WorldWideScience

Sample records for ground army adaptive

  1. Compact networked radars for Army unattended ground sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, David A.; Viveiros, Edward A.; Wellman, Ronald; Clark, John; Kurtz, Jim; Pulskamp, Jeff; Proie, Robert; Ivanov, Tony; Polcawich, Ronald G.; Adler, Eric D.

    2010-04-01

    The Army Research Laboratory is in partnership with the University of Florida - Electronics Communications Laboratory to develop compact radar technology and demonstrate that it is scalable to a variety of ultra-lightweight platforms (<10 lbs.) to meet Army mission needs in persistent surveillance, unattended ground sensor (UGS), unmanned systems, and man-portable sensor applications. The advantage of this compact radar is its steerable beam technology and relatively long-range capability compared to other small, battery-powered radar concepts. This paper will review the ongoing development of the sensor and presents a sample of the collected data thus far.

  2. Building Adaptive Nurse Leaders for Future Army Full Spectrum Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-12

    influence.”29 Dr. Charles Albano (2007) addressed adaptive leadership by comparing it to mechanical systems. He explained that adaptive leadership is...http://www.ncsl.org.uk/media-f7b-97-randd- leaders-business-heifetz.pdf (accessed 24 November 2008), 2. 29Dr. Charles Albano , “What is Adaptive...2008) Albano , Dr. Charles. “What is Adaptive Leadership?” 22 April 2007. http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/calbano.html. Army News Service

  3. Mission aware energy saving strategies for Army ground vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattathreya, Macam S.

    Fuel energy is a basic necessity for this planet and the modern technology to perform many activities on earth. On the other hand, quadrupled automotive vehicle usage by the commercial industry and military has increased fuel consumption. Military readiness of Army ground vehicles is very important for a country to protect its people and resources. Fuel energy is a major requirement for Army ground vehicles. According to a report, a department of defense has spent nearly $13.6 billion on fuel and electricity to conduct ground missions. On the contrary, energy availability on this plant is slowly decreasing. Therefore, saving energy in Army ground vehicles is very important. Army ground vehicles are embedded with numerous electronic systems to conduct missions such as silent and normal stationary surveillance missions. Increasing electrical energy consumption of these systems is influencing higher fuel consumption of the vehicle. To save energy, the vehicles can use any of the existing techniques, but they require complex, expensive, and time consuming implementations. Therefore, cheaper and simpler approaches are required. In addition, the solutions have to save energy according to mission needs and also overcome size and weight constraints of the vehicle. Existing research in the current literature do not have any mission aware approaches to save energy. This dissertation research proposes mission aware online energy saving strategies for stationary Army ground vehicles to save energy as well as to meet the electrical needs of the vehicle during surveillance missions. The research also proposes theoretical models of surveillance missions, fuzzy logic models of engine and alternator efficiency data, and fuzzy logic algorithms. Based on these models, two energy saving strategies are proposed for silent and normal surveillance type of missions. During silent mission, the engine is on and batteries power the systems. During normal surveillance mission, the engine is

  4. Effect of adaptability of field army recruits to psychological education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-xue ZHAO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of psychological education adaptability on the mental quality and mental health of recruits of field army units. Methods A total number of 1244 recruits who joined the army in 2012 were tested with Mental Quality Questionnaire of Armyman (MQQA, Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90, Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS, Selfrating Depression Scale (SDS, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and self-compiled questionnaire for adaptability psychological education. 568 recruits received adaptability psychological education for 10 times (sessions in the experimental group, and 676 in the control group did not receive the education. Results After intervention, each dimension score of experimental and control groups on MQQA significantly increased (P0.05. Psychological education showed a significant effect on improving mental quality (P0.05. After education, the anxiety, depression, state-trait anxiety scores of the two groups reduced significantly (P<0.001; compared with the control group, the anxious emotion was effectively relieved by psychological education in experimental group (P<0.001. The recruits in the experimental group showed significant difference in 30 subjective evaluation items between before- and after-education periods (P<0.001. Conclusions The adaptability psychological education has a significant effect on promoting the mental quality, mental health, emotional state and positive cognition of the recruits in field army units. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.06.15

  5. Distributed Common Ground System Army Increment 1 (DCGS-A Inc 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    requirements and business case assessments. In 2002, the Army consolidated the critical requirements in nine families of fielded systems and included...for MAIS Programs 3 Program Information 4 Responsible Office 4 References 4 Program Description 5 Business Case 6 Program Status...Description Distributed Common Ground System–Army (DCGS-A) is the Army Service component of the DoD DCGS Family of Systems and the Defense Intelligence

  6. Single Fuel Concept for Croatian Army Ground Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Spudić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available During the process of approaching the European associationsand NATO the Republic of Croatia has accepted the singlefuel concept for all ground vehicles of the Croatian Army.Croatia has also undertaken to insure that all aircraft, motorvehicles and equipment with turbo-engines or with pressurizedfuel injection, for participation in NATO and PfP led operationscan • operate using the kerosene-based aviation fuel(NATO F-34. The paper gives a brief overview and the resultsof the earned out activities in the Armed Forces of the Republicof Croatia, the expected behaviour of the motor vehicle andpossible delays caused by the use of kerosene fuel (NATOF-34 as fuel for motor vehicles. The paper also gives the advantagesand the drawbacks of the single fuel concept. By acquiringnew data in the Croatian Armed Forces and experienceexchange with other nations about the method of using fuelF-34, the development of the technologies of engine manufacturingand its vital parts or by introducing new standards in theproductjon of fuels and additives new knowledge will certainlybe acquired for providing logistics support in the area of operations,and its final implementation will be a big step forward forthe Republic of Croatia towards Europe and NATO.

  7. 33 CFR 334.140 - Chesapeake Bay; U.S. Army Proving Ground Reservation, Aberdeen, Md.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....140 Chesapeake Bay; U.S. Army Proving Ground Reservation, Aberdeen, Md. (a) Restricted area defined. The following indicates the limits of the waters of or adjacent to the Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and inside of which boundaries will lie the restricted area known as the Aberdeen Proving...

  8. Adaptation Through Flexibility: 656 Army Air Corps During Operation Corporate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    Squadron RAF/AAC 1942-2012 (E. Yorkshire, England: Pen and Sword Aviation, 2013), 10. 3Ibid. 2 how little one could observe through dense forest ...NATO operations in the heavily forested Norway. Combined with the flatter nature of the Falklands’ ground, the ability for Scout and Gazelle aircraft...crews slept in two man tents until their relocation to Darwin and Goose Green where cow barns and pigsties became makeshift homes.201 They adapted to

  9. 77 FR 59021 - License Amendment Request for the U.S. Department of the Army, National Ground Intelligence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION License Amendment Request for the U.S. Department of the Army, National Ground Intelligence Center.... This license is held by the U.S. Department of the Army, National Ground Intelligence Center...

  10. Effectiveness Evaluation Tools and Methods for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model: Research Outline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Evaluation Tools and Methods for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model: Research Outline by Joan H Johnston, Greg...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effectiveness Evaluation Tools and Methods for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model...provide affordable, tailored SRL training and educational capabilities for the US Army, the US Army Research Laboratory is investigating and developing

  11. Army National Guard (ARNG) Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) end-user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelath, R.P. [National Guard Bureau, Arlington, VA (United States); Rasch, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) project is designed to identify and develop programs which automate requirements not included in standard army systems. This includes providing automated interfaces between standard army systems at the National Guard Bureau (NGB) level and at the state/territory level. As part of the OSCAR project, custom software has been installed at NGB to streamline management of major end items. This software allows item managers to provide automated disposition on excess equipment to states operating the Standard Army Retail Supply System Objective (SARSS-O). It also accelerates movement of excess assets to improve the readiness of the Army National Guard (ARNG)--while reducing excess on hand. The purpose of the End-User Manual is to provide direction and guidance to the customer for implementing the ARNG Excess Management Program.

  12. The Tesat transportable adaptive optical ground station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucke, Karen; Seiter, Christoph; Heine, Frank; Gregory, Mark; Tröndle, Daniel; Fischer, Edgar; Berkefeld, Thomas; Feriencik, Mikael; Feriencik, Marco; Richter, Ines; Meyer, Rolf

    2016-03-01

    Tesat together with Synopta have built a Transportable Adaptive Optical Ground Station (TAOGS) under contract of German Aerospace Center DLR for communication with the 1st and 2nd generation of Tesat's spaceborne Laser Communication Terminals (LCTs), which employ coherent homodyne optical communication with 1064 nm and binary phase shift keying (BPSK) modulation. The TAOGS is able to communicate with space segments on low earth orbit (LEO, high pointing and tracking dynamics, 5.625 Gbps), and with space segments on geostationary orbit (GEO, low pointing dynamics, up to 40,000 km distance, optical data rate of 2.8125 Gbps and user data rate of 1.8 Gbps). After an alignment and testing phase at the location of Izana, Tenerife, using the TDP1 LCT on geostationary Alphasat as counter terminal, the TAOGS is now fully functioning. Several up-links, down-links and bi-directional links have been performed. Experimental results of some of these links are presented. An outlook to further activities is given.

  13. 美军无人地面车辆发展综述%Development Survey of US Army Unmanned Ground Vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈欣; 王立操; 李联邦; 左志奇

    2012-01-01

    US army unmanned ground vehicles are primitively introduced. The development course of US army unmanned ground vehicles is expatiated, present condition and development trends are given. Some suggestions on developing military unmanned ground vehicles are presented.%对美军无人地面车辆进行简要介绍,阐述美军无人地面车辆发展历程,给出了其研究现状与趋势,提出了对我国无人地面车辆发展的几点启示。

  14. Remediation application strategies for depleted uranium contaminated soils at the US Army Yuma Proving Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandel, D.S.; Medina, S.M.; Weidner, J.R.

    1994-03-01

    The US Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), located in the southwest portion of Arizona conducts firing of projectiles into the Gunpoint (GP-20) firing range. The penetrators are composed of titanium and DU. The purpose of this project was to determine feasible cleanup technologies and disposal alternatives for the cleanup of the depleted uranium (DU) contaminated soils at YPG. The project was split up into several tasks that include (a) collecting and analyzing samples representative of the GP-20 soils, (b) evaluating the data results, (c) conducting a literature search of existing proven technologies for soil remediation, and (0) making final recommendations for implementation of this technology to the site. As a result of this study, several alternatives for the separation, treatment, and disposal procedures are identified that would result in meeting the cleanup levels defined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for unrestricted use of soils and would result in a significant cost savings over the life of the firing range.

  15. Selected Foreign Counterparts of U.S. Army Ground Combat Systems and Implications for Combat Operations and Modernization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-18

    not have a new ground combat vehicle under development and “at current funding levels, the Bradley and Abrams will remain in the inventory for 50...time since World War I, that the Army does not have a new ground combat vehicle under development and “at current funding levels, the Bradley and...Jane’s Land Warfare Platforms Armoured Fighting Vehicles, 2016-2017; IHS Jane’s Armour and Artillery, 2011-2012; and unclassified information provided to

  16. The Vertical Horopter is Not Adaptable and is Not Adaptive for Viewing Along the Ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Banks

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Helmholtz speculated that the pitch of the vertical horopter is an adaptation for perceiving 3D structure along the ground. We examined this claim by asking whether the horopter is adaptable (ie, whether it is different for people of different heights and whether it can be changed in response to distorting lenses and whether it's adaptive (ie, whether it really is suited for perceiving along the ground. We find that it is not adaptable in that the pitch of the vertical horopter is not correlated with height and in that it does not change in response to one week of altered visual experience. We also find that it is not adaptive for viewing along the ground because the vertical horopter is a convex curve rather than a line. We speculate that it is adaptive for other aspects of natural viewing.

  17. Adaptive Sampling approach to environmental site characterization at Joliet Army Ammunition Plant: Phase 2 demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujewski, G.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies Dept.; Johnson, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Adaptive sampling programs provide real opportunities to save considerable time and money when characterizing hazardous waste sites. This Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project demonstrated two decision-support technologies, SitePlanner{trademark} and Plume{trademark}, that can facilitate the design and deployment of an adaptive sampling program. A demonstration took place at Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP), and was unique in that it was tightly coupled with ongoing Army characterization work at the facility, with close scrutiny by both state and federal regulators. The demonstration was conducted in partnership with the Army Environmental Center`s (AEC) Installation Restoration Program and AEC`s Technology Development Program. AEC supported researchers from Tufts University who demonstrated innovative field analytical techniques for the analysis of TNT and DNT. SitePlanner{trademark} is an object-oriented database specifically designed for site characterization that provides an effective way to compile, integrate, manage and display site characterization data as it is being generated. Plume{trademark} uses a combination of Bayesian analysis and geostatistics to provide technical staff with the ability to quantitatively merge soft and hard information for an estimate of the extent of contamination. Plume{trademark} provides an estimate of contamination extent, measures the uncertainty associated with the estimate, determines the value of additional sampling, and locates additional samples so that their value is maximized.

  18. The Adaptive Edge: Introducing Adaptive Skills Techniques to Army Special Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    biofeedback during a performance enhancement training session at the United States Military Academy 82 Army Center of Enhanced Performance, Enhancement...Special Forces. St. Paul: MBI Publishing Company, 2001. “Relaxation & Meditation .” Brainmac Sports Coach (accessed 20 May, 2010). Robson, Rob. “Goal

  19. Instructional Management for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model-Research Outline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    SRL training and educational capabilities for the US Army, the US Army Research Laboratory is investigating and developing adaptive tools and methods...to largely automate the authoring (creation), delivery of instruction, and evaluation of computer- regulated training and education capabilities. A...instruction, 6 and evaluation of computer-regulated training and education capabilities to help build SRL skills and support mixed-initiative

  20. Adapting the Army’s Training and Leader Development Programs for Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Army Corps of Engineers USAR U.S. Army Reserve USARC U.S. Army Reserve Command USASMA U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy USR Unit Status Report VTT ...increases flexibility. Previ- ously, this portion of the course was taught either in residence or by video tele-training ( VTT ), which either required

  1. Adaptive filtering for air-to-ground surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigling, Brian D.

    2004-09-01

    This paper introduces a new concept for air-to-ground noise radar based on adaptive filtering. A transmitting antenna illuminates a region of interest with a continuous, noise waveform. The processor within the receiver treats the illuminated scene as a linear system with unknown coefficients which filters the transmitted signal. Given access to the transmitted waveform and the digitized backscattered signal, the receiver adaptively estimates the unknown filter coefficients, using the same processing architecture as a wireless channel equalizer, and continues to update their values as the transmitter and receiver traverse their flight paths. The adapted filters correspond to range profiles of the illuminated scene which may be Doppler processed to yield synthetic aperture imagery.

  2. Understanding why a Ground Combat Vehicle that Carries Nine Dismounts is Important to the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    cites a quote by GEN Donn Starry, TRADOC commander from 1977 to 1981, in which he notes, “We in TRADOC . . . decided to put the TOW on the MICV because...Carmichael, John M., “Devising Doctrine for the Bradley Fighting Vehicle Platoon Dismount Element—Finding the Right Starting Point,” Fort...Mahon, John K., and Romana Danysh, Army Lineage Series: Infantry, Part I: Regular Army, Washington, D.C.: Office of the Chief of Military History, United

  3. `imaka - a ground-layer adaptive optics system on Maunakea

    CERN Document Server

    Chun, Mark; Toomey, Douglas; Lu, Jessica; Service, Max; Baranec, Christoph; Thibault, Simon; Brousseau, Denis; Hayano, Yutaka; Oya, Shin; Santi, Shane; Kingery, Christopher; Loss, Keith; Gardiner, John; Steele, Brad

    2016-01-01

    We present the integration status for `imaka, the ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) system on the University of Hawaii 2.2-meter telescope on Maunakea, Hawaii. This wide-field GLAO pathfinder system exploits Maunakea's highly confined ground layer and weak free-atmosphere to push the corrected field of view to ~1/3 of a degree, an areal field approaching an order of magnitude larger than any existing or planned GLAO system, with a FWHM ~ 0.33 arcseconds in the visible and near infrared. We discuss the unique design aspects of the instrument, the driving science cases and how they impact the system, and how we will demonstrate these cases on the sky.

  4. Autonomous Robotic Weapons: US Army Innovation for Ground Combat in the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    164 William Mathews, “Megacity Warfare: Taking Urban Combat To a Whole New Level,” ARMY Magazine, March, 2015, 31. 165 David Shunk, “ Mega Cities ...2014. Accessed April 2, 2015. http://usarmy.vo.llnwd.net/e2/c/downloads/351235.pdf. “ Mega Cities , Ungoverned Areas, and the Challenge of Army... plan is expected to reduce the overall active force strength from 520,000 to less than 450,000 and from 44 BCTs to just 28 BCTs by FY 2019.102 These

  5. Laser based bi-directional Gbit ground links with the Tesat transportable adaptive optical ground station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Frank; Saucke, Karen; Troendle, Daniel; Motzigemba, Matthias; Bischl, Hermann; Elser, Dominique; Marquardt, Christoph; Henninger, Hennes; Meyer, Rolf; Richter, Ines; Sodnik, Zoran

    2017-02-01

    Optical ground stations can be an alternative to radio frequency based transmit (forward) and receive (return) systems for data relay services and other applications including direct to earth optical communications from low earth orbit spacecrafts, deep space receivers, space based quantum key distribution systems and Tbps capacity feeder links to geostationary spacecrafts. The Tesat Transportable Adaptive Optical Ground Station is operational since September 2015 at the European Space Agency site in Tenerife, Spain.. This paper reports about the results of the 2016 experimental campaigns including the characterization of the optical channel from Tenerife for an optimized coding scheme, the performance of the T-AOGS under different atmospheric conditions and the first successful measurements of the suitability of the Alphasat LCT optical downlink performance for future continuous variable quantum key distribution systems.

  6. Evaluation of System Architectures for the Army Aviation Ground Power Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    for DC power ( Baldor Electric Company 2014; U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command 2007). 14 C. CHAPTER SUMMARY This chapter examined... Baldor Electric Company. 2014. Performance Data: EJMM2334T [Pamphlet]. Fort Smith, AR: ABB Group. Balje, O. E. 1962. A Study on Design Criteria and

  7. Reduced foraging investment as an adaptation to patchy food sources: A phasic army ant simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teseo, Serafino; Delloro, Francesco

    2017-09-07

    Colonies of several ant species within the subfamily Dorylinae alternate stereotypical discrete phases of foraging and reproduction. Such phasic cycles are thought to be adaptive because they minimize the amount of foraging and the related costs, and at the same time enhance the colony-level ability to rely on patchily distributed food sources. In order to investigate these hypotheses, we use here a simple computational approach to study the population dynamics of two species of virtual ant colonies that differ quantitatively in their foraging investment. One species, which we refer to as "phasic", forages only half of the time, mirroring the phasic activity of some army ants; the other "non-phasic" species forages instead all the time. We show that, when foraging costs are relatively high, populations of phasic colonies grow on average faster than non-phasic populations, outcompeting them in mixed populations. Interestingly, such tendency becomes more consistent as food becomes more difficult to find but locally abundant. According to our results, reducing the foraging investment, for example by adopting a phasic lifestyle, can result in a reproductive advantage, but only in specific conditions. We thus suggest phasic colony cycles to have emerged together with the doryline specialization in feeding on the brood of other eusocial insects, a resource that is hard to obtain but highly abundant if available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Survival through Adaptation: The Chinese Red Army and the Encirclement Campaigns, 1927-1936

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    commonplace. Army commanders also allowed a decadent and sedentary lifestyle to overcome the military garrisons around China. Many soldiers were addicted to......the NRA came into Red areas. When the Red Army moved out of an area, the people would immediately spring into action. All grains, oil, and salt were

  9. Evaluation of Synthetic Fuel for Army Ground Applications: Tasks 2-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-29

    S-8 fuel content.  The largest variation between test fuels is seen for the Unburned Hydrocarbons ( UHC ) in the exhaust. Both the averag e and m...aximum UHC ar e lower w ith increasing S-8 con tent in the fuel. When cold starting aids ar e utilized, it is apparent there is less UHC in the ex...STDEV Standard deviation SwRI® Southwest Research Institute® TFLRF U.S. Army TARDEC Fuels and Lubricants Research Facility UHC Unburned

  10. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Technique for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auday Al-Mayyahi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS for solving navigation problems of an autonomous ground vehicle (AGV. The system consists of four ANFIS controllers; two of which are used for regulating both the left and right angular velocities of the AGV in order to reach the target position; and other two ANFIS controllers are used for optimal heading adjustment in order to avoid obstacles. The two velocity controllers receive three sensor inputs: front distance (FD; right distance (RD and left distance (LD for the low-level motion control. Two heading controllers deploy the angle difference (AD between the heading of AGV and the angle to the target to choose the optimal direction. The simulation experiments have been carried out under two different scenarios to investigate the feasibility of the proposed ANFIS technique. The simulation results have been presented using MATLAB software package; showing that ANFIS is capable of performing the navigation and path planning task safely and efficiently in a workspace populated with static obstacles.

  11. Family Adaptation to the Demands of Army Life: A Review of Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    an official Department of the Army position, unless so designated by other authorized documents. .2 j r hrm APOroie REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMBs No...society changes - with increased ethnic diversity, greater empowerment of women, and more individually oriented values, for example - the Army will be...function adequately on their own if necessary, as themselves, as a parent, and as an employee . The Aiwy. Our rcview points to soiie obvious things the

  12. The Influence of U.S. Strategic Culture on Innovation and Adaptation in the U.S. Army

    OpenAIRE

    Kamara, Hassan M.

    2015-01-01

    Culture is an abstract phenomenon that influences its environment. According to culture theorist Edgar Schein, “culture is an abstraction, yet the forces that are created in social and organizational situations that derive from culture are powerful. If we don’t understand the operation of these forces, we become victim to them.” As a subset of culture, the strategic culture of the United States requires study so we can understand its influences on innovation and adaptation in the U.S. Army, a...

  13. History of the Army Ground Forces. Study Number 24. History of the Mountain Training Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1948-01-01

    An ex- ample Is afforded by the action of men in setting out to retrieve para- chuted loads which had grounded on P potentially dangerous snow slope...skiers in the Office of the Quartermaeter Generar. On 20 May 1943 the Mountain and Winter Warfare Board submitted a list of aug- gestions to the Special...Winter Varfare Board subaitted a list of sug- gestions to the Special Forces Section of the Quartermaster General in Washington regarding a proposed

  14. Innovative Leader Development: Evaluation of the U.S. Army Asymmetric Warfare Adaptive Leader Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    orientations (Button, Mathieu, and Zajac, 1996); general cognitive ability using the Won- derlic Contemporary Cognitive Ability Test ( Wonderlic , 2012...representative AWALP students are of the Army at large, students’ scores on the Wonderlic Contemporary Cognitive Ability Test are generally comparable...and Organizational Psychology, Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association, 2011, pp. 303–341. references 133 Wonderlic , Inc

  15. Adaptive Magnetorheological Isolator for Ground Support Equipment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The minimization of vibration-induced damage has become a critical issue for rocket launch ground support electronics (GSE). GSE located near a major rocket launch...

  16. Adaptive Magnetorheological Isolator for Ground Support Equipment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The minimization of vibration-induced damage has become a critical issue for rocket launch ground support electronics (GSE). In particular, the effect of high...

  17. Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment: Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System (JLENS), U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground, Dugway, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    the NRHP because it does not meet any criteria for listing ( Quist , 2008). The U.S. Army agreed with this recommendation and determined that...Knight Rachel Quist 75th Civil Engineering Group – Hill AFB Loni Johnson, CERC Kay Winn, CEVOR 75th Civil Engineering Group – Oasis Ronald... Quist , Rachel. 2008. Cultural Resources Management Officer, Dugway Proving Ground. Personal communication with Mary Peters, MBP Consulting

  18. Adapting sampling plans to caribou distribution on calving grounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Crête

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available Between 1984 and 1988, the size of the two caribou herds in northern Québec was derived by combining estimates of female numbers on calving grounds in June and composition counts during rut in autumn. Sampling with aerial photos was conducted on calving grounds to determine the number of animals per km2, telemetry served to estimate the proportion of females in the census area at the time of photography in addition to summer survival rate, and helicopter or ground observations were used for composition counts. Observers were able to detect on black and white negatives over 95 percent of caribou counted from a helicopter flying at low altitude over the same area; photo scale varied between = 1:3 600 and 1:6 000. Sampling units covering less than 15-20 ha were the best for sampling caribou distribution on calving grounds, where density generally averaged » 10 individuals-km"2. Around 90 percent of caribou on calving grounds were females; others were mostly yearling males. During the 1-2 day photographic census, 64 to 77 percent of the females were present on the calving areas. Summer survival exceeded 95 percent in three summers. In autumn, females composed between 45 and 54 percent of each herd. The Rivière George herd was estimated at 682 000 individuals (± 36%; alpha = 0.10 in 1988. This estimate was imprecise due to insufficiens sample size for measuring animal density on the calving ground and for determining proportion of females on the calving ground at the time of the photo census. To improve precision and reduce cost, it is proposed to estimate herd size of tundra caribou in one step, using only aerial photos in early June without telemetry.

  19. The Challenge of Adaptation: The US Army in the Aftermath of Conflict, 1953-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    PhD Dissertation, Ohio State University, 2006). 21. Weigley, History of the United States Army, enlarged edition, p.525. 22. Doris M. Condit...Secretary of the Treasury Humphrey , and Secretary of Defense Wilson, it was agreed that the emphasis on “new weapons,” as nuclear weapons were euphe...1978. Condit, Doris M. History of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, v.II: The Test of War 1950-1953. Washington, DC: Historical Office, Office

  20. Adaptive Swarm Formation Control for Hybrid Ground and Aerial Assets

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Laura; Garcia, Richard; Fields, Mary Anne; Valavanis, Kimon

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a methodology for control and coordination of UAVs and UGVs has been presented. UAVs and UGVs were integrated into a single team and were able to adapt their formation accordingly. Potential field functions together with limiting functions can be successfully utilized to control UGV and UAV swarm formation, obstacle avoidance and the overall swarm movement. A single UAV was also successfully used to pull the UGV swarm into formation. These formations can move as a un...

  1. Army Contracting Command - Aberdeen Proving Ground Contracting Center’s Management of Noncompetitive Awards Was Generally Justified

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    officer , the J&A should have been documented in the Army Paperless Contract File system; however, we did not find evidence of a completed J&A in the Army... Paperless Contract File system. The contracting officer also stated that a contract specialist uploaded the electronic contract documentation to...reports or contact the Secondary Reports Distribution Unit auditnet@dodig.mil. Suggestions for Audits To suggest or request audits, contact the Office

  2. Antthrushes, antpittas, and gnateaters (Aves, Formicariidae) as army ant followers

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin O. Willis

    1984-01-01

    Antthrushes (Formicarius, Chamaeza) sometimes walk around swarms of army ants and capture ground prey, but do not follow ants regularly. Among antpittas, only fast-leaping Pittasoma michleri and P. rufopileatum regularly follow ants. Gnateaters (Conopophaga) follow ants little. All these ground-foraging genera are poorly adapted for rapid flying, and failure to follow ants is perhaps due to inability to evade predators or out fly competitors near groups of birds attracted by ants.

  3. Ca2+ cycling in heart cells from ground squirrels: adaptive strategies for intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Chen Li

    Full Text Available Heart tissues from hibernating mammals, such as ground squirrels, are able to endure hypothermia, hypoxia and other extreme insulting factors that are fatal for human and nonhibernating mammals. This study was designed to understand adaptive mechanisms involved in intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis in cardiomyocytes from the mammalian hibernator, ground squirrel, compared to rat. Electrophysiological and confocal imaging experiments showed that the voltage-dependence of L-type Ca(2+ current (I(Ca was shifted to higher potentials in ventricular myocytes from ground squirrels vs. rats. The elevated threshold of I(Ca did not compromise the Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release, because a higher depolarization rate and a longer duration of action potential compensated the voltage shift of I(Ca. Both the caffeine-sensitive and caffeine-resistant components of cytosolic Ca(2+ removal were more rapid in ground squirrels. Ca(2+ sparks in ground squirrels exhibited larger amplitude/size and much lower frequency than in rats. Due to the high I(Ca threshold, low SR Ca(2+ leak and rapid cytosolic Ca(2+ clearance, heart cells from ground squirrels exhibited better capability in maintaining intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis than those from rats and other nonhibernating mammals. These findings not only reveal adaptive mechanisms of hibernation, but also provide novel strategies against Ca(2+ overload-related heart diseases.

  4. Hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the Chromic Acid Pit site, US Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Thomas, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Chromic Acid Pit site is an inactive waste disposal site that is regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976. The 2.2-cubic-yard cement-lined pit was operated from 1980 to 1983 by a contractor to the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss. The pit, located on the Fort Bliss military reservation, in El Paso, Texas, was used for disposal and evaporation of chromic acid waste generated from chrome plating operations. The site was certified closed in 1989 and the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission issued Permit Number HW-50296 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Permit Number TX4213720101), which approved and implemented post-closure care for the Chromic Acid Pit site. In accordance with an approved post-closure plan, the U.S. Geological Survey is cooperating with the U.S. Army in evaluating hydrogeologic conditions and ground- water quality at the site. One upgradient and two downgradient ground-water monitoring wells were installed adjacent to the chromic acid pit by a private contractor. Quarterly ground-water sampling of these wells by the U.S. Geological Survey began in December 1993. The Chromic Acid Pit site is situated in the Hueco Bolson intermontane valley. The Hueco Bolson is a primary source of ground water in the El Paso area. City of El Paso and U.S. Army water-supply wells are located on all sides of the study area and are completed 600 to more than 1,200 feet below land surface. The ground-water level in the area of the Chromic Acid Pit site has declined about 25 feet from 1982 to 1993. Depth to water at the Chromic Acid Pit site in September 1994 was about 284 feet below land surface; ground-water flow is to the southeast. Ground-water samples collected from monitoring wells at the Chromic Acid Pit site contained dissolved-solids concentrations of 442 to 564 milligrams per liter. Nitrate as nitrogen concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 2.7 milligrams per liter; nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen

  5. Background chemistry for chemical warfare agents and decontamination processes in support of delisting waste streams at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblatt, D.H.; Small, M.J.; Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.

    1996-04-01

    The State of Utah, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (DSHW), has declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, cleanup, and testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues have been designated as corrosive, reactive, toxic, and acute hazardous (Hazardous Waste No. F999). The RCRA regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other state hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous but allow generators to petition the regulator to {open_quotes}delist,{close_quotes} if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. The U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) believes that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous and has obtained assistance from Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to make the delisting demonstration. The objective of this project is to delist chemical agent decontaminated residues resulting from materials testing activities and to delist a remediation residue (e.g., contaminated soil). To delist these residues, it must be demonstrated that the residues (1) do not contain hazardous quantities of the listed agents; (2) do not contain hazardous quantities of constituents listed in 40 CFR Part 261, Appendix VIII; (3) do not exhibit other characteristics that could define the residues as hazardous; and (4) do not fail a series of acute toxicity tests. The first phase will focus on a subset of the F999 wastes generated at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), where the Army tests the effects of military chemical agents and agent-decontamination procedures on numerous military items. This effort is identified as Phase I of the Delisting Program. Subsequent phases will address other DPG chemical agent decontaminated residues and remediation wastes and similar residues at other installations.

  6. Aircraft-on-ground path following control by dynamical adaptive backstepping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Bihua; Jiao Zongxia; Shuzhi Sam Ge

    2013-01-01

    The necessity of improving the air traffic and reducing the aviation emissions drives to investigate automatic steering for aircraft to effectively roll on the ground.This paper addresses the path following control problem of aircraft-on-ground and focuses on the task that the aircraft is required to follow the desired path on the runway by nose wheel automatic steering.The proposed approach is based on dynamical adaptive backstepping so that the system model does not have to be transformed into a canonical triangular form which is necessary in conventional backstepping design.This adaptive controller performs well despite the lack of information on the aerodynamic load and the tire cornering stiffness parameters.Simulation results clearly demonstrate the advantages and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  7. A novel intelligent adaptive control of laser-based ground thermal test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Zhengtao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser heating technology is a type of potential and attractive space heat flux simulation technology, which is characterized by high heating rate, controlled spatial intensity distribution and rapid response. However, the controlled plant is nonlinear, time-varying and uncertainty when implementing the laser-based heat flux simulation. In this paper, a novel intelligent adaptive controller based on proportion–integration–differentiation (PID type fuzzy logic is proposed to improve the performance of laser-based ground thermal test. The temperature range of thermal cycles is more than 200 K in many instances. In order to improve the adaptability of controller, output scaling factors are real time adjusted while the thermal test is underway. The initial values of scaling factors are optimized using a stochastic hybrid particle swarm optimization (H-PSO algorithm. A validating system has been established in the laboratory. The performance of the proposed controller is evaluated through extensive experiments under different operating conditions (reference and load disturbance. The results show that the proposed adaptive controller performs remarkably better compared to the conventional PID (PID controller and the conventional PID type fuzzy (F-PID controller considering performance indicators of overshoot, settling time and steady state error for laser-based ground thermal test. It is a reliable tool for effective temperature control of laser-based ground thermal test.

  8. A novel intelligent adaptive control of laser-based ground thermal test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhengtao; Yu Gang; Li Shaoxia; He Xiuli; Chen Ru; Zheng Caiyun; Ning Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Laser heating technology is a type of potential and attractive space heat flux simulation technology, which is characterized by high heating rate, controlled spatial intensity distribution and rapid response. However, the controlled plant is nonlinear, time-varying and uncertainty when implementing the laser-based heat flux simulation. In this paper, a novel intelligent adaptive controller based on proportion–integration–differentiation (PID) type fuzzy logic is proposed to improve the performance of laser-based ground thermal test. The temperature range of thermal cycles is more than 200 K in many instances. In order to improve the adaptability of controller, output scaling factors are real time adjusted while the thermal test is underway. The initial values of scaling factors are optimized using a stochastic hybrid particle swarm optimization (H-PSO) algorithm. A validating system has been established in the laboratory. The performance of the pro-posed controller is evaluated through extensive experiments under different operating conditions (reference and load disturbance). The results show that the proposed adaptive controller performs remarkably better compared to the conventional PID (PID) controller and the conventional PID type fuzzy (F-PID) controller considering performance indicators of overshoot, settling time and steady state error for laser-based ground thermal test. It is a reliable tool for effective temperature control of laser-based ground thermal test.

  9. Simulation of a ground-layer adaptive optics system for the Kunlun Dark Universe Survey Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Jia; Sijiong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Ground Layer Adaptive Optics (GLAO) is a recently developed technique extensively applied to ground-based telescopes,which mainly compensates for the wavefront errors induced by ground-layer turbulence to get an appropriate point spread function in a wide field of view.The compensation results mainly depend on the turbulence distribution.The atmospheric turbulence at Dome A in the Antarctic is mainly distributed below 15 meters,which is an ideal site for applications of GLAO.The GLAO system has been simulated for the Kunlun Dark Universe Survey Telescope,which will be set up at Dome A,and uses a rotating mirror to generate several laser guide stars and a wavefront sensor with a wide field of view to sequentially measure the wavefronts from different laser guide stars.The system is simulated on a computer and parameters of the system are given,which provide detailed information about the design of a practical GLAO system.

  10. Specializations of birds that attend army ant raids: an ecological approach to cognitive and behavioral studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Sean; Logan, Corina J; Clayton, Nicola S

    2012-11-01

    Tropical birds forage at army ant raids on several continents. Obligate foraging at army ant raids evolved several times in the Neotropical true antbird family (Thamnophilidae), and recent evidence suggests a diversity of bird species from other families specialize to varying degrees on army ant exploitation. Army ant raids offer access to high prey densities, but the ant colonies are mobile and widely spaced. Successful army ant exploitation requires solving a complex foraging problem because army ant raids are unpredictable in space and time. Birds can counteract the challenges posed by the ants by using strategies that raise their chances of detecting army ant raids, and birds can use additional strategies to track army ant colonies they have located. Some features of army ant biology, such as their conspicuous swarms and columns, above-ground activity, and regular cycles of behavior, provide opportunities for birds to increase their effectiveness at exploiting raids. Changes in sensory, cognitive and behavioral systems may all contribute to specialized army ant exploitation in a bird population. The combination of specializations that are employed may vary independently among bird species and populations. The degree of army ant exploitation by birds varies geographically with latitude and elevation, and with historical patterns such as centers of distribution of obligate thamnophilid antbirds. We predict the set of specializations a given bird population exhibits will depend on local ecology, as well as phylogenetic history. Comparative approaches that focus on these patterns may indicate ecological and evolutionary factors that have shaped the costs and benefits of this foraging strategy. The development of army ant exploitation in individual birds is poorly understood, and individual expression of these specializations may depend on a combination of genetic adaptation with cognitive plasticity, possibly including social and experiential learning. Future

  11. Optical Communication System for Remote Monitoring and Adaptive Control of Distributed Ground Sensors Exhibiting Collective Intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, S.M.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    Comprehensive management of the battle-space has created new requirements in information management, communication, and interoperability as they effect surveillance and situational awareness. The objective of this proposal is to expand intelligent controls theory to produce a uniquely powerful implementation of distributed ground-based measurement incorporating both local collective behavior, and interoperative global optimization for sensor fusion and mission oversight. By using a layered hierarchal control architecture to orchestrate adaptive reconfiguration of autonomous robotic agents, we can improve overall robustness and functionality in dynamic tactical environments without information bottlenecks. In this concept, each sensor is equipped with a miniaturized optical reflectance modulator which is interactively monitored as a remote transponder using a covert laser communication protocol from a remote mothership or operative. Robot data-sharing at the ground level can be leveraged with global evaluation criteria, including terrain overlays and remote imaging data. Information sharing and distributed intelli- gence opens up a new class of remote-sensing applications in which small single-function autono- mous observers at the local level can collectively optimize and measure large scale ground-level signals. AS the need for coverage and the number of agents grows to improve spatial resolution, cooperative behavior orchestrated by a global situational awareness umbrella will be an essential ingredient to offset increasing bandwidth requirements within the net. A system of the type described in this proposal will be capable of sensitively detecting, tracking, and mapping spatial distributions of measurement signatures which are non-stationary or obscured by clutter and inter- fering obstacles by virtue of adaptive reconfiguration. This methodology could be used, for example, to field an adaptive ground-penetrating radar for detection of underground structures in

  12. Configurable adaptive optical system for imaging of ground-based targets from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Brian K.; Friedman, Edward J.; Hooker, R. Brian; Cermak, Michael A.

    2003-03-01

    Space-based, high resolution, Earth remote sensing systems, that employ large, flexible, lightweight primary mirrors, will require active wavefront correction, in the form of active and adaptive optics, to correct for thermally and vibrationally induced deformations in the optics. These remote sensing systems typically have a large field-of-view. Unlike the adaptive optics on ground-based astronomical telescopes, which have a negligible field-of-view, the adaptive optics on these space-based remote sensing systems will be required to correct the wavefront over the entire field-of-view, which can be several degrees. The error functions for astronomical adaptive optics have been developed for the narrow field-of-view correction of atmospheric turbulence and do not address the needs of wide field space-based systems. To address these needs, a new wide field adaptive optics theory and a new error function are developed. Modeling and experimental results demonstrate the validity of the wide field adaptive optics theory and new error function. This new error function, which is a new extension of conventional adaptive optics, lead to the development of three new types of imaging systems: wide field-of-view, selectable field-of-view, and steerable field-of-view. These new systems can have nearly diffraction-limited performance across the entire field-of-view or a narrow movable region of high-resolution imaging. The factors limiting system performance will be shown. The range of applicability of the wide field adaptive optics theory is shown. The range of applicability is used to avoid limitations in system performance and to estimate the optical systems parameters, which will meet the system"s performance requirements.

  13. Adaptive method for real-time gait phase detection based on ground contact forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lie; Zheng, Jianbin; Wang, Yang; Song, Zhengge; Zhan, Enqi

    2015-01-01

    A novel method is presented to detect real-time gait phases based on ground contact forces (GCFs) measured by force sensitive resistors (FSRs). The traditional threshold method (TM) sets a threshold to divide the GCFs into on-ground and off-ground statuses. However, TM is neither an adaptive nor real-time method. The threshold setting is based on body weight or the maximum and minimum GCFs in the gait cycles, resulting in different thresholds needed for different walking conditions. Additionally, the maximum and minimum GCFs are only obtainable after data processing. Therefore, this paper proposes a proportion method (PM) that calculates the sums and proportions of GCFs wherein the GCFs are obtained from FSRs. A gait analysis is then implemented by the proposed gait phase detection algorithm (GPDA). Finally, the PM reliability is determined by comparing the detection results between PM and TM. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed PM is highly reliable in all walking conditions. In addition, PM could be utilized to analyze gait phases in real time. Finally, PM exhibits strong adaptability to different walking conditions.

  14. Foundations for learning and adaptation in a multi-degree-of-freedom unmanned ground vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Michael R.; Bailey, Richard

    2004-04-01

    The real-time coordination and control of a many motion degrees of freedom (dof) unmanned ground vehicle under dynamic conditions in a complex environment is nearly impossible for a human operator to accomplish. Needed are adaptive on-board mechanisms to quickly complete sensor-effector loops to maintain balance and leverage. This paper contains a description of our approach to the control problem for a small unmanned ground vehicle with six dof in the three spatial dimensions. Vehicle control is based upon seven fixed action patterns that exercise all of the motion dof of which the vehicle is capable, and five basic reactive behaviors that protect the vehicle during operation. The reactive behaviors demonstrate short-term adaptations. The learning processes for long-term adaptations of the vehicle control functions that we are implementing are composed of classical and operant conditionings of novel responses to information available from distance sensors (vision and audition) built upon the pre-defined fixed action patterns. The fixed action patterns are in turn modulated by the pre-defined low-level reactive behaviors that, as unconditioned responses, continuously serve to maintain the viability of the robot during the activations of the fixed action patterns, and of the higher-order (conditioned) behaviors. The sensors of the internal environment that govern the low-level reactive behaviors also serve as the criteria for operant conditioning, and satisfy the requirement for basic behavioral motivation.

  15. Ground-water quality, water year 1995, and statistical analysis of ground-water-quality data, water years 1994-95, at the Chromic Acid Pit site, US Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Roybal, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    The Chromic Acid Pit site is an inactive waste disposal site that is regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976. The 2.2-cubic-yard cement-lined pit was operated from 1980 to 1983 by a contractor to the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss. The pit, located on the Fort Bliss military reservation in El Paso, Texas, was used for disposal and evaporation of chromic acid waste generated from chrome plating operations. The site was closed in 1989, and the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission issued permit number HW-50296 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency number TX4213720101), which approved and implemented post-closure care for the Chromic Acid Pit site. In accordance with an approved post-closure plan, the U.S. Geological Survey is cooperating with the U.S. Army in monitoring and evaluating ground-water quality at the site. One upgradient ground-water monitoring well (MW1) and two downgradient ground-water monitoring wells (MW2 and MW3), installed adjacent to the chromic acid pit, are monitored on a quarterly basis. Ground-water sampling of these wells by the U.S. Geological Survey began in December 1993. The ground-water level, measured in a production well located approximately 1,700 feet southeast of the Chromic Acid Pit site, has declined about 29.43 feet from 1982 to 1995. Depth to water at the Chromic Acid Pit site in September 1995 was 284.2 to 286.5 feet below land surface; ground-water flow at the water table is assumed to be toward the southeast. Ground-water samples collected from monitoring wells at the Chromic Acid Pit site during water year 1995 contained dissolved- solids concentrations of 481 to 516 milligrams per liter. Total chromium concentrations detected above the laboratory reporting limit ranged from 0.0061 to 0.030 milligram per liter; dissolved chromium concentrations ranged from 0.0040 to 0.010 milligram per liter. Nitrate as nitrogen concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 2.8 milligrams per

  16. Identifying Ground-Robot Impedance to Improve Terrain Adaptability in Running Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Arevalo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, running robots are still outperformed by animals, but their dynamic behaviour can be described by the same model. This coincidence means that biomechanical studies can reveal much about the adaptability and energy efficiency of walking mechanisms. In particular, animals adjust their leg stiffness to negotiate terrains with different stiffnesses to keep the total leg-ground stiffness constant. In this work, we aim to provide one method to identify ground-robot impedance so that control can be applied to emulate the aforementioned animal behaviour. Experimental results of the method are presented, showing well- differentiated estimations on four different types of terrain. Additionally, an analysis of the convergence time is presented and compared with the contact time of humans while running, indicating that the method is suitable for use at high speeds.

  17. Effectiveness of adaptive optics system in satellite-to-ground coherent optical communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Huang; Ke, Deng; Chao, Liu; Peng, Zhang; Dagang, Jiang; Zhoushi, Yao

    2014-06-30

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems can suppress the signal fade induced by atmospheric turbulence in satellite-to-ground coherent optical communication. The lower bound of the signal fade under AO compensation was investigated by analyzing the pattern of aberration modes for a one-stage imaging AO system. The distribution of the root mean square of the residual aberration is discussed on the basis of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the residual aberration of the AO system. The effectiveness of the AO system for improving the performance of coherent optical communication is presented in terms of the bit error rate and system availability.

  18. Domain Modeling for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model-Research Outline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Fletcher JD. Opportunities for new “smart” learning environments enabled by next generation web capabilities. Journal of Education Multimedia and...Psychologist. 2010. Graesser AC, D’Mello S. Emotions during the learning of difficult material . In: Brian H Ross, Editor(s), Psychology of...Army Learning Model—Research Outline by Robert Sottilare, Anne Sinatra, Michael Boyce, and Arthur Graesser Approved

  19. Counterinsurgency on the Ground in Afghanistan. How Different Units Adapted to Local Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    littoral • Latin America and West Africa The Strategic Studies Division is led by Rear Admiral Michael McDevitt, USN (Ret.), who is available at 703...ABP Afghan Border Police ADT agribusiness development team AMF Afghan Militia Forces ANA Afghan National Army ANCOP Afghan National Civil Order...Battalion in Nangarhar, 2005—2009 This vignette describes how a US Army battalion, provincial reconstruction team (PRT), and agribusiness development

  20. Individual Learner and Team Modeling for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model: Research Outline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Applications to Learning and Teaching . Washington (DC): American Psychological Association; 2012. p. 451–473. Halpern DF, Millis K, Graesser AC...collection information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for...ABSTRACT While human tutoring and mentoring are common teaching tools, current US Army standards for training and education are group instruction and

  1. Simultaneous Topology, Shape, and Sizing Optimisation of Plane Trusses with Adaptive Ground Finite Elements Using MOEAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norapat Noilublao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel integrated design strategy to accomplish simultaneous topology shape and sizing optimisation of a two-dimensional (2D truss. An optimisation problem is posed to find a structural topology, shape, and element sizes of the truss such that two objective functions, mass and compliance, are minimised. Design constraints include stress, buckling, and compliance. The procedure for an adaptive ground elements approach is proposed and its encoding/decoding process is detailed. Two sets of design variables defining truss layout, shape, and element sizes at the same time are applied. A number of multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs are implemented to solve the design problem. Comparative performance based on a hypervolume indicator shows that multiobjective population-based incremental learning (PBIL is the best performer. Optimising three design variable types simultaneously is more efficient and effective.

  2. Precision in ground based solar polarimetry: Simulating the role of adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaraju, K

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurement of polarization in spectral lines is important for the reliable inference of magnetic fields on the Sun. For ground based observations, polarimetric precision is severely limited by the presence of Earth's atmosphere. Atmospheric turbulence (seeing) produces signal fluctuations which combined with the non-simultaneous nature of the measurement process cause intermixing of the Stokes parameters known as seeing induced polarization cross-talk. Previous analysis of this effect (Judge et al., 2004) suggests that cross-talk is reduced not only with increase in modulation frequency but also by compensating the seeing induced image aberrations by an Adaptive Optics (AO) system. However, in those studies the effect of higher order image aberrations than those corrected by the AO system was not taken into account. We present in this paper an analysis of seeing induced cross-talk in the presence of higher order image aberrations through numerical simulation. In this analysis we find that the amount...

  3. An alternative approach to the ground motion prediction problem by a non-parametric adaptive regression method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerlikaya-Özkurt, Fatma; Askan, Aysegul; Weber, Gerhard-Wilhelm

    2014-12-01

    Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs) are empirical relationships which are used for determining the peak ground response at a particular distance from an earthquake source. They relate the peak ground responses as a function of earthquake source type, distance from the source, local site conditions where the data are recorded and finally the depth and magnitude of the earthquake. In this article, a new prediction algorithm, called Conic Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (CMARS), is employed on an available dataset for deriving a new GMPE. CMARS is based on a special continuous optimization technique, conic quadratic programming. These convex optimization problems are very well-structured, resembling linear programs and, hence, permitting the use of interior point methods. The CMARS method is performed on the strong ground motion database of Turkey. Results are compared with three other GMPEs. CMARS is found to be effective for ground motion prediction purposes.

  4. Regionally Adaptable Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPE) from Empirical Models of Fourier and Duration of Ground Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Sanjay; Scherbaum, Frank; Kuehn, Nicolas; Stafford, Peter; Edwards, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The current practice of deriving empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) involves using ground motions recorded at multiple sites. However, in applications like site-specific (e.g., critical facility) hazard ground motions obtained from the GMPEs are need to be adjusted/corrected to a particular site/site-condition under investigation. This study presents a complete framework for developing a response spectral GMPE, within which the issue of adjustment of ground motions is addressed in a manner consistent with the linear system framework. The present approach is a two-step process in which the first step consists of deriving two separate empirical models, one for Fourier amplitude spectra (FAS) and the other for a random vibration theory (RVT) optimized duration (Drvto) of ground motion. In the second step the two models are combined within the RVT framework to obtain full response spectral amplitudes. Additionally, the framework also involves a stochastic model based extrapolation of individual Fourier spectra to extend the useable frequency limit of the empirically derived FAS model. The stochastic model parameters were determined by inverting the Fourier spectral data using an approach similar to the one as described in Edwards and Faeh (2013). Comparison of median predicted response spectra from present approach with those from other regional GMPEs indicates that the present approach can also be used as a stand-alone model. The dataset used for the presented analysis is a subset of the recently compiled database RESORCE-2012 across Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean region.

  5. Adapting school-based substance use prevention curriculum through cultural grounding: a review and exemplar of adaptation processes for rural schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Margaret; Hecht, Michael L; Miller-Day, Michelle; Krieger, Janice L; Syvertsen, Amy K; Graham, John W; Pettigrew, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    A central challenge facing twenty-first century community-based researchers and prevention scientists is curriculum adaptation processes. While early prevention efforts sought to develop effective programs, taking programs to scale implies that they will be adapted, especially as programs are implemented with populations other than those with whom they were developed or tested. The principle of cultural grounding, which argues that health message adaptation should be informed by knowledge of the target population and by cultural insiders, provides a theoretical rational for cultural regrounding and presents an illustrative case of methods used to reground the keepin' it REAL substance use prevention curriculum for a rural adolescent population. We argue that adaptation processes like those presented should be incorporated into the design and dissemination of prevention interventions.

  6. Authoring Tools and Methods for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model: Research Outline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    investigating and developing adaptive tools and methods to largely automate the authoring (creation), delivery of instruction, and evaluation of computer... evaluate adaptive technologies to make them usable by a larger segment of the training and educational community. This research includes 6...and evaluation of computer-regulated training and education capabilities to help build SRL skills and support mixed-initiative interaction. A major

  7. Adaptive locomotor training on an end-effector gait robot: evaluation of the ground reaction forces in different training conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomelleri, Christopher; Waldner, Andreas; Werner, Cordula; Hesse, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of robotic gait rehabilitation is the restoration of independent gait. To achieve this goal different and specific patterns have to be practiced intensively in order to stimulate the learning process of the central nervous system. The gait robot G-EO Systems was designed to allow the repetitive practice of floor walking, stair climbing and stair descending. A novel control strategy allows training in adaptive mode. The force interactions between the foot and the ground were analyzed on 8 healthy volunteers in three different conditions: real floor walking on a treadmill, floor walking on the gait robot in passive mode, floor walking on the gait robot in adaptive mode. The ground reaction forces were measured by a Computer Dyno Graphy (CDG) analysis system. The results show different intensities of the ground reaction force across all of the three conditions. The intensities of force interactions during the adaptive training mode are comparable to the real walking on the treadmill. Slight deviations still occur in regard to the timing pattern of the forces. The adaptive control strategy comes closer to the physiological swing phase than the passive mode and seems to be a promising option for the treatment of gait disorders. Clinical trials will validate the efficacy of this new option in locomotor therapy on the patients.

  8. Reflecting on Hell in Anticipation of Armageddon: The Impact of Reflection and Adaptation on the Education of the US Army Officer Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-10

    officer and commander functions. There was no longer time for classes on military sanitation and hygiene . Languages (French and German) were removed from...Years 1990 and 1991 (Washington, DC: Center of Military History, 1997), 4. 104 US Department of the Army, A Statement on the Posture of the United...106 US Department of the Army, Posture of the United States Army: FY 1997, x. 29

  9. 美陆军装备环境适应性试验与评价机制及启示%Environmental Adaptability Testing and Evaluation Mechanism of US Army Equipment and Its Enlightenments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘刚; 许翔; 董素荣; 刘瑞林

    2012-01-01

    By introducing the history of equipment environment adaptability problems to US army, the mechanism of equipment environmental adaptability testing and evaluating of US army was studied and the useful experiences for PLA was summarized and recommended.%从美国陆军装备环境适应性问题的发展历史入手,介绍了美国陆军装备环境适应性试验与评价研究机制,总结了该机制的特点,给出了针对我军陆军装备环境适应性试验研究机制建设的启示。

  10. Locally Adaptive Detection Algorithm for Forward-Looking Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    34Algorithms for landmine discrimination using the NIITEK ground penetrating radar ", Proc. SPIE 4742, 709-718 (2002). [5] Gader, P.D., Grandhi, R., Lee...W.H., Wilson, J.N., and Ho, K.C. “Feature analysis for the NIITEK ground penetrating radar using order weighted averaging operators for landmine ...34Plastic landmine detection using time-frequency analysis for forward-looking ground - penetrating radar ”, Proc. SPIE 5089, 851-862 (2003). [9] Stone

  11. Real Leadership and the U.S. Army: Overcoming a Failure of Imagination to Conduct Adaptive Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    no room for serious adaptive work. 4. Detect when your narcissism is getting in the way. Many people who enter the political arena or seek to lead...with authority have narcissistic tenden- cies. This is not necessarily bad. Narcissism is the feeling of self-importance and the exaggeration of...your value and contribution. Leaders must always be watching to ensure their narcissism does not get in the way of the real work. Excessive narcissism

  12. Hardware in the Loop Implementation of Adaptive Vision Based Guidance Law for Ground Target Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    53 Figure 31. PTU -D300 from Directed Perceptions...54 Figure 32. xPC Driver Model for the PTU -D300 .................................................. 55 Figure 33. Ground... PTU -D300...................................................... 55 Table 2. Summary of S-Functions

  13. Real-Time Landmine Detection with Ground-Penetrating Radar Using Discriminative and Adaptive Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Gader

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a real-time software system for landmine detection using ground-penetrating radar (GPR. The system includes an efficient and adaptive preprocessing component; a hidden Markov model- (HMM- based detector; a corrective training component; and an incremental update of the background model. The preprocessing is based on frequency-domain processing and performs ground-level alignment and background removal. The HMM detector is an improvement of a previously proposed system (baseline. It includes additional pre- and postprocessing steps to improve the time efficiency and enable real-time application. The corrective training component is used to adjust the initial model parameters to minimize the number of misclassification sequences. This component could be used offline, or online through feedback to adapt an initial model to specific sites and environments. The background update component adjusts the parameters of the background model to adapt it to each lane during testing. The proposed software system is applied to data acquired from three outdoor test sites at different geographic locations, using a state-of-the-art array GPR prototype. The first collection was used as training, and the other two (contain data from more than 1200 m2 of simulated dirt and gravel roads for testing. Our results indicate that, on average, the corrective training can improve the performance by about 10% for each site. For individual lanes, the performance gain can reach 50%.

  14. 78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... creativity, flexibility and adaptability throughout the Institutional Army, without creating a new organizational construct. 7. Committee's Designated Federal Officer or Point of Contact: COL David Trybula, david...

  15. Ground-based research on vestibular adaption to G-level transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, E.L.; Nooij, S.A.E.; Bos, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Dit artikel beschrijft de nieuwste resultaten van het ESA onderzoeksproject 'Motion perception' waarbij de correlatie wordt onderzocht tussen de gevoeligheid van astronauten voor Space Adaption Syndrome (SAS) en Sickness Induced by Centrifugation (SIC)

  16. Reform of the Army Physical Disability Evaluation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-24

    that USAPDA currently falls under the Army Human Resources Command and not the Army Medical Command in that the medical department only provides...confusing to Soldiers, and leaves the impression that the Army ‘ underrates ’ disability in order to achieve fiscal savings.33 While that may not be the...Adapted from the PDES Review for the Commanding General, Human Resources Command as presented by the U.S. Army Physical Disability Agency, 3 July 2008

  17. Army Working Capital Fund: Army Industrial Operations Could Improve Budgeting and Management of Carryover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    throughs of four Army depot maintenance operations to observe the work being performed and discussed with officials the causes for workload carrying...the preponderance of the Industrial Operations workload . Army Materiel Command (AMC) serves as the management command for Industrial Operations... automotive and Armaments Command LCMC mission of developing, acquiring, fielding, and sustaining ground systems, such as the Mine Resistant Ambush

  18. Pathfinder first light: alignment, calibration, and commissioning of the LINC-NIRVANA ground-layer adaptive optics subsystem

    CERN Document Server

    Kopon, Derek; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Herbst, Tom; Viotto, Valentina; Farinato, Jacopo; Bergomi, Maria; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Marafatto, Luca; Baumeister, Harald; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Jürgen; Briegel, Florian; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Mohr, Lars; Radhakrishnan, Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    We present descriptions of the alignment and calibration tests of the Pathfinder, which achieved first light during our 2013 commissioning campaign at the LBT. The full LINC-NIRVANA instrument is a Fizeau interferometric imager with fringe tracking and 2-layer natural guide star multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems on each eye of the LBT. The MCAO correction for each side is achieved using a ground layer wavefront sensor that drives the LBT adaptive secondary mirror and a mid-high layer wavefront sensor that drives a Xinetics 349 actuator DM conjugated to an altitude of 7.1 km. When the LINC-NIRVANA MCAO system is commissioned, it will be one of only two such systems on an 8-meter telescope and the only such system in the northern hemisphere. In order to mitigate risk, we take a modular approach to commissioning by decoupling and testing the LINC-NIRVANA subsystems individually. The Pathfinder is the ground-layer wavefront sensor for the DX eye of the LBT. It uses 12 pyramid wavefront sensors to opt...

  19. Who governs climate adaptation? Getting green roofs for stormwater retention off the ground

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, H.L.P.; Driessen, P.P.J.; Runhaar, H.A.C.; Stamatelos, J.

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs are an innovative solution for urban stormwater management. This paper examines governance arrangements for green roofs as a ‘no-regrets’ climate adaptation measure in five cities. We analysed who governs green roofs, why and with what outcome. Our results show that hierarchical and mark

  20. Two-step adaptive extraction method for ground points and breaklines from lidar point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bisheng; Huang, Ronggang; Dong, Zhen; Zang, Yufu; Li, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The extraction of ground points and breaklines is a crucial step during generation of high quality digital elevation models (DEMs) from airborne LiDAR point clouds. In this study, we propose a novel automated method for this task. To overcome the disadvantages of applying a single filtering method in areas with various types of terrain, the proposed method first classifies the points into a set of segments and one set of individual points, which are filtered by segment-based filtering and multi-scale morphological filtering, respectively. In the process of multi-scale morphological filtering, the proposed method removes amorphous objects from the set of individual points to decrease the effect of the maximum scale on the filtering result. The proposed method then extracts the breaklines from the ground points, which provide a good foundation for generation of a high quality DEM. Finally, the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method extracts ground points in a robust manner while preserving the breaklines.

  1. Steerable Space Fed Lens Array for Low-Cost Adaptive Ground Station Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Popovic, Zoya; Rondineau, Sebastien; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Fed Lens Array (SFLA) is an alternative to a phased array antenna that replaces large numbers of expensive solid-state phase shifters with a single spatial feed network. SFLA can be used for multi-beam application where multiple independent beams can be generated simultaneously with a single antenna aperture. Unlike phased array antennas where feed loss increases with array size, feed loss in a lens array with more than 50 elements is nearly independent of the number of elements, a desirable feature for large apertures. In addition, SFLA has lower cost as compared to a phased array at the expense of total volume and complete beam continuity. For ground station applications, both of these tradeoff parameters are not important and can thus be exploited in order to lower the cost of the ground station. In this paper, we report the development and demonstration of a 952-element beam-steerable SFLA intended for use as a low cost ground station for communicating and tracking of a low Earth orbiting satellite. The dynamic beam steering is achieved through switching to different feed-positions of the SFLA via a beam controller.

  2. Pathfinder first light: alignment, calibration, and commissioning of the LINC-NIRVANA ground-layer adaptive optics subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopon, Derek; Conrad, Al; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Herbst, Tom; Viotto, Valentina; Farinato, Jacopo; Bergomi, Maria; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Marafatto, Luca; Baumeister, Harald; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Jürgen; Briegel, Florian; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Mohr, Lars; Radhakrishnan, Kalyan

    2014-08-01

    We present descriptions of the alignment and calibration tests of the Pathfinder, which achieved first light during our 2013 commissioning campaign at the LBT. The full LINC-NIRVANA instrument is a Fizeau interferometric imager with fringe tracking and 2-layer natural guide star multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems on each eye of the LBT. The MCAO correction for each side is achieved using a ground layer wavefront sensor that drives the LBT adaptive secondary mirror and a mid-high layer wavefront sensor that drives a Xinetics 349 actuator DM conjugated to an altitude of 7.1 km. When the LINC-NIRVANA MCAO system is commissioned, it will be one of only two such systems on an 8-meter telescope and the only such system in the northern hemisphere. In order to mitigate risk, we take a modular approach to commissioning by decoupling and testing the LINC-NIRVANA subsystems individually. The Pathfinder is the ground-layer wavefront sensor for the DX eye of the LBT. It uses 12 pyramid wavefront sensors to optically co-add light from natural guide stars in order to make four pupil images that sense ground layer turbulence. Pathfinder is now the first LINC-NIRVANA subsystem to be fully integrated with the telescope and commissioned on sky. Our 2013 commissioning campaign consisted of 7 runs at the LBT with the tasks of assembly, integration and communication with the LBT telescope control system, alignment to the telescope optical axis, off-sky closed loop AO calibration, and finally closed loop on-sky AO. We present the programmatics of this campaign, along with the novel designs of our alignment scheme and our off-sky calibration test, which lead to the Pathfinder's first on-sky closed loop images.

  3. Adaptation of Industrial Organisations to the Environment Grounded in Evolutionary Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rob; Dekkers; Eveline; van; de; Boogaard; Naima; el-Bouzidi; Hil; de; Skraastad

    2002-01-01

    Yes, we perceive that the environment in which comp an ies operate, is changing at higher speeds then before. Globalisation, higher inn ovation rates, customisation, more intense competition, technological developmen ts account for these changes effecting the way industrial companies operate and eventually their structures and processes. Companies have to adapt themselves to these changes. The question arose whether the approach of the Section Industria l Organisation and Management that it has practised ...

  4. Boots on the Ground: Science-Management Partnerships Facilitate Climate Change Adaptation in National Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. L.; Halofsky, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Effective climate change engagement on public lands is characterized by (1) an enduring science-management partnership, (2) involvement of key stakeholders, (3) consideration of broad landscapes with multiple landowners, (4) science-based, peer-reviewed assessments of sensitivity of natural resources to climate change, (5) adaptation strategies and tactics developed by resource managers, and (6) leadership and a workforce motivated to implement climate-smart practices in resource planning and project management. Using this sequence of steps, the U.S. Forest Service, in collaboration with other agencies and universities, has developed climate change vulnerability assessments and adaptation plans for national forests and other lands. Although implementation (step 6) has been slow in some cases, the success of this process has been documented in 25 national forests and is now being accelerated across the National Forest System (155 national forests). Although hundreds of meetings, strategies, plans, and panels have focused on climate change adaptation over the past decade, only direct engagement between scientists and resource managers (less planning, more doing) has resulted in substantive outcomes.

  5. RTTOV-gb - adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer a new capability to provide continuous observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer. Thus, they are potential candidates to supplement radiosonde network and satellite data to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through a variational assimilation of their data. However in order to assimilate MWR observations, a fast radiative transfer model is required and such a model is not currently available. This is necessary for going from the model state vector space to the observation space at every observation point. The fast radiative transfer model RTTOV is well accepted in the NWP community, though it was developed to simulate satellite observations only. In this work, the RTTOV code has been modified to allow for simulations of ground-based upward-looking microwave sensors. In addition, the tangent linear, adjoint, and K-modules of RTTOV have been adapted to provide Jacobians (i.e., the sensitivity of observations to the atmospheric thermodynamical state) for ground-based geometry. These modules are necessary for the fast minimization of the cost function in a variational assimilation scheme. The proposed ground-based version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, has been validated against accurate and less time-efficient line-by-line radiative transfer models. In the frequency range commonly used for temperature and humidity profiling (22-60 GHz), root-mean-square brightness temperature differences are smaller than typical MWR uncertainties (˜ 0.5 K) at all channels used in this analysis. Brightness temperatures (TBs) computed with RTTOV-gb from radiosonde profiles have been compared with nearly simultaneous and co-located ground-based MWR observations. Differences between simulated and measured TBs are below 0.5 K for all channels except for the water vapor band, where most of the uncertainty comes from instrumental errors. The Jacobians calculated with the K-module of RTTOV

  6. Army Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Army Robotics 07 October 2009 Dr. Grant Gerhart, Senior Research Scientist Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A... Robots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Grant Gerhart; Bernard Theisen 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...CBRNE • IED Defeat Systems • Disarm / Disrupt • Reconnaissance • Investigation • Explosive Sniffer • Common Robotic Kit • EOD • Convoy • Log

  7. The adaptive function of masturbation in a promiscuous African ground squirrel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M Waterman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies of animal mating systems increasingly emphasize female multiple mating and cryptic sexual selection, particularly sperm competition. Males under intense sperm competition may manipulate sperm quantity and quality through masturbation, which could waste sperm and decrease fertility. I examined the factors influencing masturbation by male Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris in light of a number of functional hypotheses. METHODOLOGY: Observational data on a marked population of squirrels were collected in east-central Namibia using scan and all-occurrences sampling. FINDINGS: Masturbation was far more frequent on days of female oestrus and mostly occurred after copulation. Masturbation rates were higher in dominant males, which copulate more, than in subordinates and increased with number of mates a female accepts. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that masturbation in this species was not a response to sperm competition nor a sexual outlet by subordinates that did not copulate. Instead masturbation could function as a form of genital grooming. Female Cape ground squirrels mate with up to 10 males in a 3-hr oestrus, and by masturbating after copulation males could reduce the chance of infection. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs can profoundly affect fertility, and their consequences for mating strategies need to be examined more fully.

  8. Stiff-knee gait in cerebral palsy: how do patients adapt to uneven ground?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Harald; Hösl, Matthias; Schwameder, Hermann; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2014-04-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to reduced toe clearance mostly caused by a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). The aim of this study was to investigate adaptive mechanism to an uneven surface in stiff-knee walkers with cerebral palsy. Sixteen patients with bilateral cerebral palsy, GMFCS I-II and stiff-knee gait, mean age 14.1 (SD=6.2) years, were compared to 13 healthy controls with mean age 13.5 (SD=4.8) years. Gait analysis including EMG was performed under even and uneven surface conditions. Similar strategies to improve leg clearance were found in patients as well as in controls. Both adapted with significantly reduced speed and cadence, increased outward foot rotation, knee and hip flexion as well as anterior pelvic tilt. Therefore cerebral palsy and stiff-knee gait did not affect the adaptation capacity on the uneven surface. On the uneven surface an average increase in knee flexion of 7° (SD=3°) and 12° (SD=5°) was observed in controls and patients with cerebral palsy, respectively. Although rectus femoris activity was increased in patients with cerebral palsy, they were able to increase their knee flexion during swing. The results of this study suggest that walking on uneven surface has the potential to improve knee flexion in stiff-knee walkers. Therefore training on uneven surface could be used as a conservative treatment regime alone, in combination with Botulinum neurotoxin or in the rehabilitation of surgery.

  9. An Army in Transition: Maintaining the Competitive Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    leaders attempt to create a culture that promotes trust and the innovation sought after by the 21st Century Army. Hofstede defined the dimension of...SUBJECT TERMS Innovation, Adaptability, Creativity, Agile, Culture , Trust 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UNLIMITED...Adaptability, Creativity, Agile, Culture , Trust CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified The United States Army still remains the most powerful land

  10. Family Strengths and Adaptation to Army Life: A Focus of Variations in Family Values and Expectations Across Racial/Ethnic Groups and Rank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-22

    is vital that chaplains provide viable opportunities for premarital counseling for Army members contemplating marriage. An important focus should be...chaplains as well as other human service providers with a clinical screening instrument for assessing marital and family systems and for planning

  11. Conceptual Design of the Adaptive Optics System for the Laser Communication Relay Demonstration Ground Station at Table Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Page, Norman A.; Burruss, Rick S.; Truong, Tuan N.; Dew, Sharon; Troy, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    The Laser Communication Relay Demonstration will feature a geostationary satellite communicating via optical links to multiple ground stations. The first ground station (GS-1) is the 1m OCTL telescope at Table Mountain in California. The optical link will utilize pulse position modulation (PPM) and differential phase shift keying (DPSK) protocols. The DPSK link necessitates that adaptive optics (AO) be used to relay the incoming beam into the single mode fiber that is the input of the modem. The GS-1 AO system will have two MEMS Deformable mirrors to achieve the needed actuator density and stroke limit. The AO system will sense the aberrations with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor using the light from the communication link's 1.55 microns laser to close the loop. The system will operate day and night. The system's software will be based on heritage software from the Palm 3000 AO system, reducing risk and cost. The AO system is being designed to work at r(sub 0) greater than 3.3 cm (measured at 500 nm and zenith) and at elevations greater than 20deg above the horizon. In our worst case operating conditions we expect to achieve Strehl ratios of over 70% (at 1.55 microns), which should couple 57% of the light into the single mode DPSK fiber. This paper describes the conceptual design of the AO system, predicted performance and discusses some of the trades that were conducted during the design process.

  12. Army Airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    contains some type of internal support structure such as a keel. A rigid airship has a full skeleton, such as the Zeppelin model from the mid 1900‟s...the World War One, the Germans used zeppelins with limited success to attack the United Kingdom (UK) in a “strategic bomber” role. The US used...similar objectives.21 The Army initiated CPR‟s on every acquisition program to identify redundancies and create efficiencies. CPR‟s have led to more

  13. Ground Wars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    Political campaigns today are won or lost in the so-called ground war--the strategic deployment of teams of staffers, volunteers, and paid part-timers who work the phones and canvass block by block, house by house, voter by voter. Ground Wars provides an in-depth ethnographic portrait of two...... infrastructures that utilize large databases with detailed individual-level information for targeting voters, and armies of dedicated volunteers and paid part-timers. Nielsen challenges the notion that political communication in America must be tightly scripted, controlled, and conducted by a select coterie...... of professionals. Yet he also quashes the romantic idea that canvassing is a purer form of grassroots politics. In today's political ground wars, Nielsen demonstrates, even the most ordinary-seeming volunteer knocking at your door is backed up by high-tech targeting technologies and party expertise. Ground Wars...

  14. Adaptive Maternal Immune Deviations as a Ground For Autism Spectrum Disorders Development in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poletaev Alexander B.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a vexed problem today. Overall, there is a high frequency of birth children (1:80 – 1:150 with late diagnosed autism spectrum disorders (ASD and this trend is getting progressively stronger. The causes for the currently increased frequency of ASD and the pathogenesis of ASD are not fully understood yet. One of the most likely mechanisms inducing ASD may be a maternal immune imprinting. This phenomenon is based on transplacental translocation of maternal antibodies of IgG class and, as a consequence, on the epigenetic “tuning” of immune system of the fetus and child. This mechanism provides development of child’s anti-infection resistance before meeting with microorganisms, but it can be also a cause of inborn pathology including the ASD appearance. The quantitative changes in maternal blood serum autoantibodies depend on a specific microbial population, or are induced by environmental chemical pollutants in association with some individual features of the maternal metabolism. These immune changes are adaptive in most cases for the maternal organism, but can be pathogenic for the fetus in some cases. We discuss in the present paper the possibilities to predict the risk from abnormal development of nervous system in fetus and early diagnosis of ASD in high-risk group of children.

  15. Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hwisoo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model. PMID:26076406

  16. Army Modernization Strategy 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    hazard. The SUGV modular design allows multiple payloads to be integrated in a plug-and- play fashion . Weighing less than 30 pounds, it is capable...the Army will: Continue to field LMP (to include Army Installations) Plan for and field GCSS-Army (F/T) Plan for and field GCSS-Army ( PLM +) Define

  17. 30 Brigade Combat Teams: Is the Army too Small

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) N/A 10. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The views expressed in this...capacity. In order to increase the number of BCTs, the Army will have to increase its end strength. 14. SUBJECT TERMS simulation, Army...brigade combat teams, Army end strength, boots on the ground to dwell time ratio 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 57 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  18. The Role of a Data Manager in the Successful Employment of the Distributed Common Ground System-Army (DCGS-A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    cases. The principles of TQM evolved into what is now known as “ Lean Six Sigma ,” or a systems analysis driven concept aimed at streamlining...organizational processes in order to gain efficiencies.20 The Army’s adaptation of many of Lean Six Sigma concepts, while not completely transferrable, offer...to effectively manage data across an enterprise. Of particular help is Peter Pande, Robert P. Neuman, and Roland R. Cavanagh’s “The Six Sigma Way

  19. Adaptive optics correction into single mode fiber for a low Earth orbiting space to ground optical communication link using the OPALS downlink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Malcolm W; Morris, Jeffery F; Kovalik, Joseph M; Andrews, Kenneth S; Abrahamson, Matthew J; Biswas, Abhijit

    2015-12-28

    An adaptive optics (AO) testbed was integrated to the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) ground station telescope at the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) as part of the free space laser communications experiment with the flight system on board the International Space Station (ISS). Atmospheric turbulence induced aberrations on the optical downlink were adaptively corrected during an overflight of the ISS so that the transmitted laser signal could be efficiently coupled into a single mode fiber continuously. A stable output Strehl ratio of around 0.6 was demonstrated along with the recovery of a 50 Mbps encoded high definition (HD) video transmission from the ISS at the output of the single mode fiber. This proof of concept demonstration validates multi-Gbps optical downlinks from fast slewing low-Earth orbiting (LEO) spacecraft to ground assets in a manner that potentially allows seamless space to ground connectivity for future high data-rates network.

  20. Physiological adaptation of Escherichia coli after transfer onto refrigerated ground meat and other solid matrices: a molecular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guernec, Anthony; Robichaud-Rincon, Philippe; Saucier, Linda

    2012-10-01

    Bacteria on meat are subjected to specific living conditions that differ drastically from typical laboratory procedures in synthetic media. This study was undertaken to determine the behavior of bacteria when transferred from a rich-liquid medium to solid matrices, as is the case during microbial process validation. Escherichia coli cultured in Brain-Heart Infusion (BHI) broth to different growth phases were inoculated in ground beef (GB) and stored at 5°C for 12 days or spread onto BHI agar and cooked meat medium (CMM), and incubated at 37°C for several hours. We monitored cell densities and the expression of σ factors and genes under their control over time. The initial growth phase of the inoculum influenced growth resumption after transfer onto BHI agar and CMM. Whatever the solid matrix, bacteria adapted to their new environment and did not perceive stress immediately after inoculation. During this period, the σ(E) and σ(H) regulons were not activated and rpoD mRNA levels adjusted quickly. The rpoS and gadA mRNA levels did not increase after inoculation on solid surfaces and displayed normal growth-dependent modifications. After transfer onto GB, dnaK and groEL gene expression was affected more by the low temperature than by the composition of a meat environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. AOLI-- Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager: Diffraction Limited Imaging in the Visible on Large Ground-Based Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Craig; Castellá, Bruno Femenia; Crass, Jonathan; King, David L; Labadie, Lucas; Aisher, Peter; Garrido, Antonio Pérez; Balcells, Marc; Díaz-Sánchez, Anastasio; Fuensalida, Jesús Jimenez; Lopez, Roberto L; Oscoz, Alejandro; Prieto, Jorge A Pérez; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis F; Villó, Isidro

    2012-01-01

    The highest resolution images ever taken in the visible were obtained by combining Lucky Imaging and low order adaptive optics. This paper describes a new instrument to be deployed on the WHT 4.2m and GTC 10.4 m telescopes on La Palma, with particular emphasis on the optical design and the expected system performance. A new design of low order wavefront sensor using photon counting CCD detectors and multi-plane curvature wavefront sensor will allow dramatically fainter reference stars to be used, allowing virtually full sky coverage with a natural guide star. This paper also describes a significant improvements in the efficiency of Lucky Imaging, important advances in wavefront reconstruction with curvature sensors and the results of simulations and sensitivity limits. With a 2 x 2 array of 1024 x 1024 photon counting EMCCDs, AOLI is likely to be the first of the new class of high sensitivity, near diffraction limited imaging systems giving higher resolution in the visible from the ground than hitherto been p...

  2. EDiFiSE full-FPGA adaptive optics: first laboratory results using the IACAT optical ground support equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulani, Haresh M.; Martín, Yolanda; Fuensalida, Jesús J.; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis F.; Echeandía, Carlos; Puga, Marta; Alonso, Angel

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews the EDiFiSE (Equalized and Diffraction-limited Field Spectrograph Experiment) full-FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) adaptive optics (AO) system and presents its first laboratory results. EDiFiSE is a prototype equalized integral field unit (EIFU) spectrograph for the observation of high-contrast systems in the Willian Herschel Telescope (WHT). Its AO system comprises two independent parallel full-FPGA control loops, one for tip-tilt and one for higher order aberrations. Xilinx's Virtex-4 and Virtex-5 FPGA's fixed point arithmetic and their interfacing with the rest of the AO components and the user have been adequately dealt with, and a very deterministic system with a negligible computational delay has been obtained. The AO system has been recently integrated in laboratory and verified using the IACAT (IAC Atmosphere and Telescope) optical ground support equipment. Closed loop correction bandwidths of 65 Hz for the tip-tilt and 25 Hz for higher order aberrations are obtained. The system has been tested in the visible range for the WHT with a 9 x 9 subpupil configuration, low star magnitude, wind speeds up to 10 m/s and Fried parameter down to 18 cm, and a resolution below the EIFU's fiber section has been obtained.

  3. Soldier Capability - Army Combat Effectiveness (SCACE). Volume 2. Selected Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    Ground, MD: US Army Human Engineering Laboratories, 1964. 228. Highsmith , Raymond Carl. Proposed Measures of Effectiveness for Human Resource Availability...A079Z33. Washington: US Army Personnel Research Office, April 1964. 564. Thomas, Patricia J., and Thomas E. D. School Validation of theBasic Test Battery

  4. [The army nurse, from hospital to overseas operations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérot, Françoise; Saliou, Henri; Lefort, Hugues; De Rudnickl, Stéphane

    2014-09-01

    Assigned to French army teaching hospitals, the army nurse can be deployed on overseas operations in support of the armed forces. Experience in the treatment of casualties in life-threatening emergencies is essential, as is the ability to adapt and react. Designated on a voluntary basis, after some two years of working in an army teaching hospital, the hospital nurse receives training in the specificities of the theatre of deployment.

  5. The Army War College Review. Volume 1, Number 2. Student Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Grand Strategy 16 Colonel Michael James Daniels United States Army The Resurrection of Adaptive Planning 30 Colonel Jon C. Wilkinson United...41 Student Publications The Resurrection of Adaptive Planning Colonel Jon C. Wilkinson The revolution in adaptive planning

  6. Army Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    NSRDEC Mission Information Team also linked video feeds from squad-organic sensors such as the Dragon Runner 20 Unmanned Ground Vehicle and the Cargo...United States can lead unprecedented efforts to eliminate threats as they emerge,” said Tim Blades , deputy director of ECBC’s Program Integration and on

  7. Army TLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-10

    equipment, as well as in ther- mistor catheters and hypodermic needles for temperature and flow measure- ment.’ YSI bead thermistors have been adapted...number (Balsley et al. 2008) - prediction of model parameterization for stable conditions, and verification of new theories for stably stratified...of the sensor element. Typical of such applications is the use of bead thermistors in gas chromatog- raphy and thermal conductivity gas analysis

  8. Temperature adaptation of active sodium-potassium transport and of passive permeability in erythrocytes of ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Willis, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    Unidirectional active and passive fluxes of K-42 and Na-24 were measured in red blood cells of ground squirrels (hibernators) and guinea pigs (nonhibernators). As the temperature was lowered, ?active' (ouabain-sensitive) K influx and Na efflux were more considerably diminished in guinea pig cells than in those of ground squirrels. The fraction of total K influx which is ouabain-sensitive in red blood cells of ground squirrels was virtually constant at all temperatures, whereas it decreased abruptly in guinea pig cells as temperature was lowered.

  9. Complexity and Army Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Mark T.

    On 12 Octther 1999, the U.S. Army began a journey down a new path to innovation, when General Eric Shinseki presented his vision of Army Transformation at the 45th annual meeting of the Association of the United States Army. In this speech, General Shinseki described the Army as an organization consisting of heavy forces with excellent staying power but poor strategic responsiveness, light forces with excellent responsiveness but poor staying power, and a logistics system with an excessively large footprint. His proposed solution, a comprehensive change of the Army resulting in full-spectrum dominance and strategic responsiveness, would occur so quickly as to "be unnerving to some." [Shinseki. 1999] While this prediction has turned out in some ways to be true, it is not necessarily the speed of change that is unnerving to many of the people studying Army Transformation.

  10. 2010 Army Modernization Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Capability Release ( JCR ) software upgrades with BFT2 and KGV-72s provides Type-1 security and enhanced (10X) L-band bandwidth to current FBCB2 terminals...Additionally, JCR will include the co-host of the TiGR and the Army will leverage to support HBCT to SBCT conversions starting in FY11. By FY13...Army Human Intelligence 89 2010 ARMY MODERNIZATION STRATEGY WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL IBCT: IED: IED: IFPC: IPADS: IRB: ISR: IT: JAB: JBC-P: JCR : JETS

  11. Army Overdependency on Contractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-20

    Army Overdependency on Contrators EWS 2005 Subject Area Topical Issues Contemporary Issues Paper Submitted by Captain HL Morris...aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information... service would not be interrupted if the contractor failed to perform. The guidelines also mandated that the Army had to be capable of providing

  12. Magnesium Nanocomposites: Current Status and Prospects for Army Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    reviewed the current state of Mg development for Army-related ground vehicle applications (56). Two Mg alloys—WE43 and Elektron 675—currently under...development through a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and Magnesium Elektron , NA show great promise for a variety of...applications. WE43 has superior corrosion resistance to many early Mg alloys and is being considered for a variety of applications. Elektron 675 is

  13. Army Phase 3. Small Business Innovation Research Program Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Project Manager: The final concern was full system militarization. Mr. Edgar Neira The AECU was designed from the start as a military U.S. Army ARDEC...for unimplanted and flu- vehicles (rain, insects) and tactical ground vehicles orine implanted ion beam deposited DLC films. (sand), as well as the...unicharges into the gun chamber and insures Army Project Manager: the engagement of the last unicharge into the gun’s swiss Mr. Edgar Neira notch. The

  14. Adaptation of Dubins Paths for UAV Ground Obstacle Avoidance When Using a Low Cost On-Board GNSS Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramūnas Kikutis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Current research on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs shows a lot of interest in autonomous UAV navigation. This interest is mainly driven by the necessity to meet the rules and restrictions for small UAV flights that are issued by various international and national legal organizations. In order to lower these restrictions, new levels of automation and flight safety must be reached. In this paper, a new method for ground obstacle avoidance derived by using UAV navigation based on the Dubins paths algorithm is presented. The accuracy of the proposed method has been tested, and research results have been obtained by using Software-in-the-Loop (SITL simulation and real UAV flights, with the measurements done with a low cost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS sensor. All tests were carried out in a three-dimensional space, but the height accuracy was not assessed. The GNSS navigation data for the ground obstacle avoidance algorithm is evaluated statistically.

  15. Army Posture Statement: A Statement on the Posture of the United States Army 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    decentralized, adaptive, creative and deadly enemy. The Army’s generating force, which prepares, trains, educates and supports Army forces worldwide, is also...Life Consultant MOUT Military Operations in Urban Terrain MRAP Mine-Resistant, Ambush- Protected MRE Mission Readiness Exercise MRT Master Resiliency

  16. Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    STRATEGIC SEALIFT SUPPORTING ARMY DEPLOYMENTS A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff...THOMPSON, MAJ, US ARMY BFA, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, Louisiana, 1994 Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 2016 Approved for...Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew

  17. Review of small-angle coronagraphic techniques in the wake of ground-based second-generation adaptive optics systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mawet, Dimitri; Lawson, Peter; Mugnier, Laurent; Traub, Wesley; Boccaletti, Anthony; Trauger, John; Gladysz, Szymon; Serabyn, Eugene; Milli, Julien; Belikov, Ruslan; Kasper, Markus; Baudoz, Pierre; Macintosh, Bruce; Marois, Christian; Oppenheimer, Ben; Barrett, Harrisson; Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Devaney, Nicolas; Girard, Julien; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Mennesson, Bertrand; Mouillet, David; Murakami, Naoshi; Poyneer, Lisa; Savransky, Dmitri; ́erinaud, Christophe V; Wallace, James K

    2012-01-01

    Small-angle coronagraphy is technically and scientifically appealing because it enables the use of smaller telescopes, allows covering wider wavelength ranges, and potentially increases the yield and completeness of circumstellar environment - exoplanets and disks - detection and characterization campaigns. However, opening up this new parameter space is challenging. Here we will review the four posts of high contrast imaging and their intricate interactions at very small angles (within the first 4 resolution elements from the star). The four posts are: choice of coronagraph, optimized wavefront control, observing strategy, and post-processing methods. After detailing each of the four foundations, we will present the lessons learned from the 10+ years of operations of zeroth and first-generation adaptive optics systems. We will then tentatively show how informative the current integration of second-generation adaptive optics system is, and which lessons can already be drawn from this fresh experience. Then, w...

  18. Mobile robot control on uneven and slippery ground: An adaptive approach based on a multi-model observer

    OpenAIRE

    Lenain, R.; Thuilot, B.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper proposes an algorithm dedicated to off-road mobile robot path tracking at high speed. In order to ensure a high accuracy, a predictive and adaptive approach is developed to face the various perturbations due to this context (mainly the bad grip conditions and the terrain geometry). The control law is based on previous work, and requires the knowledge of sideslip angles, which cannot be directly measured. As a result, an observer based on two levels of modeli...

  19. United States Army Medical Department Journal. Leadership in the Army Medical Department, October - December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    work, The Origin of Species,’ is that the key to survival in biological evolution is the ability of a species to adapt. A species that does not adapt...attorneys, military paralegals , and civilian paralegals providing legal support throughout the AMEDD at the 8 medical centers and numerous hospitals...Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), mobilized 18 Judge Advocates and paralegals in 2007 and has continued a cycle of mobilizations of legal personnel to

  20. The U.S. Army Capstone Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    leadership.10 This strategic guidance describes a joint force that will be smaller and leaner , but will be agile, flexible, ready, and technologically...becomes a smaller, leaner force, it must take advantage of this war dividend and reinvest it in the future.39 These experienced leaders form the...enable assured mobility, vertical maneuver, strategic mobility, operational reach, and unmanned ground autonomy . These investments will enable the Army

  1. RTTOV-gb - Adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) is the single most important under-sampled part of the atmosphere. According to the WMO Statement Of Guidance For Global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), temperature and humidity profiles (in cloudy areas) are among the four critical atmospheric variables not adequately measured in the PBL. Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) provide temperature and humidity profiles in both clear- and cloudy-sky conditions with high temporal resolution and low-to-moderate vertical resolution, with information mostly residing in the PBL. Ground-based MWR offer to bridge this observational gap by providing continuous temperature and humidity information in the PBL. The MWR data assimilation into NWP models may be particularly important in nowcasting and severe weather initiation. The assimilation of thermodynamic profiles retrieved from MWR data has been recently experimented, but a way to possibly increase the impact is to directly assimilate measured radiances instead of retrieved profiles. The assimilation of observed radiances in a variational scheme requires the following tools: (i) a fast radiative transfer (RT) model to compute the simulated radiances at MWR channels from the NWP model fields (ii) the partial derivatives (Jacobians) of the fast radiative transfer model with respect to control variables to optimize the distances of the atmospheric state from both the first guess and the observations. Such a RT model is available from the EUMETSAT NWPSAF (Numerical Weather Prediction Satellite Application Facility) and well accepted in the NWP community: RTTOV. This model was developed for nadir-viewing passive visible, infrared, and microwave satellite radiometers, spectrometers and interferometers. It has been modified to handle ground-based microwave radiometer observations. This version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, provides the tools needed to exploit ground-based upward looking MWR brightness temperatures into NWP variational data

  2. Tactical UAV’s in the French Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    DLRFCMP SDTI Maintien en service jusqu’à l’arrivée du MCMMContrat Fabrication CL 289 Contrat Retrofit drone Adaptation véhicules Maintien en...Tactical UAV’s in the French Army LtCol Pierre-Yves HENRY, Technical Service of the French Army, Program Officer for Battlefield Surveillance Report...suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis

  3. US Army Cultural Obstacles to Transformational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    leaders capable of building an organizational culture that promotes deep individual “ buy in,” are necessary to keep Army units committed and cohesive...Covey, “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”, (New York, NY: Fireside, 1989), 42. 19 Bass and Riggio, 4. 20 Ibid, 5. 23 21 Adapted from US...25 Author not stated, “Generation Y: The Millennials , Ready or not, here they come”, available from http://www.nasrecruitment.com/TalentTips

  4. Denoising and Back Ground Clutter of Video Sequence using Adaptive Gaussian Mixture Model Based Segmentation for Human Action Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugapriya. K

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The human action recognition system first gathers images by simply querying the name of the action on a web image search engine like Google or Yahoo. Based on the assumption that the set of retrieved images contains relevant images of the queried action, we construct a dataset of action images in an incremental manner. This yields a large image set, which includes images of actions taken from multiple viewpoints in a range of environments, performed by people who have varying body proportions and different clothing. The images mostly present the “key poses” since these images try to convey the action with a single pose. In existing system to support this they first used an incremental image retrieval procedure to collect and clean up the necessary training set for building the human pose classifiers. There are challenges that come at the expense of this broad and representative data. First, the retrieved images are very noisy, since the Web is very diverse. Second, detecting and estimating the pose of humans in still images is more difficult than in videos, partly due to the background clutter and the lack of a foreground mask. In videos, foreground segmentation can exploit motion cues to great benefit. In still images, the only cue at hand is the appearance information and therefore, our model must address various challenges associated with different forms of appearance. Therefore for robust separation, in proposed work a segmentation algorithm based on Gaussian Mixture Models is proposed which is adaptive to light illuminations, shadow and white balance is proposed here. This segmentation algorithm processes the video with or without noise and sets up adaptive background models based on the characteristics also this method is a very effective technique for background modeling which classifies the pixels of a video frame either background or foreground based on probability distribution.

  5. Designing and implementing the Army Nursing Leader Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunemn, Kathleen; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L; Connally, Tina; Bramley, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Chief of the Army Nurse Corps directed a thorough review of existing training programs available to and provided for Army Nursing personnel for the development of full-spectrum leaders for Army Nursing. The review provided the gap analysis necessary to restructure courses provided by the Department of Nursing Science at the Army Medical Department Center and School. This new grouping of courses is referred to as the Army Nursing Leader Academy. The Army Nursing Leader Academy is the first of its kind in that it addresses career-long learning of all Army Nursing by focusing on building skills, knowledge, and behaviors to produce sustainable, full-spectrum leaders. The Nursing Leader Academy consists of a series of sequential nurse leader development courses combined with a web based resource center. Grounded in the Patient CaringTouch System, guided by nurse competencies, and gauged by the Leader Capabilities Map, the Nursing Leader Academy provides learning that is relevant and timely designed to reinforce enterprise values and culture to ensure readiness for successive roles and positions. Full implementation of the Nursing Leader Academy will include the evidence-based elements of formal schooling, coaching, self-development, functional/technical (competency attainment), and professional experiences.

  6. Index to Army Times 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    task force told. Army Times; Mar. 14, 1988; 48(31): p. 52. DENTAL RECORDS Army behind in dental record effort. Army Times; Nov. 21, 1988; 49(15): p. 27...p. 17. MILITARY DEPENDENTS-- DENTAL CARE Dental insurance for military families may be expanded. Army Times; Aug. 22, 1988; 49(2): p. 24. MILITARY...compensation bill. Army Times; May 2, 1988; 48(38): p. 38. PENTAGON MEDITATION CLUB Meditators, Soviets munch pasta , push peace. Army Times; May 23, 1988; 48

  7. Compatibility, adaptability and use of different types of ground floor houses in 19th century town planning: Case study Subotica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aladžić Viktorija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A lack of knowledge of the history of architecture and town planning in the 19th century resulted in underrated regard towards this historic period and consequently in a devastation of urban and architectural heritage of the 19th century. This research was intended to clarify some segments of the history of architecture and town planning in the 19th century based on the example of Subotica. Research has shown that the basic types of ground floor houses built during the 19th century in Subotica were mutually compatible and that by a simple addition of rooms on the simple base house, more complex base houses could be built. In the same way rural houses could also be transformed into urban ones. This pattern allowed for utmost rationality of the construction of individual houses as well as of the whole town. The town, due to the application of compatible house plans, reflected a semblance of order which improved year on year, because every house at any given moment represented a finished structure. Simple attachment of building parts also allowed the houses that were located in the middle of the lot to be elongated to the street regulation line. Compatible house plans, as an auxiliary means, facilitated the application of building rules, the realization of regulation plans and provided continuous development of the town of Subotica in the period of over 150 years.

  8. Adaptive Seat Energy Absorbers for Enhanced Crash Safety: Technology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    ARL-TR-7743 ● AUG 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Adaptive Seat Energy Absorbers for Enhanced Crash Safety: Technology...AUG 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Adaptive Seat Energy Absorbers for Enhanced Crash Safety: Technology Demonstration by Muthuvel...COVERED (From - To) 10 January 2012–29 February 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Adaptive Seat Energy Absorbers for Enhanced Crash Safety: Technology

  9. Acquisition of the Army Tactical Missile System Anti-Personnel/Anti-Materiel Block IA Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    The Army Tactical Missile System Anti-PersonnellAnti-Materiel Block IA missile (Block IA) is a ground-launched missile system consisting of a surface-to-surface guided missile with an anti-personnel/anti-materiel warhead...

  10. Developing ground penetrating radar (GPR) for enhanced root and soil organic carbon imaging: Optimizing bioenergy crop adaptation and agro-ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, D. B.; Delgado, A.; Bruton, R.; Dobreva, I. D.; Teare, B.; Jessup, R.; Rajan, N.; Bishop, M. P.; Lacey, R.; Neely, H.; Hons, F.; Novo, A.

    2016-12-01

    Selection of the ideal high biomass energy feedstock and crop cultivars for our national energy and production needs should consider not only the value of the harvested above ground feedstock, but also the local and global environmental services it provides in terms of terrestrial carbon (C) phyto-sequestration and improved soil organic matter enrichment. Selection of ideal crops cultivars is mature, while biofuel feedstock is well under way. What is lacking, however, is high throughput phenotyping (HTP) and integrated real-time data analysis technologies for selecting ideal genotypes within these crops that also confer recalcitrant high biomass or perennial root systems not only for C phyto-sequestration, but also for adaptation to conservation agro-ecosystems, increasing soil organic matter and soil water holding capacity. In no-till systems, significant studies have shown that increasing soil organic carbon is derived primarily from root and not above ground biomass. As such, efforts to increase plant soil phyto-sequestration will require a focus on developing optimal root systems within cultivated crops. We propose to achieve a significant advancement in the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) as one approach to phenotype root biomass and 3D architecture, and to quantify soil carbon sequestration. In this context, GPR can be used for genotypic selection in breeding nurseries and unadapted germplasm with favorable root architectures, and for assessing management and nutrient practices that promote root growth. GPR has been used for over a decade to successfully map coarse woody roots. Only few have evaluated its efficacy for imaging finer fibrous roots found in grasses, or tap root species. The objectives of this project is to: i) Empirically define the optimal ground penetrating radar (GPR)-antenna array for 3D root and soil organic carbon imaging and quantification in high biomass grass systems; and ii) Develop novel 3- and 4-dimensional data analysis

  11. Learning under Conditions of Hierarchy and Discipline: The Case of the German Army, 1939-1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Max

    2008-01-01

    To survive in and adapt to dynamic, turbulent, and complex environments, organizations need to engage in learning. This truism is particularly relevant for army organizations in times of war and armed conflict. In this article a case of army operations during World War II is analyzed on the basis of Ortenblad's integrated model of the learning…

  12. Readiness Reporting for an Adaptive Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 167 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...stability operations, for example, are unlikely to be decimated by an enemy, and short of that it is difficult if not impossible to gauge how well a...Office, June 2011e. 18 ARC, 2010. 19 ARC, 2011. 20 John T. Dewey , Defense Readiness Reporting System: A Better Way to Measure Readiness? USAWC

  13. A History of the Army Ground Forces; Study Number 16. The Army Ground Forces History of the Second Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-09-01

    artillery with infantry was poor, orders were verbose, and time and space factors were not -sufficiently considered. Genera.. Fredndall observed pungently ...practicable, he must be subjected in training to every eight, sound, and sensation of battle. He must be trained to act calmly and with sound judgment

  14. Branding the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    the specific segment of the population that the marketer or retailer identifies as the most likely consumer of their product or service.14 While the...Target+ Market . 15 Linda Clingan, “US Army Custom Segmentation System” (Fort Knox, KY: June 1, 2007). 16 “Common Language Marketing Dictionary.” 17...Linda Clingan, “US Army Custom Segmentation System.” 11 marketing teams face the harder-to-measure goal of “building awareness,” whereas the sales

  15. First results from SAM-FP: Fabry-Perot observations with ground-layer adaptive optics - the structure and kinematics of the core of 30 Doradus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Amram, P.; Quint, Bruno C.; Torres-Flores, S.; Barbá, R.; Andrade, D.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the first data set obtained with SOAR Adaptive Module-Fabry-Parot (SAM-FP), a Fabry-Perot instrument mounted inside the SOAR telescope Adaptive-Optics Module. This is the only existing imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer using laser-assisted ground-layer adaptive optics. SAM-FP was used to observe the ionized gas, traced by Hα, in the centre of the 30 Doradus starburst (the Tarantula Nebula) in the Large Magellanic Cloud, with high spatial (∼0.6 arcsec, or 0.15 pc) and spectral (R ≃ 11 200) resolution. Radial velocity, velocity dispersion and monochromatic maps were derived. The region displays a mix of narrow, σ ∼ 20 km s-1 profiles and multiple broader profiles with σ ∼ 70-80 km s-1, indicating the complex nature of the nebula kinematics. A comparison with previously obtained VLT/FLAMES spectroscopy demonstrates that the data agree well in the regions of overlap, but the Fabry-Perot data are superior in spatial coverage. A preliminary analysis of the observations finds a new expanding bubble south of R136, with a projected radius of r = 5.6 pc and an expansion velocity of 29 ± 4 km s-1. In addition, the first-time detailed kinematic maps derived here for several complexes and filaments of 30 Doradus allow identification of kinematically independent structures. These data exemplify the power of the combination of a high-order Fabry-Perot with a wide-field imager (3 × 3 arcmin2 GLAO-corrected field of view) for high-resolution spatial and spectral studies. In particular, SAM-FP data cubes are highly advantageous over multifibre or long-slit data sets for nebula structure studies and to search for small-scale bubbles, given their greatly improved spatial coverage. For reference, this paper also presents two appendices with detailed descriptions of the usage of Fabry-Perot devices, including formulae and explanations for understanding Fabry-Perot observations.

  16. Understanding Resilience Dimensions and Adaptive Strategies to the Impact of Recurrent Droughts in Borana Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia: A Grounded Theory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhanu, Zewdie; Ambelu, Argaw; Berhanu, Negalign; Tesfaye, Abraraw; Woldemichael, Kifle

    2017-01-26

    Recurrent shocks and stresses are increasingly deteriorating pastoralist communities' resilience capacities in many aspects. A context specific resilience framework is essential to strengthen pastoralist community's resilience capacity towards the impact of recurrent drought. Hence, the present study was aimed to develop a context specific and data driven resilience building framework towards impacts of recurrent droughts in the case of Borana pastoralists in Ethiopia. Qualitative grounded theory approach was employed to guide the study process. The data were collected through focus group discussions and in-depth interviews in two drought affected districts of Borana Zone during October 2013. The analysis was assisted by ATLAS. ti 7.1.4. The analysis provided a context specific resilience building conceptual tool, which consists of, closely interconnected, eight dimensions operating at multiple capacities and levels: environment (underlying vulnerability factor); livestock, infrastructures/social services, and wealth (immediate causes and effects); community network/social capital, as well as governance, peace and security (support and enabling factors oriented), psychosocial, and human capital (as eventual outcomes and impacts). The resilience capacities of these pastoralist communities have been eroded, leaving them without sufficient and effective adaptive strategies. The emergent resilience framework can serve as a useful guidance to design context-specific interventions that makes the people and the system resilient to the impacts of recurrent droughts.

  17. Understanding Resilience Dimensions and Adaptive Strategies to the Impact of Recurrent Droughts in Borana Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia: A Grounded Theory Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewdie Birhanu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent shocks and stresses are increasingly deteriorating pastoralist communities’ resilience capacities in many aspects. A context specific resilience framework is essential to strengthen pastoralist community’s resilience capacity towards the impact of recurrent drought. Hence, the present study was aimed to develop a context specific and data driven resilience building framework towards impacts of recurrent droughts in the case of Borana pastoralists in Ethiopia. Qualitative grounded theory approach was employed to guide the study process. The data were collected through focus group discussions and in-depth interviews in two drought affected districts of Borana Zone during October 2013. The analysis was assisted by ATLAS. ti 7.1.4. The analysis provided a context specific resilience building conceptual tool, which consists of, closely interconnected, eight dimensions operating at multiple capacities and levels: environment (underlying vulnerability factor; livestock, infrastructures/social services, and wealth (immediate causes and effects; community network/social capital, as well as governance, peace and security (support and enabling factors oriented, psychosocial, and human capital (as eventual outcomes and impacts. The resilience capacities of these pastoralist communities have been eroded, leaving them without sufficient and effective adaptive strategies. The emergent resilience framework can serve as a useful guidance to design context-specific interventions that makes the people and the system resilient to the impacts of recurrent droughts.

  18. Understanding Resilience Dimensions and Adaptive Strategies to the Impact of Recurrent Droughts in Borana Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia: A Grounded Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhanu, Zewdie; Ambelu, Argaw; Berhanu, Negalign; Tesfaye, Abraraw; Woldemichael, Kifle

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent shocks and stresses are increasingly deteriorating pastoralist communities’ resilience capacities in many aspects. A context specific resilience framework is essential to strengthen pastoralist community’s resilience capacity towards the impact of recurrent drought. Hence, the present study was aimed to develop a context specific and data driven resilience building framework towards impacts of recurrent droughts in the case of Borana pastoralists in Ethiopia. Qualitative grounded theory approach was employed to guide the study process. The data were collected through focus group discussions and in-depth interviews in two drought affected districts of Borana Zone during October 2013. The analysis was assisted by ATLAS. ti 7.1.4. The analysis provided a context specific resilience building conceptual tool, which consists of, closely interconnected, eight dimensions operating at multiple capacities and levels: environment (underlying vulnerability factor); livestock, infrastructures/social services, and wealth (immediate causes and effects); community network/social capital, as well as governance, peace and security (support and enabling factors oriented), psychosocial, and human capital (as eventual outcomes and impacts). The resilience capacities of these pastoralist communities have been eroded, leaving them without sufficient and effective adaptive strategies. The emergent resilience framework can serve as a useful guidance to design context-specific interventions that makes the people and the system resilient to the impacts of recurrent droughts. PMID:28134771

  19. 少数民族与汉族应征青年军队职业适应性比较%Comparative study on the army occupational adaptability between the minority nationalities and Han recruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建章; 关慕桢; 肖玮; 刘旭峰; 苗丹民

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the differences between the minority nationality and Han recruits in army occupational adaptability.Methods 3 213 recruited youths coming from 29 autonomous counties of minority nationalities,Yunnan Province were tested by 2011 Chinese enrollment psychological test system to explore the differences of the intelligence adaptability and character trait adaptability between the minority nationality and Han recruits.Results There were obvious differences in the eligible rates of intelligence and character trait between minority nationality and Han recruits ( x2 =13.3,9.0; P < 0.01 ).The intelligence eligible rates of Yi,Hani,Wa recruits (78.1%,76.8%,68.2%,respectively) were significantly lower than those of Han recruits (84.0%) (P<0.01 ),and time used in three intelligence test was all significantly longer than Han recruits(P < 0.05 ).Naxi and Dai recruits' time used in word reasoning ( ( 109.2 ± 20.9) s; ( 123.9 ± 32.5 ) s,respectively) was both longer than Han recruits' (P<0.01).In the fact of character trait,the eligible rates of Hani,Wa recruits (67.8%,64.3%,respectively) were significantly lower than that of Han recruits (78.1%) (P < 0.01 ).The Hani average score of T dimension (57.9 ± 17.5) was obviously higher than the Han's score (52.2 ± 16.5) (P < 0.05 ).All dimensions average scores except T and D dimension of Wa recruits were all significantly higher than those in Han recruits(P < 0.05 ).Conclusion Every minority nationality has its unique differences in armyoccupational adaptability from Han.Ethnic factor may be an important reference for new recruits' selection,education and management.%目的 探讨少数民族和汉族应征青年军队职业适应性差异.方法 采用全国征兵心理检测系统,测量2010年云南省29个少数民族自治县3213名应征青年,从智力和性格特征两方面探讨军队职业适应性的民族差异.结果 少数民族与汉族应征青年在智力和性格

  20. Women in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-06

    undoubtedly be included in the ultimate AFEES test package for future enlistees. The significance of this study effort, and ultimate value to the Army...FY. 2 2 PART 4 PROXOTIONS AND SELECTIONS Selection by. grade for promocion , command and advanced schooling are presented in this part. o Selections

  1. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata…

  2. US Army Qualification of Alternative Fuels Specified in MIL-DTL-83133H for Ground Systems Use. Final Qualification Report: JP-8 Containing Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene Manufactured Via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis or Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    hoses, butterfly valves , couplers, adapters, and straight pipe sections. Each pump / engine assembly was subjected to a 400 hour durability test...AAFARS)  Fuel System Supply Point (FSSP)  Petroleum and Water (PAWS) storage, distribution, and handling equipment including pumps, hoses, valves ...components such as pumps, hoses, valves , couplers, adapters, and pipe sections that comprise the typical PAWS bulk fuel and water distribution and

  3. A Pilotless Army in the Megalopolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    they will be holding 74 David B. Glade , “Unmanned Aerial Vehicles – Implications for Military Operations,” Occasional Paper No. 16 (Maxwell A.F.B...ComancheProjectGrounded.htm, accessed 26 February 2004. 89 David B. Glade , “Unmanned Aerial Vehicles – Implications for Military Operations,” 1. 29 away from the...in equipment, parts or personnel to maintain their functionality. According to US Army MAJ John V. McCoy, graduate of the US Army’s Logistics

  4. 75 FR 7255 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... Department of the Army Army Educational Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... CFR 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Date of Meeting: March 11, 2010. Place of Meeting:...

  5. Military Review: The Professional Journal of the U.S. Army. October 2006. Special Edition, Counterinsurgency Reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Colombian Army Adaptation to FARC Insurgency (Carlisle, PA: U.S. Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, 2002). See also Jay Cope, La Guerra...do so, and thus to some extent lt gen (Retired) Jay M. garner had been replaced because of a failure by the army, since the absence of law and order...Michael Asher , Lawrence: The Uncrowned King of Arabia (Eastbourne, East Sussex, UK: Gardners Books, Ltd., 1999); Barbara Tuchman, Stillwell and the

  6. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata toward a new mission:…

  7. 1998 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Biological (CB) Protective Duty Uniform (STO) • Biometrics (SRO) • Nanoscience (SRO) • Millimeter Wave Material and Dissemination Technology... Biometrics and Nanoscience SROs will enable the development of advanced NBC detection and characterization systems, including the exploitation of biologically...Requirements Trailers • Procure HEMAT Trailers Figure K-23 K-19 //;<?. U.S. Army 1997Modernization Plan This final fleet assessment, made against the

  8. Army Leader Transitions Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    to improving the organization. The following are some effective methods and a compilation of techniques and considerations which have been used... improve your understanding of the environment. Outgoing Leader’s Assessment An important item to obtain from the current leader is a list of key contacts...The courseware allows users to tailor training materials to specific needs. Users access this at the CAL AKO website or Army eLearning https

  9. Army Equipment Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Intrusion System (BAIS) (14.6 percent of the Army Acquisition Objective (AAO) of 8,933). Provides early seismic /acoustic warning, intrusion detection...The advanced affordable Turbine engine (aaTe), S&T Program developed and demon- strated two new helicopter turbine engines that provide significant...improvements in engine power and operating efficiencies. In FY12, the program transitioned to the Army’s Improved Turbine Engine Program (ITEP) to

  10. 2007 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Presidential Decision Memorandum (PDM) II OSA Study, the PDM III FCA/ LCA Study and the Joint JCA Analysis of Alternatives. Army senior leadership...control package and a new rocket motor . The M30 Dual Purpose Improved Conventional Munition (DPICM) version of the GMLRS contains 404 sub-munitions...lbs, HE unitary warhead, a multimode (point detonating, delay and proximity) fuze capability; and insensitive munitions (IM) rocket motor , further

  11. The Army Lawyer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Fired at Fleeing Cars, Soldiers Say, WASH. POST, Oct. 12, 2007, at A1 (quoting Major General (MG) Joseph Fil , Commander of 1st Cavalry Division, as...saying, “It’s yet another challenge, another setback.”). 32 See generally id. (quoting MG Joseph Fil as saying in reference to the incidents of PSC...Prosecutors Research Institute 99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510 Alexandria, VA 22313 (703) 549-9222 JULY 2008 • THE ARMY LAWYER

  12. Impact оf the First World War оn the Transformation of German Army

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evdokimova Tatyana

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Germany’s defeat in World War I and proclamation of the first German republic significantly influenced the change of the role of the army in the German state. At the stage of reorganization of the Kaiser’s army into the Reichswehr (1918–1921 the main result of this transformation became the creation of a new model of the German Army in which the principle of “distancing” the army from politics was replaced by new legislative and political realities that raised the question of inevitability of relationship between the army and the state. The Versailles Treaty and the Weimar constitution put forward the task of turning the German army into integral part of the state apparatus which led to losing its apoliticality. They also contributed to the emergence of Reich Ministry and the post of Reich Minister combined in one person the representative of the army and the state power. Besides, they helped to form a united German professional army and provided joint search of allies in the field of armaments by politicians and military men. The army tried to defend the old Prussian military traditions in terms of the German State called itself the Reich, and Weimar politicians sought to put the army under a parliamentary-presidential control. At the later stage of the Weimar Republic political generals will appear in the army, and important government positions will be taken by the representatives of the Generalitat. But the outcome of the force balance already at the stage of development of the temporary Reichswehr, when the real power in the army was in hands of the commander of the ground forces, and not of the Reich President and Reich Minister largely predetermined the strength of the conservative military elite in the future.

  13. The Army Profession: A Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    profile cases of alleged misconduct” were symptomatic of “a much larger issue affecting the armed forces.”9 In the Associated Press, Lolita Baldor ...of-misconduct-among-high-level-military-leaders?lite (accessed January 02, 2013). 10Lolita C. Baldor , "US Army Brigadier General Jeffrey Sinclair to...Science: An Academic Discipline." Army Magazine, no. 5 (May 2005): 14-15. Baldor , Lolita C. and Michael Biesecker. "US Army Brigadier General

  14. 76 FR 70710 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries... first-come basis. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lieutenant Colonel Renea Yates;...

  15. The evolution of extreme polyandry in social insects: insights from army ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Matthias Benjamin; Moritz, Robin Frederik Alexander; Kraus, Frank Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The unique nomadic life-history pattern of army ants (army ant adaptive syndrome), including obligate colony fission and strongly male-biased sex-ratios, makes army ants prone to heavily reduced effective population sizes (Ne). Excessive multiple mating by queens (polyandry) has been suggested to compensate these negative effects by increasing genetic variance in colonies and populations. However, the combined effects and evolutionary consequences of polyandry and army ant life history on genetic colony and population structure have only been studied in a few selected species. Here we provide new genetic data on paternity frequencies, colony structure and paternity skew for the five Neotropical army ants Eciton mexicanum, E. vagans, Labidus coecus, L. praedator and Nomamyrmex esenbeckii; and compare those data among a total of nine army ant species (including literature data). The number of effective matings per queen ranged from about 6 up to 25 in our tested species, and we show that such extreme polyandry is in two ways highly adaptive. First, given the detected low intracolonial relatedness and population differentiation extreme polyandry may counteract inbreeding and low Ne. Second, as indicated by a negative correlation of paternity frequency and paternity skew, queens maximize intracolonial genotypic variance by increasingly equalizing paternity shares with higher numbers of sires. Thus, extreme polyandry is not only an integral part of the army ant syndrome, but generally adaptive in social insects by improving genetic variance, even at the high end spectrum of mating frequencies.

  16. The evolution of extreme polyandry in social insects: insights from army ants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Benjamin Barth

    Full Text Available The unique nomadic life-history pattern of army ants (army ant adaptive syndrome, including obligate colony fission and strongly male-biased sex-ratios, makes army ants prone to heavily reduced effective population sizes (Ne. Excessive multiple mating by queens (polyandry has been suggested to compensate these negative effects by increasing genetic variance in colonies and populations. However, the combined effects and evolutionary consequences of polyandry and army ant life history on genetic colony and population structure have only been studied in a few selected species. Here we provide new genetic data on paternity frequencies, colony structure and paternity skew for the five Neotropical army ants Eciton mexicanum, E. vagans, Labidus coecus, L. praedator and Nomamyrmex esenbeckii; and compare those data among a total of nine army ant species (including literature data. The number of effective matings per queen ranged from about 6 up to 25 in our tested species, and we show that such extreme polyandry is in two ways highly adaptive. First, given the detected low intracolonial relatedness and population differentiation extreme polyandry may counteract inbreeding and low Ne. Second, as indicated by a negative correlation of paternity frequency and paternity skew, queens maximize intracolonial genotypic variance by increasingly equalizing paternity shares with higher numbers of sires. Thus, extreme polyandry is not only an integral part of the army ant syndrome, but generally adaptive in social insects by improving genetic variance, even at the high end spectrum of mating frequencies.

  17. Army Training Study: Concepts of the Army Training System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-08

    Combat Units. 1 March 1971. Harher, Robert A. and Coleman, Charlie C. Application of Simulation Training Exercises to Crisis Relocation Planning...product or outpit of the Army’s helth -. Ssinn. 0 ro)gram qM is a go example of hw pr hugra-. udgetinc’ is intro-. to work. The Army’s health care

  18. The Future Security Environment: Why the U.S. Army Must Differentiate and Grow Millennial Officer Talent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    incorporates a more per- sonalized management approach could help to motivate and retain millennial officers and better prepare them for senior leadership ...Center for Army Leadership . This Paper, however, focuses on specific policy recommendations that will enable the Army to differentiate talent within the...Senior Officer Talent Management : Fostering Institutional Adaptability, stress that, in order for differentiation to be successful, any system must

  19. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    the integration with Army Enterprise Resource Planning systems. As a financial feeder system, ACWS will meet the compliance requirements of the...Federal Financial Management Improvement Act of 1996. The system will meet the full scope of Army Contracting requirements, including those in secure and...business process efficiencies, support compliance with the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act of 1996, integrate with existing Enterprise

  20. Army Energy Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-08

    ultimate goal. Additionally, electric vehicles, scooters , and bicycles are being widely used for on-post courier, patrol and maintenance operations. Table 4...characteristics. b. Suspension systems. The Army has a new suspension system under develop- ment called the Loopwheel. This new experimental suspension will...200 200 COMPOSITE STRUCTURAL VEH COMPS AMM 2 6.2 AH84 100 0 0 LIGHTWEIGHT SUSPENSION COMPS AMM 0 6.2 AH84 300 350 250 SAMARIUM-COBALT GEN TECH HOL 3 6.2

  1. US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) style guide, Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.

    1996-09-30

    A stated goal of the U.S. Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIS) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of style guides. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide. This document, the U.S. Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide, represents the first version of that style guide. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for RT/NRT Army systems across the weapon systems domains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each domain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their domains.

  2. The French Army and British Army Crimean War Reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Dawson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available French army logistics of the Crimean War are generally considered to have been better organized than their British counterpart. This sometimes erroneous belief was fuelled by letters home (from officers and men as well as by the reporting of various ‘special correspondents’ in the Crimea, and created an emotional response favourable to the ordinary soldier and, in particular, towards the French. This then became the basis for arguments for reform of the British army in the military and domestic press and in Parliament. Clamour for reform on French lines led to official studies being made of the French army, especially of logistics, officer education, and even uniforms. The French army, however, was little understood and the resulting ephemeral corps-style units (such as Land Transport Corps, Army Work Corps, and Mounted Staff Corps were quickly found faulty. In fact, official study of the French army often had little or no effect on the major reforms of the war. Emulation of the French was ultimately short-lived and of little effect; the favourable perception of the French was based on short-term emotional response and, indeed, the desire for army reform had its sting drawn with the establishment of the Roebuck Committee. Post-war retrenchment and success in the Indian Mutiny would stifle what was left of the reform debate.

  3. Adaptive collaborative control of highly redundant robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, David A.

    2008-04-01

    The agility and adaptability of biological systems are worthwhile goals for next-generation unmanned ground vehicles. Management of the requisite number of degrees of freedom, however, remains a challenge, as does the ability of an operator to transfer behavioral intent from human to robot. This paper reviews American Android research funded by NASA, DARPA, and the U.S. Army that attempts to address these issues. Limb coordination technology, an iterative form of inverse kinematics, provides a fundamental ability to control balance and posture independently in highly redundant systems. Goal positions and orientations of distal points of the robot skeleton, such as the hands and feet of a humanoid robot, become variable constraints, as does center-of-gravity position. Behaviors utilize these goals to synthesize full-body motion. Biped walking, crawling and grasping are illustrated, and behavior parameterization, layering and portability are discussed. Robotic skill acquisition enables a show-and-tell approach to behavior modification. Declarative rules built verbally by an operator in the field define nominal task plans, and neural networks trained with verbal, manual and visual signals provide additional behavior shaping. Anticipated benefits of the resultant adaptive collaborative controller for unmanned ground vehicles include increased robot autonomy, reduced operator workload and reduced operator training and skill requirements.

  4. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Proposed rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army proposes to revise its regulations concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires Non-Army...

  5. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army is finalizing revisions to its regulation concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires non-Army agencies (including...

  6. Building a Shallow Army: Replacement Operations in the Future Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    warfare by air and sea and ground occupation of the enemy homelands. See Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett, A War to Be Won: Fighting the Second...the POE for the unit, gathering and mobilizing key personnel, and other critical tasks required for a functional CRC.62 The second major issue with...Praeger, 1992. Krepinevich, Andrew. The Army and Vietnam. Baltimore, Md.: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986. Murray, Williamson and Allan R

  7. The Army and the Need for an Amphibious Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-23

    resources, if China 58 Ernest Bower, “China’s ‘aggressiveness’ is drawing ASEAN closer,” dw.de...mission.”111 A MAGTF is a formation , comprised of air assets, ground formations , and logistical elements, tailorable to each mission. Its “building-block...military. The Army, in the mid-1990s, had a vested interest to develop formations capable of integrating into the “Joint Forces that deploy rapidly

  8. Joint Command, Control and Communications: An Army Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    positions along its supplemental landlocked borders. The • ’ • • • • • • • i Infantry Division is garrisoned within the Western Calmorn capital to...Counter Measures (ECM). To capitalize on these advancements, the Army has fielded the Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS) as a...SMechanized Infantry MECH INF SArmored Recon (CAV) ARC ; Armored ArWlAery (Self AARTY (SP) ___Propelled)m SlgnaVCommo SIG ; Transportation TRANS Psycologi c

  9. Quadrifilar Helix Antenna for Enhanced Air-to-Ground Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    5d. PROJECT NUMBER TPA # CE-SE-2014-09 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army...effect of the metallic ground plane provided by the aircraft fuselage is explored through simulation, and the ideal standoff distance from this ground...Fig. 5 Effect of ground plane and absorber on QHA reflection coefficient .....4 Fig. 6 Effect of ground plane and absorber on QHA radiation pattern

  10. 浙江地区地源热泵系统适应性研究和设计方法%Adaptability and Design Method for Ground-source Heat Pump System in Zhejiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐峰; 胡吉士

    2014-01-01

    Currently, ground-source heat pump technology is widely applied as a renewable energy technology in Zhejiang. From a practical application point of view, there are still many errors in the appli-cable building types and design of the technology. The adaptability of ground-source heat pump system in different building types is analyzed with years of experience in designing ground-source heat pump system. The design methods are presented. The work would provide method and reference for reasonable applica-tion of ground-source heat pump technology in places with hot summer and cold winter.%目前,地源热泵技术作为一项可再生能源技术在浙江地区大力推进。从实际应用看,该技术在适用的建筑类型和设计方面尚存在诸多误区。结合笔者对地源热泵系统多年的设计经验,研究分析了浙江地区地源热泵系统在不同建筑类型中的适应性,并提出了相应的设计方法,可为夏热冬冷地区合理应用地源热泵技术提供参考。

  11. Adapting algebraic diagrammatic construction schemes for the polarization propagator to problems with multi-reference electronic ground states exploiting the spin-flip ansatz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrancois, Daniel; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    For the investigation of molecular systems with electronic ground states exhibiting multi-reference character, a spin-flip (SF) version of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) scheme for the polarization propagator up to third order perturbation theory (SF-ADC(3)) is derived via the intermediate state representation and implemented into our existing ADC computer program adcman. The accuracy of these new SF-ADC(n) approaches is tested on typical situations, in which the ground state acquires multi-reference character, like bond breaking of H2 and HF, the torsional motion of ethylene, and the excited states of rectangular and square-planar cyclobutadiene. Overall, the results of SF-ADC(n) reveal an accurate description of these systems in comparison with standard multi-reference methods. Thus, the spin-flip versions of ADC are easy-to-use methods for the calculation of "few-reference" systems, which possess a stable single-reference triplet ground state.

  12. US Army TARDEC: Robotics Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    unclassified US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics 25 March 2010 Reference herein to any specific commercial...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Bernard... Robotics Industry Partnerships Academia PartnershipsGovernment Partnerships TRADOC Community Outreach • S&T Support to the RS-JPO • Develops and Fosters

  13. Army Medicine’s Role in Strength & Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    Management  Evidence-Based Complimentary and Alternative Therapeutic Modes  Acupuncture  Biofeedback  Yoga  Meditation  Standardizes Pain Management...Definition of Resilience • "Resilience is the ability to grow and thrive in the face of challenges and bounce back from adversity.” Army Comprehensive...Soldier Fitness • Dynamic construct with two dimensions – ability to adapt and cope to effectively deal with stressors – capacity to bounce back from

  14. Senior Conference 50, The Army We Need: The Role of Landpower in an Uncertain Strategic Environment, June 1-3, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    powers and nonstate actors continue to grow their force size. Second, the Army must work to heal and repair the internal rift between active duty Army...Army’s inability to adapt to a changing world. While it is true that some of this is engrained in the organizational culture due to self -se- lection...shift to a new paradigm to foster in- stitutional agility. As Secretary Robert Gates said, we need to break up the institutional concrete . The Army

  15. Army Acquisition and Contracting Personnel Requirements: How are the Army’s Current Recruitment, Development and Retention Programs Meeting Current and Future Personnel Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    execution. Organizations provided responses they have or are evaluating schedule flexibility, telework policy, and voluntary civilian fitness. Engaging...includes individuals responsible for planning, design, development, testing, contracting, production , introduction, acquisition logistics support... production ; foreign military sales; grants; and other transactions. RDECOM was renamed Army Contracting Command – Aberdeen Proving Ground (SCRT) on

  16. 2014 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leader Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    feedback to learners . The level of rigor or challenge posed by all ix courses shows room for improvement, particularly courses offered entirely...The attributes represent the values and identity of Army leaders (character), how leaders are perceived by followers and others (presence), and...degree. Less than 10% attended a resident Army course, completed structured self-development, learned a foreign language , or engaged in other types of

  17. Magnesium Technology and Manufacturing for Ultra Lightweight Armored Ground Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Bruce Davis and Rick DeLorme Magnesium Elektron North America, Inc. A reprint from the Proceedings of the 2008 Army Science Conference...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES *Magnesium Elektron North America, Inc., 1001 College St., Madison, IL 62060 A reprint from the Proceedings of the 2008 Army Science...initial emphasis on the Elektron WE43 alloy system for lightweight armored ground vehicle applications. Engineering design factors are reviewed and

  18. 77 FR 9633 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries Advisory...: Lieutenant Colonel Renea Yates; renea-yates@us.army.mil or 571.256.4325. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  19. The Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) Annual Survey of the Army Profession (CASAP FY16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-30

    Colonel, U.S. Army Director , Center for the Army Profession and Ethic NOTICES DISTRIBUTION: Primary distribution of this...Army leaders regarding the effectiveness of policies and practices intended to inspire and motivate Army professionals to “live by and uphold the Army...FY17/18 AA – OP theme, One Army, Indivisible. Assessment of the State of the Army Profession assists Senor Army leaders in understanding the effects

  20. Adaptive Ground Penetrating Radar Systems to Visualize Antipersonnel Plastic Landmines Based on Local Texture in Scattering / Reflection Data in Space and Frequency Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Yukimasa; Hirose, Akira

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, first we explained the ground-penetrating radars (GPRs) which are studied currently as a new technology for the antipersonnel plastic landmine detection. In this field, researchers usually choose a measurement type from the pulse GPR or the stepped frequency GPR. Though both of these methods have merits and demerits, a steppedfrequency GPR has an advantage in the high ability to extract features over a pulse GPR.

  1. Adapting algebraic diagrammatic construction schemes for the polarization propagator to problems with multi-reference electronic ground states exploiting the spin-flip ansatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefrancois, Daniel; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas, E-mail: dreuw@uni-heidelberg.de [Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, Ruprecht-Karls University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-09-28

    For the investigation of molecular systems with electronic ground states exhibiting multi-reference character, a spin-flip (SF) version of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) scheme for the polarization propagator up to third order perturbation theory (SF-ADC(3)) is derived via the intermediate state representation and implemented into our existing ADC computer program adcman. The accuracy of these new SF-ADC(n) approaches is tested on typical situations, in which the ground state acquires multi-reference character, like bond breaking of H{sub 2} and HF, the torsional motion of ethylene, and the excited states of rectangular and square-planar cyclobutadiene. Overall, the results of SF-ADC(n) reveal an accurate description of these systems in comparison with standard multi-reference methods. Thus, the spin-flip versions of ADC are easy-to-use methods for the calculation of “few-reference” systems, which possess a stable single-reference triplet ground state.

  2. Give us back our field army! The Dutch army leadership and the operational planning during the interwar years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amersfoort, H.; Amersfoort, H.; Klinkert, W.

    2011-01-01

    The 1922 Army Reform Bill reduced the Dutch army to a militia. During the period between the two World Wars Dutch army leadership sought to rebuild an army that in several repects (organization, armement, doctrine) could be compared to the armies of great powers like France and Germany. The army lea

  3. Give us back our field army! The Dutch army leadership and the operational planning during the interwar years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amersfoort, H.; Amersfoort, H.; Klinkert, W.

    2011-01-01

    The 1922 Army Reform Bill reduced the Dutch army to a militia. During the period between the two World Wars Dutch army leadership sought to rebuild an army that in several repects (organization, armement, doctrine) could be compared to the armies of great powers like France and Germany. The army lea

  4. U.S. Army Medical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Excerpt-3 Building partnerships through military medicine Tripler Army Medical Center assists in medical missions. Read more ... their age, height, and weight. Healthy Living Videos Army Medicine Health Minute View More Videos

  5. U.S. Army weapon systems human-computer interface style guide. Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.; Donohoo, D.T.

    1997-12-31

    A stated goal of the US Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIs) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of HCI design guidance documents. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA), now termed the Joint Technical Architecture-Army (JTA-A). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide, which resulted in the US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide Version 1. Based on feedback from the user community, DISC4 further tasked PNNL to revise Version 1 and publish Version 2. The intent was to update some of the research and incorporate some enhancements. This document provides that revision. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for the RT/NRT Army system domain across the weapon systems subdomains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each subdomain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their subdomains.

  6. Green Remediation: Army Policy and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    treated on-site within a contained asphalt- lined former pH control pond and treated in 300 yard increments – Caustic soda was evenly spread on soil...Army installations and FUDS.  The examples presented are not representative of all Army efforts 11 Energy Example Former Nebraska Ordnance Plant ...Daugherty, mark.e.daugherty@us.army.mil 15 Land and Ecosystems Example #2 Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant (Excess) Cleanup Objective: Treat soil

  7. Enhancing Army Joint Force Headquarters Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Ad hoc (Army) 2004–2005 MNSTC-I SSTR CENTCOM Ad hoc (Army) 2004-2005 JTF-G8/ DNC /RNC HD/CS NORTHCOM Ad hoc (Army) x 3 2004 JTF-515 SSTR PACOM 2004...AFIC = Armed Forces Inaugural Committee; CENTCOM = Central Command; DNC = Democratic National Committee; EUCOM = European Command; FSSG = Fleet

  8. The Evolution of Army Leader Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Developing Talent, (Carlisle Barracks, PA: U.S. Army War College, March 2010), 4-6...16 Casey Wardynski, David S. Lyle, Michael J. Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Employing Talent, (Carlisle

  9. The Distributed Common Ground System-Army User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    29 Anil Khurana and Stephen R. Rosenthal, “Integrating the Fuzzy Front End of New Product Development,” Sloan...... front end ” before a project starts could be time spent to start the project, thus saving time in the overall development process.29 There is also a

  10. U.S. Army’s Ground Vehicle Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    platforms. • TARDEC Energy Storage Team Role is the Engineering Support Activity (ESA) to ensure conformance with the specification & recommendation...for QPL acceptance. • TARDEC Standardization Team Role is the Qualifying Activity that maintains the modifications to the MIL-PRF 32143B and QPL

  11. Listing of Army Fuel-Consuming Nonautomotive Ground Support Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    W Z(55I(00W(.J...J0((55(5 X55(S NNN. .6uu m xv~ 00d0. . -z 00 0 0a0 e~ W 0 0 1fl 0 40.28 QUf0=Q lS59uuIIIII 4 a a acca N0QgI %q c a It, 4t 0 0 0 - !3...QO c~lCS- VIC X00 woo" )- 00 0*U- OKKKK3S33S300 xwC w A IWZ -I 2 In -m0N~ - P1 - --- - 004M43101 S C t4IMY-40 £I39M 93 ~ ~ KK A .- I, I - - .- I. 0 0

  12. Evading the Endgame in an Insurgency Undertaking: The Case of the Lord’s Resistance Army and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Liberation Army/Movement SPLA/M-IO Sudan People’s Liberation Army/Movement–In Opposition SRTM Shuttle Rather Topography Mission UCDP/GED Uppsala...advantages is called ground of tactical importance (GTI) in military terms.58 There is 30m Shuttle Rather Topography Mission (SRTM) elevation data...leaders of the insurgency. This may include phone tracking, human intelligence, signal intelligence, and drones , among other methods. The most cost

  13. 78 FR 60238 - Proposed Modification and Establishment of Restricted Areas; Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ...; Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed..., within the existing restricted areas R-4001A and R- 4001B, at the U.S. Army's Aberdeen Proving Ground in... nonparticipating aircraft from a hazard to navigation in the Aberdeen Proving Ground airspace. DATES: Comments......

  14. Ground water and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, R.G.; Scanlon, B.; Döll, P.; Rodell, M.; Beek, R. van; Wada, Y.; Longuevergne, L.; Leblanc, M.; Famiglietti, J.S.; Edmunds, M.; Konikow, L.; Green, T.R.; Chen, J.; Taniguchi, M.; Bierkens, M.F.P.; MacDonald, A.; Fan, Y.; Maxwell, R.M.; Yechieli, Y.; Gurdak, J.J.; Allen, D.M.; Shamsudduha, M.; Hiscock, K.; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2012-01-01

    As the world’s largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate chang

  15. Ground water and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, R.G.; Scanlon, B.; Döll, P.; Rodell, M.; Beek, R. van; Wada, Y.; Longuevergne, L.; Leblanc, M.; Famiglietti, J.S.; Edmunds, M.; Konikow, L.; Green, T.R.; Chen, J.; Taniguchi, M.; Bierkens, M.F.P.; MacDonald, A.; Fan, Y.; Maxwell, R.M.; Yechieli, Y.; Gurdak, J.J.; Allen, D.M.; Shamsudduha, M.; Hiscock, K.; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2012-01-01

    As the world’s largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate

  16. Elevation and forest clearing effects on foraging differ between surface--and subterranean--foraging army ants (Formicidae: Ecitoninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anjali; O'Donnell, Sean

    2009-01-01

    1. Forest fragmentation often results in a matrix of open areas mixed with patches of forest. Both biotic and abiotic factors can affect consumer species' ability to utilize the altered habitat, especially for species that range over large areas searching for prey. 2. Army ants (Formicidae: Ecitoninae) are highly mobile top predators in terrestrial Neotropical ecosystems. Army ant foraging behaviour is influenced by forest clearing at lowland sites, and clearing can reduce army ant population persistence. 3. Because high temperatures are implicated in hindering above-ground army ant foraging, we predicted that forest clearing effects on army ant foraging would be reduced at higher (cooler) elevations in montane forest. We also predicted that subterranean foraging, employed by some army ant species, would buffer them from the negative effects of forest clearing. 4. We quantified the foraging rates of above-ground and underground foraging army ants at eight sites along an elevational gradient from 1090 to 1540 m a.s.l. We asked whether these two foraging strategies cause a difference in the ability of army ants to forage in open matrix areas relative to elevationally matched forested habitats, and whether elevation predicts open area vs. forest foraging rate differences. 5. As predicted, army ants that forage above-ground had lower foraging rates in open areas, but the open area vs. forest difference declined with elevation. In contrast, underground foragers were not affected by habitat type, and underground foraging rates increased with elevation. Ground surface temperatures were higher in open areas than forested areas. Temperatures declined with elevation, and temperature differences between open and forested areas decreased with elevation. 6. We conclude that army ants that forage above-ground may be restricted to forested areas due to a thermal tolerance threshold, but that they are released from this limitation at higher elevations. We further suggest that

  17. Army Science Board 1991 Summer Study - Army Simulation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    May 91, Mr. C. Hatfield, Lawrence Livermore Labor atory JANUS-Technology, 29 May 91, Mr. Paul Herman , Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Aviation...Development, 30 May 91, Mr. Mansur , US Army, Aviation Systems Command Crew Station Research and Development Facility Briefing and Demonstration, 30 May

  18. US Army Institute of Surgical Research Annual Research Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    Cellulitis diagnosed by clinical criteria and treated with penicillin will not be grounds for exclusion from the study. Patient pairs will be excluded... mitochondrial studies. In US Army Institute of Surgical Research Annual Research Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1983. San Antonio: US Government Printing

  19. Engineer: The Professional Bulletin of Army Engineers, May-Aug 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    15 November 1961 Photo courtesy Fort Slocum Alum ni and Friends C ollection Photo courtesy United States Army Corps of Engineers May-August 2009... salts increased the conductivity of the soil and precluded downward propagation of signals from methods such as ground-penetrating radar and

  20. MUVES-S2 Adaptive Geometry User Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ARL-TR-7438 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory MUVES-S2 Adaptive Geometry User Guide by Matthew C Rothwell and James...return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7438 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory MUVES-S2 Adaptive Geometry User Guide by... Geometry User Guide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew C Rothwell and James Hunt 5d. PROJECT

  1. Grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tina

    2015-04-29

    Grounded theory is a popular research approach in health care and the social sciences. This article provides a description of grounded theory methodology and its key components, using examples from published studies to demonstrate practical application. It aims to demystify grounded theory for novice nurse researchers, by explaining what it is, when to use it, why they would want to use it and how to use it. It should enable nurse researchers to decide if grounded theory is an appropriate approach for their research, and to determine the quality of any grounded theory research they read.

  2. History of the Army Ground Forces. Study Number 11. Training in the Ground Army 1942-1945

    Science.gov (United States)

    1948-01-01

    Special Staff Seas, Jan 44. 125. History of AGF, Study No 21, Preparation of Units for Overseas Movement, p 6. 126. Memo of Maj David W. Gray for G-3, ACF...the responsibility for developing it reposed in the ’unit omander ." This principle was re- garded as fundamental by General McNair, and when over a

  3. Full Spectrum Army Officer Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Colonel Ronda G. Urey Department of Military...Lieutenant Colonel Thomas J. Edwards, Jr. United States Army Colonel Ronda G. Urey Project Adviser This SRP is submitted in

  4. A Mobile Army of Ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    their cultural position(s). The following scholars have agreed to participate the event: Pawel Grabarczyk (“Games Within Games: How to Properly Individuate Game Modes?”), Stefano Gualeni (“Augmented Ontologies and Games”), Jesper Juul: (“A Mobile Army of Ontologies”), Veli-Matti Karhulahti (“Videogame...

  5. Male parentage in army ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, Daniel J C; Schöning, Caspar; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2006-01-01

    of active research in insect sociobiology. Here we present microsatellite data for 176 males from eight colonies of the African army ant Dorylus (Anomma) molestus. Comparison with worker genotypes and inferred queen genotypes from the same colonies show that workers do not or at best very rarely reproduce...

  6. The Army Needs More Patriots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    the 10th AAMDC by at least 48% to account for requirements to perform Brigade headquarters functions, maintaining AAMDC TAC forward deployed and...Program (MCTP), US Army Combined Arms Center ( CAC ), Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, can coordinate with AAMDCs to send a senior AMD officer to attend unit

  7. Index to Army Times 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Times; Jan. 28, 1991; 51(26): p. 10. DEFENSE OUTPLACEMENT REFERRAL SYSTEM (DORS) Service to find the right desk for your resume. Army Times; Oct. 28...DEPENDENT SCHOOLS (DODDS) DORS SEE DEFENSE OUTPLACEMENT REFERRAL SYSTEM (DORS) DOUBLE DIPPING SEE RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL--DUAL COMPENSATION 0 38 DRAGON

  8. Into the black and back: the ecology of brain investment in Neotropical army ants (Formicidae: Dorylinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulova, S.; Purce, K.; Khodak, P.; Sulger, E.; O'Donnell, S.

    2016-04-01

    Shifts to new ecological settings can drive evolutionary changes in animal sensory systems and in the brain structures that process sensory information. We took advantage of the diverse habitat ecology of Neotropical army ants to test whether evolutionary transitions from below- to above-ground activity were associated with changes in brain structure. Our estimates of genus-typical frequencies of above-ground activity suggested a high degree of evolutionary plasticity in habitat use among Neotropical army ants. Brain structure consistently corresponded to degree of above-ground activity among genera and among species within genera. The most above-ground genera (and species) invested relatively more in visual processing brain tissues; the most subterranean species invested relatively less in central processing higher-brain centers (mushroom body calyces). These patterns suggest a strong role of sensory ecology (e.g., light levels) in selecting for army ant brain investment evolution and further suggest that the subterranean environment poses reduced cognitive challenges to workers. The highly above-ground active genus Eciton was exceptional in having relatively large brains and particularly large and structurally complex optic lobes. These patterns suggest that the transition to above-ground activity from ancestors that were largely subterranean for approximately 60 million years was followed by re-emergence of enhanced visual function in workers.

  9. Mine detection with a forward-looking ground-penetrating synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marshall R.; Witten, Thomas R.; Duncan, Michael; McCummins, Robert

    2003-09-01

    In order to detect buried land mines in clutter, Planning Systems Incorporated has adapted its Ground Penetrating Synthetic Aperture Radar (GPSAR) technology for forward-looking applications. The Forward Looking GPSAR (FLGPSAR), is a wide-band stepped-frequency radar operating over frequencies from 400 MHz to 4 GHz. The FLGPSAR system is based on a modified John Deere E-Gator turf vehicle that is capable of remote control. Custom Archimedean spiral antennas are used to populate the GPSAR array. These antennas are designed and built by PSI and have exceptional broad-band radiation characteristics. The FLGSPAR system has been used to detect plastic and metallic landmines at U.S. Army test facilities and at PSI's engineering center in Long Beach Mississippi. Multi-look SAR processing has been shown to significantly improve the quality of FLGPSAR imagery.

  10. Solar Adaptive Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Rimmele

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics (AO has become an indispensable tool at ground-based solar telescopes. AO enables the ground-based observer to overcome the adverse effects of atmospheric seeing and obtain diffraction limited observations. Over the last decade adaptive optics systems have been deployed at major ground-based solar telescopes and revitalized ground-based solar astronomy. The relatively small aperture of solar telescopes and the bright source make solar AO possible for visible wavelengths where the majority of solar observations are still performed. Solar AO systems enable diffraction limited observations of the Sun for a significant fraction of the available observing time at ground-based solar telescopes, which often have a larger aperture than equivalent space based observatories, such as HINODE. New ground breaking scientific results have been achieved with solar adaptive optics and this trend continues. New large aperture telescopes are currently being deployed or are under construction. With the aid of solar AO these telescopes will obtain observations of the highly structured and dynamic solar atmosphere with unprecedented resolution. This paper reviews solar adaptive optics techniques and summarizes the recent progress in the field of solar adaptive optics. An outlook to future solar AO developments, including a discussion of Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO and Ground-Layer AO (GLAO will be given.

  11. 扎根理论在本科护理专业学生学习适应性研究中的应用%Application of grounded theory in learning adaptability of undergraduate nursing students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐志晶; 章雅青; 李丽; 沈亮

    2013-01-01

    目的 探索我国高校护生的学习适应性扎根理论.方法 以扎根理论方法论为指导,采用深度访谈法和实物分析法收集资料,通过开放式编码、关联式编码、选择式编码以及整个研究过程撰写备忘录方式分析资料.结果 共访谈了16位符合纳入标准的学生,同时获得其中13位学生的实物资料.研究形成22个开放式码号、6个关联式码号和3个核心类属.得到本科护理专业学生学习适应理论.结论 扎根理论方法论是从经验资料的基础上建立理论,本研究的结果距离学生更近更确切,研究结果也更加适合用于指导和读懂后来者.%Objective To discuss the application of grounded theory in learning adaptability of undergraduate nursing students.Methods Based on grounded theory,in-depth interviews and practical analysis were used to collect the date.Open coding,axial coding,selective coding and memorandum writing throughout the study were used to analyze the data.Results Totals of 16 students were interviewed and 13 students' physical data were included.The study formed 22 open codes,six axial codes and three core categories,and learning adaptability theory of undergraduate nursing students were established.Conclusions Grounded theory methodology is established on the basis of empirical data,and the results of this study are more precise and more suitable for guiding the latecomers.

  12. Grounded cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2008-01-01

    Grounded cognition rejects traditional views that cognition is computation on amodal symbols in a modular system, independent of the brain's modal systems for perception, action, and introspection. Instead, grounded cognition proposes that modal simulations, bodily states, and situated action underlie cognition. Accumulating behavioral and neural evidence supporting this view is reviewed from research on perception, memory, knowledge, language, thought, social cognition, and development. Theories of grounded cognition are also reviewed, as are origins of the area and common misperceptions of it. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues are raised whose future treatment is likely to affect the growth and impact of grounded cognition.

  13. Military Health Care: Army Needs to Improve Oversight of Warrior Transition Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    their needs, undergo physical rehabilitation, meet with behavioral health therapists, participate in adaptive sports and reconditioning programs...soldiers at the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The program is to coordinate care for soldiers recovering from serious physical and...2) established processes to oversee the selection of WTU personnel, assess their training , and adjust staff levels; and (3) assessed adherence

  14. 77 FR 66823 - Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD... the Federal Regulations (41 CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date(s) of...

  15. 78 FR 69077 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open-meeting rules...@us.army.mil , (831) 242-5828. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to 41 CFR 102-3.105(j) and 102-...

  16. 77 FR 50089 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of...

  17. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Dates of Meeting: May 16, 2013. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  18. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of...

  19. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: February 23, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  20. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... ] Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: May 31, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122...

  1. 78 FR 38956 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open- meeting rules. FOR... Designated Federal Officer: ATFL- APO, Monterey, CA, 93944, Robert.Savukinas@us.army.mil , (831)...

  2. Implementation of routine ash predictions using a general purpose atmospheric dispersion model (HYSPLIT) adapted for calculating ash thickness on the ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Tony; Davis, Cory; Deligne, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    GNS Science currently produces twice-daily forecasts of the likely ash deposition if any of the active or recently active volcanoes in New Zealand was to erupt, with a number of alternative possible eruptions for each volcano. These use our ASHFALL program for calculating ash thickness, which uses 1-D wind profiles at the location of each volcano derived from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model output supplied by MetService. HYSPLIT is a hybrid Lagrangian dispersion model, developed by NOAA/ARL, which is used by MetService in its role as a Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre, to model airborne volcanic ash, with meteorological data provided by external and in-house NWP models. A by-product of the HYSPLIT volcanic ash dispersion simulations is the deposition rate at the ground surface. Comparison of HYSPLIT with ASHFALL showed that alterations to the standard fall velocity model were required to deal with ash particles larger than about 50 microns, which make up the bulk of ash deposits near a volcano. It also required the ash injected into the dispersion model to have a concentration based on a typical umbrella-shaped eruption column, rather than uniform across all levels. The different parameters used in HYSPLIT also caused us to revisit what possible combinations of eruption size and column height were appropriate to model as a likely eruption. We are now running HYSPLIT to produce alternative ash forecasts. It is apparent that there are many times at which the 3-D wind model used in HYSPLIT gives a substantially different ash deposition pattern to the 1-D wind model of ASHFALL, and the use of HYSPLIT will give more accurate predictions. ASHFALL is likely still to be used for probabilistic hazard forecasting, in which very large numbers of runs are required, as HYSPLIT takes much more computer time.

  3. Army Net Zero Prove Out. Army Net Zero Training Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    reclaim system does not enable Fort Carson to achieve its net zero water goal, which is to reclaim water through the WWTP equal to or greater than the...Class A Recycled Water Plant WWTP rapid infiltration basin #1 (of 4) 426,000 gal water supply storage reservoir Primary Lagoon for WWTP 6 7...cost of water = Longer time to payback  Double charged for incoming and outgoing  Army owned WWTP – true cost of water = water/sewer rates It

  4. Exploring the Complexities of Army Civilians and the Army Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    as the province of practitioners of a profession. For a fiduciary relationship , a profession manifests when the nature of the services provided...9. 94 “5 CFR 2636.305 - Compensation and Other Restrictions Relating to Professions Involving a Fiduciary Relationship ,” linked from The Legal...operations.9 The symbiotic relationship and necessity for Army civilians is apparent in generating land combat power and providing support for

  5. Excited states of large open-shell molecules: an efficient, general, and spin-adapted approach based on a restricted open-shell ground state wave function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemelt, Michael; Neese, Frank

    2013-04-11

    A spin-adapted configuration interaction with singles method that is based on a restricted open-shell reference function (ROCIS) with general total spin S is presented. All excited configuration state functions (CSFs) are generated with the aid of a spin-free second quantization formalism that only leads to CSFs within the first order interacting space. By virtue of the CSF construction, the formalism involves higher than singly excited determinants but not higher than singly excited configurations. Matrix elements between CSFs are evaluated on the basis of commutator relationships using a symbolic algebra program. The final equations were, however, hand-coded in order to maximize performance. The method can be applied to fairly large systems with more than 100 atoms in reasonable wall-clock times and also parallelizes well. Test calculations demonstrate that the approach is far superior to UHF-based configuration interaction with single excitations but necessarily falls somewhat short of quantitative accuracy due to the lack of dynamic correlation contributions. In order to implicitly account for dynamic correlation in a crude way, the program optionally allows for the use of Kohn-Sham orbitals in combination with a modest downscaling of two-electron integrals (DFT/ROCIS). All two-electron integrals of Kohn-Sham orbitals that appear in the Hamiltonian matrix are reduced by a total of three scaling parameters that are suitable for a wide range of molecules. Test calculations on open-shell organic radicals as well as transition metal complexes demonstrate the wide applicability of the method and its ability to calculate the electronic spectra of large molecular systems.

  6. Army Corps of Engineers: Efforts to Assess the Impact of Extreme Weather Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    southern California dam, which allowed the Corps to retain rainwater to help respond to the state’s extreme drought conditions . The Corps has assessed...anticipate, prepare for, respond to, and adapt to changing conditions and to withstand and recover rapidly from disruptions with minimal damage. As directed... Extreme Weather Events in the Planning Process Page 16 GAO-15-660 Army Corps of Engineers adapting projects to this projected change.27

  7. Adaption of the radiation dose for computed tomography of the body - back-ground for the dose adaption programme OmnimAs; Straaldosreglering vid kroppsdatortomografi - bakgrund till dosregleringsprogrammet OmnimAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, Ulf; Kristiansson, Mattias [Trelleborg Hospital (Sweden); Leitz, Wolfram [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden); Paahlstorp, Per-Aake [Siemens Medical Solutions, Solna (Sweden)

    2004-11-01

    When performing computed tomography examinations the exposure factors are hardly ever adapted to the patient's size. One reason for that might be the lack of simple methods. In this report the computer programme OmnimAs is described which is calculating how the exposure factors should be varied together with the patient's perimeter (which easily can be measured with a measuring tape). The first approximation is to calculate the exposure values giving the same noise levels in the image irrespective the patient's size. A clinical evaluation has shown that this relationship has to be modified. One chapter is describing the physical background behind the programme. Results calculated with OmnimAs are in good agreement with a number of published studies. Clinical experiences are showing the usability of OmnimAs. Finally the correlation between several parameters and image quality/dose is discussed and how this correlation can be made use of for optimising CT-examinations.

  8. Army Planning: Comprehensive Risk Assessment Needed for Planned Changes to the Armys Force Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    focus on retaining combat units, and senior Army leaders ’ assessment that shortfalls in combat units are more challenging to resolve than shortfalls in...According to the Army, this reduction will require reductions of both combat and supporting units. Army leaders reported that reducing the Army to...such levels creates significant but manageable risk to executing the U.S. military strategy and that further reductions would result in unacceptable

  9. Army Independent Risk Assessment Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    AMSAA Kadry Rizk, TARDEC Lisa Graf, TARDEC Klaus Sanford, TRAC Elyse Krezmien, TRAC Jerry Scriven, ALU Igor Linkov, ERDC Alison Tichenor...Engineering ATEC - Army Test and Evaluation Command BCA - Business Case Analysis C - Consequence Level C- BA - Cost Benefit Analysis CDD...the AMSAA Risk Team has completed 12 technical and schedule risk assessments to support AoAs and Cost-Benefit Analyses (C- BAs ). AMSAA also developed

  10. 2011 Army Strategic Planning Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    TESI ) of 22,000 Soldiers, the Army’s total force by the end of the mid-term period is programmed to be 520K (AC). We will achieve a more...dwell ratios, extending TESI authority to adequately man deploying units and sustain the All-Volunteer Force, right-sizing the generating force, and... TESI Temporary End-Strength Increase WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction 2011 ARMY STRATEGIC PLANNING GUIDANCE Page 19 2011

  11. Plain English for Army Lawyers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    TELEPHONE (Include Arta Code) 22c. OFFICE SYMBOL Judy CI irk 207-475.1Ull I FA-AR 0D FRM 1473, 84 MAR 83 APR edition may be used until exhausted SE CURITY...instructions during courts- martial . Contractors and contracting officers outdo each other in blaming lawyers for problems that crop up in Government...of legal practice -- from courts- martial to client services and from business transac- tions to administrative regulations. Although Army clients may

  12. Information Management: Army Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    commander is the franchising authority. When appropriate, the installation commander may designate a non-appropriated fund instrumentality (NAFI) to be...the franchising authority. Overall staff management of CATV is the responsibility of the DISC4 at the Army level and will be executed at the local level...installations are cable television franchising authorities for the purpose of the applicable cable televisions laws. As a result, installations may

  13. Management: Total Army Quality Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-15

    meet current and future customer needs . 3–2. Strategic planning a. Strategic planning is the process by which managers at higher levels envision their...framework for all Army organizations to measure how well they are meeting their stated goals and customer needs . It provides a systematic review that...business. (2) Customer-Driven – The organization’s focus is on its customers – ensuring its operations meet customer needs in the most efficient manner

  14. Considering a Cadre Augmented Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    division equivalents (HDEs) of Abrams tanks in the first year of ____________ 101 Dewar et al (2000), p. 59 102 Dewar et al (2000), p. 61 -200- An...Reserves and the Abrams Doctrine: Unfulfilled Promise, Uncertain Future,” Heritage Foundation Lecture, April 18, 2005. Carey, Benedict, “Stress on Troops... Floyd H., The Standby Reserve Training Corps: An Alternative Mobilization Manpower Policy, Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, PA, 1985. Dupuy

  15. Army Environmental Cleanup Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    New success indicators are all definable, measurable, and achievable MAY 200918 of 29 Emerging Issues  Emerging contaminants  MMRP progress  NCP...programmatic expectations  NDNODS  Operational range program  Vapor Intrusion MAY 200919 of 29 Emerging Contaminants – Hexavalent Chromium...regulatory standards  Several emerging contaminants have been assessed and judged to have a significant potential impact to Army cleanup programs

  16. Army Training Study: Survey Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-08

    training: dis- tractors, turbulence, and availabilty of training support material. Results from a detailed breakdown of the respondents by rank, type of...report lower usage of Army regulations in training than do respondents in CONUS. Unit differences are noted only insofar as air defense artillery...specialities. Differences by rank are noted on each iteir with junior officers, senior NCOs and junior NCOs reporting higher usage in all areas than

  17. Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-28

    Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) AWCF Army Working Capital Fund CIP Construction-in-Progress DCD/ DCW DFAS...Warehouse (DCD/ DCW ). The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) (ASA[FM&C]) is responsible for the policies, procedures...entity’s information to automatically populate that indicator. As a result, IFS did not send DCD/ DCW correct information for determining the

  18. The US Army Learning Concept for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    Pedagogy is still the right answer… • Learning on demand The US Army Learning Concept for 2015 Mobile Learning enabled by technology • Problem...The US Army Learning Concept for 2015 18 October 2012 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...SUBTITLE The US Army Learning Concept for 2015 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  19. Army Prisoner Population Prediction Study (AP3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    Probability that a prisoner , serving his sentence, will benefit from clemency/ parole board actions. The probabilities that offenders will be...5-9 6-1 Non-Army Prisoners in Army Facilities ............... 6-3 D-1 Generation/Arrival of Offenders ..................... D-2 D-2...8 CHAPTER2 THE ARMY CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM 2-1. INTRODUCTION a. In order to understand the flow of offenders into and out of the Amy’s prison system

  20. From the laboratory to the soldier: providing tactical behaviors for Army robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knichel, David G.; Bruemmer, David J.

    2008-04-01

    The Army Future Combat System (FCS) Operational Requirement Document has identified a number of advanced robot tactical behavior requirements to enable the Future Brigade Combat Team (FBCT). The FBCT advanced tactical behaviors include Sentinel Behavior, Obstacle Avoidance Behavior, and Scaled Levels of Human-Machine control Behavior. The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, (TRADOC) Maneuver Support Center (MANSCEN) has also documented a number of robotic behavior requirements for the Army non FCS forces such as the Infantry Brigade Combat Team (IBCT), Stryker Brigade Combat Team (SBCT), and Heavy Brigade Combat Team (HBCT). The general categories of useful robot tactical behaviors include Ground/Air Mobility behaviors, Tactical Mission behaviors, Manned-Unmanned Teaming behaviors, and Soldier-Robot Interface behaviors. Many DoD research and development centers are achieving the necessary components necessary for artificial tactical behaviors for ground and air robots to include the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM), Space and Naval Warfare (SPAWAR) Systems Center, US Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) and non DoD labs such as Department of Energy (DOL). With the support of the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE) through DoD and non DoD labs the Army Maneuver Support Center has recently concluded successful field trails of ground and air robots with specialized tactical behaviors and sensors to enable semi autonomous detection, reporting, and marking of explosive hazards to include Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) and landmines. A specific goal of this effort was to assess how collaborative behaviors for multiple unmanned air and ground vehicles can reduce risks to Soldiers and increase efficiency for on and off route explosive hazard detection, reporting, and marking. This paper discusses experimental results achieved with a robotic countermine system

  1. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    .... SUMMARY: On March 7, 2011 (76 FR 12508-12548), DoD published notice of approval of a personnel management... the Army; Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Tank Automotive Research, Development... 9, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: TARDEC: Mr. Gregory Berry, U. S. Army Tank...

  2. Modeling and Simulation of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-28

    Wilhelm, A. N., Surgenor, B. W., and Pharoah, J. G., “Design and evaluation of a micro-fuel-cell-based power system for a mobile robot ,” Mechatronics ...of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA bU.S. Army RDECOM-TARDEC, Warren, MI, USA ABSTRACT Long-duration missions challenge ground robot systems with respect...to energy storage and efficient conversion to power on demand. Ground robot systems can contain multiple power sources such as fuel cell, battery and

  3. Renewable Energy Opportunties at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrell, Alice C.; Kora, Angela R.; Russo, Bryan J.; Horner, Jacob A.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Weimar, Mark R.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Nesse, Ronald J.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-05-31

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Dugway Proving Ground, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment.

  4. Ground water and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Richard G.; Scanlon, Bridget; Döll, Petra; Rodell, Matt; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Longuevergne, Laurent; Leblanc, Marc; Famiglietti, James S.; Edmunds, Mike; Konikow, Leonard; Green, Timothy R.; Chen, Jianyao; Taniguchi, Makoto; Bierkens, Marc F.P.; MacDonald, Alan; Fan, Ying; Maxwell, Reed M.; Yechieli, Yossi; Gurdak, Jason J.; Allen, Diana M.; Shamsudduha, Mohammad; Hiscock, Kevin; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2012-01-01

    As the world's largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate change as more frequent and intense climate extremes (droughts and floods) increase variability in precipitation, soil moisture and surface water. Here we critically review recent research assessing the impacts of climate on ground water through natural and human-induced processes as well as through groundwater-driven feedbacks on the climate system. Furthermore, we examine the possible opportunities and challenges of using and sustaining groundwater resources in climate adaptation strategies, and highlight the lack of groundwater observations, which, at present, limits our understanding of the dynamic relationship between ground water and climate.

  5. Ground water and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Richard G.; Scanlon, Bridget; Döll, Petra; Rodell, Matt; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Longuevergne, Laurent; Leblanc, Marc; Famiglietti, James S.; Edmunds, Mike; Konikow, Leonard; Green, Timothy R.; Chen, Jianyao; Taniguchi, Makoto; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; MacDonald, Alan; Fan, Ying; Maxwell, Reed M.; Yechieli, Yossi; Gurdak, Jason J.; Allen, Diana M.; Shamsudduha, Mohammad; Hiscock, Kevin; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate change as more frequent and intense climate extremes (droughts and floods) increase variability in precipitation, soil moisture and surface water. Here we critically review recent research assessing the impacts of climate on ground water through natural and human-induced processes as well as through groundwater-driven feedbacks on the climate system. Furthermore, we examine the possible opportunities and challenges of using and sustaining groundwater resources in climate adaptation strategies, and highlight the lack of groundwater observations, which, at present, limits our understanding of the dynamic relationship between ground water and climate.

  6. Ground Water and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Richard G.; Scanlon, Bridget; Doell, Petra; Rodell, Matt; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Longuevergne, Laurent; Leblanc, Marc; Famiglietti, James S.; Edmunds, Mike; Konikow, Leonard; Green, Timothy R.; Chen, Jianyao; Taniguchi, Makoto; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; MacDonald, Alan; Fan, Ying; Maxwell, Reed M.; Yechieli, Yossi; Gurdak, Jason J.; Allen, Diana M.; Shamsudduha, Mohammad; Hiscock, Kevin; Yeh, Pat J. -F; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2013-01-01

    As the world's largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate change as more frequent and intense climate extremes (droughts and floods) increase variability in precipitation, soil moisture and surface water. Here we critically review recent research assessing the impacts of climate on ground water through natural and human-induced processes as well as through groundwater-driven feedbacks on the climate system. Furthermore, we examine the possible opportunities and challenges of using and sustaining groundwater resources in climate adaptation strategies, and highlight the lack of groundwater observations, which, at present, limits our understanding of the dynamic relationship between ground water and climate.

  7. Army Science Board Ad Hoc Subgroup Report, Manning Army Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    VA 22314 (703) 751-2745 Major Brad Taylor, DCSP Military Staff Assistant Dr. Dan Risser , ARI Army Staff Assistant Dr. K.C. Emerson 560 Boulder...SINCGARS Meeting with DCSPER Mr. BradshawCAPL) Mr. Bennett(AMSAA) Dr. Risser (ARI) LtCol Abney LtGen Thurman 10 December, 1981 - The Pentagon...ASVAB Update Maintenance Data PM Trade BOIP/QQPRI/Div 86 Dr. Eaton(ARI) Dr. Risser (ARI) Dr. Hofer Col. Bettinger(SSC) 11 December, 1981

  8. Assessing the Assignment Policy for Army Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    General surgeon 61K Thoracic surgeon 61L Plastic surgeon 61M Orthopedic surgeon 61N Flight surgeon 61P Physiatrist 61Q Radiation oncologist 61R Diagnostic... veterinarian (immaterial) Branch 65, Army Medical Specialist Corps 65A Occupational therapy Table C.3—Continued 100 Assessing the Assignment Policy for Army

  9. Survey of Army Personnel Interested in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Demographic prof’de CurrentActive Army Personnel rent Teachers Actie - ifl~ = -Employment Active Actve Active Outside Army Officers Enlted Educaion Base: 607...Base: 607 345 206 301 1144 2380 0^ PA Desire to work with young people 71 69 70 64 70 78 Value or significance of education in society 69 68 68 75

  10. After the Spring: Reforming Arab Armies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Arab region, and intercultural communication . She was previously assigned to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Defence College and the...and provides solutions to strategic Army issues affecting the national security community . The Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute...concern topics having strategic implications for the Army, the Department of Defense, and the larger national security community . In addition to its

  11. Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  12. Army industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoughton, Kate McMordie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boyd, Brian K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  13. Cryptic diversity, high host specificity and reproductive synchronization in army ant-associated Vatesus beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Beeren, Christoph; Maruyama, Munetoshi; Kronauer, Daniel J C

    2016-02-01

    Army ants and their arthropod symbionts represent one of the most species-rich animal associations on Earth, and constitute a fascinating example of diverse host-symbiont interaction networks. However, despite decades of research, our knowledge of army ant symbionts remains fragmentary due to taxonomic ambiguity and the inability to study army ants in the laboratory. Here, we present an integrative approach that allows us to reliably determine species boundaries, assess biodiversity, match different developmental stages and sexes, and to study the life cycles of army ant symbionts. This approach is based on a combination of community sampling, DNA barcoding, morphology and physiology. As a test case, we applied this approach to the staphylinid beetle genus Vatesus and its different Eciton army ant host species at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. DNA barcoding led to the discovery of cryptic biodiversity and, in combination with extensive community sampling, revealed strict host partitioning with no overlap in host range. Using DNA barcoding, we were also able to match the larval stages of all focal Vatesus species. In combination with studies of female reproductive physiology, this allowed us to reconstruct almost the complete life cycles of the different beetle species. We show that Vatesus beetles are highly adapted to the symbiosis with army ants, in that their reproduction and larval development are synchronized with the stereotypical reproductive and behavioural cycles of their host colonies. Our approach can now be used to study army ant-symbiont communities more broadly, and to obtain novel insights into co-evolutionary and ecological dynamics in species-rich host-symbiont systems.

  14. Annihilating time and space: The electrification of the United States Army, 1875--1920

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shannon Allen

    2000-10-01

    The United States Army embraced electrical technology in the 1870s as part of a wider initiative to meet the challenge of the coastal defense mission. As commercial power storage, generation, and transmission technology improved and the army came to recognize the value of the energy source as a means and method of improving command and control, localized electrical networks were integrated into the active service of the military. New vulnerabilities emerged as the army became ever more reliant upon electric power, however, and electrification---the institutional adoption and adaptation of electrical technologies---emerged as a very expensive and contentious process guided by technical, political, and economic pressures, and influenced by conflicting personalities within the service. This study considers the institutional evolution of the U.S. Army before and during World War I with respect to the adoption and application of electrical technology. The changing relationships between the military and electrical manufacturing and utilities industries during the period 1875--1920 are also explored. Using a combination of military archival sources and published primary materials, this study traces the effects of electrification on the army. In the end, this study proves that electrification was, at first, a symptom of, and later, a partial solution to the army's struggle to modernize and centralize during the period under consideration. Electrification produced a set of conditions that encouraged a new maturity within the ranks of the army, in technical, doctrinal, and administrative terms. This growth eventually led to the development of new capabilities, new forms of military organization, new missions, and new approaches to warfare.

  15. Medical students' unique experience of army leadership training: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earis, John; Garner, J; Haddock, D; Jenkins, J; Jha, V

    2017-02-13

    To assess the interactive experience of first year medical students attending the leadership and management course hosted by a British Army Reserve Field Hospital developed in partnership with Liverpool University. 244 students submitted a 1000-word structured reflective learning assignment about their reaction to, learning from and any behaviour and attitude changes as a result of, the training. The assignments were thematically analysed to identify how aspects of the training had impacted upon the students' understanding of leadership and teamwork. Their comments relating to the army were analysed to gain insight into their views and experience of the training. Students were surprised at how enjoyable and useful they found the course. Initially they expressed scepticism about what they could learn in an army-based environment. However, the training, particularly command and planning tasks, helped them appreciate and understand the different skills individuals can bring to a team environment, and the importance of everyone contributing. While some students were challenged by aspects of the course, with support and encouragement from team-mates and the army personnel, they learned they could achieve more together. Teaching leadership and management skills to medical students is a challenge which can be effectively addressed by adapting and developing army training resources. Students overcame initial scepticism about participating, and learned a lot about themselves and each other. In addition, the army developed a better understanding of the doctors of the future. The expertise of the army in delivering this training was crucial to its success as the medical school could not have provided this experience unsupported. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Adaptive Design of Visual Perception Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    the same treatment type, and the image stimuli within the cells are presented in random order. 2c. Calibrated perception laboratory The...Adaptive design of visual perception experiments John D. O’Connor, Jonathon Hixson US ARMY RDECOM CERDEC NVESD Ft. Belvoir, VA 22060...ABSTRACT Meticulous experimental design may not always prevent confounds from affecting experimental data acquired during visual perception

  17. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply.

  18. Organizational Adaptive Capacity: How Much, How Fast, and How Often

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-25

    equilibrates between internal and external factors. The objective here is to synthesize the many intuitive and disparately articulated concepts of adaptation...idea of “reversibility” emerged in the force structure debate and is included in the latest Army Posture Statement.22 The general idea 7...the Posture of the United States Army 2012, Posture Statement presented to the 112 th Cong., 2 nd Session (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the

  19. Adaptive and mobile ground sensor array.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, Michael Warren; O' Rourke, William T.; Zenner, Jennifer; Maish, Alexander B.

    2003-12-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to demonstrate the use of robotic vehicles for deploying and autonomously reconfiguring seismic and acoustic sensor arrays with high (centimeter) accuracy to obtain enhancement of our capability to locate and characterize remote targets. The capability to accurately place sensors and then retrieve and reconfigure them allows sensors to be placed in phased arrays in an initial monitoring configuration and then to be reconfigured in an array tuned to the specific frequencies and directions of the selected target. This report reviews the findings and accomplishments achieved during this three-year project. This project successfully demonstrated autonomous deployment and retrieval of a payload package with an accuracy of a few centimeters using differential global positioning system (GPS) signals. It developed an autonomous, multisensor, temporally aligned, radio-frequency communication and signal processing capability, and an array optimization algorithm, which was implemented on a digital signal processor (DSP). Additionally, the project converted the existing single-threaded, monolithic robotic vehicle control code into a multi-threaded, modular control architecture that enhances the reuse of control code in future projects.

  20. Adaptive Campaigning Applied: Australian Army Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    There is a lot of discourse on the validity or otherwise of Australia’s way of warfare in the general media by both reporters and military commentators... understudied by previous graduates to build their experience in teaching methods, allowing them to pass on their knowledge into the future. As detailed

  1. Developing Adaptive Junior Leaders in the Army Nurse Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    children, Tyler, Dylan, Haley , and Holly. Thank you for putting up with the long days and nights of research, writing, re-writing, and just plain...journal 7, no. 1 (Winter). http://www.academicleadership.org/pdf/ALJ_ISSN1533-7812_7_1_283.pdf (accessed 6 November 2011). Conger, Jay A., and Douglas A

  2. Aviation medicine and the Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyrnwy-Jones, P; Thornton, R

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this short series of articles is not to present the reader with a vast amount of technical data, soon to be forgotten, but to provide some items of general interest from the past, present, and future of Army aviation. Obviously there will be a concentration on medical matters, but the aim is to give the reader a feel for the rapid progress being made in helicopter design and the likely problems we may face in the future. The first article serves as an introduction to the series and three further articles will cover various aspects of the speciality. The second will be concerned with AAC helicopter accidents and will include accident investigation, crashworthiness and the contribution made by pilot error. The third article will cover major environmental problems of helicopters, particularly noise, vibration and thermal stress. The fourth article will examine ways in which microprocessors and modern technology will affect future helicopter and ancillary equipment development; for instance, a helicopter with no external windows has been suggested, 'The Iron Cockpit'. The fifth article will be concerned with the clinical aspects of Army Aviation medicine.

  3. 32 CFR 651.14 - Integration with Army planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Integration with Army planning. 651.14 Section... the Decision Process § 651.14 Integration with Army planning. (a) Early integration. The Army goal is to concurrently integrate environmental reviews with other Army planning and decision-making actions...

  4. Army Basic Skills Provision: Whole Organisation Approach/Lessons Learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic Skills Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Army began working in partnership with the Basic Skills Agency in 2000. This was formalised with the establishment of the Basic Skills Agency's National Support Project for the Army (2001) that contributes to the raising of basic skills standards in the Army by advising on, and assisting with, the development of the Army's basic skills policy…

  5. 76 FR 43993 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: August 10, 2011. Time(s) of Meeting: 0800-1200. Location: Newport News Marriott at City Center, 740 Town Center...

  6. Study on Water Adaptability of Seven Common Species of Ground Cover Plants in South China%华南地区7种常见园林地被植物水分适应性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱瑭璜; 雷江丽; 庄雪影

    2012-01-01

    Water adaptability of seven common ground cover plants in South China were studied by pot experiment. The effect of biomass increment, root-crown ratio, florescence, diurnal variations of net photosynthetic rate and diurnal variations of net transpiration rate were determined in different soil water content. The experimental results showed that 7 ground cover plants could grow strongly in the soil w ith the water holding rate above 70% to 75%. Schefflera arboricola, Rhoeo discolor (L'He'rit.) Hance and Syngonium podophyllum Schott 'White Butterfly' could grow well and possess good ornamental value in the soil with minimum water holding rates of 30% to 35%; lxora coccinea L., Excoecaria cochinchinensis, Hymenocallis littoralis and Nephrolepis auriculata could grow well in the soil with minimum water holding rates of 50% to 55%.%以华南地区7种常见园林地被植物为研究对象,通过盆栽控水试验研究,综合比较了不同水分条件下植株的生长量、根冠比、花期、花量、净光合速率日变化、净蒸腾速率日变化等生长及光合指标的变化趋势.结果表明:1)在水分条件下限为土壤持水率的70%~75%时,7种参试植物均有较旺盛的生长势;2)在满足各参试植物园林观赏性的前提下,鹅掌藤(Schefflera arboricola)、蚌花[Rhoeo discolor (L’Hérit.)Hance]和[白蝶合果芋(Syngonium podophyllum Schott ‘White Butterfly’)在水分条件下限为土壤持水率的30%~35%时可以正常生长;而红花龙船化(Ixora coceinea L.)、红背桂(Excoecaria cochinchinensis)、水鬼蕉(Hymenocallis littoralis)和肾蕨(Nephrolepis auriculata)在水分条件下限为土壤持水率的50%~55%时可以正常生长.

  7. Evaluation of the US Army Research Laboratory Squeeze 5 Magnetic Flux Compression Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302...SANDERSON 6 US ARMY TACOM (PDF) J WHITE L FRANKS D TEMPLETON M LAWSON J HITCHCOCK N COOPER 2 PM ABCT (PDF) J ROWE E BARSHAW...4 NATL GROUND INTLLGNC (PDF) CTR D EPPERLY T SHAVER T WATERBURY D DOBROWOLSKI 1 PM MRAP (PDF) J PEREZ (JPO) 1 DARPA/DSO

  8. Defense Acquisitions: 2009 is a Critical Juncture for the Army’s Future Combat System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    In 2008 and 2009, the Army plans o begin funding production of the first of three planned spin outs of FCS echnologies to current forces. However...of service on a mobile ad-hoc network, end-to-end interoperability with strategic networks of the global information grid, and synchronization of FCS...3 current force vehicles—the Abrams tank, the Bradley vehicle, and the High- Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle—and to field unattended ground

  9. Tasked and Ready: The Armys Commitment to the Better Buying Power Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    adversaries as isolated as individual terrorists and as large as nation-states. Our portfolio must span aviation, ground vehicles, missiles, ammunition...and elimination of chemical and biological weapons. This breadth of portfolios coupled with significant fund- ing and manpower reductions posed by...programs of record, then examined ongoing sustainment needs from a total-life-cycle perspective . The Army continues to identify critical technolo- gies

  10. Mortality Surveillance in the U.S. Army 20052014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Army Publ ic Heal th Center (Provis ional Public Health Report Army Public Health Center (Provisional) Army Public Health Center (Provisional...Public Health Report Mortality Surveillance in the U.S. Army 2005-2014 PHR No. S.0034370-14 Approved for public release, distribution unlimited...Disease Surveillance Portfolio Behavioral and Social Health Outcomes Program Mortality Surveillance in the U.S. Army 2005–2014 Brent E

  11. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 2 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q2 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army...56               INTRODUCTION The Army Hearing Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health ... required by Department of Defense Instruction (DoDI) 6055.12, Department of the Army Pamphlet (DA Pam) 40-501, and the Chief of Staff of the Army’s

  12. Getting it right: revamping Army talent management

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited U.S. Army officers face countless opportunity costs, especially at the mid-grade level, when deciding to stay in the Army past the ten-year mark of service. The scarcity of skilled labor in today’s economy makes it important that organizations, especially the Army, retain their human capital investment. This thesis suggests techniques to acquire, manage, and retain talent to ensure that the Army’s officer talent pool is not depleted. S...

  13. Enhanced Ground Control for ISS Robotics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will investigate and adapt aides which will increase the efficiency of ISS robotics ground control operations with the intent of creating more...

  14. Developing an Adaptability Training Strategy and Policy for the DoD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Application Training Course. William M. Darwin , Asymmetric Warfare Group Three briefings addressed specific venues where the Army believes training...Florida; Dr. David Horth , Dr. Bob Rosenfeld, Dr. Gregory B. Laskow, Dr. Kerry Bunker, Dr. Mary Lynne Pulley and Dr. Talula Cartwright from the...Thinking within the Context of Adaptability. Dr. Richard Meinhart, Army War College • Adaptability Learning Symposium. William M. Darwin , Asymmetric Warfare

  15. Army Business Transformation: The Utility of Using Corporate Business Models within the Institutional Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailer, Jr., John J

    2007-01-01

    .... Through a survey of the literature of published corporate business plans and models, military reports, Army depot case studies, and comparative analysis of emerging computer software technology...

  16. The Adjustment of New Recruits to Military Life in the Chinese Army: The Longitudinal Predictive Power of MMPI-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lijun; Han, Jing; Han, Jian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the findings of two studies analyzing new recruits' adjustment to army life in the Chinese military. In the first exploratory study, we developed a scale to measure new recruits' adjustment to military life, and found that new soldiers' adaptation could be divided into two distinct types: interpersonal…

  17. Microhabitat and body size effects on heat tolerance: implications for responses to climate change (army ants: Formicidae, Ecitoninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudier, Kaitlin M; Mudd, Abigail E; Erickson, Shayna C; O'Donnell, Sean

    2015-09-01

    1. Models that predict organismal and population responses to climate change may be improved by considering ecological factors that affect species thermal tolerance. Species differences in microhabitat use can expose animals to diverse thermal selective environments at a given site and may cause sympatric species to evolve different thermal tolerances. 2. We tested the hypothesis that species differences in body size and microhabitat use (above- vs. below-ground activity) would correspond to differences in thermal tolerance (maximum critical temperatures: CTmax ). Thermal buffering effects of soil can reduce exposure to extreme high temperatures for below-ground active species. We predicted larger-bodied individuals and species would have higher CTmax and that species mean CTmax would covary positively with degree of above-ground activity. We used Neotropical army ants (Formicidae: Ecitoninae) as models. Army ants vary in microhabitat use from largely subterranean to largely above-ground active species and are highly size polymorphic. 3. We collected data on above- and below-ground temperatures in habitats used by army ants to test for microhabitat temperature differences, and we conducted CTmax assays for army ant species with varying degrees of surface activity and with different body sizes within and between species. We then tested whether microhabitat use was associated with species differences in CTmax and whether microhabitat was a better predictor of CTmax than body size for species that overlapped in size. 4. Microhabitat use was a highly significant predictor of species' upper thermal tolerance limits, both for raw data and after accounting for the effects of phylogeny. Below-ground species were more thermally sensitive, with lower maximum critical temperatures (CTmax ). The smallest workers within each species were the least heat tolerant, but the magnitude of CTmax change with body size was greater in below-ground species. Species-typical microhabitat

  18. [The army of the East and health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guivarc'h, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    A medical disaster due to the failure of a plan intended to free Belfort by an army of 90 000 men, formed by Bourbaki in Nevers, joined in Besancon by 40 000 men from Lyon and from Dijon. Envisaged in three days, the regrouping lasts three weeks. A gigantic railway blocking, by an icy cold, leaves in the trains of the soldiers without food, of the horses without irons nor fodder. A third of manpower is from the start inapt for the fights. The utter exhaustion of the men don't make possible to exploit the success of Villersexel's battle (January 9), nor to cross Lizaine. The medical army officers joined those of the civil ambulances formed in South-east, and that of Pamard. The care given with delay on the covered with snow ground, in precarious shelters or encumbered hospitals, is summary. Cold, gelures, walk feet, infection, associated variola, are the cause of a high mortality: 8 500 died, and much of casualties. Ordered by Bourbaki, the dramatic routed to Switzerland by Pontarlier and the Cluse collar, under the Prussian shells will add 15 000 killed. The Swiss ones collect sick and wounded in 200 ambulances along the border, and on 87 000 men to be disarmed in 9 000 hospitalize. Pamard will remain until March 18 at the Pontarlier' hospital.

  19. Army Response Letter - signed April 27, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Army response letter regarding a request to elevate the decision of the New England Division Engineer (DE) to issue a permit to the Maine Department of Transportation to construct a marine terminal at Sears Island.

  20. Current and Future Army Resiliency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    organizational learning, Peter Senge , illustrates this point very well: “Organizations learn only through individuals who learn. Individual learning does not...downloads/CSF2Newsletter- Issue3.pdf, (accessed March 3, 2013). 11 Griffith, “Army Suicides,” 496. 12 Casey, “Comprehensive Soldier Fitness,” 2. 13 Peter ... Senge , The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of the Learning Organization (New York, NY: Doubleday, 2006), 129. 14 Griffith, “Army Suicides,” 505

  1. Army Cyber Mission Force - Ambitions and Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    as part of the CyMF. This represents a departure from previous Army recruiting paradigms. Equally important as branding is the significance of...readdress branding , compensation, professional development and organization in order to increase the likelihood of success for the Cyber Mission Force...unique character traits that differ from the typical traits of Army enlistees. The research has further shown that compensation, branding

  2. Strategic Planning and Army Installation Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    program. The U.S. Army has adopted the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria for use in the ACOE program. Strategic planning is one of the...seven pillars of the Baldrige criteria. The Army has recognized that strategic planning is the key to the future. Strategic planning is the key to...and utilization of strategic planning . This paper examines through case study analysis several civilian communities and lessons learned through their

  3. Army JTIDS: A C3 Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    Guerra , Director of Combat Developments, United States Army Signal Center, Fort Gordon for his sponsorship. Professor Donald A. Lacer and Professor...radio frequency band. This insures compatibility with civil Distance Measuring Equipment (DME), Military Tactical Air Navigation equipment (TACAN...LEBMNN~JORDAN ,AFGHNISTrAN ISRAEL, EGYPT SAD SUDAN SOUT)H YEMEN YEMEN ETHIOPIA Figure 22 The JSTARS Radar Platform data to Army fire support

  4. The Utility of Ada for Army Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-10

    34 Ada " for Ada Lovelace (1815-1851), a mathematician who worked with Charles Babbage on his difference and analytic engines.9 Later in 1979, the HOLWG...OF ADA FOR ARMY MODELING BY COLONEL MICHAEL L. YOCOM DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for publie releases distribution is unlimited. 1% LF-, EC TE...TITLE (ad Subtitle) a. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED The Utility of Ada for Army Modeling Individual Study Project 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER

  5. 'Grounded' Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2012-01-01

    play within one particular neighbourhood: Nørrebro in the Danish capital, Copenhagen. The article introduces the concept of grounded politics to analyse how groups of Muslim immigrants in Nørrebro use the space, relationships and history of the neighbourhood for identity political statements....... The article further describes how national political debates over the Muslim presence in Denmark affect identity political manifestations within Nørrebro. By using Duncan Bell’s concept of mythscape (Bell, 2003), the article shows how some political actors idealize Nørrebro’s past to contest the present...

  6. Russian Army Mat as a Code System Controlling Behaviour in the Russian army

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Mikhailin

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This text is to be a shortened, restructured and based on somewhat another factological foundation version of my article “Russkii mat kak muzhskoi obstsennyi kod: problema proiskhozhdeniia i evoliutsiia statusa”, published in # 43 of Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie. Tracing the genesis of mat to the specific modes of behaviour, peculiar to the archaic male warrior bands, I’m going to show that the military milieu (and some other, structurally close to it social strata, has always been – and remain – absolutely adequate for the mat speaking. Moreover, mat has always carried on within these strata rather specific function connected with creating of one’s identity as a military, and its use offers various and sometimes the only possible means of impact at one’s equal or subordinate (or even superior. As a matter of fact, mat is a basis for a whole code system, controlling different military behaviour practices. The problems of the freshers’ adaptation and of the national specificities in the late Soviet and modern Russian army are to be considered with special respect.

  7. Physiological consequences of U.S. Army Ranger training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nindl, Bradley C; Barnes, Brian R; Alemany, Joseph A; Frykman, Peter N; Shippee, Ronald L; Friedl, Karl E

    2007-08-01

    Soldiers are expected to maintain a high degree of physical readiness as operational demands can severely degrade performance capabilities. This study examined the physiological consequences of U.S. Army Ranger training on strength, power, body composition, and somatotrophic hormones. In an intensive 8-wk military training course that included an average daily energy deficit of 1000 kcal.d, lower-body power output, maximal lifting strength, body composition, and serum concentrations of several somatotrophic hormones were measured in 50 male soldiers (24.6 +/- 4.4 y; 176.1 +/- 7.8 cm; 78.4 +/- 8.7 kg; 14.7 +/- 4.2% body fat) before and after the course. Vertical jump height (-16%), explosive power output (-21%), maximal lifting strength. (-20%), body mass (-13%), fat-free mass (-6%), and fat mass (-50%) declined (P losses of tissue mass. Lower-body power output, estimated from vertical jump height and body mass, is a sensitive and field expedient measure that can be used to assess the influence of caloric deficit on physical performance after 8 wk of U.S. Army Ranger training. With severe weight loss (>or=13% of body mass), IGF-I and cortisol correlate more closely with soft-tissue tissue adaptations than does testosterone.

  8. Deep-Time Convergence in Rove Beetle Symbionts of Army Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Munetoshi; Parker, Joseph

    2017-03-20

    Recent adaptive radiations provide striking examples of convergence [1-4], but the predictability of evolution over much deeper timescales is controversial, with a scarcity of ancient clades exhibiting repetitive patterns of phenotypic evolution [5, 6]. Army ants are ecologically dominant arthropod predators of the world's tropics, with large nomadic colonies housing diverse communities of socially parasitic myrmecophiles [7]. Remarkable among these are many species of rove beetle (Staphylinidae) that exhibit ant-mimicking "myrmecoid" body forms and are behaviorally accepted into their aggressive hosts' societies: emigrating with colonies and inhabiting temporary nest bivouacs, grooming and feeding with workers, but also consuming the brood [8-11]. Here, we demonstrate that myrmecoid rove beetles are strongly polyphyletic, with this adaptive morphological and behavioral syndrome having evolved at least 12 times during the evolution of a single staphylinid subfamily, Aleocharinae. Each independent myrmecoid clade is restricted to one zoogeographic region and highly host specific on a single army ant genus. Dating estimates reveal that myrmecoid clades are separated by substantial phylogenetic distances-as much as 105 million years. All such groups arose in parallel during the Cenozoic, when army ants diversified into modern genera [12] and rose to ecological dominance [13, 14]. This work uncovers a rare example of an ancient system of complex morphological and behavioral convergence, with replicate beetle lineages following a predictable phenotypic trajectory during their parasitic adaptation to host colonies.

  9. Army Transformaton: A View from the U.S. Army War College

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    71 4. THE ARMY THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS William F. Grimsley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 5...THE ARMY THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS William F. Grimsley “Who are you?" said the caterpillar. “I-I hardly know, Sir, just at present—at least I know...

  10. 2009 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Main Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Effective/Very Effective (AC, 2007-2009) Army Values Empathy Warrior Ethos Military Bearing/Physical Fitness Composure/ Resilence Mental Agility Sound...dependents ( children ) does not appear to have as much of an impact on morale, as 21% of Army leaders who indicate having no dependents report low or

  11. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 2: Army fault tolerant architecture design and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) hardware architecture and components and the operating system. The architectural and operational theory of the AFTA Fault Tolerant Data Bus is discussed. The test and maintenance strategy developed for use in fielded AFTA installations is presented. An approach to be used in reducing the probability of AFTA failure due to common mode faults is described. Analytical models for AFTA performance, reliability, availability, life cycle cost, weight, power, and volume are developed. An approach is presented for using VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) to describe and design AFTA's developmental hardware. A plan is described for verifying and validating key AFTA concepts during the Dem/Val phase. Analytical models and partial mission requirements are used to generate AFTA configurations for the TF/TA/NOE and Ground Vehicle missions.

  12. Is space the ultimate high ground?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Gregory J.; Stallings, Francis P.

    2011-06-01

    Military experts often refer to space as the ultimate high ground under the premise that placing systems in orbit provides advantages consistent with the military doctrine of high ground. Although space provides the ultimate "observation post", it has none of the other advantages traditionally associated with high ground. Army Field Manual (FM) 34-130 states the other advantages of holding key terrain: commanding avenues of approach, overcoming obstacles, and affording cover and concealment as additional benefits of high ground. Yet systems in orbit incur none of these additional advantages. Finally, international restrictions and reciprocity concerns limit the employment of weapons in space nullifying many of the unique capability advantages that would otherwise support the "high ground" aspect of space. As the ultimate observation post, satellites provide a large quantity of vital data to military decision makers. This massive amount of data needs to have as much context as possible to convert this data to useful knowledge. To use space assets optimally, the military needs to learn from the past and make space and cyber products distributed and tactical. It is absolutely essential to distribute the right information to the lowest level (tactical elements) of the organization or the "boots on the ground" in a timely manner.

  13. Army PM UAS Spectrum Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    35.15GHz Sierra Nevada Corporation ( SNC ) 1 Aircraft (Wing) J/F-12 06982 TALS TS - Ground Unit RX 34.85 to 35.15GHz TX 34.78 to 35.08GHz Sierra...Nevada Corporation ( SNC ) 2 Runway J/F-12 06982 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Gray Eagle RF Spectrum Requirements 23 System Component

  14. Influence of new military athletic footwear on the kinetics and kinematics of running in relation to army boots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries in the lower extremities are common in military recruits. Army boots have frequently been cited as a potential mechanism behind these high injury rates. In response to this, the British Army introduced new footwear models, the PT-03 (cross-trainer) and PT1000 (running shoes), which are issued to each new recruit in an attempt to reduce the incidence of these injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the kinetics and kinematic of the PT-03 and PT1000 footwear in relation to conventional army boots. Thirteen participants ran at 4.0 m·s in each footwear condition. Three-dimensional kinematics from the hip, knee, and ankle were measured using an 8-camera motion analysis system. In addition, simultaneous ground reaction forces were obtained. Kinetic parameters were obtained alongside joint kinematics and compared using repeated-measures analyses of variance. The kinetic analysis revealed that impact parameters were significantly greater when running in the army boot compared with the PT-03 and PT1000. The kinematic analysis indicated that, in comparison with the PT-03 and PT1000, running in army boots was associated with significantly greater eversion and tibial internal rotation. It was also found that when running in the PT-03 footwear, participants exhibited significantly greater hip adduction and knee abduction compared with the army boots and PT1000. The results of this study suggest that the army boots and PT-03 footwear are associated with kinetic and kinematic parameters that have been linked to the etiology of injury; thus, it is recommended that the PT1000 footwear be adopted for running exercises.

  15. Army Response Letter & Analysis - signed February 5, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    A reply to a letter from Mr. J. Charles Fox, former Administrator for Water requesting to review the proposed decision of the Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District Department of the Army (DA) permit to Vail Associates.

  16. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and thank you for your interest in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). ... This Web site provides an introduction to the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) ...

  17. Bot armies as threats to network security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

    2007-04-01

    "Botnets", or "bot armies", are large groups of remotely controlled malicious software. Bot armies pose one of the most serious security threats to all networks. Botnets, remotely controlled and operated by botmasters or botherders, can launch massive denial of service attacks, multiple penetration attacks, or any other malicious network activity on a massive scale. While bot army activity has, in the past, been limited to fraud, blackmail, and other forms of criminal activity, their potential for causing large-scale damage to the entire internet; for launching large-scale, coordinated attacks on government computers and networks; and for large-scale, coordinated data gathering from thousands of users and computers on any network has been underestimated. This paper will not discuss how to build bots but the threats they pose. In a "botnet" or "bot army", computers can be used to spread spam, launch denial-of-service attacks against Web sites, conduct fraudulent activities, and prevent authorized network traffic from traversing the network. In this paper we discuss botnets and the technologies that underlie this threat to network and computer security. The first section motivates the need for improved protection against botnets, their technologies, and for further research about botnets. The second contains background information about bot armies and their key underlying technologies. The third section presents a discussion of the types of attacks that botnets can conduct and potential defenses against them. The fourth section contains a summary and suggestions for future research and development.

  18. Optimizing the Sustainment of U.S. Army Weapon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    64 OPTIMIZING SUSTAINMENT OF ARMY SYSTEMS 6 Chapter 1 - Optimizing the Sustainment of U.S. Army Weapon Systems In a paradigm shift from...past 13 years. The result has been the erosion of perishable maintenance skills. The Army must develop the most effective plan to sustain these...communities to study and effectively manage Army sustainment . One effort is the development of Maintenance Steering Groups (MSG) to perform extensive

  19. Army Communicator. Volume 32, Number 2, Spring 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Engineering requires skilled leaders LTC Tony Roper 14 Update Telecommunications Systems Engineering Course MAJ Mark Thomson 16 The Paradigm shift in enabling...to 200 locations. Each TLA stack includes, at a minimum, an Army Security Router and an Intrusion Detection System or Intrusion Protection System...Security Center APC – Area Processing Center ARNET – Army Reserve Network ARSTRAT – Army Strategic Com- mand ASR – Army Security Router CIF – Central Issue

  20. Retaining Talent for Army 2020: Overcoming Institutional Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    Assignments for Leaders, RETAL, 8. 18 Casey Wardynski, David S. Lyle, and Michael J. Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for...Opportunities (Boston: Harvard University, 2011), 17. 22 32 Wardynski, Lyle, and Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for...www.hrc.army.mil/milper/11-282 (accessed March 14, 2012). 34 Wardynski, Lyle, and Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for

  1. Army Hearing Program Talking Points Calendar Year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    National Guard 7% Army Reserve 2% of Soldiers have a hearing loss that requires a Fit-for-Duty (Readiness) evaluation: 1% Active Duty 2% Army...Reserve ARMY HEARING PROGRAM TALKING POINTS CALENDAR YEAR 2016 TIP No. 51-065-0817 2 BACKGROUND Hearing health in the Army has improved...over time, largely due to the dedicated work of hearing health experts. However, noise-induced hearing loss and associated problems have not been

  2. Bolster Ground Force Capabilities in the Asia-Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    Defense, China is “exploiting a power vacuum [in Asia ] with a Cold War mindset. It is tilting the balance of power in its favor against weak...NAVAL WAR COLLEGE Newport, R.I. BOLSTER GROUND FORCE CAPABILITIES IN THE ASIA -PACIFIC REGION by Bryan Dunker Major, United States Army...created them.” – Albert Einstein INTRODUCTION Following the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War in 1991, the United States

  3. 具有落角约束的对地攻击自适应变结构导引律%A Terminal Guidance Law of the Self-adaption Variable Structure Considering Angular Constraint for Air-to Ground Attacking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蚩军祥; 赵辉; 翁兴伟; 轩永波

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at the problem that air-to-ground weapons attack precisely, a terminal guidance law of the self-adaption variable structure with sliding mode considering angular constraint was deduced. Based on the self-adaption variable structure, the angular constraint was introduced,so that the guidance law could meet the demands of both guidance precision and impact angle. The simulation result shows that the guidance law not only has good guidance precision when attacking moving target on the ground, but also can fit the angular constraint. The result is instructive for combat operation of air-to-ground precision guided weapons.%针对空对地攻击武器对地面目标的精确打击问题,提出了一种带落角约束的自适应滑模变结构末制导律.该制导律在自适应滑模导引律的基础上,引入落角约束项,可以满足制导精度和落角的双重要求.仿真结果表明,该制导律对地面活动目标的攻击既具有较高的制导精度,又可以满足落角要求,对空地精确制导武器的作战使用具有指导意义.

  4. Irrigation Alternatives to Meet Army Net Zero Water Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Up to 100 Rain Barrel Catchment Up to...US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Irrigation Alternatives to Meet Army Net Zero Water Goals Richard J. Scholze Dick L. Gebhart H...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Irrigation Alternatives to Meet Army Net Zero Water Goals 5a. CONTRACT

  5. The Women’s Army Corps: 1945-1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    floor-length wool skirt, white silk blouse , blue tiara with gold thread embroidery, blue suede pumps, white kid gloves, and a finger-tip length blue...24, 33, 267 Army Uniform Board, 162, 260 chief, 64, 94, 162, 212. See also Blanch - Army Uniform Branch, 394 field, Col. Florence A.; Bryant, Col. Army

  6. 32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Utilization of Army bands. 508.1 Section 508.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPETITION WITH CIVILIAN BANDS § 508.1 Utilization of Army bands. (a)...

  7. 32 CFR 644.517 - Clearance of Army lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Clearance of Army lands. 644.517 Section 644.517 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... and Improvements § 644.517 Clearance of Army lands. The responsibility for performing clearance...

  8. Certification Report: Army Aviation Alternative Fuels Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    SPECIAL REPORT RDMR-AE-16-02 CERTIFICATION REPORT: ARMY AVIATION ALTERNATIVE FUELS CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Dale Cox...NOT TO BE CONSTRUED AS AN OFFICIAL DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY POSITION UNLESS SO DESIGNATED BY OTHER AUTHORIZED DOCUMENTS. TRADE NAMES USE...COVERED Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Certification Report: Army Aviation Alternative Fuels Certification Program 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6

  9. APPLYING PRACTICAL NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHIC INSPECTION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ARMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    INSPECTION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ARMY Stephan C. Zuber November 2016 Approved for public...release; distribution is unlimited. AD U.S. ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER Enterprise and Systems Integration Center...are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy, or decision, unless so designated by

  10. Training America’s Army for the Next Millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Corte Madera , California: Waite Group Press, 1994), 28. 9 William W. Hartzog and Susan Canedy, "TRADOC: Moving the Army Into the Future," Army...Future. Corte Madera , California: Waite Group Press, 1994. Romjue, John, L. American Army Doctrine for the Post-Cold War. Washington, D.C.: U.S

  11. An Organizational Climate Assessment of the Army Contracting Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT AN ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE ASSESSMENT OF THE ARMY CONTRACTING WORKFORCE...professional report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE AN ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE ASSESSMENT OF THE ARMY CONTRACTING WORKFORCE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S...13 dimensions within the area of organizational climate . This research analyzes the responses from active Army civilian and military workforce

  12. ARMY DOCTRINE AND THE PHYSICAL DOMAIN REQUIREMENTS OF STRATEGIC LEADERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    agencies and organizations outside of the Army for the physical domain concept design and research commitments in developing strategic leaders... organizations outside the Army offer an abundance of potential contributions to human performance capability development . Notes 1 Department of the...components of the human dimension for Army leader development as individuals move through a career from direct to strategic leadership. Using a qualitative

  13. 32 CFR 636.10 - Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. 636.10... Stewart, Georgia § 636.10 Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. Personnel assigned or employed at Hunter Army Airfield are required to register their privately owned vehicles within five days...

  14. Army Sustainment. Volume 42, Issue 5, September-October 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    consumption during flight. During the colder seasons, sustainment packs included ther- moses of coffee or hot chocolate . During night opera- tions, they...divisions, he added the 89th Division and the 90th Division. [The National Army was a volunteer Army (almost analogous to today’s Army Reserve) that was

  15. Installation Management Command: Preparing Civilians for the Army of 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    resist change.55 “Walt Disney is credited with saying that “change is inevitable, growth is optional.”56 If we are to execute the best plan to...Management Command Regulation 350-1 (Washington, DC, U.S. Department of the Army, June 1 2010). 11 U.S. Department of the Army, The Army, A-3. 12

  16. An Army Illumination Model (AAIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    6639000 India Chennai 13.060 80.250 24 Population Country City Latitude Longitude 11680000 India Delhi 28.667 77.233 6833000 India Hyderabad 17.385...providing illumination levels for cities , the model now includes values for lunar illumination under clear or (partially) cloudy skies at ground level...function of population and distance (>10 km) from city center under clear and overcast conditions. A technical overview of the model, along with

  17. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  18. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, S.C. [Radiation Standards and Dosimetry Laboratory, Redstone Arsenal, AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated.

  19. Installation to Production of a Large-Scale General Purpose Graphics Processing Unit (GPGPU) Cluster at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory: Thufir

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    return it to the originator . Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5067 ARL-TR-7085 September 2014 Installation to...tree types (deciduous or coniferous ) and tree density (4). Initially, we will be running two software applications with RF propagation models using

  20. Army Hearing Program Talking Points Calendar Year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-14

    clinically significant hearing loss: 4% Active Duty 8% Army National Guard 7% Army Reserve 2% of Soldiers have a hearing loss that requires a...Guard (ARNG) Data % Require Fit-for-Duty Evaluation 2.5% 6,000 / 241,256 Army Reserve (USAR) Data % Require Fit-for-Duty Evaluation 2.4% 3,117...STATISTICS FOR CY15 25% of Soldiers have some degree of hearing loss: 21% Active Duty 27% Army National Guard 28% Army Reserve 6% of Soldiers have a

  1. 2013 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Main Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    the Leadership Requirements Model and Leader Effectiveness Implicit leadership theory (Eden & Leviatan , 1975; Yukl, 2002) indicates followers...D.C.: Headquarters, Department of the Army. Eden, D. & Leviatan , U. (1975). Implicit leadership theory as a determinant of the factor structure

  2. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Relationship Education in the U.S. Army: 2-Year Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Scott M; Rhoades, Galena K; Loew, Benjamin A; Allen, Elizabeth S; Carter, Sarah; Osborne, Laura J; Prentice, Donnella; Markman, Howard J

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an evidence-based, community-delivered adaptation of couple relationship education (CRE; specifically, PREP, The Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program) delivered at two Army installations. The study is a randomized controlled trial with two years of follow-up, examining marital quality and stability. Sample composition was 662 married couples with a spouse in the U.S. Army. Analyses yielded no evidence of overall enduring intervention effects on relationship quality but couples assigned to intervention at the higher risk site were significantly less likely than controls to be divorced at the two-year follow-up (8.1% vs. 14.9%, p divorce was strongest for minority couples. The findings add to the literature on who may benefit most from CRE.

  4. An antenna engineering handbook for Army and Marine field communication applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breakall, J. K.; Domning, E. E.; Christman, A. M.; Averill, W. P.; McDonald, J.

    1987-02-01

    There is currently interest in modeling various antennas chosen to be used in field communication scenarios in the HF range by both the Army and Marine Corps. An engineering antenna handbook and computer database program has been produced at LLNL which will be used in producing an ultimate field antenna handbook. A host of antenna types and configurations have been studied for characteristics which can be used for optimizing best performance when interfaced with existing propagation codes and models. A parameter variation study has been undertaken with frequencies varied from 2 to 30 MHz and ground conductivities and dielectric constants varied for all possible ground conditions. Antenna parameters such as length, height, number of wires, ground stake length, and screen radius variation about some nominal have been looked at. Figures of merit have been devised for both surface and sky wave propagation. Various ways of presenting final results have been explored such as tables, graphs, databases, and parametric lookup tables.

  5. Building A Better Force: Regular Army / Reserve Components Integration In The Army Chemical Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    capabilities. Today, these changes detract from the Army Chemical Corps’ ability to provide the required capabilities to the joint force commander to execute...structural changes , including the creation of the US Army Reserve Command (USARC) and elevation of the Chief of the National Guard Bureau (NGB) to a...will enhance the CBRN force’s capabilities, evolving threats, changes in operational requirements , and equipment modernization continue to energize

  6. Evaluating Mobile Device Ownership and Usage in the U.S. Army: Implications for Army Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Mercado University of Central Florida Randall D. Spain U.S. Army Research Institute July 2014 United States Army...NUMBER 633007 6. AUTHOR(S) Joseph E. Mercado ; Randall D. Spain 5c. PROJECT NUMBER A792 5d. TASK NUMBER 5e...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Subject Matter POC and Subject Matter Expert: Joseph E. Mercado 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words): As the U.S

  7. The Army’s Institutional Values: Current Doctrine and the Army’s Values Training Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    called Generation X, and the generation after that is being referred to as the Millennials . The current demographic makeup of the Army includes members...Fraternization, Code of Conduct Training, Character Development, Law of War, Military Ethics, Suicide Prevention, Army Family Advocacy, Alcohol and Drug...explains that by introducing height and weight 112 standards, raising PT standards, emphasizing training and education, and deglamorizing alcohol

  8. Army Strong: Equipped, Trained and Ready. Final Report of the 2010 Army Acquisition Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Disadvantaged Business Utilization, Department of the Army Price, Lee, Brigadier General, U.S. Army, PEO, Command Control Communications-Tactical...based on QDRs or future forecasts. Task Force ODIN was a successful rapid acquisition. It delivered a counter-Improvised Explosive Device (CIED...new build • Deliver 6 Lots of 250 a/c • IOTE using five AB3 aircraft in Mar 2012 • FRP decision planned for Jul 2012 • Development will continue

  9. Typology of Army Families. Coping Styles of Successful, Career Army Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    22% Individuals ( Trainees , holdees, etc.) 101,000 13% The Army has approximately 100 different job titles, called Military Occupational Specialties...management trainee program. He received his draft notice, and he enlisted in the Army under the College/Officer C-ndidate School (OCS) program. His...not really like it there. TPhe neighbor s were, not very friendly, bu~t Betty has been trying to organize a block Clb I h U elt that she as gained o

  10. 2010 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Volume 2, Main Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    address uncertainty to face the challenges in Full Spectrum Operations (Nicely, Bryson, Aude, Keller-Glaze, & Vowels , in preparation). 21 3...Affective commitment is an emotional or attachment to the Army. Those strongly committed leaders identify with and enjoy working for the Army...Medical Command. Nicely, K., Bryson, J., Aude, S., Keller-Glaze, H., & Vowels , C. (in preparation). Preparatory Skillsets for Brigade Combat Teams

  11. Army Science Board Ad Hoc Sub-Group Report on Energy Needs of the Army,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    and solar. The goal for the year 2000 is to reduce the use of natural petroleum by 75 percent and to replace natural gas with synthetic gas ( syngas ...example, one * goal states that (by 2000) syngas will replace natural gas. The Army has therefore programed efforts to Implement syngas tech- nologies at...the reactor would run at full capacity to make up for shortages and to allow the Army to meet expanded needs. The AHSG notes that such systems resolve

  12. Estimating active Army and Army Reserve competition for high quality recruits with other military services

    OpenAIRE

    Demyanovich, James M.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis concentrated primarily on the recruiting of high quality recruits for the period FY 1987 through 2d Quarter FY 1995. The U.S. Military Entrance Processing Command (USMEPCOM) data used contained sufficiently accurate figures on Active Army and Army Reserve accessions. The data appears to represent a relatively accurate historical record of the number of non prior service enlistments into the Military Services, with the exception of the Air National Guard and Ai...

  13. 2014 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Military Leader Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-22

    of representativeness across the Army. The respondent sample closely approximated the population of the Army in distribution of component and gender ...be Europe 25 (56%), while the smallest percentages of high morale are reported in Korea (48%). Low morale is reported by 19% and 21% of...standards are types of behaviors that hinder trust by creating climates of perceived inequality . As expected, the display of favoritism is negatively

  14. The VLT Adaptive Optics Facility Project: Adaptive Optics Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Robin; Hubin, Norbert; Stroebele, Stefan; Fedrigo, Enrico; Oberti, Sylvain; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Bacon, Roland; McDermid, Richard; Bonaccini-Calia, Domenico; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Riccardi, Armando; Donaldson, Rob; Lelouarn, Miska; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Conzelman, Ralf; Delabre, Bernard; Stuik, Remko; Paufique, Jerome; Kasper, Markus; Vernet, Elise; Downing, Mark; Esposito, Simone; Duchateau, Michel; Franx, Marijn; Myers, Richard; Goodsell, Steven

    2006-03-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility is a project to convert UT4 into a specialised Adaptive Telescope with the help of a Deformable Secondary Mirror (see previous article). The two instruments that have been identified for the two Nasmyth foci are: Hawk-I with its AO module GRAAL allowing a Ground Layer Adaptive Optics correction (GLAO) and MUSE with GALACSI for GLAO correction and Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics correction. This article describes the AO modules GRAAL and GALACSI and their Real-Time Computers based on SPARTA.

  15. 33 CFR 385.31 - Adaptive management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adaptive management program. 385.31 Section 385.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMMATIC REGULATIONS FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE EVERGLADES RESTORATION...

  16. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Heeringa, Steven G

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six components of the Army STARRS. These include: an integrated analysis of the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004-2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e. those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQs] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. Department of Defense/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination.

  17. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeringa, Steven G; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting, contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples.

  18. Distance Education Findings for Army Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    operated by the U.S. Army Logistics Management College at Ft. Lee, VA was studied. The SEN student examination scores did not significantly differ...Baccalaureate Nursing Program Bollinger, M., Danon , N., Maddox, K., University of Wisconsin- Eau Claire School of Nursing Teaching approaches incorporated

  19. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... statements specifying that they have no financial or other interest in the outcome of the project. The..., or any protected natural or ecological resources of global importance. (g) Army NEPA documentation.../statement and also avoid extensive, time-consuming, and costly analyses or revisions. Project proponents...

  20. The Army’s Local Economic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    available to the general public. 6 U.S. Army Environmental Command, 2014. 7 James Hosek, Aviva Litovitz, and Adam C. Resnick , How Much Does Military Spending...Hosek, James, Aviva Litovitz, and Adam C. Resnick , How Much Does Military Spending Add to Hawaii’s Economy? Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND Corporation, TR

  1. Dental Therapy Assistant: Attitudes of Army Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Theodore H.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    The U. S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a formal program based on the concept that dental care can be more efficiently and effectively provided with treatment teams composed of one dental officer, two dental therapy assistants, one basic assistant, and the shared support of other auxiliary personnel. Such a team will use three dental treatment…

  2. Army Information Operations Officer Needs Analysis Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    helping with formatting the final report iv ARMY INFORMATION OPERATIONS OFFICER NEEDS ANALYSIS REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Research...time.” One IO officer suggested the IPO try to get a access the database that has all the old APA reports archived as a way to look at assessment

  3. Army Reserve (AR) Educational Assistance (EA) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army TRADOC Analysis Center Ft. Lee, VA 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S...Programs REAP: Reserve Education Assistance Program; MGIB-SR: Montgomery GI Bill – Selected Reserve; SRK: Selected Reserve Kicker ; OFF: Officer; EM

  4. Army Reserve Accessions and Retention Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army TRADOC Analysis Center Ft. Lee, VA 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...incentives, TRICARE, and TSP matching funds as opposed to large bonuses. – Provide small kickers to critical MOSs. 10 June 2008 29ARARA Brief to MORSS

  5. A Forecast of Army Aviation Training Research and Development Requirements for the Period 1985 to 2000. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    DIFFERENT OR NEW TRAINING Sulystm Factor Factor ADOCS (Advanced System Characteristics Flight Controls (0.65) Digital Optical Power Controls (0.30...needed to meet Army aviation training needs were addressed. Pester (1979) reported on the formulation of a digital data base to produce Computer Generated... Pester , R. F., Laboratory Development of Computer-Generated Image Displays for Evaluation in Terrain Flight Training, General Electric Company, Ground

  6. Lighter side of adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Tyson, Robert K

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive optics has been under development for well over 40 years. It is an indisputable necessity for all major ground-based astronomical telescopes and is the foundation for laser and wavefront sensor design. Lighter Side of Adaptive Optics is a nontechnical explanation of optics, the atmosphere, and the technology for ""untwinkling"" the stars. While interweaving a fictional romantic relationship as an analogy to adaptive optics, and inserting satire, humor, and philosophical rants, Tyson makes a difficult scientific topic understandable. The ""why"" and ""how"" of adaptive optics has never

  7. 78 FR 22527 - Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ] ACTION: Request for information regarding support to Army Core Competencies... 102-3.140 through 160, the Department of the Army requests information on science and technology...

  8. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

  9. The Roots of Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G Glaser, Ph.D.; Hon Ph.D.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available I studied sociology at Stanford 1948 to 1952, which was partially fine but limited in those days. But then I knew I wanted to be a sociologist. Returning to the USA from the army in 1955 to study sociology at Columbia confirmed my goals. I bought the program 100% on doing sociology as my life work. All I do is sociology in every facet of life; work, recreation, family etc. My life is sociology driven and directed.Now let me give you a quote from Barton’s (1955, p.246 article of Paul F. Lazarsfeld [PFL], “Analyzing the logic of research operations to clarify concepts remained a key to PFL’s life”. It has been the key to my life also.“All is data” – that now sloganized tenet of Grounded Theory [GT] – clearly came from PFL per Barton’s words. Robert K. Merton’s [RKM] brief flicker of light – to admit to emergence (see Barton, p. 255 – became the key to GT’s theoretical stance.

  10. Hydrogeologic setting, hydraulic properties, and ground-water flow at the O-Field area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, W.S.; Smith, B.S.; Donnelly, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Army disposed chemical agents, laboratory materials, and unexploded ordnance at O-Field in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, from before World War II until at least the 1950's. Soil, ground water, surface water,and wetland sediments in the O-Field area were contaminated from the disposal activity. A ground-water-flow model of the O-Field area was constructed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1989 to simulate flow in the central and southern part of the Gunpowder Neck. The USGS began an additional study of the contamination in the O-Field area in cooperation with the U.S. Army in 1990 to (1) further define the hydrogeologic framework of the O-Field area, (2) characterize the hydraulic properties of the aquifers and confining units, and (3) define ground-water flow paths at O-Field based on the current data and simulations of ground-water flow. A water-table aquifer, an upper confining unit, and an upper confined aquifer comprise the shallow ground-water aquifer system of the O-Field area. A lower confining unit, through which ground-water movement is negligible, is considered a lower boundary to the shallow aquifer system. These units are all part of the Pleistocene Talbot Formation. The model developed in the previous study was redesigned using the data collected during this study and emphasized New O-Field. The current steady-state model was calibrated to water levels of June 1993. The rate of ground-water flow calculated by the model was approximately 0.48 feet per day (ft/d) and the rate determined from chlorofluorocarbon dates was approximately 0.39 ft/d.

  11. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs.

  12. Making Weapons for the Terracotta Army

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Martinón-Torres

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Terracotta Army of the First Emperor of China is one of the most emblematic archaeological sites in the world. Many questions remain about the logistics of technology, standardisation and labour organisation behind the creation of such a colossal construction in just a few decades over 2,000 years ago. An ongoing research project co-ordinated between the UCL Institute of Archaeology and the Emperor Qin Shihang's Terracotta Army Museum is beginning to address some of these questions. This paper outlines some results of the typological, metric, microscopic, chemical and spatial analyses of the 40,000 bronze weapons recovered with the Terracotta Warriors. Thanks to a holistic approach developed specifically for this project, it is possible to reveal remarkable aspects of the organisation of the Qin workforce in production cells, of the standardisation, efficiency and quality-control procedures employed, and of the sophisticated technical knowledge of the weapon-makers.

  13. Women in the Army Policy Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-12

    chondromalacia of the perfornmance-limiting conditions thait *eiulted from an 8-1%eek patella (21). hip or neck of femur stress fracture (20). sprains...by the Chondromalacia of patella 21 10 Hip or neck or femur stress fracture 20 9 apparent lack of heel stability inherent in ;he Army boot used Ankle...of the patella a miaieary training program on males and females Aveat Space wert also reported. Environ Afed 30: 562-566. 1979 Although the

  14. Army Aviation Operations in the Pacific Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-04

    on any part of Libyan territory.”31 The deteriorating situation in the city of Benghazi triggered the first air action of the campaign as the French ...Gadhafi’s forces. Attack helicopters also had a role in the campaign with the British Army fielding the AH-64 Apache and the French providing their...number of armed vehicles, displaying the flexibility of helicopter operations in this particular theatre .36 A total of 22 Apache missions (49 combat

  15. Army Research Laboratory 2009 Annual Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The second technology substitutes fatty acid monomers for styrene in unsaturated polyester and vinyl ester repair resins , while maintain- ing...U.S. Army Research Laboratory 2009 Annual Review Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection...of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering

  16. Women in the Army: A Selected Bibliography,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    through their natural differentiation men and women unequivocally -. . affirm their brotherhood." Simone de Beauvoir The Second Sex , 1950. -... . a...worth: U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 1977. (Micro- fiche DDC AD-A 043 084) (The author argues that qualifications other than sex be used to...Performance at West Point: Relationships with Intelligence and Attitudes Toward Sex Roles." Armed Forces and Society, Vol. 7, Winter 1981, pp. 246-255

  17. Army Reserve Capabilities-Based Prioritization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-15

    journal databases such as JSTOR , ABI Inform, Proquest, and Emerald; syllabi for courses in strategic management and planning at Harvard, MIT, Wharton, and...methodology for prioritization. • Secure, database repository of appropriate bins, criteria or metrics for prioritization. • Reproducible...Prioritization PPBC/SRG Initial POM Database turned over to Army Budget TGM Issued ARB Final POM/BES Decisions Price/Rate Changes Other Fact-of-Life Changes

  18. US Army Medical Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    findings in this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents...characteristics. ACHIEVEMENTS: A commercial dental X-ray film processor unit devel- oped and marketed by the Air Techniques Inc. Company of New Hyde Park, NY, was...has been designed which will increase the usefulness of the standard r. ubered containers. Prototypes will be procured during 2nd Quarter FY80. 83 D

  19. Army Air and Missile Defense. Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Peace/ Colombia Scenario " Features of this Future "* Spread of democracy eliminates risk of wars "* EU, China, Japan economic, but not political, U.S...multinational effort to restore order to Bogota, Colombia , led by the U.S. Army. This would follow extensive and debilitating urban conflict between...Egypt Civil War Scenario . Features of this Future "* Nation-states destroyed in several regions by overpopulation , environmental degradation, ethnic

  20. Global Demands: Limited Forces. US Army Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    space lot tirve. hence a rlassical moble defense is !uled out. in Eur ope, one finds not only a lack of geostrategic depth but also an understandable...fuel and ammunition require- ments, putting greater reliance on technology ; Clausewitz-like "friction" always diminishes expected performance...34 Moreover, as General Donald R. Keith has said, " Technology won’t save us if we don’t field it." 18 One serious drain on Army resources is POMCUS-prepo

  1. Army Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Investment Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-30

    with a substantial force multiplier by enabling preconfigured loads to be positioned on demountable cargo beds (flat racks ) that allow for increased...International Organization for Standardization (ISO) containers without flat racks . • Modernize Container Handling Units (CHU) with new procurement...theater. The standard CHU utilized on the HEMTT does not have an on board stowage capability. As HEMTT M1120s are cycled through the Recap 20 The Army

  2. Electronic Warfare in Army Models - A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Improvement Program (AMIP), Joint (Army, AF, Marines) EW Center, and SAGA (Studies, Analysis, and Gaming Agency) of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to identify an...Virginia, January, 1973. 5. Catalog of Wargaming and Military Simulation Models, 7th Edition, SAGA 180-77, Studies, Analysis, and Gaming Agency, Organization...snow/sleet. It can simulate nighttime with full moon and twilight , smoke and dust as they affect the target acquisition capability of an RPV-type device

  3. The United States Army 1996 Modernization Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Targeting-Air, Bi -static Radar for Weapons Location, Combined Arms Command and Control, Battlefield Combat Identification, The Army Combined Arms Weapon...Suppression system (BASS) and the Small Arms Protection system ( SAPS ), reducing weight of the removable armor paneling while providing improved...weapons. The effectiveness of biological warfare ( BW ) agents can now be enhanced through advanced biotechnology. Viruses may be made resistant to

  4. Ground water and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    This national workshop on ground water and energy was conceived by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Assessments. Generally, OEA needed to know what data are available on ground water, what information is still needed, and how DOE can best utilize what has already been learned. The workshop focussed on three areas: (1) ground water supply; (2) conflicts and barriers to ground water use; and (3) alternatives or solutions to the various issues relating to ground water. (ACR)

  5. Disqualifying Medical Conditions of Flying Personnel in Chinese Army and Air Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-wei Wang; Shu-xuan Xu; Xian-rong Xu; Tong-xin Chen

    2008-01-01

    @@ After inpatient aircrews of Chinese Army and Air Force are treated at local hospitals,their health status will be evaluated.If it is aeronantieally adaptable,the conclusion would be flying qualification;if it may impact the flight safety or the flight environment may aggravate the illness,the conclusion would be flight suspension,and then the patient should be forwarded from local hospital to our hospital.After detailed examination,if the conditions of flying personnel are considered not qualified for flight,the conclusion of flying disqualification should be made finally.

  6. A Review of the Army’s Modular Force Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    and coordinating the schedules of busy Army stakeholders . Rickey Smith, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, Army Capabilities Integration Center...and Terry Pudas at the National Defense University for their thorough reviews of this report and for their thoughtful sug- gestions , which were...formations found in the pages of the docu- ments cited in the bibliography. The project also hosted interim reviews with stakeholders from the Office of

  7. Technology and the Era of the Mass Army

    OpenAIRE

    Massimiliano Gaetano Onorato; Kenneth Scheve; David Stasavage

    2012-01-01

    We investigate how technology has influenced the size of armies. During the nineteenth century the development of the railroad made it possible to field and support mass armies, significantly increasing the observed size of military forces. During the late twentieth century further advances in technology made it possible to deliver explosive force from a distance and with precision, making mass armies less desirable. We find strong support for our technological account using a new data set co...

  8. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 3 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1904 and Department of Defense Instruction (DODI) 6055.12 require reporting of occupational hearing illness and...U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q3 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army...Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health Management System and provides a means for the installation Hearing Program Managers

  9. Professionalism and Leadership in the Army Medical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Colonel Daniel F . Perugini U. S. Army Faculty Research Advisor Dr. John E. Bokel Dut&~Unaz~i :.4l The Industrial College of the Armed Forces National...profession, from patient care to command. Daniel F . Perugini 1992 Executive Research Project RS 3f Professionalism and Leadership in the Army Medical...Department Colonel Daniel F . Perugini U. S. Army Faculty Research Advisor Dr. John E. Bokel 4- I-orce 4Ls • ..... ’ /or The Industrial College of the Armed

  10. Know Before You Go: Improving Army Officer Sociocultural Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-04

    by Lieutenant Colonel James C. Laughrey United States Army Dr. Richard Meinhart Project Adviser This SRP is...St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: IMPROVING ARMY OFFICER SOCIOCULTURAL KNOWLEDGE BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL JAMES C...LAUGHREY United States Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for Public Release. Distribution is Unlimited. USAWC CLASS OF 2008 This SRP is

  11. The Chinese People’s Liberation Army and Political Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    THE CHINESE PEOPLE’S LIBERATION ARMY AND POLITICAL SOCIALIZATION by LIEUTENANT COLONEL GEORGE K. OSBORN, USA (What is the role of the Chinese ...People’s Liberation Army in the Political Socialization o f the Chinese People?) The hypothesis here advanced is that, except for a period during...the decade of the 1950’s, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has played a major role in the political socialization not only of those who

  12. Army Green and Sustainable Remediation: Policy and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    with caustic soda • More than 112,000 cubic yards of soil treated using alkaline hydrolysis • Total TNT/DNT mass removed is more than 75 tons...system • In-situ pilot study using bacteria to treat perchlorate in groundwater • Targeted species removal and use of native plants and grass seed...pump-and-treat technologies Aerial view of the Seneca Army Depot June 2010Army Green and Sustainable Remediation 13 Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant

  13. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial lighting ceases...

  14. Army Air and Missile Defense Network Design Facility (AAMDNDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides JTIDS network designs and platform initialization load files for all Joint and Army-only tests, exercises, operations, and contingency events...

  15. Battling Bullying in the British Army 1987 – 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Wither

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the attempts by the UK MOD to eradicate bullying in the British Army. Although British recruits are not confronted by mistreatment that compares with the phenomenon of dedovshchina, the Army has struggled to eliminate incidents of bullying from the ranks, which have tarnished the image of the British Army. The article examines the nature and extent of the problem, the efficacy of official policy to combat it, and suggests reasons why bullying persists even in a long- standing professional army. It also seeks to provide instructive insights for those militaries of the successor states of the Soviet Union that are currently blighted by dedovshchina.

  16. INVENTORY CONTROL OF ARMY NON-COMBAT ESSENTIAL ITEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARMY EQUIPMENT, INVENTORY CONTROL , MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL, SPARE PARTS, CONTROL SYSTEMS, TEST METHODS, MILITARY FACILITIES, UNITED STATES, WEST GERMANY, THAILAND, VIETNAM, SOUTH KOREA, JAPAN.

  17. Porridge and peas: C. Stanton Hicks and Australian army rations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collingham, Lizzie

    2009-09-01

    In 1942 Australian troops came back from fighting the Japanese in New Guinea exhausted and malnourished. The army rations of bully beef and biscuits were insufficiently rich in vitamins to sustain men in combat in tropical conditions. The nutritionist C. Stanton Hicks was one of a vast army of scientists who worked behind the scenes to maximize the war effort. He made it his mission to improve the army diet. He set up the Australian Army Catering Corps, invented combat ration packs and tried to introduce vitamin-rich foods into the soldiers' diet. Two of his more idiosyncratic innovations were wheat porridge and Tasmanian blue peas.

  18. Interview with Susan Morrisey Livingstone, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Logistics and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    US Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center - The Army Environmental History Project Interview with Susan Morrisey...The Army Environmental History Project ERDC/CERL M-07-1 March 2007 Interview with Susan Morrisey Livingstone, Assistant Secretary of the Army for...Environmental Quality," Work Item 6HF9K5, "The Army Environmental History Project." The technical monitor was John J. Fittipaldi, Army Environmental

  19. Renewable Energy Assessment Methodology for Japanese OCONUS Army Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solana, Amy E.; Horner, Jacob A.; Russo, Bryan J.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kora, Angela R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Hand, James R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.

    2010-08-30

    Since 2005, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been asked by Installation Management Command (IMCOM) to conduct strategic assessments at selected US Army installations of the potential use of renewable energy resources, including solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste, and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). IMCOM has the same economic, security, and legal drivers to develop alternative, renewable energy resources overseas as it has for installations located in the US. The approach for continental US (CONUS) studies has been to use known, US-based renewable resource characterizations and information sources coupled with local, site-specific sources and interviews. However, the extent to which this sort of data might be available for outside the continental US (OCONUS) sites was unknown. An assessment at Camp Zama, Japan was completed as a trial to test the applicability of the CONUS methodology at OCONUS installations. It was found that, with some help from Camp Zama personnel in translating and locating a few Japanese sources, there was relatively little difficulty in finding sources that should provide a solid basis for conducting an assessment of comparable depth to those conducted for US installations. Project implementation will likely be more of a challenge, but the feasibility analysis will be able to use the same basic steps, with some adjusted inputs, as PNNL’s established renewable resource assessment methodology.

  20. PALSAR ground data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Heinrich; Palsetia, Marzban; Carande, Richard; Curlander, James C.

    2002-02-01

    The upcoming launches of new satellites like ALOS, Envisat, Radarsat2 and ECHO will pose a significant challenge for many ground stations, namely to integrate new SAR processing software into their existing systems. Vexcel Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has built a SAR processing system, named APEX -Suite, for spaceborne SAR satellites that can easily be expanded for the next generation of SAR satellites. APEX-Suite includes an auto-satellite-detecting Level 0 Processor that includes bit-error correction, data quality characterization, and as a unique feature, a sophisticated and very accurate Doppler centroid estimator. The Level 1 processing is divided into the strip mode processor FOCUST, based on the well-proven range-Doppler algorithm, and the SWATHT ScanSAR processor that uses the Chirp Z Trans-form algorithm. A high-accuracy ortho-rectification processor produces systematic and precision corrected Level 2 SAR image pro ducts. The PALSAR instrument is an L-band SAR with multiple fine and standard resolution beams in strip mode, and several wide-swath ScanSAR modes. We will address the adaptation process of Vexcel's APEX-Suite processing system for the PALSAR sensor and discuss image quality characteristics based on processed simulated point target phase history data.

  1. Army Warfighter Information NetworkTactical Increment 2 Procurement Quantity Not Supported for Future Army Forces (REDACTED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Increment 2 to enter the production and deployment phase of the acquisition process. The Army awarded an indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity...contract in March 2010 for the production of WIN-T Increment 2 equipment. Table 1 shows the Army’s organizations and responsibilities for the WIN-T...estimate the necessary Army units beyond the approved Army structure memorandum to cover the WIN-T Increment 2 production and fielding period

  2. America’s Army: Our Families Give Us Strength. Fiscal Year 2010 United States Army Annual Financial Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    States Army Annual Financial Report The Army GF recognizes excess, obsolete, and unserviceable OM&S at a net realizable value of $0 pending...been addressed, to include logistics interfaces. The Army WCF recognizes excess, obsolete, and unserviceable inventory at net realizable value of $0...27,818,640 $ (4,654,388) $ 23,164,252 Legend for Valuation Methods: LAC = Latest Acquisition Cost NRV = Net Realizable Value SP = Standard Price LCM

  3. Multinational Force Integration: The ROK Army’s Integration With The US Army In The Vietnam War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    British 1st Armoured Division serving directly under I MEF.53 The coalition’s special operations command consisted of the special operations forces of...War, the US Army successfully integrated a foreign army into a multinational force under a unified headquarters, through a mix of formal and informal...then escalating into combat operations in 1965. The US Army operated with small teams of advisors under the Military Advisory Assistance Group

  4. The Army Metering Data Management System (MDMS): Using MDMS To Meet the Army’s Energy Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    strategies such as AEWCP, AESIS, and IMCP US Army Corps of Engineers Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville Meeting Army Energy Goals Policy...Planning AEWCP, AESIS, IMCP Program/Project Needs Assessment EACA, EEAP, REM, ESCO DES as Prioritized by Army Energy Manager ECIP,UESC,ESPC, ESP,UMCS,AMP...Management Campaign Plan ( IMCP ) Goals Energy Goals (EN) • EN 1 – Reduce energy and water consumption • EN 2 – Increase energy and water efficiency

  5. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  6. Badger Army Ammunition Plant groundwater data management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J.P. [Olin Corp., Baraboo, WI (United States). Badger Army Ammunition Plant

    1994-12-31

    At the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (Badger), there are currently over 200 wells that are monitored on a quarterly basis. Badger has had three active production periods since its construction in 1942. During these periods, various nitrocellulose based propellants were produced including single base artillery propellants were produced including single base artillery propellant, double base rocket propellant and BALL POWDER{reg_sign} propellant. Intermediate materials used in the manufacture of these propellants were also produced, including nitroglycerine, and sulfuric and nitric acids. To meet the challenge of managing the data in-house, a groundwater data management system (GDMS) was developed. Although such systems are commercially available, they were not able to provide the specific capabilities necessary for data management and reporting at Badger. The GDMS not only provides the routine database capabilities of data sorts and queries, but has provided an automated data reporting system as well. The reporting function alone has significantly reduced the time and efforts that would normally be associated with this task. Since the GDMS was developed at Badger, the program can be continually adapted to site specific needs. Future planned modifications include automated reconciliation, improved transfer of data to graphics software, and statistical analysis and interpretation of the data.

  7. The 1984 ARI (Army Research Institute) Survey of Army Recruits: Codebook for October 84/February 85 Active Army Survey Respondents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    TOOK/PASS IN HIGH SCHOOL:COMPUTR SCI 202 T198E TOOK/PASS IN HIGH SCHOOL:INTRMED ALGBRA 203 T198F TOOK/PASS IN HIGH SCHOOL:TRIGONOMETRY 204 T198G TOOK...OCTOBER 84/FEBRUARY 85 ACTIVE ARMY SURVEY RESPONDENTS WHEN DO YOU REGULARLY WATCH TV DURING THE WEEKEND -- SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS? T233C - EARLY EVENING...I PERCENTI VALUE I MEANING 81 0.71 NO RESPONSE 2418 . D QUESTION NOT ON SURVEY 857 77.5 0 NOT CHECKED 241 21.8 1 CHECKED - EARLY EVENING --- 6PM TO

  8. ADAPT Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT) Project Lead: Scott Poll Subject Fault diagnosis in electrical power systems Description The Advanced...

  9. Commentary on "The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)": Army STARRS: a Framingham-like study of psychological health risk factors in soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Kerry J; Schoomaker, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    Although historically the Army suicide rate has been significantly lower than the civilian rate, in 2004, the suicide and accidental death rates began trending upward. By 2008, the Army suicide rate had risen above the national average (20.2 per 100,000). In 2009, 160 active duty Soldiers took their lives, making suicide the third leading cause of death among the Army population. If accidental death, frequently the result of high-risk behavior, is included, then more Soldiers died by their own actions than in combat in 2009. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) was thus created in 2009 to begin to address these problems. The Army STARRS project is a large consortium of seven different studies to develop data-driven methods for mitigating or preventing suicide behaviors and improving the overall mental health and behavioral functioning of Army Soldiers during and after their Army service. The first research articles from the Army STARRS project were published in late 2013 and early 2014. This work has already begun to outline important facets of risk in the military, and it is helping to drive an empirically derived approach to improvements in understanding mental disorders and risk behavior and to improve prevention and support of mental health and resilience. The Framingham Heart Study, started in the 1940s, marked a watershed event in utilizing large cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal collaborative research to identify and understand risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The Army STARRS project, through its collaborative, prospective, and robust innovative design and implementation, may provide the beginning of a similar scientific cohort in mental disorders. The work of this project will help understand biological and psychological aspects of military service, including those leading to suicide. When coupled with timely feedback to Army leadership, it permits near real-time steps to diagnose, mitigate, and

  10. A quantification of the physiological demands of the army emergency responder in the Australian army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofari, Paul J; Laing Treloar, Alison K; Silk, Aaron J

    2013-05-01

    The Australian Defence Force is reviewing the physical demands of all employment categories in the Australian Army to establish valid and legally defensible assessments. The current assessments, performed in physical training attire, are not specific to job demands. Moreover, the fitness standards decrease based on age and are lower for females, and as job requirements are constant, these assessments are counterintuitive. With regard to the Army Emergency Responder employment category, tasks of physical demand in the present study were selected through consultation with subject-matter experts. Participants consisted of 10 qualified Army Emergency Responder soldiers and three noncareer firefighters under instruction. Real-life firefighting scenarios were witnessed by researchers and helped form task simulations allowing measurement of heart rate and oxygen consumption. Peak oxygen consumption ranged from 21.8 ± 3.8 to 40.0 ± 3.4 mL kg(-1) min(-1) during cutting activities and a search and rescue task, respectively, representing values similar to or higher than the current entry standards. Manual handling tasks were also assessed, with the heaviest measured being two soldiers lifting a 37.7-kg Utility Trunk to 150 cm. The findings provide a quantitative assessment of the physiological demands of Army Emergency Responders, and highlight the need for change in current fitness assessments.

  11. The Rift between the Army National Guard and the Active Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Behavioral and Social Sciences, December 1988), 48. 16 Ibid., 59. 17 Bettina A. Babbitt , Essex Corporation and Charles 0. Nystrom, U.S. Army Research...Sciences, June 1989) 209. 40 BIBLIOGRAPHY Babbitt , Bettina A., and Nystrom, Charles 0., Questionnaire Construction Manual, Research Product 89-20

  12. A molecular phylogeny of Dorylus army ants provides evidence for multiple evolutionary transitions in foraging niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilhelmsen Lars B

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Army ants are the prime arthropod predators in tropical forests, with huge colonies and an evolutionary derived nomadic life style. Five of the six recognized subgenera of Old World Dorylus army ants forage in the soil, whereas some species of the sixth subgenus (Anomma forage in the leaf-litter and some as conspicuous swarm raiders on the forest floor and in the lower vegetation (the infamous driver ants. Here we use a combination of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences to reconstruct the phylogeny of the Dorylus s.l. army ants and to infer the evolutionary transitions in foraging niche and associated morphological adaptations. Results Underground foraging is basal and gave rise to leaf-litter foraging. Leaf-litter foraging in turn gave rise to two derived conditions: true surface foraging (the driver ants and a reversal to subterranean foraging (a clade with most of the extant Dorylus s.s. species. This means that neither the subgenus Anomma nor Dorylus s.s. is monophyletic, and that one of the Dorylus s.s. lineages adopted subterranean foraging secondarily. We show that this latter group evolved a series of morphological adaptations to underground foraging that are remarkably convergent to the basal state. Conclusion The evolutionary transitions in foraging niche were more complex than previously thought, but our comparative analysis of worker morphology lends strong support to the contention that particular foraging niches have selected for very specific worker morphologies. The surprising reversal to underground foraging is therefore a striking example of convergent morphological evolution.

  13. 77 FR 21977 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    .... Purpose: Hear the preliminary findings of the Strategic Directions for Army Science and Technology and vote on adoption. Proposed Agenda: Open Session, the ASB will hear preliminary findings of the Strategic Directions for Army Science & Technology study and vote on adoption. FOR FURTHER...

  14. Rear Area Security In The Field Army Service Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    his ma.jor subordinate Commanders, the arm support brigade commander. Rear are? ecurity doctrine requires the area coriander to coordin- ate unit...field army service area. Response The army support brigade coriander conducts phase I rear area security operations within the limits of current

  15. Rapid Acquisition of Army Command and Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    requirements documents, and sustainment structures of existing programs to choreograph rapid initiation of a concept and ensure its fielding and...manner of choreographing the transition to the Army from DARPA. The establishment of CDRT in 2004 indicated that senior leaders in the Army were aware of

  16. Army Response Letter & Analysis - signed January 19, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    A response to the letter, which requested a review of the proposed decision by the Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District to issue four Department of the Army permits to Baltimore County (3 permits) and Anne Arundel County (1 permit), MD.

  17. Soldier Education in the British Army, 1920-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jim

    2008-01-01

    This article surveys the history of compulsory education for soldiers' career advancement in the British army. It begins with an examination of the organizational context before analyzing the rationale, syllabus, teaching and assessment of soldier education. It concludes that for members of the army education organization their self-perception as…

  18. Can the Army Become a Learning Organization? A Question Reexamined

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    tions (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1957), 7–17. 20 Marilyn Darling, Charles Parry, and Joseph Moore, “Learning in the Thick of It,” Harvard...U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Pamphlet 525–3–7–01, The U.S. Army Study of the Human Dimension of the Future (Fort Monroe , VA: Department

  19. USACE Environmental Support to the Army and the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    Environmental Workload $1.9B Obligations (M) Army IRP/MMRP $164 Army EQ $189 AF IRP/MMRP $208 AF EQ $103 Superfund $312 FUSRAP $152 FUDS $457 BRAC ER...Federal Agencies •Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program ( FUSRAP ) •Defense State Memorandum of Agreement (DSMOA) 5 BUILDING

  20. The Culminating Point and U.S. Army Tactical Doctrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-18

    at the tactical level. 16 SECTION III CONTEMPORARY USE AND FUTURE APPLICABILITY Forewarned, forearmed; to be prepared is half the victory. Miguel de... Cervantes U.S ARMY CONTEMPORARY USE OF TACTICAL CULMINATION The U.S. Army has been actively attempting to address the ramifications of culmination at

  1. Army Drawdown and Restructuring: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to a...35 Vago Muradian, “Odierno Pushes BCT Revamp, 4 Must-Have Programs, Army Times, October 29, 2012. 36 Sebastian Sprenger, “Draft Army

  2. New Initiatives in the Army Green Procurement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Symbol/(703) XXX - XXX (DSN XXX ) / email address Date-Time-GroupSECURITY CLASSIFICATION HERE New Initiatives in the Army Green Procurement Program Army...Program (GPP) Strategy will accompany the policy memo Slide 3 of 5Name/Office Symbol/(703) XXX - XXX (DSN XXX ) / email address Date-Time-GroupSECURITY

  3. Army Logistician. Volume 39, Issue 2, March-April 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    With over 90 fixed interrogators at key nodes throughout Iraq and the availability of the upgraded Standard Army Retail Sup- ply System (SARSS) at...not change or supersede official Army publications. The masculine pronoun may refer to either gender. Reprints: Articles may be reprinted with

  4. Closing the Candor Chasm: The Missing Element of Army Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    BIBLIOGRAPHY Baldor, Lolita C. “Army Chief Sees Greater Role for Guard and Reserves.” Norfolk Virginian-Pilot. January 27, 2012. hampton- roads.com/2012/01...20. 41. Lolita C. Baldor, “Army Chief Sees Greater Role for Guard and Reserves,” Norfolk Virginian-Pilot, January 27, 2012; Budget Control Act of

  5. Army Sustainment. Volume 42, Issue 6, November-December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Joseph L. Bass Commanding General Army Expeditionary Contracting Command Major General James K. Gilman Commanding General Army Medical Research and...administration, optical fabrication, laboratory services, preventive medicine, dentistry , medical operations and planning, evacuation, and practical nursing...advantage of a lot of lessons learned from previous deployments,” said Brigadier General Joseph L. Bass, commanding general of the ECC. “We

  6. Army Corps of Engineers: Water Resource Authorizations, Appropriations, and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    Army Corps of Engineers: Water Resource Authorizations, Appropriations, and Activities Nicole T. Carter Specialist in Natural Resources Policy...of Engineers: Water Resource Authorizations, Appropriations, and Activities Congressional Research Service Summary The U.S. Army Corps of...congressional attention because its water resource projects can have significant local and regional economic benefits and environmental effects

  7. U. S. Army Directory of Technical Information Holdings and Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Dale L.

    The directory identifies 111 Army sources of technical information that include 2200 specialized subject areas. The sources are indexed by subject matter, and name of holding, so that a searcher can find a description of all available indexed Army information services, with details on scope and size of collections, services available, and means of…

  8. US Army Medical Department Journal, April-June 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    793. AUTHOR: 12. Bailit M, Dyer MB. Beyond bankable dollars: Establishing a business tMedical Corps, U.S. Army. Lieutenant Colonel Rice is an...Available at http://www.emwf.org/usr _ d o / Care Administration and is assigned to Headquarters, U.S. Army Medical Bailitbeyond bankable

  9. Army General Fund Adjustments Not Adequately Documented or Supported

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    management to develop effective internal controls over its financial reporting process. The Circular requires that agencies document the business ...Indianapolis correct these control deficiencies, there is considerable risk that the AGF financial statements will be materially misstated and the Army...deficiencies, there is considerable risk that the AGF financial statements will be materially misstated and the Army will not achieve audit readiness by

  10. Occupational differences in US Army suicide rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, R C; Stein, M B; Bliese, P D; Bromet, E J; Chiu, W T; Cox, K L; Colpe, L J; Fullerton, C S; Gilman, S E; Gruber, M J; Heeringa, S G; Lewandowski-Romps, L; Millikan-Bell, A; Naifeh, J A; Nock, M K; Petukhova, M V; Rosellini, A J; Sampson, N A; Schoenbaum, M; Zaslavsky, A M; Ursano, R J

    2015-11-01

    Civilian suicide rates vary by occupation in ways related to occupational stress exposure. Comparable military research finds suicide rates elevated in combat arms occupations. However, no research has evaluated variation in this pattern by deployment history, the indicator of occupation stress widely considered responsible for the recent rise in the military suicide rate. The joint associations of Army occupation and deployment history in predicting suicides were analysed in an administrative dataset for the 729 337 male enlisted Regular Army soldiers in the US Army between 2004 and 2009. There were 496 suicides over the study period (22.4/100 000 person-years). Only two occupational categories, both in combat arms, had significantly elevated suicide rates: infantrymen (37.2/100 000 person-years) and combat engineers (38.2/100 000 person-years). However, the suicide rates in these two categories were significantly lower when currently deployed (30.6/100 000 person-years) than never deployed or previously deployed (41.2-39.1/100 000 person-years), whereas the suicide rate of other soldiers was significantly higher when currently deployed and previously deployed (20.2-22.4/100 000 person-years) than never deployed (14.5/100 000 person-years), resulting in the adjusted suicide rate of infantrymen and combat engineers being most elevated when never deployed [odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1-4.1], less so when previously deployed (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.1), and not at all when currently deployed (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8-1.8). Adjustment for a differential 'healthy warrior effect' cannot explain this variation in the relative suicide rates of never-deployed infantrymen and combat engineers by deployment status. Efforts are needed to elucidate the causal mechanisms underlying this interaction to guide preventive interventions for soldiers at high suicide risk.

  11. Channel Modeling for Air-to-Ground Wireless Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingcheng Shi; Di He; Bin Li; Jianwu Dou

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss several large⁃scale fading models for different environments. The COST231⁃Hata model is adapted for air⁃to⁃ground modeling. We propose two criteria for air⁃to⁃ground channel modelling based on test data derived from field testing in Beijing. We develop a new propagation model that is more suitable for air⁃to⁃ground communication that pre⁃vious models. We focus on improving this propagation model using the field test data.

  12. Army Leadership. Competent, Confident, and Agile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    in desert camouflage patterns. While some peacetime fieldings may take 18 to 24 months to complete, the two logistic leaders set an ambitious goal...London: Octopus Books, 1974), 98- 111. Department of Veterans Affairs: casualty numbers. 4-4 4-10 “There is a great deal…”: George S. Patton, Jr., War...KS: U.S. Army Command and General Staff College Press, 1997. Taylor, A. J. P. and S. L. Mayer. History of World War II. London: Octopus Books, 1974

  13. Army Transformation: Navigating into the Blue Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    posed by the Domino Theory.7 Since 2004, the MA is embarking on a transformation program known as the ‘Army 2 10 plus 10’. General Tan Sri Dato ’ Sri... based political parties, lost its two-third majority in the federal parliament for the first time in history and was ousted as the ruling party in four...within the military or civilian community they are based , at a larger and more significant scale. The MA may consider allowing organizational

  14. WAR ELEPHANTS IN THE PYRRHUS' ARMY

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In the IIIrd century BC king of Epirus Pyrrhus has used Indian elephants in his army. These animals have been brought to his forces from Ptolemy Thunderbolt. These beasts came to Europe with Seleucus Nicator and took part in many battles between the Diadochi in Asia. Pyrrhus has used them in Italian campanign and he was the first who had brought these animals to Italy. They became the first elephants which terrified Romans and were the first elephants which have been defeated by them. This wa...

  15. Korean War Logistics Eighth United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-09

    from defensive to offensive, as CINCUNC directed it to attack north to Pyongyang, capital city of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (OPRK), North...weapons to kill the tanks. General Eberle, G-4, FEC, described the urgent need for Bazookas in Korea . ... the Russians provided the North Koreans with T...8217,- ’S~ I6 0 iI. RONIOJ3A2DS PO.;S KOREA APR t gN -I S * ~z T- -:*J *1* Porto3~, r -. r 4< ,Ž . BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. Appleman, Roy E. US Army in the Korean War

  16. Climate adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  17. Foundations of autonomy for ground robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.; Mitchell, Robert R.

    2012-06-01

    Unmanned systems have become a critical element of the Army's Force Structure for applications such as Emergency Ordnance Disposal (EOD). Systems currently fielded are typically tele-operated and, thus, impose significant cognitive burden upon the operator. The Robotics CTA (RCTA), a collaborative research endeavor between the Army Research Laboratory and a consortium of eight industrial and academic partners, is developing fundamental technology to enable a new level of autonomous capability for future unmanned systems that can act as teammates to Soldiers making up a small unit. The Alliance is focusing research in five key areas: a cognitively based world model, semantic perception, learning, meta-cognition, and adaptive behaviors. Because current world model representations are relatively shallow, metrically based, and support only brittle behaviors, the RCTA is creating a cognitive-to-metric world model that can incorporate and utilize mission context. Current perceptual capabilities for unmanned systems are generally limited to a small number of well defined objects or behaviors. The RCTA is raising perception to a semantic level that enables understanding of relationships among objects and behaviors. To successfully team with small units, the command and control of unmanned systems must move away from the current hardware controller paradigm to one of verbal and gestural communication, implicit cues, and transparency of action between Soldier and robot. The RCTA is also exploring adaptive behavior and mechanics that will permit manipulation of arbitrarily shaped objects, animal-like mobility in complex environments, and conduct of military missions in dynamic tactical conditions. Efforts to incorporate learning from the lowest levels of the architecture upwards are key to each of the above.

  18. Use of evidence-based treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder in Army behavioral healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Joshua E; West, Joyce C; Duffy, Farifteh F; Herrell, Richard K; Rae, Donald S; Hoge, Charles W

    2013-01-01

    To identify the extent to which evidence-based psychotherapy (EBP) and psychopharmacologic treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are provided to U.S. service members in routine practice, and the degree to which they are consistent with evidence-based treatment guidelines. We surveyed the majority of Army behavioral health providers (n = 2,310); surveys were obtained from 543 (26%). These clinicians reported clinical data on a total sample of 399 service member patients. Of these patients, 110 (28%) had a reported PTSD diagnosis. Data were weighted to account for sampling design and nonresponses. Army providers reported 86% of patients with PTSD received evidence-based psychotherapy (EBP) for PTSD. As formal training hours in EBPs increased, reported use of EBPs significantly increased. Although EBPs for PTSD were reported to be widely used, clinicians who deliver EBP frequently reported not adhering to all core procedures recommended in treatment manuals; less than half reported using all the manualized core EBP techniques. Further research is necessary to understand why clinicians modify EBP treatments, and what impact this has on treatment outcomes. More data regarding the implications for treatment effectiveness and the role of clinical context, patient preferences, and clinical decision-making in adapting EBPs could help inform training efforts and the ways that these treatments may be better adapted for the military.

  19. Air Power for Patton’s Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    clarify further air-ground command and control procedures. If anything, it served to enhance the role of the ground comman- der and, in the eyes of...advance headquarters in Hillingdon House, Uxbridge, where a short time later IX Fighter Command’s advance headquarters joined them. At Hillingdon ...sion failed in this instance, the reconnaissance pilot performed as planned. Reconnaissance pilots not only served as the eyes of the ground forces

  20. The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps: A Compromise to Overcome the Conflict of Women Serving in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permeswaran, Yashila

    2008-01-01

    Though people now take the idea of women in the military for granted, in the 1940s it was a vigorously debated suggestion. Men protected their country; women stayed at home. Because of the conflict over whether women should serve in the army, Congress compromised by creating the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC). This article describes the…

  1. Anything But: Joint Air-Ground Training at the U.S. Army Ground Combat Training Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-03

    Antis, COL Jim Dickens , and COL (Ret) Tom Snukis. If I ever become a “world class” planner, it will be a direct result of their hard work and patience...enjoyed at the National Training Center, created the Joint 89 Burge 2009. 90 Wolf, 413. 91 Wickham, GEN John A., USA, and Gen Charles A. Gabriel...part of the US Army’s rapid advance to Baghdad, that V Corps Historian Dr. Charles E. Kirkpatrick, described the effort as an “almost flawless

  2. Management Research and Grounded Theory: A review of grounded theorybuilding approach in organisational and management research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J.J. Kenealy, Ph.D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Grounded theory is a systematic methodology for the collection and analysis of data which was discovered by Glaser and Strauss in the 1960’s. The discovery of this method was first presented to the academic community in their book ‘The Discovery of Grounded Theory’ (1967 which still remains a primary point of reference for those undertaking qualitative research and grounded theory in particular. This powerful research method has become very popular in some research domains; whilst increasing in popularity it is still less prevalent in the field of organisational and management research particularly in its original form. This self reflexive paper sets out to explore the possibilities for this imbalance which takes the discussion onto the areas of methodological adaptation and training. It also enters the debate about access to research subjects and provides a succinct argument supporting the notion that grounded theory should simply be viewed as a method that develops empirically grounded conceptual theory.

  3. Exploiting link dynamics in LEO-to-ground communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Joseph Mcrae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caffrey, Michael P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The high dynamics of the LEO-to-ground radio channel are described. An analysis shows how current satellite radio systems largely underutilize the available radio link, and that a radio that can adaptively vary the bit rate can more fully exploit it, resulting in increased data throughput and improved power efficiency. We propose one method for implementing the adaptivity, and present simulation results.

  4. Adopting an Adaptive Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres, Phil

    2009-01-01

    This thesis grounds itself upon two implicitly time-based assumptions: 1. Change is inevitable 2. Design is an iterative process Herbert Simon posits design as an engine of change. He states that design activity is the devising of ‘courses of action aimed at changing existing situations into pref...... particular time-based attributes can be exhibited – most notably, adaptation. The implementation of this framework necessitates a re-examination of the process and concerns of architectural design. The sub-text of the thesis is to remember that the activity of design is itself designed....

  5. Adaptive pattern for autonomous UAV guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Chen-Ko; Segor, Florian

    2013-09-01

    The research done at the Fraunhofer IOSB in Karlsruhe within the AMFIS project is focusing on a mobile system to support rescue forces in accidents or disasters. The system consists of a ground control station which has the capability to communicate with a large number of heterogeneous sensors and sensor carriers and provides several open interfaces to allow easy integration of additional sensors into the system. Within this research we focus mainly on UAV such as VTOL (Vertical takeoff and Landing) systems because of their ease of use and their high maneuverability. To increase the positioning capability of the UAV, different onboard processing chains of image exploitation for real time detection of patterns on the ground and the interfacing technology for controlling the UAV from the payload during flight were examined. The earlier proposed static ground pattern was extended by an adaptive component which admits an additional visual communication channel to the aircraft. For this purpose different components were conceived to transfer additive information using changeable patterns on the ground. The adaptive ground pattern and their application suitability had to be tested under external influence. Beside the adaptive ground pattern, the onboard process chains and the adaptations to the demands of changing patterns are introduced in this paper. The tracking of the guiding points, the UAV navigation and the conversion of the guiding point positions from the images to real world co-ordinates in video sequences, as well as use limits and the possibilities of an adaptable pattern are examined.

  6. Musculoskeletal injuries sustained in modern army combatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possley, Daniel R; Johnson, Anthony E

    2012-01-01

    Participation in martial arts has grown over the past 15 years with an estimated 8 million participants. In 2004, the Chief of Staff of the Army directed that all Initial Military Training soldiers receive Modern Army Combatives (MAC) training. The mechanical differences between the various martial arts styles incorporated into mixed martial arts/MAC pose challenges to the medical professional. We report the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries by Level 1 and 2 trained active duty soldiers participating in MAC over a 3-year period. From June 1, 2005 to January 1, 2009, the Orthopaedic Surgery service treated and tracked all injuries in MAC. Data was analyzed using the Chi(2) method of analysis. (p < 0.05). 155 of 1,025 soldiers presenting with MAC injuries reported inability to perform their military occupation specialty duties. The knee was most frequently injured followed by shoulder. Surgical intervention was warranted 24% of the time. Participants in MAC reported injuries severe enough to impact occupational duties at 15.5%. Surgical intervention was warranted only 24% of the time. The knee and shoulder are the most frequently injured body parts. Labral repair was the most frequent surgical procedure.

  7. 32 CFR 634.12 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. 634.12 Section 634.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... § 634.12 Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. Army commanders will take...

  8. Building the Army of the Republic of Vietnam’s Logistical System: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Building the Army of the Republic of Vietnam’s Logistical System: Lessons Learned A Monograph by MAJ...Jonathan R. Gregory United State Army School of Advanced Military Studies United States Army Command and General Staff College Fort Leavenworth...Building of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam’s Logistical System: Lessons Learned Approved by: __________________________________, Monograph Director

  9. How to Maintain an Operational Reserve? Further Engaging Army Reserve Component Forces in the Coming Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-17

    with mobilizing Reserve Component units for overseas missions. This flexibility will allow the Army to meet ongoing mission requirements , while... reserve will impose an increased cost on the Army. First (and most obviously), the Army will have to fund the additional pay and allowances required ...AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY HOW TO MAINTAIN AN OPERATIONAL RESERVE ? FURTHER ENGAGING ARMY RESERVE COMPONENT FORCES IN

  10. Grounded coplanar waveguide defected ground structure enabled mulitlayered passive circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlieter, Daniel Benjamin

    Passive circuits are essential to microwave and millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequency design, especially as new commercial applications emerge for complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. However, it is challenging to design distributed passive circuits for CMOS due to the substrate loss and thin dielectric layers of the back-end-of-line (BEOL). Furthermore, distributed passive circuits need to be adapted for compactness and integration while overcoming these challenges and maintaining high performance. Grounded coplanar waveguide defected ground structures meet this need for compact and integrable passive circuits by utilizing the top and bottom ground planes of the transmission line to implement circuit elements. Defected ground structures (DGS) are distributed elements realized by etching specific patterns into the ground planes of transmission lines. These structures can be used in conjunction with the center conductor of planar transmission lines to reduce circuit size and/or improve performance. By implementing DGS in grounded coplanar waveguide (GCPW) multiple resonances and higher impedances can be achieved. The resonant-based GCPW DGS are more compact than their microstrip and CPW counterparts and fit well into the vertical technology of back-end-of-line CMOS. This research demonstrates up to 80% size reduction at 5.8GHz by realizing spiral-shaped DGS in GCPW and applying the resulting GCPW DGS unit cell to a dual-behavior band-pass filter. The filter has been scaled to 60GHz and realized in a 130nm CMOS process by using floating metal strips to reduce the impact of the lossy silicon substrate. The impedance-based GCPW DGS, called EG-GCPW, have up to a 20:1 impedance ratio on Rogers RT/DuroidRTM 5880 and an impedance ratio of 15:1 on a benzocyclobutene post-CMOS process. These high impedance ratios increased the power division ratio of an unequal Wilkinson power divider to 7:1 and reduced the size of a stepped impedance low

  11. Extended adaptive mutation operator for training an explosive hazard detection prescreener in forward looking infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravinder; Price, Stanton R.; Anderson, Derek T.

    2015-05-01

    A big challenge with forward looking (FL), versus downward looking, sensors mounted on a ground vehicle for explosive hazard detection (EHD) is they "see everything", on and off road. Even if a technology such as road detection is used, we still have to find and subsequently discriminate targets versus clutter on the road and often road side. When designing an automatic detection system for FL-EHD, we typically make use of a prescreener to identify regions of interest (ROI) instead of searching for targets in an inefficient brute force fashion by extracting complicated features and running expensive classifiers at every possible translation, rotation and scale. In this article, we explore the role of genetic algorithms (GAs), specifically with respect to a new adaptive mutation operator, for learning the parameters of a FL-EHD prescreener in FL infrared (FLIR) imagery. The proposed extended adaptive mutation (eAM) algorithm is driven by fitness similarities in the chromosome population. Currently, our prescreener consists of many free parameters that are empirically chosen by a researcher. The parameters are learned herein using the proposed optimization technique and the performance of the system is measured using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves on data obtained from a U.S. Army test site that includes a variety of target types buried at varying depths and from different times of day. The proposed technique is also applied to numerous synthetic fitness landscapes to further assess the effectiveness of the eAM algorithm. Results show that the new adaptive mutation technique converges faster to a better solution than a GA with fixed mutation.

  12. [Medical research in the US Armed Forces (Report 3). The US Army].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, A A; Aleĭnikov, S I; Bolekhan, V I; Ivchenko, I V; Krassiĭ, A B; Nagibovich, O A; Petrov, S V; Rezvantsev, M V; Soldatov, E A; Shalakhin, R A; Sheppli, E V

    2012-12-01

    The US Army. The present article is the third part of the review dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Armed Forces. The first and the second parts have been published in the previous issuses of the journal. Specifically this article is dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Army. It is shown that in the US Army the medical and biological research is conducted and coordinated by the special US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. The following units are successively presented: US Army Institute of Surgical Research, US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, US Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine. The particular research programs conducting in the above mentioned institutions are presented.

  13. Ambiguous Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Lyngsie, Jacob

    We investigate why some exchange relationships terminate prematurely. We argue that investments in informal governance structures induce premature termination in relationships already governed by formal contracts. The formalized adaptive behavior of formal governance structures and the flexible a...

  14. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  15. Hedonic "adaptation"

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    People live in a world in which they are surrounded by potential disgust elicitors such as ``used'' chairs, air, silverware, and money as well as excretory activities. People function in this world by ignoring most of these, by active avoidance, reframing, or adaptation. The issue is particularly striking for professions, such as morticians, surgeons, or sanitation workers, in which there is frequent contact with major disgust elicitors. In this study, we study the ``adaptation'' process to d...

  16. Strategic Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of theoretical contributions that have influenced the discourse around strategic adaptation including contingency perspectives, strategic fit reasoning, decision structure, information processing, corporate entrepreneurship, and strategy process. The related...... concepts of strategic renewal, dynamic managerial capabilities, dynamic capabilities, and strategic response capabilities are discussed and contextualized against strategic responsiveness. The insights derived from this article are used to outline the contours of a dynamic process of strategic adaptation...

  17. Airport Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy

    travels safely and efficiently through the airport. When an aircraft lands, a significant number of tasks must be performed by different groups of ground crew, such as fueling, baggage handling and cleaning. These tasks must be complete before the aircraft is able to depart, as well as check......-in and security services. These tasks are collectively known as ground handling, and are the major source of activity with airports. The business environments of modern airports are becoming increasingly competitive, as both airports themselves and their ground handling operations are changing to private...... ownership. As airports are in competition to attract airline routes, efficient and reliable ground handling operations are imperative for the viability and continued growth of both airports and airlines. The increasing liberalization of the ground handling market prompts ground handling operators...

  18. [Introduction to grounded theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shou-Yu; Windsor, Carol; Yates, Patsy

    2012-02-01

    Grounded theory, first developed by Glaser and Strauss in the 1960s, was introduced into nursing education as a distinct research methodology in the 1970s. The theory is grounded in a critique of the dominant contemporary approach to social inquiry, which imposed "enduring" theoretical propositions onto study data. Rather than starting from a set theoretical framework, grounded theory relies on researchers distinguishing meaningful constructs from generated data and then identifying an appropriate theory. Grounded theory is thus particularly useful in investigating complex issues and behaviours not previously addressed and concepts and relationships in particular populations or places that are still undeveloped or weakly connected. Grounded theory data analysis processes include open, axial and selective coding levels. The purpose of this article was to explore the grounded theory research process and provide an initial understanding of this methodology.

  19. The Army rolls through Indianapolis: Fieldwork at the Virtual Army Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Allen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay takes an ethnographic look at the individuals and institutions associated with the development, production, and implementation of the Virtual Army Experience (VAE, a mobile mission simulator that travels across the United States to venues such as state fairs and air shows. As an explicit aid to Army recruitment and interaction with the public, the VAE is an interesting nexus point that often channels public anxieties surrounding the medium of the video game and its role in the militarization of society. Here, I present my own experience of doing ethnography at this site, describing how it is received by visitors and interpreted by its employees. By means of the example of the VAE, I argue that polarizing media reports and academic criticisms that pit the processes of militarization against critical reflection of those processes are counterproductive and result in silencing more nuanced and thoughtful critical reflection that is already present at sites such as the VAE.

  20. The Army rolls through Indianapolis: Fieldwork at the Virtual Army Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Allen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay takes an ethnographic look at the individuals and institutions associated with the development, production, and implementation of the Virtual Army Experience (VAE, a mobile mission simulator that travels across the United States to venues such as state fairs and air shows. As an explicit aid to Army recruitment and interaction with the public, the VAE is an interesting nexus point that often channels public anxieties surrounding the medium of the video game and its role in the militarization of society. Here, I present my own experience of doing ethnography at this site, describing how it is received by visitors and interpreted by its employees. By means of the example of the VAE, I argue that polarizing media reports and academic criticisms that pit the processes of militarization against critical reflection of those processes are counterproductive and result in silencing more nuanced and thoughtful critical reflection that is already present at sites such as the VAE.

  1. US army land condition-trend analysis (LCTA) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diersing, Victor E.; Shaw, Robert B.; Tazik, David J.

    1992-05-01

    The US Army Land Condition-Trend Analysis (LCTA) program is a standardized method of data collection, analysis, and reporting designed to meet multiple goals and objectives. The method utilizes vascular plant inventories, permanent field plot data, and wildlife inventories. Vascular plant inventories are used for environmental documentation, training of personnel, species identification during LCTA implementation, and as a survey for state and federal endangered or threatened species. The permanent field plot data documents the vegetational, edaphic, topographic, and disturbance characteristics of the installation. Inventory plots are allocated in a stratified random fashion across the installation utilizing a geographic information system that integrates satellite imagery and soil survey information. Ground cover, canopy cover, woody plant density, slope length, slope gradient, soil information, and disturbance data are collected at each plot. Plot data are used to: (1) describe plant communities, (2) characterize wildlife and threatened and endangered species habitat, (3) document amount and kind of military and nonmilitary disturbance, (4) determine the impact of military training on vegetation and soil resources, (5) estimate soil erosion potential, (6) classify land as to the kind and amount of use it can support, (7) determine allowable use estimates for tracked vehicle training, (8) document concealment resources, (9) identify lands that require restoration and evaluate the effectiveness of restorative techniques, and (10) evaluate potential acquisition property. Wildlife inventories survey small and midsize mammals, birds, bats, amphibians, and reptiles. Data from these surveys can be used for environmental documentation, to identify state and federal endangered and threatened species, and to evaluate the impact of military activities on wildlife populations. Short- and long-term monitoring of permanent field plots is used to evaluate and adjust land

  2. Ground Vehicle Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Ground Vehicle Robotics Jim Parker Associate Director, Ground Vehicle Robotics UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...DATE 20 AUG 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED 09-05-2013 to 15-08-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics 5a...Willing to take Risk on technology -User Evaluated -Contested Environments -Operational Data Applied Robotics for Installation & Base Ops -Low Risk

  3. the Army Ethic-Educating and Equipping the Army Mid-Level Leaders in the CGSOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Dynamics” category, there are two annual and two semiannual training requirements. Army values training and combating human trafficking program are...expectation of soldiers to both “kill enemies and cultivate stable, effective, and humane polities.”57 Regardless of the focus area, ethics education...traits without principles are blind.”66 The virtue ethics ultimately holds that to separate good soldiers from good human being is “logically defective

  4. Evaluation of Support Provided to Mobilized Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-05

    with family members. CENTCOM and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command have significantly improved access to communications with family as the...contract with Bahrain Maritime and Mercantile International, beginning in August 2002 through December 2003.10 Seven Seas Shiphandlers became the...Switching Network (DSN) • MWR phone banks through the Army and Air Force Exchange System (AAFES) • Internet cafes (provided by the Navy Space and Naval

  5. Improving Army Basic Research: Report of an Expert Panel on the Future of Army Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2004. During the early 1990’s her studies with Dr. Richard Axel led to the discovery of a large gene family...dilute gases of alkali atoms, and for early fundamental studies of the properties of the condensates. 2004 Medicine : Linda Buck—odorant receptors...Research: An Uncertain Future for the Bell Legacy,” Prometheus , Vol. 21, No. 2, June 2003. Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for

  6. Enlisting Lean Six Sigma in the Army Acquisition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    One of the strategic objectives of this overarching strategy is to “support Army-wide LSS [Lean Six Sigma ] and business transformation and focus on...re- sults of financial management LSS projects Army-wide.” • • • • • • I M P R O V I N G P R O C E S S E S Enlisting Lean Six Sigma in the Army...Lean Six Sigma process. The LSS process has its own methodology that can be applied to any manufacturing, transactional, or service process to reduce

  7. Occupational differences in US Army suicide rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, R. C.; Stein, M. B.; Bliese, P. D.; Bromet, E. J.; Chiu, W. T.; Cox, K. L.; Colpe, L. J.; Fullerton, C. S.; Gilman, S. E.; Gruber, M. J.; Heeringa, S. G.; Lewandowski-Romps, L.; Millikan-Bell, A.; Naifeh, J. A.; Nock, M. K.; Petukhova, M. V.; Rosellini, A. J.; Sampson, N. A.; Schoenbaum, M.; Zaslavsky, A. M.; Ursano, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Civilian suicide rates vary by occupation in ways related to occupational stress exposure. Comparable military research finds suicide rates elevated in combat arms occupations. However, no research has evaluated variation in this pattern by deployment history, the indicator of occupation stress widely considered responsible for the recent rise in the military suicide rate. Method The joint associations of Army occupation and deployment history in predicting suicides were analysed in an administrative dataset for the 729 337 male enlisted Regular Army soldiers in the US Army between 2004 and 2009. Results There were 496 suicides over the study period (22.4/100 000 person-years). Only two occupational categories, both in combat arms, had significantly elevated suicide rates: infantrymen (37.2/100 000 person-years) and combat engineers (38.2/100 000 person-years). However, the suicide rates in these two categories were significantly lower when currently deployed (30.6/100 000 person-years) than never deployed or previously deployed (41.2–39.1/100 000 person-years), whereas the suicide rate of other soldiers was significantly higher when currently deployed and previously deployed (20.2–22.4/100 000 person-years) than never deployed (14.5/100 000 person-years), resulting in the adjusted suicide rate of infantrymen and combat engineers being most elevated when never deployed [odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–4.1], less so when previously deployed (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.1), and not at all when currently deployed (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8–1.8). Adjustment for a differential ‘healthy warrior effect’ cannot explain this variation in the relative suicide rates of never-deployed infantrymen and combat engineers by deployment status. Conclusions Efforts are needed to elucidate the causal mechanisms underlying this interaction to guide preventive interventions for soldiers at high suicide risk. PMID:26190760

  8. The Grounded Theory Bookshelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian B. Martin, Ph.D.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Bookshelf will provide critical reviews and perspectives on books on theory and methodology of interest to grounded theory. This issue includes a review of Heaton’s Reworking Qualitative Data, of special interest for some of its references to grounded theory as a secondary analysis tool; and Goulding’s Grounded Theory: A practical guide for management, business, and market researchers, a book that attempts to explicate the method and presents a grounded theory study that falls a little short of the mark of a fully elaborated theory.Reworking Qualitative Data, Janet Heaton (Sage, 2004. Paperback, 176 pages, $29.95. Hardcover also available.

  9. Is adaptation. Truly an adaptation? Is adaptation. Truly an adaptation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Flores Nogueira Diniz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The article begins by historicizing film adaptation from the arrival of cinema, pointing out the many theoretical approaches under which the process has been seen: from the concept of “the same story told in a different medium” to a comprehensible definition such as “the process through which works can be transformed, forming an intersection of textual surfaces, quotations, conflations and inversions of other texts”. To illustrate this new concept, the article discusses Spike Jonze’s film Adaptation. according to James Naremore’s proposal which considers the study of adaptation as part of a general theory of repetition, joined with the study of recycling, remaking, and every form of retelling. The film deals with the attempt by the scriptwriter Charles Kaufman, cast by Nicholas Cage, to adapt/translate a non-fictional book to the cinema, but ends up with a kind of film which is by no means what it intended to be: a film of action in the model of Hollywood productions. During the process of creation, Charles and his twin brother, Donald, undergo a series of adventures involving some real persons from the world of film, the author and the protagonist of the book, all of them turning into fictional characters in the film. In the film, adaptation then signifies something different from itstraditional meaning. The article begins by historicizing film adaptation from the arrival of cinema, pointing out the many theoretical approaches under which the process has been seen: from the concept of “the same story told in a different medium” to a comprehensible definition such as “the process through which works can be transformed, forming an intersection of textual surfaces, quotations, conflations and inversions of other texts”. To illustrate this new concept, the article discusses Spike Jonze’s film Adaptation. according to James Naremore’s proposal which considers the study of adaptation as part of a general theory of repetition

  10. Construction Shortfall and Forensic Investigation on Soft Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, M.; Ibrahim, B. N.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, numerous construction activities performed on soft ground have undergone various kind of failures. Some of the failures were due to lack of understanding the nature of soft ground, inadequate site investigation data, adaptation of inappropriate type of ground improvement techniques or foundation system. Couple with inadequate desk study carried out to the historical condition of the site, chronological of activities carried out within the site prior to construction. Hence coordinated approach required to be executed for field investigation works with proper supervision would be the key to prevent any design or construction related failure in the future. This paper addresses some of shortfalls related to design and construction failures in soft ground.

  11. OSUS sensor integration in Army experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganger, Robert; Nowicki, Mark; Kovach, Jesse; Gregory, Timothy; Liss, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Live sensor data was obtained from an Open Standard for Unattended Sensors (OSUS, formerly Terra Harvest)- based system provided by the Army Research Lab (ARL) and fed into the Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) sponsored Actionable Intelligence Technology Enabled Capabilities Demonstration (AI-TECD) Micro Cloud during the E15 demonstration event that took place at Fort Dix, New Jersey during July 2015. This data was an enabler for other technologies, such as Sensor Assignment to Mission (SAM), Sensor Data Server (SDS), and the AI-TECD Sensor Dashboard, providing rich sensor data (including images) for use by the Company Intel Support Team (CoIST) analyst. This paper describes how the OSUS data was integrated and used in the E15 event to support CoIST operations.

  12. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2000-02-25

    The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment.

  13. Systems Engineering Approach To Ground Combat Vehicle Survivability In Urban Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    of global urbanization, planning for urban operations is critical to the execution and success of any military campaign. The U.S. Army describes...for the enemy to prepare for the likely attack direction and to plan coordinated attacks against the incoming ground force. Enemy sensors can also...The Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) is developing an integrated counter IED suite known as the Counter IED & Mine Suite ( CIMS ). According to Eshel

  14. An Examination of Potential Misclassification of Army Suicides: Results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Kenneth L; Nock, Matthew K; Biggs, Quinn M; Bornemann, Jennifer; Colpe, Lisa J; Dempsey, Catherine L; Heeringa, Steven G; McCarroll, James E; Ng, Tsz Hin; Schoenbaum, Michael; Ursano, Robert J; Zhang, Bailey G; Benedek, David M

    2016-07-22

    Debate continues about the accuracy of military suicide reporting due to concerns that some suicides may be classified as accidents to minimize stigma and ensure survivor benefits. We systematically reviewed records for 998 active duty Army deaths (510 suicides; 488 accident, homicide, and undetermined deaths; 2005-2009) and, using research criteria, reclassified 8.2% of the nonsuicide cases to definite suicide (1), suicide probable (4), or suicide possible (35). The reclassification rate to definite suicide was only 0.2% (1/488). This low rate suggests that flagrant misclassification of Army deaths is uncommon and surveillance reports likely reflect the "true" population of Army suicides.

  15. Adaptive silviculture for climate change: a national experiment in manager-scientist partnerships to apply an adaptation framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda M. ​Nagel; Brian J. Palik; Michael A. Battaglia; Anthony W. D' Amato; James M. Guldin; Chris Swanston; Maria K. Janowiak; Matthew P. Powers; Linda A. Joyce; Constance I. Millar; David L. Peterson; Lisa M. Ganio; Chad Kirschbaum; Molly R. Roske

    2017-01-01

    Forest managers in the United States must respond to the need for climate-adaptive strategies in the face of observed and projected climatic changes. However, there is a lack of on-the-ground forest adaptation research to indicate what adaptation measures or tactics might be effective in preparing forest ecosystems to deal with climate change. Natural resource managers...

  16. Innovative smart micro sensors for Army weaponry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Paul B.; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene

    2008-03-01

    Micro sensors offer the potential solution to cost, size, and weight issues associated with smart networked sensor systems designed for environmental/missile health monitoring and rocket out-gassing/fuel leak detection, as well as situational awareness on the battlefield. In collaboration with the University of Arkansas (Fayetteville), University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa and Birmingham), Alabama A&M University (Normal), and Streamline Automation (Huntsville, AL), scientists and engineers at the Army Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) are investigating several nano-based technologies to solve the problem of sensing extremely small levels of toxic gases associated with both chemical warfare agents (in air and liquids) and potential rocket motor leaks. Innovative techniques are being devised to adapt voltammetry, which is a well established technique for the detection and quantification of substances dissolved in liquids, to low-cost micro sensors for detecting airborne chemical agents and potential missile propellant leakages. In addition, a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique, which enhances Raman scattered light by excitation of surface plasmons on nanoporous metal surfaces (nanospheres), is being investigated to develop novel smart sensors for the detection of chemical agents (including rocket motor out-gassing) and potential detection of home-made explosive devices. In this paper, results are delineated that are associated with experimental studies, which are conducted for the aforementioned cases and for several other nano-based technology approaches. The design challenges of each micro sensor technology approach are discussed. Finally, a comparative analysis of the various innovative micro-sensor techniques is provided.

  17. Pesticides in Ground Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    1996-01-01

    Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588.......Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588....

  18. Pesticides in Ground Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    1996-01-01

    Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588.......Review af: Jack E. Barbash & Elizabeth A. Resek (1996). Pesticides in Ground Water. Distribution trends and governing factors. Ann Arbor Press, Inc. Chelsea, Michigan. pp 588....

  19. US Army Corps of Engineers Reachback Operations Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Providing Relevant Solutions to the Armed Forces and the NationThe USACE Reachback Operation Center at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC)...

  20. US Army Corps of Engineers Reachback Operations Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Providing Relevant Solutions to the Armed Forces and the Nation The USACE Reachback Operation Center at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC)...

  1. Developing Strategic Thinking Leaders in the U.S. Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    Michael J. Colarusso , Accessing Talent: The Foundation of a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy (Carlisle Barracks, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, February 2010), 36. 24 44 Gerras, Strategic Leadership Primer, 29.

  2. 78 FR 60864 - Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Science Board members to review and deliberate on the FY14 Army Science Board study reports. Agenda: The board will convene to present the results of the Fiscal Year 2013 study titled, ``Creating an...

  3. Evaluation of Synthetic Fuel for Army Ground Applications Tasks II-VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-29

    84760 22937 20 PABZZ 5325005981428 84760 10445 21 D.BZZ 84760 27002 21 D.BZZ 84760 28861 22 PABZZ 5315008871539 84760 11141 23 PABZZ 3040011883242...SUPERSEDES: EDmON NO.: 15 DATED: OT-31-0S DEPT. OF DEFSNSE (1.2 CST MIN. FUEL) NOTE; THIS SPECIFICATION DEVt:LOPED WITH ISO LONG INI. t:T STUD... ISO 4093: .083" (1.6 mmliD X 25" {636 mml LONG. 2. CAUSRATIN~ INJECTORS ........ ’SAE Jlii66/ ISO 7440: 0.5 mm ORIFICE PLATE NOP: 3000 PSI (207 &ARl

  4. Sensor Technology Baseline Study for Enabling Condition Based Maintenance Plus in Army Ground Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    and mechanisms are identified. Based on this analysis, baselines sensor technologies are determined to prognosticate these types failure causes early...Current/voltage sensor measured at sensor terminals; Fluid level sensor Excessive slippage and clutch chatter Internal transmission failure ... TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sensor Technology Baseline Study for Enabling Condition Based Maintenance Plus in

  5. Alternative Fuels for use in DoD/Army Tactical Ground Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    Construction Equipment • Bridging • Assured Mobility Systems Robotics • TALON • PackBot • MARCbot • Gladiator • Demonstrators • Technology...Advance Controls; Advance LTC; Fuel Systems; Adv. Turbo •Modern Engine Repower MILITARY* • Variety engines (MY 19XX) • Jet fuel (JP-8

  6. Technical Challenges of the U.S. Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    GCV contractors must design for and test high road speed during the vehicle’s development. The ability of a hybrid electrical drivetrain to sustain...Bradley required heavier-duty drivetrain components because the smooth suspensions encouraged drivers to stress the mechanical limits of the drivetrain

  7. COUNTERMEASURE: Army Ground Risk-Management Information. Volume 26, Number 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    SOM (Ill’" HISIL1111-MOll, Lack of deptil Ll I’ll Ikm (AllcO. perceptiml ill I tic desurt LýWhIWS 1110SO WS[)OIISihl1lt1(,𔃻,_ 1.11silic [[I’ll...tlavelill", over "allk lorl-aill. SCIliOl- OCCUINUIt, 1-111d VOýli(IC sullfi-Ilt degrades 111-11t vision. h-,11n Soldiers on vollovol IXCjllile (Ile USO

  8. Air Force Support of Army Ground Operations Lessons Learned during World War II, Korea, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-06

    Th ;e 8epre--cdin this paper .rv thoe. of ’:ceauhor IDep 2rtmt-nt of Diefense rayo t gr: s hsPcC % FOC, O P 0- C GOUND OP!-txA’TONS ’A NS tTAI.D 11...NOTE S T edder, Wi.th Preudice: The War Memoirs . - y Air Force. Lord Tedaer. rr- 40-43. 2.".~ : X :"~ , M~.c, ’ = A r Power in Three Wars WW 7:, Kora...that FEAF assume operational control over land based Marine air units and over carri.er bjdsed aviation operating over Korea effective as soon as X

  9. Personnel Management for Executives, Army Regional Training Center, Central Atlantic Region, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    is more inwardly focused on ideas, concepts, and relationship of ideas. The inventory uses the two terms as Carl Jung intended. EXTROVERT INTROVERT...preferences include extroversion and introversion . The Extrovert is primarily focused on the external world of people and activi- ties; whereas, the Introvert...edition. C. G. Jung . PSYCHOLOGICAL REFLECTIONS, Bollingen Series XXXI, Princeton University Press, 1974 edition. David Keirsey and Marilyn Bates

  10. An Analysis of U.S. Army Unmanned Ground Vehicle Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-28

    FY09-34 contains a modified SWOT analysis with strengths and opportunities provided for each domain and weaknesses and threats provided in one...strategy analysis framework focuses on these strengths, weaknesses, opportunities , and threats. This is referred to as “ SWOT Analysis ” and is taught in...resources. This challenge of “ SWOT ” analysis makes it a less than optimal framework for conducting this analysis . In 1980, Michael E. Porter offered

  11. Army Ground Risk-Management Publication, Countermeasure, Volume 19 No, 6. June 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    for the 21st century. Better risk management programs will strengthen those areas even more. However, that loss of hard cash is not the only...sterile gauze, adhesive tape, scissors, an elastic bandage to wrap a large wound, acetaminophen , a thermometer, medicated ointments, tweezers, calamine...everything else. The range lit up with streaking tracers. The ball ammo hissed and pinged as they shot downrange. You could hear the rounds ricocheting

  12. Reactive Structure and Smart Armor for Army’s Future Ground Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    For increasing the accuracy of the location detection, there are two methods can be considered. One is increase the density of the distribution of...needed to realize the objective of this aproach . It is seen that with further development of the new technology, it is possible to utilize the

  13. Non-Chromate, ZVOC Coatings for Steel Substrates on Army and Navy Aircraft and Ground Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    phosphate conversion coating for steel, TT-C-490 Type I. ES-3 IMPLEMENTATION The synergy of this project and the revision of Federal Specification TT-C...been coated without any corrosion inhibitive pretreatment or conversion coating. The products demonstrated satisfy the hexavalent chrome...bound to the metal surface. Zircobond 4200 is a zirconate based pretreatment developed as a replacement for zinc phosphate . All of these

  14. History of the Army Ground Forces. Study Number 25. The Airborne Command and Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-01-01

    installation of external racks, voicing the opinion that the suspension of bundl,.3 from external racks would mterially affect the flying...fouled the suspension lines of parachutes, resulting in injury to the parachutist, and that the conbat boot was inferior to the parachute boot for field...and the Cushman Scooter . The product finally standardized was known as the Motorcycle, Solo, Extra Light. Development by the Indian Motorcycle Copany

  15. Distributed Common Ground System - Army Increment 2 (DCGS-A Inc 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Increment 2 will provide additional capabilities to enhance Intelligence processing and fusion across Intelligence domains. Business Case Business Case...for MAIS Programs 3 Program Information 4 Responsible Office 4 References 4 Program Description 5 Business Case 5 Program...Acquisition Executive DoD - Department of Defense DoDAF - DoD Architecture Framework FD - Full Deployment FDD - Full Deployment Decision FY

  16. A History of the Army Ground Forces; Study Number 29. The Tank Destroyer History

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-01-01

    bove, was nore particularly directed to the second and third missiona. Temporary offices were astabli;hed in varioue buildings in the Temple busi ... familtes in the area, many of them representing four generations, were somewhat dazod when oconronted, in Jawmary with the fact, first: that their land

  17. Satellite and Ground Communication Systems: Space and Electronic Warfare Threats to the United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    invasion, a 2015 Russian training exercise that rehearsed a contingency invasion of Norway, Finland, Denmark, and Sweden shows otherwise. In the...17 David Blair, “Russian Forces ‘Practised Invasion of Norway, Finland, Denmark and Sweden ,’” June 26...Research, 2008. Blair, David. “Russian Forces ‘Practised Invasion of Norway, Finland, Denmark and Sweden ,’” June 26, 2015. Accessed on November 12, 2016

  18. History of the Army Ground Forces. Study Number 12. The Building and Training of Infantry Divisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-01-01

    coenande.s, for the March divi- sions, was the subject of a pungent letter from 1eeral ’arshall to General Lear in xhich The Chief of Staff said: "I have...sight, sound, and sensation of battle,". and to train him "tp act calmly with sound judgent regardless of noise, confusion, and surprise," The

  19. Assessment of Aberdeen Proving Ground - Army Contracting Command, Contract Management Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-11

    Cavanagh, J. J., Lloyd, R., Logan, S., Schoenberg, A., Sochon, G., & Wheeler, E. (1999). The balanced scorecard for managing procurement performance...systems (2008). The Balance Scorecard approach is presented by Niven as “a carefully selected set of quantifiable measures derived from the...contract score card developed by Cullen looks further past the balance scorecard approach by assessing an organization’s contracted functions (2009

  20. Communication, concepts and grounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Frank

    2015-02-01

    This article discusses the relation between communication and conceptual grounding. In the brain, neurons, circuits and brain areas are involved in the representation of a concept, grounding it in perception and action. In terms of grounding we can distinguish between communication within the brain and communication between humans or between humans and machines. In the first form of communication, a concept is activated by sensory input. Due to grounding, the information provided by this communication is not just determined by the sensory input but also by the outgoing connection structure of the conceptual representation, which is based on previous experiences and actions. The second form of communication, that between humans or between humans and machines, is influenced by the first form. In particular, a more successful interpersonal communication might require forms of situated cognition and interaction in which the entire representations of grounded concepts are involved.

  1. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  2. Ground energy coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, P. D.

    The feasibility of ground coupling for various heat pump systems was investigated. Analytical heat flow models were developed to approximate design ground coupling devices for use in solar heat pump space conditioning systems. A digital computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) was written to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow in order to simulate the behavior of ground coupling experiments and to provide performance predictions which have been compared to experimental results. GROCS also has been integrated with TRNSYS. Soil thermal property and ground coupling device experiments are described. Buried tanks, serpentine earth coils in various configurations, lengths and depths, and sealed vertical wells are being investigated. An earth coil used to heat a house without use of resistance heating is described.

  3. Relational grounding facilitates development of scientifically useful multiscale models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Tai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We review grounding issues that influence the scientific usefulness of any biomedical multiscale model (MSM. Groundings are the collection of units, dimensions, and/or objects to which a variable or model constituent refers. To date, models that primarily use continuous mathematics rely heavily on absolute grounding, whereas those that primarily use discrete software paradigms (e.g., object-oriented, agent-based, actor typically employ relational grounding. We review grounding issues and identify strategies to address them. We maintain that grounding issues should be addressed at the start of any MSM project and should be reevaluated throughout the model development process. We make the following points. Grounding decisions influence model flexibility, adaptability, and thus reusability. Grounding choices should be influenced by measures, uncertainty, system information, and the nature of available validation data. Absolute grounding complicates the process of combining models to form larger models unless all are grounded absolutely. Relational grounding facilitates referent knowledge embodiment within computational mechanisms but requires separate model-to-referent mappings. Absolute grounding can simplify integration by forcing common units and, hence, a common integration target, but context change may require model reengineering. Relational grounding enables synthesis of large, composite (multi-module models that can be robust to context changes. Because biological components have varying degrees of autonomy, corresponding components in MSMs need to do the same. Relational grounding facilitates achieving such autonomy. Biomimetic analogues designed to facilitate translational research and development must have long lifecycles. Exploring mechanisms of normal-to-disease transition requires model components that are grounded relationally. Multi-paradigm modeling requires both hyperspatial and relational grounding.

  4. Adaptive test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lars Peter; Rose, Mette

    2010-01-01

    Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale.......Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale....

  5. Evolving Army Needs for Space-Based Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    College is to produce graduates who are skilled critical thinkers and complex problem solvers. Concurrently, it is our duty to the U.S. Army to also...missile warning data—launch loca- tion, flight tracking, and predicted impact area—to operational communities writ large.42 For space force enhancement...of cyberspace theory writ large to better coordinate actions related to space, cyberspace, and the electro- magnetic spectrum. • The Army should

  6. Army Energy Initiatives Task Force Industry Summit (portfolio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    financing to accelerate efficiency projects – Implement technologies to significantly reduce energy footprint in the field • Build Resilience through...for patrols and required for Soldier sustainment • Alternative energy capabilities & interoperability builds flexibility and resilience Soldiers of...https://eko.usace.army.mil/public/fa/ netzero / • http://army-energy.hqda.pentagon.mil/ netzero / Energy Initiatives Task Force UNCLASSIFIED Assistant

  7. The Importance of Morale in the Modern New Zealand Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    became a tribe: Ngati Tumatauenga, the “Tribe of the War God,” an initiative that was aimed at embracing both the Maori culture and the warrior spirit...integration, and Maori culture integration. The Future Battlefield In an age of rapidly developing technological advancements, the battlefield of the future...gender integration of women into the combat trades is undertaken in the modern NZ Army. Maori Culture Integration In 1995, the NZ Army became a tribe

  8. Army Sustainment. Volume 42, Issue 3. May-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Jeffrey Pfeffer and Gerald R. Salancik, is a theory that “emphasizes the point that the environment is a...Perspectives, Oxford University Press, New York, 1997, pp. 78–79. “Resource dependence theory was most fully developed by Jeffrey Pfeffer and Gerald...study on their own. Lieutenant General Jeffrey A. Sorenson, the Depart- ment of the Army G–6, has observed, “Because the Army is moving to a

  9. Advancing Architecture-Centric Practices in US Army Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Stephen Blanchette, Jr. & John Bergey 27 April 2010 © 2010 Carnegie Mellon University Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB...FREEDOM FROM PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT. 2 Architecture-Centric Army Acquisition Blanchette & Bergey , 27 April 2010 © 2010 Carnegie...Mellon University DoD Systems are Increasingly Complex… 3 Architecture-Centric Army Acquisition Blanchette & Bergey , 27 April 2010 © 2010 Carnegie Mellon

  10. The United States Army Medical Department Journal, April - June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Certification exam. Additionally, they are offered the opportunity to take the ServSafe ® certification examination.† The Navy trains Preventive Medicine...the ServSafe Exam.5(p5) Navy  Scope of practice – a concern because Navy PMTs operate clinically, unlike Army preventive medicine personnel...with other programs relocating and integrating into the Medical Education and Training Campus concept. *Army Training Course 322-68S10 †The ServSafe

  11. Army Organizational Culture of Innovation: A Strategic Imperative for Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-15

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT AN ARMY ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE OF INNOVATION: A STRATEGIC IMPERATIVE FOR TRANSFORMATION by Lieutenant Colonel Martin... Organizational Culture of Innovation A Strategic Imperative for Transformation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 ABSTRACT AUTHOR: Lieutenant Colonel Martin T. Carpenter TITLE: An Army Organizational Culture of

  12. Army Information Technology Enterprise Solutions-2 Services Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-09

    Contracting personnel from the Army and other Federal agencies who are involved in information technology service acquisition decisions should read...IDIQ) contracts. The Inspector General (IG), DoD initiated the audit of the Army Information Technology Enterprise Solutions-2 Services (ITES-2S...contract because of the material impact this contract will have on the acquisition of information technology resources within DoD and the Federal Government

  13. Army Social Media: Harnessing the Power of Networked Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    9/1/2011 Army Social Media : harnessing the power of networked communications Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Army Social Media : harnessing the power of networked communications 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...the Chief of Public Affairs,Online and Social Media Division,1500 Pentagon,Washington,DC,20301 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9

  14. Army Communicator. Volume 31, Number 2, Spring 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    see Army Commu- nicator article titled HF Combat Net Radio Lesson Learned Again, by David M. Fiedler , Spring 2004). Integrating more communications...year- round,” said Drew. According to Fred Porzio, project leader for this effort with PM DCATS’ Product Manager, Defense Wide Transmission Systems, the...Army Communicator 49 singling out Fred Porzio, the project lead for PM DWTS; Greg Parks, who designed the system for prime contractor Eaton/Powerware

  15. Army Materiel Requirements Documents: Qualitative Analysis of Efficiency and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    tough examination of the assumptions of our past and real ideas for change that solve issues,” said Paul Mann (personal communication, October 25...for Acquisition and Systems Management (U.S. Army) and Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology, Paul Mann / SES...Systems, and Michael Aldridge, J8 staff (Requirements Analyst, JUONS/ JEONS , Joint Capabilities Division). Interview questions used to collect data

  16. Army Net Zero Prove Out. Net Zero Waster Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Colorado • Fort Bliss, Texas These sites served as test beds for the Army’s Net Zero Initiative, specifically, Net Zero Water , and the Army provided...have sustainability, energy efficiency, water conservation, recycling, pollution prevention, and green procurement programs in place that they can...ARMY NET ZERO PROVE OUT Final Net Zero Water Best Practices November 18, 2014 Distribution A Approved for public release

  17. Investigating the U.S. Armys Human Dimension Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    challenged and expanded my mental model. I am honored to be part of this amazing institution. To my family, thanks for the unconditional love and... surprising , but it emphasizes that leadership and the army as a professions continue to be one of foundation for future Army. Furthermore, Leadership...therapy, performance dietetics, and cognitive enhancement (Kelley et al. 2013, 16). The benefits of the social and physical are not surprising , but

  18. Army Model and Simulation Stewardship Report FY98

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    capability. 6. BENEFITS TO THE ARMY: This effort is a key component to the Virtual Sealift Emergency Deployment Readiness Exercise ( SEDRE ). With the...reduction in the numbers of SEDREs performed in a year, the Army deployment community needs alternative methods to train and prepare units for actual...deployments. The Virtual SEDRE will simulate and visualize the deployment activities that occur at specific installations and ports and supplement

  19. The United States Army Operating Concept, 2016-2028

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    retrograde operations. f. Theater armies may also include a medical command for deployment support that provides health services to Army and other...tenets of jus in bello ,120 discrimination (between combatants and noncombatants), and proportionality in the use of force,121 measured against the...Barracks, PA, 19. (Used with permission.) 119 Biddle, 9. 120 Jus in bello , translated as justice in war, are agreements defining limits on acceptable

  20. Integration of New Technology in Army Libraries. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-02

    Topographic Laboratories Scientific and Technical Information Center B-65 SFacilities Engineering Support Agency B-72 Mobility Bquipment Research and...requests received 222 B-14 -- : -.- t -o . . -I j INTEGRATION OF NEW TECHNOILOGY IN ARMY LIBRARIES: DATA COLLECTION LIBRARY: Ballistic Research...4 u.._9.C F , i -. t- ’’- • -- -- .•_ •-g• _ "dt LIBRARY: U.S. ARMY MOBILITY EQUIPMENT RESEARH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND (MERADCOM) COMMAND: DARCOM