited to anonymously complete an open-ended questionnaire asking about the relevance of a music therapy program for patients and visitors (what it does; whether it helps). In Study 2, staff were theoretically sampled and interviewed regarding the personal effects of witnessing patient-centered music therapy. Data from each study were comparatively analyzed according to grounded theory procedures. Positive and negative cases were evident and data saturation arguably achieved. In Study 1, 38 staff unexpectedly described personally helpful emotional, cognitive, and team effects and consequent improved patient care. In Study 2, 62 staff described 197 multiple personal benefits and elicited patient care improvements. Respondents were mostly nursing (57) and medical (13) staff. Only three intrusive effects were reported: audibility, initial suspicion, and relaxation causing slowing of work pace. A substantive grounded theory emerged applicable to the two cancer centers: Staff witnessing MT can experience personally helpful emotions, moods, self-awarenesses, and teamwork and thus perceive improved patient care. Intrusive effects are uncommon. Music therapy's benefits for staff are attributed to the presence of live music, the human presence of the music therapist, and the observed positive effects in patients and families. Patient-centered oncologic music therapy in two cancer centers is an incidental supportive care modality for staff, which can reduce their stress and improve work environments and perceived

  5. The effects of vegetation cover on soil nematode communities in various biotopes disturbed by industrial emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šalamún, Peter; Hanzelová, Vladimíra; Miklisová, Dana; Šestinová, Oľga; Findoráková, Lenka; Kováčik, Peter

    2017-08-15

    Better understanding of interactions among belowground and aboveground components in biotopes may improve our knowledge about soil ecosystem, and is necessary in environment assessment using indigenous soil organisms. In this study, we proposed that in disturbed biotopes, vegetation play important role in the buffering of contamination impact on soil communities and decrease the ecological pressure on soil biota. To assess the effects of these interactions we compared nematode communities, known for their bioindication abilities, from four types of disturbed and undisturbed biotopes (coniferous forest, permanent grassland, agricultural field, clearings), where the main stress agent was represented by long-term acidic industrial emissions containing heavy metals (As, Cd, Cu, and Pb). To understand the ecological interactions taking place in studied biotopes, we studied abiotic factors (soil properties) and biotic factors (vegetation, nematode communities). Except significant increase in metals total and mobile concentrations in disturbed biotopes soil, we found acidification of soil horizon, mainly in the clearings (pH=3.68), due to SO2 precipitation. These factors has caused in clearings degradation of native phytocoenoses and decrease in decomposition rate characterized by high amount of organic matter (Cox=4.29%). Nematodes reacts to these conditions by shifts in trophic structure (bacteriovores to fungal feeders), increase in c-p 2 genera (Aphelenchoides, Acrobeloides, and Cephalobus), absence of sensitive groups (c-p 3-5, omnivores, predators), and decrease in ecological indices (SI, MI, MI2-5, H'). Similar contamination was found in forest biotope, but the nematodes composition indicates more suitable conditions; more complex community structure (presence of sensitive trophic and higher c-p groups), higher abundance and indices values, comparable with less stressed field and grassland biotopes. As showed our results, the vegetation undoubtedly plays an

  6. Effect of earthworms on the community structure of active methanotrophic bacteria in a landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héry, Marina; Singer, Andrew C; Kumaresan, Deepak; Bodrossy, Levente; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Prosser, Jim I; Thompson, Ian P; Murrell, J Colin

    2008-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, landfills are the primary anthropogenic source of methane emissions. Methanotrophic bacteria present in landfill biocovers can significantly reduce methane emissions via their capacity to oxidize up to 100% of the methane produced. Several biotic and abiotic parameters regulate methane oxidation in soil, such as oxygen, moisture, methane concentration and temperature. Earthworm-mediated bioturbation has been linked to an increase in methanotrophy in a landfill biocover soil (AC Singer et al., unpublished), but the mechanism of this trophic interaction remains unclear. The aims of this study were to determine the composition of the active methanotroph community and to investigate the interactions between earthworms and bacteria in this landfill biocover soil where the methane oxidation activity was significantly increased by the earthworms. Soil microcosms were incubated with 13C-CH4 and with or without earthworms. DNA and RNA were extracted to characterize the soil bacterial communities, with a particular emphasis on methanotroph populations, using phylogenetic (16S ribosomal RNA) and functional methane monooxygenase (pmoA and mmoX) gene probes, coupled with denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis, clone libraries and pmoA microarray analyses. Stable isotope probing (SIP) using 13C-CH4 substrate allowed us to link microbial function with identity of bacteria via selective recovery of 'heavy' 13C-labelled DNA or RNA and to assess the effect of earthworms on the active methanotroph populations. Both types I and II methanotrophs actively oxidized methane in the landfill soil studied. Results suggested that the earthworm-mediated increase in methane oxidation rate in the landfill soil was more likely to be due to the stimulation of bacterial growth or activity than to substantial shifts in the methanotroph community structure. A Bacteroidetes-related bacterium was identified only in the active bacterial community of earthworm-incubated soil but

  7. Hysteresis Effect of Runoff of the Heihe River on Vegetation Cover in the Ejina Oasis in Northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    JIN, Xiaomei; HU, Guangcheng; LI, Wenmei

    The relationship between vegetation growth and groundwater in arid areas is one of the most actively researching topics in ecohydrology. On account of little precipitation, the oasis is the only form of sustenance for living and economic development, for the local people in the arid areas of Northwest China. During recent years, with the increase of water consumption in the middle stream area of the Heihe river basin, the incoming water has decreased gradually and the area of the Ejina oasis in the downstream area has decreased continuously. It has caused lake drying, land desertification, and eco-environmental degradation. The vegetation growth of the oasis has a close relationship with the water resources. Therefore, research on the quantitative relationship between the runoff and the vegetation growth has significance in improving the eco-environment, and balancing the contradiction of water consumption and reasonable allocation of the water resources in the Heihe river basin. Combined with remote sensing data and runoff of the Heihe river, the quantitative relationship between the vegetation growth of the Ejina oasis and the runoff of the Heihe river has been established from the regional scale in this study. The result indicates that the growth of oasis vegetation depends on the runoff of the Heihe river and the groundwater. The time lag of the impact of the runoff of the river on the vegetation cover of the Ejina oasis is one year, and the groundwater links the vegetation cover and the runoff by this hysteresis effect.

  8. [Effects of soil covering on solar greenhouse pepper water use efficiency and soil nitrate N and available phosphorus contents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mao-juan; Liang, Yin-li; Chen, Jia-rui; Xiong, Ya-mei; Wei, Ze-xiu

    2007-06-01

    A greenhouse study on the effects of soil covering on pepper (Capsicum anmuum L.) water use efficiency and soil nitrate and available phosphorus contents showed that straw mulch + plastic film mulch could get the highest pepper yield water use efficiency (33.04 kg . m(-3)) and economic water use efficiency (50.22 yuan . m(-3)), followed by plastic film mulch, with the two parameters being 18.81 kg . m(-3) and 28.57 yuan . m(-3), respectively. Significant differences of nitrate N content in 0-20 cm soil layer were observed among different treatments. The control had the highest nitrate N content (50.33 mg . kg(-1)), followed by straw mulch (31.98 mg . kg(-1)) and straw + plastic film mulch (31.96 mg . kg(-1)), and plastic film mulch and applying water preserving agent. Compared with the control, soil covering could increase the nitrate N use efficiency of pepper, and decrease the accumulation of nitrate N in plough layer. In 0-20 cm soil layer, treatment plastic film mulch had the lowest available phosphorus content (0.72 mg . kg(-3)), and the second (0. 92 mg . kg(-1)) was the treatment straw + plastic film mulch. Treatments straw + plastic film mulch and plastic film mulch could increase pepper fruit yield and fertilizer use efficiency, and decrease fertilizer loss.

  9. Understanding the Effect of Land Cover Classification on Model Estimates of Regional Carbon Cycling in the Boreal Forest Biome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, John; Kang, Sinkyu

    2003-01-01

    The original objectives of this proposed 3-year project were to: 1) quantify the respective contributions of land cover and disturbance (i.e., wild fire) to uncertainty associated with regional carbon source/sink estimates produced by a variety of boreal ecosystem models; 2) identify the model processes responsible for differences in simulated carbon source/sink patterns for the boreal forest; 3) validate model outputs using tower and field- based estimates of NEP and NPP; and 4) recommend/prioritize improvements to boreal ecosystem carbon models, which will better constrain regional source/sink estimates for atmospheric C02. These original objectives were subsequently distilled to fit within the constraints of a 1 -year study. This revised study involved a regional model intercomparison over the BOREAS study region involving Biome-BGC, and TEM (A.D. McGuire, UAF) ecosystem models. The major focus of these revised activities involved quantifying the sensitivity of regional model predictions associated with land cover classification uncertainties. We also evaluated the individual and combined effects of historical fire activity, historical atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and climate change on carbon and water flux simulations within the BOREAS study region.

  10. Hanford site ground water protection management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    Ground water protection at the Hanford Site consists of preventative and remedial measures that are implemented in compliance with a variety of environmental regulations at local, state, and federal levels. These measures seek to ensure that the resource can sustain a broad range of beneficial uses. To effectively coordinate and ensure compliance with applicable regulations, the U.S. Department of Energy has issued DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE 1988a). This order requires all U.S. Department of Energy facilities to prepare separate ground water protection program descriptions and plans. This document describes the Ground Water Protection Management Plan (GPMP) for the Hanford Site located in the state of Washington. DOE Order 5400.1 specifies that the GPMP covers the following general topical areas: (1) documentation of the ground water regime; (2) design and implementation of a ground water monitoring program to support resource management and comply with applicable laws and regulations; (3) a management program for ground water protection and remediation; (4) a summary and identification of areas that may be contaminated with hazardous waste; (5) strategies for controlling hazardous waste sources; (6) a remedial action program; and (7) decontamination, decommissioning, and related remedial action requirements. Many of the above elements are currently covered by existing programs at the Hanford Site; thus, one of the primary purposes of this document is to provide a framework for coordination of existing ground water protection activities. The GPMP provides the ground water protection policy and strategies for ground water protection/management at the Hanford Site, as well as an implementation plan to improve coordination of site ground water activities.

  11. Ground Observation and Correction of P-band Radar Imaging Ionospheric Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ning

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For high resolution space-borne P-band SAR system, ionospheric effects could cause serious phase errors. These errors are causally related to