WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground coupled waves

  1. Ground-coupled air waves and diffracted infrasound from the Arequipa earthquake of June 23, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pichon, A.; Guilbert, J.; Vega, A.; Garcés, M.; Brachet, N.

    2002-09-01

    On June 23, 2001, a strong earthquake measuring Mw 8.4 occurred along the coast of south-central Peru. Coherent infrasonic waves were detected over a period of one hour by the IS08 infrasound station in Bolivia. Analysis of the ground-coupled air waves shows that the rupture propagated from the northwestern to the southeastern part of the fault with a rupture velocity of 3.3 km/s. The azimuth variation of the infrasonic waves is attributed to a distribution of secondary sources along the highest mountain ranges, which excite infrasonic waves that are diffracted to the ground. The predominant source of infrasound is likely distributed along the Andean Cordillera. Using the azimuth and arrival time determination, the horizontal scale size of the distant source regions of infrasonic waves is reconstructed over distances greater than 400 km.

  2. Ground-coupled air waves and diffracted infrasounds from the Arequipa earthquake of June 23, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepichon, A.; Guilbert, J.; Van de Walle, M.

    2001-12-01

    On June 23, 2001, a strong earthquake measuring Ms 8.2 occurred along the coast of south-central Peru. This event was detected by the IS08 infrasound station of Bolivia operating for the CTBTO(Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization). Coherent infrasonic waves have been detected over a period of one hour. In the first part of the signals, the analysis of the seismic coupled-air waves shows clearly that the rupture propagates from the northwertern to the southeastern part of the fault. The Doppler effect allows us to fixe the velocity of the rupture equal to 3.4 +/- 0.5 km.s-1. In the second part of the signals, the azimuth variation is interpreted as a distribution of secondary sources along the highest mountain ranges generating distant air-coupled waves in the atmosphere. The predominant source mechanism of the earthquake and two main aftershocks is likely diffracted pressure waves radiated along the Eastern Andean Cordillera from the southwest of the station to the coastline near Pamana. From the wave azimuth and arrival time determination, the horizontal scale size of the distant source regions remote from the epicenters is reconstructed over distances greater than 400 km. The generation of pressure waves associated with offshore source regions is also considered.

  3. Ground energy coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, P. D.

    The feasibility of ground coupling for various heat pump systems was investigated. Analytical heat flow models were developed to approximate design ground coupling devices for use in solar heat pump space conditioning systems. A digital computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) was written to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow in order to simulate the behavior of ground coupling experiments and to provide performance predictions which have been compared to experimental results. GROCS also has been integrated with TRNSYS. Soil thermal property and ground coupling device experiments are described. Buried tanks, serpentine earth coils in various configurations, lengths and depths, and sealed vertical wells are being investigated. An earth coil used to heat a house without use of resistance heating is described.

  4. Measurement and simulation of ground-coupled air waves and diffracted infrasound from the Kokoxili Earthquake, 14th Nov. 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, J.; Le Pichon, A.; Vallee, M.; Alcoverro, B.; Ulziibat, M.

    2002-12-01

    On November 14, 2001, a strong earthquake measuring Mm 7.8 occurred in the Qinghai Province (China). Coherent infrasonic waves were detected during more than one hour by the IS34 infrasound station in Mongolia (~1500 km from the epicenter). Using an appropriate acoustic propagation model, the inversion of the infrasonic measurements allows a precise localization of the secondary sources distribution along the Qinghai mountains. The predominant source of infrasound is likely ground-coupled air waves generated by the strong variations of topography due to energy carried out by surface seismic waves that travel from the epicenter region through the Qinghai mountains. To confirm the locations of these distant source regions, the pressure field has been reconstructed at IS34. For each element of the topography, a synthetic seismogram used as an input of the integral relation of Huygens-Rayleigh permits to estimate the pressure variation. The synthetic pressure field fit the recorded data in azimuth and in relative amplitude. These results confirm the hypothesis of a strong coupling between the Rayleigh waves and the atmosphere, as it has already been observed during the Arequipa earthquake of June 23rd 2001. The simulations also permit to validate the infrasonic propagation model. This favorable setting within a region of high mountains makes easier the evaluation of the relative contribution of the different source mechanisms involved in large earthquake.

  5. Coupled-cluster Green's function: Analysis of properties originating in the exponential parametrization of the ground-state wave function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Kowalski, Karol

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we derive basic properties of the Green's-function matrix elements stemming from the exponential coupled-cluster (CC) parametrization of the ground-state wave function. We demonstrate that all intermediates used to express the retarded (or, equivalently, ionized) part of the Green's function in the ω representation can be expressed only through connected diagrams. Similar properties are also shared by the first-order ω derivative of the retarded part of the CC Green's function. Moreover, the first-order ω derivative of the CC Green's function can be evaluated analytically. This result can be generalized to any order of ω derivatives. Through the Dyson equation, derivatives of the corresponding CC self-energy operator can be evaluated analytically. In analogy to the CC Green's function, the corresponding CC self-energy operator can be represented by connected terms. Our analysis can easily be generalized to the advanced part of the CC Green's function.

  6. Ground states of linearly coupled Schrodinger systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the standing waves of a linearly coupled Schrodinger system which arises from nonlinear optics and condensed matter physics. The coefficients of the system are spatially dependent and have a mixed behavior: they are periodic in some directions and tend to positive constants in other directions. Under suitable assumptions, we prove that the system has a positive ground state. In addition, when the L-infinity-norm of the coupling coefficient tends to zero, the asymptotic behavior of the ground states is also obtained.

  7. Coupling of Pi2 wave energy in the inner magnetosphere as inferred from low-latitude ground observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN DeSheng; YANG HuiGen; CHEN ZhuoTian; C. P. NIELSEN

    2008-01-01

    Taking advantage of high time-resolution (1 s) geomagnetic field measurements obtained at low-latitude stations, we investigated frequency differences of Pi2 pul-sations between the dayside and the nightside. Firstly, we examined two Pi2 cases globally observed by multiple ground stations and found that the dominant fre-quency peaks at the dayside showed latitudinal dependence, I.e., the higher (lower) frequency peak was predominant at lower (higher) latitude. We also noticed that the dominant Pi2 frequency on the nightaide was apparently higher than that on the dayside. We argue that the multiple frequency peaks observed on the ground are harmonics of a plasmaspheric cavity resonance mode (CRM) and that the latitu-dinal dependence of the dominant frequency peaks may result from the energy coupling between the CRM and field line resonance (FLR) occurred in the near Earth space. We also argue that the frequency difference between the dayside and the nightaide could be caused by the reason that a higher harmonic was observed in the nightaide plasmasphere but was not effectively observed in the dayside. In addition, we statistically examined 829 Pi2 events that were simultaneously re-corded at Kakioka (KAK, Maglat=27.2°) and Jicamarca (JIC, Maglat=0.0°), the two stations separated by~10 h in local time (LT) and one of them (JIC) is located at the dip equator. We found that the Pi2 frequency observed at KAK on the nightside was higher than that observed at JIC on the dayside on average. After investigating the occurrence histogram of the frequency difference (△f=fJIC-fKAK) for the events si-multaneously observed at KAK and JIC, we found that close to half of the events had the identical frequency (|△f|<1.0 mHz). The statistical results are consistent with the facts reflected by case studies.

  8. Coupling of Pi2 wave energy in the inner magnetosphere as inferred from low-latitude ground observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.; P.; NIELSEN

    2008-01-01

    Taking advantage of high time-resolution (1 s) geomagnetic field measurements obtained at low-latitude stations, we investigated frequency differences of Pi2 pul-sations between the dayside and the nightside. Firstly, we examined two Pi2 cases globally observed by multiple ground stations and found that the dominant fre-quency peaks at the dayside showed latitudinal dependence, i.e., the higher (lower) frequency peak was predominant at lower (higher) latitude. We also noticed that the dominant Pi2 frequency on the nightside was apparently higher than that on the dayside. We argue that the multiple frequency peaks observed on the ground are harmonics of a plasmaspheric cavity resonance mode (CRM) and that the latitu-dinal dependence of the dominant frequency peaks may result from the energy coupling between the CRM and field line resonance (FLR) occurred in the near Earth space. We also argue that the frequency difference between the dayside and the nightside could be caused by the reason that a higher harmonic was observed in the nightside plasmasphere but was not effectively observed in the dayside. In addition, we statistically examined 829 Pi2 events that were simultaneously re-corded at Kakioka (KAK, Maglat=27.2°) and Jicamarca (JIC, Maglat=0.0°), the two stations separated by ~10 h in local time (LT) and one of them (JIC) is located at the dip equator. We found that the Pi2 frequency observed at KAK on the nightside was higher than that observed at JIC on the dayside on average. After investigating the occurrence histogram of the frequency difference (△f=fJIC-fKAK) for the events si-multaneously observed at KAK and JIC, we found that close to half of the events had the identical frequency (|△f |<1.0 mHz). The statistical results are consistent with the facts reflected by case studies.

  9. Full-wave modelling of ground-penetrating radars: antenna mutual coupling phenomena and sub-surface scattering processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caratelli, D.; Yarovoy, A.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology finds applications in many areas such as geophysical prospecting, archaeology, civil engineering, environmental engineering, and defence applications as a non-invasive sensing tool [3], [6], [18]. One key component in any GPR system is the receiver/transmitt

  10. Coupled-cluster Green's function: Analysis of properties originating in the exponential parametrization of the ground-state wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo; Kowalski, Karol

    2016-12-23

    In this paper we derive basic properties of the Green’s function matrix elements stemming from the exponential coupled cluster (CC) parametrization of the ground-state wave function. We demon- strate that all intermediates used to express retarded (or equivalently, ionized) part of the Green’s function in the ω-representation can be expressed through connected diagrams only. Similar proper- ties are also shared by the first order ω-derivatives of the retarded part of the CC Green’s function. This property can be extended to any order ω-derivatives of the Green’s function. Through the Dyson equation of CC Green’s function, the derivatives of corresponding CC self-energy can be evaluated analytically. In analogy to the CC Green’s function, the corresponding CC self-energy is expressed in terms of connected diagrams only. Moreover, the ionized part of the CC Green’s func- tion satisfies the non-homogeneous linear system of ordinary differential equations, whose solution may be represented in the exponential form. Our analysis can be easily generalized to the advanced part of the CC Green’s function.

  11. Optimized ground coupled heat pump mechanical package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catan, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    This project addresses the question of how well a ground coupled heat pump system could perform with a heat pump which was designed specifically for such systems operating in a northern climate. Conventionally, systems are designed around water source heat pumps which are not designed for ground coupled heat pump application. The objective of the project is to minimize the life cycle cost for a ground coupled system given the freedom to design the heat pump and the ground coil in concert. In order to achieve this objective a number of modeling tools were developed which will likely be of interest in their own right.

  12. Recent results from a continuous wave stepped frequency GPR system using a new ground-coupled multi-element antenna array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, Neil; Linford, Paul; Payne, Andy

    2016-04-01

    The recent availability of multi-channel GPR instrumentation has allowed high-speed acquisition of densely sampled data sets over unprecedented areas of coverage. Such instrumentation has been of particular interest for the mapping of near-surface archaeological remains where the ability to collect GPR data at very close sample spacings (antenna array. Whilst this system originally utilised an air-coupled antenna array there remained some debate over the suitability of an air-coupled antenna for all site conditions, particularly where a conductive surface layer, typical of many archaeological sites in the UK, may impede the transfer of energy into the ground. Encouraging results obtained from an initial prototype ground-coupled antenna array led to the introduction of a full width 22 channel G1922 version in March 2014 for use with the MkIV GeoScope console, offering faster acquisition across a wider frequency bandwidth (60MHz to 3GHz) with a cross-line 0.075m spacing between the individual elements in the array. Field tests over the Roman remains at Silchester corroborated the results from the earlier prototype, demonstrating an increased depth of penetration at the site compared to the previous air-coupled array. Further field tests were conducted with the G1922 over a range of sites, including Roman villa sites, formal post-medieval garden remains and a medieval farmstead to assess the response of the ground-coupled antenna to more challenging site conditions, particularly through water saturated soils. A full production DXG1820 version of the antenna became available for field work in 2015 offering optimisation of the individual element design to aid the recovery of weak return signals. Again, this has proved useful over sites where the presence of water saturated soils may have compromised the use of an air-coupled antenna array, or potentially restricted the depth of signal penetration. Collecting densely samples GPR data over very large areas has, however

  13. The Coupling Waves of Multicore-Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Multicore-fiber as gain medium for fiber laser is introduced. The cores are coupled via evanescent waves. Analysis of the coupling waves is agree with the numerical simulations and experimental results.

  14. Random coupling of acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Christophe; Lott, Francois; Haynes, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    In numerical modeling of long-range acoustic propagation in the atmosphere, the effect of gravity waves on low-frequency acoustic waves is often ignored. As the sound speed far exceeds the gravity wave phase speed, these two types of waves present different spatial scales and their linear coupling is weak. It is possible, however, to obtain relatively strong couplings via sound speed profile changes with altitude. In the present study, this scenario is analyzed for realistic gravity wave fields and the incident acoustic wave is modeled as a narrow-banded acoustic pulse. The gravity waves are represented as a random field using a stochastic multiwave parameterization of non-orographic gravity waves. The parameterization provides independent monochromatic gravity waves, and the gravity wave field is obtained as the linear superposition of the waves produced. When the random terms are retained, a more generalized wave equation is obtained that both qualitatively and quantitatively agrees with the observations of several highly dispersed stratospheric wavetrains. Here, we show that the cumulative effect of gravity wave breakings makes the sensitivity of ground-based acoustic signals large, in that small changes in the parameterization can create or destroy an acoustic wavetrain.

  15. Internal wave coupling processes in Earth's atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Yiğit, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a contemporary review of vertical coupling in the atmosphere and ionosphere system induced by internal waves of lower atmospheric origin. Atmospheric waves are primarily generated by meteorological processes, possess a broad range of spatial and temporal scales, and can propagate to the upper atmosphere. A brief summary of internal wave theory is given, focusing on gravity waves, solar tides, planetary Rossby and Kelvin waves. Observations of wave signatures in the upper atmosphere, their relationship with the direct propagation of waves into the upper atmosphere, dynamical and thermal impacts as well as concepts, approaches, and numerical modeling techniques are outlined. Recent progress in studies of sudden stratospheric warming and upper atmospheric variability are discussed in the context of wave-induced vertical coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere.

  16. Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation is studied theoretically and experimentally. This coupling arises because of the electrochemical double layer, which exists along the solid-grain/fluid-electrolyte boundaries of porous media. Within the double layer, charge is redistributed, creat

  17. Coupled-cavity traveling-wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, D. J.; Omalley, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Computer program is developed for analysis of coupled cavity traveling waves tubes (TWT's) which are used in variety of radar and communications applications. Programmers can simulate tubes of arbitrary complexity such as input and output couplers and other features peculiar to one or few cavities which may be modeled by correct choices of input data.

  18. Coupling between whistler waves and slow-mode solitary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tenerani, Anna; Pegoraro, Francesco; Contel, Olivier Le

    2012-01-01

    The interplay between electron-scale and ion-scale phenomena is of general interest for both laboratory and space plasma physics. In this paper we investigate the linear coupling between whistler waves and slow magnetosonic solitons through two-fluid numerical simulations. Whistler waves can be trapped in the presence of inhomogeneous external fields such as a density hump or hole where they can propagate for times much longer than their characteristic time scale, as shown by laboratory experiments and space measurements. Space measurements have detected whistler waves also in correspondence to magnetic holes, i.e., to density humps with magnetic field minima extending on ion-scales. This raises the interesting question of how ion-scale structures can couple to whistler waves. Slow magnetosonic solitons share some of the main features of a magnetic hole. Using the ducting properties of an inhomogeneous plasma as a guide, we present a numerical study of whistler waves that are trapped and transported inside pr...

  19. Optimization of a ground coupled heat pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, V.D.; Catan, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    A cooperative analytical project has optimized a horizontal ground coil heat pump system for the Pittsburgh climate. This is the first step in the exploration of several advanced designs including various ground coil devices and advanced heat pump components. The project made use of new and existing design tools to simulate system performance and determine first cost. The system life cycle cost was minimized while constraining the system to meet the design day cooling load using a function minimizing program. Among the system parameters considered were: air-to-refrigerant frontal area, air-to-refrigerant fin pitch, air-to-refrigerant air flowrate, compressor displacement, liquid-to-refrigerant coil length, liquid-to-refrigerant coil diameter, ground coil fluid flowrate, ground coil length, and ground coil depth.

  20. Comb-Line Filter with Coupling Capacitor in Ground Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kitamura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A comb-line filter with a coupling capacitor in the ground plane is proposed. The filter consists of two quarter-wavelength microstrip resonators. A coupling capacitor is inserted into the ground plane in order to build strong coupling locally along the resonators. The filtering characteristics are investigated through numerical simulations as well as experiments. Filtering characteristics that have attenuation poles at both sides of the passband are obtained. The input susceptances of even and odd modes and coupling coefficients are discussed. The filters using stepped impedance resonators (SIRs are also discussed, and the effects of the coupling capacitor for an SIR structure are shown.

  1. COMPUTATIONS OF WIND-WAVE COUPLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We present numerical computations of a new wind-wave coupling theory that is governed by a system of nonlinear advance-delay differential equations (NLADDE). NLADDE are functional differential equations for which the derivative of an unknown function depends nonlinearly on the past (delayed), present, and future (advanced) values of the unknown function (if time is the independent variable). A practical numerical method for solving NLADDE is implemented, based on a collocation method. The method is tested f...

  2. Evaluation of ground stiffness parameters using continuous surface wave geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Anne; Foged, Niels

    2000-01-01

    -small-strain stiffness of the ground Gmax. Continuous surface wave geophysics offers a quick, non-intrusive and economical way of making such measurements. This paper reviews the continuous surface wave techniques and evaluates, in engineering terms, the applicability of the method to the site investigation industry....

  3. Evaluation of ground stiffness parameters using continuous surface wave geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Anne; Foged, Niels

    2000-01-01

    -small-strain stiffness of the ground Gmax. Continuous surface wave geophysics offers a quick, non-intrusive and economical way of making such measurements. This paper reviews the continuous surface wave techniques and evaluates, in engineering terms, the applicability of the method to the site investigation industry....

  4. ORBITAL INSTABILITY OF STANDING WAVES FOR THE COUPLED NONLINEAR KLEIN-GORDON EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zaihui; Guo Boling; Zhang Jian

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with a type of standing waves for the coupled nonlin-ear Klein-Gordon equations in three space dimensions. First we construct a suitable constrained variational problem and obtain the existence of the standing waves with ground state by using variational argument. Then we prove the orbital instability of the standing waves by defining invariant sets and applying some priori estimates.

  5. Coupled cluster calculations of ground and excited states of nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, K L; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Papenbrock, T; Piecuch, P

    2004-01-01

    The standard and renormalized coupled cluster methods with singles, doubles, and noniterative triples and their generalizations to excited states, based on the equation of motion coupled cluster approach, are applied to the He-4 and O-16 nuclei. A comparison of coupled cluster results with the results of the exact diagonalization of the Hamiltonian in the same model space shows that the quantum chemistry inspired coupled cluster approximations provide an excellent description of ground and excited states of nuclei. The bulk of the correlation effects is obtained at the coupled cluster singles and doubles level. Triples, treated noniteratively, provide the virtually exact description.

  6. Optimized ground coupled heat pump mechanical package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catan, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The system which was optimized was a horizontal earth coil in a given house in the Pittsburgh area. The types of components used in the heat pump are essentially conventional. The method of this study is derived from one used to optimize an air-source heat pump for operation at standard steady state conditions. A computer model, created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is used to predict heat pump performance for specified configuration and operating conditions. A predetermined set of design parameters is automatically altered by a constrained minimization program (a Numerical Algorithms Group library routine hereafter referred to as the optimizer) to find the combination for which the highest COP is predicted by the heat pump model. In the present study, the set of parameters to be varied include some pertaining to the ground coil as well as some pertaining to the heat pump. The optimizer, in this case, pursues a minimum life cycle cost which is calculated using the heat pump model, a ground coil model (called FTECM for Fast Transient Earth Coil model), and a parameterized cost model. The flow chart shows how the optimizer interacts with these programs to minimize life cycle cost.

  7. Convectively coupled Kelvin waves in CMIP5 coupled climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Li, Tim

    2016-04-01

    This study provided a quantitative evaluation of convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) over the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean simulated by 20 coupled climate models that participated in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. The two leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) modes of filtered daily precipitation anomalies are used to represent the eastward propagating CCKWs in both observations and simulations. The eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the EOF modes represent the spatial patterns and intensity of CCKWs respectively, and the lead-lag relationship between the two EOF principle components describe the phase propagation of CCKWs. A non-dimensional metric was designed in consideration of all the three factors (i.e., pattern, amplitude and phase propagation) for evaluation. The relative rankings of the models based on the skill scores calculated by the metric are conducted for the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, respectively. Two models (NorESM1-M and MPI-ESM-LR) are ranked among the best 20 % for both the regions. Three models (inmcm4, MRI-CGCM3 and HadGEM2-ES) are ranked among the worst 20 % for both the regions. While the observed CCKW amplitude is greater north of the equator in the Pacific, some models overestimate the CCKW ampliutde in the Southern Hemisphere. This bias is related to the mean state precipitation bias along the south Pacific convergence zone.

  8. Convectively coupled Kelvin waves in CMIP5 coupled climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Li, Tim

    2017-02-01

    This study provided a quantitative evaluation of convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) over the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean simulated by 20 coupled climate models that participated in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. The two leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) modes of filtered daily precipitation anomalies are used to represent the eastward propagating CCKWs in both observations and simulations. The eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the EOF modes represent the spatial patterns and intensity of CCKWs respectively, and the lead-lag relationship between the two EOF principle components describe the phase propagation of CCKWs. A non-dimensional metric was designed in consideration of all the three factors (i.e., pattern, amplitude and phase propagation) for evaluation. The relative rankings of the models based on the skill scores calculated by the metric are conducted for the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, respectively. Two models (NorESM1-M and MPI-ESM-LR) are ranked among the best 20 % for both the regions. Three models (inmcm4, MRI-CGCM3 and HadGEM2-ES) are ranked among the worst 20 % for both the regions. While the observed CCKW amplitude is greater north of the equator in the Pacific, some models overestimate the CCKW ampliutde in the Southern Hemisphere. This bias is related to the mean state precipitation bias along the south Pacific convergence zone.

  9. Polarization Diversity for HF Ground Wave Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Xiaolin; JIN Ming

    2001-01-01

    A new method of single sample polar-ization filtering is proposed.The algorithm is fast andsuitable for the polarization processing of stationaryor nonstationary polarized disturbed signals with oneor more independent sources of disturbance.An HFground wave polarimetric radar with the ability of ra-dio disturbance suppression is then introduced.Somenumerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of sin-gle sample polarization filtering method for groundwave polarimetric radar.

  10. Nonlinear spin wave coupling in adjacent magnonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadovnikov, A. V., E-mail: sadovnikovav@gmail.com; Nikitov, S. A. [Laboratory “Metamaterials,” Saratov State University, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Kotel' nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); Beginin, E. N.; Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Grishin, S. V.; Sheshukova, S. E. [Laboratory “Metamaterials,” Saratov State University, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-25

    We have experimentally studied the coupling of spin waves in the adjacent magnonic crystals. Space- and time-resolved Brillouin light-scattering spectroscopy is used to demonstrate the frequency and intensity dependent spin-wave energy exchange between the side-coupled magnonic crystals. The experiments and the numerical simulation of spin wave propagation in the coupled periodic structures show that the nonlinear phase shift of spin wave in the adjacent magnonic crystals leads to the nonlinear switching regime at the frequencies near the forbidden magnonic gap. The proposed side-coupled magnonic crystals represent a significant advance towards the all-magnonic signal processing in the integrated magnonic circuits.

  11. Coupled wave analysis of obliquely incident waves in thin film gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roey, J.; Lagasse, P. E.

    1981-02-01

    The problem of a guided wave obliquely incident on a grating etched in a thin film guide is considered. Two-dimensional coupled wave equations for the incident and reflected beams are derived for the cases of TE-TE, TE-TM, and TM-TM coupling. Two methods, a ray optic approximation and a coupled beam method, are proposed for the numerical solution of the coupled wave equations. Both methods are illustrated by a number of calculated examples.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Ground Coupling of Low Yield Nuclear Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Without nuclear testing, advanced simulation and experimental facilities, such as the National Ignition Facility ( NIF ), are essential to assuring...in planning future experimental work at NIF . 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 93 14. SUBJECT TERMS National Ignition Facility, GEODYN, Ground Coupling...simulation and experimental facilities, such as the National Ignition Facility ( NIF ), are essential to assuring safety, reliability, and effectiveness

  13. On the Ground State Wave Function of Matrix Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ying-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    We propose an explicit construction of the leading terms in the asymptotic expansion of the ground state wave function of BFSS SU(N) matrix quantum mechanics. Our proposal is consistent with the expected factorization property in various limits of the Coulomb branch, and involves a different scaling behavior from previous suggestions. We comment on some possible physical implications.

  14. On the ground state wave function of matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Yin, Xi

    2015-11-01

    We propose an explicit construction of the leading terms in the asymptotic expansion of the ground state wave function of BFSS SU( N ) matrix quantum mechanics. Our proposal is consistent with the expected factorization property in various limits of the Coulomb branch, and involves a different scaling behavior from previous suggestions. We comment on some possible physical implications.

  15. Coriolis-coupled wave packet dynamics of H + HLi reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanaban, R; Mahapatra, S

    2006-05-11

    We investigated the effect of Coriolis coupling (CC) on the initial state-selected dynamics of H+HLi reaction by a time-dependent wave packet (WP) approach. Exact quantum scattering calculations were obtained by a WP propagation method based on the Chebyshev polynomial scheme and ab initio potential energy surface of the reacting system. Partial wave contributions up to the total angular momentum J=30 were found to be necessary for the scattering of HLi in its vibrational and rotational ground state up to a collision energy approximately 0.75 eV. For each J value, the projection quantum number K was varied from 0 to min (J, K(max)), with K(max)=8 until J=20 and K(max)=4 for further higher J values. This is because further higher values of K do not have much effect on the dynamics and also because one wishes to maintain the large computational overhead for each calculation within the affordable limit. The initial state-selected integral reaction cross sections and thermal rate constants were calculated by summing up the contributions from all partial waves. These were compared with our previous results on the title system, obtained within the centrifugal sudden and J-shifting approximations, to demonstrate the impact of CC on the dynamics of this system.

  16. Coupling atmospheric and ocean wave models for storm simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting

    This thesis studies the wind-wave interactions through the coupling between the atmospheric model and ocean surface wave models. Special attention is put on storm simulations in the North Sea for wind energy applications in the coastal zones. The two aspects, namely storm conditions and coastal...... areas, are challenging for the wind-wave coupling system because: in storm cases, the wave field is constantly modified by the fast varying wind field; in coastal zones, the wave field is strongly influenced by the bathymetry and currents. Both conditions have complex, unsteady sea state varying...... with time and space that challenge the current coupled modeling system. The conventional approach of estimating the momentum exchange is through parameterizing the aerodynamic roughness length (z0) with wave parameters such as wave age, steepness, significant wave height, etc. However, it is found in storm...

  17. Interface between light coupled to excited-states transition and ground-state coherence of rubidium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Parniak, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an interface between light coupled to transition between excited states of rubidium and long-lived ground-state atomic coherence. In our proof-of-principle experiment a non-linear process of four-wave mixing in an open-loop configuration is used to achieve light emission proportional to independently prepared ground-state atomic coherence. We demonstrate strong correlations between Raman light heralding generation of ground-state coherence and the new four-wave mixing signal. Dependance of the efficiency of the process on laser detunings is studied.

  18. Exact Travelling Wave Solutions to a Coupled Nonlinear Evolution Equation[

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGDing-Jiang; ZHANGHong-Qing

    2004-01-01

    By using an improved hyperbola function method, several types of exact travelling wave solutions to a coupled nonlinear evolution equation are obtained, which include kink-shaped soliton solutions, bell-shaped soliton solutions, envelop solitary wave solutions, and new solitary waves. The method can be applied to other nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics.

  19. Exact Travelling Wave Solutions to a Coupled Nonlinear Evolution Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ding-Jiang; ZHANG Hong-Qing

    2004-01-01

    By using an improved hyperbola function method, several types of exact travelling wave solutions to a coupled nonlinear evolution equation are obtained, which include kink-shaped soliton solutions, bell-shaped soliton solutions, envelop solitary wave solutions, and new solitary waves. The method can be applied to other nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics.

  20. Dynamics of coupled light waves and electron-acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P K; Stenflo, L; Hellberg, M

    2002-08-01

    The nonlinear interaction between coherent light waves and electron-acoustic waves in a two-electron plasma is considered. The interaction is governed by a pair of equations comprising a Schrödinger-like equation for the light wave envelope and a driven (by the light pressure) electron-acoustic wave equation. The newly derived nonlinear equations are used to study the formation and dynamics of envelope light wave solitons and light wave collapse. The implications of our investigation to space and laser-produced plasmas are pointed out.

  1. Structural factors of solar system cluster ground coupled storage rationalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor V. Wysochin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The computational investigations of unsteady heat transfer in seasonal solar heat storage system were conducted. This storage system consists of nine ground heat exchangers. The investigations were made for periodical diurnal cycle charging during summer season. The heat exchanger is presented as vertical probe with concentric tubes arrangement. Aim: The aim of the work is the optimization of cluster ground coupled storage – the probes quantity in cluster, their lengths and interval – using high precision mathematical model. Materials and Methods: The mathematical model of conjugate solar system functioning and ground coupled storage involves differential equations describing the incoming and conversion of solar energy in solar collector. Also it includes the heat exchange in ground heat exchangers and three-dimensional soil mass. Results: The need of mutual influence accounting of the solar collector and the ground heat exchanger size ranges is shown. One more thing – capability of effectiveness improvement of the collector based on reasonable step size selection for cluster and selection of active heat exchangers quantity in requisite construction. Conclusions: The recommendations for organization of heat exchangers of the collector work are offered. The five-probe structure is the most effective one for cluster arrangement of seasonal heat storage. The recommended interval between probes is 4 meters.

  2. Requirements for Verifying Wave-Wave Coupling at Texcoco, Valley of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, W. R.

    2002-12-01

    A late-arriving monochromatic wave has been identified at the Texcoco accelerograph array in the Valley of Mexico, for the 2001 October 8 Coyuca, Guerrero (M 6.1) earthquake. Because this wave propagates nearly towards the epicentre, it must be locally-generated, and its combination of low velocity (160m/s phase, 60m/s group) long delay (85sec after s-wave arrival), distance from the basin margin (about 8km), and relatively high amplitude, are not consistent with current beliefs about wave attenuation in the lacustrine mud in which the wave travels. Three possibilities must be considered; that the mud does not attenuate motion as much as believed; that most of the wave energy does not travel in the mud; or that the observed wave is coupled to a less-attenuated wave so that energy lost in the mud is continually being replaced by wave-wave coupling. Wave-wave coupling is a likely mechanism because the monochromatic motion is at a frequency that differs from the readily-evaluated "layer frequency", ruling out the layer as the main determinant of frequency. Instead it is possible that the observed frequency is that at which a Rayleigh wave travels at the speed of a wave in a material below the surface (28m thick) layer. In order for wave-wave coupling to be unambiguously confirmed it is necessary to identify a layer of material which will support a wave at the observed velocity of 160m/s. Such a wave is unlikely to be a p-wave because p-waves in the profile are likely to have velocities in excess of 1500m/s. SCPT testing will readily determine whether an s-wave velocity of 160m/s is present in the profile. In the case of coupling of a Rayleigh wave to an acoustic wave it is relatively easy to identify the two waves and to ascertain that they travel at the same speed, on account of the widely differing nature of the two waves. A pressure detector will not respond to the Rayleigh wave, even though a seismometer will respond to the pressure wave. The situation is more

  3. Detecting topological order in a ground state wave function

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    A large class of topological orders can be understood and classified using the string-net condensation picture. These topological orders can be characterized by a set of data (N, d_i, F^{ijk}_{lmn}, \\delta_{ijk}). We describe a way to detect this kind of topological order using only the ground state wave function. The method involves computing a quantity called the ``topological entropy'' which directly measures the quantum dimension D = \\sum_i d^2_i.

  4. A Coupled Multiphysics Approach for Simulating Induced Seismicity, Ground Acceleration and Structural Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorney, Robert; Coleman, Justin; Wilkins, Amdrew; Huang, Hai; Veeraraghavan, Swetha; Xia, Yidong; Permann, Cody

    2017-04-01

    Numerical modeling has played an important role in understanding the behavior of coupled subsurface thermal-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes associated with a number of energy and environmental applications since as early as the 1970s. While the ability to rigorously describe all key tightly coupled controlling physics still remains a challenge, there have been significant advances in recent decades. These advances are related primarily to the exponential growth of computational power, the development of more accurate equations of state, improvements in the ability to represent heterogeneity and reservoir geometry, and more robust nonlinear solution schemes. The work described in this paper documents the development and linkage of several fully-coupled and fully-implicit modeling tools. These tools simulate: (1) the dynamics of fluid flow, heat transport, and quasi-static rock mechanics; (2) seismic wave propagation from the sources of energy release through heterogeneous material; and (3) the soil-structural damage resulting from ground acceleration. These tools are developed in Idaho National Laboratory's parallel Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment, and are integrated together using a global implicit approach. The governing equations are presented, the numerical approach for simultaneously solving and coupling the three coupling physics tools is discussed, and the data input and output methodology is outlined. An example is presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the coupled multiphysics approach. The example involves simulating a system conceptually similar to the geothermal development in Basel Switzerland, and the resultant induced seismicity, ground motion and structural damage is predicted.

  5. BIFURCATIONS OF TRAVELLING WAVE SOLUTIONS TO A COUPLED NONLINEAR WAVE SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Employ theory of bifurcations of dynamical systems to a system of coupled nonlin-ear equations, the existence of solitary wave solutions, kink wave solutions, anti-kink wave solutions and periodic wave solutions is obtained. Under different parametric conditions, various suffcient conditions to guarantee the existence of the above so-lutions are given. Some exact explicit parametric representations of travelling wave solutions are derived.

  6. Wave-Tide-Surge Coupled Simulation for Typhoon Maemi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byung Ho Choi; Byung Il Min; Kyeong Ok Kim; Jin Hee Yuk

    2013-01-01

    The main task of this study focuses on studying the effect of wave-current interaction on currents,storm surge and wind wave as well as effects of current induced wave refraction and current on waves by using numerical models which consider the bottom boundary layer and sea surface roughness parameter for shallow and smooth bed area around Korean Peninsula.The coupled system (unstructured-mesh SWAN wave and ADCIRC) run on the same unstructured mesh.This identical and homogeneous mesh allows the physics of wave-circulation interactions to be correctly resolved in both models.The unstructured mesh can be applied to a large domain allowing all energy from deep to shallow waters to be seamlessly followed.There is no nesting or overlapping of structured wave meshes,and no interpolation is required.In response to typhoon Maemi (2003),all model components were validated independently,and shown to provide a faithful representation of the system's response to this storm.The waves and storm surge were allowed to develop on the continental shelf and interact with the complex nearshore environment.The resulting modeling system can be used extensively for prediction of the typhoon surge.The result show that it is important to incorporate the wave-current interaction effect into coastal area in the wave-tide-surge coupled model.At the same time,it should consider effects of depth-induced wave breaking,wind field,currents and sea surface elevation in prediction of waves.Specially,we found that:(1) wave radiation stress enhanced the current and surge elevation otherwise wave enhanced nonlinear bottom boundary layer decreased that,(2) wind wave was significantly controlled by sea surface roughness thus we cautiously took the experimental expression.The resulting modeling system can be used for hindcasting (prediction) the wave-tide-surge coupled environments at complex coastline,shallow water and fine sediment area like areas around Korean Peninsula.

  7. Guided wave coupling in integrated-optic gratings - Normal incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roey, J.; Denturck, B.; Lagasse, P. E.

    1984-10-01

    The coupling between the different guided modes of an integrated-optic waveguide grating filter is analyzed. A numerical method based on a finite-difference scheme for the solution of this coupling problem in the case of normal incidence is presented. This allows one to study the influence of the grating profile on the coupling between guided or radiated waves. The exact numerical results are compared with approximate formulas for the coupling coefficient.

  8. Ground Signatures of EMIC Waves obtained From a 3D Global Wave Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, R.; Sydorenko, D.; Zong, Q.; Zhang, L.

    2016-12-01

    EMIC waves generated in the inner magnetosphere are important drivers of radiation belt particle loss. Van Allen Probes and ground observations of EMIC waves suggest that localized magnetospheric sources inject waves that are guided along geomagnetic field lines and then reflected and refracted in the low altitude magnetosphere [Kim, E.-H., and J. R. Johnson (2016), Geophys. Res. Lett., 43, 13-21, doi:10.1002/2015GL066978] before entering the ionosphere. The waves then spread horizontally within the F-region waveguide and propagate to the ground. To understand the observed properties of EMIC waves, a global 3D model of ULF waves in Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and neutral atmosphere has been developed. The simulation domain extends from Earth's surface to a spherical boundary a few tens of thousands of km in radius. The model uses spherical coordinates and incorporates an overset Yin-Yang grid that eliminates the singularity at the polar axis and improves uniformity of the grid in the polar areas [Kageyama, A., and T. Sato (2004), Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 5, Q09005, doi:10.1029/2004GC000734]. The geomagnetic field in the model is general, but is dipole in this study. The plasma is described as a set of electron and multiple species ion conducting fluids. Realistic 3D density profiles of various ion species as well as thermospheric parameters are provided by the Canadian Ionosphere Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) [Martynenko O.V. et al. (2014), J. Atmos. Solar-Terr. Phys., 120, 51-61, doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2014.08.014]. The global ULF wave model is applied to study propagation of EMIC waves excited in the equatorial plane near L=7. Wave propagation along field lines, reflection and refraction in the zone of critical frequencies, and further propagation through the ionosphere to the ground are discussed.

  9. A coupled "AB" system: Rogue waves and modulation instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C F; Grimshaw, R H J; Chow, K W; Chan, H N

    2015-10-01

    Rogue waves are unexpectedly large and localized displacements from an equilibrium position or an otherwise calm background. For the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) model widely used in fluid mechanics and optics, these waves can occur only when dispersion and nonlinearity are of the same sign, a regime of modulation instability. For coupled NLS equations, rogue waves will arise even if dispersion and nonlinearity are of opposite signs in each component as new regimes of modulation instability will appear in the coupled system. The same phenomenon will be demonstrated here for a coupled "AB" system, a wave-current interaction model describing baroclinic instability processes in geophysical flows. Indeed, the onset of modulation instability correlates precisely with the existence criterion for rogue waves for this system. Transitions from "elevation" rogue waves to "depression" rogue waves are elucidated analytically. The dispersion relation as a polynomial of the fourth order may possess double pairs of complex roots, leading to multiple configurations of rogue waves for a given set of input parameters. For special parameter regimes, the dispersion relation reduces to a cubic polynomial, allowing the existence criterion for rogue waves to be computed explicitly. Numerical tests correlating modulation instability and evolution of rogue waves were conducted.

  10. Breakup of Spiral Waves in Coupled Hindmarsh-Rose Neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun; JIA Ya; TANG Jun; YANG Li-Jian

    2008-01-01

    @@ Breakup of spiral wave in the Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nearest-neighbour couplings is reported.Appropriate initial values and parameter regions are selected to develop a stable spiral wave and then the Gauesian coloured noise with different intensities and correlation times is imposed on all neurons to study the breakup of spiral wave, respectively.Based on the mean field theory, the statistical factor of synchronization is defined to analyse the evolution of spiral wave.It is found that the stable rotating spiral wave encounters breakup with increasing intensity of Gaussian coloured noise or decreasing correlation time to certain threshold.

  11. Beta Value Coupled Wave Theory for Nonslanted Reflection Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Neipp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a modified coupled wave theory to describe the properties of nonslanted reflection volume diffraction gratings. The method is based on the beta value coupled wave theory, which will be corrected by using appropriate boundary conditions. The use of this correction allows predicting the efficiency of the reflected order for nonslanted reflection gratings embedded in two media with different refractive indices. The results obtained by using this method will be compared to those obtained using a matrix method, which gives exact solutions in terms of Mathieu functions, and also to Kogelnik’s coupled wave theory. As will be demonstrated, the technique presented in this paper means a significant improvement over Kogelnik’s coupled wave theory.

  12. Surface-wave mode coupling : modelling and inverting waveforms including body-wave phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquering, H.A.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with a similar problem as addressed by Li & Tanimoto (1993) in the surfacewave mode approach. In this thesis it is shown that surface-wave mode coupling is required when body-wave phases in laterally heterogeneous media are modelled by surface-wave mode summation. An efficie

  13. Holes and chaotic pulses of traveling waves coupled to a long-wave mode

    CERN Document Server

    Herrero, H; Herrero, Henar; Riecke, Hermann

    1997-01-01

    Localized traveling-wave pulses and holes, i.e. localized regions of vanishing wave amplitude, are investigated in a real Ginzburg-Landau equation coupled to a long-wave mode. In certain parameter regimes the pulses exhibit a Hopf bifurcation which leads to a breathing motion. Subsequently the oscillations undergo period-doubling bifurcations and become chaotic.

  14. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gong, E-mail: gchenncem@gmail.com; Schmid, Andreas K. [NCEM, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Mascaraque, Arantzazu [Depto. Física de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada IQFR (CSIC) - UCM, 28040 Madrid (Spain); N' Diaye, Alpha T. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  15. A modified coupled pair functional approach. [for dipole moment calculation of metal hydride ground states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, D. P.; Langhoff, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    A modified coupled pair functional (CPF) method is presented for the configuration interaction problem that dramatically improves properties for cases where the Hartree-Fock reference configuration is not a good zeroth-order wave function description. It is shown that the tendency for CPF to overestimate the effect of higher excitations arises from the choice of the geometric mean for the partial normalization denominator. The modified method is demonstrated for ground state dipole moment calculations of the NiH, CuH, and ZnH transition metal hydrides, and compared to singles-plus-doubles configuration interaction and the Ahlrichs et al. (1984) CPF method.

  16. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines with Finite Width Ground Plane Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Dalton, Edan; Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.; Papapolymerou, John; Williams, W. Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional circuits built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing Si/SiGe monolithic microwave/millimeter-wave integrated circuits on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) (low resistivity) Si wafers. Thin film microstrip lines (TFMS) with finite width ground planes embedded in the polyimide are often used. However, the closely spaced TFMS lines are susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and experimental measurements are used to show that the ground planes must be connected by via holes to reduce coupling in both the forward and backward directions.

  17. An experimental study of wave coupling in gravity surface wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Sommeria, Joel; Viboud, Samuel; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Weak turbulence is a theoretical framework aimed at describing wave turbulence (in the weakly nonlinear limit) i.e. a statistical state involving a large number of nonlinearly coupled waves. For gravity waves at the surface of water, it provides a phenomenology that may describe the formation of the spectrum of the ocean surface. Analytical predictions of the spectra are made based on the fact that energy transfer occurs through 4-wave coupling. By using an advanced stereoscopic imaging technique, we measure in time the deformation of the water surface. We obtain a state of wave turbulence by using two small wedge wavemakers in a 13-m diameter wavetank. We then use high order correlator (bi- and tri-coherence) in order to get evidence of the active wave coupling present in our system as used successfully for gravity-capillary wave turbulence. At odds with the weak turbulence theory we observe 3-wave interaction involving 2 quasi linear wave and a bound wave whose frequency lies on the first harmonics of the linear dispersion relation. We do not observe 4-wave coupling within the accuracy of our measurement. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement No 647018-WATU).

  18. Gravitational Wave Detection by Interferometry (Ground and Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Pitkin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational-wave detectors. Sources such as coalescing compact binary systems, neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, stellar collapses and pulsars are all possible candidates for detection. The most promising design of gravitational-wave detector uses test masses a long distance apart and freely suspended as pendulums on Earth or in drag-free spacecraft. The main theme of this review is a discussion of the mechanical and optical principles used in the various long baseline systems in operation around the world - LIGO (USA, Virgo (Italy/France, TAMA300 and LCGT (Japan, and GEO600 (Germany/U.K. - and in LISA, a proposed space-borne interferometer. A review of recent science runs from the current generation of ground-based detectors will be discussed, in addition to highlighting the astrophysical results gained thus far. Looking to the future, the major upgrades to LIGO (Advanced LIGO, Virgo (Advanced Virgo, LCGT and GEO600 (GEO-HF will be completed over the coming years, which will create a network of detectors with the significantly improved sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves. Beyond this, the concept and design of possible future "third generation" gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope (ET, will be discussed.

  19. Gravitational Wave Detection by Interferometry (Ground and Space).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, Matthew; Reid, Stuart; Rowan, Sheila; Hough, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational-wave detectors. Sources such as coalescing compact binary systems, neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, stellar collapses and pulsars are all possible candidates for detection. The most promising design of gravitational-wave detector uses test masses a long distance apart and freely suspended as pendulums on Earth or in drag-free spacecraft. The main theme of this review is a discussion of the mechanical and optical principles used in the various long baseline systems in operation around the world - LIGO (USA), Virgo (Italy/France), TAMA300 and LCGT (Japan), and GEO600 (Germany/U.K.) - and in LISA, a proposed space-borne interferometer. A review of recent science runs from the current generation of ground-based detectors will be discussed, in addition to highlighting the astrophysical results gained thus far. Looking to the future, the major upgrades to LIGO (Advanced LIGO), Virgo (Advanced Virgo), LCGT and GEO600 (GEO-HF) will be completed over the coming years, which will create a network of detectors with the significantly improved sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves. Beyond this, the concept and design of possible future "third generation" gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope (ET), will be discussed.

  20. Superstrong coupling of thin film magnetostatic waves with microwave cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Tang, Hong X., E-mail: hong.tang@yale.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Zou, Changling [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States); Jiang, Liang [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    We experimentally demonstrated the strong coupling between a microwave cavity and standing magnetostatic magnon modes in a yttrium iron garnet film. Such strong coupling can be observed for various spin wave modes under different magnetic field bias configurations, with a coupling strength inversely proportional to the transverse mode number. A comb-like spectrum can be obtained from these high order modes. The collectively enhanced magnon-microwave photon coupling strength is comparable with the magnon free spectral range and therefore leads to the superstrong coupling regime. Our findings pave the road towards designing a new type of strongly hybridized magnon-photon system.

  1. Wave propagation of coupled modes in the DNA double helix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabi, C B; Ekobena Fouda, H P [Laboratory of Biophysics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon); Mohamadou, A [Condensed Matter Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, PO Box 24157, Douala (Cameroon); Kofane, T C, E-mail: contab408@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Mechanics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2011-03-15

    The remarkable dynamics of waves propagating along the DNA molecule is described by the coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations. We consider both the single and the coupled nonlinear excitation modes and, under numerical simulations of the Peyrard-Bishop model, with the use of realistic values of parameters, their biological implications are studied. Furthermore, the characteristics of the coupled mode solution are discussed and we show that such a solution can describe the local opening observed within the transcription and the replication phenomena.

  2. Coupling Atmosphere and Waves for Coastal Wind Turbine Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolanos, Rodolfo; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Petersen, Ole S.

    2014-01-01

    , but new roughness formulations have been proposed to better estimate wave-wind interactions according to observations. In the present work, an assessment of several roughness descriptions is performed, and implications for coastal wind and wave modelling are studied. An atmospheric (WRF) and spectral wave...... model (MIKE 21 SW) are implemented for the North Sea in order to consider wave effects on roughness. The objective is to see the reaction of an atmospheric model to the water surface description through offline coupling. A comparison with three simplified roughness formulations embedded in WRF showed...

  3. The Town Effect: Dynamic Interaction between a Group of Structures and Waves in the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenishi, Koji

    2010-11-01

    In a conventional approach, the mechanical behaviour of a structure subjected to seismic or blast waves is treated separately from its surroundings, and in many cases, the dynamic coupling effect between multiple structures and the waves propagating in the ground is disregarded. However, if many structures are built densely in a developed urban area, this dynamic interaction may not become negligible. The first purpose of this contribution is to briefly show the effect of multiple interactions between waves and surface buildings in a town. The analysis is based on a recently developed, fully coupled, rigorous mathematical study, and for simplicity, each building in the town is represented by a rigid foundation, a mass at the top and an elastic spring that connects the foundation and mass. The buildings stand at regular spatial intervals on a linear elastic half-space and are subjected to two-dimensional anti-plane vibrations. It is found that the buildings in this model significantly interact with each other through the elastic ground, and the resonant (eigen) frequencies of the collective system (buildings or town) become lower than that of a single building with the same rigid foundation. This phenomenon may be called the “town effect” or “city effect.” Then, second, it is shown that the actual, unique structural damage pattern caused by the 1976 Friuli, Italy, earthquake may better be explained by this “town effect,” rather than by investigating the seismic performance of each damaged building individually. The results suggest that it may also be possible to evaluate the physical characteristics of incident seismic/blast waves “inversely” from the damage patterns induced to structures by the waves.

  4. Damping and coupling of long-period hydromagnetic waves by the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, F. B.; Allan, W.

    The theory that long-period geomagnetic pulsations are due to hydromagnetic waves resonating in a magnetosphere bounded by an anisotropically conducting ionosphere, insulating atmosphere, and conducting earth is reviewed. The history of the subject is outlined, covering the effects of the ionospheric boundary on: pulsations seen at ground level and in the ionosphere (ionospheric screening, 90 deg rotation of polarization, attenuation of short wavelengths, mode coupling via Hall conductance); and wave systems above the ionosphere (wave-boundary impedance matching, damping, phase variation along the geomagnetic field, and allowed resonances). Coupling of non-axisymmetric modes within the magnetosphere is also mentioned, and a summary of the present picture given, with suggestions for future work.

  5. Coupling model for waves propagating over a porous seabed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Liao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The wave–seabed interaction issue is of great importance for the design of foundation around marine infrastructures. Most previous investigations for such a problem have been limited to uncoupled or one-way coupled methods connecting two separated wave and seabed sub models with the continuity of pressures at the seabed surface. In this study, a strongly coupled model was proposed to realize both wave and seabed processes in a same program and to calculate the wave fields and seabed response simultaneously. The information between wave fields and seabed fields were strongly shared and thus results in a more profound investigation of the mechanism of the wave–seabed interaction. In this letter, the wave and seabed models were validated with previous experimental tests. Then, a set of application of present model were discussed in prediction of the wave-induced seabed response. Numerical results show the wave-induced liquefaction area of coupled model is smaller than that of uncoupled model.

  6. Conditions for the spin wave nonreciprocity in an array of dipolarly coupled magnetic nanopillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verba, Roman; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Bankowski, Elena; Meitzler, Thomas; Melkov, Gennadiy; Slavin, Andrei

    2013-08-01

    It is demonstrated that collective spin waves (SWs) propagating in complex periodic arrays of dipolarly coupled magnetic nanopillars existing in a saturated (single-domain) ground state in a zero bias magnetic field could be nonreciprocal. To guarantee the SW nonreciprocity, two conditions should be fulfilled: (i) existence of a nonzero out-of-plane component of the pillars' static magnetization and (ii) a complex periodicity of array's ground state with at least two elements per a primitive cell, if the elements are different, and at least three elements per a primitive cell, if the elements are identical.

  7. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Warner, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  8. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep S.; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-03-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  9. Optimized ground-coupled heat pump system design for northern climate applications. [Including ground coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catan, M.A.; Baxter, V.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of the performance of a ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) system with a water - source heat pump package designed expressly for such systems operating in a northern climate. The project objective was to minimize the life-cycle cost of a GCHP system by optimizing the design of both the heat pump package and the ground coil in concert. In order to achieve this objective, a number of modelling tools were developed or modified to analyze the heat pump's performance and cost and the ground coil's performance. The life-cycle cost of a GCHP system (water-source heat pump with a horizontal ground coil) for an 1800 ft/sup 2/ (167 m/sup 2/) house in Pittsburgh, PA, was minimized over a 7 year economic life. Simple payback for the optimized GCHP system, relative to conventional air-source heat pumps, was under 3 years. The water-source heat pump package resulting from this optimization is calculated to cost 21% more than its conventional counterpart with a heating coefficient of performance (COP) about 20% higher, and a cooling COP about 23% higher. In the GCHP system modeled, its annual energy savings are predicted to be about 11% compared to a system designed around the conventional heat pump while having about the same installation cost. The major conclusion of this study is - GCHP system performance improvement can be attained by improving the water-source heat pump package at less cost than by buying more ground coil. The following conclusions were drawn from the steady-state performance optimization results: (1) By adding about $100.00 to the manufacturer's cost off construction, both the heating and cooling COPs can be improved by 20% or more. (2) Cooling COP need not be sacrificed for the sake of heating performance and vice versa. 13 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Optimized ground coupled heat pump design: Phase 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.W.; Catan, M.; Le Doux, P.; Metz, P.D.; Saunders, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    This report describes the first phase of a project to design a water-to-air heat pump optimized for ground coupling applications. The project is being conducted jointly by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and an industrial partner to be selected via a competitive procurement. In the completion of Phase I, three major tasks were completed. First, based on experimental work performed at BNL, water-refrigerant heat exchanger models were developed for incorporation into the ORNL heat pump optimization program. Next, a procedure was developed to generate correlations between heat pump entering fluid temperature and load. The correlations, called ''Source Temperature/Load Maps'', will tell the optimization program how many hours/season the heat pump will operate with any pair of values for these quantities. This report discusses these first two tasks within Phase I.

  11. Shear flow induced wave couplings in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poedts, S. [KULeuven, Heverlee (Belgium). Centre for Plasma Astrophysics; Rogava, A.D. [Tbilisi State Univ. (Georgia). Dept. of Physics]|[International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Mahajan, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies]|[International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    1998-01-01

    A sheared background flow in a plasma induces coupling between different MHD wave modes, resulting in their mutual transformations with corresponding energy redistributing between the modes. In this way, the energy can be transfered from one wave mode to the other, but energy can also be added to or extracted from the background flow. In the present paper it is investigated whether the wave coupling and energy transfer mechanisms can operate under solar wind conditions. It is shown that this is indeed the case. Hence, the long-period waves observed in the solar wind at r > 0.3 AU might be generated by much faster periodic oscillations in the photosphere of the Sun. Other possible consequences for observable beat phenomena in the wind and the acceleration of the solar wind particles are also discussed.

  12. Fully Coupled Electromechanical Elastodynamic Model for Guided Wave Propagation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2013-01-01

    Physics-based computational models play a key role in the study of wave propagation for structural health monitoring (SHM) and the development of improved damage detection methodologies. Due to the complex nature of guided waves, accurate and efficient computation tools are necessary to investigate the mechanisms responsible for dispersion, coupling, and interaction with damage. In this paper, a fully coupled electromechanical elastodynamic model for wave propagation in a heterogeneous, anisotropic material system is developed. The final framework provides the full three dimensional displacement and electrical potential fields for arbitrary plate and transducer geometries and excitation waveform and frequency. The model is validated theoretically and proven computationally efficient. Studies are performed with surface bonded piezoelectric sensors to gain insight into the physics of experimental techniques used for SHM. Collocated actuation of the fundamental Lamb wave modes is modeled over a range of frequenc...

  13. On the coupling between spinning particles and cosmological gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Milillo, Irene; Montani, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    The influence of spin in a system of classical particles on the propagation of gravitational waves is analyzed in the cosmological context of primordial thermal equilibrium. On a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric, when the precession is neglected, there is no contribution due to the spin to the distribution function of the particles. Adding a small tensor perturbation to the background metric, we study if a coupling between gravitational waves and spin exists that can modify the evolution of the distribution function, leading to new terms in the anisotropic stress, and then to a new source for gravitational waves. In the chosen gauge, the final result is that, in the absence of other kind of perturbations, there is no coupling between spin and gravitational waves.

  14. Measuring the electrical properties of soil using a calibrated ground-coupled GPR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, C.P.; Olhoeft, G.R.; Wright, D.L.; Powers, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional methods for estimating vadose zone soil properties using ground penetrating radar (GPR) include measuring travel time, fitting diffraction hyperbolae, and other methods exploiting geometry. Additional processing techniques for estimating soil properties are possible with properly calibrated GPR systems. Such calibration using ground-coupled antennas must account for the effects of the shallow soil on the antenna's response, because changing soil properties result in a changing antenna response. A prototype GPR system using ground-coupled antennas was calibrated using laboratory measurements and numerical simulations of the GPR components. Two methods for estimating subsurface properties that utilize the calibrated response were developed. First, a new nonlinear inversion algorithm to estimate shallow soil properties under ground-coupled antennas was evaluated. Tests with synthetic data showed that the inversion algorithm is well behaved across the allowed range of soil properties. A preliminary field test gave encouraging results, with estimated soil property uncertainties (????) of ??1.9 and ??4.4 mS/m for the relative dielectric permittivity and the electrical conductivity, respectively. Next, a deconvolution method for estimating the properties of subsurface reflectors with known shapes (e.g., pipes or planar interfaces) was developed. This method uses scattering matrices to account for the response of subsurface reflectors. The deconvolution method was evaluated for use with noisy data using synthetic data. Results indicate that the deconvolution method requires reflected waves with a signal/noise ratio of about 10:1 or greater. When applied to field data with a signal/noise ratio of 2:1, the method was able to estimate the reflection coefficient and relative permittivity, but the large uncertainty in this estimate precluded inversion for conductivity. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  15. Adiabatic trapping in coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, H. A.; Ali, Z. [Department of Physics, G.C. University, 54000 Lahore (Pakistan); Masood, W. [COMSATS, Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-03-15

    In the present work, we have discussed the effects of adiabatic trapping of electrons on obliquely propagating Alfven waves in a low {beta} plasma. Using the two potential theory and employing the Sagdeev potential approach, we have investigated the existence of arbitrary amplitude coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic solitary waves in both the sub and super Alfvenic cases. The results obtained have been analyzed and presented graphically and can be applied to regions of space where the low {beta} assumption holds true.

  16. Coupled wave versus modal theory in uniform dielectric gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. St. J.

    1983-11-01

    The philosophical bases of coupled wave and modal theories are explored and compared. For the particular case of the diffraction of light by thick, uniform dielectric gratings, they are investigated in detail. It is shown that Moharam and Gaylord's recent accurate method for solving the coupled wave equations (JOSA 71 (1981) 811) is exactly equivalent to the modal (or Floquet-Bloch) approach, and hence that their results can be interpreted in an alternative manner using the many valuable intuitional insights offered by Floquet-Bloch theory.

  17. Holes and chaotic pulses of traveling waves coupled to a long-wave mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Henar; Riecke, Hermann

    1997-02-01

    It is shown that localized traveling-wave pulses and holes can be stabilized by a coupling to a long-wave mode. Simulations of suitable real Ginzburg-Landau equations reveal a small parameter regime in which the pulses exhibit a breathing motion (presumably related to a front bifurcation), which subsequently becomes chaotic via period-doubling bifurcations.

  18. Modification of polarization filtering technique in HF ground wave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Guoyi; Tan Zhongji; Wang Jiantao

    2006-01-01

    The polarization filter using three orthogonal linear polarization antennas can suppress more disturbances than the polarization filter using two orthogonal linear polarization antennas in HF ground wave radar. But the algorithm of the threedimension filter is relatively complicated and not suitable for real-time processing. It can't use linear and nonlinear polarization vector translation technique directly. A modified polarization filter which is simple and has same suppressing ability as the three-dimension polarization filter is given. It only has half parameters of the primary one. Some problems about estimation of polarization parameters and selection of disturbances are discussed. A method of holding the phase of radar backscatter signal constantly is put forward so that unstationary disturbance signal can be processed.

  19. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. These effects can inform electromagnetic follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  20. Ring Current-Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, generated by ion temperature anisotropy in Earth s ring current (RC), is the best known example of wave- particle interaction in the magnetosphere. Also, there is much controversy over the importance of EMIC waves on RC depletion. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt (RB) by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the calculation of EMIC waves must be a very critical part of the space weather studies. The new RC model that we have developed and present for the first time has several new features that we have combine together in a one single model: (a) several lower frequency cold plasma wave modes are taken into account; (b) wave tracing of these wave has been incorporated in the energy EMIC wave equation; (c) no assumptions regarding wave shape spectra have been made; (d) no assumptions regarding the shape of particle distribution have been made to calculate the growth rate; (e) pitch-angle, energy, and mix diffusions are taken into account together for the first time; (f) the exact loss-cone RC analytical solution has been found and coupled with bounce-averaged numerical solution of kinetic equation; (g) the EMIC waves saturation due to their modulation instability and LHW generation are included as an additional factor that contributes to this process; and (h) the hot ions were included in the real part of dielectric permittivity tensor. We compare our theoretical results with the different EMIC waves models as well as RC experimental data.

  1. Ring Current Ion Coupling with Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, George V.

    2002-01-01

    A new ring current global model has been developed for the first time that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes wave evolution of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (EMIC). The coupled model is able to simulate, for the first time self-consistently calculated RC ion kinetic and evolution of EMIC waves that propagate along geomagnetic field lines and reflect from the ionosphere. Ionospheric properties affect the reflection index through the integral Pedersen and Hall coductivities. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions, intensities of EMIC, global RC energy balance, and some other parameters will be studied in detail for the selected geomagnetic storms. The space whether aspects of RC modelling and comparison with the data will also be discussed.

  2. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling in Porous Ground - Measurements and Analysis for On-Site-Inspection Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Gorschlüter, Felix; Altmann, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    During on-site inspections (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) a local seismic network can be installed to measure seismic aftershock signals of an assumed underground nuclear explosion. These signals are caused by relaxation processes in and near the cavity created by the explosion and when detected can lead to a localisation of the cavity. This localisation is necessary to take gas samples from the ground which are analysed for radioactive noble gas isotopes to confirm or dismiss the suspicion of a nuclear test. The aftershock signals are of very low magnitude so they can be masked by different sources, in particular periodic disturbances caused by vehicles and aircraft in the inspection area. Vehicles and aircraft (mainly helicopters) will be used for the inspection activities themselves, e.g. for overhead imagery or magnetic-anomaly sensing. While vehicles in contact with the ground can excite soil vibrations directly, aircraft and vehicles alike emit acoustic waves which excite soil vibrations when hitting the ground. These disturbing signals are of periodic nature while the seismic aftershock signals are pulse-shaped, so their separation is possible. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is yet incomplete, a better understanding is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. In a project funded by the Young Scientist Research Award of the CTBTO to one of us (ML), we investigated the acoustic-seismic coupling of airborne signals of jet aircraft and artificially induced ones by a speaker. During a measurement campaign several acoustic and seismic sensors were placed below the take-off trajectory of an airport at 4 km distance. Therefore taking off and landing jet aircraft passed nearly straightly above the setup. Microphones were placed close to the ground to record the sound pressure of incident

  3. Dust acoustic waves in strongly coupled dissipative plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, B. S.; Yu, M. Y.

    2000-12-01

    The theory of dust acoustic waves is revisited in the frame of the generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic theory for highly correlated dusts. Physical processes relevant to many experiments on dusts in plasmas, such as ionization and recombination, dust-charge variation, elastic electron and ion collisions with neutral and charged dust particles, as well as relaxation due to strong dust coupling, are taken into account. These processes can be on similar time scales and are thus important for the conservation of particles and momenta in a self-consistent description of the system. It is shown that the dispersion properties of the dust acoustic waves are determined by a sensitive balance of the effects of strong dust coupling and collisional relaxation. The predictions of the present theory applicable to typical parameters in laboratory strongly coupled dusty plasmas are given and compared with the experiment results. Some possible implications and discrepanies between theory and experiment are also discussed.

  4. Long codas of coupled wave systems in seismic basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Thomas H.

    2002-11-01

    Quite some time ago it was pointed out that the damage patterns and Fourier spectra of the 1985 earthquake in Mexico City are only compatible with a resonant effect of horizontal waves with the approximate speed of sound waves in water [see Flores et al., Nature 326, 783 (1987)]. In a more recent paper it was pointed out that this indeed will occur with a very specific frequency selection for a coupled system of Raleigh waves at the interface of the bottom of the ancient lakebed with the more solid deposits, and an evanescent sound wave in the mud above [see J. Flores et al., Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 89, 14-21 (1999)]. In the present talk we shall go over these arguments again and show that strong reflection at the edges of the lake must occur to account for the strong magnification entailing necessarily a long coda, and that the mecanism can be understood in the same terms.

  5. Hourly simulation of a Ground-Coupled Heat Pump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, C.; Zanchini, E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a MATLAB code for the hourly simulation of a whole Ground-Coupled Heat Pump (GCHP) system, based on the g-functions previously obtained by Zanchini and Lazzari. The code applies both to on-off heat pumps and to inverter-driven ones. It is employed to analyse the effects of the inverter and of the total length of the Borehole Heat Exchanger (BHE) field on the mean seasonal COP (SCOP) and on the mean seasonal EER (SEER) of a GCHP system designed for a residential house with 6 apartments in Bologna, North-Center Italy, with dominant heating loads. A BHE field with 3 in line boreholes is considered, with length of each BHE either 75 m or 105 m. The results show that the increase of the BHE length yields a SCOP enhancement of about 7%, while the SEER remains nearly unchanged. The replacement of the on-off heat pump by an inverter-driven one yields a SCOP enhancement of about 30% and a SEER enhancement of about 50%. The results demonstrate the importance of employing inverter-driven heat pumps for GCHP systems.

  6. Stability of Solitary Waves for Three Coupled Long Wave - Short Wave Interaction Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Borluk, H.; Erbay, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider a three-component system of one dimensional long wave-short wave interaction equations. The system has two-parameter family of solitary wave solutions. We prove orbital stability of the solitary wave solutions using variational methods.

  7. Mediterranea Forecasting System: a focus on wave-current coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Emanuela; Delrosso, Damiano; Pistoia, Jenny; Drudi, Massimiliano; Fratianni, Claudia; Grandi, Alessandro; Pinardi, Nadia; Oddo, Paolo; Tonani, Marina

    2016-04-01

    The Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) is a numerical ocean prediction system that produces analyses, reanalyses and short term forecasts for the entire Mediterranean Sea and its Atlantic Ocean adjacent areas. MFS became operational in the late 90's and has been developed and continuously improved in the framework of a series of EU and National funded programs and is now part of the Copernicus Marine Service. The MFS is composed by the hydrodynamic model NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) 2-way coupled with the third generation wave model WW3 (WaveWatchIII) implemented in the Mediterranean Sea with 1/16 horizontal resolution and forced by ECMWF atmospheric fields. The model solutions are corrected by the data assimilation system (3D variational scheme adapted to the oceanic assimilation problem) with a daily assimilation cycle, using a background error correlation matrix varying seasonally and in different sub-regions of the Mediterranean Sea. The focus of this work is to present the latest modelling system upgrades and the related achieved improvements. In order to evaluate the performance of the coupled system a set of experiments has been built by coupling the wave and circulation models that hourly exchange the following fields: the sea surface currents and air-sea temperature difference are transferred from NEMO model to WW3 model modifying respectively the mean momentum transfer of waves and the wind speed stability parameter; while the neutral drag coefficient computed by WW3 model is passed to NEMO that computes the turbulent component. In order to validate the modelling system, numerical results have been compared with in-situ and remote sensing data. This work suggests that a coupled model might be capable of a better description of wave-current interactions, in particular feedback from the ocean to the waves might assess an improvement on the prediction capability of wave characteristics, while suggests to proceed toward a fully

  8. Modeling Pancake Formation with a Coupled Wave-Ice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramony, J.; Orzech, M.; Shi, F.; Bateman, S. P.; Calantoni, J.

    2016-12-01

    Recent results from the ONR-sponsored Arctic Sea State DRI cruise (Thomson et al., 2016, EOS, in press) suggest that small-scale pancake ice formation is an important process in the initial recovery and refreezing of the Arctic pack ice each autumn. Ocean surface waves and ambient temperature play significant roles in shaping and/or limiting the pancake growth patterns, which may either facilitate or delay the recovery of the ice pack. Here we apply a phase-resolving, coupled wave-ice system, consisting of a CFD wave model (NHWAVE) and a discrete-element ice model (LIGGGHTS), to investigate the formation processes of pancake ice under different conditions. A series of simulations is run, each beginning with a layer of disconnected ice particles floating on the ocean surface. Wave conditions and ice bonding properties are varied to examine the effects of mild versus stormy conditions, wind waves versus swell, and warmer versus colder temperatures. Model runs are limited to domains of O(1 sq km). Initial tests have shown some success in replicating qualitative results from the Sea State cruise, including the formation of irregularly shaped pancakes from the "frazil" ice layer, changes in formation processes caused by varying ambient temperature (represented through variations in ice bonding strength), occasional rafting of one pancake on top of another, and increased wave attenuation as pancakes grow larger.

  9. Computer simulation of ground coupled storage in a series solar assisted heat pump system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, John W.; Metz, Philip D.

    1979-01-01

    A quantitative study of the effect of thermal coupling between the ground and the heat storage element of a series solar assisted heat pump system is presented. The transient simulation computer program TRNSYS is used to simulate the solar portion of this system. A program to simulate the thermal interaction of the storage element with the ground is incorporated into TRNSYS as a sub-routine. This program calculates heat flow through the ground in discrete steps over space and time. Boundary conditions are established. The ground coupled storage is driven by thermal inputs from the solar portion of the system and from the changing ambient and ground temperatures.

  10. Traveling and Standing Waves in Coupled Pendula and Newton's Cradle

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Azpeitia, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    The existence of traveling and standing waves is investigated for chains of coupled pendula with periodic boundary conditions. The results are proven by applying topological methods to subspaces of symmetric solutions. The main advantage of this approach comes from the fact that only properties of the linearized forces are required. This allows to cover a wide range of models such as Newton's cradle, the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam lattice, and the Toda lattice.

  11. Body-wave traveltime and amplitude shifts from asymptotic travelling wave coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the sensitivity of finite-frequency body-wave traveltimes and amplitudes to perturbations in 3-D seismic velocity structure relative to a spherically symmetric model. Using the approach of coupled travelling wave theory, we consider the effect of a structural perturbation on an isolated portion of the seismogram. By convolving the spectrum of the differential seismogram with the spectrum of a narrow window taper, and using a Taylor's series expansion for wavenumber as a function of frequency on a mode dispersion branch, we derive semi-analytic expressions for the sensitivity kernels. Far-field effects of wave interactions with the free surface or internal discontinuities are implicitly included, as are wave conversions upon scattering. The kernels may be computed rapidly for the purpose of structural inversions. We give examples of traveltime sensitivity kernels for regional wave propagation at 1 Hz. For the direct SV wave in a simple crustal velocity model, they are generally complicated because of interfering waves generated by interactions with the free surface and the Mohorovic??ic?? discontinuity. A large part of the interference effects may be eliminated by restricting the travelling wave basis set to those waves within a certain range of horizontal phase velocity. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2006 RAS.

  12. Guiding, bending, and splitting of coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhen; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a type of waveguiding mechanism for coupled surface-wave defect modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. Unlike conventional spoof surface plasmon waveguides, waveguiding of coupled surface-wave defect modes is achieved through weak coupling between tightly localized defect cavities in an otherwise gapped surface-wave photonic crystal, as a classical wave analogue of tight-binding electronic wavefunctions in solid state lattices.

  13. Coupling a Surface Acoustic Wave to an Electron Spin in Diamond via a Dark State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Andrew Golter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of quantum acoustics explores interactions between acoustic waves and artificial atoms and their applications in quantum information processing. In this experimental study, we demonstrate the coupling between a surface acoustic wave (SAW and an electron spin in diamond by taking advantage of the strong strain coupling of the excited states of a nitrogen vacancy center while avoiding the short lifetime of these states. The SAW-spin coupling takes place through a Λ-type three-level system where two ground spin states couple to a common excited state through a phonon-assisted as well as a direct dipole optical transition. Both coherent population trapping and optically driven spin transitions have been realized. The coherent population trapping demonstrates the coupling between a SAW and an electron spin coherence through a dark state. The optically driven spin transitions, which resemble the sideband transitions in a trapped-ion system, can enable the quantum control of both spin and mechanical degrees of freedom and potentially a trapped-ion-like solid-state system for applications in quantum computing. These results establish an experimental platform for spin-based quantum acoustics, bridging the gap between spintronics and quantum acoustics.

  14. Acoustic mode coupling induced by nonlinear internal waves: evaluation of the mode coupling matrices and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T C

    2014-02-01

    This paper applies the mode coupling equation to calculate the mode-coupling matrix for nonlinear internal waves appearing as a train of solitons. The calculation is applied to an individual soliton up to second order expansion in sound speed perturbation in the Dyson series. The expansion is valid so long as the fractional sound speed change due to a single soliton, integrated over range and depth, times the wavenumber is smaller than unity. Scattering between the solitons are included by coupling the mode coupling matrices between the solitons. Acoustic fields calculated using this mode-coupling matrix formulation are compared with that obtained using a parabolic equation (PE) code. The results agree very well in terms of the depth integrated acoustic energy at the receivers for moving solitary internal waves. The advantages of using the proposed approach are: (1) The effects of mode coupling can be studied as a function of range and time as the solitons travel along the propagation path, and (2) it allows speedy calculations of sound propagation through a packet or packets of solitons saving orders of magnitude computations compared with the PE code. The mode coupling theory is applied to at-sea data to illustrate the underlying physics.

  15. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  16. Water Wave Solutions of the Coupled System Zakharov-Kuznetsov and Generalized Coupled KdV Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Seadawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytic study was conducted on coupled partial differential equations. We formally derived new solitary wave solutions of generalized coupled system of Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK and KdV equations by using modified extended tanh method. The traveling wave solutions for each generalized coupled system of ZK and KdV equations are shown in form of periodic, dark, and bright solitary wave solutions. The structures of the obtained solutions are distinct and stable.

  17. Water wave solutions of the coupled system Zakharov-Kuznetsov and generalized coupled KdV equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seadawy, A R; El-Rashidy, K

    2014-01-01

    An analytic study was conducted on coupled partial differential equations. We formally derived new solitary wave solutions of generalized coupled system of Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) and KdV equations by using modified extended tanh method. The traveling wave solutions for each generalized coupled system of ZK and KdV equations are shown in form of periodic, dark, and bright solitary wave solutions. The structures of the obtained solutions are distinct and stable.

  18. New Explicit Solitary Wave Solutions and Periodic Wave Solutions for the Generalized Coupled Hirota-Satsuma KdV system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENYong; YANZhen-Ya; 等

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,we study the generalized coupled Hirota-Satsuma KdV system by using the new generalized transformation in homogeneous balance method.As a result,many explicit exact solutions,which contain new solitary wave solutions,periodic wave solutions,and the combined formal solitary wave solutions,and periodic wave solutions ,are obtained.

  19. Waveguide characteristics of coupled in-plane waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Lu, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojun

    2012-06-01

    In-plane waves in a waveguide made from a thin plate are described by a superposition of a set of orthogonal functions that satisfy the edge conditions of the waveguide. Due to the Poisson and shear effects, the displacement components of the in-plane waves along the two in-plane orthogonal coordinates are coupled and this coupling affects the propagation and spatial properties of the waveguide modes. The orthogonal functions and their associated wavenumbers represent the characteristics of the uncoupled modes of the waveguide where the above mentioned couplings are ignored. This study demonstrates that the characteristics of the waveguide modes are determined by the couplings of the uncoupled mode pairs, which become significant when the pairs satisfy the conditions of spatial coincidence. At some frequencies, certain waveguide modes can be determined by a single pair of uncoupled modes. For this case, the analytical solution for the waveguide modes exists and provides both a qualitative and quantitative interpretation of the characteristics of the waveguide mode.

  20. Propagation of interplanetary shock excited ultra low frequency (ULF) waves in magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere——Multi-spacecraft “Cluster” and ground-based magnetometer observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The ultra low frequency (ULF) wave in magnetosphere can act as an important means for solar wind energy inward transmission.This paper quantitatively analyzes the propagation process of the ULF wave triggered by the interplanetary shock propagating from inner magnetosphere equatorial plane along magnetic field lines to the top of the ionosphere and below ionosphere propagating process and establishes a relatively complete magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere propagation model which can be used to study the relationship between the amplitude of the ULF waves triggered by the interplanetary shock wave in magnetospheric space and the magnetic effect caused by the ULF waves.After a comparison with recent observations,we found that: in the event during November 7,2004 that an interplanetary shock wave interacted with the magnetosphere,Cluster satellites observed that electric field fluctuations and the band-pass filtered result of ground stations meridional component had similar characteristics.Comparing with the geomagnetic measurement near the footprints,we found that the electric field disturbance in the magnetosphere spread along the ground magnetic field lines in the form of the ULF waves and changed into geomagnetic disturbance.The result reveals that the ULF wave is in contact with the ground geomagnetic observation.The ULF waves couple with ionized components in ionosphere and spread to the ground in the form of electromagnetic waves.In this research,we believe that the magnetosphere,ionosphere and ground magnetic effects caused by interplanetary shock wave are the same physical phenomena responding in different locations.Based on the overall consideration of entire electromagnetic response to the interplanetary shock wave,we found that the correlation between CLUSTER multi-satellite observation and geomagnetic station observation is due to the ULF wave propagated in magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere system,and we quantitatively interpreted this response

  1. Uniqueness of ground states of some coupled nonlinear Schrodinger systems and their application

    OpenAIRE

    MA,LI; Lin ZHAO

    2007-01-01

    We establish the uniqueness of ground states of some coupled nonlinear Schrodinger systems in the whole space. We firstly use Schwartz symmetrization to obtain the existence of ground states for a more general case. To prove the uniqueness of ground states, we use the radial symmetry of the ground states to transform the systems into an ordinary differential system, and then we use the integral forms of the system. More interestingly, as an application of our uniqueness results, we derive a s...

  2. Slot-coupled CW standing wave accelerating cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shaoheng; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-05-16

    A slot-coupled CW standing wave multi-cell accelerating cavity. To achieve high efficiency graded beta acceleration, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include different cell lengths. Alternatively, to achieve high efficiency with acceleration for particles with beta equal to 1, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include the same cell design. Coupling between the cells is achieved with a plurality of axially aligned kidney-shaped slots on the wall between cells. The slot-coupling method makes the design very compact. The shape of the cell, including the slots and the cone, are optimized to maximize the power efficiency and minimize the peak power density on the surface. The slots are non-resonant, thereby enabling shorter slots and less power loss.

  3. Rational homoclinic solution and rogue wave solution for the coupled long-wave–short-wave system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chen Wei; Chen Hanlin; Dai Zhengde

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a rational homoclinic solution is obtained via the classical homoclinicsolution for the coupled long-wave–short-wave system. Based on the structures of ratinal homoclinic solution, the characteristics of homoclinic solution are discussed which might provide us with useful information on the dynamics of the relevant physical fields.

  4. Effects of soil amplification ratio and multiple wave interference for ground motion due to earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhixin; XU Jiren; Ryuji Kubota

    2004-01-01

    Influences on the ground motion simulations by soil amplification effects and multiple seismic wave interferences in the heterogeneous medium are investigated. Detailed velocity structure obtained from the microtremor array survey is adopted in the ground motion simulation. Analyses for amplification ratios of core samples of ten drill holes with 40 m deep in the sedimentary layers show that the soil amplification ratio influences nonlinearly the seismic ground motion. Based on the above analysis results, the ground motion in the heavily damaged zone in the Japanese Kobe earthquake of 1995 is simulated in a digital SH seismic wave model by using the pseudospectral method with the staggered grid RFFT differentiation (SGRFFTD). The simulated results suggest that the heterogeneous velocity structure results in a complicated distribution of the maximum amplitudes of acceleration waveforms with multiple peaks at the surface. Spatial distribution of the maximum amplitudes coincides well with that of collapse ratios of buildings in Kobe. The dual peaks of the collapse ratios away from the earthquake fault coincide well with the double peak amplitudes of simulated seismic acceleration waves also. The cause for the first peak amplitude of the ground motion is attributable to the interference of the secondary surface wave from the bedrock propagating horizontally along the surface sedimentary layer and the body wave from the basin bottom according to analyses of wave snapshots propagating in inhomogeneous structure of the Osaka group layers. The second peak amplitude of the ground motion may be attributive to the interference of the secondary surface wave from the tunneling waves in the shallow sediments and the body wave. It is important for the study on complicated distributions of earthquake damages to investigate influences on the ground motion by soil amplification effects and multiple seismic wave interferences due to the structure. Explorations of the structure to the

  5. Detecting hidden volcanic explosions from Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Alaska with infrasound and ground-couples airwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Slivio; Fee, David; Haney, Matthew; Schneider, David

    2012-01-01

    In Alaska, where many active volcanoes exist without ground-based instrumentation, the use of techniques suitable for distant monitoring is pivotal. In this study we report regional-scale seismic and infrasound observations of volcanic activity at Mt. Cleveland between December 2011 and August 2012. During this period, twenty explosions were detected by infrasound sensors as far away as 1827 km from the active vent, and ground-coupled acoustic waves were recorded at seismic stations across the Aleutian Arc. Several events resulting from the explosive disruption of small lava domes within the summit crater were confirmed by analysis of satellite remote sensing data. However, many explosions eluded initial, automated, analyses of satellite data due to poor weather conditions. Infrasound and seismic monitoring provided effective means for detecting these hidden events. We present results from the implementation of automatic infrasound and seismo-acoustic eruption detection algorithms, and review the challenges of real-time volcano monitoring operations in remote regions. We also model acoustic propagation in the Northern Pacific, showing how tropospheric ducting effects allow infrasound to travel long distances across the Aleutian Arc. The successful results of our investigation provide motivation for expanded efforts in infrasound monitoring across the Aleutians and contributes to our knowledge of the number and style of vulcanian eruptions at Mt. Cleveland.

  6. Ground motions on rocky, cliffed, and sandy shorelines generated by ocean waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Adam P.; Guza, Robert T.; Dickson, Mark E.; O'Reilly, William C.; Flick, Reinhard E.

    2013-12-01

    We compare ground motions observed within about 100 m of the waterline on eight sites located on shorelines with different morphologies (rock slope, cliff, and sand beaches). At all sites, local ocean waves generated ground motions in the frequency band 0.01-40 Hz. Between about 0.01 and 0.1 Hz, foreshore loading and gravitational attraction from ocean swell and infragravity waves drive coherent, in-phase ground flexing motions mostly oriented cross-shore that decay inland. At higher frequencies between 0.5 and 40 Hz, breaking ocean waves and wave-rock impacts cause ground shaking. Overall, seismic spectral shapes were generally consistent across shoreline sites and usually within a few orders of magnitude despite the diverse range of settings. However, specific site response varied and was influenced by a combination of tide level, incident wave energy, site morphology, ground composition, and signal decay. Flexing and shaking increased with incident wave energy and was often tidally modulated, consistent with a local generation source. Flexing magnitudes were usually larger than shaking, and flexing displacements of several mm were observed during relatively large incident wave conditions (Hs 4-5 m). Comparison with traffic noise and earthquakes illustrate the relative significance of local ocean-generated signals in coastal seismic data. Seismic observations are not a simple proxy for wave-cliff interaction.

  7. Algorithm of sky-ground-wave signal separation in CDMA system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jingjuan; Chen Shiru

    2008-01-01

    To solve the problem of the sky-wave interference in radio positioning system operating in CDMA mode, an algorithm of sky-ground-wave separation is provided. Based on the MLE (maximum likelihood estimate),and by estimating the amplitude and the phase of the sky-wave signal, the provided algorithm for separating sky-ground-wave is implemented. The mathematics model used for signal processing is established, and the possible solutions are provided. The structure and signal processing flow implementing the presented algorithm in the receiver are presented. A multi-channels signal searching idea is adopted, some of which process the sky-wave signal, and some of which process the ground-wave signal. Numerical analysis and simulation show that the proposed algorithm has higher accuracy, more rapid processing speed, and simpler implementation for the estimation of the sky-wave signal parameter, and can separate the sky-wave signal and ground-wave signal from the arrival combination signal effectively.

  8. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines and Finite Ground Coplanar Lines Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Bushyager, N.; Papapolymerou, J.; Tentzeris, E. M.; Laskar, J.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional circuits built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing Si/SiGe monolithic microwave/mm-wave integrated circuits on CMOS (low resistivity) Si wafers. It is expected that these circuits will replace the ones fabricated on GaAs and reduce the overall system cost. However, the closely spaced transmission lines that are required for a high-density circuit environment are susceptible to high levels of cross-coupling, which degrades the overall circuit performance. In this paper, theoretical and experimental results on coupling and ways to reduce it are presented for two types of transmission lines: a) the microstrip line and b) the Finite Ground Coplanar (FGC) line. For microstrip lines it is shown that a fence of metalized via-holes can significantly reduce coupling, especially in the case when both lines are on the same polyimide layer or when the shielding structure extends through several polyimide layers. For closely spaced microstrip lines, coupling is lower for a metal filled trench shield than a via-hole fence. Coupling amongst microstrip lines is dependent on the ratio of line separation to polyimide thickness and is primarily due to magnetic fields. For FGC lines it is shown that they have in general low coupling that can be reduced significantly when there is even a small gap between the ground planes of each line. FGC lines have approximately 8 dB lower coupling than coupled coplanar waveguides (CPW). In addition, forward and backward characteristics of the FGC lines do not resemble those of other transmission lines such as microstrip. Therefore, the coupling mechanism of the FGC lines is different compared to thin film microstrip lines.

  9. Coupling of transverse and longitudinal waves in piano strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchenique, Nikki; Collin, Samantha R; Moore, Thomas R

    2015-04-01

    The existence of longitudinal waves in vibrating piano strings has been previously established, as has their importance in producing the characteristic sound of the piano. Modeling of the coupling between the transverse and longitudinal motion of strings indicates that the amplitude of the longitudinal waves are quadratically related to the transverse displacement of the string, however, experimental verification of this relationship is lacking. In the work reported here this relationship is tested by driving the transverse motion of a piano string at only two frequencies, which simplifies the task of unambiguously identifying the constituent signals. The results indicate that the generally accepted relationship between the transverse motion and the longitudinal motion is valid. It is further shown that this dependence on transverse displacement is a good approximation when a string is excited by the impact of the hammer during normal play.

  10. Modeling of atmospheric-coupled Rayleigh waves on planets with atmosphere: From Earth observation to Mars and Venus perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lognonné, Philippe; Karakostas, Foivos; Rolland, Lucie; Nishikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic coupling between solid Earth and atmosphere has been observed since the 1960s, first from ground-based seismic, pressure, and ionospheric sensors and since 20 years with various satellite measurements, including with global positioning system (GPS) satellites. This coupling leads to the excitation of the Rayleigh surface waves by local atmospheric sources such as large natural explosions from volcanoes, meteor atmospheric air-bursts, or artificial explosions. It contributes also in the continuous excitation of Rayleigh waves and associated normal modes by atmospheric winds and pressure fluctuations. The same coupling allows the observation of Rayleigh waves in the thermosphere most of the time through ionospheric monitoring with Doppler sounders or GPS. The authors review briefly in this paper observations made on Earth and describe the general frame of the theory enabling the computation of Rayleigh waves for models of telluric planets with atmosphere. The authors then focus on Mars and Venus and give in both cases the atmospheric properties of the Rayleigh normal modes and associated surface waves compared to Earth. The authors then conclude on the observation perspectives especially for Rayleigh waves excited by atmospheric sources on Mars and for remote ionospheric observations of Rayleigh waves excited by quakes on Venus.

  11. Cloud Computing for Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Kazanskiy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Design and analysis of complex nanophotonic and nanoelectronic structures require significant computing resources. Cloud computing infrastructure allows distributed parallel applications to achieve greater scalability and fault tolerance. The problems of effective use of high-performance computing systems for modeling and simulation of subwavelength diffraction gratings are considered. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA is adapted to cloud computing environment. In order to accomplish this, data flow of the RCWA is analyzed and CPU-intensive operations are converted to data-intensive operations. The generated data sets are structured in accordance with the requirements of MapReduce technology.

  12. Effects of asymmetric coupling and self-coupling on metastable dynamical transient rotating waves in a ring of sigmoidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Yo

    2014-05-01

    Transient rotating waves in a ring of sigmoidal neurons with asymmetric bidirectional coupling and self-coupling were studied. When a pair of stable steady states and an unstable traveling wave coexisted, rotating waves propagating in a ring were generated in transients. The pinning (propagation failure) of the traveling wave occurred in the presence of asymmetric coupling and self-coupling, and its conditions were obtained. A kinematical equation for the propagation of wave fronts of the traveling and rotating waves was then derived for a large output gain of neurons. The kinematical equation showed that the duration of transient rotating waves increases exponentially with the number of neurons as that in a ring of unidirectionally coupled neurons (metastable dynamical transients). However, the exponential growth rate depended on the asymmetry of bidirectional coupling and the strength of self-coupling. The rate was equal to the propagation time of the traveling wave (a reciprocal of the propagation speed), and it increased near pinned regions. Then transient rotating waves could show metastable dynamics (extremely long duration) even in a ring of a small number of neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Millimetre-wave spectroscopy of HC{sub 4}Cl in ground and excited vibrational states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizzocchi, Luca [Dipartimento di Chimica ' G. Ciamician' , Universita di Bologna, via F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: luca.bizzocchi@unibo.it; Degli Esposti, Claudio [Dipartimento di Chimica ' G. Ciamician' , Universita di Bologna, via F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: claudio.degliesposti@unibo.it

    2008-05-04

    The semi-stable HC{sub 4}Cl molecule has been detected in the pyrolysis products of propyne and carbon tetrachloride mixtures. The rotational spectrum of the most abundant isotopologue HC{sub 4}{sup 35}Cl has been investigated in the millimetre- and sub-millimetre-wave regions for the ground and 12 vibrationally excited states which approximately lie below 630 cm{sup -1}, namely ({nu}{sub 5}{nu}{sub 6}{nu}{sub 7}{nu}{sub 8}{nu}{sub 9})=(10000), (01000), (00100), (00010), (00001), (00020), (00002), (00003), (00004), (00101), (00011) and (00012). Transitions up to J=151 <- 150 were measured for the ground state, allowing for a precise evaluation of the quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants D and H. The l-type resonances between the different sublevels of the bending states and the anharmonic resonance which couples the states {nu}{sub 5}=1, {nu}{sub 8}=2 and {nu}{sub 9}=4 have been taken into account in the analysis of the spectra, which yielded precise determinations of the x{sub L(99)}, x{sub L(88)}, x{sub L(89)} and x{sub L(79)} anharmonicity constants and of the {phi}{sub 588} normal coordinate cubic force constant. Extensive measurements have also been performed for the HC{sub 4}{sup 37}Cl isotopologue.

  14. Framework of Distributed Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean-Wave Modeling System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Yuanqiao; HUANG Liwen; DENG Jian; ZHANG Jinfeng; WANG Sisi; WANG Lijun

    2006-01-01

    In order to research the interactions between the atmosphere and ocean as well as their important role in the intensive weather systems of coastal areas, and to improve the forecasting ability of the hazardous weather processes of coastal areas, a coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave modeling system has been developed.The agent-based environment framework for linking models allows flexible and dynamic information exchange between models. For the purpose of flexibility, portability and scalability, the framework of the whole system takes a multi-layer architecture that includes a user interface layer, computational layer and service-enabling layer. The numerical experiment presented in this paper demonstrates the performance of the distributed coupled modeling system.

  15. Performance and Optimization for a Ground-Coupled Liquid Loop Heat Recovery Ventilation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ya-su; Per FAHLEN; Torbj(o)rn LINDHOLM

    2007-01-01

    Ground-coupled heat pumps(GCHP) arecommonly used in residential heating system. To mitigatethe boreholes temperature dropping with operating time, anew exhaust-air recharging system is developed. The newrecharging system can be used in three operational modes.In this paper, a ground-coupled heat recovery ventilation(HRV) model is discussed. A thermal model is set up tofind the optimal brine flow rate and heat transfer allocationratio between exhaust and supply coils for maximum heatrecovery efficiency. Contrary to the conventional liquid-loopHRV systems, the brine temperature entering the exhaustcoil never goes blow zero(0℃), and hence defrosting isneedless in the ground-coupled HRV system. This can makethe ground-coupled HRV system over 20% more efficientthan a conventional HRV system at low outdoortemperatures.

  16. Ground penetrating radar antenna measurements based on plane-wave expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of the system consisting of the ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna and the air-soil interface is measured using a loop buried in the soil. The plane-wave spectrum is used to determine various parameters characterizing the radiation of the GPR antenna...

  17. Contrast validation test for retrieval method of high frequency ground wave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hailong; GUO Peifang; HAN Shuzong; XIE Qiang; ZHOU Liangming

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, on the basis of the working principles of high frequency ground wave radar for retrieval of ocean wave and sea wind elements were used to systematically study the data obtained from contrast validation test in Zhoushan sea area of Zhejiang Province on Oct. 2000, to validate the accuracy of OSMAR2000for wave and wind parameters, and to analyze the possible error caused when using OSMAR2000 to retrieve ocean parameters.

  18. Bond order wave (BOW) phase of the extended Hubbard model: Electronic solitons, paramagnetism, coupling to Peierls and Holstein phonons

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Manoranjan; Soos, Zolt'an G.

    2011-01-01

    The bond order wave (BOW) phase of the extended Hubbard model (EHM) in one dimension (1D) is characterized at intermediate correlation $U = 4t$ by exact treatment of $N$-site systems. Linear coupling to lattice (Peierls) phonons and molecular (Holstein) vibrations are treated in the adiabatic approximation. The molar magnetic susceptibility $\\chi_M(T)$ is obtained directly up to $N = 10$. The goal is to find the consequences of a doubly degenerate ground state (gs) and finite magnetic gap $E_...

  19. New Explicit Solitary Wave Solutions and Periodic Wave Solutions for the Generalized Coupled Hirota-Satsuma KdV System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong; YAN Zhen-Ya; LI Biao; ZHANG Hong-Qing

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we study the generalized coupled Hirota Satsuma KdV system by using the new generalizedtransformation in homogeneous balance method. As a result, many explicit exact solutions, which contain new solitarywave solutions, periodic wave solutions, and the combined formal solitary wave solutions, and periodic wave solutions,are obtained.

  20. Transverse multipolar light-matter couplings in evanescent waves

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Bonod, Nicolas; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to study the interaction between matter and evanescent fields. The approach is based on the decomposition of evanescent plane waves into multipoles of well-defined angular momentum transverse to both decay and propagation directions. We use the approach to identify the origin of the recently observed directional coupling of emitters into guided modes, and of the opposite Zeeman state excitation of atoms near a fiber. We explain how to rigorously quantify both effects, and show that the directionality and the difference in excitation rates grow exponentially with the multipolar order of the light-matter interaction. We also use the approach to study and maximize the transverse torque exerted by an evanescent plane wave onto a given spherical absorbing particle. The maximum occurs at the quadrupolar order of the particle, and for a particular polarization of the plane wave. All the obtained physical insights can be traced back to the two main features of the decomposition of evanescent pl...

  1. Wave Data Processing and Analysis, Part 2: Codes for Coupling GenCade and CMS-Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    coastal modeling system , Report 2: CMS -Wave. ERDC/CHL-TR-11-10. Vicksburg, MS: US Army Engineer Research and Development Center. Connell, K. J. and...Coupling GenCade and CMS -Wave by Rusty Permenter, Kenneth J. Connell, and Zeki Demirbilek PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering...to GenCade. This is the second CHETN in a two‐part series detailing the process of coupling CMS ‐Wave with GenCade. This CHETN focuses on

  2. P -wave coupled channel effects in electron-positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Meng-Lin; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Wang, Qian

    2016-11-01

    P -wave coupled channel effects arising from the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds in e+e- annihilations are systematically studied. We provide an exploratory study by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation with short-ranged contact potentials obtained in the heavy quark limit. These contact potentials can be extracted from the P -wave interactions in the e+e- annihilations, and then be employed to investigate possible isosinglet P -wave hadronic molecules. In particular, such an investigation may provide information about exotic candidates with quantum numbers JPC=1-+ . In the mass region of the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds, there are two quark model bare states, i.e. the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ), which are assigned as (13D1) and (31S1) states, respectively. By an overall fit of the cross sections of e+e-→D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , D*D¯*, we determine the physical coupling constants to each channel and extract the pole positions of the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ). The deviation of the ratios from that in the heavy quark spin symmetry (HQSS) limit reflects the HQSS breaking effect due to the mass splitting between the D and the D*. Besides the two poles, we also find a pole a few MeV above the D D¯ *+c .c . threshold which can be related to the so-called G (3900 ) observed earlier by BABAR and Belle. This scenario can be further scrutinized by measuring the angular distribution in the D*D¯* channel with high luminosity experiments.

  3. Ground coupled solar heat pumps: analysis of four options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    Heat pump systems which utilize both solar energy and energy withdrawn from the ground are analyzed using a simplified procedure which optimizes the solar storage temperature on a monthly basis. Four ways of introducing collected solar energy to the system are optimized and compared. These include use of actively collected thermal input to the heat pump; use of collected solar energy to heat the load directly (two different ways); and use of a passive option to reduce the effective heating load.

  4. Tunable, continuous-wave single-resonant optical parametric oscillator with output coupling for resonant wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong-Hua, Zheng; Bao-Fu, Zhang; Zhong-Xing, Jiao; Biao, Wang

    2016-01-01

    We present a continuous-wave singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator with 1.5% output coupling of the resonant signal wave, based on an angle-polished MgO-doped periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN), pumped by a commercial Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm. The output-coupled optical parametric oscillator delivers a maximum total output power of 4.19 W with 42.8% extraction efficiency, across a tuning range of 1717 nm in the near- and mid-infrared region. This indicates improvements of 1.87 W in output power, 19.1% in extraction efficiency and 213 nm in tuning range extension in comparison with the optical parametric oscillator with no output coupling, while at the expense of increasing the oscillation threshold by a factor of ˜ 2. Moreover, it is confirmed that the finite output coupling also contributes to the reduction of the thermal effects in crystal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61308056, 11204044, 11232015, and 11072271), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20120171110005 and 20130171130003), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. 14lgpy07), and the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory, China (Grant No. ZHD201203).

  5. Convectively coupled Kelvin waves in aquachannel simulations: 2. Life cycle and dynamical-convective coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Joaquín. E.; Nolan, David S.; Mapes, Brian E.

    2016-10-01

    This second part of a two-part study uses Weather Research and Forecasting simulations with aquachannel and aquapatch domains to investigate the time evolution of convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs). Power spectra, filtering, and compositing are combined with object-tracking methods to assess the structure and phase speed propagation of CCKWs during their strengthening, mature, and decaying phases. In this regard, we introduce an innovative approach to more closely investigate the wave (Kelvin) versus entity (super cloud cluster or "SCC") dualism. In general, the composite CCKW structures represent a dynamical response to the organized convective activity. However, pressure and thermodynamic fields in the boundary layer behave differently. Further analysis of the time evolution of pressure and low-level moist static energy finds that these fields propagate eastward as a "moist" Kelvin wave (MKW), faster than the envelope of organized convection or SCC. When the separation is sufficiently large the SCC dissipates, and a new SCC generates to the east, in the region of strongest negative pressure perturbations. We revisit the concept itself of the "coupling" between convection and dynamics, and we also propose a conceptual model for CCKWs, with a clear distinction between the SCC and the MKW components.

  6. Coupled cluster calculation for ground state properties of closed-shell nuclei and single hole states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen

    2000-04-01

    We continue the investigations of ground state properties of closed-shell nuclei using the Argonne v18 realistic NN potential, together with the Urbana IX three-nucleon interaction. The ground state wave function is used to calculate the charge form factor and charge density. Starting with the ground state wave function of the closed-shell nucleus, we use the equation of motion technique to calculate the ground state and excited states of a neighboring nucleus. We then generate the corresponding magnetic form factor. We correct for distortions due to the interaction between the electron probe and the nuclear Coulomb field using the DWBA picture. We compare our results with the available experimental data. Even though our presentation will focus mainly on the ^16O and ^15N nuclei, results for other nuclei in the p and s-d shell will also be presented.

  7. Nonlinear waves in a positive-negative coupled waveguide zigzag array

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantseva, Elena V

    2013-01-01

    We consider the coupled electromagnetic waves propagating in a waveguide array, which consists of alternating waveguides of positive and negative refraction indexes. Due to zigzag configuration there are interactions between both nearest and next nearest neighboring waveguides exist. It is shown that there is a stop band in the spectrum of linear waves. The system of evolution equations for coupled waves has the steady state solution describing the electromagnetic pulse running in the array. Numerical simulation demonstrates robustness of these solitary waves.

  8. Human seizures couple across spatial scales through travelling wave dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, L.-E.; Fiddyment, G.; Madsen, J. R.; Eskandar, E. N.; Truccolo, W.; Eden, U. T.; Cash, S. S.; Kramer, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    Epilepsy--the propensity toward recurrent, unprovoked seizures--is a devastating disease affecting 65 million people worldwide. Understanding and treating this disease remains a challenge, as seizures manifest through mechanisms and features that span spatial and temporal scales. Here we address this challenge through the analysis and modelling of human brain voltage activity recorded simultaneously across microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales. We show that during seizure large-scale neural populations spanning centimetres of cortex coordinate with small neural groups spanning cortical columns, and provide evidence that rapidly propagating waves of activity underlie this increased inter-scale coupling. We develop a corresponding computational model to propose specific mechanisms--namely, the effects of an increased extracellular potassium concentration diffusing in space--that support the observed spatiotemporal dynamics. Understanding the multi-scale, spatiotemporal dynamics of human seizures--and connecting these dynamics to specific biological mechanisms--promises new insights to treat this devastating disease.

  9. Capillary Waves And Energy Coupling In Laser Materials Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, A.; Herziger, G.; Holtgen, B.; Kreutz, E. W.; Treusch, H. G.

    1987-09-01

    Static and dynamic measurements of the incident laser power, of the diffuse and specular reflected power have been performed in order to determine the absorption behavior of various metals and semiconductors during the interaction with powerful CO2-and Nd:YAG-laser-radiation. The absorptivity of the vapor and laser-induced plasma was probed by high-speed photography and measurements of conductivity transients as a function of intensity, composition, and pressure of the ambient atmosphere. For IIB the intensity-dependent energy coupling is governed by the generation of photon-induced plasma in the surface region in combination with the dynamics of the molten and vaporized material within the interaction zone giving in addition indication for capillary waves.

  10. Coupling characteristics between five-layer slab wave-guides including left-handed materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Lu-fa; WANG Zi-hua

    2008-01-01

    To obtain the coupling characteristics between slab wave-guides including lift-handed material, we modify the coupledwave equations by using Maxwell's equations. First, we obtain new-couplid wave equations and new-coupling coefficient.Second, the coupling between two identical five-layer slab wave-guides where their cores are left-haaded material, but theircladdings are right-handed materials is studied. The coupling coefficient for even TE mode which is more complex than thatof the riglt-handed material slab wave guides, is obtained.

  11. Gravitational Wave Detection by Interferometry (Ground and Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hough Jim

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational wave detectors. Sources such as coalescing compact binary systems, low-mass X-ray binaries, stellar collapses and pulsars are all possible candidates for detection. The most promising design of gravitational wave detector uses test masses a long distance apart and freely suspended as pendulums on Earth or in drag-free craft in space. The main theme of this review is a discussion of the mechanical and optical principles used in the various long baseline systems being built around the world -- LIGO (USA, VIRGO (Italy/France, TAMA 300 (Japan and GEO 600 (Germany/UK -- and in LISA, a proposed space-borne interferometer.

  12. Nonlinear coupling of kinetic Alfven waves with acoustic waves in a self-gravitating dusty plasma with adiabatic trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeen, A.; Masood, W.; Qureshi, M. N. S.; Shah, H. A.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, linear and nonlinear coupling of kinetic Alfven and acoustic waves has been studied in a dusty plasma in the presence of trapping and self-gravitation effects. In this regard, we have derived the linear dispersion relations for positively and negatively coupled dust kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves. Stability analysis of the coupled dust kinetic Alfven-acoustic wave has also been presented. The formation of solitary structures has been investigated following the Sagdeev potential approach by using the two-potential theory. Numerical results show that the solitary structures can be obtained only for sub-Alfvenic regimes in the scenario of space plasmas.

  13. Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction in the Lifecycle of ENSO: The Coupled Wave Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jialin LIN

    2009-01-01

    To explain the oscillatory nature of E1 Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), many ENSO theories emphasize the free oceanic equatorial waves propagating/reflecting within the Pacific Ocean, or the discharge/recharge of Pacific-basin-averaged ocean heat content. ENSO signals in the Indian and Atlantic oceans are often considered as remote response to the Pacific SST anomaly through atmospheric teleconnections. This study investigates the ENSO life cycle near the equator using long-term observational datasets. Space-time spectral analysis is used to identify and isolate the dominant interannual oceanic and atmospheric wave modes associated with ENSO. Nino3 SST anomaly is utilized as the ENSO index, and lag-correlation/regression are used to construct the composite ENSO life cycle. The propagation, structure and feedback mechanisms of the dominant wave modes are studied in detail. The results show that the dominant oceanic equatorial wave modes associated with ENSO are not free waves, but are two ocean-atmosphere coupled waves including a coupled Kelvin wave and a coupled equatorial Rossby (ER) wave. These waves are not confined only to the Pacific Ocean, but are of planetary scale with zonal wavenumbers 1-2, and propagate all the way around the equator in more than three years, leading to the longer than 3-year period of ENSO. When passing the continents, they become uncoupled atmospheric waves. The coupled Kelvin wave has larger variance than the coupled ER wave, making the total signals dominated by eastward propagation. Surface zonal wind stress (x) acts to slow down the waves. The two coupled waves interact with each other through boundary reflection and superposition, and they also interact with an off-equatorial Rossby wave in north Pacific along 15N through boundary reflection and wind stress forcing. The precipitation anomalies of the two coupled waves meet in the eastern Pacific shortly after the SST maximum of ENSO and excite a dry atmospheric Kelvin wave which

  14. Propagation of edge waves in a thinly layered laminated medium with stress couples under initial stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pijush Pal Roy

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of edge waves in a thinly layered laminated medium with stress couples under initial stresses is examined. Based upon an approximate representation of a laminated medium by an equivalent anisotropic continuum with average initial and couple stresses, an explicit form of frequency equation is obtained to derive the phase velocity of edge waves. Edge waves exist under certain conditions. The inclusion of couple stresses increases the velocity of wave propagation. For a specific compression, the presence of couple stresses increases the velocity of wave propagation with the increase of wave number, whereas the reverse is the case when there is no couple stress. Numerical computation is performed with graphical representations. Several special cases are also examined.

  15. A coupled DEM-CFD method for impulse wave modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tao; Utili, Stefano; Crosta, GiovanBattista

    2015-04-01

    Rockslides can be characterized by a rapid evolution, up to a possible transition into a rock avalanche, which can be associated with an almost instantaneous collapse and spreading. Different examples are available in the literature, but the Vajont rockslide is quite unique for its morphological and geological characteristics, as well as for the type of evolution and the availability of long term monitoring data. This study advocates the use of a DEM-CFD framework for the modelling of the generation of hydrodynamic waves due to the impact of a rapid moving rockslide or rock-debris avalanche. 3D DEM analyses in plane strain by a coupled DEM-CFD code were performed to simulate the rockslide from its onset to the impact with still water and the subsequent wave generation (Zhao et al., 2014). The physical response predicted is in broad agreement with the available observations. The numerical results are compared to those published in the literature and especially to Crosta et al. (2014). According to our results, the maximum computed run up amounts to ca. 120 m and 170 m for the eastern and western lobe cross sections, respectively. These values are reasonably similar to those recorded during the event (i.e. ca. 130 m and 190 m respectively). In these simulations, the slope mass is considered permeable, such that the toe region of the slope can move submerged in the reservoir and the impulse water wave can also flow back into the slope mass. However, the upscaling of the grains size in the DEM model leads to an unrealistically high hydraulic conductivity of the model, such that only a small amount of water is splashed onto the northern bank of the Vajont valley. The use of high fluid viscosity and coarse grain model has shown the possibility to model more realistically both the slope and wave motions. However, more detailed slope and fluid properties, and the need for computational efficiency should be considered in future research work. This aspect has also been

  16. Guiding, bending, and splitting of coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Zhang, Baile, E-mail: blzhang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2016-01-25

    We experimentally demonstrate a type of waveguiding mechanism for coupled surface-wave defect modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. Unlike conventional spoof surface plasmon waveguides, waveguiding of coupled surface-wave defect modes is achieved through weak coupling between tightly localized defect cavities in an otherwise gapped surface-wave photonic crystal, as a classical wave analogue of tight-binding electronic wavefunctions in solid state lattices. Wave patterns associated with the high transmission of coupled defect surface modes are directly mapped with a near-field microwave scanning probe for various structures including a straight waveguide, a sharp corner, and a T-shaped splitter. These results may find use in the design of integrated surface-wave devices with suppressed crosstalk.

  17. Homogenization of seismic surface wave profiling in highly heterogeneous improved ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C.; Chien, C.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic surface wave profiling is gaining popularity in engineering practice for determining shear-wave velocity profile since the two-station SASW (Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave) was introduced. Recent developments in the multi-station approach (Multi-station Analysis of Surface Wave, MASW) result in several convenient commercial tools. Unlike other geophysical tomography methods, the surface wave method is essentially a 1-D method assuming horizontally-layered medium. Nevertheless, MASW is increasingly used to map lateral variation of S-wave velocity by multiple surveys overlooking the effect of lateral heterogeneity. MASW typically requires long receiver spread in order to have enough depth coverage. The accuracy and lateral resolution of 2-D S-wave velocity imaging by surface wave is not clear. Many geotechnical applications involves lateral variation in a scale smaller than the geophone spread and wave length. For example, soft ground is often improved to increase strength and stiffness by methods such as jet grouting and stone column which result in heterogeneous ground with improved columns. Experimental methods (Standard Penetration Test, sampling and laboratory testing, etc.) used to assess such ground improvement are subjected to several limitations such as small sampling volume, time-consuming, and cost ineffectiveness. It's difficult to assess the average property of the improved ground and the actual replacement ratio of ground improvement. The use of seismic surface wave method for such a purpose seems to be a good alternative. But what MASW measures in such highly heterogeneous improved ground remains to be investigated. This study evaluated the feasibility of MASW in highly heterogeneous ground with improved columns and investigated the homogenization of shear wave velocity measured by MASW. Field experiments show that MASW testing in such a composite ground behaves similar to testing in horizontally layered medium. It seems to measure some sort

  18. An atmosphere-wave regional coupled model: improving predictions of wave heights and surface winds in the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Kathrin; Staneva, Joanna; Koch, Wolfgang; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Ho-Hagemann, Ha T. M.; Stanev, Emil V.

    2017-04-01

    The coupling of models is a commonly used approach when addressing the complex interactions between different components of earth systems. We demonstrate that this approach can result in a reduction of errors in wave forecasting, especially in dynamically complicated coastal ocean areas, such as the southern part of the North Sea - the German Bight. Here, we study the effects of coupling of an atmospheric model (COSMO) and a wind wave model (WAM), which is enabled by implementing wave-induced drag in the atmospheric model. The numerical simulations use a regional North Sea coupled wave-atmosphere model as well as a nested-grid high-resolution German Bight wave model. Using one atmospheric and two wind wave models simultaneously allows for study of the individual and combined effects of two-way coupling and grid resolution. This approach proved to be particularly important under severe storm conditions as the German Bight is a very shallow and dynamically complex coastal area exposed to storm floods. The two-way coupling leads to a reduction of both surface wind speeds and simulated wave heights. In this study, the sensitivity of atmospheric parameters, such as wind speed and atmospheric pressure, to the wave-induced drag, in particular under storm conditions, and the impact of two-way coupling on the wave model performance, is quantified. Comparisons between data from in situ and satellite altimeter observations indicate that two-way coupling improves the simulation of wind and wave parameters of the model and justify its implementation for both operational and climate simulations.

  19. Competing magnetic ground states and their coupling to the crystal lattice in CuFe2Ge2

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Andrew F.; Calder, Stuart; Parker, David S.; Sales, Brian C.; McGuire, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying and characterizing systems with coupled and competing interactions is central to the development of physical models that can accurately describe and predict emergent behavior in condensed matter systems. This work demonstrates that the metallic compound CuFe2Ge2 has competing magnetic ground states, which are shown to be strongly coupled to the lattice and easily manipulated using temperature and applied magnetic fields. Temperature-dependent magnetization M measurements reveal a ferromagnetic-like onset at 228 (1) K and a broad maximum in M near 180 K. Powder neutron diffraction confirms antiferromagnetic ordering below TN ≈ 175 K, and an incommensurate spin density wave is observed below ≈125 K. Coupled with the small refined moments (0.5–1 μB/Fe), this provides a picture of itinerant magnetism in CuFe2Ge2. The neutron diffraction data also reveal a coexistence of two magnetic phases that further highlights the near-degeneracy of various magnetic states. These results demonstrate that the ground state in CuFe2Ge2 can be easily manipulated by external forces, making it of particular interest for doping, pressure, and further theoretical studies. PMID:27739477

  20. Conjugate ground and multisatellite observations of compression-related EMIC Pc1 waves and associated proton precipitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. E. Usanova; I. R. Mann; Z. C. Kale; I. J. Rae; R. D. Sydora; M. Sandanger; F. Søraas; K.-H. Glassmeier; K.-H. Fornacon; H. Matsui; P. A. Puhl-Quinn; A. Masson; X. Vallières

    2010-01-01

    ...) waves from 25 September 2005. On the ground, dayside structured EMIC wave activity was observed by the CARISMA and STEP magnetometer arrays for several hours during the period of maximum compression...

  1. A refined computer program for the transient simulation of ground coupled heat pump systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J. W.; Metz, P. D.; Saunders, J. H.

    1983-04-01

    The use of the earth as a heat source/sink or storage medium for various heat pump based space conditioning systems were investigated. A computer program ground coupled system (GROCS) was developed to model the behavior of ground coupling devices. The GROCS was integrated with TRNSYS, the solar system simulation program, to permit the simulation of complete ground coupled heat pump systems. Experimental results were compared to GROCS simulation results for model validation. It is found that the model has considerable validity. A refined version of the GROCS-TRNSYS program developed to model vertical or horizontal earth coil systems, which considers system cycling is described. The design of the program and its interaction with TRNSYS are discussed.

  2. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines With Finite Width Ground Plane Embedded in Thin Film Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Dalton, Edan; Tentzeris, Manos M.; Papapolymerou, John

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interconnects built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing 3D circuits on CMOS (low resistivity) Si wafers, GaAs, and ceramic substrates. Thin film microstrip lines (TFMS) with finite width ground planes embedded in the polyimide are often used. However, the closely spaced TFMS lines a r e susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and experimental measurements a r e used to show that the ground planes must be connected by via holes to reduce coupling in both the forward and backward directions. Furthermore, it is shown that coupled microstrip lines establish a slotline type mode between the two ground planes and a dielectric waveguide type mode, and that the via holes recommended here eliminate these two modes.

  3. Status of advanced ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave detection

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Katherine L; Dwyer, Sheila; Puppo, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave (GW) detection were first constructed starting 20 years ago and as of 2010 collection of several years' worth of science data at initial design sensitivities was completed. Upgrades to the initial detectors together with construction of brand new detectors are ongoing and feature advanced technologies to improve the sensitivity to GWs. This conference proceeding provides an overview of the common design features of ground-based laser interferometric GW detectors and establishes the context for the status updates of each of the four gravitational-wave detectors around the world: Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, GEO600 and KAGRA.

  4. Method and basis set dependence of anharmonic ground state nuclear wave functions and zero-point energies: application to SSSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmann, Stephen J; Jordan, Meredith J T

    2010-02-07

    One of the largest remaining errors in thermochemical calculations is the determination of the zero-point energy (ZPE). The fully coupled, anharmonic ZPE and ground state nuclear wave function of the SSSH radical are calculated using quantum diffusion Monte Carlo on interpolated potential energy surfaces (PESs) constructed using a variety of method and basis set combinations. The ZPE of SSSH, which is approximately 29 kJ mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/6-31G* level of theory, has a 4 kJ mol(-1) dependence on the treatment of electron correlation. The anharmonic ZPEs are consistently 0.3 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy than the harmonic ZPEs calculated at the Hartree-Fock and MP2 levels of theory, and 0.7 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy at the CCSD(T)/6-31G* level of theory. Ideally, for sub-kJ mol(-1) thermochemical accuracy, ZPEs should be calculated using correlated methods with as big a basis set as practicable. The ground state nuclear wave function of SSSH also has significant method and basis set dependence. The analysis of the nuclear wave function indicates that SSSH is localized to a single symmetry equivalent global minimum, despite having sufficient ZPE to be delocalized over both minima. As part of this work, modifications to the interpolated PES construction scheme of Collins and co-workers are presented.

  5. Universal Wave Function Overlap and Universal Topological Data from Generic Gapped Ground States

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We propose a way -- universal wave function overlap -- to extract universal topological data from generic ground states of gapped systems in any dimensions. Those extracted topological data should fully characterize the topological orders with gapped or gapless boundary. For non-chiral topological orders in 2+1D, this universal topological data consist of two matrices, $S$ and $T$, which generate a projective representation of $SL(2,\\mathbb Z)$ on the degenerate ground state Hilbert space on ...

  6. Particle production during inflation and gravitational waves detectable by ground-based interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Jessica L.; Sorbo, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Inflation typically predicts a quasi scale-invariant spectrum of gravitational waves. In models of slow-roll inflation, the amplitude of such a background is too small to allow direct detection without a dedicated space-based experiment such as the proposed BBO or DECIGO. In this paper we note that particle production during inflation can generate a feature in the spectrum of primordial gravitational waves. We discuss the possibility that such a feature might be detected by ground-based laser...

  7. Orbital stability of spatially synchronized solitary waves of an m-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuangye; Nguyen, Nghiem V.; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the orbital stability of solitary-wave solutions for an m-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system i /∂ ∂ t u j + /∂ 2 ∂ x 2 u j + ∑ i = 1 m b i j |" separators=" u i | 2 u j = 0 , j = 1 , … , m , where m ≥ 2, uj are complex-valued functions of (x, t) ∈ ℝ2, bjj ∈ ℝ, j = 1, 2, …, m, and bij, i ≠ j are positive coupling constants satisfying bij = bji. It will be shown that spatially synchronized solitary-wave solutions of the m-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system exist and are orbitally stable. Here, by synchronized solutions we mean solutions in which the components are proportional to one another. Our results completely settle the question on the existence and stability of synchronized solitary waves for the m-coupled system while only partial results were known in the literature for the cases of m ≥ 3 heretofore. Furthermore, the conditions imposed on the symmetric matrix B = (bij) satisfied here are both sufficient and necessary for the m-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system to admit synchronized ground-state solutions.

  8. Comparative evaluation of ground-coupled heat pumps that use solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.W.; Catan, M.A.

    1985-03-01

    A study of combined building space conditioning systems using both solar energy and heat pumps was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Several of these systems used the ground as a source or storage element for thermal energy, in order to reduce or eliminate the need for backup energy. This paper summarizes the results obtained for these systems in the United States, and describes the relationship of ground-coupling to the overall US solar-assisted heat-pump program.

  9. Structure of Ground state Wave Functions for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect: A Variational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sutirtha; Mandal, Sudhansu

    The internal structure and topology of the ground states for fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) are determined by the relative angular momenta between all the possible pairs of electrons. Laughlin wave function is the only known microscopic wave function for which these relative angular momenta are homogeneous (same) for any pair of electrons and depend solely on the filling factor. Without invoking any microscopic theory, considering only the relationship between number of flux quanta and particles in spherical geometry, and allowing the possibility of inhomogeneous (different) relative angular momenta between any two electrons, we develop a general method for determining a closed-form ground state wave function for any incompressible FQHE state. Our procedure provides variationally obtained very accurate wave functions, yet having simpler structure compared to any other known complex microscopic wave functions for the FQHE states. This method, thus, has potential in predicting a very accurate ground state wave function for the puzzling states such as the state at filling fraction 5/2. We acknowledge support from Department of Science and Technology, India.

  10. Ground State Transitions in Vertically Coupled Four-Layer Single Electron Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGAn-Mei; XIEWen-Fang

    2005-01-01

    We study a four-electron system in a vertically coupled four-layer quantum dot under a magnetic field by the exact diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matr/x. We find that discontinuous ground-state energy transitions are induced by an external magnetic field. We find that dot-dot distance and electron-electron interaction strongly affect the low-lying states of the coupled quantum dots. The inter-dot correlation leads to some sequences of possible disappearances of ground state transitions, which are present for uncoupled dots.

  11. Ground State Transitions in Vertically Coupled Four-Layer Single Electron Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG An-Mei; XIE Wen-Fang

    2005-01-01

    We study a four-electron system in a vertically coupled four-layer quantum dot under a magnetic field by the exact diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix. We find that discontinuous ground-state energy transitions are induced by an external magnetic field. We find that dot-dot distance and electron-electron interaction strongly affect the low-lying states of the coupled quantum dots. The inter-dot correlation leads to some sequences of possible disappearances of ground state transitions, which are present for uncoupled dots.

  12. From a breather homoclinic wave to a rogue wave solution for the coupled Schrödinger-Boussinesq equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanjian; Dai, Zhengde; Liu, Changfu

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, two types of multi-parameter breather homoclinic wave solutions—including breather homoclinic wave and rational homoclinic wave solutions—are obtained by using the Hirota technique and ansätz with complexity of parameter for the coupled Schrödinger-Boussinesq equation. Rogue waves in the form of the rational homoclinic solution are derived when the periods of breather homoclinic wave go to infinite. Some novel features of homoclinic wave solutions are discussed and presented. In contrast to the normal bright rogue wave structure, a structure like a four-petaled flower in temporal-spatial distribution is exhibited. Further with the change of the wave number of the plane wave, the bright and dark rogue wave structures may change into each other. The bright rogue wave structure results from the full merger of two nearby peaks, and the dark rogue wave structure results from the full merger of two nearby holes. The dark rogue wave for the uncoupled Boussinesq equation is finally obtained. Its structural properties show that it never takes on bright rogue wave features with the change of parameter. It is hoped that these results might provide us with useful information on the dynamics of the relevant fields in physics.

  13. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over $80\\%$ of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to $70\\%$. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can obser...

  14. Conjugate ground and multisatellite observations of compression-related EMIC Pc1 waves and associated proton precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usanova, M. E.; Mann, I. R.; Kale, Z. C.; Rae, I. J.; Sydora, R. D.; Sandanger, M.; Søraas, F.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Fornacon, K.-H.; Matsui, H.; Puhl-Quinn, P. A.; Masson, A.; Vallières, X.

    2010-07-01

    We present coordinated ground satellite observations of solar wind compression-related dayside electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves from 25 September 2005. On the ground, dayside structured EMIC wave activity was observed by the CARISMA and STEP magnetometer arrays for several hours during the period of maximum compression. The EMIC waves were also registered by the Cluster satellites for half an hour, as they consecutively crossed the conjugate equatorial plasmasphere on their perigee passes at L ˜ 5. Simultaneously, conjugate to Cluster, NOAA 17 passed through field lines supporting EMIC wave activity and registered a localized enhancement of precipitating protons with energies >30 keV. Our observations suggest that generation of the EMIC waves and consequent loss of energetic protons may last for several hours while the magnetosphere remains compressed. The EMIC waves were confined to the outer plasmasphere region, just inside the plasmapause. Analysis of lower-frequency Pc5 waves observed both by the Cluster electron drift instrument (EDI) and fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) instruments and by the ground magnetometers show that the repetitive structure of EMIC wave packets observed on the ground cannot be explained by the ultra low frequency (ULF) wave modulation theory. However, the EMIC wave repetition period on the ground was close to the estimated field-aligned Alfvénic travel time. For a short interval of time, there was some evidence that EMIC wave packet repetition period in the source region was half of that on the ground, which further suggests bidirectional propagation of wave packets.

  15. Theoretical and Experimental Study on Ground Coupled Heat Pump with Vertical Spiral Coil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新国; 周倩; 赵军; 朱强; 胡璟

    2003-01-01

    The numerical simulation study on the temperature distribution of underground field for the ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) with vertical spiral coil was carried out by using finite element. The distribution and recovery of underground field temperature under different operation ratio and the optimal operation ratio were simulated. The performance parameters, i.e. inlet and outlet temperature of the ground spiral coil in heating and cooling modes were tested, the heat extracted or emitted by the heat pump to the ground was calculated, and the coefficients of performance (COP) of GCHP at heating and cooling modes were analyzed.

  16. Analytical expressions for partial wave two-body Coulomb transition matrices at ground-state energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, V. F.

    2016-11-01

    Leaning upon the Fock method of the stereographic projection of the three-dimensional momentum space onto the four-dimensional unit sphere the possibility of the analytical solving of the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation for the partial wave two-body Coulomb transition matrix at the ground bound state energy has been studied. In this case new expressions for the partial p-, d- and f-wave two-body Coulomb transition matrices have been obtained in the simple analytical form. The developed approach can also be extended to determine analytically the partial wave Coulomb transition matrices at the energies of excited bound states.

  17. Stability and evolution of wave packets in strongly coupled degenerate plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, A P

    2011-01-01

    We study the nonlinear propagation of electrostatic wave packets in a collisional plasma composed of strongly coupled ions and relativistically degenerate electrons. The equilibrium of ions is maintained by an effective temperature associated with their strong coupling, whereas that of electrons is provided by the relativistic degeneracy pressure. Using a multiple scale technique, a (3+1)-dimensional coupled set of nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equations with nonlocal nonlinearity is derived from a generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic model. These coupled equations, which govern the dynamics of wave packets, are used to study the oblique modulational instability of a Stoke's wave train to a small plane wave perturbation. We show that the wave packets, though stable to the parallel modulation, becomes unstable against oblique modulations. In contrast to the long-wavelength carrier modes, the wave packets with short-wavelengths are shown to be stable in the weakly relativistic case, whereas they can be stable...

  18. Solitary Wave Solutions for the Coupled Ito System and a Generalized Hirota-Satsuma Coupled KdV System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-Feng; ZHANG Hong-Qing

    2001-01-01

    We make use of an extended tanh-function method and symbolic computation to construct four kinds of travelling solitary wave solutions for the coupled Ito system and a generalized Hirota-Satsuma coupled KdV system.PACS numbers: 02.90.+p, 03.40.-t

  19. Generalized squeezing rotating-wave approximation to the isotropic and anisotropic Rabi model in the ultrastrong-coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Yu

    2016-12-01

    Generalized squeezing rotating-wave approximation (GSRWA) is proposed by employing both the displacement and the squeezing transformations. A solvable Hamiltonian is reformulated in the same form as the ordinary RWA ones. For a qubit coupled to oscillators experiment, a well-defined Schrödinger-cat-like entangled state is given by the displaced-squeezed oscillator state instead of the original displaced state. For the isotropic Rabi case, the mean photon number and the ground-state energy are expressed analytically with additional squeezing terms, exhibiting a substantial improvement of the GSRWA. And the ground-state energy in the anisotropic Rabi model confirms the effectiveness of the GSRWA. Due to the squeezing effect, the GSRWA improves the previous methods only with the displacement transformation in a wide range of coupling strengths even for large atom frequency.

  20. Application of Fault Location Mode Based on Travelling Waves for Neutral Non-effective Grounding Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>Fault location for distribution feeders short circuit especially single-phase grounding fault is an important task in distribution system with non-effectively grounded neutral.Fault location mode for distribution feeders using fault generated current and voltage transient traveling waves was investigated.The characteristics of transient traveling waves resulted from each short circuit fault and their transmission disciplinarian in distribution feeders are analyzed.This paper proposed that double end travelling waves theory which measures arriving time of fault initiated surge at both ends of the monitored line is fit for distribution feeders but single end traveling waves theory not.According to different distribution feeders,on the basis of analyzing original traveling waves reflection rule in line terminal, Current-voltage mode,voltage-voltage mode and current-current mode for fault location based on traveling waves are proposed and aerial mode component of original traveling waves is used to realize fault location.Experimental test verify the feasibility and correctness of the proposed method.

  1. Existence,Orbital Stability and Instability of Solitary Waves for Coupled BBM Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-wei Cui

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the orbital stability/instability of solitary waves for coupled BBM equations which have Hamiltonian form.The explicit solitary wave solutions will be worked out first.Then by detailed spectral analysis and decaying estimates of solutions for the initial value problem,we obtain the orbital stability/instability of solitary waves.

  2. Back Radiation Suppression through a Semitransparent Ground Plane for a mm-Wave Patch Antenna

    KAUST Repository

    Klionovski, Kirill

    2017-06-21

    Omnidirectional radiation pattern with minimum backward radiation is highly desirable for base station antennas to minimize the multipath effects. Semitransparent ground planes have been used to reduce the backward radiation, but mostly with complicated non-uniform impedance distribution. In this work, we propose, for the first time, a round semitransparent ground plane of radius 0.8 λ with uniform impedance distribution that can improve the front-to-back ratio of a wideband patch antenna by 11.6 dB as compared to a similar sized metallic ground plane. The value of uniform impedance is obtained through analytical optimization by using asymptotic expressions in the Kirchhoff approximation of the radiation pattern of a toroidal wave scattered by a round semitransparent ground plane. The semitransparent ground plane has been realized using a low-cost carbon paste on a Kapton film. Experimental results match closely with those of simulations and validate the overall concept.

  3. Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by EMIC waves, observed from ground and space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyoski, Y [NAGOYA UNIV; Sakaguchi, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Shiokawa, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Evans, D S [NOAA, BOULDER; Albert, Jay [AFRL; Connors, M [UNIV OF ATHABASCA

    2008-01-01

    We show evidence that left-hand polarised electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere. Our unique set of ground and satellite observations shows coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keY and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The coincident precipitation was produced by wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves near the plasmapause. The estimation of pitch angle diffusion coefficients supports that the observed EMIC waves caused coincident precipitation ofboth ions and relativistic electrons. This study clarifies that ions with energies of tens of ke V affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts via cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  4. On the Interpretation of Gravity Wave Measurements by Ground-Based Lidars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Dörnbrack

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper asks the simple question: How can we interpret vertical time series of middle atmosphere gravity wave measurements by ground-based temperature lidars? Linear wave theory is used to show that the association of identified phase lines with quasi-monochromatic waves should be considered with great care. The ambient mean wind has a substantial effect on the inclination of the detected phase lines. The lack of knowledge about the wind might lead to a misinterpretation of the vertical propagation direction of the observed gravity waves. In particular, numerical simulations of three archetypal atmospheric mountain wave regimes show a sensitivity of virtual lidar observations on the position relative to the mountain and on the scale of the mountain.

  5. Mitigation of Traffic-Induced Ground Vibration by Inclined Wave Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    2009-01-01

    Double sheet pile walls can be used as wave barriers in order to mitigate ground vibrations from railways. The present analysis concerns the efficiency of such barriers, especially with regard to the influence of the barrier inclination and the backfill between the walls. Thus, the screening...

  6. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  7. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  8. A shear wave ground surface vibration technique for the detection of buried pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Papandreou, B.

    2014-07-01

    A major UK initiative, entitled 'Mapping the Underworld' aims to develop and prove the efficacy of a multi-sensor device for accurate remote buried utility service detection, location and, where possible, identification. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics; the application of this technology for detecting buried infrastructure, in particular pipes, is currently being investigated. Here, a shear wave ground vibration technique for detecting buried pipes is described. For this technique, shear waves are generated at the ground surface, and the resulting ground surface vibrations measured. Time-extended signals are employed to generate the illuminating wave. Generalized cross-correlation functions between the measured ground velocities and a reference measurement adjacent to the excitation are calculated and summed using a stacking method to generate a cross-sectional image of the ground. To mitigate the effects of other potential sources of vibration in the vicinity, the excitation signal can be used as an additional reference when calculating the cross-correlation functions. Measurements have been made at two live test sites to detect a range of buried pipes. Successful detection of the pipes was achieved, with the use of the additional reference signal proving beneficial in the noisier of the two environments.

  9. Instrumental vetoes for transient gravitational-wave triggers using noise-coupling models: The bilinear-coupling veto

    CERN Document Server

    Ajith, Parameswaran; Christensen, Nelson; Adhikari, Rana; Pearlman, Aaron B; Wein, Alex; Weinstein, Alan J; Yuan, Ben

    2014-01-01

    LIGO and Virgo recently completed searches for gravitational waves at their initial target sensitivities, and soon Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo will commence observations with even better capabilities. In the search for short duration signals, such as coalescing compact binary inspirals or "burst" events, noise transients can be problematic. Interferometric gravitational-wave detectors are highly complex instruments, and, based on the experience from the past, the data often contain a large number of noise transients that are not easily distinguishable from possible gravitational-wave signals. In order to perform a sensitive search for short-duration gravitational-wave signals it is important to identify these noise artifacts, and to "veto" them. Here we describe such a veto, the bilinear-coupling veto, that makes use of an empirical model of the coupling of instrumental noise to the output strain channel of the interferometric gravitational-wave detector. In this method, we check whether the data from th...

  10. Ground-Coupled Heating-Cooling Systems in Urban Areas: How Sustainable Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Ground-coupled heating-cooling systems (GCHCSs) exchange heat between the built environment and the subsurface using pipework buried in trenches or boreholes. If heat pumps in GCHCSs are powered by "green electricity," they offer genuine carbon-free heating-cooling; for this reason, there has been a surge in the technology in recent years.…

  11. Ground-Coupled Heating-Cooling Systems in Urban Areas: How Sustainable Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Ground-coupled heating-cooling systems (GCHCSs) exchange heat between the built environment and the subsurface using pipework buried in trenches or boreholes. If heat pumps in GCHCSs are powered by "green electricity," they offer genuine carbon-free heating-cooling; for this reason, there has been a surge in the technology in recent…

  12. Spin-Orbit Coupling Controlled J =3 /2 Electronic Ground State in 5 d3 Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. E.; Calder, S.; Morrow, R.; Feng, H. L.; Upton, M. H.; Lumsden, M. D.; Yamaura, K.; Woodward, P. M.; Christianson, A. D.

    2017-05-01

    Entanglement of spin and orbital degrees of freedom drives the formation of novel quantum and topological physical states. Here we report resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of the transition metal oxides Ca3 LiOsO6 and Ba2 YOsO6 , which reveals a dramatic spitting of the t2 g manifold. We invoke an intermediate coupling approach that incorporates both spin-orbit coupling and electron-electron interactions on an even footing and reveal that the ground state of 5 d3-based compounds, which has remained elusive in previously applied models, is a novel spin-orbit entangled J =3 /2 electronic ground state. This work reveals the hidden diversity of spin-orbit controlled ground states in 5 d systems and introduces a new arena in the search for spin-orbit controlled phases of matter.

  13. Experimental analysis of direct-expansion ground-coupled heat pump systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, V. C.; Baxter, V. D.

    1991-09-01

    Direct-expansion ground-coil-coupled (DXGC) heat pump systems have certain energy efficiency advantages over conventional ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) systems. Principal among these advantages are that the secondary heat transfer fluid heat exchanger and circulating pump are eliminated. While the DXGC concept can produce higher efficiencies, it also produces more system design and environmental problems (e.g., compressor starting, oil return, possible ground pollution, and more refrigerant charging). Furthermore, general design guidelines for DXGC systems are not well documented. A two-pronged approach was adopted for this study: (1) a literature survey, and (2) a laboratory study of a DXGC heat pump system with R-22 as the refrigerant, for both heating and cooling mode tests done in parallel and series tube connections. The results of each task are described in this paper. A set of general design guidelines was derived from the test results and is also presented.

  14. Numerical Simulation for Roadways in Swelling Rock Under Coupling Function of Water and Ground Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪协兴; 卢爱红; 茅献彪; 张东升

    2002-01-01

    According to the analogical relation in the governing differential equations of the humidity stress field theory and the temperature stress field theory, the problem of solving the humidity stress field was transformed into that of solving the temperature stress field by the change of parameters. As a result, th e problem of roadways in swelling rock under the coupling function of water and ground pressure can be solved by the analytical module of temperature stress fie ld in software ANSYS. In the numerical simulation mentioned above, three kinds of supporting, I.e. Steel support, bolting support and non-support, were taken I nto account, the pressure distribution and deformation state of roadways with a swelling rock floor under the coupling function of water and ground pressure were analyzed and compared with those in the action of only ground pressure. The rese arch results provides a scientific basis for the deformation control of roadways in swelling rock.

  15. Development of an unstructured-grid wave-current coupled model and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xingru; Yin, Baoshu; Yang, Dezhou

    2016-08-01

    An unstructured grid wave-current coupled model was developed by coupling the SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) wave model and ADCIRC (Advanced Circulation model) ocean model through the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). The developed coupled model has high spatial resolution in the coastal area and is efficient for computation. The efficiency of the newly developed SWAN + ADCIRC model was compared with that of the widely-used SWAN + ADCIRC coupled model, in which SWAN and ADCIRC are coupled directly rather than through the MCT. Results show that the directly-coupled model is more efficient when the total number of computational cores is small, but the MCT-coupled model begin to run faster than the directly-coupled model when more computational cores are used. The MCT-coupled model maintains the scalability longer and can increase the simulation efficiency more than 35% by comparing the minimum wall clock time of one day simulation in the test runs. The MCT-coupled SWAN + ADCIRC model was used to simulate the storm surge and waves during the typhoon Usagi which formed in the western Pacific on September 17, 2013 and landed at Shanwei, China. Three numerical experiments were performed to investigate the effect of wave-current interaction on the storm surge and waves. The results show that the coupled model can better simulate the storm surge and waves when considering the wave-induced radiation stress, the wave effect on the wind stress drag coefficient and the modulation of current and water level on waves. During the typhoon Usagi, the effect of wave radiation stress could result in a maximum of 0.75 m increase in the extreme storm surge, and the wave induced wind stress could cause a -0.82∼0.48 m change of the extreme storm surge near the coastal area. Besides, the radiation stress forced currents cannot be ignored either in the study of mass transport at coastal zones. Results of this study are useful for understanding the wave-current interaction processes and

  16. Stimulation of whistler activity by an artificial ground-based low frequency acoustic wave source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Silvestr; Kim, Vitaly; Khegay, Valery; Kalita, Bogdan

    This paper presents some results of an active experiment aimed to impact the ionosphere with low frequency acoustic waves artificially generated in the near-ground atmosphere. The main goal of the experiment was checking if the artificially generated acoustic waves could affect whistler occurrence at middle latitudes. As a source of acoustic waves we used twin powerful sonic speakers. One of which produced acoustic waves at a frequency of 600 Hz while the other one at a frequency of 624 Hz with intensity of 160 dB at a distance of 1 m away from end of the horn. The duration of sonic pulse was one minute. As a result of acoustic wave interference above the acoustic wave source there appears some kind of a virtual sonic antenna that radiates lower frequency acoustic waves at a frequency being equal to the difference of the two initially generated frequencies (624 Hz - 600 Hz = 24 Hz). The resulting acoustic wave is capable to penetrate to higher altitudes than the initially generated waves do because of its lower frequency. A whistler detector was located at about 100 m far away from the acoustic wave source. We performed the 50 experiments at Lviv (49.50° N, 24.00° E) with acoustic influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere system. The obtained results indicate that the emitted low frequency acoustic waves were clearly followed by enhanced whistler occurrence. We suggest that the observations could be interpreted how increase of transparency of ionosphere and upward refraction of VLF spherics resulted from modulation of local atmospheric parameters by the acoustic waves. These two effects produce to the increase of amount of the whistlers.

  17. Dust acoustic solitary and shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas with nonthermal ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hamid Reza Pakzad; Kurosh Javidan

    2009-11-01

    The Korteweg–de Vries–Burgers (KdV–Burgers) equation and modified Korteweg–de Vries–Burgers equation are derived in strongly coupled dusty plasmas containing nonthermal ions and Boltzmann distributed electrons. It is found that solitary waves and shock waves can be produced in this medium. The effects of important parameters such as ion nonthermal parameter, temperature, density and velocity on the properties of shock waves and solitary waves are discussed.

  18. Wave propagation versus transient ground displacement as a credible hazard to buried oil and gas pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The cause of damage to a natural gas pipeline during the 1994 Northridge earthquake in the San Fernando Valley in California was examined in a collaborative effort by Southern California Gas Co., Pacific Gas and Electric Co., and with support from Tokyo Gas, Osaka Gas and Toho Gas. Extensive field and laboratory studies were conducted on a 1925 gas pipeline that suffered several girth weld failures in Potrero Canyon where significant ground displacement was observed. Ground cracking and sand boils were observed in the area following the earthquake but there were few other signs of permanent ground deformation near the pipeline damage. Damage consisted mostly of girth weld tensile failure and two cases of buckling of the pipe wall. Initial evidence suggested that the damage may have been caused by wave propagation, but a detailed study has shown that wave propagation effect was not a significant factor in the pipeline damage. A simple analytical model was developed to determine the transient ground deformation that might have occurred in the area of the pipeline damage. The model also provides clues regarding the cause of the ground cracking observed at the margins of the canyon. It also provides approximate magnitudes of differential ground displacements resulting from the earthquake. The model also considers the reasons for spatial distribution of pipeline damage. 13 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  19. Focusing of Rayleigh waves generated by high-speed trains under the condition of ground vibration boom

    CERN Document Server

    Krylov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, the effects of focusing of Rayleigh waves generated by high speed trains in the supporting ground under the condition of ground vibration boom are considered theoretically. These effects are similar to the effects of focusing of sound waves radiated by aircraft under the condition of sonic boom. In particular, if a railway track has a bend to provide the possibility of changing direction of train movement, the Rayleigh surface waves generated by high-speed trains under the condition of ground vibration boom may become focused. This results in concentration of their energy along a simple caustic line at one side of the track and in the corresponding increase in ground vibration amplitudes. The effect of focusing of Rayleigh waves may occur also if a train moves along a straight line with acceleration and its current speed is higher than Rayleigh wave velocity in the ground. The obtained results are illustrated by numerical calculations.

  20. An Efficient Full-Wave Electromagnetic Analysis for Capacitive Body-Coupled Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Irfan Kazim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Measured propagation loss for capacitive body-coupled communication (BCC channel (1 MHz to 60 MHz is limitedly available in the literature for distances longer than 50 cm. This is either because of experimental complexity to isolate the earth-ground or design complexity in realizing a reliable communication link to assess the performance limitations of capacitive BCC channel. Therefore, an alternate efficient full-wave electromagnetic (EM simulation approach is presented to realistically analyze capacitive BCC, that is, the interaction of capacitive coupler, the human body, and the environment all together. The presented simulation approach is first evaluated for numerical/human body variation uncertainties and then validated with measurement results from literature, followed by the analysis of capacitive BCC channel for twenty different scenarios. The simulation results show that the vertical coupler configuration is less susceptible to physiological variations of underlying tissues compared to the horizontal coupler configuration. The propagation loss is less for arm positions when they are not touching the torso region irrespective of the communication distance. The propagation loss has also been explained for complex scenarios formed by the ground-plane and the material structures (metals or dielectrics with the human body. The estimated propagation loss has been used to investigate the link-budget requirement for designing capacitive BCC system in CMOS sub-micron technologies.

  1. Fast Inversion of Air-Coupled Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave (SASW Using in situ Particle Displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Lu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave (SASW is widely used in nondestructive subsurface profiling for geological sites. The air-coupled SASW is an extension from conventional SASW methods by replacing ground-mounted accelerometers with non-contact microphones, which acquire a leaky surface wave instead of ground vibration. The air-coupled SASW is a good candidate for fast inspection in shallow geological studies. Especially for pavement maintenance, minimum traffic interference might be induced. One issue that restrains SASW from fast inspection is the traditional slow inversion which relies on guess-and-check iteration techniques including a forward analysis. In this article, a fast inversion analysis algorithm is proposed to estimate the shear velocity profile without performing conventional forward simulation. By investigating the attenuation of particle displacement along penetrating depths, a weighted combination relationship is derived to connect the dispersion curve with the shear velocity profile directly. Using this relationship, the shear velocity profile could be estimated from a given/measured dispersion curve. The proposed procedure allows the surface wave-based method to be fully automatic and even operated in real-time for geological site and pavement assessment. The method is verified by the forward analysis with stiffness matrix method. It is also proved by comparing with other published results using various inversion methods.

  2. Robust vetoes for gravitational-wave burst triggers using known instrumental couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Ajith, P; Smith, J R; Strain, K A

    2006-01-01

    The search for signatures of transient, unmodelled gravitational-wave (GW) bursts in the data of ground-based interferometric detectors typically uses `excess-power' search methods. One of the most challenging problems in the burst-data-analysis is to distinguish between actual GW bursts and spurious noise transients that trigger the detection algorithms. In this paper, we present a unique and robust strategy to `veto' the instrumental glitches. This method makes use of the phenomenological understanding of the coupling of different detector sub-systems to the main detector output. The main idea behind this method is that the noise at the detector output (channel H) can be projected into two orthogonal directions in the Fourier space -- along, and orthogonal to, the direction in which the noise in an instrumental channel X would couple into H. If a noise transient in the detector output originates from channel X, it leaves the statistics of the noise-component of H orthogonal to X unchanged, which can be veri...

  3. Travelling wave solutions for the Painleve-integrable coupled KdV equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Biao Lin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the travelling wave solutions for a system of coupled KdV equations derived by Lou et al [11]. In that paper, they found 5 types of Painleve integrable systems for the coupled KdV system. We show that each of them can be reduced to a partially or completely uncoupled system, through which the dynamical behavior of travelling wave solutions can be determined. In some parameter regions, exact formulas for periodic and solitary waves can be obtained while in other cases, bounded travelling wave solution are discussed.

  4. Comparison and error analysis of remotely measured waveheight by high frequency ground wave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    High frequency ground wave radar (HFGWR) has unique advantage in the survey of dynamical factors, such as sea surface current, sea wave, and sea surface wind in marine conditions in coastal sea area.Compared to marine satellite remote sensing, it involves lower cost, has higher measuring accuracy and spatial resolution and sampling frequency. High frequency ground wave radar is a new land based remote sensing instrument with superior vision and greater application potentials. This paper reviews the development history and application status of high frequency wave radar, introduces its remote-sensing principle and method to inverse offshore fluid, and wave and wind field. Based on the author's "863 Project", this paper recounts comparison and verification of radar remote-sensing value, the physical calibration of radar-measured data and methods to control the quality of radar-sensing data. The authors discuss the precision of radar-sensing data's inversing on offshore fluid field and application of the assimilated data on assimilation.

  5. An optimized ground-coupled heat pump system design for northern climate applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catan, M.A.; Baxter, V.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of the performance of a ground coupled heat pump (GCHP) system with a water-source heat pump package designed expressly for such systems operating in a northern climate. The project objective was to minimize the life-cycle cost of a GCHP system by optimizing the design of both the heat pump package and the group coil in concert. In order to achieve this objective, a number of modelling tools were developed to analyze the heat pump's performance and cost, and the ground coil's performance.

  6. Advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors' potential to detect generic deviations from general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Narikawa, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the potential of the advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA, to detect generic deviations of gravitational waveforms from the prediction of General Relativity. We use the parameterized post-Einsteinian formalism to characterize the deviations, and assess how much magnitude of the deviations are detectable by using an approximate decision scheme based on Bayesian statistics. We find that there exist detectable regions of the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters by using a single gravitational wave event. The regions are not excluded by currently existing binary pulsar observations for the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters at higher post-Newtonian order.

  7. Nonbreaking wave-induced mixing in upper ocean during tropical cyclones using coupled hurricane-ocean-wave modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijaz, S.; Ghantous, M.; Babanin, A. V.; Ginis, I.; Thomas, B.; Wake, G.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of turbulence generated by nonbreaking waves have been investigated by testing and evaluating a new nonbreaking wave parameterization in a coupled hurricane-ocean-wave model. The MPI version of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) with hurricane forcing is coupled with the WAVEWATCH-III (WW3) surface wave model. Hurricane Ivan is chosen as the test case due to its extreme intensity and availability of field data during its passage. The model results are validated against field observations of wave heights and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the National Data Buoy Centre (NDBC) during Hurricane Ivan and against limited in situ current and bottom temperature data. A series of numerical experiments is set up to examine the influence of the nonbreaking wave parameterization on the mixing of upper ocean. The SST response from the modeling experiments indicates that the nonbreaking wave-induced mixing leads to significant cooling of the SST and deepening of the mixed layer. It was found that the nondimensional constant b1 in the nonbreaking wave parameterization has different impacts on the weak and the strong sides of the storm track. A constant value of b1 leads to improved predictions on the strong side of the storm while a steepness-dependent b1 provides a better agreement with in situ observations on the weak side. A separate simulation of the intense tropical cyclone Olwyn in north-west Australia revealed the same trend for b1 on the strong side of the tropical cyclone.

  8. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  9. Lower ground state due to counter-rotating wave interaction in trapped ion system

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, T; Feng, M

    2007-01-01

    We consider a single ion confined in a trap under radiation of two traveling waves of lasers. In the strong-excitation regime and without the restriction of Lamb-Dicke limit, the Hamiltonian of the system is similar to a driving Jaynes-Cummings model without rotating wave approximation (RWA). The approach we developed enables us to present a complete eigensolutions, which makes it available to compare with the solutions under the RWA. We find that, the ground state in our non-RWA solution is energically lower than the counterpart under the RWA. If we have the ion in the ground state, it is equivalent to a spin dependent force on the trapped ion. Discussion is made for the difference between the solutions with and without the RWA, and for the relevant experimental test, as well as for the possible application in quantum information processing.

  10. Techniques to extend the reach of ground based gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Sheila

    2016-03-01

    While the current generation of advanced ground based detectors will open the gravitational wave universe to observation, ground based interferometry has the potential to extend the reach of these observatories to high redshifts. Several techniques have the potential to improve the advanced detectors beyond design sensitivity, including the use of squeezed light, upgraded suspensions, and possibly new optical coatings, new test mass materials, and cryogenic suspensions. To improve the sensitivity by more than a factor of 10 compared to advanced detectors new, longer facilities will be needed. Future observatories capable of hosting interferometers 10s of kilometers long have the potential to extend the reach of gravitational wave astronomy to cosmological distances, enabling detection of binary inspirals from throughout the history of star formation.

  11. Ground-coupled airwaves at Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, and their potential for eruption monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cassandra M.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Thompson, Glenn

    2016-07-01

    An abnormally high number of explosion quakes were noted during the monitoring effort for the 2007 eruption of Pavlof Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. In this study, we manually cataloged the explosion quakes from their characteristic ground-coupled airwaves. This study investigates how the ground-coupled airwaves might be used in a monitoring or analysis effort by estimating energy release and gas mass release. Over 3 × 104 quakes were recorded. The energy release from the explosions is approximated to be 3 × 1011 J, and the total gas mass (assuming 100 % water) released was 450 t. The tracking of explosion quakes has the potential to estimate relative eruption intensity as a function of time and is thus a useful component of a seismic monitoring program.

  12. An Overview of Recent Advances in the Iterative Analysis of Coupled Models for Wave Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Soares

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wave propagation problems can be solved using a variety of methods. However, in many cases, the joint use of different numerical procedures to model different parts of the problem may be advisable and strategies to perform the coupling between them must be developed. Many works have been published on this subject, addressing the case of electromagnetic, acoustic, or elastic waves and making use of different strategies to perform this coupling. Both direct and iterative approaches can be used, and they may exhibit specific advantages and disadvantages. This work focuses on the use of iterative coupling schemes for the analysis of wave propagation problems, presenting an overview of the application of iterative procedures to perform the coupling between different methods. Both frequency- and time-domain analyses are addressed, and problems involving acoustic, mechanical, and electromagnetic wave propagation problems are illustrated.

  13. Spinor-electron wave guided modes in coupled quantum wells structures by solving the Dirac equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, Jesus [Area de Optica, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultade de Fisica, Escola Universitaria de Optica e Optometria, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain)], E-mail: suso.linares.beiras@usc.es; Nistal, Maria C. [Area de Optica, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultade de Fisica, Escola Universitaria de Optica e Optometria, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain)

    2009-05-04

    A quantum analysis based on the Dirac equation of the propagation of spinor-electron waves in coupled quantum wells, or equivalently coupled electron waveguides, is presented. The complete optical wave equations for Spin-Up (SU) and Spin-Down (SD) spinor-electron waves in these electron guides couplers are derived from the Dirac equation. The relativistic amplitudes and dispersion equations of the spinor-electron wave-guided modes in a planar quantum coupler formed by two coupled quantum wells, or equivalently by two coupled slab electron waveguides, are exactly derived. The main outcomes related to the spinor modal structure, such as the breaking of the non-relativistic degenerate spin states, the appearance of phase shifts associated with the spin polarization and so on, are shown.

  14. Three-dimensional coupled mode analysis of internal-wave acoustic ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmelev, Alexey A; Lynch, James F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Schmidt, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    A fully three-dimensional coupled mode approach is used in this paper to describe the physics of low frequency acoustic signals propagating through a train of internal waves at an arbitrary azimuth. A three layer model of the shallow water waveguide is employed for studying the properties of normal modes and their coupled interaction due to the presence of nonlinear internal waves. Using a robust wave number integration technique for Fourier transform computation and a direct global matrix approach, an accurate three-dimensional coupled mode full field solution is obtained for the tonal signal propagation through straight and parallel internal waves. This approach provides accurate results for arbitrary azimuth and includes the effects of backscattering. This enables one to provide an azimuthal analysis of acoustic propagation and separate the effects of mode coupled transparent resonance, horizontal reflection and refraction, the horizontal Lloyd's mirror, horizontal ducting and anti-ducting, and horizontal tunneling and secondary ducting.

  15. Second-order coupling of numerical and physical wave tanks for 2D irregular waves. Part I: Formulation, implementation and numerical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiwen; Liu, Shuxue; Bingham, Harry B.

    2014-01-01

    In this series of two papers, we report on the irregular wave extension of the second-order coupling theory of numerical and physical wave model described in [Z. Yang, S. Liu, H.B. Bingham and J. Li. Second-order theory for coupling numerical and physical wave tanks: Derivation, evaluation...

  16. EXISTENCE OF TIME PERIODIC SOLUTIONS FOR A DAMPED GENERALIZED COUPLED NONLINEAR WAVE EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房少梅; 郭柏灵

    2003-01-01

    The time periodic solution problem of damped generalized coupled nonlinear wave equations with periodic boundary condition was studied. By using the Galerkin method to construct the approximating sequence of time periodic solutions, a priori estimate and Laray-Schauder fixed point theorem to prove the convergence of the approximate solutions, the existence of time periodic solutions for a damped generalized coupled nonlinear wave equations can be obtained.

  17. Solitary waves for a coupled nonlinear Schrodinger system with dispersion management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayotis Panayotaros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We consider a system of coupled nonlinear Schrodinger equations with periodically varying dispersion coefficient that arises in the context of fiber-optics communication. We use Lions's Concentration Compactness principle to show the existence of standing waves with prescribed L^2 norm in an averaged equation that approximates the coupled system. We also use the Mountain Pass Lemma to prove the existence of standing waves with prescribed frequencies.

  18. Phase-coherent mapping of gravitational-wave backgrounds using ground-based laser interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Joseph D; Cornish, Neil J; Gair, Jonathan; Mingarelli, Chiara M F; van Haasteren, Rutger

    2015-01-01

    We extend the formalisms developed in Gair et al. and Cornish and van Haasteren to create maps of gravitational-wave backgrounds using a network of ground-based laser interferometers. We show that in contrast to pulsar timing arrays, which are insensitive to half of the gravitational-wave sky (the curl modes), a network of ground-based interferometers is sensitive to both the gradient and curl components of the background. The spatial separation of a network of interferometers, or of a single interferometer at different times during its rotational and orbital motion around the Sun, allows for recovery of both components. We derive expressions for the response functions of a laser interferometer in the small-antenna limit, and use these expressions to calculate the overlap reduction function for a pair of interferometers. We also construct maximum-likelihood estimates of the + and x-polarization modes of the gravitational-wave sky in terms of the response matrix for a network of ground-based interferometers, e...

  19. Numerical implementation of Voigt and Maxwell models for simulation of waves in the ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheshenin Sergey Vladimirovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A lot of papers have been dedicated to simulation of dynamic processes in soil and underground structures. For example, some authors considered wave distribution in underground water pipes for creation of vibration monitoring system, others considered theoretical and algorithm aspects of efficient implementation of realistic seismic wave attenuation due to viscosity development with the help of Finite Difference Method, etc. The paper describes the numerical simulation, designed for simulation of the stress-strain state in the ground subjected to wave processes. We consider the ground with a concrete structure immersed in. The purpose of the work is the description of small vibrations in hard soil, which can nevertheless make undesirable impact on the objects in the ground or on the surface. Explicit Wilkins type scheme is used for time integration. It has proven to be successful, including the use in a well-known LS-DYNA code. As a result we created our own computer code based on the finite element method (FEM. An example of its practical usage is given.

  20. Standing Wave Solutions in Nonhomogeneous Delayed Synaptically Coupled Neuronal Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Linghai; STONER Melissa Anne

    2012-01-01

    The authors establish the existence and stability of standing wave solutions of a nonlinear singularly perturbed system of integral differential equations and a nonlinear scalar integral differential equation.It will be shown that there exist six standing wave solutions ((u(x,t),w(x,t)) =(U(x),W(x)) to the nonlinear singularly perturbed system of integral differential equations.Similarly,there exist six standing wave solutions u(x,t) =U(x) to the nonlinear scalar integral differential equation.The main idea to establish the stability is to construct Evans functions corresponding to several associated eigenvalue problems.

  1. Coupling hydrodynamic and wave models: first step and sensitivity experiments in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Emanuela; Oddo, Paolo; Drudi, Massimiliano; Pinardi, Nadia; Korres, Gerasimos; Grandi, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    This work describes the first step towards a fully coupled modelling system composed of an ocean circulation and a wind wave model. Sensitivity experiments are presented for the Mediterranean Sea where the hydrodynamic model NEMO is coupled with the third-generation wave model WaveWatchIII (WW3). Both models are implemented at 1/16° horizontal resolution and are forced by ECMWF 1/4° horizontal resolution atmospheric fields. The models are two-way coupled at hourly intervals exchanging the following fields: sea surface currents and temperature are transferred from NEMO to WW3 by modifying the mean momentum transfer of waves and the wind speed stability parameter, respectively. The neutral drag coefficient computed by WW3 is then passed to NEMO, which computes the surface stress. Five-year (2009-2013) numerical experiments were carried out in both uncoupled and coupled mode. In order to validate the modelling system, numerical results were compared with coastal and drifting buoys and remote sensing data. The results show that the coupling of currents with waves improves the representation of the wave spectrum. However, the wave-induced drag coefficient shows only minor improvements in NEMO circulation fields, such as temperature, salinity, and currents.

  2. Coupling hydrodynamic and wave models: first step and sensitivity experiments in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Emanuela; Oddo, Paolo; Drudi, Massimiliano; Pinardi, Nadia; Korres, Gerasimos; Grandi, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    This work describes the first step towards a fully coupled modelling system composed of an ocean circulation and a wind wave model. Sensitivity experiments are presented for the Mediterranean Sea where the hydrodynamic model NEMO is coupled with the third-generation wave model WaveWatchIII (WW3). Both models are implemented at 1/16° horizontal resolution and are forced by ECMWF 1/4° horizontal resolution atmospheric fields. The models are two-way coupled at hourly intervals exchanging the following fields: sea surface currents and temperature are transferred from NEMO to WW3 by modifying the mean momentum transfer of waves and the wind speed stability parameter, respectively. The neutral drag coefficient computed by WW3 is then passed to NEMO, which computes the surface stress. Five-year (2009-2013) numerical experiments were carried out in both uncoupled and coupled mode. In order to validate the modelling system, numerical results were compared with coastal and drifting buoys and remote sensing data. The results show that the coupling of currents with waves improves the representation of the wave spectrum. However, the wave-induced drag coefficient shows only minor improvements in NEMO circulation fields, such as temperature, salinity, and currents.

  3. A (2+1)-Dimensional Dispersive Long Wave Hierarchy and its Integrable Couplings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanhe Dong

    2007-01-01

    Under the frame of the (2+1)-dimensional zero curvature equation and Tu model,the (2+1)-dimensional dispersive long wave hierarchy is obtained. Furthermore, the loop algebra is expanded into a larger one. Moreover, a class of integrable coupling system for dispersive long wave hierarchy and (2+1)-dimensional multi-component integrable system will be investigated.

  4. Coupling of flexural and longitudinal wave motion in a periodic structure with asymmetrically arranged transverse beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Lars; Ohlrich, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the coupling of flexural and longitudinal wave motions in a waveguide with structural side branches attached at regular intervals. The analysis is based on periodic structure theory, and considers wave transmission in a fully tricoupled and semidefinite periodic...

  5. Wave coupling between the lower and middle thermosphere as viewed from TIMED and GOCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasperini, F.; Forbes, J.M.; Doornbos, E.N.; Bruinsma, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical coupling between the lower and middle thermosphere due to the eastward propagating diurnal tide with zonal wave number 3 (DE3) and the 3.5 day ultra-fast Kelvin Wave (UFKW) is investigated using Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energetics and Dynamics-Sounding of the Atmosphere using B

  6. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2012-09-04

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  7. Coupled BOUSS-2D and CMS-Wave Modeling Approach for Harbor Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    al. 2011; Demirbilek et al. 2007) is part of the Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) for simulating combined waves, currents, sediment transport, and...III. 2011. Verification and Validation of the Coastal Modeling System : Report 2, CMS -Wave, Tech. Report ERDC/CHL-TR-11-10, U.S. Army Engineer R&D...ERDC/CHL CHETN-IV-84 August 2012 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Coupled BOUSS-2D and CMS -Wave Modeling Approach for

  8. A Coupled Atmospheric and Wave Modeling System for Storm Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Bolanos, R.

    2015-01-01

    to parametrize z0. The results are validated through QuikScat data and point measurements from an open ocean site Ekosk and a coastal, relatively shallow water site Horns Rev. It is found that the modeling system captures in general better strong wind and strong wave characteristics for open ocean condition than...... Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with the thirdgeneration ocean wave modelSWAN. This study investigates mainly two issues: spatial resolution and the wind-wave interface parameter roughness length(z0). To study the impact of resolution, the nesting function for both WRF and SWAN is used, with spatial...... (1991) z0 expression gives better results of the signicant wave hight under high sea state conditions....

  9. Accumulative coupling between magnetized tenuous plasma and gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan

    2016-07-01

    We explicitly compute the plasma wave (PW) induced by a plane gravitational wave (GW) traveling through a region of strongly magnetized plasma, governed by force-free electrodynamics. The PW comoves with the GW and absorbs its energy to grow over time, creating an essentially force-free counterpart to the inverse-Gertsenshtein effect. The time-averaged Poynting flux of the induced PW is comparable to the vacuum case, but the associated current may offer a more sensitive alternative to photodetection when designing experiments for detecting/constraining high-frequency gravitational waves. Aside from the exact solutions, we also offer an analysis of the general properties of the GW to PW conversion process, which should find use when evaluating electromagnetic counterparts to astrophysical gravitational waves that are generated directly by the latter as a second-order phenomenon.

  10. Accumulative coupling between magnetized tenuous plasma and gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    We explicitly compute the plasma wave (PW) induced by a plane gravitational wave (GW) travelling through a region of strongly magnetized plasma, governed by force-free electrodynamics. The PW co-moves with the GW and absorbs its energy to grow over time, creating an essentially force-free counterpart to the inverse-Gertsenshtein effect. The time-averaged Poynting flux of the induced PW is comparable to the vacuum case, but the associated current may offer a more sensitive alternative to photodetection when designing experiments for detecting/constraining high frequency gravitational waves. Aside from the exact solutions, we also offer an analysis of the general properties of the GW to PW conversion process, which should find use when evaluating electromagnetic counterparts to astrophysical gravitational waves, that are generated directly by the latter as a second order phenomenon.

  11. An Arctic Ice/Ocean Coupled Model with Wave Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    ocean waves and sea ice interact, for use in operational models of the Arctic Basin and the adjacent seas; – improve the forecasting capacities of...spectra and modify their directional spread. Being the primary focus of the current project, we are developing innovative methods to model these...during WIFAR (Waves-in-Ice Forecasting for Arctic Operators), a partnership between the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC) in

  12. Coupled-Channels Partial-Wave Analysis of Kaon Photoproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    The K-matrix formalism is offering a very realistic approach to arrive at a description of meson-nucleon scattering that obeys unitarity since it takes into account the full coupled channels dynamics. Some examples of the importance of coupled channels effects are presented for photo-induced reactio

  13. Coupled-Channels Partial-Wave Analysis of Kaon Photoproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.

    2008-01-01

    The K-matrix formalism is offering a very realistic approach to arrive at a description of meson-nucleon scattering that obeys unitarity since it takes into account the full coupled channels dynamics. Some examples of the importance of coupled channels effects are presented for photo-induced reactio

  14. T ransition of the True Ground State in a Coupled Three-Layer Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张战军; 李白文; 饶建国; 鲍诚光

    2002-01-01

    Low lying states of a vertically coupled three-layer quantum-dot system are studied. Each layer contains oneelectron, and the tunnelling of electrons between layers is neglected. Effects of the interlayer separation d and theexternal magnetic field B are evaluated by numerical calculations. In the strong coupling case (i.e. d is small),as in a single dot, transitions of the angular momentum L of the true ground states occur when B increases,whereas in the weak coupling case the transition does not occur and L remains zero. Furthermore, it is foundthat the variation of d may also induce the L transition. As a result, a phase diagram of L of the true groundstate is given in the d - B plane.

  15. Sub-Ohmic spin-boson model with off-diagonal coupling: ground state properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Zhiguo; Duan, Liwei; Li, Xin; Shenai, Prathamesh M; Zhao, Yang

    2013-10-28

    We have carried out analytical and numerical studies of the spin-boson model in the sub-ohmic regime with the influence of both the diagonal and the off-diagonal coupling accounted for, via the Davydov D1 variational ansatz. While a second-order phase transition is known to be exhibited by this model in the presence of diagonal coupling only, we demonstrate the emergence of a discontinuous first order phase transition upon incorporation of the off-diagonal coupling. A plot of the ground state energy versus magnetization highlights the discontinuous nature of the transition between the isotropic (zero magnetization) state and nematic (finite magnetization) phases. We have also calculated the entanglement entropy and a discontinuity found at a critical coupling strength further supports the discontinuous crossover in the spin-boson model in the presence of off-diagonal coupling. It is further revealed via a canonical transformation approach that for the special case of identical exponents for the spectral densities of the diagonal and the off-diagonal coupling, there exists a continuous crossover from a single localized phase to doubly degenerate localized phase with differing magnetizations.

  16. Pattern formation of coupled spiral waves in bilayer systems: rich dynamics and high-frequency dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Haichun; Gao, Jihua; Zhan, Meng

    2011-11-01

    The interaction of two spiral waves with independent frequencies in a bilayer oscillatory medium (one spiral in each layer) and with a symmetric coupling e is studied. If the spirals have different frequencies, the faster spiral is unaffected by the slower one, and the slower can show a variety of behaviors, which depend on e and include, in order of increasing e, phase drifting, amplitude modulation, amplitude domination, and phase synchronization. This high-frequency dominance, the asymmetric driving-response effect under the condition of a symmetric coupling, is generic and independent of whether the coupled spiral waves are outwardly rotating or inwardly rotating spirals. If the spirals have identical frequencies, they may even show complete synchronization, parallel drift, or circular drift, depending on the relative rotation direction of the two spirals and their initial separation distance. Comparisons with coupled spirals in monolayer media, previous works on coupled spirals in bilayer systems, and coupled phase oscillators are made.

  17. Localized waves in three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    We study the generalized Darboux transformation to the three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation. First- and second-order localized waves are obtained by this technique. In first-order localized wave, we get the interactional solutions between first-order rogue wave and one-dark, one-bright soliton respectively. Meanwhile, the interactional solutions between one-breather and first-order rogue wave are also given. In second-order localized wave, one-dark-one-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave is presented in the first component, and two-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave are gained respectively in the other two components. Besides, we observe second-order rogue wave together with one-breather in three components. Moreover, by increasing the absolute values of two free parameters, the nonlinear waves merge with each other distinctly. These results further reveal the interesting dynamic structures of localized waves in the three-component coupled system. Project supported by the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953904), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11275072 and 11435005), the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120076110024), the Network Information Physics Calculation of Basic Research Innovation Research Group of China (Grant No. 61321064), and Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center of Trustworthy Software for Internet of Things, China (Grant No. ZF1213).

  18. Comparative Calculation of Heat Exchange with the Ground in Residential Building Including Periodes of Heat Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staszczuk Anna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides verification of 3D transient ground-coupled model to calculation of heat exchange between ground and typical one-storey, passive residential building. The model was performed with computer software WUFI®plus and carried out to estimate the indoor air temperatures during extending hot weather periods. For verifying the results of calculations performed by the WUFI®plus software, the most recent version of EnergyPlus software version was used. Comparison analysis of calculation results obtained with the two above mentioned calculation method was made for two scenarios of slab on ground constructions: without thermal insulation and with thermal insulation under the whole slab area. Comprehensive statistical analysis was done including time series analysis and descriptive statistics parameters.

  19. Enhancing four-wave-mixing processes by nanowire arrays coupled to a gold film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutrina, Ekaterina; Ciracì, Cristian; Gauthier, Daniel J; Smith, David R

    2012-05-07

    We consider the process of four-wave mixing in an array of gold nanowires strongly coupled to a gold film. Using full-wave simulations, we perform a quantitative comparison of the four-wave mixing efficiency associated with a bare film and films with nanowire arrays. We find that the strongly localized surface plasmon resonances of the coupled nanowires provide an additional local field enhancement that, along with the delocalized surface plasmon of the film, produces an overall four-wave mixing efficiency enhancement of up to six orders of magnitude over that of the bare film. The enhancement occurs over a wide range of excitation angles. The film-coupled nanowire array is easily amenable to nanofabrication, and could find application as an ultra-compact component for integrated photonic and quantum optic systems.

  20. Nonreciprocal wave scattering on nonlinear string-coupled oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepri, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.lepri@isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Pikovsky, Arkady [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str 24/25, Potsdam (Germany); Department of Control Theory, Nizhni Novgorod State University, Gagarin Av. 23, 606950, Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-01

    We study scattering of a periodic wave in a string on two lumped oscillators attached to it. The equations can be represented as a driven (by the incident wave) dissipative (due to radiation losses) system of delay differential equations of neutral type. Nonlinearity of oscillators makes the scattering non-reciprocal: The same wave is transmitted differently in two directions. Periodic regimes of scattering are analyzed approximately, using amplitude equation approach. We show that this setup can act as a nonreciprocal modulator via Hopf bifurcations of the steady solutions. Numerical simulations of the full system reveal nontrivial regimes of quasiperiodic and chaotic scattering. Moreover, a regime of a “chaotic diode,” where transmission is periodic in one direction and chaotic in the opposite one, is reported.

  1. Shear wave velocity-based evaluation and design of stone column improved ground for liquefaction mitigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yanguo; Sun Zhengbo; Chen Jie; Chen Yunmin; Chen Renpeng

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation and design of stone column improvement ground for liquefaction mitigation is a challenging issue for the state of practice.In this paper,a shear wave velocity-based approach is proposed based on the well-defined correlations of liquefaction resistance (CRR)-shear wave velocity (Vs)-void ratio (e) of sandy soils,and the values of parameters in this approach are recommended for preliminary design purpose when site specific values are not available.The detailed procedures of pre-and post-improvement liquefaction evaluations and stone column design are given.According to this approach,the required level of ground improvement will be met once the target Vs of soil is raised high enough (i.e.,no less than the critical velocity) to resist the given earthquake loading according to the CRR-Vs relationship,and then this requirement is transferred to the control of target void ratio (i.e.,the critical e) according to the Vs-e relationship.As this approach relies on the densification of the surrounding soil instead of the whole improved ground and is conservative by nature,specific considerations of the densification mechanism and effect are given,and the effects of drainage and reinforcement of stone columns are also discussed.A case study of a thermal power plant in Indonesia is introduced,where the effectiveness of stone column improved ground was evaluated by the proposed Vs-based method and compared with the SPT-based evaluation.This improved ground performed well and experienced no liquefaction during subsequent strong earthquakes.

  2. A Numerical Study on the Screening of Blast-Induced Waves for Reducing Ground Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dohyun; Jeon, Byungkyu; Jeon, Seokwon

    2009-06-01

    Blasting is often a necessary part of mining and construction operations, and is the most cost-effective way to break rock, but blasting generates both noise and ground vibration. In urban areas, noise and vibration have an environmental impact, and cause structural damage to nearby structures. Various wave-screening methods have been used for many years to reduce blast-induced ground vibration. However, these methods have not been quantitatively studied for their reduction effect of ground vibration. The present study focused on the quantitative assessment of the effectiveness in vibration reduction of line-drilling as a screening method using a numerical method. Two numerical methods were used to analyze the reduction effect toward ground vibration, namely, the “distinct element method” and the “non-linear hydrocode.” The distinct element method, by particle flow code in two dimensions (PFC 2D), was used for two-dimensional parametric analyses, and some cases of two-dimensional analyses were analyzed three-dimensionally using AUTODYN 3D, the program of the non-linear hydrocode. To analyze the screening effectiveness of line-drilling, parametric analyses were carried out under various conditions, with the spacing, diameter of drill holes, distance between the blasthole and line-drilling, and the number of rows of drill holes, including their arrangement, used as parameters. The screening effectiveness was assessed via a comparison of the vibration amplitude between cases both with and without screening. Also, the frequency distribution of ground motion of the two cases was investigated through fast Fourier transform (FFT), with the differences also examined. From our study, it was concluded that line-drilling as a screening method of blast-induced waves was considerably effective under certain design conditions. The design details for field application have also been proposed.

  3. Shear wave velocity-based evaluation and design of stone column improved ground for liquefaction mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguo; Sun, Zhengbo; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yunmin; Chen, Renpeng

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation and design of stone column improvement ground for liquefaction mitigation is a challenging issue for the state of practice. In this paper, a shear wave velocity-based approach is proposed based on the well-defined correlations of liquefaction resistance (CRR)-shear wave velocity ( V s)-void ratio ( e) of sandy soils, and the values of parameters in this approach are recommended for preliminary design purpose when site specific values are not available. The detailed procedures of pre- and post-improvement liquefaction evaluations and stone column design are given. According to this approach, the required level of ground improvement will be met once the target V s of soil is raised high enough (i.e., no less than the critical velocity) to resist the given earthquake loading according to the CRR- V s relationship, and then this requirement is transferred to the control of target void ratio (i.e., the critical e) according to the V s- e relationship. As this approach relies on the densification of the surrounding soil instead of the whole improved ground and is conservative by nature, specific considerations of the densification mechanism and effect are given, and the effects of drainage and reinforcement of stone columns are also discussed. A case study of a thermal power plant in Indonesia is introduced, where the effectiveness of stone column improved ground was evaluated by the proposed V s-based method and compared with the SPT-based evaluation. This improved ground performed well and experienced no liquefaction during subsequent strong earthquakes.

  4. Empirical evidence of Rayleigh waves in Norcia (central Italy) and their quantitative contribution to ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffagni, Enrico; Cattaneo, Marco; Bordoni, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Spectral ratio techniques, such as the Horizontal-to-Vertical (HV) and Standard (SSR) may exhibit different trends in specific frequency bands when conducted in alluvial basins. A possible explanation of this discrepancy can be provided by the presence of Rayleigh oscillations, that are considered responsible of an amplification of the vertical component with respect to the horizontal. We propose a new methodology for the identification of Rayleigh waves arrivals, to test on small-size basins. With this procedure, candidate Rayleigh waves are localized in time-frequency domain on an instantaneous polarization plane which is constructed by defining the instantaneous maximum vertical and horizontal spectral amplitudes. Validation of the candidate Rayleigh arrivals is performed by evaluating the instantaneous ellipticity. This step yields to a quantitative measure of the polarization, providing an indicator of the Rayleigh contribution to ground motion. We tested this methodology in the Norcia basin (central Italy) using a 18 selected earthquakes (2.0 L'Aquila sequence (2009). We demonstrate the robustness of our methodology by localizing evidences of Rayleigh wave arrivals immediately from (1 s) up to 30 s after the first S-wave group, even for low-magnitude events (Ml < 3.0). The generation of the detected Rayleigh waves analyzed in time-frequency range, appears to be magnitude-dependent and in function of the location in the basin. Our quantitative estimate of the Rayleigh polarization resulted to be comparable to the HV response value in specific frequency bands, for example in deamplification, demonstrating a plausible connection with Rayleigh oscillations. The authors encourage the usage or implementation of similar procedures conducted in basin studies, in order to determine quantitatively the Rayleigh contribution to ground motion, for a better characterization of the local seismic response.

  5. Assessment of the importance of the current-wave coupling in the shelf ocean forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jordà

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of wave-current interactions on shelf ocean forecasts is investigated in the framework of the MFSTEP (Mediterranean Forecasting System Project Towards Enviromental Predictions project. A one way sequential coupling approach is adopted to link the wave model (WAM to the circulation model (SYMPHONIE. The coupling of waves and currents has been done considering four main processes: wave refraction due to currents, surface wind drag and bo€ttom drag modifications due to waves, and the wave induced mass flux. The coupled modelling system is implemented in the southern Catalan shelf (NW Mediterranean, a region with characteristics similar to most of the Mediterranean shelves. The sensitivity experiments are run in a typical operational configuration. The wave refraction by currents seems to be not very relevant in a microtidal context such as the western Mediterranean. The main effect of waves on current forecasts is through the modification of the wind drag. The Stokes drift also plays a significant role due to its spatial and temporal characteristics. Finally, the enhanced bottom friction is just noticeable in the inner shelf.

  6. Assessment of the importance of the current-wave coupling in the shelf ocean forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jordà

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of wave-current interactions on shelf ocean forecasts is investigated in the framework of the MFSTEP (Mediterranean Forecasting System Project Towards Enviromental Predictions project. A one way sequential coupling approach is adopted to link the wave model (WAM to the circulation model (SYMPHONIE. The coupling of waves and currents has been done considering four main processes: wave refraction due to currents, surface wind drag and bottom drag modifications due to waves, and the wave induced mass flux. The coupled modelling system is implemented in the southern Catalan shelf (NW Mediterranean, a region with characteristics similar to most of the Mediterranean shelves. The sensitivity experiments are run in a typical operational configuration. The wave refraction by currents seems to be not very relevant in a microtidal context such as the western Mediterranean. The main effect of waves on current forecasts is through the modification of the wind drag. The Stokes drift also plays a significant role due to its spatial and temporal characteristics. Finally, the enhanced bottom friction is just noticeable in the inner shelf.

  7. Amplitude equations for coupled electrostatic waves in the limit of weak instability

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, J D; Crawford, John David; Knobloch, Edgar

    1997-01-01

    We consider the simplest instabilities involving multiple unstable electrostatic plasma waves corresponding to four-dimensional systems of mode amplitude equations. In each case the coupled amplitude equations are derived up to third order terms. The nonlinear coefficients are singular in the limit in which the linear growth rates vanish together. These singularities are analyzed using techniques developed in previous studies of a single unstable wave. In addition to the singularities familiar from the one mode problem, there are new singularities in coefficients coupling the modes. The new singularities are most severe when the two waves have the same linear phase velocity and satisfy the spatial resonance condition $k_2=2k_1$. As a result the short wave mode saturates at a dramatically smaller amplitude than that predicted for the weak growth rate regime on the basis of single mode theory. In contrast the long wave mode retains the single mode scaling. If these resonance conditions are not satisfied both mo...

  8. On strongly interacting internal waves in a rotating ocean and coupled Ostrovsky equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, A; Grimshaw, R H J; Khusnutdinova, K R

    2013-06-01

    In the weakly nonlinear limit, oceanic internal solitary waves for a single linear long wave mode are described by the KdV equation, extended to the Ostrovsky equation in the presence of background rotation. In this paper we consider the scenario when two different linear long wave modes have nearly coincident phase speeds and show that the appropriate model is a system of two coupled Ostrovsky equations. These are systematically derived for a density-stratified ocean. Some preliminary numerical simulations are reported which show that, in the generic case, initial solitary-like waves are destroyed and replaced by two coupled nonlinear wave packets, being the counterpart of the same phenomenon in the single Ostrovsky equation.

  9. Linear energy relationships in ground state proton transfer and excited state proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Magomedov, Artiom; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-02-12

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes are elementary chemical reactions involved in a broad range of radical and redox reactions. Elucidating fundamental PCET reaction mechanisms are thus of central importance for chemical and biochemical research. Here we use quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), and the algebraic diagrammatic-construction through second-order (ADC(2)) to study the mechanism, thermodynamic driving force effects, and reaction barriers of both ground state proton transfer (pT) and photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) between nitrosylated phenyl-phenol compounds and hydrogen-bonded t-butylamine as an external base. We show that the obtained reaction barriers for the ground state pT reactions depend linearly on the thermodynamic driving force, with a Brønsted slope of 1 or 0. Photoexcitation leads to a PCET reaction, for which we find that the excited state reaction barrier depends on the thermodynamic driving force with a Brønsted slope of 1/2. To support the mechanistic picture arising from the static potential energy surfaces, we perform additional molecular dynamics simulations on the excited state energy surface, in which we observe a spontaneous PCET between the donor and the acceptor groups. Our findings suggest that a Brønsted analysis may distinguish the ground state pT and excited state PCET processes.

  10. Magnetic field controlled charge density wave coupling in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Ivashko, O.; Holmes, A. T.; Christensen, N. B.; Hücker, M.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Rütt, U.; Zimmermann, M. V.; Forgan, E. M.; Hayden, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    The application of magnetic fields to layered cuprates suppresses their high-temperature superconducting behaviour and reveals competing ground states. In widely studied underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO), the microscopic nature of field-induced electronic and structural changes at low temperatures remains unclear. Here we report an X-ray study of the high-field charge density wave (CDW) in YBCO. For hole dopings ~0.123, we find that a field (B~10 T) induces additional CDW correlations along the CuO chain (b-direction) only, leading to a three-dimensional (3D) ordered state along this direction at B~15 T. The CDW signal along the a-direction is also enhanced by field, but does not develop an additional pattern of correlations. Magnetic field modifies the coupling between the CuO2 bilayers in the YBCO structure, and causes the sudden appearance of the 3D CDW order. The mirror symmetry of individual bilayers is broken by the CDW at low and high fields, allowing Fermi surface reconstruction, as recently suggested.

  11. Dynamical System Approach to a Coupled Dispersionless System: Localized and Periodic Traveling Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gambo Betchewe; Kuetche Kamgang Victor; Bouetou Bouetou Thomas; Timoleon Crepin Kofane

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of a coupled dispersionlees system describing a current-conducting string with infinite length within a magnetic field.Thus,following a dynamical system approach,we unwrap typical miscellaneous traveling waves including localized and periodic ones.Studying the relative stabilities of such structures through their energy densities,we find that under some boundary conditions,localized waves moving in positive directions are more stable than periodic waves which in contrast stand for the most stable traveling waves in another boundary condition situation.

  12. Ferromagnetic resonance study of interface coupling for spin waves in narrow NiFe/Ru/NiFe multilayer nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, P.; Haghshenasfard, Z.; Cottam, M. G.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2016-12-01

    A systematic investigation is presented for the magnetization dynamics in trilayer nanowires, consisting of two permalloy (Ni80Fe20 ) layers separated by a nonmagnetic Ru spacer layer. The width of the wires ranges from 90 to 190 nm. By varying the Ru thickness between 0.7 and 2.0 nm, the interlayer coupling can be effectively controlled, modifying the corresponding magnetic ground state and the spin-wave dynamics. By contrast with previous work on coupled trilayer nanowires with larger widths (270 nm and more), the focus here is on nanowire arrays where the strong shape anisotropy competes with the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions and biquadratic exchange interactions across the Ru interface, as well as dipolar interactions and Zeeman energy. As a result, the spin-wave spectrum is found to be drastically modified. Ferromagnetic resonance and hysteresis loop measurements are reported over a wide range of applied magnetic fields, showing that the overall magnetization alignment between the permalloy layers may be parallel, antiparallel, or in a spin-flop state, depending on the overall interlayer coupling. The experimental results for different stripe widths are successfully analyzed using a microscopic dipole-dipole theory and micromagnetic simulations.

  13. Thermal-economic modeling and optimization of vertical ground-coupled heat pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanaye, Sepehr; Niroomand, Behzad [Energy Systems Improvement Laboratory (ESIL), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Narmak, Tehran 16488 (Iran)

    2009-04-15

    The optimal design process of a ground source heat pump includes thermal modeling of the system and selection of optimal design parameters which affect the system performance as well as initial and operational costs. In this paper, the modeling and optimizing processes of a ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) with closed vertical ground heat exchanger (VGHX) are presented. To verify the modeling procedure of heat pump and VGHX systems, the simulation outputs were compared with the corresponding values reported in the literature and acceptable accuracy was obtained. Then an objective function (the sum of annual operating and investment costs of the system) was defined and minimized, exposed to the specified constraints to estimate the optimum design parameters (decision variables). Two Nelder-Mead and genetic algorithm optimization techniques were applied to guarantee the validity of the optimization results. For the given heating/cooling loads and various climatic conditions, the optimum values of heat pump design parameters (saturated temperature/pressure of condenser and evaporator) as well as VGHX design parameters (inlet and outlet temperatures of the ground water source, pipe diameter, depth and number of boreholes) were predicted. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis of change in the total annual cost of the system and optimum design parameters with the climatic conditions, cooling/heating capacity, soil type, and number of boreholes were discussed. Finally, the sensitivity analysis of change in optimum design parameters with increase in the investment and electricity costs was performed. (author)

  14. Analysis and field evaluation of an advanced ground-coupled heat pump system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, V.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Catan, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Hughes, H.M. (Climate Master, Inc. (USA)); Hughes, P.J. (Fleming (W.S.) and Associates, Inc., Syracuse, NY (USA)); O' Neil, R.A. (Niagara Mohawk Power Corp., Syracuse, NY (USA))

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the performance of a ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) system with a water-source heat pump (WSHP) package designed expressly for such systems for a northern climate. The research objective was to minimize the life-cycle cost (LCC) of a GCHP system by optimizing the design of both the heat pump package and the ground heat exchanger in concert. The LCC of a GCHP system with a horizontal ground heat exchanger was minimized over a seven-year economic life for an 1800 ft{sup 2} (167 m{sup 2}) house in Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Simple payback for the optimized system, relative to conventional air-source heat pumps (ASHPs), was less than three years. The resulting WSHP design is calculated to cost approximately 20% more than its conventional counterpart, but offers a 20% higher heating coefficient of performance (COP) and a 23% higher cooling COP. The major conclusion of this study is that by improving the WSHP package efficiency, the ground heat exchanger size can be reduced by at least 30% without sacrificing performance; this can yield significant improvement in the cost competitiveness of GCHP systems. 10 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Effect of spin-orbit coupling on the ground state structure of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vinayak; Gyanchandani, Jyoti; Chaturvedi, Shashank; Sikka, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    Near zero kelvin ground state structure of mercury is the body centered tetragonal (BCT) structure (β Hg). However, in all previously reported density functional theory (DFT) calculations, either the rhombohedral or the HCP structure has been found to be the ground state structure. Based on the previous calculations it was predicted that the correct treatment of the SO effects would improve the result. We have performed FPLAPW calculations, with and without inclusion of the SO coupling, for determining the ground state structure. These calculations determine rhombohedral structure as the ground state structure instead of BCT structure. The calculations, without inclusion of SO effect, predict that the energies of rhombohedral and BCT structures are very close to each other but the energy of rhombohedral structure is lower than that of BCT structure at ambient as well as high pressure. On the contrary, the SO calculations predict that though at ambient conditions the rhombohedral structure is the stable structure but on applying a pressure of 3.2 GPa, the BCT structure becomes stable. Hence, instead of predicting the stability of BCT structure at zero pressure, the SO calculations predict its stability at 3.2 GPa. This small disagreement is expected when the energy differences between the structures are small.

  16. A fully-coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave model of the Caspian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, Nicolas; Toumi, Ralf

    2016-11-01

    Located in the mid-latitudes, the Caspian Sea is the largest enclosed basin in the world. A fully-coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave model of the Caspian Sea at high resolution (8 km) for a period of three years is presented. After validating each component of the modelling platform, the wave state of the Caspian Sea is studied. Results show very different wave regimes between the three different basins, a strong seasonality and an almost swell-free state. It is shown here that waves modify the horizontal eddy viscosity and vertical heat diffusion. However, due to a reasonably weak annual wave state, these effects are restricted to the upper-ocean layer (cooling of the SST accompanied with a deepening of the MLD is modelled during autumn and winter. The results also show a significant improvement of the model skill in the representation of the dynamics when ROMS is coupled to WRF. Finally, as ocean surface waves imply feedback at the interface atmosphere-ocean through the transfer of momentum, mass and heat, we investigate their potential effects on the Caspian Sea dynamics. Results are mixed and show a reasonably weak impact of wave-induced processes. While waves have a negligible effect during the winter as wave-induced mixing is confined to the MLD, the summer global SST are less accurately modelled due to the enhancement of mixing in shallow MLDs. However the SST bias, temperature at a subsurface location are improved.

  17. Coupling of Wave and Circulation Models in the Atlantic European North-West Shelf Predicting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Krüger, Oliver; Behrens, Arno; Lewis, Huw; Castillo, Juan M.

    2017-04-01

    This study addresses the coupling between wind wave and circulation models on the example of the Atlantic - European North-West Shelf (NWS). This topic reflects the increased interest in operational oceanography to reduce prediction errors of state estimates at coastal scales. The uncertainties in most of the presently used models result from the nonlinear feedback between strong tidal currents and wind-waves, which can no longer be ignored, in particular in the coastal zone where its role seems to be dominant. Coupled circulation (NEMO) and wave model (WAM) system was used to study the effects of surface ocean waves on thermohaline distribution and ocean circulation at the NWS. Four scenarios - including Stokes-Coriolis force, sea-state dependent energy flux (additional turbulent kinetic energy due to breaking waves), sea-state dependent momentum flux and the combination of the three wave-induced forcing were performed to study the role of the wave-induced processes on model simulations. The individual and collective role of those processes is quantified and the results are compared with the NWS circulation model results without wave effects as well as against various in-situ measurements. The performance of the forecasting system is illustrated for the cases of several extreme events. The improved skills resulting from the new developments in the forecasting system, in particular during extreme events, justify further enhancements of the coastal operational systems. The study is performed in the frame of the COPERNICUS CMEMS Service Evolution Projects Wave2NEMO and OWAIRS.

  18. Horizontal ground coupled heat pump: Thermal-economic modeling and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanaye, Sepehr; Niroomand, Behzad [Energy Systems Improvement Laboratory (ESIL), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST) (Iran)

    2010-12-15

    The modeling and optimizing processes of a Ground Coupled Heat Pump (GCHP) with closed Horizontal Ground Heat eXchanger (HGHX) are presented in this paper. After thermal modeling of GCHP including HGHX, the optimum design parameters of the system were estimated by minimizing a defined objective function (total of investment and operation costs) subject to a list of constraints. This procedure was performed applying Genetic Algorithm technique. For given heating/cooling loads and various climatic conditions, the optimum values of saturated temperature/pressure of condenser and evaporator as well as inlet and outlet temperatures of the water source in cooling and heating modes were predicted. Then, for our case study, the design parameters as well as the configuration of HGHX were obtained. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis of change in the total annual cost of the system and optimum design parameters with the climatic conditions, cooling/heating capacity, and soil type were discussed. (author)

  19. Optimization of Serial Combined System of Ground-Coupled Heat Pump and Solar Collector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jun; CHEN Yan; LU Suzhen; CUI Junkui

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical optimization model was set up for a ground-solar combined system based on in-situ experimental results,in which the solar collector was combined serially with a ground-coupled heat pump(GCHP).The universal optimal equations were solved by the constrained variable metric method considering both the performance and economics.Then the model was applied to a specific case concerning an actual solar assisted GCHP system for space heating.The results indicated a system coefficient of performance(COP)of 3.9 for the optimal method under the seriaI heating mode,and 3.2 for the conventional one.In addition,the optimum solution also showed advantages in energy and cost saving.1eading to a 16.7%improvement in the heat pump performance at 17.2%less energy consumption and 11.8%lower annual cost,respectively.

  20. Wave turbulence in a two-layer fluid: coupling between free surface and interface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Issenmann, Bruno; Falcon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally study gravity-capillary wave turbulence on the interface between two immiscible fluids of close density with free upper surface. We locally measure the wave height at the interface between both fluids by means of a highly sensitive laser Doppler vibrometer. We show that the inertial range of the capillary wave turbulence regime is significantly extended when the upper fluid depth is increased: The crossover frequency between the gravity and capillary wave turbulence regimes is found to decrease whereas the dissipative cut-off frequency of the spectrum is found to increase. We explain most of these observations by the progressive decoupling between waves propagating at the interface and the ones at the free surface, using the full dispersion relation of gravity-capillary waves in a two-layer fluid of finite depths.s.

  1. Second-order coupling of numerical and physical wave tanks for 2D irregular waves. Part II: Experimental validation in two-dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiwen; Liu, Shuxue; Bingham, Harry B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an experimental validation of the second-order coupling theory outlined by Yang et al. (Z. Yang, S. Liu, H.B. Bingham and J. Li., 2013. Second-order coupling of numerical and physical wave tanks for 2D irregular waves. Part I: Formulation, implementation and numerical properties...... to an unwanted spurious freely propagating second harmonic that is substantially reduced when compared to an identical wave paddle operating with a first-order coupling signal. Using nonlinear regular (monochromatic), bichromatic and irregular wave cases as well as varying coupled wave tank bathymetries, both...... these aspects are verified over a broad range of wave frequencies and shown to be extensively applicable to physical wave tanks. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  2. Local/global analysis applications to ground-coupled heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Anzi, Adnan [College of Engineering, Department of Architecture, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Code No. 13060, Safat (Kuwait); Krarti, Moncef [CEAE Department, CB 428, University of Colorado, 80309, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2003-09-01

    In this paper, a new local/global analysis technique is developed to solve multi-dimensional ground-coupled heat transfer problems. In particular, the novel method is applied in this paper to determine foundation heat transfer for buildings with slab-on-grade floors. It is found that analytical solutions can be used successfully to capture thermal bridging effect when integrated in the developed local/global analysis technique. In addition, it is found that significant savings in computational effort can be achieved with no sacrifice in accuracy when local/global analysis is used. (authors)

  3. Universal Wave-Function Overlap and Universal Topological Data from Generic Gapped Ground States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Heidar; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2015-07-17

    We propose a way-universal wave-function overlap-to extract universal topological data from generic ground states of gapped systems in any dimensions. Those extracted topological data might fully characterize the topological orders with a gapped or gapless boundary. For nonchiral topological orders in (2+1)D, these universal topological data consist of two matrices S and T, which generate a projective representation of SL(2,Z) on the degenerate ground state Hilbert space on a torus. For topological orders with a gapped boundary in higher dimensions, these data constitute a projective representation of the mapping class group MCG(M^{d}) of closed spatial manifold M^{d}. For a set of simple models and perturbations in two dimensions, we show that these quantities are protected to all orders in perturbation theory. These overlaps provide a much more powerful alternative to the topological entanglement entropy and allow for more efficient numerical implementations.

  4. Electric Signals on and under the Ground Surface Induced by Seismic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Takeuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We constructed three observation sites in northeastern Japan (Honjo, Kyowa, and Sennan with condenser-type large plate electrodes (4 × 4 m2 as sensors supported 4 m above the ground and with pairs of reference electrodes buried vertically at 0.5 m and 2.5 m depth (with a ground velocity sensor at Sennan only. Electrical signals of an earthquake (M6.3 in northeastern Japan were detected simultaneously with seismic waves. Their waveforms were damped oscillations, with greatly differing signal amplitudes among sites. Good positive correlation was found between the amplitudes of signals detected by all electrodes. We propose a signal generation model: seismic acceleration vertically shook pore water in the topsoil, generating the vertical streaming potential between the upper unsaturated water zone and the lower saturated water zone. Maximum electric earth potential difference was observed when one electrode was in the saturated water zone, and the other was within the unsaturated water zone, but not when the electrodes were in the saturated water zone. The streaming potential formed a charge on the ground surface, generating a vertical atmospheric electric field. The large plate electrode detected electric signals related to electric potential differences between the electrode and the ground surface.

  5. Low velocity target detection based on time-frequency image for high frequency ground wave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Songhua; WU Shicai; WEN Biyang

    2007-01-01

    The Doppler spectral broadening resulted from non-stationary movement of target and radio-frequency interference will decrease the veracity of target detection by high frequency ground wave(HEGW)radar.By displaying the change of signal energy on two dimensional time-frequency images based on time-frequency analysis,a new mathematical morphology method to distinguish target from nonlinear time-frequency curves is presented.The analyzed results from the measured data verify that with this new method the target can be detected correctly from wide Doppler spectrum.

  6. Mountain wave PSC dynamics and microphysics from ground-based lidar measurements and meteorological modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reichardt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The day-long observation of a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC by two co-located ground-based lidars at the Swedish research facility Esrange (67.9° N, 21.1° E on 16 January 1997 is analyzed in terms of PSC dynamics and microphysics. Mesoscale modeling is utilized to simulate the meteorological setting of the lidar measurements. Microphysical properties of the PSC particles are retrieved by comparing the measured particle depolarization ratio and the PSC-averaged lidar ratio with theoretical optical data derived for different particle shapes. In the morning, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT particles and then increasingly coexisting liquid ternary aerosol (LTA were detected as outflow from a mountain wave-induced ice PSC upwind Esrange. The NAT PSC is in good agreement with simulations for irregular-shaped particles with length-to-diameter ratios between 0.75 and 1.25, maximum dimensions from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, and a number density from 8 to 12 cm-3 and the coexisting LTA droplets had diameters from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, a refractive index of 1.39 and a number density from 7 to 11 cm-3. The total amount of condensed HNO3 was in the range of 8–12 ppbv. The data provide further observational evidence that NAT forms via deposition nucleation on ice particles as a number of recently published papers suggest. By early afternoon the mountain-wave ice PSC expanded above the lidar site. Its optical data indicate a decrease in minimum particle size from 3 to 1.9 µm with time. Later on, following the weakening of the mountain wave, wave-induced LTA was observed only. Our study demonstrates that ground-based lidar measurements of PSCs can be comprehensively interpreted if combined with mesoscale meteorological data.

  7. On the Periodic Solutions of the Five-Dimensional Lorenz Equation Modeling Coupled Rosby Waves and Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Tiago; Llibre, Jaume

    2017-06-01

    Lorenz studied the coupled Rosby waves and gravity waves using the differential system U˙ = -VW + bVZ,V˙ = UW - bUZ,Ẇ = -UV,Ẋ = -Z,Ż = bUV + X. This system has the two first integrals H1 = U2 + V2,H 2 = V2 + W2 + X2 + Z2. Our main result shows that in each invariant set {H1 = h1 > 0}∩{H2 = h2 > 0} there are at least four (resp., 2) periodic solutions of the differential system with b≠0 and h2 > h1 (resp., h2 < h1).

  8. Electric-Field Coupling to Spin Waves in a Centrosymmetric Ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu

    A systematic control of spin waves via external electric fields has been a long standing issue for the design of magnonic devices, and is of fundamental interest. One way to attain such control is to use multiferroics, whose electric and magnetic polarizations are inherently coupled. The lack of electric polarization in a centrosymmetric ferrite, however, makes direct coupling of its magnetization to external electric fields a challenge. Indirect electric control of spin waves has been accomplished by hybridizing yttrium iron garnet (YIG), a centrosymmetric ferrite, with a piezoelectric material. Here, we predict direct control of spin waves in YIG by a flexoelectric interaction, which couples an electric field to the spatial gradient of the magnetization, and thus the spin waves. Based on a superexchange model, which describes the antiferromagnetic coupling between two nearest neighbor iron ions through an oxygen ion, including spin-orbit coupling, we estimate the coupling constant and predict a phase shift linear in the applied electric fields. The theory is then confirmed by experimental measurement of the electric-field-induced phase shift in a YIG waveguide. In addition to the flexoelectric effect, another electric effect is observed, which couples the electric field directly with the magnetization of YIG. We call this a magnetoelectric effect. By adjusting the direction of the electric field, the two effects can be well separated. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the theoretical prediction. A phenomenological coupling constant for the magnetoelectric effect is also obtained. Our findings point to an important avenue for manipulating spin waves and developing electrically tunable magnonic devices.

  9. High-order rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with negative coherent coupling in an isotropic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Tian, Bo; Xie, Xi-Yang; Chai, Jun; Jiang, Yan

    2016-10-01

    High-order rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with negative coherent coupling, which describe the propagation of orthogonally polarized optical waves in an isotropic medium, are reported in this paper. Key point lies in the introduction of a limit process in the Darboux transformation, with which we obtain a family of the first- and second-order rational solutions for the purpose of modelling the rogue waves. We observe that the double-hump rogue wave in the course of evolution turns into the one-hump rogue wave, and that the dark rogue wave with four valleys in the course of evolution turns into the bright rogue wave. It is found that the second-order rogue wave can split up, giving birth to the multiple rogue waves.

  10. Simulation of Organized Convection and Tropical-wave Coupling in a YOTC MJO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrieff, M. W.; Liu, C.

    2015-12-01

    Organized precipitating convection coupled to various tropical waves was impressively complex in the eastern Indian Ocean in the April 2009 MJO, one of the six MJOs that occurred during the YOTC virtual global field campaign (May 2008-April 2010). Organized convection in the form of a westward-propagating synoptic-scale supercluster and a family of eastward-propagating mesoscale squall lines formed west of Sumatra. The supercluster was strongly coupled to a westward inertio-gravity wave. All these features are embedded in an equatorial Rossby wave, and the MJO overall. The 1.3 km inner-grid of the WRF model, nested in a 4 km-grid outer-grid spanning the Indian Ocean and the western Maritime Continent region, successfully simulated the timing, location, propagation, and life-cycle of this multiscale convection-wave interaction as verified by TRMM measurements.

  11. Breathers and rogue waves: Demonstration with coupled nonlinear Schrödinger family of equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Vishnu Priya; M Senthilvelan; M Lakshmanan

    2015-03-01

    Different types of breathers and rogue waves (RWs) are some of the important coherent structures which have been recently realized in several physical phenomena in hydrodynamics, nonlinear optics, Bose–Einstein condensates, etc. Mathematically, they have been deduced in non-linear Schrödinger (NLS) equations. Here we show the existence of general breathers, Akhmediev breathers, Ma soliton and rogue wave solutions in coupled Manakov-type NLS equations and coupled generalized NLS equations representing four-wave mixing. We deduce their explicit forms using Hirota bilinearization procedure and bring out their exact structures and important properties. We also show the method to deduce the various breather solutions from rogue wave solutions using factorization form and the so-called imbricate series.

  12. Coupling between whistler waves and ion-scale solitary waves: cluster measurements in the magnetotail during a substorm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenerani, A; Le Contel, O; Califano, F; Pegoraro, F; Robert, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Sauvaud, J A

    2012-10-12

    We present a new model of self-consistent coupling between low frequency, ion-scale coherent structures with high frequency whistler waves in order to interpret Cluster data. The idea relies on the possibility of trapping whistler waves by inhomogeneous external fields where they can be spatially confined and propagate for times much longer than their characteristic electronic time scale. Here we take the example of a slow magnetosonic soliton acting as a wave guide in analogy with the ducting properties of an inhomogeneous plasma. The soliton is characterized by a magnetic dip and density hump that traps and advects high frequency waves over many ion times. The model represents a new possible way of explaining space measurements often detecting the presence of whistler waves in correspondence to magnetic depressions and density humps. This approach, here given by means of slow solitons, but more general than that, is alternative to the standard approach of considering whistler wave packets as associated with nonpropagating magnetic holes resulting from a mirror-type instability.

  13. Elastic constants measurement of anisotropic Olivier wood plates using air-coupled transducers generated Lamb wave and ultrasonic bulk wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Souhail; Ketata, Hassiba; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi; Hosten, Bernard

    2010-04-01

    A hybrid elastic wave method is applied to determine the anisotropic constants of Olive wood specimen considered as an orthotropic solid. The method is based on the measurements of the Lamb wave velocities as well as the bulk ultrasonic wave velocities. Electrostatic, air-coupled, ultrasonic transducers are used to generate and receive Lamb waves which are sensitive to material properties. The variation of phase velocity with frequency is measured for several modes propagating parallel and normal to the fiber direction along a thin Olivier wood plates. A numerical model based mainly on an optimization method is developed; it permits to recover seven out of nine elastic constants with an uncertainty of about 15%. The remaining two elastic constants are then obtained from bulk wave measurements. The experimental Lamb phase velocities are in good agreement with the calculated dispersion curves. The evaluation of Olive wood elastic properties has been performed in the low frequency range where the Lamb length wave is large in comparison with the heterogeneity extent. Within the interval errors, the obtained elastic tensor doesn't reveal a large deviation from a uniaxial symmetry.

  14. Phase Coupling in Langmuir Wave Packets: Evidence for Four Wave Interactions in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    The four wave interaction process, known as the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI) is considered as one of the mechanisms responsible for stabilizing the electron beams associated with solar type III radio bursts. It has been reported that (1) an intense localized Langmuir wave packet associated with a type III burst contains the spectral characteristics of the OTSI: (a) a resonant peak at the local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe), (b) a Stokes peak at a frequency slightly lower than f(sub pe), (c) anti-Stokes peak at a frequency slightly higher than f(sub pe), and (d) a low frequency enhancement below a few hundred Hz, (2) the frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the OTSI, and (3) the peak intensity of the wave packet is well above the thresholds for the OTSI as well as spatial collapse of envelope solitons. Here, for the first time, applying the trispectral analysis on this wave packet, we show that the tricoherence, which measures the degree of coherent four-wave coupling amongst the observed spectral components exhibits a peak. This provides an additional evidence for the OTSI and related spatial collapse of Langmuir envelope solitons in type III burst sources.

  15. Coupled Mooring Analyses for the WEC-Sim Wave Energy Converter Design Tool: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirnivas, Senu; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Hall, Matthew; Bosma, Bret

    2016-07-01

    A wave-energy-converter-specific time-domain modeling method (WEC-Sim) was coupled with a lumped-mass-based mooring model (MoorDyn) to improve its mooring dynamics modeling capability. This paper presents a verification and validation study on the coupled numerical method. First, a coupled model was built to simulate a 1/25 model scale floating power system connected to a traditional three-point catenary mooring with an angle of 120 between the lines. The body response and the tension force on the mooring lines at the fairlead in decay tests and under regular and irregular waves were examined. To validate and verify the coupled numerical method, the simulation results were compared to the measurements from a wave tank test and a commercial code (OrcaFlex). Second, a coupled model was built to simulate a two-body point absorber system with a chain-connected catenary system. The influence of the mooring connection on the point absorber was investigated. Overall, the study showed that the coupling of WEC-Sim and the MoorDyn model works reasonably well for simulating a floating system with practical mooring designs and predicting the corresponding dynamic loads on the mooring lines. Further analyses on improving coupling efficiency and the feasibility of applying the numerical method to simulate WEC systems with more complex mooring configuration are still needed.

  16. Coupled Mooring Analyses for the WEC-Sim Wave Energy Converter Design Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirnivas, Senu; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Hall, Matthew; Bosma, Bret

    2016-06-24

    A wave-energy-converter-specific time-domain modeling method (WEC-Sim) was coupled with a lumped-mass-based mooring model (MoorDyn) to improve its mooring dynamics modeling capability. This paper presents a verification and validation study on the coupled numerical method. First, a coupled model was built to simulate a 1/25 model scale floating power system connected to a traditional three-point catenary mooring with an angle of 120 between the lines. The body response and the tension force on the mooring lines at the fairlead in decay tests and under regular and irregular waves were examined. To validate and verify the coupled numerical method, the simulation results were compared to the measurements from a wave tank test and a commercial code (OrcaFlex). Second, a coupled model was built to simulate a two-body point absorber system with a chain-connected catenary system. The influence of the mooring connection on the point absorber was investigated. Overall, the study showed that the coupling of WEC-Sim and the MoorDyn model works reasonably well for simulating a floating system with practical mooring designs and predicting the corresponding dynamic loads on the mooring lines. Further analyses on improving coupling efficiency and the feasibility of applying the numerical method to simulate WEC systems with more complex mooring configuration are still needed.

  17. Modelling floor heating systems using a validated two-dimensional ground coupled numerical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter; Kragh, Jesper; Roots, Peter

    2005-01-01

    the floor. This model can be used to design energy efficient houses with floor heating focusing on the heat loss through the floor construction and foundation. It is found that it is impor-tant to model the dynamics of the floor heating system to find the correct heat loss to the ground, and further......This paper presents a two-dimensional simulation model of the heat losses and tempera-tures in a slab on grade floor with floor heating which is able to dynamically model the floor heating system. The aim of this work is to be able to model, in detail, the influence from the floor construction...... and foundation on the performance of the floor heating sys-tem. The ground coupled floor heating model is validated against measurements from a single-family house. The simulation model is coupled to a whole-building energy simu-lation model with inclusion of heat losses and heat supply to the room above...

  18. Hybrid modelling of near-field coupling onto grounded wire under ultra-short duration perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelo, B.; Liu, Y.

    2014-10-01

    A time-frequency (TF) hybrid model (HM) for investigating the interaction between EM near-field (NF) aggression and grounded wire is addressed. The HM is based on the combination of techniques for extracting the EM NF radiated by electronic structures and the calculation of electrical disturbances across the wire due to EM coupling. The computation method is fundamentally inspired from transmission line (TL) theory under EM illumination. The methodology including flow chart interpreting the routine algorithm based on the combination of frequency and time domain approaches is featured. An experimental result showing the EM coupling between patch antenna-wire from 1.5-3.5GHz reveals the efficiency of the HM in frequency domain. The relevance of this HM was illustrated with a structure comprised of 20cm aggressor and 5cm victim I-shaped wires placed above a planar ground plane. The aggressor was excited with 40ns duration perturbation signal. After Matlab implementation of the HM, the disturbance voltages across the extremity of the victim wire were extracted. This simple and fast HM is useful for the EMC engineering during the design and fabrication phases of electrical and electronic systems.

  19. X-ray-absorption sum rules in jj-coupled operators and ground-state moments of actinide ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, G; Thole, BT

    1996-01-01

    Sum rules for magnetic x-ray dichroism, relating the signals of the spin-orbit split core level absorption edges to the ground-state spin and orbital operators, are expressed in jj-coupled operators. These sum rules can be used in the region of intermediate coupling by taking into account the cross

  20. Dust-Acoustic Waves in Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas Containing Variable-Charge Impurities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bai-Song; HE Kai-Fen; M. Y. Yu

    2000-01-01

    A relatively self-consistent theory of dust-acoustic waves in the strongly coupled dusty plasmas containing variable charge impurities is given. Relevant physical processes such as dust elastic relaxation and dust charge relaxation are taken into account. It is shown that the negative dispersion of dust-acoustic waves due to the strong correlation of dusts is enhanced in the presence of dust-neutral collisions.

  1. Alfvén wave coupled with flow-driven fluid instability in interpenetrating plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vranjes, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain and Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The Alfvén wave is analyzed in case of one quasineutral plasma propagating with some constant speed v{sub 0} through another static quasineutral plasma. A dispersion equation is derived describing the Alfvén wave coupled with the flow driven mode ω=kv{sub 0} and solutions are discussed analytically and numerically. The usual solutions for two oppositely propagating Alfvén waves are substantially modified due to the flowing plasma. More profound is modification of the solution propagating in the negative direction with respect to the magnetic field and the plasma flow. For a large enough flow speed (exceeding the Alfvén speed in the static plasma), this negative solution may become non-propagating, with frequency equal to zero. In this case, it represents a spatial variation of the electromagnetic field. For greater flow speed it becomes a forward mode, and it may merge with the positive one. This merging of the two modes represents the starting point for a flow-driven instability, with two complex-conjugate solutions. The Alfvén wave in interpenetrating plasmas is thus modified and coupled with the flow-driven mode and this coupled mode is shown to be growing when the flow speed is large enough. The energy for the instability is macroscopic kinetic energy of the flowing plasma. The dynamics of plasma particles caused by such a coupled wave still remains similar to the ordinary Alfvén wave. This means that well-known stochastic heating by the Alfvén wave may work, and this should additionally support the potential role of the Alfvén wave in the coronal heating.

  2. An Improved Coupling of Numerical and Physical Models for Simulating Wave Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiwen; Liu, Shu-xue; Li, Jin-xuan

    2014-01-01

    An improved coupling of numerical and physical models for simulating 2D wave propagation is developed in this paper. In the proposed model, an unstructured finite element model (FEM) based Boussinesq equations is applied for the numerical wave simulation, and a 2D piston-type wavemaker is used fo...... that the proposed numerical scheme and transfer function modulation method are efficient for the data transfer from the numerical model to the physical model up to a deterministic level.......An improved coupling of numerical and physical models for simulating 2D wave propagation is developed in this paper. In the proposed model, an unstructured finite element model (FEM) based Boussinesq equations is applied for the numerical wave simulation, and a 2D piston-type wavemaker is used...... for the physical wave generation. An innovative scheme combining fourth-order Lagrange interpolation and Runge-Kutta scheme is described for solving the coupling equation. A Transfer function modulation method is presented to minimize the errors induced from the hydrodynamic invalidity of the coupling model and...

  3. Experimental observation of strong coupling effects on the dispersion of dust acoustic waves in a plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, P; Sen, A; Kaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion properties of low frequency dust acoustic waves in the strong coupling regime are investigated experimentally in an argon plasma embedded with a mixture of kaolin and $MnO_2$ dust particles. The neutral pressure is varied over a wide range to change the collisional properties of the dusty plasma. In the low collisional regime the turnover of the dispersion curve at higher wave numbers and the resultant region of $\\partial\\omega/\\partial k < 0$ are identified as signatures of dust-dust correlations. In the high collisional regime dust neutral collisions produce a similar effect and prevent an unambiguous identification of strong coupling effects.

  4. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, M.; Kapfinger, S.; Reichert, T.; Finley, J. J.; Wixforth, A.; Kaniber, M.; Krenner, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity-quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a fSAW ≃ 800 MHz surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function, g(2). All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of g(2), demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system.

  5. Enhanced four-wave mixing via photonic bandgap coupled defect resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, S

    2005-05-16

    Frequency conversion efficiency via four-wave mixing in coupled 1-D photonic crystal defect structures is studied numerically. In structures where all interacting frequencies coincide with intraband defect resonances, energy conversion efficiencies greater than 5% are predicted. Because the frequency spacings are determined by the free-spectral range, thereby requiring long defects for small spacings using intraband resonances, four-wave mixing using coupled-defect miniband resonances in more compact structures is also studied. Conversion efficiencies of greater than 1% are obtained in this case.

  6. Highly asymmetric interaction forces induced by acoustic waves in coupled plate structures

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Xiying; Zhang, Shenwei; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-01-01

    Mutual forces can be induced between coupled structures when illuminated by external acoustic waves. In this Letter, we propose a concept of asymmetric interaction between two coupled plate-like structures, which is generated by oppositely incident plane waves. Besides the striking contrast in magnitude, the mutual force induced by one of the incidences can be tuned extremely strong due to the resonant excitation of the flexural plate modes. The highly asymmetric interaction with enhanced strength in single side should be potentially useful, such as in designing ultrasound instruments and sensors.

  7. Nonlinear propagation of coupled electromagnetic waves in a circular cylindrical waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovik, D. V.; Smol'kin, E. Yu.

    2017-08-01

    The problem of the propagation of coupled surface electromagnetic waves in a two-layer cylindrical circular waveguide filled with an inhomogeneous nonlinear medium is considered. A nonlinear coupled TE-TM wave is characterized by two (independent) frequencies ωe and ωm and two propagation constants {\\widehat γ _e} and {\\widehat γ _m}. The physical problem reduces to a nonlinear two-parameter eigenvalue problem for a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The existence of eigenvalues ({\\widehat γ _e}, {\\widehat γ _m}) in proven and intervals of their localization are determined.

  8. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Starinets, Andrei O.

    2006-01-01

    Using gauge theory/gravity duality we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. We compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of N=2 supersymmetric SU(N) Yang-Mills plasma at a temperature much larger than the mass scale of the theory in the limit of large N and large 't Hooft coupling. The speed of sound is computed both from the equation of state and the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. Both computations lead to the same result. Bulk viscosity is determined by computing the attenuation constant of the sound wave mode.

  9. A Review of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Wave Phenomena Related to Tropospheric-Ionospheric Coupling Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Klenzing, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of coupling mechanisms between the troposphere and the ionosphere requires a multidisciplinary approach involving several branches of atmospheric sciences, from meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and fulminology to aeronomy, plasma physics, and space weather. In this work, we review low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere cavity from a troposphere-ionosphere coupling perspective. We discuss electromagnetic wave generation, propagation, and resonance phenomena, considering atmospheric, ionospheric and magnetospheric sources, from lightning and transient luminous events at low altitude to Alfven waves and particle precipitation related to solar and magnetospheric processes. We review in situ ionospheric processes as well as surface and space weather phenomena that drive troposphere-ionosphere dynamics. Effects of aerosols, water vapor distribution, thermodynamic parameters, and cloud charge separation and electrification processes on atmospheric electricity and electromagnetic waves are reviewed. We also briefly revisit ionospheric irregularities such as spread-F and explosive spread-F, sporadic-E, traveling ionospheric disturbances, Trimpi effect, and hiss and plasma turbulence. Regarding the role of the lower boundary of the cavity, we review transient surface phenomena, including seismic activity, earthquakes, volcanic processes and dust electrification. The role of surface and atmospheric gravity waves in ionospheric dynamics is also briefly addressed. We summarize analytical and numerical tools and techniques to model low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation and solving inverse problems and summarize in a final section a few challenging subjects that are important for a better understanding of tropospheric-ionospheric coupling mechanisms.

  10. Convectively coupled equatorial waves within the MJO during CINDY/DYNAMO: slow Kelvin waves as building blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kazuyoshi; Kiladis, George N.; Dias, Juliana; Nasuno, Tomoe

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the relationship between the MJO and convectively coupled equatorial waves (CCEWs) during the CINDY2011/DYNAMO field campaign using satellite-borne infrared radiation data, in order to better understand the interaction between convection and the large-scale circulation. The spatio-temporal wavelet transform (STWT) enables us to document the convective signals within the MJO envelope in terms of CCEWs in great detail, through localization of space-time spectra at any given location and time. Three MJO events that occurred in October, November, and December 2011 are examined. It is, in general, difficult to find universal relationships between the MJO and CCEWs, implying that MJOs are diverse in terms of the types of disturbances that make up its convective envelope. However, it is found in all MJO events that the major convective body of the MJO is made up mainly by slow convectively coupled Kelvin waves. These Kelvin waves have relatively fast phase speeds of 10-13 m s-1 outside of, and slow phase speeds of 8-9 m s-1 within the MJO. Sometimes even slower eastward propagating signals with 3-5 m s-1 phase speed show up within the MJO, which, as well as the slow Kelvin waves, appear to comprise major building blocks of the MJO. It is also suggested that these eastward propagating waves often occur coincident with n = 1 WIG waves, which is consistent with the schematic model from Nakazawa in 1988. Some practical aspects that facilitate use of the STWT are also elaborated upon and discussed.

  11. Exact Synchronization for a Coupled System of Wave Equations with Dirichlet Boundary Controls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatsien LI; Bopeng RAO

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,the exact synchronization for a coupled system of wave equations with Dirichlet boundary controls and some related concepts are introduced.By means of the exact null controllability of a reduced coupled system,under certain conditions of compatibility,the exact synchronization,the exact synchronization by groups,and the exact null controllability and synchronization by groups are all realized by suitable boundary controls.

  12. Non-partial wave treatment of reactive and non-reactive scattering Coupled integral equation formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, E. F.; Kouri, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    Coupled integral equations are derived for the full scattering amplitudes for both reactive and nonreactive channels. The equations do not involve any partial wave expansion and are obtained using channel operators for reactive and nonreactive collisions. These coupled integral equations are similar in nature to equations derived for purely nonreactive collisions of structureless particles. Using numerical quadrature techniques, these equations may be reduced to simultaneous algebraic equations which may then be solved.

  13. Effects of the Biot and the squirt-flow coupling interaction on anisotropic elastic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Considering the velocity anisotropy of the solid/fluid relative motion and employment of the BISQ theory[1] based on the one-dimensional porous isotropic case, we establish a two-phase anisotropic elastic wave equation to simultaneously include the Biot and the squirt mechanisms in terms of both the basic principles of the fluid's mass conservation and the elastic-wave dynamical equations in the two-phase anisotropic rock. Numerical results, while the Biot-flow and the squirt-flow effects are simultaneously considered in the transversely isotropic (TI) poroelastic medium, show that the attenuation of the quasi P-wave and the quasi SV-wave strongly depend on the permeability anisotropy, and the attenuation behavior at low and high frequencies is contrary. Meanwhile, the attenuation and dispersion of the quasi P-wave are also affected seriously by the anisotropic solid/fluid coupling additional density.

  14. How does downward planetary wave coupling affect polar stratospheric ozone in the Arctic winter stratosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, Sandro W.; Silverman, Vered; Matthes, Katja; Harnik, Nili; Omrani, Nour-Eddine; Wahl, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    It is well established that variable wintertime planetary wave forcing in the stratosphere controls the variability of Arctic stratospheric ozone through changes in the strength of the polar vortex and the residual circulation. While previous studies focused on the variations in upward wave flux entering the lower stratosphere, here the impact of downward planetary wave reflection on ozone is investigated for the first time. Utilizing the MERRA2 reanalysis and a fully coupled chemistry-climate simulation with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1(WACCM)) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), we find two downward wave reflection effects on ozone: (1) the direct effect in which the residual circulation is weakened during winter, reducing the typical increase of ozone due to upward planetary wave events and (2) the indirect effect in which the modification of polar temperature during winter affects the amount of ozone destruction in spring. Winter seasons dominated by downward wave reflection events (i.e., reflective winters) are characterized by lower Arctic ozone concentration, while seasons dominated by increased upward wave events (i.e., absorptive winters) are characterized by relatively higher ozone concentration. This behavior is consistent with the cumulative effects of downward and upward planetary wave events on polar stratospheric ozone via the residual circulation and the polar temperature in winter. The results establish a new perspective on dynamical processes controlling stratospheric ozone variability in the Arctic by highlighting the key role of wave reflection.

  15. Excitation of the Uller-Zenneck electromagnetic surface waves in the prism-coupled configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Mehran; Faryad, Muhammad

    2017-08-01

    A configuration to excite the Uller-Zenneck surface electromagnetic waves at the planar interfaces of homogeneous and isotropic dielectric materials is proposed and theoretically analyzed. The Uller-Zenneck waves are surface waves that can exist at the planar interface of two dissimilar dielectric materials of which at least one is a lossy dielectric material. In this paper, a slab of a lossy dielectric material was taken with lossless dielectric materials on both sides. A canonical boundary-value problem was set up and solved to find the possible Uller-Zenneck waves and waveguide modes. The Uller-Zenneck waves guided by the slab of the lossy dielectric material were found to be either symmetric or antisymmetric and transmuted into waveguide modes when the thickness of that slab was increased. A prism-coupled configuration was then successfully devised to excite the Uller-Zenneck waves. The results showed that the Uller-Zenneck waves are excited at the same angle of incidence for any thickness of the slab of the lossy dielectric material, whereas the waveguide modes can be excited when the slab is sufficiently thick. The excitation of Uller-Zenneck waves at the planar interfaces with homogeneous and all-dielectric materials can usher in new avenues for the applications for electromagnetic surface waves.

  16. Condition assessment of concrete pavements using both ground penetrating radar and stress-wave based techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengxing; Anderson, Neil; Sneed, Lesley; Torgashov, Evgeniy

    2016-12-01

    Two stress-wave based techniques, ultrasonic surface wave (USW) and impact echo (IE), as well as ground penetrating radar (GPR) were used to assess the condition of a segment of concrete pavement that includes a layer of concrete, a granular base and their interface. Core specimens retrieved at multiple locations were used to confirm the accuracy and reliability of each non-destructive testing (NDT) result. Results from this study demonstrate that the GPR method is accurate for estimating the pavement thickness and locating separations (air voids) between the concrete and granular base layers. The USW method is a rapid way to estimate the in-situ elastic modulus (dynamic elastic modulus) of the concrete, however, the existence of air voids at the interface could potentially affect the accuracy and reliability of the USW test results. The estimation of the dynamic modulus and the P-wave velocity of concrete was improved when a shorter wavelength range (3 in. to 8.5 in.) corresponding to the concrete layer thickness was applied instead of the full wavelength rage (3 in. to 11 in.) based on the standard spacing of the receiver transducers. The IE method is proved to be fairly accurate in estimating the thickness of concrete pavements. However, the flexural mode vibration could affect the accuracy and reliability of the test results. Furthermore, the existence of air voids between the concrete and granular base layers could affect the estimation of the compression wave velocity of concrete when the full wavelength range was applied (3 in. to 11 in.). Future work is needed in order to improve the accuracy and reliability of both USW and IE test results.

  17. An Improved Coupling of Numerical and Physical Models for Simulating Wave Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳志文; 柳淑学; 李金宣

    2014-01-01

    An improved coupling of numerical and physical models for simulating 2D wave propagation is developed in this paper. In the proposed model, an unstructured finite element model (FEM) based Boussinesq equations is applied for the numerical wave simulation, and a 2D piston-type wavemaker is used for the physical wave generation. An innovative scheme combining fourth-order Lagrange interpolation and Runge-Kutta scheme is described for solving the coupling equation. A Transfer function modulation method is presented to minimize the errors induced from the hydrodynamic invalidity of the coupling model and/or the mechanical capability of the wavemaker in area where nonlinearities or dispersion predominate. The overall performance and applicability of the coupling model has been experimentally validated by accounting for both regular and irregular waves and varying bathymetry. Experimental results show that the proposed numerical scheme and transfer function modulation method are efficient for the data transfer from the numerical model to the physical model up to a deterministic level.

  18. Strong coupling of gold dipolar nanoantennas by symmetry-breaking in evanescent wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jhen-Hong; Chen, Kuo-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Observing the resonance wavelengths of nanoantennas (NAs) with changing incident angles in TM and TE polarization. Extinction cross section shows the dark and bright coupling modes at resonance wavelength of NAs with symmetry breaking oblique incidence. The plasmonic enhancement is stronger under evanescent wave in total internal reflection.

  19. Travelling waves associated with saddle-node bifurcation in weakly coupled CML

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotelo Herrera, Ma Dolores, E-mail: dsh@dfmf.uned.e [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, E.U.I.T.I., Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ronda de Valencia 3, 28012 Madrid (Spain); San Martin, Jesus, E-mail: jsm@dfmf.uned.e [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, E.U.I.T.I., Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ronda de Valencia 3, 28012 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Matematica y de Fluidos, U.N.E.D., Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-19

    Weakly coupled CML can be analytically solved by using perturbative methods. This technique has been recently used to deduce analytical expressions for travelling waves. Nonetheless, the results were limited for periodic solutions far away from saddle-node bifurcation. In this Letter, this problem is solved and periodic solutions, arising from the individual dynamics, are totally characterised.

  20. Construction of wave operator for two-dimensional Klein-Gordon-Schrodinger systems with Yukawa coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Tsuruta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We prove the existence of the wave operator for the Klein-Gordon-Schrodinger system with Yukawa coupling. This non-linearity type is below Strichartz scaling, and therefore classic perturbation methods will fail in any Strichartz space. Instead, we follow the "first iteration method" to handle these critical non-linearities.

  1. Forced vibration and wave propagation in mono-coupled periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlrich, Mogens

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the wave propagation and vibration characteristics of mono-coupled structures which are of spatially periodic nature. The receptance approach to periodic structure theory is applied to study undamped periodic systems with composite structural elements; particular emphasis...... of the determination of the junction-receptance. The influence of such a disorder is illustrated by a simple example...

  2. Nonlinear coupling of left and right handed circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R. P., E-mail: rpsharma@ces.iitd.ac.in; Sharma, Swati, E-mail: swati.sharma704@gmail.com; Gaur, Nidhi, E-mail: nidhiphysics@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-07-15

    The nonlinear phenomena are of prominent interests in understanding the particle acceleration and transportation in the interplanetary space. The ponderomotive nonlinearity causing the filamentation of the parallel propagating circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave having a finite frequency may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the heating of the plasmas. The contribution will be different of the left (L) handed mode, the right (R) handed mode, and the mix mode. The contribution also depends upon the finite frequency of the circularly polarized waves. In the present paper, we have investigated the effect of the nonlinear coupling of the L and R circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave on the localized structures formation and the respective power spectra. The dynamical equations are derived in the presence of the ponderomotive nonlinearity of the L and R pumps and then studied semi-analytically as well as numerically. The ponderomotive nonlinearity accounts for the nonlinear coupling between both the modes. In the presence of the adiabatic response of the density fluctuations, the nonlinear dynamical equations satisfy the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The equations thus obtained are solved in solar wind regime to study the coupling effect on localization and the power spectra. The effect of coupling is also studied on Faraday rotation and ellipticity of the wave caused due to the difference in the localization of the left and the right modes with the distance of propagation.

  3. On the spectral stability of periodic waves of the coupled Schrödinger equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirkaya, Aslihan, E-mail: demirkaya@hartford.edu [Mathematics Department, University of Hartford, 200 Bloomfield Avenue, West Hartford, CT 06117 (United States); Hakkaev, Sevdzhan [Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Istanbul Aydin University, Istanbul (Turkey); Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics, Shumen University, Shumen (Bulgaria)

    2015-12-04

    In this present work we consider the periodic standing wave solutions for the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. We restrict our problem to two cases and construct the solutions explicitly. Then we make the stability analysis for each case. We show that the relevant stationary solutions are spectrally stable for certain parameters. For those parameters, we also present our numerical results in the spectral analysis. - Highlights: • We consider the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. • We study the existence and the stability of the periodic standing waves. • We show that these waves are spectrally stable for certain parameter values. • We use Floquet theory and do some numerical computations.

  4. The effect of initial stress on the propagation behavior of SH waves in piezoelectric coupled plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myung Seob; Kang, Yeon June

    2011-05-01

    This study analytically investigates the propagation of shear waves (SH waves) in a coupled plate consisting of a piezoelectric layer and an elastic layer with initial stress. The piezoelectric material is polarized in z-axis direction and perfectly bonded to an elastic layer. The mechanical displacement and electrical potential function are derived for the piezoelectric coupled plates by solving the electromechanical field equations. The effects of the thickness ratio and the initial stress on the dispersion relations and the phase and group velocities are obtained for electrically open and mechanically free situations. The numerical examples are provided to illustrate graphically the variations of the phase and group velocities versus the wave number for the different layers comparatively. It is seen that the phase velocity of SH waves decreases with the increase of the magnitude of the initial compression stress, while it increases with the increase of the magnitude of the initial tensile stress. The initial stress has a great effect on the propagation of SH waves with the decrease of the thickness ratio. This research is theoretically useful for the design of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices with high performance.

  5. Pavement thickness and stabilised foundation layer assessment using ground-coupled GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinhui; Vennapusa, Pavana K. R.; White, David J.; Beresnev, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Experimental results from field and laboratory investigations using a ground-coupled ground penetrating radar (GPR), dielectric measurement, magnetic imaging tomography (MIT) and dynamic cone penetrometer (DCP) tests are presented. Dielectric properties of asphalt pavement and stabilised and unstabilised pavement foundation materials were evaluated in the laboratory in frozen and unfrozen conditions. Laboratory test results showed that dielectric properties of materials back-calculated from GPR in comparison to dielectric gauge measurements are strongly correlated and repeatable. For chemically stabilised materials, curing time affected the dielectric properties of the materials. Field tests were conducted on asphalt pavement test sections with different foundation materials (stabilised and unstabilised layers), drainage conditions and layer thicknesses. GPR and MIT results were used to determine asphalt layer thicknesses and were compared with measured core thicknesses, while GPR and DCP were used to assess foundation layer profiles. Asphalt thicknesses estimated from GPR showed an average error of about 11% using the dielectric gauge values as input. The average error reduced to about 4% when calibrated with cores thicknesses. MIT results showed thicknesses that are about 9% higher than estimated using GPR. Foundation layer thicknesses could not be measured using GPR due to variations in moisture conditions between the test sections, which is partly attributed to variations in gradation and drainage characteristics of the subbase layer.

  6. Coupling Fine-Scale Root and Canopy Structure Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady S. Hardiman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem physical structure, defined by the quantity and spatial distribution of biomass, influences a range of ecosystem functions. Remote sensing tools permit the non-destructive characterization of canopy and root features, potentially providing opportunities to link above- and belowground structure at fine spatial resolution in functionally meaningful ways. To test this possibility, we employed ground-based portable canopy LiDAR (PCL and ground penetrating radar (GPR along co-located transects in forested sites spanning multiple stages of ecosystem development and, consequently, of structural complexity. We examined canopy and root structural data for coherence (i.e., correlation in the frequency of spatial variation at multiple spatial scales ≤10 m within each site using wavelet analysis. Forest sites varied substantially in vertical canopy and root structure, with leaf area index and root mass more becoming even vertically as forests aged. In all sites, above- and belowground structure, characterized as mean maximum canopy height and root mass, exhibited significant coherence at a scale of 3.5–4 m, and results suggest that the scale of coherence may increase with stand age. Our findings demonstrate that canopy and root structure are linked at characteristic spatial scales, which provides the basis to optimize scales of observation. Our study highlights the potential, and limitations, for fusing LiDAR and radar technologies to quantitatively couple above- and belowground ecosystem structure.

  7. Mutual coupling between parallel columns of periodic slots in a ground plane surrounded by dielectric slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, J. P.; Munk, Benedikt A.

    1992-01-01

    Arrays of slots with arbitrary orientation in a conducting plane which are infinitely periodic in one dimension and finitely periodic in another dimension are considered. The perfect conducting plane extends infinitely and is bounded on each side by dielectric slabs of finite thickness and infinite extent. Single columns of slots are represented by equivalent magnetic scattering currents, which are solved for via the moment method. The mutual coupling (admittance) between slot columns in the presence of the stratified media is found by the array scanning method (ASM), which expresses the admittance as the average of the scan admittance of an artificially constructed doubly infinite array of slots over all real scan angles. The technique avoids the use of Sommerfeld integrals, but still gives rise to singularities at scan angles corresponding to the resonant excitation of surface waves. An analytical approximation is made to remove these surface wave singularities, thus making numerical implementation of the method practical. The method is quite general and may be extended to thin slot elements of arbitrary shape and orientation.

  8. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    CERN Document Server

    Weiß, Matthias; Reichert, Thorsten; Finley, Jonathan J; Wixforth, Achim; Kaniber, Michael; Krenner, Hubert J

    2016-01-01

    A coupled quantum dot--nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a $f_{\\rm SAW}\\simeq800\\,\\mathrm{MHz}$ surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function $g^{(2)}$. All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of $g^{(2)}$, demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system. The implemented scheme can be directly extended to strongly coupled systems and acoustically drives non-adiabatic entangling quantum gates based on Landau-Zener transitions.

  9. Traveling wave solutions of degenerate coupled multi-KdV equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürses, Metin; Pekcan, Aslı

    2016-10-01

    Traveling wave solutions of degenerate coupled ℓ-KdV equations are studied. Due to symmetry reduction these equations reduce to one ordinary differential equation (ODE), i.e., (f')2 = Pn(f) where Pn(f) is a polynomial function of f of degree n = ℓ + 2, where ℓ ≥ 3 in this work. Here ℓ is the number of coupled fields. There is no known method to solve such ordinary differential equations when ℓ ≥ 3. For this purpose, we introduce two different types of methods to solve the reduced equation and apply these methods to degenerate three-coupled KdV equation. One of the methods uses the Chebyshev's theorem. In this case, we find several solutions, some of which may correspond to solitary waves. The second method is a kind of factorizing the polynomial Pn(f) as a product of lower degree polynomials. Each part of this product is assumed to satisfy different ODEs.

  10. Beam Coupling Impedances of Traveling-Wave Ferrite-Free Extraction Kickers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    2002-04-01

    Fast traveling-wave extraction kickers contain no ferrite and consist of two long metallic parallel plates supported by insulators inside a beam pipe. A beam is deflected by both the electric and magnetic fields of a TEM wave created by a pulse propagating along the strips in the direction opposite to the beam. Computations of the beam coupling impedances for such structures are difficult because of their length. In the paper, the beam coupling impedances of such transmission-line kickers are calculated by combining analytical and numerical methods: the wake potentials computed in short models are extended analytically to obtain the wakes for the long kickers, and then the corresponding beam impedances are derived. As one can expect, at very low frequencies the results are in agreement with simple analytical expressions available for the coupling impedances of striplines in beam position monitors.

  11. Estimation of detection threshold in multiple ship target situations with HF ground wave radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hongbo; Shen Yiying; Liu Yongtan

    2007-01-01

    A credible method of calculating the detection threshold is presented for the multiple target situations,which appear frequently in the lower Doppler velocity region during the surveillance of sea with HF ground wave radar. This method defines a whole-peak-outlier elimination (WPOE) criterion, which is based on in-peak-samples correlation of each target echo spectra, to trim off the target signals and abnormal disturbances with great amplitude from the complex spectra. Therefore, cleaned background noise samples are obtained to improve the accuracy and reliability of noise level estimation. When the background noise is nonhomogeneous, the detection samples are limited and often occupied heavily with outliers. In this case, the problem that the detection threshold is overvalued can be solved. In applications on experimental data, it is verified that this method can reduce the miss alarm rate of signal detection effectively in multiple target situations as well as make the adaptability of the detector better.

  12. Regulating drift-wave plasma turbulence into spatiotemporal patterns by pinning coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Panpan; Yang, Lei; Deng, Zhigang; Wang, Xingang

    2011-07-01

    Using the technique of pinning coupling in chaos control, we investigate how the two-dimensional drift-wave plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Mima equation can be regulated into different spatiotemporal patterns. It is shown both analytically and numerically that, depending on the pattern structure of the target, the pinning strength necessary for regulating the turbulence could have a large variation. More specifically, with the increase of the wave number of the target, the critical pinning strength is found to be increased by a power-law scaling. Moreover, in both the transition and transient process of the pinning regulation, the modes of the turbulence are found to be suppressed in a hierarchical fashion, that is, by the sequence of mode wave number. The findings give insight into the dynamics of drift-wave turbulence, as well as indicative to the design of new control techniques for real-world turbulence.

  13. Forced Planetary Waves in the Northern Hemisphere Winter: Wave-Coupled Orographic and Thermal Forcings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shyh-Chin; Trenberth, Kevin E.

    1988-02-01

    A more complete and new formulation of the orographic forcing and new thermal forcings are included in a steady state model of the Northern Hemisphere planetary waves. When both forcings are included, the simulation produces excellent results which are compared in detail with observations. In particular, the Siberian high, the tropospheric East Asian trough and subtropical tropospheric East Asian jet stream maxima are well reproduced even though the forcing is primarily extratropical in origin.The modes uses a lower boundary condition in which the orographic forcing is determined by the effects of the total flow, not just the zonal mean basic state. Consequently, the net orographic forcing changes when thermal forcing is added and the tow solution is not equal to the linear sum of the solutions with orographic and thermal forcings separately. The thermally induced orographic forcing is found to be very significant and, in the troposphere, there is strong interaction between the two forcings with both of roughly equal importance. However, the Iowa-latitude vertically propagating waves am deflected by the subtropical jet and absorbed in the low-latitude easterlies. Thus only the mid-high latitude planetary waves are important in the stratosphere which seems to be dominated by the thermally forced component.The model is forced with new estimates of diabetic heating from several FGGE analyses. The sensitivity of the results to different heatings and their assumed vertical profile is examined. The amplitude of the lower-troposphere response is very sensitive to the vertical profile but there are much smaller changes at upper levels which are dominated by the remote response. Large differences in the response to the different diabatic heatings are found at high latitudes and over the Pacific Ocean. However, when orographic forcing is also included, these differences diminish indicating a smaller sensitivity to uncertainties in heating, and thus the orographic forcing is

  14. Existence and Concentration of Ground States of Coupled Nonlinear Schr(o)dinger Equations with Bounded Potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gongming WEI

    2008-01-01

    A 2-coupled nonlinear Schr(o)dinger equations with bounded varying potentials and strongly attractive interactions is considered.When the attractive interaction is strong enough,the existence of a ground state for sufficiently small Planck constant is proved.As the Planck constant approaches zero,it is proved that one of the components concentrates at a minimum point of the ground state energy function which is defined in Section 4.

  15. Ground Motion Zoning of Santiago de Cuba: An Approach by SH Waves Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Leonardo; García, Julio; Vaccari, Franco; Panza, Giuliano F.; González, Bertha; Reyes, Carmen; Fernández, Bárbara; Pico, Ramón; Zapata, José A.; Arango, Enrique

    The expected ground motion in Santiago de Cuba basin from earthquakes which occurred in the Oriente fault zone is studied. Synthetic SH-waves seismograms have been calculated along four profiles in the basin by the hybrid approach (modal summation for the path source-profile and finite differences for the profile) for a maximum frequency of 1 Hz. The response spectra ratio (RSR) has been determined in 49 sites, distributed along all considered profiles with a spacing of 900 m. The corresponding RSR versus frequency curves have been classified using a logical-combinatorial algorithm. The results of the classification, in combination with the uppermost geological setting (geotechnical information and geological geometry of the subsoil) are used for the seismic zoning of the city. Three different main zones are identified, and a small sector characterized by major resonance effects, due to the particular structural conditions. Each zone is characterized in terms of its expected ground motion parameters for the most probable strong earthquake (MS=7), and for the maximum possible (MS=8).

  16. Spatial versus temporal deterministic wave breakup of nonlinearly coupled light waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, D; Minardi, S; Trull, J; Varanavicius, A; Tamosauskas, G; Valiulis, G; Dubietis, A; Caironi, D; Trillo, S; Piskarskas, A; Di Trapani, P

    2003-10-01

    We investigate experimentally the competition between spatial and temporal breakup due to modulational instability in chi((2)) nonlinear mixing. The modulation of the wave packets caused by the energy exchange between fundamental and second-harmonic components is found to be the prevailing trigger mechanism which, according to the relative weight of diffraction and dispersion, leads to the appearance of a multisoliton pattern in the low-dimensional spatial or temporal domain.

  17. Mitigation potential of horizontal ground coupled heat pumps for current and future climatic conditions: UK environmental modelling and monitoring studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    García González, Raquel; Verhoef, Anne; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Gan, Guohui; Wu, Yupeng; Hughes, Andrew; Mansour, Majdi; Blyth, Eleanor; Finch, Jon; Main, Bruce

    2010-05-01

    An increased uptake of alternative low or non-CO2 emitting energy sources is one of the key priorities for policy makers to mitigate the effects of environmental change. Relatively little work has been undertaken on the mitigation potential of Ground Coupled Heat Pumps (GCHPs) despite the fact that a GCHP could significantly reduce CO2 emissions from heating systems. It is predicted that under climate change the most probable scenario is for UK temperatures to increase and for winter rainfall to become more abundant; the latter is likely to cause a general rise in groundwater levels. Summer rainfall may reduce considerably, while vegetation type and density may change. Furthermore, recent studies underline the likelihood of an increase in the number of heat waves. Under such a scenario, GCHPs will increasingly be used for cooling as well as heating. These factors will affect long-term performance of horizontal GCHP systems and hence their economic viability and mitigation potential during their life span ( 50 years). The seasonal temperature differences encountered in soil are harnessed by GCHPs to provide heating in the winter and cooling in the summer. The performance of a GCHP system will depend on technical factors (heat exchanger (HE) type, length, depth, and spacing of pipes), but also it will be determined to a large extent by interactions between the below-ground parts of the system and the environment (atmospheric conditions, vegetation and soil characteristics). Depending on the balance between extraction and rejection of heat from and to the ground, the soil temperature in the neighbourhood of the HE may fall or rise. The GROMIT project (GROund coupled heat pumps MITigation potential), funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (UK), is a multi-disciplinary research project, in collaboration with EarthEnergy Ltd., which aims to quantify the CO2 mitigation potential of horizontal GCHPs. It considers changing environmental conditions and combines

  18. A numerical coupled model for studying air-sea-wave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Le Ngoc

    1995-10-01

    A numerical coupled model of air-sea-wave interaction is developed to study the influence of ocean wind waves on dynamical, turbulent structures of the air-sea system and their impact on coupled modeling. The model equations for both atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers include equations for: (1) momentum, (2) a k-ɛ turbulence scheme, and (3) stratification in the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers. The model equations are written in the same form for both the atmosphere and ocean. In this model, wind waves are considered as another source of turbulent energy in the upper layer of the ocean besides turbulent energy from shear production. The dissipation ɛ at the ocean surface is written as a linear combination of terms representing dissipation from mean flow and breaking waves. The ɛ from breaking waves is estimated by using similarity theory and observed data. It is written in terms of wave parameters such as wave phase speed, height, and length, which are then expressed in terms of friction velocity. Numerical experiments are designed for various geostrophic winds, wave heights, and wave ages, to study the influence of waves on the air-sea system. The numerical simulations show that the vertical profiles of ɛ in the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers (AOBL) are similar. The magnitudes of ɛ in the oceanic surface zone are much larger than those in the atmospheric surface zone and in the interior of the oceanic boundary layer (OBL). The model predicts ɛ distributions with a surface zone of large dissipation which was not expected from similarity scaling based on observed wind stress and surface buoyancy. The simulations also show that waves have a strong influence on eddy viscosity coefficients (EVC) and momentum fluxes, and have a dominated effect on the component of fluxes in the direction of the wind. The depth of large changes in flux magnitudes and EVC in the ocean can reach to 10-20 m. The simulations of surface drift currents confirm that

  19. Gaussian-Based Coupled-Cluster Theory for the Ground-State and Band Structure of Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, James; Sun, Qiming; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Berkelbach, Timothy C

    2017-03-14

    We present the results of Gaussian-based ground-state and excited-state equation-of-motion coupled-cluster theory with single and double excitations for three-dimensional solids. We focus on diamond and silicon, which are paradigmatic covalent semiconductors. In addition to ground-state properties (the lattice constant, bulk modulus, and cohesive energy), we compute the quasiparticle band structure and band gap. We sample the Brillouin zone with up to 64 k-points using norm-conserving pseudopotentials and polarized double- and triple-ζ basis sets, leading to canonical coupled-cluster calculations with as many as 256 electrons in 2176 orbitals.

  20. Renormalized energy of ground and first excited state of Fröhlich polaron in the range of weak coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Tkach

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The partial summing of infinite range of diagrams for the two-phonon mass operator of polaron described by Frohlich Hamiltonian is performed using the Feynman-Pines diagram technique. The renormalized spectral parameters of ground and first excited (phonon repeat polaron state are accurately calculated for the weak electron-phonon coupling at T=0 K. It is shown that the stronger electron-phonon interaction shifts the energy of both states into low-energy region of the spectra. The ground state stays stationary and the excited one - decays at bigger coupling constant.

  1. Dust-acoustic solitary waves and shocks in strongly coupled quantum plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the propagation characteristics of electrostatic dust-acoustic (DA) solitary waves and shocks in a strongly coupled dusty plasma consisting of intertialess electrons and ions, and strongly coupled inertial charged dust particles. A generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic model with the effects of electrostatic dust pressure associated with the strong coupling of dust particles, and a quantum hydrodynamic model with the effects of quantum forces associated with the Bohm potential and the exchange-correlation potential for electrons and ions are considered. Both the linear and weakly nonlinear theory of DA waves are studied by the derivation and analysis of dispersion relations as well as Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and KdV-Burgers (KdVB)-like equations. It is shown that in the kinetic regime ($\\omega\\tau_m\\gg1$, where $\\omega$ is the wave frequency and $\\tau_m$ is the viscoelastic relaxtation time), the amplitude of the DA solitary waves decays slowly with time with the effect of a small amount of dus...

  2. Gravitational waves from merging intermediate-mass black holes : II Event rates at ground-based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Shinkai, Hisa-aki; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Based on a dynamical formation model of a super-massive black-hole (SMBH), we estimate expected observational profile of gravitational wave at ground-based detectors, such as KAGRA or advanced LIGO/VIRGO. Focusing that the second generation of detectors have enough sensitivity from 10 Hz and up (especially with KAGRA due to its location at less seismic noise), we are able to detect the ring-down gravitational wave of a BH of the mass $M 1$ per year for $\\rho=10$. Thus if we observe a BH with more than $100 M_\\odot$ in future gravitational wave observations, our model naturally explains its source.

  3. Linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic waves in a strongly coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ema, S. A., E-mail: ema.plasma@gmail.com; Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342 (Bangladesh); Hossen, M. R. [Deparment of Natural Sciences, Daffodil International University, Sukrabad, Dhaka-1207 (Bangladesh)

    2015-09-15

    A theoretical study on the propagation of linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic (HIA) waves in an unmagnetized, collisionless, strongly coupled plasma system has been carried out. The plasma system is assumed to contain adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ion fluids, nonextensive distributed electrons, and Maxwellian light ions. The normal mode analysis is used to study the linear behaviour. On the other hand, the well-known reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the nonlinear dynamical equations, namely, Burgers equation and Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation. They are also numerically analyzed in order to investigate the basic features of shock and solitary waves. The adiabatic effects on the HIA shock and solitary waves propagating in such a strongly coupled plasma are taken into account. It has been observed that the roles of the adiabatic positively charged heavy ions, nonextensivity of electrons, and other plasma parameters arised in this investigation have significantly modified the basic features (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of the HIA solitary/shock waves. The findings of our results obtained from this theoretical investigation may be useful in understanding the linear as well as nonlinear phenomena associated with the HIA waves both in space and laboratory plasmas.

  4. Visualization of stress wave propagation via air-coupled acoustic emission sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivey, Joshua C.; Lee, Gil-Yong; Yang, Jinkyu; Kim, Youngkey; Kim, Sungchan

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of visualizing stress waves propagating in plates using air-coupled acoustic emission sensors. Specifically, we employ a device that embeds arrays of microphones around an optical lens in a helical pattern. By implementing a beamforming technique, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot and full-field measurement. This is a significant improvement over the conventional wave propagation tracking approaches based on laser doppler vibrometry or digital image correlation techniques. In this paper, we focus on demonstrating the feasibility and efficacy of this air-coupled acoustic emission technique by using large metallic plates exposed to external impacts. The visualization results of stress wave propagation will be shown under various impact scenarios. The proposed technique can be used to characterize and localize damage by detecting the attenuation, reflection, and scattering of stress waves that occurs at damage locations. This can ultimately lead to the development of new structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation methods for identifying hidden cracks or delaminations in metallic or composite plate structures, simultaneously negating the need for mounted contact sensors.

  5. A three-dimensional coupled numerical model of nonlinear waves in a harbor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.G.THAM

    2008-01-01

    A 3-D time-domain numerical coupled model for nonlinear waves acting on a ship in a harbor has been developed in the present study.The whole domain is divided into the inner domain and the outer domain.The inner domain is the area around the ship,where the flow is expressed by the Laplace equation and numerically solved by the finite element method.The other area is the outer domain,where the flow is described by the higher-order Boussinesq equations and numerically solved by the finite difference method.The matching conditions on the interfaces between the inner domain and the outer domain,the procedure of coupled solution,the length of common domain and the mesh generation in the inner domain are discussed in detail.The other coupled model with the flow in the inner domain governed by the simplified linear Euler equations and relevant physical experiment are adopted to validate the present coupled model,and it is shown that the numerical results of the present model agree with the experimental data,so the present model can be used for the study on the effect of nonlinear waves acting on a fixed ship in a large area and provide a reference for the time-domain simulation of nonlinear wave forces on an arbitrary object in a large harbor and the 3-D district computation in the future.

  6. Vibrational Energy Flow Analysis of Corrected Flexural Waves in Timoshenko Beam – Part II: Application to Coupled Timoshenko Beams

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for the energy flow analysis of coupled Timoshenko beam structures and various numerical applications to verify the developed methodology. To extend the application of the energy flow model for corrected flexural waves in the Timoshenko beam, which is developed in the other companion paper, to coupled structures, the wave transmission analyses of general coupled Timoshenko beam systems are performed. First, power transmission and reflection coefficients for...

  7. Development and transition of spiral wave in the coupled Hindmarsh-Rose neurons in two-dimensional space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Jun; Ying He-Ping; Liu Yong; Li Shi-Rong

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics and the transition of spiral waves in the couplcd Hindmarsh-Rose (H-R) neurons in two-dimensional space are investigated in the paper. It is found that the spiral wave can be induced and developed in the coupled HR neurons in two-dimensional space, with appropriate initial values and a parameter region given. However, the spiral wave could encounter instability when the intensity of the external current reaches a threshold value of 1.945. The transition of spiral wave is found to be affected by coupling intensity D and bifurcation parameter r. The spiral wave becomes sparse as the coupling intensity increases, while the spiral wave is eliminated and the whole neuronal system becomes homogeneous as the bifurcation parameter increases to a certain threshold value. Then the coupling action of the four sub-adjacent neurons, which is described by coupling coefficient DI, is also considered, and it is found that the spiral wave begins to breakup due to the introduced coupling action from the sub-adjacent neurons (or sites) and together with the coupling action of the nearest-neighbour neurons, which is described by the coupling intensity D.

  8. Identification of ground motion features for high-tech facility under far field seismic waves using wavelet packet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shieh-Kung; Loh, Chin-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Tsun

    2016-04-01

    Seismic records collected from earthquake with large magnitude and far distance may contain long period seismic waves which have small amplitude but with dominant period up to 10 sec. For a general situation, the long period seismic waves will not endanger the safety of the structural system or cause any uncomfortable for human activity. On the contrary, for those far distant earthquakes, this type of seismic waves may cause a glitch or, furthermore, breakdown to some important equipments/facilities (such as the high-precision facilities in high-tech Fab) and eventually damage the interests of company if the amplitude becomes significant. The previous study showed that the ground motion features such as time-variant dominant frequencies extracted using moving window singular spectrum analysis (MWSSA) and amplitude characteristics of long-period waves identified from slope change of ground motion Arias Intensity can efficiently indicate the damage severity to the high-precision facilities. However, embedding a large hankel matrix to extract long period seismic waves make the MWSSA become a time-consumed process. In this study, the seismic ground motion data collected from broadband seismometer network located in Taiwan were used (with epicenter distance over 1000 km). To monitor the significant long-period waves, the low frequency components of these seismic ground motion data are extracted using wavelet packet transform (WPT) to obtain wavelet coefficients and the wavelet entropy of coefficients are used to identify the amplitude characteristics of long-period waves. The proposed method is a timesaving process compared to MWSSA and can be easily implemented for real-time detection. Comparison and discussion on this method among these different seismic events and the damage severity to the high-precision facilities in high-tech Fab is made.

  9. Fast calculate the parameters of surface acoustic wave coupling-of-modes model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiansheng; HE Shitang

    2007-01-01

    Accurate solutions of acoustic waves in piezoelectric substrate and metal film as layered structure were obtained. Phase velocity, electromechanical coupling coefficient and static capacitance were calculated based upon the solutions. Chen and Haus' theory was used to analyze surface acoustic waves in shorten gratings with single finger every period and a reflection coefficient expression of one strip was presented. Parameters of aluminum on X112°Y LiTaO3 and gold on ST-quartz were calculated. The results agreed well with those from Ken-ya Hashimoto's theory. The reflection coefficient of gold on ST-quartz was measured to verify the theoretical result.

  10. Traveling Wave-Guide Channels of a New Coupled Integrable Dispersionless System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abbagari Souleymanou; Victor K. Kuetche; Thomas B. Bouetou; Timoleon C. Kofane

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of the recent investigation of new coupled integrable dispersionless equations by means of the Darboux transformation [Zhaqilao, et al., Chin. Phys; B 18 (2009) 1780], we carry out the initial value analysis of the previous system using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta's computational scheme. As a result, while depicting its phase portraits accordingly, we show that the above dispersionless system actually supports two kinds of solutions amongst which the localized traveling wave-guide channels. In addition, paying particular interests to such localized structures, we construct the bilinear transformation of the current system from which scattering amongst the above waves can be deeply studied.

  11. Second-order theory for coupling 2D numerical and physical wave tanks: Derivation, evaluation and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiwen; Liu, Shuxue; Bingham, Harry B.

    2013-01-01

    of regular waves, and the re-reflection control on the wave paddle is also not included. In order to validate the solution methodology further, a series of nonlinear, periodic waves based on stream function theory are generated in a physical wave tank using a piston-type wavemaker. These experiments show......A full second-order theory for coupling numerical and physical wave tanks is presented. The ad hoc unified wave generation approach developed by Zhang et al. [Zhang, H., Schäffer, H.A., Jakobsen, K.P., 2007. Deterministic combination of numerical and physical coastal wave models. Coast. Eng. 54...... nonlinear wave generation in the physical wave tank based on target numerical solutions. The performance and efficiency of the new model is first evaluated theoretically based on second order Stokes waves. Due to the complexity of the problem, the proposed method has been truncated at 2D and the treatment...

  12. Understanding the Potential of Aeroelastic Couplings to Stabilize Ground and Air Resonance in a Soft-Inplane Tiltrotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Anna K. T.

    1999-01-01

    The tiltrotor offers the best mix of hovering and cruise flight of any of the current V/STOL configurations. One possible improvement on the tiltrotors of today designs would be using a soft-inplane hingeless hub. The advantages to a soft-inplane hingeless hub range from reduced weight and maintenance to reduced vibration and loads. However, soft-inplane rotor systems are inherently in danger of the aeromechanical instabilities of ground and air resonance. Furthermore tiltrotors can be subject to whirl flutter. At least in part because of the potential for air and ground resonance in a soft-inplane rotor, the Bell XV-15, the Bell-Boeing V-22 Osprey, and the new Bell Augusta 609 have stiff-inplane, gimballed rotors which do not experience these instabilities. In order to design soft-inplane V/STOL aircraft that do not experience ground or air resonance, it is important to be able to predict these instabilities accurately. Much of the research studying the stability of tiltrotors has been focused on the understanding and prediction of whirl flutter. As this instability is increasingly well understood, air and ground resonance for a tiltrotor need to be investigated. Once we understand the problems of air and ground resonance in a tiltrotor, we must look for solutions to these instabilities. Other researchers have found composite or kinematic couplings in the blades of a helicopter helpful for ground and air resonance stability. Tiltrotor research has shown composite couplings in the wing to be helpful for whirl flutter. Therefore, this project will undertake to model ground and air resonance of a soft-inplane hingeless tiltrotor to understand the mechanisms involved and to evaluate whether aeroelastic couplings in the wing or kinematic couplings in the blades would aid in stabilizing these instabilities in a tiltrotor.

  13. Inducing rostrum interfacial waves by fluid-solid coupling in a Chinese river dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhongchang; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Chong; Wang, Xianyan

    2016-01-01

    Through numerically solving the appropriate wave equations, propagation of biosonar signals in a Chinese river dolphin (baiji) was studied. The interfacial waves along the rostrum-tissue interfaces, including both compressional (longitudinal) and shear (transverse) waves in the solid rostrum through fluid-solid coupling were examined. The baiji's rostrum was found to effect acoustic beam formation not only as an interfacial wave generator but also as a sound reflector. The wave propagation patterns in the solid rostrum were found to significantly change the wave movement through the bone. Vibrations in the rostrum, expressed in solid displacement, initially increased but eventually decreased from posterior to anterior sides, indicating a complex physical process. Furthermore, the comparisons among seven cases, including the combination of (1) the rostrum, melon, and air sacs; (2) rostrum-air sacs; (3) rostrum-melon; (4) only rostrum; (5) air sacs-melon; (6) only air sacs; and (7) only melon revealed that the cases including the rostrum were better able to approach the complete system by inducing rostrum-tissue interfacial waves and reducing the differences in main beam angle and -3 dB beam width. The interfacial waves in the rostrum were considered complementary with reflection to determine the obbligato role of the rostrum in the baiji's biosonar emission. The far-field beams formed from complete fluid-solid models and non-fluid-solid models were compared to reveal the effects brought by the consideration of shear waves of the solid structures of the baiji. The results may provide useful information for further understanding the role of the rostrum in this odontocete species.

  14. Perturbations of ground support alter posture and locomotion coupling during step initiation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mark W; Hilliard, Marjorie Johnson; Martinez, Katherine M; Zhang, Yunhui; Simuni, Tanya; Mille, Marie-Laure

    2011-02-01

    During the initiation of stepping, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) for lateral weight transfer and propulsion normally precede the onset of locomotion. In Parkinson's disease (PD), impaired step initiation typically involves altered APA ground force production with delayed step onset and deficits in stepping performance. If, as in stance and gait, sensory information about lower limb load is important for the control of stepping, then perturbations influencing loading conditions could affect the step initiation process. This study investigated the influence of changes in lower limb loading during step initiation in patients with PD and healthy control subjects. Participants performed rapid self-triggered step initiation with the impending single stance limb positioned over a pneumatically actuated platform. In perturbation trials, the stance limb ground support surface was either moved vertically downward (DROP) or upward (ELEVATE) by 1.5 cm shortly after the onset of the APA phase. Overall, PD patients demonstrated a longer APA duration, longer time to first step onset, and slower step speed than controls. In both groups, the DROP perturbation reinforced the intended APA kinetic changes for lateral weight transfer and resulted in a significant reduction in APA duration, increase in peak amplitude, and earlier time to first step onset compared with other conditions. During ELEVATE trials that opposed the intended weight transfer forces both groups rapidly adapted their stepping to preserve standing stability by decreasing step length and duration, and increasing step height and foot placement laterally. The findings suggested that sensory information associated with limb load and/or foot pressure modulates the spatial and temporal parameters of posture and locomotion components of step initiation in interaction with a centrally generated feedforward mode of neural control. Moreover, impaired step initiation in PD may at least acutely be enhanced by

  15. Optical gravitational wave detectors on the ground and in space: theory and technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Yves Vinet

    2010-01-01

    Major predictions of General Relativity, unforeseen at the beginning of the preceding century, are now under investigation. The existence of black holes of any mass from tens to billions of solar masses is now established, and the physics around these objects begins to be studied through direct observations in a wide electromagnetic spectrum from visible light to X-rays. General relativity, however, provides an extra medium which carries more information on the regions of intense gravitational field, namely gravitational waves (GWs). Due to their extremely weak coupling to matter, GWs are precisely generated in those regions of spacetime undergoing strong curvature, which is very exciting for modern astrophysics. On the other hand, this weak coupling makes it difficult for GWs to cause appreciable effects in human made instruments. This is why technology of GW detectors took such a long time to reach a sensitivity level consistent with GW amplitudes predicted by theoretical models of sources. In the present status, apart from resonant solid detectors, two large interferometric antennas (LIGO in the USA and the French-Italian Virgo) are beginning to produce data, and a joint ESA-NASA space mission, resulting from a wide effort of European and American groups, is reaching a crucial approval phase. The aim of the present review is to give the theoretical bases of GW detectors using light.

  16. Gravitational waves induced by massless vector fields with non-minimal coupling to gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Kaixi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate the contribution of the late time mode of a massless vector field to the power spectrum of the primordial gravitational wave using retarded Green's propagator. We consider a non-trivial coupling between gravity and the vector field. We find that the correction is scale-invariant and of order $\\frac{H^4}{M_P^4}$. The non-minimal coupling leads to a dependence of $\\frac{H^2}{M^2}$, which can amplify the correlation function up to the level of $\\frac{H^2}{M^2_P}$.

  17. Stimulated Brillouin scattering and Brillouin-coupled four-wave-mixing in a silica microbottle resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Asano, Motoki; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Ikuta, Rikizo; Yang, Lan; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We report the first observation of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) with Brillouin lasing, and Brillouin-coupled four-wave-mixing (FWM) in an ultra-high-Q silica microbottle resonator. The Brillouin lasing was observed at the frequency of $\\Omega_B=2\\pi\\times10.4$ GHz with a threshold power of $0.45$ mW. Coupling between Brillouin and FWM was observed in both backward and forward scattering directions with separations of $2\\Omega_B$. At a pump power of $10$ mW, FWM spacing reached to 7th and 9th order anti-Stokes and Stokes, respectively.

  18. Stimulated Brillouin scattering and Brillouin-coupled four-wave-mixing in a silica microbottle resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Motoki; Takeuchi, Yuki; Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya; Ikuta, Rikizo; Yang, Lan; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2016-05-30

    We report the first observation of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) with Brillouin lasing, and Brillouin-coupled four-wave-mixing (FWM) in an ultra-high-Q silica microbottle resonator. The Brillouin lasing was observed at the frequency of ΩB = 2π × 10.4 GHz with a threshold power of 0.45 mW. Coupling between Brillouin and FWM was observed in both backward and forward scattering directions with separations of 2ΩB. At a pump power of 10 mW, FWM spacing reached to 7th and 9th order anti-Stokes and Stokes, respectively.

  19. On asymptotic stability of solitary waves for Sch\\"odinger equation coupled to nonlinear oscillator, II

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, A I; Stuart, D

    2008-01-01

    The long-time asymptotics is analyzed for finite energy solutions of the 1D Schr\\"odinger equation coupled to a nonlinear oscillator; mathematically the system under study is a nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, whose nonlinear term includes a Dirac delta. The coupled system is invariant with respect to the phase rotation group U(1). This article, which extends the results of a previous one, provides a proof of asymptotic stability of solitary wave solutions in the case that the linearization contains a single discrete oscillatory mode satisfying a non-degeneracy assumption of the type known as the Fermi Golden Rule.

  20. Simulation of ultrasonic lamb wave generation, propagation and detection for a reconfigurable air coupled scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobie, Gordon; Spencer, Andrew; Burnham, Kenneth; Pierce, S Gareth; Worden, Keith; Galbraith, Walter; Hayward, Gordon

    2011-04-01

    A computer simulator, to facilitate the design and assessment of a reconfigurable, air-coupled ultrasonic scanner is described and evaluated. The specific scanning system comprises a team of remote sensing agents, in the form of miniature robotic platforms that can reposition non-contact Lamb wave transducers over a plate type of structure, for the purpose of non-destructive evaluation (NDE). The overall objective is to implement reconfigurable array scanning, where transmission and reception are facilitated by different sensing agents which can be organised in a variety of pulse-echo and pitch-catch configurations, with guided waves used to generate data in the form of 2-D and 3-D images. The ability to reconfigure the scanner adaptively requires an understanding of the ultrasonic wave generation, its propagation and interaction with potential defects and boundaries. Transducer behaviour has been simulated using a linear systems approximation, with wave propagation in the structure modelled using the local interaction simulation approach (LISA). Integration of the linear systems and LISA approaches are validated for use in Lamb wave scanning by comparison with both analytic techniques and more computationally intensive commercial finite element/difference codes. Starting with fundamental dispersion data, the paper goes on to describe the simulation of wave propagation and the subsequent interaction with artificial defects and plate boundaries, before presenting a theoretical image obtained from a team of sensing agents based on the current generation of sensors and instrumentation.

  1. Multiple and spin off initiation of atmospheric convectively coupled Kelvin waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Dariusz B.; Flatau, Maria K.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Schmidt, Jerome M.

    2017-02-01

    A novel atmospheric convectively coupled Kelvin wave trajectories database, derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation data, is used to investigate initiation of sequential Kelvin wave events. Based on the analysis of beginnings of trajectories from years 1998-2012 it is shown that sequential event initiations can be divided into two distinct categories: multiple initiations and spin off initiations, both of which involve interactions with ocean surface and upper ocean temperature variability. The results of composite analysis of the 83 multiple Kelvin wave initiations show that the local thermodynamic forcing related to the diurnal sea surface temperature variability is responsible for sequential Kelvin wave development. The composite analysis of 91 spin off Kelvin wave initiations shows that the dynamic forcing is a dominant effect and the local thermodynamic forcing is secondary. Detail case studies of both multiple and spin off initiations confirm statistical analysis. A multiple initiation occurs in the presence of the high upper ocean diurnal cycle and a spin off initiation results from both dynamic and local thermodynamic processes. The dynamic forcing is related to increased wind speed and latent heat flux likely associated with an off equatorial circulation. In addition a theoretical study of the sequential Kelvin waves is performed using a shallow water model. Finally, conceptual models of these two types of initiations are proposed.

  2. Coupled reservoir-geomechanical analysis of CO2 injection and ground deformations at In Salah, Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, J.; Vasco, D.W.; Myer, L.

    2009-11-01

    In Salah Gas Project in Algeria has been injecting 0.5-1 million tonnes CO{sub 2} per year over the past five years into a water-filled strata at a depth of about 1,800 to 1,900 m. Unlike most CO{sub 2} storage sites, the permeability of the storage formation is relatively low and comparatively thin with a thickness of about 20 m. To ensure adequate CO{sub 2} flow-rates across the low-permeability sand-face, the In Salah Gas Project decided to use long-reach (about 1 to 1.5 km) horizontal injection wells. In an ongoing research project we use field data and coupled reservoir-geomechanical numerical modeling to assess the effectiveness of this approach and to investigate monitoring techniques to evaluate the performance of a CO{sub 2}-injection operation in relatively low permeability formations. Among the field data used are ground surface deformations evaluated from recently acquired satellite-based inferrometry (InSAR). The InSAR data shows a surface uplift on the order of 5 mm per year above active CO{sub 2} injection wells and the uplift pattern extends several km from the injection wells. In this paper we use the observed surface uplift to constrain our coupled reservoir-geomechanical model and conduct sensitivity studies to investigate potential causes and mechanisms of the observed uplift. The results of our analysis indicates that most of the observed uplift magnitude can be explained by pressure-induced, poro-elastic expansion of the 20 m thick injection zone, but there could also be a significant contribution from pressure-induced deformations within a 100 m thick zone of shaly sands immediately above the injection zone.

  3. Traveling wave effect on the seismic response of a steel arch bridge subjected to near fault ground motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yan; George C Lee

    2007-01-01

    In the 1990s, several major earthquakes occurred throughout the world, with a common observation that near fault ground motion (NFGM) characteristics had a distinct impact on causing damage to civil engineering structures that could not be predicted by using far field ground motions. Since then, seismic responses of structures under NFGMs have been extensively examined, with most of the studies focusing on structures with relatively short fundamental periods, where the traveling wave effect does not need to be considered. However, for long span bridges, especially arch bridges, the traveling wave (only time delay considered) effect may be very distinct and is therefore important. In this paper, the results from a case study on the seismic response of a steel arch bridge under selected NFGMs is presented by considering the traveling wave effect with variable apparent velocities. The effects of fling step and long period pulses of NFGMs on the seismic responses of the arch bridge are also discussed.

  4. Phase linearity of the 914H coupled-cavity traveling wave tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Frank E.

    1994-01-01

    Tests of phase deviation from linearity were made on two 914H coupled-cavity traveling wave tubes (TWT). One tube had a voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) of 2.4 and the other 1.4. The data showed that phase deviation is primarily a function of the amplitude and shape of the output VSWR. It was predicted that the low-VSWR tube would give a better system performance than the tube with a high VSWR. This prediction was confirmed by the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) system tests performed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. A possible improvement in the construction and stability of coupled-cavity TWT's is discussed.

  5. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, P; Starinets, A O; Benincasa, Paolo; Buchel, Alex; Starinets, Andrei O.

    2005-01-01

    Using gauge theory/gravity duality we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. We compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of N=2^* supersymmetric SU(N_c) Yang-Mills plasma at a temperature much larger than the mass scale of the theory in the limit of large N_c and large 't Hooft coupling. The speed of sound is computed both from the equation of state and the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. Both computations lead to the same result. Bulk viscosity is determined by computing the attenuation constant of the sound wave mode.

  6. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benincasa, Paolo [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada); Buchel, Alex [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON N2J 2W9 (Canada); Starinets, Andrei O. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON N2J 2W9 (Canada)]. E-mail: starina@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2006-01-16

    Using gauge theory/gravity duality we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. We compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of N=2* supersymmetric SU(N{sub c}) Yang-Mills plasma at a temperature much larger than the mass scale of the theory in the limit of large N{sub c} and large 't Hooft coupling. The speed of sound is computed both from the equation of state and the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. Both computations lead to the same result. Bulk viscosity is determined by computing the attenuation constant of the sound wave mode.

  7. Vibrational Energy Flow Analysis of Corrected Flexural Waves in Timoshenko Beam – Part II: Application to Coupled Timoshenko Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Park

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the methodology for the energy flow analysis of coupled Timoshenko beam structures and various numerical applications to verify the developed methodology. To extend the application of the energy flow model for corrected flexural waves in the Timoshenko beam, which is developed in the other companion paper, to coupled structures, the wave transmission analyses of general coupled Timoshenko beam systems are performed. First, power transmission and reflection coefficients for all kinds of propagating waves in the general, coupled Timoshenko beam structures are derived by the wave transmission approach. In numerical applications, the energy flow solutions using the derived coefficients agree well with the classical solutions for various exciting frequencies, damping loss factors, and coupled Timoshenko beam structures. Additionally, the numerical results for the Timoshenko beam are compared with those for the Euler-Bernoulli beam.

  8. Modeling short wave radiation and ground surface temperature: a validation experiment in the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliotti, P.; Cremonese, E.; Dallamico, M.; Gruber, S.; Migliavacca, M.; Morra di Cella, U.

    2009-12-01

    Permafrost distribution in high-mountain areas is influenced by topography (micro-climate) and high variability of ground covers conditions. Its monitoring is very difficult due to logistical problems like accessibility, costs, weather conditions and reliability of instrumentation. For these reasons physically-based modeling of surface rock/ground temperatures (GST) is fundamental for the study of mountain permafrost dynamics. With this awareness a 1D version of GEOtop model (www.geotop.org) is tested in several high-mountain sites and its accuracy to reproduce GST and incoming short wave radiation (SWin) is evaluated using independent field measurements. In order to describe the influence of topography, both flat and near-vertical sites with different aspects are considered. Since the validation of SWin is difficult on steep rock faces (due to the lack of direct measures) and validation of GST is difficult on flat sites (due to the presence of snow) the two parameters are validated as independent experiments: SWin only on flat morphologies, GST only on the steep ones. The main purpose is to investigate the effect of: (i) distance between driving meteo station location and simulation point location, (ii) cloudiness, (iii) simulation point aspect, (iv) winter/summer period. The temporal duration of model runs is variable from 3 years for the SWin experiment to 8 years for the validation of GST. The model parameterization is constant and tuned for a common massive bedrock of crystalline rock like granite. Ground temperature profile is not initialized because rock temperature is measured at only 10cm depth. A set of 9 performance measures is used for comparing model predictions and observations (including: fractional mean bias (FB), coefficient of residual mass (CMR), mean absolute error (MAE), modelling efficiency (ME), coefficient of determination (R2)). Results are very encouraging. For both experiments the distance (Km) between location of the driving meteo

  9. Charge creation and nucleation of longitudinal plasma wave in coupled Josephson junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Hamdipour, M.

    2009-01-01

    We study the phase dynamics in coupled Josephson junctions describing by system of nonlinear differential equations. Results of detailed numerical simulations of charge creation in the superconducting layers and the longitudinal plasma wave (LPW) nucleation are presented. We demonstrate the different time stages in the development of the LPW and present results of FFT analysis at different values of bias current. The correspondence between the breakpoint position on the outermost branch of cu...

  10. The c-axis charge traveling wave in coupled system of Josephson junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Hamdipour, M.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a manifestation of the charge traveling wave along the c-axis (TW) in current voltage characteristics of coupled Josephson junctions in high-$T_c$ superconductors. The branches related to the TW with different wavelengths are found for the stacks with different number of Josephson junctions at different values of system's parameters. Transitions between the TW branches and the outermost branch are observed. Time dependence of the electric charge in the superconducting layers an...

  11. Singular solitons and other solutions to a couple of nonlinear wave equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mustafa Inc; Esma Uluta(s); Anjan Biswas

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the extended (G′/G)-expansion method and applies it to a couple of nonlinear wave equations.These equations are modified the Benjamin-Bona-Mahoney equation and the Boussinesq equation.This extended method reveals several solutions to these equations.Additionally,the singular soliton solutions are revealed,for these two equations,with the aid of the ansatz method.

  12. Wind waves modelling on the water body with coupled WRF and WAVEWATCH III models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Baydakov, Georgy; Vdovin, Maxim; Papko, Vladislav; Sergeev, Daniil

    2015-04-01

    Simulation of ocean and sea waves is an accepted instrument for the improvement of the weather forecasts. Wave modelling, coupled models modelling is applied to open seas [1] and is less developed for moderate and small inland water reservoirs and lakes, though being of considerable interest for inland navigation. Our goal is to tune the WAVEWATCH III model to the conditions of the inland reservoir and to carry out the simulations of surface wind waves with coupled WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) and WAVEWATCH III models. Gorky Reservoir, an artificial lake in the central part of the Volga River formed by a hydroelectric dam, was considered as an example of inland reservoir. Comparing to [2] where moderate constant winds (u10 is up to 9 m/s) of different directions blowing steadily all over the surface of the reservoir were considered, here we apply atmospheric model WRF to get wind input to WAVEWATCH III. WRF computations were held on the Yellowstone supercomputer for 4 nested domains with minimum scale of 1 km. WAVEWATCH III model was tuned for the conditions of the Gorky Reservoir. Satellite topographic data on altitudes ranged from 56,6° N to 57,5° N and from 42.9° E to 43.5° E with increments 0,00833 ° in both directions was used. 31 frequencies ranged from 0,2 Hz to 4 Hz and 30 directions were considered. The minimal significant wave height was changed to the lower one. The waves in the model were developing from some initial seeding spectral distribution (Gaussian in frequency and space, cosine in direction). The range of the observed significant wave height in the numerical experiment was from less than 1 cm up to 30 cm. The field experiments were carried out in the south part of the Gorky reservoir from the boat [2, 3]. 1-D spectra of the field experiment were compared with those obtained in the numerical experiments with different parameterizations of flux provided in WAVEWATCH III both with constant wind input and WRF wind input. For all the

  13. A Spectral Multiscale Method for Wave Propagation Analysis: Atomistic-Continuum Coupled Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, Amit K; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new multiscale method which is capable of coupling atomistic and continuum domains for high frequency wave propagation analysis. The problem of non-physical wave reflection, which occurs due to the change in system description across the interface between two scales, can be satisfactorily overcome by the proposed method. We propose an efficient spectral domain decomposition of the total fine scale displacement along with a potent macroscale equation in the Laplace domain to eliminate the spurious interfacial reflection. We use Laplace transform based spectral finite element method to model the macroscale, which provides the optimum approximations for required dynamic responses of the outer atoms of the simulated microscale region very accurately. This new method shows excellent agreement between the proposed multiscale model and the full molecular dynamics (MD) results. Numerical experiments of wave propagation in a 1D harmonic lattice, a 1D lattice with Lennard-Jones potential, a ...

  14. Observation of Quantum Beating from Two Coupled Parametric Six-Wave Mixing Signals in Rb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Chang-Jun; HE Jun-Fang; ZHAI Xue-Jun; XUE Bing

    2008-01-01

    Two processes of coupled difference-frequency axially phase-matched parametric six-wave mixing are carried out in Rb vapour by two-photon excitation using fs laser pulses, and parametric six-wave mixing signals in the infrared and near infrared regime are detected. The infrared parametric six-wave mixing signals are up-converted into the visible spectral range by sum-frequency mixing with the pump laser in a LiI03 crystal. Moreover, quantum beating at 608cm-1, corresponding to the 7s - 5d energy difference in Rb, is observed from the sum-frequency signal at 495 nm. As a result, we obtain modulated light signals in the visible, near infrared and infrared spectral ranges, and study the interference between 7s and 5d states of Rb.

  15. A laterally-coupled distributed feedback laser with equivalent quarter-wave phase shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingsi; Cheng, Julian

    2013-11-04

    We report the first laterally-coupled distributed feedback (LC-DFB) laser with a quarter-wave equivalent phase shift (EPS) realized by interference lithography (IL) and conventional photolithography. A specially designed sampled grating is fabricated on both sidewalls of a ridge waveguide to provide a quarter-wave EPS at the center of the cavity. The resulting laser exhibits stable single-mode lasing operation over a wide range of injection currents, with a side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 41.1 dB. This provides a practical, low-cost method to fabricate quarter-wave phase shifted DFB lasers with high performance without any epitaxial regrowth or the use of electron-beam lithography, thereby simplifying the fabrication of DFB lasers with stable and precise wavelengths, as single devices or as arrays in photonic integrated circuits.

  16. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik;

    2016-01-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere......-wave-coupled regional climate model, separately and combined. The swell influence on atmospheric mixing is introduced into the atmospheric mixing length formula by adding a swell-induced contribution to the mixing. The swell influence on the wind stress under wind-following swell, moderate-range wind, and near......-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress...

  17. Cosmological Gravitational Wave in a Gravity with Quadratic Order Curvature Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Noh, H

    1996-01-01

    We present a set of equations describing the cosmological gravitational wave in a gravity theory with quadratic order gravitational coupling terms which naturally arise in quantum correction procedures. It is known that the gravitational wave equation in the gravity theories with a general $f(R)$ term in the action leads to a second order differential equation with the only correction factor appearing in the damping term. The case for a $R^{ab} R_{ab}$ term is completely different. The gravitational wave is described by a fourth order differential equation both in time and space. However, curiously, we find that the contributions to the background evolution are qualitatively the same for both terms.

  18. Standing wave plasmon modes interact in an antenna-coupled nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jared; Large, Nicolas; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi

    2015-03-01

    In a standing wave optical cavity, the coupling of cavity modes, e.g. through a nonlinear medium, results in a rich variety of nonlinear dynamical phenomena, such as frequency pushing and pulling, mode-locking and pulsing, and modal instabilities. Metallic nanowires of finite length support a hierarchy of longitudinal surface plasmon modes with standing wave properties: the plasmonic analog of a Fabry-Pérot cavity. Here we show that positioning the nanowire within the gap of a plasmonic nanoantenna introduces a passive, hybridization-based coupling of the standing-wave nanowire plasmon modes with the antenna structure, mediating an interaction between the nanowire plasmon modes themselves. Frequency pushing and pulling, and the enhancement and suppression of specific plasmon modes, can be controlled and manipulated by nanoantenna position and shape. Dark-field spectroscopy, CL spectroscopy and imaging, and finite-difference time-domain calculations are performed to investigate these surface plasmon ``drift.'' Near-field coupling of nanoantennas to nanowire optical cavities shows that plasmon hybridization is a powerful strategy for controlling the radiative LDOS of nanowires, and could ultimately enable strategies for active control of emission properties in nanowire-based devices. Work funded by the Welch Foundation (C-1220, C-1222), the NSSEFF (N00244-09-1-0067), the ONR (N00014-10-1-0989), and the NSF (ECCS-1040478, CNS-0821727).

  19. Advanced Coupled Simulation of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Systems and Above Ground Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Bastian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel O.; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage in borehole heat exchanger arrays is a promising technology to reduce primary energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. These systems usually consist of several subsystems like the heat source (e.g. solarthermics or a combined heat and power plant), the heat consumer (e.g. a heating system), diurnal storages (i.e. water tanks), the borehole thermal energy storage, additional heat sources for peak load coverage (e.g. a heat pump or a gas boiler) and the distribution network. For the design of an integrated system, numerical simulations of all subsystems are imperative. A separate simulation of the borehole energy storage is well-established but represents a simplification. In reality, the subsystems interact with each other. The fluid temperatures of the heat generation system, the heating system and the underground storage are interdependent and affect the performance of each subsystem. To take into account these interdependencies, we coupled a software for the simulation of the above ground facilities with a finite element software for the modeling of the heat flow in the subsurface and the borehole heat exchangers. This allows for a more realistic view on the entire system. Consequently, a finer adjustment of the system components and a more precise prognosis of the system's performance can be ensured.

  20. Riccati-coupled similarity shock wave solutions for multispeed discrete Boltzmann models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornille, H. (Service de Physique Theorique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Platkowski, T. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland))

    1993-05-01

    The authors study nonstandard shock wave similarity solutions for three multispeed discrete boltzmann models: (1) the square 8[upsilon][sub i] model with speeds 1 and [radical]2 with the x axis along one median, (2) the Cabannes cubic 14[upsilon][sub i] model with speeds 1 and [radical]3 and the x axis perpendicular to one face, and (3) another 14[upsilon][sub i] model with speeds 1 and [radical]2. These models have five independent densities and two nonlinear Riccati-coupled equations. The standard similarity shock waves, solutions of scalar Riccati equations, are monotonic and the same behavior holds for the conservative macroscopic quantities. First, the exact similarity shock-wave solutions of coupled Riccati equations are determined and the nonmonotonic behavior for one density and a smaller effect for one conservative macroscopic quantity are observed when a violation of the microreversibility is allowed. Second, new results are obtained on the Whitham weak shock wave propagation. Third, the corresponding dynamical system is numerically solved, with microreversibility satisfied or not, and the analogous nonmonotonic behavior is observed. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Interactions of localized wave structures and dynamics in the defocusing coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Yan, Zhenya; Wen, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Yong

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the defocusing coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations from a 3 ×3 Lax pair. The Darboux transformations with the nonzero plane-wave solutions are presented to derive the newly localized wave solutions including dark-dark and bright-dark solitons, breather-breather solutions, and different types of new vector rogue wave solutions, as well as interactions between distinct types of localized wave solutions. Moreover, we analyze these solutions by means of parameters modulation. Finally, the perturbed wave propagations of some obtained solutions are explored by means of systematic simulations, which demonstrates that nearly stable and strongly unstable solutions. Our research results could constitute a significant contribution to explore the distinct nonlinear waves (e.g., dark solitons, breather solutions, and rogue wave solutions) dynamics of the coupled system in related fields such as nonlinear optics, plasma physics, oceanography, and Bose-Einstein condensates.

  2. Satellite and Ground Signatures of Kinetic and Inertial Scale ULF Alfven Waves Propagating in Warm Plasma in Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, R.; Sydorenko, D.

    2015-12-01

    Results from a 3D global numerical model of Alfven wave propagation in a warm multi-species plasma in Earth's magnetosphere are presented. The model uses spherical coordinates, accounts for a non-dipole magnetic field, vertical structure of the ionosphere, and an air gap below the ionosphere. A realistic density model is used. Below the exobase altitude (2000 km) the densities and the temperatures of electrons, ions, and neutrals are obtained from the IRI and MSIS models. Above the exobase, ballistic (originating from the ionosphere and returning to ionosphere) and trapped (bouncing between two reflection points above the ionosphere) electron populations are considered similar to [Pierrard and Stegen (2008), JGR, v.113, A10209]. Plasma parameters at the exobase provided by the IRI are the boundary conditions for the ballistic electrons while the [Carpenter and Anderson (1992), JGR, v.97, p.1097] model of equatorial electron density defines parameters of the trapped electron population. In the simulations that are presented, Alfven waves with frequencies from 1 Hz to 0.01 Hz and finite azimuthal wavenumbers are excited in the magnetosphere and compared with Van Allen Probes data and ground-based observations from the CARISMA array of ground magnetometers. When short perpendicular scale waves reflect form the ionosphere, compressional Alfven waves are observed to propagate across the geomagnetic field in the ionospheric waveguide [e.g., Lysak (1999), JGR, v.104, p.10017]. Signals produced by the waves on the ground are discussed. The wave model is also applied to interpret recent Van Allen Probes observations of kinetic scale ULF waves that are associated with radiation belt electron dynamics and energetic particle injections.

  3. Bond-order wave phase of the extended Hubbard model: Electronic solitons, paramagnetism, and coupling to Peierls and Holstein phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoranjan; Soos, Zoltán G.

    2010-10-01

    The bond-order wave (BOW) phase of the extended Hubbard model (EHM) in one dimension (1D) is characterized at intermediate correlation U=4t by exact treatment of N -site systems. Linear coupling to lattice (Peierls) phonons and molecular (Holstein) vibrations are treated in the adiabatic approximation. The molar magnetic susceptibility χM(T) is obtained directly up to N=10 . The goal is to find the consequences of a doubly degenerate ground state (gs) and finite magnetic gap Em in a regular array. Degenerate gs with broken inversion symmetry are constructed for finite N for a range of V near the charge-density-wave boundary at V≈2.18t where Em≈0.5t is large. The electronic amplitude B(V) of the BOW in the regular array is shown to mimic a tight-binding band with small effective dimerization δeff . Electronic spin and charge solitons are elementary excitations of the BOW phase and also resemble topological solitons with small δeff . Strong infrared intensity of coupled molecular vibrations in dimerized 1D systems is shown to extend to the regular BOW phase while its temperature dependence is related to spin solitons. The Peierls instability to dimerization has novel aspects for degenerate gs and substantial Em that suppresses thermal excitations. Finite Em implies exponentially small χM(T) at low temperature followed by an almost linear increase with T . The EHM with U=4t is representative of intermediate correlations in quasi-1D systems such as conjugated polymers or organic ion-radical and charge-transfer salts. The vibronic and thermal properties of correlated models with BOW phases are needed to identify possible physical realizations.

  4. gprMax: Open source software to simulate electromagnetic wave propagation for Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Craig; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Giannakis, Iraklis

    2016-12-01

    gprMax is open source software that simulates electromagnetic wave propagation, using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method, for the numerical modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). gprMax was originally developed in 1996 when numerical modelling using the FDTD method and, in general, the numerical modelling of GPR were in their infancy. Current computing resources offer the opportunity to build detailed and complex FDTD models of GPR to an extent that was not previously possible. To enable these types of simulations to be more easily realised, and also to facilitate the addition of more advanced features, gprMax has been redeveloped and significantly modernised. The original C-based code has been completely rewritten using a combination of Python and Cython programming languages. Standard and robust file formats have been chosen for geometry and field output files. New advanced modelling features have been added including: an unsplit implementation of higher order Perfectly Matched Layers (PMLs) using a recursive integration approach; diagonally anisotropic materials; dispersive media using multi-pole Debye, Drude or Lorenz expressions; soil modelling using a semi-empirical formulation for dielectric properties and fractals for geometric characteristics; rough surface generation; and the ability to embed complex transducers and targets.

  5. Convergence of the partial wave expansion of the He ground state

    CERN Document Server

    Bromley, M W J

    2006-01-01

    The Configuration Interaction (CI) method using a very large Laguerre orbital basis is applied to the calculation of the He ground state. A minimum of 35 radial orbitals for each partial wave ranging from 0 to 12 are included resulting in a basis with a total of 465 orbitals. The convergence of the energy and electron-electron $\\delta$-function with respect to J (the maximum angular momenta of the orbitals included in the CI expansion) are investigated in detail. It is seen that the convergence properties of some previous very large calculations show irregularities. The J to infinity limit of the energy was obtained by fitting to expansions of the type Delta E_J = A_E/(J+1/2)^4 + B_E/(J+1/2)^5 + ..., giving an energy about 10^-7 hartree from the exact energy. Convergence issues caused problems when trying to determine the J to infinity limit of using a similar asymptotic expansion and the biggest calculations achieved accuracies between 0.2 and 0.5%.

  6. Low Frequency Gravitational Wave Detection With Ground Based Atom Interferometer Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Chaibi, W; Canuel, B; Bertoldi, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below few Hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows to reduce the Newtonian Noise (NN) which limits all ground based GW detectors below few Hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of factor 2 could be achieved, and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a 10-fold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below $1\\times 10^{-19}/ \\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ in the $ 0.3-3 \\ \\text{Hz}$ frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity o...

  7. Wave packet and statistical quantum calculations for the He + NeH{sup +} → HeH{sup +} + Ne reaction on the ground electronic state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koner, Debasish; Panda, Aditya N., E-mail: adi07@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Barrios, Lizandra; González-Lezana, Tomás, E-mail: t.gonzalez.lezana@csic.es [Instituto de Física Fundamental, C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2014-09-21

    A real wave packet based time-dependent method and a statistical quantum method have been used to study the He + NeH{sup +} (v, j) reaction with the reactant in various ro-vibrational states, on a recently calculated ab initio ground state potential energy surface. Both the wave packet and statistical quantum calculations were carried out within the centrifugal sudden approximation as well as using the exact Hamiltonian. Quantum reaction probabilities exhibit dense oscillatory pattern for smaller total angular momentum values, which is a signature of resonances in a complex forming mechanism for the title reaction. Significant differences, found between exact and approximate quantum reaction cross sections, highlight the importance of inclusion of Coriolis coupling in the calculations. Statistical results are in fairly good agreement with the exact quantum results, for ground ro-vibrational states of the reactant. Vibrational excitation greatly enhances the reaction cross sections, whereas rotational excitation has relatively small effect on the reaction. The nature of the reaction cross section curves is dependent on the initial vibrational state of the reactant and is typical of a late barrier type potential energy profile.

  8. Tackling excess noise from bilinear and nonlinear couplings in gravitational-wave interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Sukanta; Mazumder, Nairwita; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Gupta, Anuradha; Lundgren, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We describe a tool we improved to detect excess noise in the gravitational wave (GW) channel arising from its bilinear or nonlinear coupling with fluctuations of various components of a GW interferometer and its environment. We also describe a higher-order statistics tool we developed to characterize these couplings, e.g., by unraveling the frequencies of the fluctuations contributing to such noise, and demonstrate its utility by applying it to understand nonlinear couplings in Advanced LIGO engineering data. Once such noise is detected, it is highly desirable to remove it or correct for it. Such action in the past has been shown to improve the sensitivity of the instrument in searches of astrophysical signals. If this is not possible, then steps must be taken to mitigate its influence, e.g., by characterizing its effect on astrophysical searches. We illustrate this through a study of the effect of transient sine-Gaussian noise artifacts on a compact binary coalescence template bank.

  9. Decay of density waves in coupled one-dimensional many-body-localized systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prelovšek, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This work analyzes the behavior of coupled disordered one-dimensional systems as modelled by identical fermionic Hubbard chains with the on-site potential disorder and coupling emerging through the interchain hopping t'. The study is motivated by the experiment on fermionic cold atoms on a disordered lattice, where a decay rate of the quenched density wave was measured. We present a derivation of the decay rate Γ within perturbation theory and show that, even at large disorder along the chains, the interaction leads to finite Γ >0 , the mechanism being the interaction-induced coupling of in-chain localized and interchain extended single-fermion states. Explicit expressions for Γ are presented for a weak interaction U U >t' . It is shown that, in both regimes, Γ increases with the interchain hopping t', as well as decreases with increasing disorder.

  10. Random noise de-noising and direct wave eliminating based on SVD method for ground penetrating radar signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cai; Song, Chao; Lu, Qi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present a method using singular value decomposition (SVD) which aims at eliminating the random noise and direct wave from ground penetrating radar (GPR) signals. To demonstrate the validity and high efficiency of the SVD method in eliminating random noise, we compare the SVD de-noising method with wavelet threshold de-noising method and bandpass filtering method on both noisy synthetic data and field data. After that, we compare the SVD method with the mean trace deleting in eliminating direct wave on synthetic data and field data. We set general and quantitative criteria on choosing singular values to carry out the random noise de-noising and direct wave eliminating process. We find that by choosing appropriate singular values, SVD method can eliminate the random noise and direct wave in the GPR data validly and efficiently to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the GPR profiles and make effective reflection signals clearer.

  11. The Nonlinear Coupling of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Waves in the Ring Current Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2004-01-01

    The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space, and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. In this paper we present the morphology, dynamics, and level of LHW activity generated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves during the May 2-7, 1998 storm period on the global scale. The LHWs were calculated based on a newly developed self-consistent model (Khazanov et. al., 2002, 2003) that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes the evolution of EMIC waves. It is found that the LHWs are excited by helium ions due to their mass dependent drift in the electric field of EMIC waves. The level of LHW activity is calculated assuming that the induced scattering process is the main saturation mechanism for these waves. The calculated LHWs electric fields are consistent with the observational data.

  12. Spin waves in exchange-coupled double layers in the presence of spin torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baláž, Pavel; Barnaś, Józef

    2015-03-01

    Spin-wave spectra of a double magnetic layer are calculated theoretically in the macroscopic limit. Magnetic dynamics is described in terms of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, and both static (of the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida type) and dynamic (via spin pumping) interlayer couplings are taken into account. The influence of spin pumping and spin transfer torque on the spin-wave spectra (frequency and damping factor) has been studied for both parallel and antiparallel magnetic configurations. The spin-wave spectrum in the parallel magnetic state is reciprocal, while in the antiparallel configuration it is nonreciprocal. In both cases, a substantial reduction of the spin-wave lifetimes due to spin pumping to the nonmagnetic metallic layers has been found. In the parallel configuration, this reduction appears mainly for optical modes, while in the antiparallel configuration, it is remarkable for all modes. In turn, the spin torque due to spin current flowing from a metallic layer, created for instance by the spin Hall effect, gives rise to significant changes in the damping factors as well, but these modifications depend on the sign of spin current. For one spin current orientation, the spin-wave damping becomes reduced and may disappear for some modes at a specific threshold value of the spin current, indicating magnetic instability in the system due to spin transfer torque. For the opposite spin current, the damping is enhanced, which indicates stabilization of the corresponding magnetic state.

  13. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik; Guo Larsén, Xiaoli

    2016-07-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere-wave-coupled regional climate model, separately and combined. The swell influence on atmospheric mixing is introduced into the atmospheric mixing length formula by adding a swell-induced contribution to the mixing. The swell influence on the wind stress under wind-following swell, moderate-range wind, and near-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress reduces the near-surface wind speed. Introducing the wave influence roughness length has a larger influence than does adding the swell influence on mixing. Compared with measurements, adding the swell influence on both atmospheric mixing and wind stress gives the best model performance for the wind speed. The influence varies with wave characteristics for different sea basins. Swell occurs infrequently in the studied area, and one could expect more influence in high-swell-frequency areas (i.e., low-latitude ocean). We conclude that the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress should be considered when developing climate models.

  14. Modeling of Breaching Due to Overtopping Flow and Waves Based on Coupled Flow and Sediment Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo He

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Breaching of earthen or sandy dams/dunes by overtopping flow and waves is a complicated process with strong, unsteady flow, high sediment transport, and rapid bed changes in which the interactions between flow and morphology should not be ignored. This study presents a depth-averaged two-dimensional (2D coupled flow and sediment transport model to investigate the flow and breaching processes with and without waves. Bed change and variable flow density are included in the flow continuity and momentum equations to consider the impacts of sediment transport. The model adopts the non-equilibrium approach for total-load sediment transport and specifies different repose angles to handle non-cohesive embankment slope avalanching. The equations are solved using an explicit finite volume method on a rectangular grid with the improved Godunov-type central upwind scheme and the nonnegative reconstruction of the water depth method to handle mixed-regime flows near the breach. The model has been tested against two sets of experimental data which show that it well simulates the flow characteristics, bed changes, and sediment transport. It is then applied to analyze flow and morphologic changes by overtopping flow with and without waves. The simulated bed change and breach cross-section shape show a significant difference if waves are considered. Erosion by flow without waves mainly occurs at the breach and is dominated by vertical erosion at the initial stage followed by the lateral erosion. With waves, the flow overtops the entire length of the dune to cause faster erosion along the entire length. Erosion mainly takes place at the upper layer at the initial stage and gradually accelerates as the height of the dune reduces and flow discharge increases, which indicates the simulated results with waves shall be further verified by physical experimental evidence.

  15. THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION STRESS ON WAVE HEIGHTS AND SEA LEVEL IN THE INTERACTION OF COUPLED WAVE-TIDE-SURGE IN THE COASTAL AREA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Based on coastal high-resolution (2′×2′) coupled wave-tide-surge interaction numerical model, the effects of radiation stress on wave heights and sea level in the coastal area of Huanghe Delta were studied. By comparisons of simulated and measured wave heights and sea level for two mediately strong weather cases, it is demonstrated that the results simulated by coupled wave-tide-surge model are closer to the measured and particularly in excellent agreement in the extreme values of the wave heights and set-up. This study shows that the radiation stress can increase the wave heights maximally to 67cm and sea level to 40cm. It is also found that there are areas of over 50cm wave height increase and an area of over 20cm sea level increase in the Huanghe Delta coastal area, and this find may be very important in engineering. For this reason, it is suggested that in the practical engineering application, the coupled wave-tide-surge interaction numerical model should be prefered.

  16. An operational coupled wave-current forecasting system for the northern Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, A.; Coluccelli, A.; Deserti, M.; Valentini, A.; Benetazzo, A.; Carniel, S.

    2012-04-01

    Since 2005 an Adriatic implementation of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (AdriaROMS) is being producing operational short-term forecasts (72 hours) of some hydrodynamic properties (currents, sea level, temperature, salinity) of the Adriatic Sea at 2 km horizontal resolution and 20 vertical s-levels, on a daily basis. The main objective of AdriaROMS, which is managed by the Hydro-Meteo-Clima Service (SIMC) of ARPA Emilia Romagna, is to provide useful products for civil protection purposes (sea level forecasts, outputs to run other forecasting models as for saline wedge, oil spills and coastal erosion). In order to improve the forecasts in the coastal area, where most of the attention is focused, a higher resolution model (0.5 km, again with 20 vertical s-levels) has been implemented for the northern Adriatic domain. The new implementation is based on the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System (COAWST)and adopts ROMS for the hydrodynamic and Simulating WAve Nearshore (SWAN) for the wave module, respectively. Air-sea fluxes are computed using forecasts produced by the COSMO-I7 operational atmospheric model. At the open boundary of the high resolution model, temperature, salinity and velocity fields are provided by AdriaROMS while the wave characteristics are provided by an operational SWAN implementation (also managed by SIMC). Main tidal components are imposed as well, derived from a tidal model. Work in progress is oriented now on the validation of model results by means of extensive comparisons with acquired hydrographic measurements (such as CTDs or XBTs from sea-truth campaigns), currents and waves acquired at observational sites (including those of SIMC, CNR-ISMAR network and its oceanographic tower, located off the Venice littoral) and satellite-derived wave-heights data. Preliminary results on the forecast waves denote how, especially during intense storms, the effect of coupling can lead to significant variations in the wave

  17. Coupling of ground biosensor networks for water monitoring with satellite observations in assessing Leptospirosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouloudis, A. N.; Rickerby, D. G.

    2012-12-01

    Leptospirosis became recently a major public-health problem that is closely related with the environment (Nature review Oct 2009, Vol 7, pp 736-747). This disease originates from zoonotic pathogens associated with asymptomatic rodent carriers. Unfortunately, it effects human populations via various direct and indirect routes. This disease can claim many victims with large outbreaks during natural disasters or floods occurring during seasonal conditions. The severity of the illness ranges from subclinical infection to a fulminating fatal disease. Improved water quality monitoring techniques based on biosensor, optical, micro-fluidic and information technologies are leading to radical changes in our ability to perceive and monitor the aquatic environment. Biosensors are capable of providing specific, high spatial resolution information and allow unattended operation that will be particularly useful for water borne related diseases. Current research on biosensors is leading to solutions to problems for several contaminants that were previously irresolvable due to their high degree of complexity. Networking of the sensors enables sensitive monitoring systems allowing real-time monitoring of pollutants and facilitates data transmission between the measurement points and central control stations for continuous surveillance and to provide an early warning capability. The application of intelligent biosensor networks for water quality monitoring and detection of localized sources of pollution are discussed together with the setting up of a methodology that utilizes images from satellite coupled with in-situ sensors for anticipating the zones of potential evolution of this disease and assessing the population at risk. Environmental and climatic conditions that are associated the outbreaks are described and the rational of combining earth observations coupled with advanced in-situ biosensors is explained. The implementation of sensor networks for data collection and exposure

  18. Propagation of SH waves in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate: Effects of interfacial imperfection couplings and the related physical mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Hong-Xing [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Li, Yong-Dong, E-mail: LYDbeijing@163.com [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Academy of Armored Force Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China); Xiong, Tao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Academy of Armored Force Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China); Guan, Yong [Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Imaging Technology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China)

    2016-09-07

    The problem of dispersive SH wave in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate that contains an imperfect interface is considered in the present work. An imperfection coupling model is adopted to describe the magnetic, electric and mechanical imperfections on the interface. A transcendental dispersion equation is derived and numerically solved to get the phase velocity. The validity of the numerical procedure is verified in a degenerated case. The effects of the coupled interfacial imperfections on the dispersion behavior of SH waves are discussed in detail and the related underlying physical mechanisms are explained. - Highlights: • SH-wave is investigated in a multiferroic plate with coupled interfacial imperfections. • SH-wave is affected by both interfacial imperfections and their inter-couplings. • Physical mechanisms of the effects are explained via energy transformations.

  19. Surface roughening of ground fused silica processed by atmospheric inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Qiang; Li, Na; Wang, Jun; Wang, Bo, E-mail: bradywang@hit.edu.cn; Li, Guo; Ding, Fei; Jin, Huiliang

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • The morphology evolution of ground fused silica, processed by atmospheric plasma, was investigated experimentally. • The roughness development results from opening and coalescing of the plasma-etched cracks. • The shapes of grain-like etched pits are the results of the adjacent cracks coalescing with one another. • The descent of the pits density is due to some smaller etched pits that are swallowed up by larger pits. • Leading role in surface smoothing is laterally etching away the side walls of the intersecting pits. - Abstract: Subsurface damage (SSD) is a defect that is inevitably induced during mechanical processes, such as grinding and polishing. This defect dramatically reduces the mechanical strength and the laser damage thresholds of optical elements. Compared with traditional mechanical machining, atmospheric pressure plasma processing (APPP) is a relatively novel technology that induces almost no SSD during the processing of silica-based optical materials. In this paper, a form of APPP, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), is used to process fused silica substrates with fluorocarbon precursor under atmospheric pressure. The surface morphology evolution of ICP-processed substrates was observed and characterized by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the roughness evolves with the etching depth, and the roughness evolution is a single-peaked curve. This curve results from the opening and the coalescing of surface cracks and fractures. The coalescence procedure of these microstructures was simulated with two common etched pits on a polished fused silica surface. Understanding the roughness evolution of plasma-processed surface might be helpful in optimizing the optical fabrication chain that contains APPP.

  20. $P$-wave coupled channel effects in electron-positron annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Meng-Lin; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    $P$-wave coupled channel effects arising from the $D\\bar{D}$, $D\\bar{D}^*+c.c.$ and $D^*\\bar{D}^*$ thresholds in $e^+e^-$ annihilations are systematically studied. We provide an exploratory study by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation with short-ranged contact potentials obtained in the heavy quark limit. These contact potentials can be extracted from the $P$-wave interactions in the $e^+e^-$ annihilations, and then be employed to investigate possible isosinglet $P$-wave hadronic molecules. In particular, such an investigation may provide information about exotic candidates with quantum numbers $J^{PC}=1^{-+}$. In the mass region of the $D\\bar{D}$, $D\\bar{D}^*+c.c.$ and $D^*\\bar{D}^*$ thresholds, there are two quark model bare states, i.e. the $\\psi(3770)$ and $\\psi(4040)$, which are assigned as $(1^3D_1)$ and $(3^1S_1)$ states, respectively. By an overall fit of the cross sections of $e^+e^-\\to D\\bar{D}$, $D\\bar{D}^*+c.c.$, $D^*\\bar{D}^*$, we determine the physical coupling constants to each channel and ...

  1. The effects of air gap reflections during air-coupled leaky Lamb wave inspection of thin plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zichuan; Jiang, Wentao; Cai, Maolin; Wright, William M D

    2016-02-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic inspection using leaky Lamb waves offers attractive possibilities for non-contact testing of plate materials and structures. A common method uses an air-coupled pitch-catch configuration, which comprises a transmitter and a receiver positioned at oblique angles to a thin plate. It is well known that the angle of incidence of the ultrasonic bulk wave in the air can be used to preferentially generate specific Lamb wave modes in the plate in a non-contact manner, depending on the plate dimensions and material properties. Multiple reflections of the ultrasonic waves in the air gap between the transmitter and the plate can produce additional delayed waves entering the plate at angles of incidence that are different to those of the original bulk wave source. Similarly, multiple reflections of the leaky Lamb waves in the air gap between the plate and an inclined receiver may then have different angles of incidence and propagation delays when arriving at the receiver and hence the signal analysis may become complex, potentially leading to confusion in the identification of the wave modes. To obtain a better understanding of the generation, propagation and detection of leaky Lamb waves and the effects of reflected waves within the air gaps, a multiphysics model using finite element methods was established. This model facilitated the visualisation of the propagation of the reflected waves between the transducers and the plate, the subsequent generation of additional Lamb wave signals within the plate itself, their leakage into the adjacent air, and the reflections of the leaky waves in the air gap between the plate and receiver. Multiple simulations were performed to evaluate the propagation and reflection of signals produced at different transducer incidence angles. Experimental measurements in air were in good agreement with simulation, which verified that the multiphysics model can provide a convenient and accurate way to interpret the signals in

  2. The study of single station inverting the sea surface current by HF ground wave radar based on adjoint assimilation technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuzong; Yang, Hua; Xue, Wenhu; Wang, Xingchi

    2017-06-01

    This paper introduces the assimilation technology in an ocean dynamics model and discusses the feasibility of inverting the sea surface current in the detection zone by assimilating the sea current radial velocity detected by single station HF ground wave radar in ocean dynamics model. Based on the adjoint assimilation and POM model, the paper successfully inverts the sea surface current through single station HF ground wave radar in the Zhoushan sea area. The single station HF radar inversion results are also compared with the bistatic HF radar composite results and the fixed point measured results by Annderaa current meter. The error analysis shows that acquisition of flow velocity and flow direction data from the single station HF radar based on adjoint assimilation and POM model is viable and the data obtained have a high correlation and consistency with the flow field observed by HF radar.

  3. Analytic Expansion for Ground-State Wavefunction of Time-Dependent Strong-Coupling SchrSdinger Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈媚; 谢琼涛

    2011-01-01

    The new method proposed recently by Friedberg, Lee, and Zhao is extended to obtain an analytic expansion for the ground-state wavefunction of a time-dependent strong-coupling Schroedinger equation. Two different types of the time-dependent harmonic oscillators are considered as examples for application of the time-dependent expansion. It is show that the time-dependent strong-coupling expansion is applicable to the time-dependent harmonic oscillators with a slowly varying time-dependent parameter.

  4. Ground-State Analysis for an Exactly Solvable Coupled-Spin Hamiltonian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mattei

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a Hamiltonian for two interacting su(2 spins. We use a mean-field analysis and exact Bethe ansatz results to investigate the ground-state properties of the system in the classical limit, defined as the limit of infinite spin (or highest weight. Complementary insights are provided through investigation of the energy gap, ground-state fidelity, and ground-state entanglement, which are numerically computed for particular parameter values. Despite the simplicity of the model, a rich array of ground-state features are uncovered. Finally, we discuss how this model may be seen as an analogue of the exactly solvable p+ip pairing Hamiltonian.

  5. Surface Wave Effects in the NEMO Ocean Model: Forced and Coupled Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Balmaseda, Magdalena Alonso; Janssen, Peter A E M

    2015-01-01

    The NEMO general circulation ocean model is extended to incorporate three physical processes related to ocean surface waves, namely the surface stress (modified by growth and dissipation of the oceanic wave field), the turbulent kinetic energy flux from breaking waves, and the Stokes-Coriolis force. Experiments are done with NEMO in ocean-only (forced) mode and coupled to the ECMWF atmospheric and wave models. Ocean-only integrations are forced with fields from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. All three effects are noticeable in the extra-tropics, but the sea-state dependent turbulent kinetic energy flux yields by far the largest difference. This is partly because the control run has too vigorous deep mixing due to an empirical mixing term in NEMO. We investigate the relation between this ad hoc mixing and Langmuir turbulence and find that it is much more effective than the Langmuir parameterization used in NEMO. The biases in sea surface temperature as well as subsurface temperature are reduced, and the total oce...

  6. Adjustment of Born-Oppenheimer electronic wave functions to simplify close coupling calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenker, Robert J; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Zhang, Yu; Wu, Yong; Yan, Lingling; Liu, Chunhua; Qu, Yizhi; Wang, Jianguo

    2013-04-30

    Technical problems connected with use of the Born-Oppenheimer clamped-nuclei approximation to generate electronic wave functions, potential energy surfaces (PES), and associated properties are discussed. A computational procedure for adjusting the phases of the wave functions, as well as their order when potential crossings occur, is presented which is based on the calculation of overlaps between sets of molecular orbitals and configuration interaction eigenfunctions obtained at neighboring nuclear conformations. This approach has significant advantages for theoretical treatments describing atomic collisions and photo-dissociation processes by means of ab initio PES, electronic transition moments, and nonadiabatic radial and rotational coupling matrix elements. It ensures that the electronic wave functions are continuous over the entire range of nuclear conformations considered, thereby greatly simplifying the process of obtaining the above quantities from the results of single-point Born-Oppenheimer calculations. The overlap results are also used to define a diabatic transformation of the wave functions obtained for conical intersections that greatly simplifies the computation of off-diagonal matrix elements by eliminating the need for complex phase factors.

  7. Evaluation of Simulated Marine Aerosol Production Using the WaveWatchIII Prognostic Wave Model Coupled to the Community Atmosphere Model within the Community Earth System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, M. S. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Keene, William C. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Zhang, J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Reichl, B. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Shi, Y. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Hara, T. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Reid, J. S. [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Monterey, CA (United States); Fox-Kemper, B. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences; Craig, A. P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Erickson, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Division; Ginis, I. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Webb, A. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Ocean Technology, Policy, and Environment

    2016-11-08

    Primary marine aerosol (PMA) is emitted into the atmosphere via breaking wind waves on the ocean surface. Most parameterizations of PMA emissions use 10-meter wind speed as a proxy for wave action. This investigation coupled the 3rd generation prognostic WAVEWATCH-III wind-wave model within a coupled Earth system model (ESM) to drive PMA production using wave energy dissipation rate – analogous to whitecapping – in place of 10-meter wind speed. The wind speed parameterization did not capture basin-scale variability in relations between wind and wave fields. Overall, the wave parameterization did not improve comparison between simulated versus measured AOD or Na+, thus highlighting large remaining uncertainties in model physics. Results confirm the efficacy of prognostic wind-wave models for air-sea exchange studies coupled with laboratory- and field-based characterizations of the primary physical drivers of PMA production. No discernible correlations were evident between simulated PMA fields and observed chlorophyll or sea surface temperature.

  8. Evanescent Wave Coupling Using Different Subwavelength Gratings for a MEMS Accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Al-Aakhir A.

    2011-12-01

    A novel technique of coupling near-field evanescent waves by means of variable period subwavelength gratings (1.2 mum and 1.0 mum), using a 1.55 mum infrared semiconductor laser is presented for the use of an optical MEMS accelerometer. The subwavelength gratings were fabricated on both glass and silicon substrates respectively. Optical simulation of the subwavelength gratings was carried out to obtain the maximum coupling efficiency of the two subwavelength gratings; the grating thickness, grating width, and the grating separation were optimized. This was performed for both silicon and glass substrates. The simulations were used to determine the total system noise, including the noise generated from the germanium photodiode, sensitivity, and displacement detection resolution of the coupled subwavelength grating MEMS accelerometer. The coupled gratings were utilized as optical readout accelerometers. The spring/proof mass silicon accelerometer was fabricated using a four mask process, in which the structure was completed using two deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) processes. The designed serpentine spring styles determine the sensitivity of the accelerometer; when the springs are made longer or shorter, thicker or thinner, this directly attributes to the sensitivity of the device. To test function of the example of the devices, the accelerometer is placed on a platform, which permits displacement normal to the plane of the grating. The 1.550 im infrared laser is incident on the coupled subwavelength grating accelerometer device and the output intensity is measured using a geranium photodiode. As the platform is displaced, the grating separation between the two gratings changes and causes the output intensity to change. Using the coupled subwavelength grating simulations as a reference to the output intensity change with respect to gap, the mechanical and coupling sensitivity properties of as it relates to acceleration is presented.

  9. Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Modeling of Tropical Cyclones: Progress, Challenges, and Ways Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi

    2015-04-01

    It has long been recognized that air-sea interaction plays an important role in tropical cyclones (TC) intensity change. However, most current numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are deficient in predicting TC intensity. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in TCs push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. Parameterizations of air-sea fluxes in NWP models are often crude and create "manmade" energy source/sink that does not exist, especially in the absence of a fully interactive ocean in the model. The erroneous surface heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes can cause compounding errors in the model (e.g., precipitation, water vapor, boundary layer properties). The energy source (heat and moisture fluxes from the ocean) and sink (surface friction and wind-induced upper ocean cooling) are critical to TC intensity. However, observations of air-sea fluxes in TCs are very limited, especially in extreme high wind conditions underneath of the eyewall region. The Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST) program was designed to better understand the air-sea interaction, especially in high wind conditions, which included laboratory and coupled model experiments and field campaign in 2003-04 hurricane seasons. Significant progress has been made in better understanding of air-sea exchange coefficients up to 30 m/s, i.e., a leveling off in drag coefficient and relatively invariant exchange coefficient of enthalpy with wind speed. More recently, the Impact of Typhoon on the Ocean in the Pacific (ITOP) field campaign in 2010 has provided an unprecedented data set to study the air-sea fluxes in TCs and their impact on TC structure and intensity. More than 800 GPS dropsondes and 900 AXBTs/AXCTs as well as drifters, floats, and moorings were deployed in TCs, including Typhoons Fanapi and Malakas, and Supertyphoon Megi with a record peak wind speed of more than 80 m

  10. Collapse of the wave field in a one-dimensional system of weakly coupled light guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakin, A. A.; Litvak, A. G.; Mironov, V. A.; Skobelev, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The analytical and numerical study of the radiation self-action in a system of coupled light guides is fulfilled on the basis of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNSE). We develop a variational method for qualitative study of DNSE and classify self-action modes. We show that the diffraction of narrow (in grating scale) wave beams weakens in discrete media and, consequently, the "collapse" of the one-dimensional wave field with power exceeding the critical value occurs. This results in the ability to self-channel radiation in the central fiber. Qualitative analytical results were confirmed by numerical simulation of DNSE, which also shows the stability of the collapse mode.

  11. SELF-EXCITED WAVE PROCESSES IN CHAINS OF UNIDIRECTIONALLY COUPLED IMPULSE NEURONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Glyzin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the mathematical modeling of neural activity. We propose new classes of singularly perturbed differential-difference equations with delay of Volterra type. With these systems, the models as a single neuron or neural networks are described. We study attractors of ring systems of unidirectionally coupled impulse neurons in the case where the number of links in the system increases indefinitely. In order to study periodic solutions of travelling wave type of this system, some special tricks are used which reduce the existence and stability problems for cycles to the investigation of auxiliary system with impulse actions. Using this approach, we establish that the number of stable self-excited waves simultaneously existing in the chain increases unboundedly as the number of links of the chain increases, that is, the well-known buffer phenomenon occurs.

  12. Enhancement of effective electromechanical coupling factor by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave device structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Teshigahara, Akihiko; Iwaki, Takao; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a drastic enhancement of the effective coupling factor K\\text{e}2 by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave (SAW) device structures such as the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure. This phenomenon occurs when the piezoelectric layer exhibits a high acoustic wave velocity. The mass loading decreases the SAW velocity and causes SAW energy confinement close to the top surface where an interdigital transducer is placed. It is shown that this phenomenon is obvious even when an amorphous SiO2 film is deposited on the top surface for temperature compensation. This K\\text{e}2 enhancement was also found in various combinations of electrode, piezoelectric layer, and/or substrate materials. The existence of this phenomenon was verified experimentally using the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure.

  13. Suppression of Spiral Waves and Spatiotemporal Chaos Under Local Self-adaptive Coupling Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun; WU Ning-Jie; YING He-Ping; YUAN Li-Hua

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a close-loop feedback control is imposed locally on the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FHN) system to suppress the stable spirals and spatiotemporal chaos according to the principle of self-adaptive coupling interaction. The simulation results show that an expanding target wave is stimulated by the spiral waves under dynamic control period when a local area of 5 x 5 grids is controlled, or the spiral tip is driven to the board of the system. It is adso found that the spatiotemporal chaos can be suppressed to get a stable homogeneous state within 50 time units as two local grids are controlled mutually. The mechanism of the scheme is briefly discussed.

  14. Hybrid metal-dielectric, slow wave structure with magnetic coupling and compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A.V., E-mail: asmirnov@radiabeam.com [RadiaBeam Systems LLC, 1713 Stewart St., Santa Monica, CA 90404 (United States); Savin, E. [RadiaBeam Systems LLC, 1713 Stewart St., Santa Monica, CA 90404 (United States); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-01

    A number of electron beam vacuum devices such as small radiofrequency (RF) linear accelerators (linacs) and microwave traveling wave tubes (TWTs) utilize slow wave structures which are usually rather complicated in production and may require multi-step brazing and time consuming tuning. Fabrication of these devices becomes challenging at centimeter wavelengths, at large number of cells, and when a series or mass production of such structures is required. A hybrid, metal-dielectric, periodic structure for low gradient, low beam current applications is introduced here as a modification of Andreev’s disk-and-washer (DaW) structure. Compensated type of coupling between even and odd TE01 modes in the novel structure results in negative group velocity with absolute values as high as 0.1c–0.2c demonstrated in simulations. Sensitivity to material imperfections and electrodynamic parameters of the disk-and-ring (DaR) structure are considered numerically using a single cell model.

  15. Coupling of a Linearized Gravitational Wave to Electromagnetic Fields and Relevant Noise Issues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳昱; 吴张晗; 张义

    2003-01-01

    According to electrodynamic equations in curved spacetime we consider the coupling of a linearized weak gravitational wave(GW)to a Gaussian beam passing through a static magnetic field.It is found that unlike the properties of the "left-circular" and "right-circular" waves of the tangential perturbative photon fluxes in the cylindrical polar coordinates,the resultant effect of the tangential and radial perturbations can produce a unique nonvanishing photon flux propagating along the direction of the electric field of the Gaussian beam.This result might provide a larger detecting space for the high-frequency GWs in GHz band.Moreover,we also discuss the relevant noise issues.

  16. Coherent coupling between radio frequency, optical, and acoustic waves in piezo-optomechanical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Krishna C; Davanço, Marcelo I; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-05-01

    Optomechanical cavities have been studied for applications ranging from sensing to quantum information science. Here, we develop a platform for nanoscale cavity optomechanical circuits in which optomechanical cavities supporting co-localized 1550 nm photons and 2.4 GHz phonons are combined with photonic and phononic waveguides. Working in GaAs facilitates manipulation of the localized mechanical mode either with a radio frequency (RF) field through the piezo-electric effect, which produces acoustic waves that are routed and coupled to the optomechanical cavity by phononic crystal waveguides, or optically through the strong photoelastic effect. Along with mechanical state preparation and sensitive readout, we use this to demonstrate an acoustic wave interference effect, similar to atomic coherent population trapping, in which RF-driven coherent mechanical motion is cancelled by optically-driven motion. Manipulating cavity optomechanical systems with equal facility through both photonic and phononic channels enables new architectures for signal transduction between the optical, electrical, and mechanical domains.

  17. Effect of viscous cross coupling between two immiscible fluids on elastic wave propagation and attenuation in unsaturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Yeh, Chao-Lung; Lee, Jhe-Wei

    2015-09-01

    A central issue in the theoretical treatment of a multiphase system is the proper mathematical description of momentum transfer across fluid-solid and fluid-fluid interfaces. Although recent studies have advanced our knowledge on modeling the coupling behavior between a porous framework and the fluids permeating it, the effect of viscous resistance caused by two-fluid flow on elastic wave behavior in unsaturated porous media still remains elusive. In the present study, the theoretical model developed for describing immiscible two-phase fluid flows in a deformable porous medium related to harmonic wave perturbation is generalized to account for viscous cross coupling due to relative velocity between two adjacent fluids. The corresponding dispersion relations whose coefficients feature all elasticity, inertial-drag, and viscous-drag parameters are then precisely formulated, in a physical context characterizing three compressional waves and one shear wave. To evaluate quantitatively this as-yet unknown effect, numerical calculations are conducted to solve the dispersion relations for Columbia fine sandy loam bearing an oil-water mixture as a function of water saturation and excitation frequency. Our results show that the phase speed and attenuation coefficient of the P3 wave which has the smallest speed is strongly sensitive to the presence of viscous cross coupling, as expected since this wave is attributed primarily to the out-of-phase motion of the two pore fluids. Viscous cross coupling also exerts an impact on the attenuation coefficient of the shear wave and the P1 wave whose speed is greatest, which exhibits two opposite trends at different ranges of low and high water contents. Relative differences in these wave attributes are principally independent of excitation frequency. A sensitivity analysis is carried out to assess how changes in viscous cross coupling affect these differences, revealing that some of them become more significant as viscous cross

  18. Coupled Cluster Calculations of the Ground and Excited Electronic States Using Two- and Four-Component Relativistic Spinors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat K. Chaudhuri

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The coupled cluster based linear response theory which is applicable to the direct calculation of atomic and molecular properties are presented and applied to compute the ionization potentials and excitation energies of light and moderately heavy atoms. The e®ect of electron correlation on the ground and excited states is studied using Hartree-Fock, Dirac-Fock and approximate two-component relativistic spinors.

  19. Development of a three-dimensional, regional, coupled wave, current, and sediment-transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, J.C.; Sherwood, C.R.; Signell, R.P.; Harris, C.K.; Arango, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a three-dimensional numerical model that implements algorithms for sediment transport and evolution of bottom morphology in the coastal-circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS v3.0), and provides a two-way link between ROMS and the wave model Simulating Waves in the Nearshore (SWAN) via the Model-Coupling Toolkit. The coupled model is applicable for fluvial, estuarine, shelf, and nearshore (surfzone) environments. Three-dimensional radiation-stress terms have been included in the momentum equations, along with effects of a surface wave roller model. The sediment-transport algorithms are implemented for an unlimited number of user-defined non-cohesive sediment classes. Each class has attributes of grain diameter, density, settling velocity, critical stress threshold for erosion, and erodibility constant. Suspended-sediment transport in the water column is computed with the same advection-diffusion algorithm used for all passive tracers and an additional algorithm for vertical settling that is not limited by the CFL criterion. Erosion and deposition are based on flux formulations. A multi-level bed framework tracks the distribution of every size class in each layer and stores bulk properties including layer thickness, porosity, and mass, allowing computation of bed morphology and stratigraphy. Also tracked are bed-surface properties including active-layer thickness, ripple geometry, and bed roughness. Bedload transport is calculated for mobile sediment classes in the top layer. Bottom-boundary layer submodels parameterize wave-current interactions that enhance bottom stresses and thereby facilitate sediment transport and increase bottom drag, creating a feedback to the circulation. The model is demonstrated in a series of simple test cases and a realistic application in Massachusetts Bay. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Amplitude death, oscillation death, wave, and multistability in identical Stuart-Landau oscillators with conjugate coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenchen; Cheng, Hongyan; Dai, Qionglin; Li, Haihong; Ju, Ping; Yang, Junzhong

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics in a ring of identical Stuart-Landau oscillators with conjugate coupling systematically. We analyze the stability of the amplitude death and find the stability independent of the number of oscillators. When the amplitude death state is unstable, a large number of states such as homogeneous oscillation death, heterogeneous oscillation death, homogeneous oscillation, and wave propagations are found and they may coexist. We also find that all of these states are related to the unstable spatial modes to the amplitude death state.

  1. The c-axis charge traveling wave in a coupled system of Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Hamdipour, M.

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate a manifestation of the charge traveling wave along the c axis (TW) in current voltage characteristics of coupled Josephson junctions in high- T c superconductors. The branches related to the TW with different wavelengths are found for the stacks with different number of Josephson junctions at different values of system's parameters. Transitions between the TW branches and the outermost branch are observed. The electric charge in the superconducting layers and charge-charge correlation functions for TW and outermost branches show different behavior with bias current. We propose an experimental testing of the TW branching by microwave irradiation.

  2. Non-minimally Coupled Gravitational and Electromagnetic Fields: pp-Wave Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Dereli, T

    2011-01-01

    We give the Lagrangian formulation of a generic non-minimally extended Einstein-Maxwell theory with an action that is linear in the curvature and quadratic in the electromagnetic field. We derive the coupled field equations by a first order variational principle using the method of Lagrange multipliers. We look for solutions describing plane-fronted Einstein-Maxwell waves with parallel rays. We give a family of exact solutions associated with a partially massless spin-2 photon and a partially massive spin-2 graviton.

  3. Super-resolution Imaging by Evanescent Wave Coupling to Surface States on Effective Gain Media

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrotra, Prateek; Blaikie, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Higher resolution demands for semiconductor lithography may be fulfilled by higher numerical aperture (NA) systems. However, NAs more than the photoresist refractive index (~1.7) cause surface confinement of the image. In this letter we describe how evanescent wave coupling to effective gain medium surface states beneath the imaging layer can counter this problem. At {\\lambda}=193 nm a layer of sapphire on SiO2 counters image decay by an effective-gain-medium resonance phenomena allowing evanescent interferometric lithography to create high aspect ratio structures at NAs of 1.85 (26-nm) and beyond.

  4. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Benincasa, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Gauge/string correspondence provides an efficient method to investigate gauge theories. In this talk we discuss the results of the paper (to appear) by P. Benincasa, A. Buchel and A. O. Starinets, where the propagation of sound waves is studied in a strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. In particular, a prediction for the speed of sound as well as for the bulk viscosity is made for the N=2* gauge theory in the high temperature limit. As expected, the results achieved show a devi...

  5. Charge creation and nucleation of the longitudinal plasma wave in coupled Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Hamdipour, M.

    2010-11-01

    We study the phase dynamics in coupled Josephson junctions described by a system of nonlinear differential equations. Results of detailed numerical simulations of charge creation in the superconducting layers and the longitudinal plasma wave (LPW) nucleation are presented. We demonstrate the different time stages in the development of the LPW and present the results of FFT analysis at different values of bias current. The correspondence between the breakpoint position on the outermost branch of current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the growing region in time dependence of the electric charge in the superconducting layer is established. The effects of noise in the bias current and the external microwave radiation on the charge dynamics of the coupled Josephson junctions are found. These effects introduce a way to regulate the process of LPW nucleation in the stack of IJJ.

  6. Intercellular waves propagation in an array of cells coupled through paracrine signaling: A computer simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepseu, W. D.; Woafo, P.

    2006-04-01

    A linear chain of cells is considered in which calcium (Ca2+) fluctuations within a cell are described by a simple minimal model. Cells are coupled together by bidirectional paracrine signaling via calcium oscillations. Two typical zones of propagation are observed: a transition zone and a regular zone. The transition zone exhibits the same phenomena that can be observed in single cells, pairs or triplets of cells. Within the regular zone, simple periodic oscillations of calcium propagate and the Ca2+ signal is similar from one cell to another (same amplitude and same frequency). But, the signals are separated by a slight phase shift characterizing the propagation of Ca2+ waves due to the type of coupling used. We also consider the colonization of the lattice by the abnormal oscillations of sick cells.

  7. Coupling discontinuous Galerkin methods and retarded potentials for transient wave propagation on unbounded domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Toufic; Joly, Patrick; Rodríguez, Jerónimo; Terrasse, Isabelle

    2011-07-01

    This work deals with the numerical simulation of wave propagation on unbounded domains with localized heterogeneities. To do so, we propose to combine a discretization based on a discontinuous Galerkin method in space and explicit finite differences in time on the regions containing heterogeneities with the retarded potential method to account the unbounded nature of the computational domain. The coupling formula enforces a discrete energy identity ensuring the stability under the usual CFL condition in the interior. Moreover, the scheme allows to use a smaller time step in the interior domain yielding to quasi-optimal discretization parameters for both methods. The aliasing phenomena introduced by the local time stepping are reduced by a post-processing by averaging in time obtaining a stable and second order consistent (in time) coupling algorithm. We compute the numerical rate of convergence of the method for an academic problem. The numerical results show the feasibility of the whole discretization procedure.

  8. A coupled phase-field and volume-of-fluid method for accurate representation of limiting water wave deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Xiping

    2016-09-01

    A coupled phase-field and volume-of-fluid method is developed to study the sensitive behavior of water waves during breaking. The THINC model is employed to solve the volume-of-fluid function over the entire domain covered by a relatively coarse grid while the phase-field model based on Allen-Cahn equation is applied over the fine grid. A special algorithm that takes into account the sharpness of the diffuse-interface is introduced to correlate the order parameter obtained on the fine grid and the volume-of-fluid function obtained on the coarse grid. The coupled model is then applied to the study of water waves generated by moving pressures on the free surface. The deformation process of the wave crest during the initial stage of breaking is discussed in details. It is shown that there is a significant variation of the free nappe developed at the front side of the wave crest as the wave steepness differs. It is of a plunging type at large wave steepness while of a spilling type at small wave steepness. The numerical results also indicate that breaking occurs later and the duration of breaking is shorter for waves of smaller steepness and vice versa. Neglecting the capillary effect leads to wave breaking with a sharper nappe and a more dynamic plunging process. The surface tension also has an effect to prevent the formation of a free nappe at the front side of the wave crest in some cases.

  9. Coupled wave-atmosphere-ocean modeling under RCP8.5 emissions during the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Hylke; Semedo, Alvaro; Sterl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Most climate models have no explicit treatment of surface ocean waves. As a result, wave climatologies are usually obtained off-line, using atmospheric forcing as input. In recent years attempts have been made to incorporate surface ocean wave models into GCMs, giving the possibility of interactions between components. In the presence of waves the atmospheric winds are modified due to different drag-coefficient and breaking waves will have also influence vertical ocean mixing. As such the waves may play a role in solving long-standing ocean and atmospheric biases. Recently we have coupled the global wave model WAM into EC-Earth GCM (v3.0.1). EC-Earth is based on the IFS atmospheric model and the NEMO/LIM ocean/sea ice model. First results are presented from a 140-year (1961-2100) continuous transient, coupled simulation under RCP8.5 emission scenario. As the modelled climate warms during the transient period, (arctic) sea-ice gradually diminishes, allowing surface waves to penetrate to higher and higher latitudes. Eventually Arctic sea-ice completely disappears in the simulation in late summer. We will discuss swell and wind-wave climatologies, Stokes drift patterns as well as other relevant wave parameters.

  10. Satellite observations of atmosphere-ionosphere vertical coupling by gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Thai; Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The Earth's thermosphere/ionosphere (T/I) is strongly influenced by various processes from above as well as from below. One of the most important processes from below is vertical coupling by atmospheric waves. Among these waves, gravity waves (GWs) excited in the lower atmosphere, mainly in the troposphere and tropopause region, are likely essential for the mean state of the T/I system. The penetration of GWs into the T/I system is however not well understood in modeling as well as observations. In this work, we analyze the correlation between different GW parameters at lower altitudes (below 90 km) and GW induced perturbations in the T/I. At lower altitudes, GW parameters are derived from temperature observations of the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER). In the T/I, GW induced perturbations of neutral density measured by Gravity field and Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) and CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) are analyzed. Interestingly, we find positive correlations between the spatial distributions at low altitudes (i.e. below 90km) and the spatial distributions of GW-induced density fluctuations in the T/I (at 200km and above), which suggests that many waves seen in the T/I have their origins in the troposphere or lower stratosphere. It is also indicated that mountain waves generated near the Andes and Antarctic Peninsula propagate up to the T/I. Strong positive correlations between GW perturbations in the T/I and GW parameters at 30 km are mainly found at mid latitudes, which may be an indicator of propagation of convectively generated GWs. Increase of correlation starting from 70 km in many cases shows that filtering of the GW distribution by the background atmosphere is very important. Processes that are likely involved are GW dissipation, generation of secondary GWs, as well as horizontal propagation of GWs. Limitations of our method and of the observations are also discussed.

  11. Simulating Tropical Instability Waves in the Equatorial Eastern Pacific with a Coupled General Circulation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xianyan; Masahide KIMOTO

    2009-01-01

    Satellite observations of SSTs have revealed the existence of unstable waves in the equatorial eastern Pacific and Atlantic oceans. These waves have a 20-40-day periodicity with westward phase speeds of 0.4-0.6 m s-1 and wavelengths of 1000-2000 km during boreal summer and fall.They are generally called tropical instability waves (TIWs).This study investigates TIWs simulated by a high-resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM).The horizontal resolution of the model is 120 km in the atmosphere,and 30 km longitude by 20 km latitude in the ocean.Model simulations show good agreement with the observed main features associated with TIWs.The results of energetics analysis reveal that barotropic energy conversion is responsible for providing the main energy source for TIWs by extracting energy from the meridional shear of the climatological-mean equatorial currents in the mixed layer.This deeper and northward-extended wave activity appears to gain its energy through baroclinic conversion via buoyancy work,which further contributes to the asymmetric distribution of TIWs.It is estimated that the strong cooling effect induced by equatorial upwelling is partially (~30%-40%)offset by the equatorward heat flux due to TIWs in the eastern tropical Pacific during the seasons when TIWs are active.The atmospheric mixed layer just above the sea surface responds to the waves with enhanced or reduced vertical mixing.Furthermore,the changes in turbulent mixing feed back to sea surface evaporation,favoring the westward propagation of TIWs.The atmosphere to the south of the Equator also responds to TIWs in a similar way,although TIWs are much weaker south of the Equator.

  12. Regional seismic wavefield computation on a 3-D heterogeneous Earth model by means of coupled traveling wave synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2002-01-01

    I present a new algorithm for calculating seismic wave propagation through a three-dimensional heterogeneous medium using the framework of mode coupling theory originally developed to perform very low frequency (f seismic wavefield computation. It is a Greens function approach for multiple scattering within a defined volume and employs a truncated traveling wave basis set using the locked mode approximation. Interactions between incident and scattered wavefields are prescribed by mode coupling theory and account for the coupling among surface waves, body waves, and evanescent waves. The described algorithm is, in principle, applicable to global and regional wave propagation problems, but I focus on higher frequency (typically f ??????0.25 Hz) applications at regional and local distances where the locked mode approximation is best utilized and which involve wavefields strongly shaped by propagation through a highly heterogeneous crust. Synthetic examples are shown for P-SV-wave propagation through a semi-ellipsoidal basin and SH-wave propagation through a fault zone.

  13. Si-prism-array coupled terahertz-wave parametric oscillator with pump light totally reflected at the terahertz-wave exit surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiliang; Qu, Yanchen; Zhao, Weijiang; Liu, Chuang; Chen, Zhenlei

    2016-09-01

    A Si-prism-array coupled terahertz (THz)-wave parametric oscillator with the pump totally reflected at the THz-wave exit surface (PR-Si-TPO) is demonstrated by manufacturing an 800 nm air gap between the crystal and the Si-prism array. Influence on the total reflection of the pump from the Si prisms is eliminated and efficient coupling of the THz wave is ensured by using this air gap. When the THz-wave frequency varies from 1.8 to 2.3 THz, compared with a Si-prism-array coupled TPO (Si-TPO) with the pump transmitting through the crystal directly, the THz-wave output energy is enhanced by 20-50 times, and the oscillating threshold is reduced by 10%-35%. Furthermore, the high end of the THz-wave frequency tuning range of the PR-Si-TPO is expanded to 3.66 THz compared with 2.5 THz for the Si-TPO.

  14. A Nonlinear Coupled-Mode System for Water Waves over a General Bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassoulis, G. A.; Belibassakis, K. A.

    2003-04-01

    Athanassoulis 2002) problems, over variable bathymetry regions. Using the local-mode expansion in conjunction with the variational principle the original problem is reformulated as an infinite, coupled-mode system of second-order differential equations in the propagation (horizontal) space, fully accounting for the effects of non-linearity and dispersion. Various simplified equations, like Boussinesq-type models, in shallow water depth, and non-linear mild-slope models, in intermediate depth, can be obtained as limiting forms. As a first step towards the solution of fully nonlinear coupled-mode system, the system is simplified keeping only up to second-order terms in the system coefficients, and the derived weakly non-linear model has been applied to water waves propagating over a flat bottom and over an arbitrary bathymetry. This model is solved numerically in the frequency and in the time domain, providing very good results in a wide range of water depths. In the case of monochromatic waves propagating over a flat bottom, it is shown that the present model correctly treats the dispersion effects in the whole range of relative water depths from practically deep to shallow water. In the same case, it is also shown that the present model reproduces correctly the second-order Stokes solutions. In the general case, the solution of the coupled-mode system is obtained numerically by truncating the local-mode series into a finite number of terms, and using finite differences for approximating the derivatives on the horizontal plane. Numerical results presented for a smooth underwater shoaling with a steep bottom slope, demonstrate that the rate of decay of the modal-amplitude functions is very fast, in conformity with similar behaviour in the linear case (Athanassoulis and Belibassakis 1999). This means that a small number of modes (up to 5 or 7) are sufficient for precise numerical solution, provided that the two new modes (the free-surface and the sloping-bottom ones) are included

  15. Fiber-coupling efficiency simulation of Gaussian Schell Model laser in space-to-ground optical communication link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liying; Li, Mengnan; Wu, Jiajie; Ma, Jing; Yang, Qingbo

    2015-08-01

    In practice, due to reasons related to the laser device and the inevitable error of the processing technique, a laser source emitted from a communication terminal is partially coherent, which is represented by the Gaussian Schell Model (GSM). In a space-to-ground optical communication link, the cross-spectral density function, based on the Gaussian Model in previous research, is replaced by GSM; thus, the fiber-coupling efficiency equation of the GSM laser source is deduced. The GSM equation presents the effects of the source coherent parameter ζ and the zenith angle θ on the fiber-coupling efficiency, which were not included previously. The effects on the fiber-coupling efficiency are numerically simulated and analyzed. The results manifest that the fiber-coupling efficiency invariably degrades with increasing ζ or θ. The hope of this work is to improve the redundancy design of fiber-coupling receiver systems by analyzing the fiber-coupling efficiency with the source coherent parameter.

  16. Efficient simulation of wave-packet dynamics on multiple coupled potential surfaces with split potential propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonovich, Igal

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple method to expedite simulation of quantum wave-packet dynamics by more than a factor of $2$ with the Strang split-operator propagation. Dynamics of quantum wave-packets are often evaluated using the the \\emph{Strang} split-step propagation, where the kinetic part of the Hamiltonian $\\hat{T}$ and the potential part $\\hat{V}$ are piecewise integrated according to $e^{- i \\hat{H} \\delta t} \\approx e^{- i \\hat{V} \\delta t/2} e^{- i \\hat{T}\\delta t} e^{- i \\hat{V} \\delta t/2}$, which is accurate to second order in the propagation time $\\delta t$. In molecular quantum dynamics, the potential propagation occurs over multiple coupled potential surfaces and requires matrix exponentiation for each position in space and time which is computationally demanding. Our method employs further splitting of the potential matrix $\\hat{V}$ into a diagonal space dependent part $\\hat{V}_{D}(R)$ and an off-diagonal time-dependent coupling-field $\\hat{V}_{OD}(t)$, which then requires only a single matrix exponentia...

  17. Density convection near radiating ICRF antennas and its effect on the coupling of lower hybrid waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Beaumont, B.; Bibet, Ph.; Bremond, S.; Kazarian, F. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Mayoral, M.L.; Mailloux, J. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX (United Kingdom); Noterdaeme, J.M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Garching (Germany)]|[Gent University, EESA Dept. (Belgium); Tuccillo, A.A. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, CR Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    Combined operation of lower hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) waves can result in a degradation of the LH wave coupling, as observed both in the Tore-Supra and Jet tokamaks. The reflection coefficient on the part of the LH launcher magnetically connected to the powered ICRF antenna increases, suggesting a local decrease in the electron density in the connecting flux tubes. This has been confirmed by Langmuir probe measurements on the LH launchers in the latest Tore-Supra experiments. Moreover, recent experiments in Jet indicate that the LH coupling degradation depends on the ICRF power and its launched k{sub /} spectrum. The 2D density distribution around the Tore-Supra ICRF antennas has been modelled with the CELLS-code, balancing parallel losses with diffusive transport and sheath induced ExB convection, obtained from RF field mapping using the ICANT-code. The calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations, i.e. density depletion is obtained, localised mainly in the antenna shadow, and dependent on ICRF power and antenna spectrum. (authors)

  18. Shear Bloch waves and coupled phonon-polariton in periodic piezoelectric waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliposyan, D G; Ghazaryan, K B; Piliposian, G T

    2014-02-01

    Coupled electro-elastic SH waves propagating in a periodic piezoelectric finite-width waveguide are considered in the framework of the full system of Maxwell's electrodynamic equations. We investigate Bloch-Floquet waves under homogeneous or alternating boundary conditions for the elastic and electromagnetic fields along the guide walls. Zero frequency stop bands, trapped modes as well as some anomalous features due to piezoelectricity are identified. For mixed boundary conditions, by modulating the ratio of the length of the unit cell to the width of the waveguide, the minimum widths of the stop bands can be moved to the middle of the Brillouin zone. The dispersion equation has been investigated also for phonon-polariton band gaps. It is shown that for waveguides at acoustic frequencies, acousto-optic coupling gives rise to polariton behavior at wavelengths much larger than the length of the unit cell but at optical frequencies polariton resonance occurs at wavelengths comparable with the period of the waveguide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Method of Moments of Coupled-Cluster Equations: Externally Corrected Approaches Employing Configuration Interaction Wave Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian S.O. Pimienta

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A new approach to the many-electron correlation problem, termed the method of moments of coupled-cluster equations (MMCC, is further developed and tested. The main idea of the MMCC theory is that of the noniterative energy corrections which, when added to the energies obtained in the standard coupled-cluster calculations, recover the exact (full configuration interaction energy. The MMCC approximations require that a guess is provided for the electronic wave function of interest. The idea of using simple estimates of the wave function, provided by the inexpensive configuration interaction (CI methods employing small sets of active orbitals to define higher–than–double excitations, is tested in this work. The CI-corrected MMCC methods are used to study the single bond breaking in HF and the simultaneous breaking of both O–H bonds in H2O.

  20. Waveform Modeling of the Crust and Upper Mantle Using S, Sp, SsPmP, and Shear-Coupled PL Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-10

    and excitation of shear-coupled Pl waves with distance and corresponding phase velocity ( Vph )-period (T) curve: αN and βN are the P and S wave...Pulliam and Sen, 2005) (b) Propagation characteristics and excitation of shear-coupled Pl waves with distance and corresponding phase velocity ( Vph

  1. Comprehensive study of ULF upstream waves observed in the topside ionosphere by CHAMP and on the ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Heilig

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on magnetic field measurements from the satellite CHAMP, a detailed picture could be obtained of the upstream wave (UW distribution in the topside ionosphere. The low, near-polar orbit of CHAMP, covering all local times, allows the global distribution of this type of pulsation to be revealed. The observations from space are compared to recordings of the ground-based MM100 meridional array covering the latitude range 66° to 42° in magnetic coordinates. UWs show up very clearly in the compressional component of the satellite magnetic field data, whereas on the ground, their signature is found in the H component, but it is mixed with oscillations from field line resonant pulsations. Here we first introduce a procedure for an automated detection of UW signatures, both in ground and space data. Then a statistical analysis is presented of UW pulsations recorded during a 132-day period, centred on the autumn 2001 equinox. Observations in the top-side ionosphere reveal a clear latitudinal distribution of the amplitudes. Largest signals are observed at the equator. Minima show up at about 40° latitude. The coherence between ground and satellite wave signatures is high over wide latitude and longitude ranges. We make suggestions about the entry mechanism of UWs from the foreshock region into the magnetosphere. The clear UW signature in satellite recordings between −60° and 60° latitude allows for detailed investigations of the dependence on solar wind conditions. We test the control of solar wind speed, interplanetary magnetic field strength and cone angle on UWs. For the first time, it is possible to derive details of the Doppler-shift effect by modifying the UW frequency from direct observations. The results reconcile foreshock wave generation predictions with near-Earth observations.

  2. Convectively coupled Kelvin waves in aquachannel simulations: 1. Propagation speeds, composite structures, and comparison with aquaplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Joaquín. E.; Nolan, David S.; Tulich, Stefan N.

    2016-10-01

    Convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) represent a significant contribution to the total variability of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). This study analyzes the structure and propagation of CCKWs simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using two types of idealized domains. These are the "aquachannel," a flat rectangle on a beta plane with zonally periodic boundary conditions and length equal to the Earth's circumference at the equator, and the "aquapatch," a square domain with zonal extent equal to one third of the aquachannel's length. A series of simulations are performed, including a doubly nested aquapatch, in which convection is solved explicitly along the equator. The model intercomparison is carried out throughout the use of several techniques such as power spectra, filtering, wave tracking, and compositing, and it is extended to some simulations from the Aquaplanet Experiment (APE). Results show that despite the equatorial superrotation bias produced by the WRF simulations, the CCKWs simulated with this model propagate with similar phase speeds (relative to the low-level mean flow) as the corresponding waves from the APE simulations. Horizontal and vertical structures of the CCKWs simulated with aquachannels are also in overall good agreement with those from aquaplanet simulations and observations, although there is a distortion of the zonal extent of anomalies when the shorter aquapatch is used.

  3. Alfven wave coupled with flow-driven fluid instability in interpenetrating plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Vranjes, J

    2015-01-01

    The Alfven wave is analyzed in case of one quasineutral plasma propagating with some constant speed $v_0$ through another static quasineutral plasma. A dispersion equation is derived describing the Alfven wave coupled with the flow driven mode $\\omega= k v_0$ and solutions are discussed analytically and numerically. The usual solutions for two oppositely propagating Alfv\\'en waves are substantially modified due to the flowing plasma. More profound is modification of the solution propagating in the negative direction with respect to the magnetic field and the plasma flow. For a large enough flow speed (exceeding the Alfven speed in the static plasma), this negative solution may become non-propagating, with frequency equal to zero. In this case it represents a spatial variation of the electromagnetic field. For greater flow speed it becomes a forward mode, and it may merge with the positive one. This merging of the two modes represents the starting point for a flow-driven instability, with two complex-conjugate...

  4. A three-dimensional, wave-current coupled, sediment transport model for POM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hua

    2010-01-01

    In the high-energy environment of coastal seas and estuaries,strong sediment resuspension/ deposition events are driven by surface waves,tides,winds and buoyancy driven currents.In recent years,A POM based three-dimensional ,wave-current coupled ,sediment transport model has been developed by the University of New South Wales.This paper presents several examples of the model applications to study sediment dynamics in the environments where forcings such as waves,tides, and winds are equally important to affect sediment fluxes and distributions.Firstly,the sediment transport model coupled to the Yellow Sea general circulation model and a third generation wave model SWAN was implemented in the Yellow Sea to study the dynamics of the sediment transport and resuspension in the northern Jiangsu shoal-water(NJSW).The sediment distributions and fluxes and their inter-annual variability were studied by realistic numerical simulations.The study found that the surface waves played a dominant role over the tides to form the turbidity maxima along the muddy coast of NJSW. Secondly,the sediment transport model was used to explore the effect of suspended sediment-induced stratificationin the bottom boundary layer(BBL).The model uses a re-parameterized bottom drag coefficient Cd that incorporates a linear stability function of flux Richardson number RsThe study has shown that the sediment induced stratification in the BBL reduces the vertical eddy viscosity and bottom shear stress in comparison with the model prediction in a neutrally stratified BBL.In response to these apparent reductions,the tidal current shear is increased and sediments are abnormally concentrated within a thin wall layer that is overlain by a thicker layer with much smaller concentration.The formation of this fluid-mud layer near the seabed has led to a significant reduction in the total sediment transport.This study contributes to the understanding of formations of tidal flats along the coasts of turbid seas

  5. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Yunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein’s theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  6. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Siemens, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein's theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  7. Study of ICRF wave propagation and plasma coupling efficiency in a linear magnetic mirror device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, S.Y.

    1991-07-01

    Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) wave propagation in an inhomogeneous axial magnetic field in a cylindrical plasma-vacuum system has historically been inadequately modelled. Previous works either sacrifice the cylindrical geometry in favor of a simpler slab geometry, concentrate on the resonance region, use a single mode to represent the entire field structure, or examine only radial propagation. This thesis performs both analytical and computational studies to model the ICRF wave-plasma coupling and propagation problem. Experimental analysis is also conducted to compare experimental results with theoretical predictions. Both theoretical as well as experimental analysis are undertaken as part of the thesis. The theoretical studies simulate the propagation of ICRF waves in an axially inhomogeneous magnetic field and in cylindrical geometry. Two theoretical analysis are undertaken - an analytical study and a computational study. The analytical study treats the inhomogeneous magnetic field by transforming the (r,z) coordinate into another coordinate system ({rho},{xi}) that allows the solution of the fields with much simpler boundaries. The plasma fields are then Fourier transformed into two coupled convolution-integral equations which are then differenced and solved for both the perpendicular mode number {alpha} as well as the complete EM fields. The computational study involves a multiple eigenmode computational analysis of the fields that exist within the plasma-vacuum system. The inhomogeneous axial field is treated by dividing the geometry into a series of transverse axial slices and using a constant dielectric tensor in each individual slice. The slices are then connected by longitudinal boundary conditions.

  8. Sexual life and fertility desire in long-term HIV serodiscordant couples in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemariam, Tewodros G; Kassie, Getnet M; Sisay, Mitike M

    2012-10-24

    Even though remarkable progress has been achieved, HIV/AIDS continues to be a major global health priority. HIV discordant relationship is one of the emerging issues in HIV prevention endeavour. In Ethiopia, very little is known about HIV-serodiscordant couples particularly how they manage their sexual relationship and fertility desire. Therefore, we conduct this study with the aim of exploring the experiences of HIV discordant couples about their sexual life, and fertility desire in the context of long-term relationships in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A grounded theory approach was employed using in-depth interviews among 36 informants in ART/PMTCT centers of three public hospitals, a health center and one PLHIV association in Addis Ababa. Theoretical sampling was used to recruit 28 clients who lived in a discordant relationship and eight health care providers as key informants. Data collection and analysis were undertaken simultaneously using a constant comparison. The analysis was facilitated using OpenCode software. A grounded theory pertaining to sexual life and desire to have a child among HIV discordant couples emerged as "maintaining the relationship" as a core category. Couples pass through a social process of struggle to maintain their relationship. The causal conditions for couples to enter into the process of struggle to maintain their relationship were collectively categorized as "Entering in-to a transition" (knowing HIV serostatus) and this includes mismatch of desire to have a child, controversy on safe sex versus desire to have a child, and undeniable change in sexual desire and practice through time were the features in entering into-transition. Then after the transition, couples engaged in certain actions/strategies that are categorized as "dealing with discordancy" such as entertaining partner's interest by scarifying once self interest to maintain their relationship. HIV discordant couples' relationship is filled with controversies of maintaining

  9. Nonadiabatic quantum wave packet dynamics of the H + H2 reaction including the coriolis coupling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Jayachander Rao; S Mahapatra

    2009-09-01

    The effect of coriolis coupling on the dynamics of H + H2 reaction is examined by calculating the initial state-selected and energy resolved reaction probabilities on the coupled manifold of its degenerate 2 (') ground electronic state. H3 in this state is prone to the Jahn-Teller (JT) instability and consequently the degeneracy is split upon distortion from its 3ℎ equilibrium geometry. The orbital degeneracy is, however, restored along the 3ℎ symmetry configuration and it results into conical intersections of the two JT split component states. The energetically lower adiabatic component of latter is repulsive, and mainly (`rather solely’) drive the H + H2 reaction dynamics. On the otherhand, the upper adiabatic component is of bound type and can only impart non-adiabaticity on the dynamics of lower state. Comparison calculations are therefore also carried out on the uncoupled lower adiabatic sheet to assess the nonadiabatic effect. Exact quantum scattering calculations are performed by a chebyshev polynomial propagator and employing the double many body expansion potential energy surface of the electronic ground state of H3. Reaction probabilities are reported up to a total energy of ∼ 3.0 eV, slightly above the energetic minimum of the seam of conical intersections at ∼ 2.74 eV. Reaction probabilities are calculated up to the total angular momentum, = 20 and for each value of , the projection quantum number is varied from 0 to min (, max), with max = 4. Probability results are compared and discussed with those obtained without the coriolis coupling.

  10. Superconductivity enhanced by d-density wave: A weak-coupling theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kim; Subok, Ri; Ilmyong, Ri; Cheongsong, Kim; Yuling, Feng

    2011-04-01

    Making a revision of mistakes in Ref. [19], we present a detailed study of the competition and interplay between the d-density wave (DDW) and d-wave superconductivity (DSC) within the fluctuation-exchange (FLEX) approximation for the two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard model. In order to stabilize the DDW state with respect to phase separation at lower dopings a small nearest-neighbor Coulomb repulsion is included within the Hartree-Fock approximation. We solve the coupled gap equations for the DDW, DSC, and π-pairing as the possible order parameters, which are caused by exchange of spin fluctuations, together with calculating the spin fluctuation pairing interaction self-consistently within the FLEX approximation. We show that even when nesting of the Fermi surface is perfect, as in a square lattice with only nearest-neighbor hopping, there is coexistence of DSC and DDW in a large region of dopings close to the quantum critical point (QCP) at which the DDW state vanishes. In particular, we find that in the presence of DDW order the superconducting transition temperature Tc can be much higher compared to pure superconductivity, since the pairing interaction is strongly enhanced due to the feedback effect on spin fluctuations of the DDW gap. π-pairing appears generically in the coexistence region, but its feedback on the other order parameters is very small. In the present work, we have developed a weak-coupling theory of the competition between DDW and DSC in 2D Hubbard model, using the static spin fluctuation obtained within FLEX approximation and ignoring the self-energy effect of spin fluctuations. For our model calculations in the weak-coupling limit we have taken U/ t=3.4, since the antiferromagnetic instability occurs for higher values of U/ t.

  11. Infrasonic induced ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ting-Li

    On January 28, 2004, the CERI seismic network recorded seismic signals generated by an unknown source. Our conclusion is that the acoustic waves were initiated by an explosive source near the ground surface. The meteorological temperature and effective sound speed profiles suggested existence of an efficient near-surface waveguide that allowed the acoustic disturbance to propagate to large distances. An explosion occurring in an area of forest and farms would have limited the number of eyewitnesses. Resolution of the source might be possible by experiment or by detailed analysis of the ground motion data. A seismo-acoustic array was built to investigate thunder-induced ground motions. Two thunder events with similar N-wave waveforms but different horizontal slownesses are chosen to evaluate the credibility of using thunder as a seismic source. These impulsive acoustic waves excited P and S reverberations in the near surface that depend on both the incident wave horizontal slowness and the velocity structure in the upper 30 meters. Nineteen thunder events were chosen to further investigate the seismo-acoustic coupling. The consistent incident slowness differences between acoustic pressure and ground motions suggest that ground reverberations were first initiated somewhat away from the array. Acoustic and seismic signals were used to generate the time-domain transfer function through the deconvolution technique. Possible non-linear interaction for acoustic propagation into the soil at the surface was observed. The reverse radial initial motions suggest a low Poisson's ratio for the near-surface layer. The acoustic-to-seismic transfer functions show a consistent reverberation series of the Rayleigh wave type, which has a systematic dispersion relation to incident slownesses inferred from the seismic ground velocity. Air-coupled Rayleigh wave dispersion was used to quantitatively constrain the near-surface site structure with constraints afforded by near-surface body

  12. Modulation of the Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves by the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y.; Jiang, X.; Waliser, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    As one of the major tropical wave modes, the convectively-coupled equatorial Kelvin wave (CCKW) plays a critical role in tropical climate / weather variability. CCKW activity exhibits strong variation on both seasonal and intraseasonal time scales. In this study, evidence of the strong modulation of the CCKW activity by the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) will be presented, with a particular focus over South America and tropical Atlantic region. The primary modulation of CCKWs over this region, as noted in anomalous fields of rainfall as well as vertical profiles of wind, moisture and temperature, is found to be a modulation of wave activity - namely amplitude, with secondary effects on vertical structure, and very little impact on wavenumber. CCKW activity is enhanced during MJO phases 8, 1, and 2, and damped during MJO phases 4, 5, and 6. Further analyses reveal that the strong modulation of the MJO on the CCKW activity could be largely through two factors, namely, the vertical zonal wind shear and the lower-middle troposphere specific humidity. The CCKW activity tends to be enhanced during MJO phases when the westward vertical wind shear and positive lower to mid-troposphere moisture anomalies are evident, and vice versa. These two physical processes associated with the MJO are found to have positively (negatively) reinforcing influences in the CCKW activity in phase 1 (4, and 5), while counteracting influences in phases 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8, leading to the observed MJO cycle of the CCKW activity anomalies in the study region. The results presented in this study may have important implications for extended-range prediction of tropical wave activity, and possibly initiation of the MJO further downstream in the Indian Ocean.

  13. 2D ground motion at a soft viscoelastic layer/hard substratum site in response to SH cylindrical seismic waves radiated by deep and shallow line sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wirgin, A; Wirgin, Armand

    2004-01-01

    We show, essentially by theoretical means, that for a site with the chosen simple geometry and mechanical properties (horizontal, homogeneous, soft viscoelastic layer of infinite lateral extent overlying, and in welded contact with, a homogeneous, hard elastic substratum of half-infinite radial extent, shear-horizontal motion): 1) coupling to Love modes is all the weaker the farther the seismic source (modeled as a line, assumed to lie in the substratum) is from the lower boundary of the soft layer, 2) for a line source close to the lower boundary of the soft layer, the ground response is characterized by possible beating phenomena, and is of significantly-longer duration than for excitation by cylindrical waves radiated by deep sources. Numerical applications of the theory show, for instance, that a line source, located 40m below the lower boundary of a 60m thick soft layer in a hypothetical Mexico City-like site, radiating a SH pulse of 4s duration, produces substantial ground motion during 200s, with marke...

  14. Coupling of WRF meteorological model to WAM spectral wave model through sea surface roughness at the Balearic Sea: impact on wind and wave forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosana-Delgado, R.; Soret, A.; Jorba, O.; Baldasano, J. M.; Sánchez-Arcilla, A.

    2012-04-01

    Meteorological models, like WRF, usually describe the earth surface characteristics by tables that are function of land-use. The roughness length (z0) is an example of such approach. However, over sea z0 is modeled by the Charnock (1955) relation, linking the surface friction velocity u*2 with the roughness length z0 of turbulent air flow, z0 = α-u2* g The Charnock coefficient α may be considered a measure of roughness. For the sea surface, WRF considers a constant roughness α = 0.0185. However, there is evidence that sea surface roughness should depend on wave energy (Donelan, 1982). Spectral wave models like WAM, model the evolution and propagation of wave energy as a function of wind, and include a richer sea surface roughness description. Coupling WRF and WAM is thus a common way to improve the sea surface roughness description of WRF. WAM is a third generation wave model, solving the equation of advection of wave energy subject to input/output terms of: wind growth, energy dissipation and resonant non-linear wave-wave interactions. Third generation models work on the spectral domain. WAM considers the Charnock coefficient α a complex yet known function of the total wind input term, which depends on the wind velocity and on the Charnock coefficient again. This is solved iteratively (Janssen et al., 1990). Coupling of meteorological and wave models through a common Charnock coefficient is operationally done in medium-range met forecasting systems (e.g., at ECMWF) though the impact of coupling for smaller domains is not yet clearly assessed (Warner et al, 2010). It is unclear to which extent the additional effort of coupling improves the local wind and wave fields, in comparison to the effects of other factors, like e.g. a better bathymetry and relief resolution, or a better circulation information which might have its influence on local-scale meteorological processes (local wind jets, local convection, daily marine wind regimes, etc.). This work, within the

  15. Ground-Wave Propagation Effects on Transmission Lines through Error Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe-Campos Felipe Alejandro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic transient calculation of overhead transmission lines is strongly influenced by the natural resistivity of the ground. This varies from 1-10K (Ω·m depending on several media factors and on the physical composition of the ground. The accuracy on the calculation of a system transient response depends in part in the ground return model, which should consider the line geometry, the electrical resistivity and the frequency dependence of the power source. Up to date, there are only a few reports on the specialized literature about analyzing the effects produced by the presence of an imperfectly conducting ground of transmission lines in a transient state. A broad range analysis of three of the most often used ground-return models for calculating electromagnetic transients of overhead transmission lines is performed in this paper. The behavior of modal propagation in ground is analyzed here into effects of first and second order. Finally, a numerical tool based on relative error images is proposed in this paper as an aid for the analyst engineer to estimate the incurred error by using approximate ground-return models when calculating transients of overhead transmission lines.

  16. Influence of Four-Wave Mixing and Walk-Off on the Self-Focusing of Coupled Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergé, L.; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, W.

    2000-01-01

    Four-wave mixing and walk-off between two optical beams are! investigated For focusing Kerr media. It is shown that four-wave mixing reinforces the self-focusing of mutually trapped waves by lowering their power threshold for collapse, only when their phase mismatch is small. On the contrary, walk...

  17. Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Spectra of the HCOO^{13}CH_{3} Isotopolog of Methylformate in the Ground State and in the First Excited Torsional State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haykal, I.; Margules, L.; Huet, T. R.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Carvajal, M.; Kleiner, I.; Guillemin, J. C.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-06-01

    The detection of nineteen new rotational transitions of the parent molecule of methylformate (HCOOCH_{3}) in the second lowest excited torsional mode (ν_{t} =2) was recently reported in Orion-KL, as well as the detection of eighty new lines corresponding to the two ^{18}O isotopologs of methylformate in their ground states. The laboratory work on HCOO^{13}CH_{3} was continued. A wide spectral range from 50 to 940 GHz was recorded in Lille with the submillimeter-wave spectrometer based on harmonic generation of a microwave synthesizer source, using a multiplication chain of solid state sources (50-100 and 150-940 GHz) and a backward wave oscillator (100-150 GHz), and coupled to a 2.2 m cell. The absolute accuracy of the line positions is better than 30 kHz up to 630 GHz and 50 kHz above. The two states (ν_{t} = 0 and 1) were fitted together using the RAM Hamiltonian of the BELGI program and a new set of 45 parameters was accurately determined. The fit contains 7050 lines corresponding to the ground state up to J = 78 and K_{a} = 34 and 1907 lines related to ν_{t} =1 up to J = 59 and K_{a} = 24. The detection of new ν_{t} =1 lines in Orion KL will be reported and discussed. This work is supported by the French Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (CNRS), by CNES, and by the Spanish Government through the grants FIS2011-28738-C02-02 and CONSOLIDER 2009-00038. S. Takano, Y. Sakai, S. Kakimoto, M. Sasaki, and K. Kobayashi PASJ. {64}, 89, 2012. B. Tercero, et al. A& A. {538}, A199, 2012. M. Carvajal, et al. A& A. {500}, 1109, 2009.

  18. Observation of two coupled Faraday waves in a vertically vibrating Hele-Shaw cell with one of them oscillating horizontally

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiaochen; Liao, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    A system of two-dimensional, two coupled Faraday interfacial waves is experimentally observed at the two interfaces of the three layers of fluids (air, pure ethanol and silicon oil) in a sealed Hele-Shaw cell with periodic vertical vibration. The upper and lower Faraday waves coexist: the upper vibrates vertically, but the crests of the lower one oscillate horizontally with unchanged wave height and a frequency equal to the half of the forcing one of the vertically vibrating basin, while the troughs of the lower one always stay in the same place (relative to the basin). Besides, they are strongly coupled: the wave height of the lower Faraday wave is either a linear function (in the case of a fixed forcing frequency) or a parabolic function (in the case of a fixed acceleration amplitude) of that of the upper, with the same wave length. In addition, the upper Faraday wave temporarily loses its smoothness at around $t=T/4$ and $t=3T/4$, where $T$ denotes the wave period, and thus has fundamental difference from ...

  19. Multifunction millimetre-wave radar for all-weather ground attack aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, K. E.

    1986-07-01

    Details of the millimeter wave radar performance are presented which show that with potentially available power sources an all weather capability can be realized. Performance is evaluated as a function of frequency and antenna size, and the use of polarimetry with wide bandwidth/coherent processing is shown to offer potential enhancement for target discrimination. The millimeter wave radar is shown to be potentially capable of satisfying the following functions: take off/landing, terrain following, area correlation, tercom, and acquisition of targets. The above roles can be achieved in an all weather environment making the millimeter wave radar a valuable multifunction airborne radar.

  20. Resonant excitation of coupled Rayleigh waves in a short and narrow fluid channel clad between two identical metal plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. García-Chocano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of ultrasonic waves through a slit between two water immersed brass plates is studied for sub-wavelength plate thicknesses and slit apertures. Extraordinary high absorption is observed at discrete frequencies corresponding to resonant excitation of Rayleigh waves on the both sides of the channel. The coupling of the Rayleigh waves occurs through the fluid and the corresponding contribution to the dispersion has been theoretically derived and also experimentally confirmed. Symmetric and anti-symmetric modes are predicted but only the symmetric mode resonances have been observed. It follows from the dispersion equation that the coupled Rayleigh waves cannot be excited in a channel with apertures less than the critical one. The calculated critical aperture is in a good agreement with the measured acoustic spectra. These findings could be applied to design a broadband absorptive metamaterial.

  1. Spectroscopic analysis of stellar mass black-hole mergers in our local universe with ground-based gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Swetha; Brown, Duncan; Ballmer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discoveries of binary black-hole mergers by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO), we investigate the prospects of ground based detectors to perform a spectroscopic analysis of signals emitted during the ringdown of the Kerr black-hole formed by a stellar mass binary black-hole merger. We investigate the detectability and resolvability of the sub-dominant modes l = m = 3, l = m = 4 and l = 2;m = 1. We find that new ground-based facilities such as Einstein Telescope or Cosmic Explorer could measure multiple ringdown modes in over 300 events per year. We also investigate detector tuning for ringdown oriented searches.

  2. Seismo-traveling ionospheric disturbances of earthquake and tsunami waves observed by space- and ground-based GPS receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. Y. G.; Chen, C. Y.; Lin, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) is a constellation of six microsatellites launched on April 15, 2006 and has been orbiting with 72° inclination at 700 to 800 km above the earth since December 2007. The main payload of the F3/C is the GPS Occultation eXperiment (GOX) which carries out probing the radio occultation (RO) total electron content between GPS satellite and F3/C. Therefore, F3/C provides us an excellent opportunity to vertically scan ionospheric electron density from 100 up to 800 km altitude. On the other hand, worldwide ground-based GPS receivers can be employed to observe traveling ionospheric disturbances of the TEC. Here, we present the ionosphere response to seismic and tsunami waves by means of F3/C RO TEC and worldwide ground-based GPS TEC as well as existing data of infrasondes, magnetometers, and Doppler sounding systems during the 11 March 2011 M9.0 Tohoku earthquake.

  3. The potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors to detect generic deviations from general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narikawa, Tatsuya; Tagoshi, Hideyuki

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA to detect generic deviations of gravitational waveforms from the predictions of general relativity. We use the parameterized post-Einsteinian formalism to characterize the deviations, and assess what magnitude of deviations are detectable by using an approximate decision scheme based on Bayesian statistics. We find that there exist detectable regions of the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters for different binary masses from the observation of a single gravitational wave event. The regions are not excluded by currently existing binary pulsar observations for the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters at higher post-Newtonian order. We also find that neglect of orbital eccentricity or tidal deformation effects do not cause a significant bias on the detectable region of generic deviations from general relativity.

  4. Sensitivity Comparison of Searches for Binary Black Hole Coalescences with Ground-based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mohapatra, Satya; Caudill, Sarah; Clark, James; Hanna, Chad; Klimenko, Sergey; Pankow, Chris; Vaulin, Ruslan; Vedovato, Gabriele; Vitale, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Searches for gravitational-wave transients from binary black hole coalescences typically rely on one of two approaches: matched filtering with templates and morphology-independent excess power searches. Multiple algorithmic implementations in the analysis of data from the first generation of ground-based gravitational wave interferometers have used different strategies for the suppression of non-Gaussian noise transients, and targeted different regions of the binary black hole parameter space. In this paper we compare the sensitivity of three such algorithms: matched filtering with full coalescence templates, matched filtering with ringdown templates and a morphology-independent excess power search. The comparison is performed at a fixed false alarm rate and relies on Monte-carlo simulations of binary black hole coalescences for spinning, non-precessing systems with total mass 25-350 solar mass, which covers the parameter space of stellar mass and intermediate mass black hole binaries. We find that in the mas...

  5. Investigating airborne low frequency GPR antenna-ground coupling through modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vogt, D

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is often a good tool for detecting near surface structure, as it is cheap, fast and has high resolution. At lower frequencies, it is an excellent tool for detecting voids such as sinkholes, old excavations or rat...

  6. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  7. Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astronomy: Parameter Estimation and Tests of General Relativity with Space- and Ground-Based Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-29

    With the discovery of the binary-black-hole (BBH) coalescence GW150914 the era of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy has started. It has recently been shown that BBH with masses comparable to or higher than GW150914 would be visible in the Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) band a few years before they finally merge in the band of ground-based detectors. This would allow for premerger electromagnetic alerts, dramatically increasing the chances of a joint detection, if BBHs are indeed luminous in the electromagnetic band. In this Letter we explore a quite different aspect of multiband GW astronomy, and verify if, and to what extent, measurement of masses and sky position with eLISA could improve parameter estimation and tests of general relativity with ground-based detectors. We generate a catalog of 200 BBHs and find that having prior information from eLISA can reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of source distance and primary black hole spin by up to factor of 2 in ground-based GW detectors. The component masses estimate from eLISA will not be refined by the ground based detectors, whereas joint analysis will yield precise characterization of the newly formed black hole and improve consistency tests of general relativity.

  8. How important is mode-coupling in global surface wave tomography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikesell, Dylan; Nolet, Guust; Voronin, Sergey; Ritsema, Jeroen; Van Heijst, Hendrik-Jan

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the influence of mode coupling for fundamental mode Rayleigh waves with periods between 64 and 174s, we analysed 3,505,902 phase measurements obtained along minor arc trajectories as well as 2,163,474 phases along major arcs. This is a selection of five frequency bands from the data set of Van Heijst and Woodhouse, extended with more recent earthquakes, that served to define upper mantle S velocity in model S40RTS. Since accurate estimation of the misfits (as represented by χ2) is essential, we used the method of Voronin et al. (GJI 199:276, 2014) to obtain objective estimates of the standard errors in this data set. We adapted Voronin's method slightly to avoid that systematic errors along clusters of raypaths can be accommodated by source corrections. This was done by simultaneously analysing multiple clusters of raypaths originating from the same group of earthquakes but traveling in different directions. For the minor arc data, phase errors at the one sigma level range from 0.26 rad at a period of 174s to 0.89 rad at 64s. For the major arcs, these errors are roughly twice as high (0.40 and 2.09 rad, respectively). In the subsequent inversion we removed any outliers that could not be fitted at the 3 sigma level in an almost undamped inversion. Using these error estimates and the theory of finite-frequency tomography to include the effects of scattering, we solved for models with χ2 = N (the number of data) both including and excluding the effect of mode coupling between Love and Rayleigh waves. We shall present some dramatic differences between the two models, notably near ocean-continent boundaries (e.g. California) where mode conversions are likely to be largest. But a sharpening of other features, such as cratons and high-velocity blobs in the oceanic domain, is also observed when mode coupling is taken into account. An investigation of the influence of coupling on azimuthal anisotropy is still under way at the time of writing of this

  9. Fully Coupled Three-Dimensional Dynamic Response of a Tension-Leg Platform Floating Wind Turbine in Waves and Wind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumari Ramachandran, Gireesh Kumar Vasanta; Bredmose, Henrik; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2014-01-01

    , which is a consequence of the wave-induced rotor dynamics. Loads and coupled responses are predicted for a set of load cases with different wave headings. Further, an advanced aero-elastic code, Flex5, is extended for the TLP wind turbine configuration and the response comparison with the simpler model...... shows a generally good agreement, except for the yaw motion. This deviation is found to be a result of the missing lateral tower flexibility in the simpler model....

  10. Performance analysis of coupled and uncoupled hydrodynamic and wave models in the northern Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busca, Claudia; Coluccelli, Alessandro; Valentini, Andrea; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Carniel, Sandro; Falcieri, Francesco; Paccagnella, Tiziana; Ravaioli, Mariangela; Riminucci, Francesco; Sclavo, Mauro; Russo, Aniello

    2014-05-01

    The complex dynamics of the Adriatic Sea are the result of geographical position, orography and bathymetry, as well as rivers discharge and meteorological conditions that influence, more strongly, the shallow northern part. Such complexity requires a constant monitoring of marine conditions in order to support several activities (marine resources management, naval operations, emergency management, shipping, tourism, as well as scientific ones). Platforms, buoys and mooring located in Adriatic Sea supply almost continuously real time punctual information, which can be spatially extended, with some limitations, by drifters and remote sensing. Operational forecasting systems represent valid tools to provide a complete tridimensional coverage of the area, with a high spatial and temporal resolution. The Hydro-Meteo-Clima Service of the Emilia-Romagna Environmental Agency (ARPA-SIMC, Bologna, Italy) and the Dept. of Life and Environmental Sciences of Università Politecnica delle Marche (DISVA-UNIVPM, Ancona, Italy), in collaboration with the Institute of Marine Science of the National Research Council (ISMAR-CNR, Italy) operationally run several wave and hydrodynamic models on the Adriatic Sea. The main implementations are based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), the wave model Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), and the coupling of the former two models in the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) system. Horizontal resolutions of the different systems range from the 2 km of AdriaROMS to the 0.5 km of the recently implemented northern Adriatic COAWST. Forecasts are produced every day for the subsequent 72 hour with hourly resolution. All the systems compute the fluxes exchanged through the interface with the atmosphere from the numerical weather prediction system named COSMO-I7, an implementation for Italy of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO) model, at 7 km horizontal resolution. Considering the several operational

  11. Simulations of direct and reflected wave trajectories for ground-based GNSS-R experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, N.; Frappart, F.; Ramillien, G.; Darrozes, J.; Desjardins, C.; Gegout, P.; Pérosanz, F.; Biancale, R.

    2014-10-01

    , satellite positions and ground paths, wave trajectories, first Fresnel zones, etc.) are provided either as text or KML files for visualization with Google Earth.

  12. A 2D Time Domain DRBEM Computer Model for MagnetoThermoelastic Coupled Wave Propagation Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdelsabour Fahmy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A numerical computer model based on the dual reciprocity boundary element method (DRBEM is extended to study magneto-thermoelastic coupled wave propagation problems with relaxation times involving anisotropic functionally graded solids. The model formulation is tested through its application to the problem of a solid placed in a constant primary magnetic field acting in the direction of the z-axis and rotating about this axis with a constant angular velocity. In the case of two-dimensional deformation, an implicit-explicit time domain DRBEM was presented and implemented to obtain the solution for the displacement and temperature fields. A comparison of the results is presented graphically in the context of Lord and Shulman (LS and Green and Lindsay (GL theories. Numerical results that demonstrate the validity of the proposed method are also presented graphically.

  13. Temporal coupled mode theory of standing wave resonant cavities for infrared photodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmanne, Emeline; De Lamaestre, Roch Espiau; Fowler, David; Boutami, Salim; Badano, Giacomo

    2015-03-23

    Standing wave resonating cavities have been proposed in the past to increase the performance of infrared detectors by minimizing the volume of photogeneration, hence the noise, while maintaining the same quantum efficiency. We present an approach based on the temporal coupled mode theory to explain their behavior and limitations. If the ratio of the imaginary part of the absorber's dielectric function to the index of the incident medium ε″(d)/n₀ is larger than 1.4, then the absorption cross section σ(a) can attain its maximum value, which for an isolated cavity is approximately 2λ/π. Besides, for σ(a) to exceed the cavity width, the incident medium refractive index must be close to unity. Metallic loss is negligible in the infrared, making those resonators suitable for integration in infrared photodetectors.

  14. Coupled motions of two ships in irregular waves in time domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-fang; LI Ji-de; WENG Nian-ming; GUAN Ling-xuan

    2004-01-01

    A three-dimensional time domain approach is used to study the aves. In this approach ,the boundary condition is satisfied on the mean wetted hull surface of the moving bodies and the free surface condition is linearized. The problem is solved by using a transient free-surface Green function source distribution on the submerged hulls. After solving the response amplitude operator ,the method of spectral analysis is employed to clearly express the motion energy spectrum and significant amplitude of two ships. For verifying the code .two same circular cylinders at beam wave are selected to calculate coupled motions by comparison with the results obtained by 3Dfrequcy method which has been proved to be efficient for solving such problems. Two Wigley ships of different sizes with the same forward speed are chosen for numerical calculation of the interaction effect, and some useful suggestions ate obtained for underway replenishment at sea.

  15. Revised NASA axially symmetric ring model for coupled-cavity traveling-wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1987-01-01

    A versatile large-signal, two-dimensional computer program is used by NASA to model coupled-cavity travelling-wave tubes (TWTs). In this model, the electron beam is divided into a series of disks, each of which is further divided into axially symmetric rings which can expand and contract. The trajectories of the electron rings and the radiofrequency (RF) fields are determined from the calculated axial and radial space-charge, RF, and magnetic forces as the rings pass through a sequence of cavities. By varying electrical and geometric properties of individual cavities, the model is capable of simulating severs, velocity tapers, and voltage jumps. The calculated electron ring trajectories can be used in designing magnetic focusing and multidepressed collectors. The details of using the program are presented, and results are compared with experimental data.

  16. Resonant plane waves in metamaterials with dipoles and quadrupoles coupled with quantum system

    CERN Document Server

    Chipouline, A; Pertsch, T

    2013-01-01

    Here the multipole approach [13], in combination with the density matrix formalism is used for establishing of the model for MMs with gain. This approach allows us to investigate analytically or semi-analytically the interplay between gain and magnetic properties of the MMs, the influence of internally unstable operation mode for spasers (MAs coupled with emitters, which the MMs consist of) on the propagation characteristics, and finally to optimize MM design. Moreover, the presented model is in line with the previously presented approach [16] (actually is its natural extension on the problem of plane wave propagation) and from the other side pretty clear and observable. The results presented in this paper resolve the discussion excited by [12] followed by [35-38].

  17. Coupling coefficients and kinetic equation for Rossby waves in multi-layer ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Soomere

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic description of baroclinic Rossby waves in multi-layer model ocean is analysed. Explicit analytical expressions for the coupling coefficients describing energy exchange intensity between different modes are obtained and their main properties are established for the three-layer model. It is demonstrated that several types of interactions vanish in the case of simple vertical structures of the ocean, e.g. when all layers have equal depth. These cases correspond to a zero component of the eigenvectors of the potential vorticity equations. The kinetic equation always possesses a fully barotropic solution. If energy is concentrated in the baroclinic modes, the barotropic mode will necessarily be generated. Motion systems consisting of a superposition of the barotropic and a baroclinic mode always transfer energy to other baroclinic modes.

  18. Coupled wave equations theory of surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnally, Michael O.; McMahon, Jeffrey M.; Van Duyne, Richard P.; Schatz, George C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a coupled wave semiclassical theory to describe plasmonic enhancement effects in surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS). A key result is that the plasmon enhanced fields which drive the vibrational equation of motion for each normal mode results in dispersive lineshapes in the SE-FSRS spectrum. This result, which reproduces experimental lineshapes, demonstrates that plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman methods provide unique sensitivity to a plasmonic response. Our derived SE-FSRS theory shows a plasmonic enhancement of |gp u|2I m {" separators="χR(ω ) gst 2 }/I m {" separators="χR(ω ) }, where |gpu|2 is the absolute square of the plasmonic enhancement from the Raman pump, χR(ω) is the Raman susceptibility, and gst is the plasmonic enhancement of the Stokes field in SE-FSRS. We conclude with a discussion on potential future experimental and theoretical directions for the field of plasmonically enhanced coherent Raman scattering.

  19. Detection of elastic photon-photon scattering through four-wave coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Lundstrom, E

    2005-01-01

    According to the theory of quantum electrodynamics, photon-photon scattering can take place via exchange of virtual electron-positron pairs. Effectively, the interaction can be formulated in terms of non-linear corrections to Maxwell's equations, and hence may be treated by classical non-linear electrodynamics. Due to the strong electromagnetic fields needed to reach any noticeable effect, photon-photon scattering has not yet been observed experimentally, but recent improvements in laser technology have increased the possibility of direct detection. A verification of the phenomena would be of great scientific value as a confirmation of quantum electrodynamics. In this thesis the possibility of direct detection of elastic photon-photon scattering through four-wave coupling is investigated, both for current and future systems. It is shown how three colliding laser pulses satisfying certain matching conditions, can generate scattered radiation in a fourth resonant direction. The interaction is modeled, and the n...

  20. On elastic waves in an thinly-layered laminated medium with stress couples under initial stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pal Roy

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is concerned with a simple transformation rule in finding out the composite elastic coefficients of a thinly layered laminated medium whose bulk properties are strongly anisotropic with a microelastic bending rigidity. These elastic coefficients which were not known completely for a layered laminated structure, are obtained suitably in terms of initial stress components and Lame's constants λi, μi of initially isotropic solids. The explicit solutions of the dynamical equations for a prestressed thinly layered laminated medium under horizontal compression in a gravity field are derived. The results are discussed specifying the effects of hydrostatic, deviatoric and couple stresses upon the characteristic propagation velocities of shear and compression wave modes.

  1. Goos-Hänchen shift in a standing-wave-coupled electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Hai-Hua; Liang, Zhi-Peng; Xu, Yan; Fan, Cun-Bo; Liu, Cheng-Zhi; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2015-03-01

    The Goos-Hänchen shift of the system composed by two cavity walls and an intracavity atomic sample is presented. The atomic sample is treated as a four-level double-Λ system, driven by the two counterpropagating coupling fields. The probe field experiences the discontinuous refractive index variation and is reflected. Moreover, under the phase-matching condition, the four-wave mixing effect based on electromagnetically induced transparency can cause effective reflection. The Goos-Hänchen shifts appear in both situations and are carefully investigated in this article. We refer to the first one with the incident and reflected light having identical wavelength as the linear Goos-Hänchen shift, and the second one with the reflection wavelength determined by the phase-matching condition as the nonlinear Goos-Hänchen shift. The differences between the two kinds of shifts, such as the incident angle range, conditions for the shift peaks, and controllability, are discussed.

  2. Development of an Inductively Coupled Thermometer for a Cryogenic Half-Wave Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madurowicz, Alexander; Kusaka, Akito

    2017-01-01

    The current state of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) research has focused much attention on the measurement of polarization. In an effort to modulate the CMB polarization while also minimizing photon noise due to thermal emission, we are developing a sapphire half-wave plate (HWP) cooled to 50 K rotating at 2 Hz on a superconducting magnetic levitating bearing. In order to measure the temperature of the rotor without making physical contact, we designed an inductively coupled cryogenic thermometer. The complex impedance of the circuit has a resonant peak when driven around 1 MHz. The width of this resonance is dependent on the value of the resistor, which varies with temperature and functions as a thermometer once calibrated. In this talk, we will present results from stationary measurements of this impedance and discuss the temperature accuracy of this thermometer, as well as a preliminary circuit design to measure this impedance during the HWP rotation.

  3. Wave modes of collective vortex gyration in dipolar-coupled-dot-array magnonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-Soo; Vogel, Andreas; Jung, Hyunsung; Lee, Ki-Suk; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2013-07-01

    Lattice vibration modes are collective excitations in periodic arrays of atoms or molecules. These modes determine novel transport properties in solid crystals. Analogously, in periodical arrangements of magnetic vortex-state disks, collective vortex motions have been predicted. Here, we experimentally observe wave modes of collective vortex gyration in one-dimensional (1D) periodic arrays of magnetic disks using time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. The observed modes are interpreted based on micromagnetic simulation and numerical calculation of coupled Thiele equations. Dispersion of the modes is found to be strongly affected by both vortex polarization and chirality ordering, as revealed by the explicit analytical form of 1D infinite arrays. A thorough understanding thereof is fundamental both for lattice vibrations and vortex dynamics, which we demonstrate for 1D magnonic crystals. Such magnetic disk arrays with vortex-state ordering, referred to as magnetic metastructure, offer potential implementation into information processing devices.

  4. Local-Oscillator Noise Coupling in Balanced Homodyne Readout for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Steinlechner, Sebastian; Bell, Angus S; Danilishin, Stefan L; Gläfke, Andreas; Gräf, Christian; Hennig, Jan-Simon; Houston, E Alasdair; Huttner, Sabina H; Leavey, Sean S; Pascucci, Daniela; Sorazu, Borja; Spencer, Andrew; Strain, Kenneth A; Wright, Jennifer; Hild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The second generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors are quickly approaching their design sensitivity. For the first time these detectors will become limited by quantum back-action noise. Several back-action evasion techniques have been proposed to further increase the detector sensitivity. Since most proposals rely on a flexible readout of the full amplitude- and phase-quadrature space of the output light field, balanced homodyne detection is generally expected to replace the currently used DC readout. Up to now, little investigation has been undertaken into how balanced homodyne detection can be successfully transferred from its ubiquitous application in table-top quantum optics experiments to large-scale interferometers with suspended optics. Here we derive implementation requirements with respect to local oscillator noise couplings and highlight potential issues with the example of the Glasgow Sagnac Speed Meter experiment, as well as for a future upgrade to the Advanced LIGO detectors.

  5. Sound waves in strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, P

    2005-01-01

    Gauge/string correspondence provides an efficient method to investigate gauge theories. In this talk we discuss the results of the paper (to appear) by P. Benincasa, A. Buchel and A. O. Starinets, where the propagation of sound waves is studied in a strongly coupled non-conformal gauge theory plasma. In particular, a prediction for the speed of sound as well as for the bulk viscosity is made for the N=2* gauge theory in the high temperature limit. As expected, the results achieved show a deviation from the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity for a conformal theory. It is pointed out that such results depend on the particular gauge theory considered.

  6. Sexual life and fertility desire in long-term HIV serodiscordant couples in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a grounded theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailemariam Tewodros G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though remarkable progress has been achieved, HIV/AIDS continues to be a major global health priority. HIV discordant relationship is one of the emerging issues in HIV prevention endeavour. In Ethiopia, very little is known about HIV-serodiscordant couples particularly how they manage their sexual relationship and fertility desire. Therefore, we conduct this study with the aim of exploring the experiences of HIV discordant couples about their sexual life, and fertility desire in the context of long-term relationships in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods A grounded theory approach was employed using in-depth interviews among 36 informants in ART/PMTCT centers of three public hospitals, a health center and one PLHIV association in Addis Ababa. Theoretical sampling was used to recruit 28 clients who lived in a discordant relationship and eight health care providers as key informants. Data collection and analysis were undertaken simultaneously using a constant comparison. The analysis was facilitated using OpenCode software. Results A grounded theory pertaining to sexual life and desire to have a child among HIV discordant couples emerged as “maintaining the relationship” as a core category. Couples pass through a social process of struggle to maintain their relationship. The causal conditions for couples to enter into the process of struggle to maintain their relationship were collectively categorized as “Entering in-to a transition” (knowing HIV serostatus and this includes mismatch of desire to have a child, controversy on safe sex versus desire to have a child, and undeniable change in sexual desire and practice through time were the features in entering into-transition. Then after the transition, couples engaged in certain actions/strategies that are categorized as “dealing with discordancy” such as entertaining partner’s interest by scarifying once self interest to maintain their relationship. Conclusions

  7. Stimulated and spontaneous four-wave mixing in silicon-on-insulator coupled photonic wire nano-cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzini, Stefano; Grassani, Davide; Galli, Matteo; Gerace, Dario; Patrini, Maddalena; Liscidini, Marco; Velha, Philippe; Bajoni, Daniele

    2013-07-01

    We report on four-wave mixing in coupled photonic crystal nano-cavities on a silicon-on-insulator platform. Three photonic wire cavities are side-coupled to obtain three modes equally separated in energy. The structure is designed to be self-filtering, and we show that the pump is rejected by almost two orders of magnitude. We study both the stimulated and the spontaneous four-wave mixing processes: owing to the small modal volume, we find that signal and idler photons are generated with a hundred-fold increase in efficiency as compared to silicon micro-ring resonators.

  8. Stimulated and spontaneous four-wave mixing in silicon-on-insulator coupled photonic wire nano-cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Azzini, Stefano; Grassani, Davide; Galli, Matteo; Gerace,Dario; Patrini, Maddalena; Liscidini, Marco; Velha, Philippe; Bajoni, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    We report on four-wave mixing in coupled photonic crystal nano-cavities on a silicon-on-insulator platform. Three photonic wire cavities are side-coupled to obtain three modes equally separated in energy. The structure is designed to be self-filtering, and we show that the pump is rejected by almost two orders of magnitudes. We study both the stimulated and the spontaneous four-wave mixing processes: owing to the small modal volume, we find that signal and idler photons are generated with a h...

  9. Stimulated and spontaneous four-wave mixing in silicon-on-insulator coupled photonic wire nano-cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Azzini, Stefano; Grassani, Davide; Galli, Matteo; Gerace, Dario; Patrini, Maddalena; Liscidini, Marco; Velha, Philippe; Bajoni, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    We report on four-wave mixing in coupled photonic crystal nano-cavities on a silicon-on-insulator platform. Three photonic wire cavities are side-coupled to obtain three modes equally separated in energy. The structure is designed to be self-filtering, and we show that the pump is rejected by almost two orders of magnitudes. We study both the stimulated and the spontaneous four-wave mixing processes: owing to the small modal volume, we find that signal and idler photons are generated with a h...

  10. Future Evolution of Marine Heat Waves in the Mediterranean: Coupled Regional Climate Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmaraki, Sofia; Somot, Samuel; Sevault, Florence; Nabat, Pierre; Cavicchia, Leone; Djurdjevic, Vladimir; Cabos, William; Sein, Dmitry

    2017-04-01

    FUTURE EVOLUTION OF MARINE HEAT WAVES IN THE MEDITERRANEAN : COUPLED REGIONAL CLIMATE PROJECTIONS The Mediterranean area is identified as a « Hot Spot » region, vulnerable to future climate change with potentially strong impacts over the sea. By 2100, climate models predict increased warming over the sea surface, with possible implications on the Mediterranean thermohaline and surface circulation,associated also with severe impacts on the ecosystems (e.g. fish habitat loss, species extinction and migration, invasive species). However, a robust assesment of the future evolution of the extreme marine temperatures remains still an open issue of primary importance, under the anthropogenic pressure. In this context, we study here the probability and characteristics of marine heat wave (MHW) occurrence in the Mediterranean Sea in future climate projections. To this end, we use an ensemble of fully coupled regional climate system models (RCSM) from the Med- CORDEX initiative. This multi-model approach includes a high-resolution representation of the atmospheric, land and ocean component, with a free air-sea interface.Specifically, dedicated simulations for the 20th and the 21st century are carried out with respect to the different IPCC-AR5 socioeconomic scenarios (1950-2100, RCP8.5, RCP4.5, RCP2.6). Model evaluation for the historical period is performed using satellite and in situ data. Then, the variety of factors that can cause the MHW (e.g. direct radiative forcing, ocean advection, stratification change) are examined to disentangle the dominant driving force. Finally, the spatial variability and temporal evolution of MHW are analyzed on an annual basis, along with additional integrated indicators, useful for marine ecosystems.

  11. Direct observation of nonlinear coupling in wave turbulence at the surface of water and relevance of approximate resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The theoretical framework of Weak Turbulence describes the statistical properties of a large collection of nonlinear waves. For a weakly nonlinear wave field, energy is assumed to be transferred only trough resonant interaction. This enables the computation of analytical solutions of the stationary statistical states (Zakhaorv spectrum). Some similarities with hydrodynamical turbulence appear : an energy cascade is present from the injection scale to the dissipation at small scales. The theory has been applied to numerous systems many of them being of geophysical or astrophysical nature (water surface waves, internal waves, inertial waves, solar winds) as well as superfluid turbulence, lasers, nonlinear optics in fibers or vibrated elastic plates. For water surface waves, experimental laboratory measurements often fail to reproduce quantitatively theoretical predictions. Gravity waves and capillary waves are often treated separately because of their different nature. For capillary waves, energy is supposed to be transferred trough 3-waves interactions, whereas for gravity waves the coupling involves 4 waves (because of the curvature of the dispersion relation which does not allow triadic solutions). In the laboratory, the range of exited wavelength are usually not strongly separated from the crossover between capillary and gravity waves (which occur near 13 Hz) due to size or measurement limitations. Near this crossover, the dispersion relation is significantly affected and this impacts most likely the theoretical predictions. To investigate how this special point may act on the phenomenology, we report laboratory experiments on gravity-capillary waves focused on the crossover (Aubourg,Mordant-PRL,2015). The setup consists in a 70 ∗ 40 cm2 vessel where waves are generated by horizontal vibration. A Fourier Transform Profilometry technique is used that is fully resolved in time and space and thus permits to compute the full space-time spectrum. The presence of an

  12. The dynamic coupling of a third-generation wave model and a 3D hydrodynamic model through boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M. Y.; Li, Y. S.

    1997-08-01

    A third-generation wind wave model based on the energy balance equation taking into account the effects of time-varying currents and coupled dynamically with a semi-implicit three-dimensional hydrodynamic model incorporating the influences of time- and space-varying vertical eddy viscosity, bottom topography and wave-current interactions is presented in this paper. The wave model is synchronously coupled with the three-dimensional hydrodynamic model through the surface atmospheric turbulent boundary layer and the bottom boundary layer. The theory of Janssen (1991) (in Journal of Physical Oceanography21, 1631-1642) is used to incorporate the effects of waves on the surface boundary layer, while the theory of Grant and Maddsen (1979) [in Journal of Geophysical Research (Oceans)84, 1797-1808], which was used by Signell et al. (1990) (in Journal of Geophysical Research95, 9671-9678) on the bottom boundary layer for constant waves, is modified for the inclusion of time-varying waves. The mutual influences between waves and currents are investigated through an idealized continental shelf case and hindcastings of storm events in the sea area adjacent to Hong Kong in the northern South China Sea. Calculations are compared with other computed results and observations. Calculations show that the wave-dependent surface stress incorporated in the three-dimensional hydrodynamic model has significant impact on water surface velocities and surface elevations (over 10% higher). The inclusion of wave-dependent bottom stress also shows some effects; however, in the presence of the wave-dependent surface stress, its effect on surge levels becomes negligible. The effect of currents on waves amounts to the reduction of the significant wave height by about 8% and less for wave mean periods. However, the inclusion of the wave-dependent bottom stress in the three-dimensional hydrodynamic model has little effect on wave characteristics whether or not the wave-dependent surface stress is

  13. Grating-Coupling-Based Excitation of Bloch Surface Waves for Lab-on-Fiber Nanoprobes

    CERN Document Server

    Scaravilli, Michele; Cusano, Andrea; Galdi, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate for the first time the possibility to excite Bloch surface waves (BSWs) on the tip of single-mode optical fibers. Within this framework, we first demonstrate the possibility to exploit a grating-coupling mechanism for on-tip excitation of BSWs, and highlight the flexibility of the proposed design as well as its intrinsic robustness to unavoidable fabrication tolerances. Subsequently, with a view towards label-free chemical and biological sensing, we present an optimized design to maximize the sensitivity (in terms of wavelength shift) of the arising resonances with respect to changes in the refractive properties of the surrounding environment. Numerical results indicate that the attained sensitivities are in line with those exhibited by state-of-the-art plasmonic nanoprobes, with the key advantage of exhibiting much narrower spectral resonances. This prototype study paves the way for a new class of miniaturized high-performance surface-wave fiber-optic devices for high-resolution...

  14. Modeling of Breaching Due to Overtopping Flow and Waves Based on Coupled Flow and Sediment Transport

    CERN Document Server

    He, Zhiguo; Zhao, Liang; Wu, Ganfeng; Pähtz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Breaching of earthen or sandy dams/dunes by overtopping flow and waves is a complicated process with strong, unsteady flow, high sediment transport, and rapid bed changes in which the interactions between flow and morphology should not be ignored. This study presents a depth-averaged two-dimensional (2D) coupled flow and sediment transport model to investigate the flow and breaching processes with and without waves. Bed change and variable flow density are included in the flow continuity and momentum equations to consider the impacts of sediment transport. The model adopts the non-equilibrium approach for total-load sediment transport and specifies different repose angles to handle non-cohesive embankment slope avalanching. The equations are solved using an explicit finite volume method on a rectangular grid with the improved Godunov-type central upwind scheme and the nonnegative reconstruction of the water depth method to handle mixed-regime flows near the breach. The model has been tested against two sets o...

  15. Electron attachment in F2 - Conclusive demonstration of nonresonant, s-wave coupling in the limit of zero electron energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to F2 has been observed in the energy range 0-140 meV, at a resolution of 6 meV (full width at half maximum). Results show conclusively a sharp, resolution-limited threshold behavior consistent with an s-wave cross section varying as sq rt of epsilon. Two accurate theoretical calculations predict only p-wave behavior varying as the sq rt of epsilon. Several nonadiabatic coupling effects leading to s-wave behavior are outlined.

  16. Fibre-Coupling Zig-Zag Beam Deflection Technology for Investigation of Attenuation Process of Laser-Induced Shock Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ping; BIAN Bao-Min; LI Zhen-Hua

    2005-01-01

    @@ A novel fibre-coupling zig-zag beam deflection technology is developed to investigate the attenuation process of laser-induced shock waves in air. Utilizing ordinal reflections of probe beams by a pair of parallel mirrors,a zig-zag beam field is formed, which has eleven probe beams in the horizontal plane. When a laser-induced shock wave propagates through the testing field, it causes eleven deflection signals one after another. The whole attenuation process of the shock wave in air can be detected and illuminated clearly on one experimental curve.

  17. Seismic interferometry of railroad induced ground motions: body and surface wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiros, Diego A.; Brown, Larry D.; Kim, Doyeon

    2016-04-01

    Seismic interferometry applied to 120 hr of railroad traffic recorded by an array of vertical component seismographs along a railway within the Rio Grande rift has recovered surface and body waves characteristic of the geology beneath the railway. Linear and hyperbolic arrivals are retrieved that agree with surface (Rayleigh), direct and reflected P waves observed by nearby conventional seismic surveys. Train-generated Rayleigh waves span a range of frequencies significantly higher than those recovered from typical ambient noise interferometry studies. Direct P-wave arrivals have apparent velocities appropriate for the shallow geology of the survey area. Significant reflected P-wave energy is also present at relatively large offsets. A common midpoint stack produces a reflection image consistent with nearby conventional reflection data. We suggest that for sources at the free surface (e.g. trains) increasing the aperture of the array to record wide angle reflections, in addition to longer recording intervals, might allow the recovery of deeper geological structure from railroad traffic. Frequency-wavenumber analyses of these recordings indicate that the train source is symmetrical (i.e. approaching and receding) and that deeper refracted energy is present although not evident in the time-offset domain. These results confirm that train-generated vibrations represent a practical source of high-resolution subsurface information, with particular relevance to geotechnical and environmental applications.

  18. Coupled wave analysis of holographically induced transparency (HIT) generated by two multiplexed volume gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, Luis; Blaya, Salvador; Acebal, Pablo; Fimia, Antonio; Madrigal, Roque; Murciano, Angel

    2011-04-11

    We present a holographic system that can be used to manipulate the group velocity of light pulses. The proposed structure is based on the multiplexing of two sequential holographic volume gratings, one in transmission and the other in reflection geometry, where one of the recording beams must be the same for both structures. As in other systems such as grating induced transparency (GIT) or coupled-resonator-induced transparency (CRIT), by using the coupled wave theory it is shown that this holographic structure represents a classical analogue of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Analytical expressions were obtained for the transmittance induced at the forbidden band (spectral hole) and conditions where the group velocity was slowed down were analyzed. Moreover, the propagation of Gaussian pulses is analyzed for this system by obtaining, after further approximations, analytical expressions for the distortion of the transmitted field. As a result, we demonstrate the conditions where the transmitted pulse is slowed down and its shape is only slightly distorted. Finally, by comparing with the exact solutions obtained, the range of validity of all the analytical formulae was verified, demonstrating that the error is very low.

  19. Spin wave eigenmodes in single and coupled sub-150 nm rectangular permalloy dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlotti, G., E-mail: giovanni.carlotti@fisica.unipg.it; Madami, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Tacchi, S. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del CNR (CNR-IOM), Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Perugia (Italy); Gubbiotti, G.; Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Porod, W. [Center for Nano Science and Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    We present the results of a Brillouin light scattering investigation of thermally excited spin wave eigenmodes in square arrays of either isolated rectangular dots of permalloy or twins of dipolarly coupled elements, placed side-by-side or head-to-tail. The nanodots, fabricated by e-beam lithography and lift-off, are 20 nm thick and have the major size D in the range between 90 nm and 150 nm. The experimental spectra show the presence of two main peaks, corresponding to modes localized either at the edges or in the center of the dots. Their frequency dependence on the dot size and on the interaction with adjacent elements has been measured and successfully interpreted on the basis of dynamical micromagnetic simulations. The latter enabled us also to describe the spatial profile of the eigenmodes, putting in evidence the effects induced by the dipolar interaction between coupled dots. In particular, in twinned dots the demagnetizing field is appreciably modified in proximity of the “internal edges” if compared to the “external” ones, leading to a splitting of the edge mode. These results can be relevant for the exploitation of sub-150 nm magnetic dots in new applications, such as magnonic metamaterials, bit-patterned storage media, and nano-magnetic logic devices.

  20. RF-thermal-structural-RF coupled analysis on a travelling wave disk-loaded accelerating structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Shi-Lun; CHI Yun-Long; ZHANG Jing-Ru; HOU Mi; LI Xiao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The travelling wave (TW) disk-loaded accelerating structure is one of the key components in normal conducting (NC) linear accelerators,and has been studied for many years.In the design process,usually after the dimensions of each cell and the two couplers are finalized,the structure is fabricated and tuned,and then the whole structure RF characteristics are measured by using a vector network analyzer.Before fabrication,the whole structure characteristics (including RF,thermal and structural ones) are less simulated due to the limited capability of currently available computers.In this paper,we described a method for performing RF-thermal-structural-RF coupled analysis on a TW disk-loaded structure using only one PC.In order to validate our method,we first analyzed and compared our RF simulation results on the 3 m long BEPC Ⅱ structure with the corresponding experimental results,which shows very good consistency.Finally,the RF-thermal-structure-RF coupled analysis results on the 1.35 m long NSC KIPT linac accelerating structure are presented.

  1. Spatial structure and dispersion of drift mirror waves coupled with Alfvén waves in a 1-D inhomogeneous plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Klimushkin

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper employs the frame of a 1-D inhomogeneous model of space plasma,to examine the spatial structure and growth rate of drift mirror modes, often suggested for interpreting some oscillation types in space plasma. Owing to its coupling with the Alfvén mode, the drift mirror mode attains dispersion across magnetic shells (dependence of the frequency on the wave-vector's radial component, kr. The spatial structure of a mode confined across magnetic shells is studied. The scale of spatial localization of the wave is shown to be determined by the plasma inhomogeneity scale and by the azimuthal component of the wave vector. The wave propagates across magnetic shells, its amplitude modulated along the radial coordinate by the Gauss function. Coupling with the Alfvén mode strongly influences the growth rate of the drift mirror instability. The mirror mode can only exist in a narrow range of parameters. In the general case, the mode represents an Alfvén wave modified by plasma inhomogeneity.

  2. Advanced technologies for future ground-based, laser-interferometric gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Giles; Hild, Stefan; Pitkin, Matthew

    2014-12-12

    We present a review of modern optical techniques being used and developed for the field of gravitational wave detection. We describe the current state-of-the-art of gravitational waves detector technologies with regard to optical layouts, suspensions and test masses. We discuss the dominant sources and noise in each of these subsystems and the developments that will help mitigate them for future generations of detectors. We very briefly summarise some of the novel astrophysics that will be possible with these upgraded detectors.

  3. Incommensurate spin density wave as a signature of spin-orbit coupling and precursor of topological superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Aaron; Wu, P.-K.; Kao, Y.-J.; Pereg-Barnea, T.

    2016-12-01

    On a square lattice, the Hubbard model at half filling reduces to the Heisenberg model and exhibits antiferromagnetism. When doped away from half filling this model gives rise to d -wave superconductivity. This behavior is reminiscent of the phenomenology of the cuprate family with their high Tcd -wave superconductivity and their antiferromagnetic parent compound. It is therefore interesting to study an extension of the Hubbard model which includes spin orbit coupling. We have previously studied this model away from half filling [see, for example, Farrell and Pereg-Barnea, Phys. Rev. B 89, 035112 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.035112] and found that the addition of spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman field leads to topological superconductivity with d +i d pairing function. In this paper we are interested in the `parent compound' of this state. Namely, we study the half filling, strong coupling limit of the square lattice Hubbard model with spin orbit coupling and Zeeman field. The strong coupling expansion of the model is a spin model which contains compass anisotropy and Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction on top of the usual Heisenberg term. We analyze this spin model classically and find an incommensurate spin density wave (ISDW) for low Zeeman fields. This ISDW has a wave vector Q ⃗ which deviates from (π ,π ) by an amount which is proportional to the spin-orbit coupling and can therefore serve as a signature. We study the stability of the ISDW phase using spin wave theory and find a stable and an unstable region. At higher but moderate Zeeman fields we find a tilted antiferromagnet and a ferromagnet at high Zeeman fields.

  4. Effects of gap junction inhibition on contraction waves in the murine small intestine in relation to coupled oscillator theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Waves of contraction in the small intestine correlate with slow waves generated by the myenteric network of interstitial cells of Cajal. Coupled oscillator theory has been used to explain steplike gradients in the frequency (frequency plateaux) of contraction waves along the length of the small intestine. Inhibition of gap junction coupling between oscillators should lead to predictable effects on these plateaux and the wave dislocation (wave drop) phenomena associated with their boundaries. It is these predictions that we wished to test. We used a novel multicamera diameter-mapping system to measure contraction along 25- to 30-cm lengths of murine small intestine. There were typically two to three plateaux per length of intestine. Dislocations could be limited to the wavefronts immediately about the terminated wave, giving the appearance of a three-pronged fork, i.e., a fork dislocation; additionally, localized decreases in velocity developed across a number of wavefronts, ending with the terminated wave, which could appear as a fork, i.e., slip dislocations. The gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone increased the number of plateaux and dislocations and decreased contraction wave velocity. In some cases, the usual frequency gradient was reversed, with a plateau at a higher frequency than its proximal neighbor; thus fork dislocations were inverted, and the direction of propagation was reversed. Heptanol had no effect on the frequency or velocity of contractions but did reduce their amplitude. To understand intestinal motor patterns, the pacemaker network of the interstitial cells of Cajal is best evaluated as a system of coupled oscillators. PMID:25501550

  5. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of β, the stratification characterized by the Väisälä-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude Θc versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. "Supersonic" fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example Θc~12° for Jupiter. On the other hand slow "subsonic" rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the β effect vanishes. "Transonic" rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34° and 39°, respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26° about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics.

  6. Analysis of the Tangjiaxi landslide-generated waves in the Zhexi Reservoir, China, by a granular flow coupling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bolin; Yin, Yueping; Wang, Shichang; Tan, Jianmin; Liu, Guangning

    2017-05-01

    A rocky granular flow is commonly formed after the failure of rocky bank slopes. An impulse wave disaster may also be initiated if the rocky granular flow rushes into a river with a high velocity. Currently, the granular mass-water body coupling study is an important trend in the field of landslide-induced impulse waves. In this paper, a full coupling numerical model for landslide-induced impulse waves is developed based on a non-coherent granular flow equation, i.e., the Mih equation. In this model, the Mih equation for continuous non-coherent granular flow controls movements of sliding mass, the two-phase flow equation regulates the interaction between sliding mass and water, and the renormalization group (RNG) turbulence model governs the movement of the water body. The proposed model is validated and applied for the 2014 Tangjiaxi landslide of the Zhexi Reservoir located in Hunan Province, China, to analyze the characteristics of both landslide motion and its following impulse waves. On 16 July 2014, a rocky debris flow was formed after the failure of the Tangjiaxi landslide, damming the Tangjiaxi stream and causing an impulse wave disaster with three dead and nine missing bodies. Based on the full coupling numerical analysis, the granular flow impacts the water with a maximum velocity of about 22.5 m s-1. Moreover, the propagation velocity of the generated waves reaches up to 12 m s-1. The maximum calculated run-up of 21.8 m is close enough to the real value of 22.7 m. The predicted landslide final deposit and wave run-up heights are in a good agreement with the field survey data. These facts verify the ability of the proposed model for simulating the real impulse wave generated by rocky granular flow events.

  7. Observations of coupled seismicity and ground deformation at El Hierro Island (2011-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    New insights into the magma storage and evolution at oceanic island volcanoes are now being achieved using remotely sensed space geodetic techniques, namely satellite radar interferometry. Differential radar interferometry is a technique tracking, at high spatial resolution, changes in the travel-time (distance) from the satellites to the ground surface, having wide applications in Earth sciences. Volcanic activity usually is accompanied by surface ground deformation. In many instances, modelling of surface deformation has the great advantage to estimate the magma volume change, a particularly interesting parameter prior to eruptions. Jointly interpreted with petrology, degassing and seismicity, it helps to understand the crustal magmatic systems as a whole. Current (and near-future) radar satellite missions will reduce the revisit time over global sub-aerial volcanoes to a sub-weekly basis, which will increase the potential for its operational use. Time series and filtering processing techniques of such streaming data would allow to track subsurface magma migration with high precision, and frequently update over vast areas (volcanic arcs, large caldera systems, etc.). As an example for the future potential monitoring scenario, we analyze multiple satellite radar data over El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain) to measure and model surface ground deformation. El Hierro has been active for more than 3 years (2011 to 2014). Initial phases of the unrest culminated in a submarine eruption (late 2011 - early 2012). However, after the submarine eruption ended, its magmatic system still active and affected by pseudo-regular energetic seismic swarms, accompanied by surface deformation without resumed eruptions. Such example is a great opportunity to understand the crustal magmatic systems in low magma supply-rate oceanic island volcanoes. This new approach to measure surface deformation processes is yielding an ever richer level of information from volcanology to

  8. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave simulations of a storm event over the Gulf of Lion and Balearic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Lionel; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Warner, John C.; Gomez, Marta; Vizoso, Guillermo; Tintore, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    The coastal areas of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea are one of the most challenging places for ocean forecasting. This region is exposed to severe storms events that are of short duration. During these events, significant air-sea interactions, strong winds and large sea-state can have catastrophic consequences in the coastal areas. To investigate these air-sea interactions and the oceanic response to such events, we implemented the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System simulating a severe storm in the Mediterranean Sea that occurred in May 2010. During this event, wind speed reached up to 25 m.s-1 inducing significant sea surface cooling (up to 2°C) over the Gulf of Lion (GoL) and along the storm track, and generating surface waves with a significant height of 6 m. It is shown that the event, associated with a cyclogenesis between the Balearic Islands and the GoL, is relatively well reproduced by the coupled system. A surface heat budget analysis showed that ocean vertical mixing was a major contributor to the cooling tendency along the storm track and in the GoL where turbulent heat fluxes also played an important role. Sensitivity experiments on the ocean-atmosphere coupling suggested that the coupled system is sensitive to the momentum flux parameterization as well as air-sea and air-wave coupling. Comparisons with available atmospheric and oceanic observations showed that the use of the fully coupled system provides the most skillful simulation, illustrating the benefit of using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model for the assessment of these storm events.

  9. Spectroscopic analysis of stellar mass black-hole mergers in our local universe with ground-based gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bhagwat, Swetha; Ballmer, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discoveries of binary black-hole mergers by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO), we investigate the prospects of ground-based detectors to perform a spectroscopic analysis of signals emitted during the ringdown of the final Kerr black-hole formed by a stellar mass binary black-hole merger. Although it is unlikely that Advanced LIGO can measure multiple modes of the ringdown, assuming an optimistic rate of 240 Gpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$, upgrades to the existing LIGO detectors could measure multiple ringdown modes in $\\sim$6 detections per year. New ground-based facilities such as Einstein Telescope or Cosmic Explorer could measure multiple ringdown modes in over 300 events per year. We perform Monte-Carlo injections of $10^{6}$ binary black-hole mergers in a search volume defined by a sphere of radius 1500 Mpc centered at the detector, for various proposed ground-based detector models. We assume a uniform random distribution in component masses of ...

  10. Determination of the chiral coupling constants c(3) and c(4) in new pp and np partial-wave analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rentmeester, MCM; Timmermans, RGE; de Swart, JJ

    2003-01-01

    As a first result of two new partial-wave analyses, one of the pp and another one of the np scattering data below 500 MeV, we report a study of the long-range chiral two-pion exchange interaction which contains the chiral coupling constants c(1), c(3), and c(4). By using as input a theoretical value

  11. Three-dimensional coupled-wave theory for the guided mode resonance in photonic crystal slabs: TM-like polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Peng, Chao; Liang, Yong; Li, Zhengbin; Noda, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    A general coupled-wave theory is presented for the guided resonance in photonic crystal (PhC) slabs with TM-like polarization. Numerical results based on our model are presented with finite-difference time-domain validations. The proposed analysis facilitates comprehensive understanding of the physics of guided resonance in PhC slabs and provides guidance for its applications.

  12. Gravitational Waves from Merging Intermediate-mass Black Holes. II. Event Rates at Ground-based Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Hisa-aki; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    2017-02-01

    Based on a dynamical formation model of a supermassive black hole (SMBH), we estimate the expected observational profile of gravitational waves at ground-based detectors, such as KAGRA or advanced LIGO/VIRGO. Noting that the second generation of detectors have enough sensitivity from 10 Hz and up (especially with KAGRA owing to its location at less seismic noise), we are able to detect the ring-down gravitational wave of a BH with mass Madvanced LIGO/VIRGO), we find that the BH merger of its total mass M∼ 60{M}ȯ is at the peak of the expected mass distribution. With its signal-to-noise ratio ρ =10 (30), we estimate the event rate R∼ 200 (20) per year in the most optimistic case, and we also find that BH mergers in the range M 1 per year for ρ =10. Thus, if we observe a BH with more than 100{M}ȯ in future gravitational-wave observations, our model naturally explains its source.

  13. Planetary wave signatures in the equatorial atmosphere ionosphere system, and mesosphere- E- and F-region coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu, M. A.; Ramkumar, T. K.; Batista, I. S.; Brum, C. G. M.; Takahashi, H.; Reinisch, B. W.; Sobral, J. H. A.

    2006-02-01

    Upward transport of wave energy and momentum due to gravity, tidal and planetary waves from below and extra-tropics controls the phenomenology of the equatorial atmosphere ionosphere system. An important aspect of this phenomenology is the development of small- and large-scale structures including thin layers in the mesosphere and E-region, and the formation of wide spectrum plasma structures of the equatorial F-region, widely known as equatorial spread F/plasma bubble irregularities (that are known to have significant impact on space application systems based on trans-ionospheric radio waves propagation). It seems that the effects of tidal and gravity waves at mesospheric and thermospheric heights and their control of ionospheric densities, electric fields and currents are relatively better known than are the effects originating from vertical coupling due to planetary waves. Results from airglow, radar and ionospheric sounding observations demonstrate the existence of significant planetary wave influence on plasma parameters at E- and F-region heights over equatorial latitudes. We present and discuss here some results showing planetary wave oscillations in concurrent mesospheric winds and equatorial electrojet intensity variations in the Indian sector as well as in the mesospheric airglow and F-layer height variation in Brazil. Also presented are evidences of planetary wave-scale oscillations in equatorial evening pre-reversal electric field (F-region vertical drift) and their effects on equatorial spread F /plasma bubble irregularity development and day-to-day variability.

  14. Numerical simulation of landslide-generated waves using a soil-water coupling smoothed particle hydrodynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chuanqi; An, Yi; Wu, Qiang; Liu, Qingquan; Cao, Zhixian

    2016-06-01

    We simulate the generation of a landslide-induced impulse wave with a newly-developed soil-water coupling model in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) framework. The model includes an elasto-plastic constitutive model for soil, a Navier-Stokes equation based model for water, and a bilateral coupling model at the interface. The model is tested with simulated waves induced by a slow and a fast landslide. Good agreement is obtained between simulation results and experimental data. The generated wave and the deformation of the landslide body can both be resolved satisfactorily. All parameters in our model have their physical meaning in soil mechanics and can be obtained from conventional soil mechanics experiments directly. The influence of the dilatancy angle of soil shows that the non-associated flow rule must be selected, and the value of the dilatancy angle should not be chosen arbitrarily, if it is not determined with relative experiments.

  15. Coupling of flexural and longitudinal wave motion in a finite periodic structure with asymmetrically arranged transverse beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Lars; Ohlrich, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    and wave forces that are associated with the characteristic wave-types, which can exist in a multicoupled periodic system [Mead, J. Sound Vib. 40, 19–39 (1975)]. The third part of the paper considers a finite specific test-structure with eight periodic elements and with structural terminations...... is examined in the first part of the present paper, and the damping-dependent decrease in wave coupling is revealed for a structure with multiresonant side-branches. In the second part, the simplifying semi-infinite assumption is relaxed and general expressions for the junction responses of finite...... and multicoupled periodic systems are derived as a generalization of the governing expressions for finite, mono-coupled periodic systems [Ohlrich, J. Sound Vib. 107, 411–434 (1986)]. The present derivation of the general frequency response of a finite system utilizes the eigenvectors of displacement responses...

  16. Coordinated polar spacecraft, geosynchronous spacecraft, and ground-based observations of magnetopause processes and their coupling to the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present in-situ observations of processes occurring at the magnetopause and vicinity, including surface waves, oscillatory magnetospheric field lines, and flux transfer events, and coordinated observations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES spacecraft, and on the ground by CANOPUS and 210° Magnetic Meridian (210MM magnetometer arrays. On 7 February 2002, during a high-speed solar wind stream, the Polar spacecraft was skimming the magnetopause in a post-noon meridian plane for ~3h. During this interval, it made two short excursions and a few partial crossings into the magnetosheath and observed quasi-periodic cold ion bursts in the region adjacent to the magnetopause current layer. The multiple magnetopause crossings, as well as the velocity of the cold ion bursts, indicate that the magnetopause was oscillating with an ~6-min period. Simultaneous observations of Pc5 waves at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES spacecraft and on the ground by the CANOPUS magnetometer array reveal that these magnetospheric pulsations were forced oscillations of magnetic field lines directly driven by the magnetopause oscillations. The magnetospheric pulsations occurred only in a limited longitudinal region in the post-noon dayside sector, and were not a global phenomenon, as one would expect for global field line resonance. Thus, the magnetopause oscillations at the source were also limited to a localized region spanning ~4h in local time. These observations suggest that it is unlikely that the Kelvin-Helmholz instability and/or fluctuations in the solar wind dynamic pressure were the direct driving mechanisms for the observed boundary oscillations. Instead, the likely mechanism for the localized boundary oscillations was pulsed reconnection at the magnetopause occurring along the X-line extending over the same 4-h region. The Pc5 band pressure fluctuations commonly seen in high-speed solar wind streams may modulate the reconnection rate as

  17. LDA + U study of Pu and PuO{sub 2} on ground state with spin-orbital coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hao, E-mail: haowangfp@gmail.com [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho 2145-2, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan); Konashi, Kenji [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho 2145-2, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan)

    2012-08-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In our paper, we use spin-orbital coupling to investigate PuO{sub 2}, which is the first time as our knowledge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We also check initially the Jahn-Teller effect of PuO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Based on the Bader charge analysis, the covalency of Pu and O atoms is clearly shown. - Abstract: In order to describe the structural, electronic and thermodynamic properties of {delta}-Pu and PuO{sub 2}, first-principle calculation is performed with spin-orbital coupling. By applying the DFT + U and occupation matrix method, we obtain a good result close to the experimental data. All possible initial occupation matrices are tried to find the ground state. The Jahn-Teller distortion and the spin-orbital effect are discussed. The intermediate coupling is proven by PDOS analysis. Covalency between Pu and O atoms is proven by quantum theory of atoms in molecules. By PDOS, occupation matrix and Bader charge analysis, the 5f configurations of {delta}-Pu and PuO{sub 2} are investigated.

  18. Surface wave effects on water temperature in the Baltic Sea: simulations with the coupled NEMO-WAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari, Victor; Staneva, Joanna; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian; Janssen, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Coupled circulation (NEMO) and wave model (WAM) system was used to study the effects of surface ocean waves on water temperature distribution and heat exchange at regional scale (the Baltic Sea). Four scenarios—including Stokes-Coriolis force, sea-state dependent energy flux (additional turbulent kinetic energy due to breaking waves), sea-state dependent momentum flux and the combination these forcings—were simulated to test the impact of different terms on simulated temperature distribution. The scenario simulations were compared to a control simulation, which included a constant wave-breaking coefficient, but otherwise was without any wave effects. The results indicate a pronounced effect of waves on surface temperature, on the distribution of vertical temperature and on upwelling's. Overall, when all three wave effects were accounted for, did the estimates of temperature improve compared to control simulation. During the summer, the wave-induced water temperature changes were up to 1 °C. In northern parts of the Baltic Sea, a warming of the surface layer occurs in the wave included simulations in summer months. This in turn reduces the cold bias between simulated and measured data, e.g. the control simulation was too cold compared to measurements. The warming is related to sea-state dependent energy flux. This implies that a spatio-temporally varying wave-breaking coefficient is necessary, because it depends on actual sea state. Wave-induced cooling is mostly observed in near-coastal areas and is the result of intensified upwelling in the scenario, when Stokes-Coriolis forcing is accounted for. Accounting for sea-state dependent momentum flux results in modified heat exchange at the water-air boundary which consequently leads to warming of surface water compared to control simulation.

  19. Ground return effect on wave propagation parameters of overhead power cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malo Machado, V.M.; Brandao Faria, J.A.; Borges da Silva, J.F. (Centro de Electrotecnia da Univ. Tecnia de Lisboa, Inst. Superior Tecnico, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, 1096 Lisboa Codex (PT))

    1990-04-01

    The propagation properties of overhead three-phase cables are usually analyzed assuming that the pipe conductor establishes a perfect shielding between the inner conductor set and any outer conductor, i.e., the power cable is assumed as an isolated system. The influence of a lossy ground plane in the neighborhood of the cable is examined in this paper. The propagation parameters for both approaches are compared---significative differences being found to exist, in the zero mode, at low working frequencies.

  20. Standard practice for guided wave testing of above ground steel pipework using piezoelectric effect transduction

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides a procedure for the use of guided wave testing (GWT), also previously known as long range ultrasonic testing (LRUT) or guided wave ultrasonic testing (GWUT). 1.2 GWT utilizes ultrasonic guided waves, sent in the axial direction of the pipe, to non-destructively test pipes for defects or other features by detecting changes in the cross-section and/or stiffness of the pipe. 1.3 GWT is a screening tool. The method does not provide a direct measurement of wall thickness or the exact dimensions of defects/defected area; an estimate of the defect severity however can be provided. 1.4 This practice is intended for use with tubular carbon steel or low-alloy steel products having Nominal Pipe size (NPS) 2 to 48 corresponding to 60.3 to 1219.2 mm (2.375 to 48 in.) outer diameter, and wall thickness between 3.81 and 25.4 mm (0.15 and 1 in.). 1.5 This practice covers GWT using piezoelectric transduction technology. 1.6 This practice only applies to GWT of basic pipe configuration. This inc...

  1. Performance of plane-wave-based LDA+U and GGA+U approaches to describe magnetic coupling in molecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Pablo; Loschen, Christoph; Moreira, Ibério De P R; Illas, Francesc

    2009-11-15

    This work explores the performance of periodic plane wave density functional theory calculations with an on-site Coulomb correction to the standard LDA and GGA exchange-correlation potential--commonly used to describe strongly correlated solids--in describing the magnetic coupling constant of a series of molecular compounds representative of dinuclear Cu complexes and of organic diradicals. The resulting LDA+U or GGA+U formalisms, lead to results comparable to experiment and to those obtained by means of standard hybrid functionals provided that the value of the U parameter is adequately chosen. Hence, these methods offer an alternative efficient computational scheme to correct LDA and GGA approaches to adequately describe the electronic structure and magnetic coupling in large molecular magnetic systems, although at the expenses of introducing an empirical (U) parameter. For all investigated copper dinuclear systems, the LDA+U and GGA+U approaches lead to an improvement in the description of magnetic properties over the original LDA and GGA schemes with an accuracy similar to that arising from the hybrid B3LYP functional, by increasing the on-site Coulomb repulsion with a moderate U value. Nevertheless, the introduction of an arbitrary U value in the 0-10 eV range most often provides the correct ground-state spin distribution and the correct sign of the magnetic coupling constant.

  2. An Investigation of the Effects of Wave State and Sea Spray on an Idealized Typhoon Using an Air-Sea Coupled Modeling System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin; GUAN Changlong; Li'an XIE; ZHAO Dongliang

    2012-01-01

    In this study,the impact of atmosphere-wave coupling on typhoon intensity was investigated using numerical simulations of an idealized typhoon in a coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system.The coupling between atmosphere and sea surface waves considered the effects of wave state and sea sprays on air-sea momentum flux,the atmospheric low-level dissipative heating,and the wave-state-affected seaspray heat flux. Several experiments were conducted to examine the impacts of wave state,sea sprays,and dissipative heating on an idealized typhoon system. Results show that considering the wave state and sea-spray-affected sea-surface roughness reduces typhoon intensity,while including dissipative heating intensifies the typhoon system.Taking into account sea spray heat flux also strengthens the typhoon system with increasing maximum wind speed and significant wave height.The overall impact of atmosphere- wave coupling makes a positive contribution to the intensification of the idealized typhoon system.The minimum central pressure simulated by the coupled atmosphere wave experiment was 16.4 hPa deeper than that of the control run,and the maximum wind speed and significant wave height increased by 31% and 4%,respectively.Meanwhile,within the area beneath the typhoon center,the average total upward air-sea heat flux increased by 22%,and the averaged latent heat flux increased more significantly by 31% compared to the uncoupled run.

  3. Be(1010): A test ground for surface electron-phonon coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shu-Jung; Sprunger, Philip; Plummer, Ward; Yang, Wanli; Brouet, Veronique; Zhou, Xingjiang; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2003-03-01

    The electron-phonon coupling on the Be(10bar10) surface has been investigated with high-resolution photoemission examining temperature dependence and dispersion distortion near the Fermi energy of the two zone boundary surface states. Two surface states (S1 and S2) coexist in a large gap in the bulk projection at the surface zone boundary barA. S1 is localized near the surface in the middle of the gap while S2 is near the bottom band edge and penetrates into the bulk. Using both a Debye and Einstein model to fit the temperature-dependent surface state line width produces an electron-phonon coupling strength with parameters, λ _S1 = 0.647 and λ _S2 = 0.491, more than two times larger than the bulk value, λ _bulk = 0.24. S2 data was measured with a 3D Debye model but the S1 data required an Einstein model with an optical phonon at energy 64 meV. Direct 2D images of the dispersion of the S1 state show dramatic distortion of the electron band dispersion within 64 meV of the Fermi energy. This data is used to extract the real and imaginary parts of the self-energy. Founded by NSF DMR-0105232 and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725

  4. Conceptual study of an ICRH traveling-wave antenna system for low-coupling conditions as expected in DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragona, R.; Messiaen, A.

    2016-07-01

    For the central heating of a fusion reactor ion cyclotron radio frequency heating (ICRH) is the first choice method as it is able to couple RF power to the ions without density limit. The drawback of this heating method is the problem of excitation of the magneto-sonic wave through the plasma boundary layer from the antenna located along the wall, without exceeding its voltage standoff. The amount of coupling depends on the antenna excitation and the surface admittance at the antenna output due to the plasma profile. The paper deals with the optimization of the antenna excitation by the use of sections of traveling-wave antennas (TWAs) distributed all along the reactor wall between the blanket modules. They are mounted and fed in resonant ring system(s). First, the physics of the coupling of a strap array is studied by simple models and the coupling code ANTITER II. Then, after the study of the basic properties of a TWA section, its feeding problem is solved by hybrids driving them in resonant ring circuit(s). The complete modeling is obtained from the matrices of the TWA sections connected to one of the feeding hybrid(s). The solution is iterated with the coupling code to determine the loading for a reference low-coupling ITER plasma profile. The resulting wave pattern up to the plasma bulk is derived. The proposed system is totally load resilient and allows us to obtain a very selective exciting wave spectrum. A discussion of some practical implementation problems is added.

  5. Wave-vector-dependent electron-phonon coupling and the charge-density-wave transition in TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschek, M.; Rosenkranz, S.; Heid, R.; Said, A. H.; Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Fisher, I. R.; Weber, F.

    2015-06-01

    We present a high-energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering investigation of the soft phonon mode in the charge-density-wave (CDW) system TbT e3 . We analyze our data based on lattice dynamical calculations using density-functional-perturbation theory and find clear evidence that strongly momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling defines the periodicity of the CDW superstructure: Our experiment reveals strong phonon softening and increased phonon linewidths over a large part in reciprocal space adjacent to the CDW ordering vector qCDW=(0 ,0 ,0.3 ) . Further, qCDW is clearly offset from the wave vector of (weak) Fermi surface nesting qFS=(0 ,0 ,0.25 ) , and our detailed analysis indicates that electron-phonon coupling is responsible for this shift. Hence, we can add TbT e3 , which was previously considered as a canonical CDW compound following the Peierls scenario, to the list of distinct charge-density-wave materials characterized by momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling.

  6. Weak stability for coupled wave and/or Petrovsky systems with complementary frictional damping and infinite memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, M. M.; Domingos Cavalcanti, V. N.; Guesmia, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we consider coupled wave-wave, Petrovsky-Petrovsky and wave-Petrovsky systems in N-dimensional open bounded domain with complementary frictional damping and infinite memory acting on the first equation. We prove that these systems are well-posed in the sense of semigroups theory and provide a weak stability estimate of solutions, where the decay rate is given in terms of the general growth of the convolution kernel at infinity and the arbitrary regularity of the initial data. We finish our paper by considering the uncoupled wave and Petrovsky equations with complementary frictional damping and infinite memory, and showing a strong stability estimate depending only on the general growth of the convolution kernel at infinity.

  7. Generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by coupled internal-gravity and alfvén waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaladze, Tamaz; Kahlon, Laila

    Nonlinear dynamics of coupled internal-gravity (IG) and alfven electromagnetic planetary waves in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer is investigated. Under such coupling new type of alfven waves is revealed. It is shown that such short wavelength turbulence of IG and alfvén waves is unstable with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbations of the zonal flow and magnetic field. A set of coupled equations describing the nonlinear interaction of coupled IG and alfven waves with zonal flows is derived. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is driven by the advection of vorticity and is based on the parametric excitation of convective cells by finite-amplitude coupled IG and alfven waves leading to the inverse energy cascade toward the longer wavelength. The growth rates of the corresponding instability and the conditions for driving them are determined. The possibility of generation of the intense mean magnetic field is shown.

  8. Mode stability analysis in the beam-wave interaction process for a three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Ji-Run; Cui Jian; Zhu Min; Guo Wei

    2013-01-01

    Based on space-charge wave theory,the formulae of the beam-wave coupling coefficient and the beam-loaded conductance are given for the beam-wave interaction in an N-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain.The ratio of the nonbeam-loaded quality factor of the coupled cavity chain to the beam quality factor is used to determine the stability of the beam-wave interaction.As an example,the stabilities of the beam-wave interaction in a three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain are discussed with the formulae and the CST code for the operations of the 2π,π,and π/2 modes,respectively.The results show that stable operation of the 2π,π,and π/2 modes may all be realized in an extended-interaction klystron with the three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain.

  9. Coupled cluster study of spectroscopic constants of ground states of heavy rare gas dimers with spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhe-Yan; Wang, Wen-Liang; Li, Ren-Zhong; Xia, Cai-Juan; Li, Lian-Bi

    2016-07-01

    The CCSD(T) approach based on two-component relativistic effective core potential with spin-orbit interaction just included in coupled cluster iteration is adopted to study the spectroscopic constants of ground states of Kr2, Xe2 and Rn2 dimers. The spectroscopic constants have significant basis set dependence. Extrapolation to the complete basis set limit provides the most accurate values. The spin-orbit interaction hardly affects the spectroscopic constants of Kr2 and Xe2. However, the equilibrium bond length is shortened about 0.013 Å and the dissociation energy is augmented about 18 cm-1 by the spin-orbit interaction for Rn2 in the complete basis set limit.

  10. Response of water temperature to surface wave effects in the Baltic Sea: simulations with the coupled NEMO-WAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari, Victor; Staneva, Joanna; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian; Janssen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The effects of wind waves on the Baltic Sea water temperature has been studied by coupling the hydrodynamical model NEMO with the wave model WAM. The wave forcing terms that have been taken into consideration are: Stokes-Coriolis force, seastate dependent energy flux and sea-state dependent momentum flux. The combined role of these processes as well as their individual contributions on simulated temperature is analysed. The results indicate a pronounced effect of waves on surface temperature, on the distribution of vertical temperature and on upwellinǵs. In northern parts of the Baltic Sea a warming of the surface layer occurs in the wave included simulations. This in turn reduces the cold bias between simulated and measured data. The warming is primarily caused by sea-state dependent energy flux. Wave induced cooling is mostly observed in near coastal areas and is mainly due to Stokes-Coriolis forcing. The latter triggers effect of intensifying upwellings near the coasts, depending on the direction of the wind. The effect of sea-state dependent momentum flux is predominantly to warm the surface layer. During the summer the wave induced water temperature changes were up to 1 °C.

  11. Full-wave model of D-region upward VLF coupling to whistlers in the plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Shao, X.; Lay, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric-lightning-to-plasmasphere VLF coupling via whistlers is key to understanding the problem of radiation-belt losses and the slot region. In the lowermost ionosphere, the "D-region" (roughly 60 - 100 km altitude), the coupling occurs between the VLF incident from the "vacuum" below, to the electron whistler capable of transiting upward through the E- and F-regions above. We have modified our successful and data-validated D-region VLF downward-reflection model to predict upward-coupled whistler waveforms recorded on topside satellites. The model has been run in production mode for predicting downward-reflected waveforms recorded at ground stations, but the model's internal calculation also fully describes the "penetrating" solution that merges into the oblique electron whistler. We have begun to test the model against VLF, three-dimensional electric-field recordings from the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) [Pfaff et al., 2010] on the C/NOFS satellite. VEFI's broadband recording and large on-board memory serendipitously provide an excellent platform for studying lightning whistlers in the plasmasphere. We have already demonstrated [Jacobson et al., 2011] that VEFI is superbly suited for testing transionospheric propagation, in conjunction with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN; see www.wwlln.net) to provide groundtruth location/time of the lightning strokes. This poster will describe latest results. Jacobson, A. R., R. H. Holzworth, R. F. Pfaff, and M. P. McCarthy (2011), Study of oblique whistlers in the low-latitude ionosphere, jointly with the C/NOFS satellite and the World-Wide Lightning Location Network, Annales Geophysicae, 29, 851-863. Pfaff, R., D. Rowland, H. Freudenreich, K. Bromund, K. Le, M. Acuna, J. Klenzing, C. Liebrecht, S. Martin, W. J. Burke, N. C. Maynard, D. E. Hunton, P. A. Roddy, J. O. Ballenthin, and G. R. Wilson (2010), Observations of DC electric fields in the low-latitude ionosphere and their variations with

  12. Detection of IMBHs with ground-based gravitational wave observatories: A biography of a binary of black holes, from birth to death

    CERN Document Server

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau

    2009-01-01

    Even though the existence of intermediate-mass black holes has not yet been corroborated observationally, these objects are of high interest for astrophysics. Our understanding of formation and evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), as well as galaxy evolution modeling and cosmography would dramatically change if an IMBH was observed. The prospect of detection and, possibly, observation and characterization of an IMBH has good chances in lower-frequency gravitational-wave (GW) astrophysics with ground-based detectors such as LIGO, Virgo and the future Einstein Telescope (ET). We present an analysis of the signal of a system of a binary of IMBHs based on a waveform model obtained with numerical relativity simulations coupled with post-Newtonian calculations at the highest available order so as to extend the waveform to lower frequencies. We find that initial LIGO and Virgo are in the position of detecting IMBHs with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of $\\sim 10$ for systems with total mass between 100 and ...

  13. Transfer ionization and its sensitivity to the ground-state wave function

    CERN Document Server

    Schöffler, M S; Popov, Yu V; Houamer, S; Titze, J; Jahnke, T; Schmidt, L Ph H; Jagutzki, O; Galstyan, A G; Gusev, A A

    2012-01-01

    We present kinematically complete theoretical calculations and experiments for transfer ionization in H$^++$He collisions at 630 keV/u. Experiment and theory are compared on the most detailed level of fully differential cross sections in the momentum space. This allows us to unambiguously identify contributions from the shake-off and two-step-2 mechanisms of the reaction. It is shown that the simultaneous electron transfer and ionization is highly sensitive to the quality of a trial initial-state wave function.

  14. Coupled Effect of Elevated Temperature and Cooling Conditions on the Properties of Ground Clay Brick Mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Abd El Aziz, Magdy; Abdelaleem, Salh; Heikal, Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    When a concrete structure is exposed to fire and cooling, some deterioration in its chemical resistivity and mechanical properties takes place. This deterioration can reach a level at which the structure may have to be thoroughly renovated or completely replaced. In this investigation, four types of cement mortars, ground clay bricks (GCB)/sand namely 0/3, 1/2, 2/1 and 3/0, were used. Three different cement contents were used: 350, 400 and 450 kg/m3. All the mortars were prepared and cured in tap water for 3 months and then kept in laboratory atmospheric conditions up to 6 months. The specimens were subjected to elevated temperatures up to 700°C for 3h and then cooled by three different conditions: water, furnace, and air cooling. The results show that all the mortars subjected to fire, irrespective of cooling mode, suffered a significant reduction in compressive strength. However, the mortars cooled in air exhibited a relativity higher reduction in compressive strength rather than those water or furnace cooled. The mortars containing GCB/sand (3/0) and GCB/sand (1/2) exhibited a relatively higher thermal stability than the others.

  15. Magnon-phonon coupling and implications for charge-density wave states and superconductivity in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2016-10-01

    The mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity of copper oxides (cuprates) remains unsolved puzzle in condensed matter physics. The cuprates represent extremely complicated system, showing fascinating variety of quantum phenomena and rich phase diagram as a function of doping. In the suggested "superconducting glue" mechanisms, phonon and spin excitations are invoked most frequently, and it appears that only spin excitations cover the energy scale required to justify very high transition temperature Tc ˜ 165 K (as in mercury-based triple layer cuprates compressed to 30 GPa). It appears that pressure is quite important variable helping to boost the Tc record by almost 30°. Pressure may be also considered as a clean tuning parameter, helping to understand the underlying balance of various energy scales and ordered states in cuprates. In this paper, a review of mostly our work on cuprates under pressure will be given, with the emphasis on the interactions between phonon and spin excitations. It appears that there is a strong coupling between superexchange interaction and stretching in-plane oxygen vibrations, which may give rise to a variety of complex phenomena, including the charge-density wave state intertwined with superconductivity and attracting a lot of interest recently.

  16. Operation and coupling of LH waves with the ITER-like wall at JET

    CERN Document Server

    Kirov, K K; Ekedahl, A; Petrzilka, V; Arnoux, G; Baranov, Yu; Brix, M; Goniche, M; Jachmich, S; Mayoral, M-L; Ongena, J; Rimini, F; Stamp, M; Contributors, JET EFDA

    2013-01-01

    In this paper important aspects of Lower Hybrid (LH) operation with the ITER Like Wall (ILW) [1] at JET are reported. Impurity release during LH operation was investigated and it was found that there is no significant Be increase with LH power. Concentration of W was analysed in more detail and it was concluded that LH contributes negligibly to its increase. No cases of W accumulation in LH-only heating experiments were observed so far. LH wave coupling was studied and optimised to achieve the level of system performance similar to before ILW installation. Measurements by Li-beam were used to study systematic dependencies of the SOL density on the gas injection rate from a dedicated gas introduction module and the LH power and launcher position. Experimental results are supported by SOL transport modelling. Observations of arcs in front of the LH launcher and hotspots on magnetically connected sections of the vessel are reported. Overall, a relatively troublefree operation of the LH system up to 2.5MW of coup...

  17. Gravitational waves and Higgs boson couplings for exploring first order phase transition in the model with a singlet scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashino, Katsuya; Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Kanemura, Shinya; Ko, Pyungwon; Matsui, Toshinori

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the spectrum of gravitational waves originated from strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the extended Higgs model with a real singlet scalar field. In order to calculate the bubble nucleation rate, we perform a two-field analysis and evaluate bounce solutions connecting the true and the false vacua using the one-loop effective potential at finite temperatures. Imposing the Sakharov condition of the departure from thermal equilibrium for baryogenesis, we survey allowed regions of parameters of the model. We then investigate the gravitational waves produced at electroweak bubble collisions in the early Universe, such as the sound wave, the bubble wall collision and the plasma turbulence. We find that the strength at the peak frequency can be large enough to be detected at future space-based gravitational interferometers such as eLISA, DECIGO and BBO. Predicted deviations in the various Higgs boson couplings are also evaluated at the zero temperature, and are shown to be large enough too. Therefore, in this model strongly first order electroweak phase transition can be tested by the combination of the precision study of various Higgs boson couplings at the LHC, the measurement of the triple Higgs boson coupling at future lepton colliders and the shape of the spectrum of gravitational wave detectable at future gravitational interferometers.

  18. Gravitational waves and Higgs boson couplings for exploring first order phase transition in the model with a singlet scalar field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Hashino

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the spectrum of gravitational waves originated from strongly first order electroweak phase transition in the extended Higgs model with a real singlet scalar field. In order to calculate the bubble nucleation rate, we perform a two-field analysis and evaluate bounce solutions connecting the true and the false vacua using the one-loop effective potential at finite temperatures. Imposing the Sakharov condition of the departure from thermal equilibrium for baryogenesis, we survey allowed regions of parameters of the model. We then investigate the gravitational waves produced at electroweak bubble collisions in the early Universe, such as the sound wave, the bubble wall collision and the plasma turbulence. We find that the strength at the peak frequency can be large enough to be detected at future space-based gravitational interferometers such as eLISA, DECIGO and BBO. Predicted deviations in the various Higgs boson couplings are also evaluated at the zero temperature, and are shown to be large enough too. Therefore, in this model strongly first order electroweak phase transition can be tested by the combination of the precision study of various Higgs boson couplings at the LHC, the measurement of the triple Higgs boson coupling at future lepton colliders and the shape of the spectrum of gravitational wave detectable at future gravitational interferometers.

  19. On ultrasound waves guided by bones with coupled soft tissues: a mechanism study and in vitro calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangang; Su, Zhongqing

    2014-07-01

    The influence of soft tissues coupled with cortical bones on precision of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) has been an issue in the clinical bone assessment in conjunction with the use of ultrasound. In this study, the effect arising from soft tissues on propagation characteristics of guided ultrasound waves in bones was investigated using tubular Sawbones phantoms covered with a layer of mimicked soft tissue of different thicknesses and elastic moduli, and an in vitro porcine femur in terms of the axial transmission measurement. Results revealed that presence of soft tissues can exert significant influence on the propagation of ultrasound waves in bones, leading to reduced propagation velocities and attenuated wave magnitudes compared with the counterparts in a free bone in the absence of soft tissues. However such an effect is not phenomenally dependent on the variations in thickness and elastic modulus of the coupled soft tissues, making it possible to compensate for the coupling effect regardless of the difference in properties of the soft tissues. Based on an in vitro calibration, this study proposed quantitative compensation for the effect of soft tissues on ultrasound waves in bones, facilitating development of high-precision QUS.

  20. Mapping refuse profile in Singapore old dumping ground through electrical resistivity, S-wave velocity and geotechnical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Tong, Huan Huan; Noh, Omar; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Giannis, Apostolos

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to track the refuse profile in Lorong Halus Dumping Ground, the largest landfill in Singapore, by electrical resistivity and surface wave velocity after 25 years of closure. Data were analyzed using an orthogonal set of plots by spreading 24 lines in two perpendicular geophone-orientation directions. Both geophysical techniques determined that refuse boundary depth was 13 ± 2 m. The refuse boundary revealed a certain degree of variance, mainly ascribed to the different principle of measurements, as well as the high heterogeneity of the subsurface. Discrepancy was higher in spots with greater heterogeneity. 3D analysis was further conducted detecting refuse pockets, leachate mounding and gas channels. Geotechnical monitoring (borehole) confirmed geophysical outcomes tracing different layers such as soil capping, decomposed refuse materials and inorganic wastes. Combining the geophysical methods with borehole monitoring, a comprehensive layout of the dumping site was presented showing the hot spots of interests.