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Sample records for groh-wargo melody thompson

  1. MELODIE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewi, J.; Mejon-Goula, M.J.; Cernes, A.; Goblet, P.

    1989-01-01

    In order to perform the safety evaluation of nuclear waste repositories, a global model, called MELODIE, is currently being developed at the CEA/IPSN, in collaboration with other CEA teams and ENSMP (Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris). The version now in operation allows the assessment of the radiological consequences due to a repository located in a granitic formation for a period of several hundred thousands of years. After a general description of MELODIE, the authors present what has been done with it, mainly the calculations performed in the PAGIS (CCE) exercise: global dose calculations and ranking of the most important parameters through the sensitivity analysis. They also note the studies performed with the geosphere module of MELODIE (METIS), especially the participation to the HYDROCOIN (OECD/NEA) exercise. In addition, the main future development axes of MELODIE are outlined

  2. Characterizing chaotic melodies in automatic music composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca, Andrés E.; Tost, Gerard O.; Zhao, Liang

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we initially present an algorithm for automatic composition of melodies using chaotic dynamical systems. Afterward, we characterize chaotic music in a comprehensive way as comprising three perspectives: musical discrimination, dynamical influence on musical features, and musical perception. With respect to the first perspective, the coherence between generated chaotic melodies (continuous as well as discrete chaotic melodies) and a set of classical reference melodies is characterized by statistical descriptors and melodic measures. The significant differences among the three types of melodies are determined by discriminant analysis. Regarding the second perspective, the influence of dynamical features of chaotic attractors, e.g., Lyapunov exponent, Hurst coefficient, and correlation dimension, on melodic features is determined by canonical correlation analysis. The last perspective is related to perception of originality, complexity, and degree of melodiousness (Euler's gradus suavitatis) of chaotic and classical melodies by nonparametric statistical tests.

  3. Memory for melody and key in childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Glenn Schellenberg

    Full Text Available After only two exposures to previously unfamiliar melodies, adults remember the tunes for over a week and the key for over a day. Here, we examined the development of long-term memory for melody and key. Listeners in three age groups (7- to 8-year-olds, 9- to 11-year-olds, and adults heard two presentations of each of 12 unfamiliar melodies. After a 10-min delay, they heard the same 12 old melodies intermixed with 12 new melodies. Half of the old melodies were transposed up or down by six semitones from initial exposure. Listeners rated how well they recognized the melodies from the exposure phase. Recognition was better for old than for new melodies, for adults compared to children, and for older compared to younger children. Recognition ratings were also higher for old melodies presented in the same key at test as exposure, and the detrimental effect of the transposition affected all age groups similarly. Although memory for melody improves with age and exposure to music, implicit memory for key appears to be adult-like by 7 years of age.

  4. Memory for melody and key in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Poon, Jaimie; Weiss, Michael W

    2017-01-01

    After only two exposures to previously unfamiliar melodies, adults remember the tunes for over a week and the key for over a day. Here, we examined the development of long-term memory for melody and key. Listeners in three age groups (7- to 8-year-olds, 9- to 11-year-olds, and adults) heard two presentations of each of 12 unfamiliar melodies. After a 10-min delay, they heard the same 12 old melodies intermixed with 12 new melodies. Half of the old melodies were transposed up or down by six semitones from initial exposure. Listeners rated how well they recognized the melodies from the exposure phase. Recognition was better for old than for new melodies, for adults compared to children, and for older compared to younger children. Recognition ratings were also higher for old melodies presented in the same key at test as exposure, and the detrimental effect of the transposition affected all age groups similarly. Although memory for melody improves with age and exposure to music, implicit memory for key appears to be adult-like by 7 years of age.

  5. Memory for melody and key in childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Jaimie; Weiss, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    After only two exposures to previously unfamiliar melodies, adults remember the tunes for over a week and the key for over a day. Here, we examined the development of long-term memory for melody and key. Listeners in three age groups (7- to 8-year-olds, 9- to 11-year-olds, and adults) heard two presentations of each of 12 unfamiliar melodies. After a 10-min delay, they heard the same 12 old melodies intermixed with 12 new melodies. Half of the old melodies were transposed up or down by six semitones from initial exposure. Listeners rated how well they recognized the melodies from the exposure phase. Recognition was better for old than for new melodies, for adults compared to children, and for older compared to younger children. Recognition ratings were also higher for old melodies presented in the same key at test as exposure, and the detrimental effect of the transposition affected all age groups similarly. Although memory for melody improves with age and exposure to music, implicit memory for key appears to be adult-like by 7 years of age. PMID:29077726

  6. Enhanced Processing of Vocal Melodies in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael W.; Schellenberg, E. Glenn; Trehub, Sandra E.; Dawber, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    Music cognition is typically studied with instrumental stimuli. Adults remember melodies better, however, when they are presented in a biologically significant timbre (i.e., the human voice) than in various instrumental timbres (Weiss, Trehub, & Schellenberg, 2012). We examined the impact of vocal timbre on children's processing of melodies.…

  7. Slow potentials in a melody recognition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verleger, R; Schellberg, D

    1990-01-01

    In a previous study, slow negative shifts were found in the EEG of subjects listening to well-known melodies. The two experiments reported here were designed to investigate the variables to which these slow potentials are related. In the first experiment, two opposite hypotheses were tested: The slow shifts might express subjects' acquaintance with the melodies or, on the contrary, the effort invested to identify them. To this end, some of the melodies were presented in the rhythms of other melodies to make recognition more difficult. Further, melodies rated as very well-known and as very unknown were analysed separately. However, the slow shifts were not affected by these experimental variations. Therefore in the second experiment, on the one hand the purely physical parameters intensity and duration were varied, but this variation had no impact on the slow shifts either. On the other hand, recognition was made more difficult by monotonously repeating the pitch of the 4th tone for the rest of some melodies. The slow negative shifts were enhanced with these monotonous melodies. This enhancement supports the "effort" hypothesis. Accordingly, the ofter shifts obtained in both experiments might likewise reflect effort. But since the task was not demanding, it is suggested that these constant shifts reflect the effort invested for coping with the entire underarousing situation rather than with the task. Frequently, slow eye movements occurred in the same time range as the slow potentials, resulting in EOG potentials spreading to the EEG recording sites. Yet results did not change substantially when the EEG recordings were corrected for the influence of EOG potentials.

  8. Still Reading Edward P. Thompson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Hernández Sandoica

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available During the final decades of the 20th century, the reading of the works of E.P. Thompson was a necessary exercise for many historians. The object of these reflections, starting from the changes occurred in historiography, is to assert its force as a historian and to reiterate its status of “classic”.

  9. Pianists exhibit enhanced memory for vocal melodies but not piano melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael W; Vanzella, Patrícia; Schellenberg, E Glenn; Trehub, Sandra E

    2015-01-01

    Nonmusicians remember vocal melodies (i.e., sung to la la) better than instrumental melodies. If greater exposure to the voice contributes to those effects, then long-term experience with instrumental timbres should elicit instrument-specific advantages. Here we evaluate this hypothesis by comparing pianists with other musicians and nonmusicians. We also evaluate the possibility that absolute pitch (AP), which involves exceptional memory for isolated pitches, influences melodic memory. Participants heard 24 melodies played in four timbres (voice, piano, banjo, marimba) and were subsequently required to distinguish the melodies heard previously from 24 novel melodies presented in the same timbres. Musicians performed better than nonmusicians, but both groups showed a comparable memory advantage for vocal melodies. Moreover, pianists performed no better on melodies played on piano than on other instruments, and AP musicians performed no differently than non-AP musicians. The findings confirm the robust nature of the voice advantage and rule out explanations based on familiarity, practice, and motor representations.

  10. Melody discrimination and protein fold classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Bywater

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in theoretical biophysics and bioinformatics is the identification of protein folds from sequence data. This can be regarded as a pattern recognition problem. In this paper we report the use of a melody generation software where the inputs are derived from calculations of evolutionary information, secondary structure, flexibility, hydropathy and solvent accessibility from multiple sequence alignment data. The melodies so generated are derived from the sequence, and by inference, of the fold, in ways that give each fold a sound representation that may facilitate analysis, recognition, or comparison with other sequences.

  11. Melody Track Selection Using Discriminative Language Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao; Li, Ming; Suo, Hongbin; Yan, Yonghong

    In this letter we focus on the task of selecting the melody track from a polyphonic MIDI file. Based on the intuition that music and language are similar in many aspects, we solve the selection problem by introducing an n-gram language model to learn the melody co-occurrence patterns in a statistical manner and determine the melodic degree of a given MIDI track. Furthermore, we propose the idea of using background model and posterior probability criteria to make modeling more discriminative. In the evaluation, the achieved 81.6% correct rate indicates the feasibility of our approach.

  12. Effects of Music Notation Reinforcement on Aural Memory for Melodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonviri, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of music notation reinforcement on aural memory for melodies. Participants were 41 undergraduate and graduate music majors in a within-subjects design. Experimental trials tested melodic memory through a sequence of target melodies, distraction melodies, and matched and unmatched answer choices.…

  13. Functional Generation of Harmony and Melody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magalhães, José Pedro; Koops, Hendrik Vincent

    2014-01-01

    We present FCOMP, a system for automatic generation of harmony and accompanying melody. Building on previous work on functional modelling of musical harmony, FCOMP first creates a foundational harmony by generating random (but user-guided) values of a datatype that encodes the rules of tonal

  14. Evaluation of the Thompson articular index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, H. R.; van der Heide, A.; Jacobs, J. W.; van der Veen, M. J.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Three articular indices for measuring disease activity are compared. In a cross sectional study the Thompson articular index (a modified Lansbury index) correlated better with laboratory variables than the Ritchie articular index or a swollen joint score (Thompson 0.74-0.77; Ritchie 0.57-0.58;

  15. Thompson Test in Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer Albertson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available HPI: A 26-year old male presented to the emergency department after experiencing the acute onset of left ankle pain while playing basketball. Upon jumping, he felt a “pop” in his left posterior ankle, followed by pain and difficulty ambulating. His exam was notable for a defect at the left Achilles tendon on palpation. The practitioner performed a Thompson test, which was positive (abnormal on the left. Significant Findings: The left Achilles tendon had a defect on palpation, while the right Achilles tendon was intact. When squeezing the right (unaffected calf, the ankle spontaneously plantar flexed, indicating a negative (normal Thompson test. Upon squeeze of the left (affected calf, the ankle did not plantar flex, signifying a positive (abnormal Thompson test. The diagnosis of left Achilles tendon rupture was confirmed intraoperatively one week later. Discussion: The Achilles tendon (also: calcaneal tendon or heel cord is derived from the medial and lateral heads of the gastrocnemius muscle, as well as the soleus muscle. Rupture of the Achilles tendon most commonly occurs in the distal tendon, approximately 2-6 cm from its attachment to the calcaneal tuberosity, in an area of hypovascularity known as the “watershed” or “critical” zone.1-3 The Thompson test (also: Simmonds-Thompson test, described by Simmonds in 1957 and Thompson in 1962, is done while the patient is in the prone position, with feet hanging over the end of a table/gurney, or with the patient kneeling on a stool or chair.4-5 Squeezing the calf of an unaffected limb will cause the ankle to plantar flex, but squeezing the calf of a limb with an Achilles tendon rupture will cause no motion. The sensitivity of the Thompson’s test for the diagnosis of a complete Achilles tendon rupture is 96-100% and the specificity is 93-100%, but data is limited.6-8

  16. MELODI: The 'Multidisciplinary European Low-Dose Initiative'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, M.; Salomaa, S.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of research to reduce uncertainties in risk assessment of low and protracted exposures is now recognised globally. In Europe a new initiative, called 'Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative' (MELODI), has been proposed by a 'European High Level and Expert Group on low-dose risk research' (www.hleg.de), aimed at integrating national and EC (Euratom) efforts. Five national organisations: BfS (DE), CEA (FR), IRSN (FR), ISS (IT) and STUK (FI), with the support of the EC, have initiated the creation of MELODI by signing a letter of intent. In the forthcoming years, MELODI will integrate in a step-by-step approach EU institutions with significant programmes in the field and will be open to other scientific organisations and stakeholders. A key role of MELODI is to develop and maintain over time a strategic research agenda (SRA) and a road map of scientific priorities within a multidisciplinary approach, and to transfer the results for the radiation protection system. Under the coordination of STUK a network has been proposed in the 2009 Euratom Programme, called DoReMi (Low-Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration), which can help the integration process within the MELODI platform. DoReMi and the First MELODI Open Workshop, organised by BfS in September 2009, are now important inputs for the European SRA. (authors)

  17. Right parietal cortex mediates recognition memory for melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Nora K; Javadi, Amir-Homayoun; Halpern, Andrea R; Pollok, Bettina; Banissy, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Functional brain imaging studies have highlighted the significance of right-lateralized temporal, frontal and parietal brain areas for memory for melodies. The present study investigated the involvement of bilateral posterior parietal cortices (PPCs) for the recognition memory of melodies using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Participants performed a recognition task before and after tDCS. The task included an encoding phase (12 melodies), a retention period, as well as a recognition phase (24 melodies). Experiment 1 revealed that anodal tDCS over the right PPC led to a deterioration of overall memory performance compared with sham. Experiment 2 confirmed the results of Experiment 1 and further showed that anodal tDCS over the left PPC did not show a modulatory effect on memory task performance, indicating a right lateralization for musical memory. Furthermore, both experiments revealed that the decline in memory for melodies can be traced back to an interference of anodal stimulation on the recollection process (remember judgements) rather than to familiarity judgements. Taken together, this study revealed a causal involvement of the right PPC for memory for melodies and demonstrated a key role for this brain region in the recollection process of the memory task. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Drawing melodies: evaluation of chironomic singing synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alessandro, Christophe; Feugère, Lionel; Le Beux, Sylvain; Perrotin, Olivier; Rilliard, Albert

    2014-06-01

    Cantor Digitalis, a real-time formant synthesizer controlled by a graphic tablet and a stylus, is used for assessment of melodic precision and accuracy in singing synthesis. Melodic accuracy and precision are measured in three experiments for groups of 20 and 28 subjects. The task of the subjects is to sing musical intervals and short melodies, at various tempi, using chironomy (hand-controlled singing), mute chironomy (without audio feedback), and their own voices. The results show the high accuracy and precision obtained by all the subjects for chironomic control of singing synthesis. Some subjects performed significantly better in chironomic singing compared to natural singing, although other subjects showed comparable proficiency. For the chironomic condition, mean note accuracy is less than 12 cents and mean interval accuracy is less than 25 cents for all the subjects. Comparing chironomy and mute chironomy shows that the skills used for writing and drawing are used for chironomic singing, but that the audio feedback helps in interval accuracy. Analysis of blind chironomy (without visual reference) indicates that a visual feedback helps greatly in both note and interval accuracy and precision. This study demonstrates the capabilities of chironomy as a precise and accurate mean for controlling singing synthesis.

  19. El discurso intelectual de E. P. Thompson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. León

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo presenta un análisis exploratorio de las estrategias narrativas en el trabajode E. P. Thompson, especialmente en obras como The Making of the English Working Class y Miseria de la teoría. Esto es desarrollado en el marco de una historiografíac

  20. Automatic encoding of polyphonic melodies in musicians and nonmusicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Takako; Trainor, Laurel J; Ross, Bernhard; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo

    2005-10-01

    In music, multiple musical objects often overlap in time. Western polyphonic music contains multiple simultaneous melodic lines (referred to as "voices") of equal importance. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that pitch changes in a single melody are automatically encoded in memory traces, as indexed by mismatch negativity (MMN) and its magnetic counterpart (MMNm), and that this encoding process is enhanced by musical experience. In the present study, we examined whether two simultaneous melodies in polyphonic music are represented as separate entities in the auditory memory trace. Musicians and untrained controls were tested in both magnetoencephalogram and behavioral sessions. Polyphonic stimuli were created by combining two melodies (A and B), each consisting of the same five notes but in a different order. Melody A was in the high voice and Melody B in the low voice in one condition, and this was reversed in the other condition. On 50% of trials, a deviant final (5th) note was played either in the high or in the low voice, and it either went outside the key of the melody or remained within the key. These four deviations occurred with equal probability of 12.5% each. Clear MMNm was obtained for most changes in both groups, despite the 50% deviance level, with a larger amplitude in musicians than in controls. The response pattern was consistent across groups, with larger MMNm for deviants in the high voice than in the low voice, and larger MMNm for in-key than out-of-key changes, despite better behavioral performance for out-of-key changes. The results suggest that melodic information in each voice in polyphonic music is encoded in the sensory memory trace, that the higher voice is more salient than the lower, and that tonality may be processed primarily at cognitive stages subsequent to MMN generation.

  1. Learning for pitch and melody discrimination in congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteford, Kelly L; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2018-03-23

    Congenital amusia is currently thought to be a life-long neurogenetic disorder in music perception, impervious to training in pitch or melody discrimination. This study provides an explicit test of whether amusic deficits can be reduced with training. Twenty amusics and 20 matched controls participated in four sessions of psychophysical training involving either pure-tone (500 Hz) pitch discrimination or a control task of lateralization (interaural level differences for bandpass white noise). Pure-tone pitch discrimination at low, medium, and high frequencies (500, 2000, and 8000 Hz) was measured before and after training (pretest and posttest) to determine the specificity of learning. Melody discrimination was also assessed before and after training using the full Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia, the most widely used standardized test to diagnose amusia. Amusics performed more poorly than controls in pitch but not localization discrimination, but both groups improved with practice on the trained stimuli. Learning was broad, occurring across all three frequencies and melody discrimination for all groups, including those who trained on the non-pitch control task. Following training, 11 of 20 amusics no longer met the global diagnostic criteria for amusia. A separate group of untrained controls (n = 20), who also completed melody discrimination and pretest, improved by an equal amount as trained controls on all measures, suggesting that the bulk of learning for the control group occurred very rapidly from the pretest. Thirty-one trained participants (13 amusics) returned one year later to assess long-term maintenance of pitch and melody discrimination. On average, there was no change in performance between posttest and one-year follow-up, demonstrating that improvements on pitch- and melody-related tasks in amusics and controls can be maintained. The findings indicate that amusia is not always a life-long deficit when using the current standard

  2. A Wavelet-Based Approach to Pattern Discovery in Melodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velarde, Gissel; Meredith, David; Weyde, Tillman

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational method for pattern discovery based on the application of the wavelet transform to symbolic representations of melodies or monophonic voices. We model the importance of a discovered pattern in terms of the compression ratio that can be achieved by using it to describe...

  3. Words and melody are intertwined in perception of sung words: EEG and behavioral evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna L Gordon

    Full Text Available Language and music, two of the most unique human cognitive abilities, are combined in song, rendering it an ecological model for comparing speech and music cognition. The present study was designed to determine whether words and melodies in song are processed interactively or independently, and to examine the influence of attention on the processing of words and melodies in song. Event-Related brain Potentials (ERPs and behavioral data were recorded while non-musicians listened to pairs of sung words (prime and target presented in four experimental conditions: same word, same melody; same word, different melody; different word, same melody; different word, different melody. Participants were asked to attend to either the words or the melody, and to perform a same/different task. In both attentional tasks, different word targets elicited an N400 component, as predicted based on previous results. Most interestingly, different melodies (sung with the same word elicited an N400 component followed by a late positive component. Finally, ERP and behavioral data converged in showing interactions between the linguistic and melodic dimensions of sung words. The finding that the N400 effect, a well-established marker of semantic processing, was modulated by musical melody in song suggests that variations in musical features affect word processing in sung language. Implications of the interactions between words and melody are discussed in light of evidence for shared neural processing resources between the phonological/semantic aspects of language and the melodic/harmonic aspects of music.

  4. Higgs at 3.5 seconds into the melody

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Listen to the music… at 3.5 into the recording you will be able to “hear” the sound of the newly discovered boson. That’s the beauty of sonification, a technique that translates dry data into beautiful melodies.   Image edit by Katarina Anthony. Sonification is a computational technique that requires enormous amounts of networking and processing power to produce results. The sonification of data presented on 4 July by the ATLAS collaboration was performed using the pan-European GÉANT network and the Grid infrastructure. The result is a melody that at 3.5 seconds reproduces the bump corresponding to the new particle. “This sonification was carried out on the same grid infrastructure used by researchers to reconstruct their data and plot their graphs,” says Domenico Vicinanza of DANTE, who led the Higgs sonification project, collaborating with Mariapaola Sorrentino of ASTRA Project (Cambridge), who contributed to the sonific...

  5. The Interpretive Approach to Religious Education: Challenging Thompson's Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In a recent book chapter, Matthew Thompson makes some criticisms of my work, including the interpretive approach to religious education and the research and activity of Warwick Religions and Education Research Unit. Against the background of a discussion of religious education in the public sphere, my response challenges Thompson's account,…

  6. A Note on Information-Directed Sampling and Thompson Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Li

    2015-01-01

    This note introduce three Bayesian style Multi-armed bandit algorithms: Information-directed sampling, Thompson Sampling and Generalized Thompson Sampling. The goal is to give an intuitive explanation for these three algorithms and their regret bounds, and provide some derivations that are omitted in the original papers.

  7. The Thompson Encephalopathy Score and Short-Term Outcomes in Asphyxiated Newborns Treated With Therapeutic Hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorsen, Patricia; Jansen-van der Weide, Martine C; Groenendaal, Floris; Onland, Wes; van Straaten, Henrika L M; Zonnenberg, Inge; Vermeulen, Jeroen R.; Dijk, Peter H; Dudink, Jeroen; Rijken, Monique; van Heijst, Arno; Dijkman, Koen P; Cools, Filip; Zecic, Alexandra; van Kaam, Anton H; de Haan, Timo R

    BACKGROUND: The Thompson encephalopathy score is a clinical score to assess newborns suffering from perinatal asphyxia. Previous studies revealed a high sensitivity and specificity of the Thompson encephalopathy score for adverse outcomes (death or severe disability). Because the Thompson

  8. The Thompson Encephalopathy Score and Short-Term Outcomes in Asphyxiated Newborns Treated With Therapeutic Hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorsen, Patricia; Jansen-van der Weide, Martine C.; Groenendaal, Floris; Onland, Wes; van Straaten, Henrika L. M.; Zonnenberg, Inge; Vermeulen, Jeroen R.; Dijk, Peter H.; Dudink, Jeroen; Rijken, Monique; van Heijst, Arno; Dijkman, Koen P.; Cools, Filip; Zecic, Alexandra; van Kaam, Anton H.; de Haan, Timo R.

    2016-01-01

    The Thompson encephalopathy score is a clinical score to assess newborns suffering from perinatal asphyxia. Previous studies revealed a high sensitivity and specificity of the Thompson encephalopathy score for adverse outcomes (death or severe disability). Because the Thompson encephalopathy score

  9. Maintenance of memory for melodies: Articulation or attentional refreshing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nees, Michael A; Corrini, Ellen; Leong, Peri; Harris, Joanna

    2017-12-01

    Past research on the effects of articulatory suppression on working memory for nonverbal sounds has been characterized by discrepant findings, which suggests that multiple mechanisms may be involved in the rehearsal of nonverbal sounds. In two experiments we examined the potential roles of two theoretical mechanisms of verbal working memory-articulatory rehearsal and attentional refreshing-in the maintenance of memory for short melodies. In both experiments, participants performed a same-different melody comparison task. During an 8-s retention interval, interference tasks were introduced to suppress articulatory rehearsal, attentional refreshing, or both. In Experiment 1, only the conditions that featured articulatory suppression resulted in worse memory performance than in a control condition, and the suppression of both attentional refreshing and articulatory rehearsal concurrently did not impair memory more than articulatory suppression alone. Experiment 2 reproduced these findings and also confirmed that the locus of interference was articulatory and not auditory (i.e., the interference was not attributable to the sound of participants' own voices during articulatory suppression). Both experiments suggested that articulatory rehearsal played a role in the maintenance of melodies in memory, whereas attentional refreshing did not. We discuss potential theoretical implications regarding the mechanisms used for the rehearsal of nonverbal sounds in working memory.

  10. Direct Electrical Stimulation in the Human Brain Disrupts Melody Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcea, Frank E; Chernoff, Benjamin L; Diamond, Bram; Lewis, Wesley; Sims, Maxwell H; Tomlinson, Samuel B; Teghipco, Alexander; Belkhir, Raouf; Gannon, Sarah B; Erickson, Steve; Smith, Susan O; Stone, Jonathan; Liu, Lynn; Tollefson, Trenton; Langfitt, John; Marvin, Elizabeth; Pilcher, Webster H; Mahon, Bradford Z

    2017-09-11

    Prior research using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) [1-4] and behavioral studies of patients with acquired or congenital amusia [5-8] suggest that the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG) in the human brain is specialized for aspects of music processing (for review, see [9-12]). Intracranial electrical brain stimulation in awake neurosurgery patients is a powerful means to determine the computations supported by specific brain regions and networks [13-21] because it provides reversible causal evidence with high spatial resolution (for review, see [22, 23]). Prior intracranial stimulation or cortical cooling studies have investigated musical abilities related to reading music scores [13, 14] and singing familiar songs [24, 25]. However, individuals with amusia (congenitally, or from a brain injury) have difficulty humming melodies but can be spared for singing familiar songs with familiar lyrics [26]. Here we report a detailed study of a musician with a low-grade tumor in the right temporal lobe. Functional MRI was used pre-operatively to localize music processing to the right STG, and the patient subsequently underwent awake intraoperative mapping using direct electrical stimulation during a melody repetition task. Stimulation of the right STG induced "music arrest" and errors in pitch but did not affect language processing. These findings provide causal evidence for the functional segregation of music and language processing in the human brain and confirm a specific role of the right STG in melody processing. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Memory for surface features of unfamiliar melodies: independent effects of changes in pitch and tempo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Stalinski, Stephanie M; Marks, Bradley M

    2014-01-01

    A melody's identity is determined by relations between consecutive tones in terms of pitch and duration, whereas surface features (i.e., pitch level or key, tempo, and timbre) are irrelevant. Although surface features of highly familiar recordings are encoded into memory, little is known about listeners' mental representations of melodies heard once or twice. It is also unknown whether musical pitch is represented additively or interactively with temporal information. In two experiments, listeners heard unfamiliar melodies twice in an initial exposure phase. In a subsequent test phase, they heard the same (old) melodies interspersed with new melodies. Some of the old melodies were shifted in key, tempo, or key and tempo. Listeners' task was to rate how well they recognized each melody from the exposure phase while ignoring changes in key and tempo. Recognition ratings were higher for old melodies that stayed the same compared to those that were shifted in key or tempo, and detrimental effects of key and tempo changes were additive in between-subjects (Experiment 1) and within-subjects (Experiment 2) designs. The results confirm that surface features are remembered for melodies heard only twice. They also imply that key and tempo are processed and stored independently.

  12. Research Ship T. G. Thompson Underway Meteorological Data, Quality Controlled

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Research Ship T. G. Thompson Underway Meteorological Data (delayed ~10 days for quality control) are from the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic...

  13. A computational approach to content-based retrieval of folk song melodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kranenburg, P.

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop a Music Information Retrieval system for folksong melodies, one needs to design an adequate computational model of melodic similarity, which is the subject of this Ph.D. thesis. Since understanding of both the properties of the melodies and computational methods is necessary,

  14. Melody recognition at fast and slow tempos: effects of age, experience, and familiarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, W Jay; Bartlett, James C; Halpern, Andrea R; Andrews, W Melinda

    2008-04-01

    Eighty-one listeners defined by three age ranges (18-30, 31-59, and over 60 years) and three levels of musical experience performed an immediate recognition task requiring the detection of alterations in melodies. On each trial, a brief melody was presented, followed 5 sec later by a test stimulus that either was identical to the target or had two pitches changed, for a same-different judgment. Each melody pair was presented at 0.6 note/sec, 3.0 notes/sec, or 6.0 notes/sec. Performance was better with familiar melodies than with unfamiliar melodies. Overall performance declined slightly with age and improved substantially with increasing experience, in agreement with earlier results in an identification task. Tempo affected performance on familiar tunes (moderate was best), but not on unfamiliar tunes. We discuss these results in terms of theories of dynamic attending, cognitive slowing, and working memory in aging.

  15. The auditory scene: an fMRI study on melody and accompaniment in professional pianists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Danilo; Verga, Laura; Iadanza, Antonella; Tettamanti, Marco; Perani, Daniela

    2014-11-15

    The auditory scene is a mental representation of individual sounds extracted from the summed sound waveform reaching the ears of the listeners. Musical contexts represent particularly complex cases of auditory scenes. In such a scenario, melody may be seen as the main object moving on a background represented by the accompaniment. Both melody and accompaniment vary in time according to harmonic rules, forming a typical texture with melody in the most prominent, salient voice. In the present sparse acquisition functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated the interplay between melody and accompaniment in trained pianists, by observing the activation responses elicited by processing: (1) melody placed in the upper and lower texture voices, leading to, respectively, a higher and lower auditory salience; (2) harmonic violations occurring in either the melody, the accompaniment, or both. The results indicated that the neural activation elicited by the processing of polyphonic compositions in expert musicians depends upon the upper versus lower position of the melodic line in the texture, and showed an overall greater activation for the harmonic processing of melody over accompaniment. Both these two predominant effects were characterized by the involvement of the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, among other associative brain regions. We discuss the prominent role of the posterior medial cortex in the processing of melodic and harmonic information in the auditory stream, and propose to frame this processing in relation to the cognitive construction of complex multimodal sensory imagery scenes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Paresev in flight with pilot Milt Thompson

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    This movie clip runs 37 seconds in length and begins with a shot from the chase plane of NASA Dryden test pilot Milt Thompson at the controls of the Paresev, then the onboard view from the pilot's seat and finally bringing the Paresev in for a landing on the dry lakebed at Edwards AFB. The Paresev (Paraglider Rescue Vehicle) was an indirect outgrowth of kite-parachute studies by NACA Langley engineer Francis M. Rogallo. In early 1960's the 'Rogallo wing' seemed an excellent means of returning a spacecraft to Earth. The delta wing design was patented by Mr. Rogallo. In May 1961, Robert R. Gilruth, director of the NASA Space Task Group, requested studies of an inflatable Rogallo-type 'Parawing' for spacecraft. Several companies responded; North American Aviation, Downey, California, produced the most acceptable concept and development was contracted to that company. In November 1961 NASA Headquarters launched a paraglider development program, with Langley doing wind tunnel studies and the NASA Flight Research Center supporting the North American test program. The North American concept was a capsule-type vehicle with a stowed 'parawing' that could be deployed and controlled from within for a landing more like an airplane instead of a 'splash down' in the ocean. The logistics became enormous and the price exorbitant, plus NASA pilots and engineers felt some baseline experience like building a vehicle and flying a Parawing should be accomplished first. The Paresev (Paraglider Research Vehicle) was used to gain in-flight experience with four different membranes (wings), and was not used to develop the more complicated inflatable deployment system. The Paresev was designed by Charles Richard, of the Flight Research Center Vehicle and System Dynamics Branch, with the rest of the team being: engineers, Richard Klein, Gary Layton, John Orahood, and Joe Wilson; from the Maintenance and Manufacturing Branch: Frank Fedor, LeRoy Barto; Victor Horton as Project Manager, with

  17. The European initiative on low-dose risk research: from the HLEG to MELODI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, Mauro; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Repussard, Jacques; Salomaa, Sisko

    2015-01-01

    The importance of low-dose risk research for radiation protection is now widely recognised. The European Commission (EC) and five European Union (EU) Member States involved in the Euratom Programme set up in 2008 a 'High Level and Expert Group on European Low Dose Risk Research' (HLEG) aimed at identifying research needs and proposing a better integration of European efforts in the field. The HLEG revised the research challenges and proposed a European research strategy based on a 'Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative' (MELODI). In April 2009, five national organisations, with the support of the EC, created the initial core of MELODI (http://www.melodi-online.eu) with a view to integrate the EU institutions with significant programmes in the field, while being open to other scientific organisations and stakeholders, and to develop an agreed strategic research agenda (SRA) and roadmap. Since then, open workshops have been organised yearly, exploring ideas for SRA implementation. As of October 2014, 31 institutions have been included as members of MELODI. HLEG recommendations and MELODI SRA have become important reference points in the radiation protection part of the Euratom Research Programme. MELODI has established close interactions through Memorandum of Understanding with other European platforms involved in radiation protection (Alliance, NERIS and EURADOS) and, together with EURADOS, with the relevant medical European Associations. The role of Joint Programming in priority setting, foreseen in the forthcoming EU Horizon 2020, calls for keeping MELODI an open, inclusive and transparent initiative, able to avoid redundancies and possible conflicts of interest, while promoting common initiatives in radiation protection research. An important issue is the establishment of a proper methodology for managing these initiatives, and this includes the set-up of an independent MELODI Scientific Committee recently extended to Alliance, NERIS

  18. The effect of exercise-induced arousal on chosen tempi for familiar melodies

    OpenAIRE

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Halpern, Andrea; Grierson, Mick; Stewart, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Many previous studies have shown that arousal affects time perception, suggesting a direct influence of arousal on the speed of the pacemaker of the internal clock. However, it is unknown whether arousal influences the mental representation of tempo (speed) for highly familiar and complex stimuli, such as well-known melodies, that have long-term representations in memory. Previous research suggests that mental representations of the tempo of familiar melodies are stable over time; the aim of ...

  19. Changes in Resting-State Connectivity following Melody-Based Therapy in a Patient with Aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Bitan, Tali; Simic, Tijana; Saverino, Cristina; Jones, Cheryl; Glazer, Joanna; Collela, Brenda; Wiseman-Hakes, Catherine; Green, Robin; Rochon, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Melody-based treatments for patients with aphasia rely on the notion of preserved musical abilities in the RH, following left hemisphere damage. However, despite evidence for their effectiveness, the role of the RH is still an open question. We measured changes in resting-state functional connectivity following melody-based intervention, to identify lateralization of treatment-related changes. A patient with aphasia due to left frontal and temporal hemorrhages following traumatic brain injuri...

  20. The European initiative on low-dose risk research: from the HLEG to MELODI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Mauro; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Jourdain, Jean-René; Salomaa, Sisko; Repussard, Jacques

    2015-09-01

    The importance of low-dose risk research for radiation protection is now widely recognised. The European Commission (EC) and five European Union (EU) Member States involved in the Euratom Programme set up in 2008 a 'High Level and Expert Group on European Low Dose Risk Research' (HLEG) aimed at identifying research needs and proposing a better integration of European efforts in the field. The HLEG revised the research challenges and proposed a European research strategy based on a 'Multidisciplinary European LOw Dose Initiative' (MELODI). In April 2009, five national organisations, with the support of the EC, created the initial core of MELODI (http://www.melodi-online.eu) with a view to integrate the EU institutions with significant programmes in the field, while being open to other scientific organisations and stakeholders, and to develop an agreed strategic research agenda (SRA) and roadmap. Since then, open workshops have been organised yearly, exploring ideas for SRA implementation. As of October 2014, 31 institutions have been included as members of MELODI. HLEG recommendations and MELODI SRA have become important reference points in the radiation protection part of the Euratom Research Programme. MELODI has established close interactions through Memorandum of Understanding with other European platforms involved in radiation protection (Alliance, NERIS and EURADOS) and, together with EURADOS, with the relevant medical European Associations. The role of Joint Programming in priority setting, foreseen in the forthcoming EU Horizon 2020, calls for keeping MELODI an open, inclusive and transparent initiative, able to avoid redundancies and possible conflicts of interest, while promoting common initiatives in radiation protection research. An important issue is the establishment of a proper methodology for managing these initiatives, and this includes the set-up of an independent MELODI Scientific Committee recently extended to Alliance, NERIS and EURADOS, with

  1. The use of Thompson sampling to increase estimation precision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we consider a sequential sampling scheme for efficient estimation of the difference between the means of two independent treatments when the population variances are unequal across groups. The sampling scheme proposed is based on a solution to bandit problems called Thompson

  2. Assessment of the Melody Valve in the Mitral Position in Young Children by Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Lindsay R.; Marx, Gerald R.; Marshall, Audrey C.; Tworetzky, Wayne; Emani, Sitaram M.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Mitral valve replacement (MVR) in young children is limited by lack of small prostheses. Our institution began performing MVR with modified, surgically placed, stented jugular vein grafts (Melody valve) in 2010. We sought to describe key echocardiographic features for pre- and post-operative assessment of this novel form of MVR. Methods The pre- and post-operative echocardiograms of 24 patients who underwent Melody MVR were reviewed. In addition to standard measurements, pre-operative potential measurements of the mitral annulus were performed whereby dimensions were estimated for Melody sizing. A ratio of the narrowest subaortic region in systole to the actual mitral valve dimension (SubA:MV) was assessed for risk of post-operative left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO). Results Melody MVR was performed at a median of 8.5 months (5.6 kg) for stenosis (5), regurgitation (3), and mixed disease (16). Pre-operatively, actual mitral z-scores measured hypoplastic (median −3.1 for the lateral (lat) dimension; −2.1 for the antero-posterior (AP) dimension). The potential measurements often had normal z-scores with fair correlation with intra-operative Melody dilation (ρ=0.51 and 0.50 for lat and AP dimensions, both p=0.01). A pre-operative SubA:MV <0.5 was associated with post-operative LVOTO, which occurred in four patients. Post-operatively, mitral gradients substantially improved, with low values relative to the effective orifice area of the Melody valve. No patients had significant regurgitation or perivalvar leak. Conclusions Pre-operative echocardiographic measurements may help guide intra-operative sizing for Melody MVR and identify patients at risk for post-operative LVOTO. Acute post-operative hemodynamic results were favorable; however, on-going assessment is warranted. PMID:27523403

  3. Neural correlates of binding lyrics and melodies for the encoding of new songs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Irene; Davachi, Lila; Valabrègue, Romain; Lambrecq, Virginie; Dupont, Sophie; Samson, Séverine

    2016-02-15

    Songs naturally bind lyrics and melody into a unified representation. Using a subsequent memory paradigm, we examined the neural processes associated with binding lyrics and melodies during song encoding. Participants were presented with songs in two conditions: a unified condition (melodies sung with lyrics), and a separate condition (melodies sung with the syllable "la"). In both cases, written lyrics were displayed and participants were instructed to memorize them by repeating them covertly or by generating mental images of the songs. We expected the unified condition to recruit the posterior superior temporal gyrus, known to be involved in perceptual integration of songs, as well as the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Conversely, we hypothesized that the separate condition would engage a larger network including the hippocampus to bind lyrics and melodies of songs, and the basal ganglia and the cerebellum to ensure the correct sequence coupling of verbal and musical information in time. Binding lyrics and melodies in the unified condition revealed activation of the left IFG, bilateral middle temporal gyrus (MTG), and left motor cortex, suggesting a strong linguistic processing for this condition. Binding in the separate compared to the unified condition revealed greater activity in the right hippocampus as well as other areas including the left caudate, left cerebellum, and right IFG. This study provides novel evidence for the role of the right hippocampus in binding lyrics and melodies in songs. Results are discussed in light of studies of binding in the visual domain and highlight the role of regions involved in timing and synchronization such as the basal ganglia and the cerebellum. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Infective endocarditis following Melody valve implantation: comparison with a surgical cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Clare; Holloway, Rhonda; Tilton, Elizabeth; Stirling, John; Finucane, Kirsten; Wilson, Nigel

    2017-03-01

    Infective endocarditis has been reported post Melody percutaneous pulmonary valve implant; the incidence and risk factors, however, remain poorly defined. We identified four cases of endocarditis from our first 25 Melody implants. Our aim was to examine these cases in the context of postulated risk factors and directly compare endocarditis rates with local surgical valves. We conducted a retrospective review of patients post Melody percutaneous pulmonary valve implant in New Zealand (October, 2009-May, 2015) and also reviewed the incidence of endocarditis in New Zealand among patients who have undergone surgical pulmonary valve implants. In total, 25 patients underwent Melody implantation at a median age of 18 years. At a median follow-up of 2.9 years, most were well with low valve gradient (median 27 mmHg) and only mild regurgitation. Two patients presented with life-threatening endocarditis and obstructive vegetations at 14 and 26 months post implant, respectively. Two additional patients presented with subacute endocarditis at 5.5 years post implant. From 2009 to May, 2015, 178 surgical pulmonic bioprostheses, largely Hancock valves and homografts, were used at our institution. At a median follow-up of 2.9 years, four patients (2%) had developed endocarditis in this group compared with 4/25 (16%) in the Melody group (p=0.0089). Three surgical valves have been replaced. The Melody valve offers a good alternative to surgical conduit replacement in selected patients. Many patients have excellent outcomes in the medium term. Endocarditis, however, can occur and if associated with obstruction can be life threatening. The risk for endocarditis in the Melody group was higher in comparison with that in a contemporaneous surgical pulmonary implant cohort.

  5. Hippocampal sclerosis affects fMR-adaptation of lyrics and melodies in songs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eAlonso

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Songs constitute a natural combination of lyrics and melodies, but it is unclear whether and how these two song components are integrated during the emergence of a memory trace. Network theories of memory suggest a prominent role of the hippocampus, together with unimodal sensory areas, in the build-up of conjunctive representations. The present study tested the modulatory influence of the hippocampus on neural adaptation to songs in lateral temporal areas. Patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis and healthy matched controls were presented with blocks of short songs in which lyrics and/or melodies were varied or repeated in a crossed factorial design. Neural adaptation effects were taken as correlates of incidental emergent memory traces. We hypothesized that hippocampal lesions, particularly in the left hemisphere, would weaken adaptation effects, especially the integration of lyrics and melodies. Results revealed that lateral temporal lobe regions showed weaker adaptation to repeated lyrics as well as a reduced interaction of the adaptation effects for lyrics and melodies in patients with left hippocampal sclerosis. This suggests a deficient build-up of a sensory memory trace for lyrics and a reduced integration of lyrics with melodies, compared to healthy controls. Patients with right hippocampal sclerosis showed a similar profile of results although the effects did not reach significance in this population. We highlight the finding that the integrated representation of lyrics and melodies typically shown in healthy participants is likely tied to the integrity of the left medial temporal lobe. This novel finding provides the first neuroimaging evidence for the role of the hippocampus during repetitive exposure to lyrics and melodies and their integration into a song.

  6. Embryologie précoce de Sacculina carcini Thompson

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bocquet-Védrine, J.

    1964-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Dans sa monographie pourtant très complète de Sacculina carcini Thompson, publiée en 1884, Delage ne traite pas de l'étude embryologique de cette espèce. Il ne se désintéressait pas pour autant de ce sujet sur lequel il exprimait son intention de revenir „plus tard, dans un moment

  7. Yawning, fatigue and cortisol: expanding the Thompson Cortisol Hypothesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Yawning and its involvement in neurological disorders has become the new scientific conundrum. Cortisol levels are known to rise during stress and fatigue; yawning may occur when we are under stress or tired. However, the link between yawning, fatigue, and cortisol has not been fully understood. Expansion of the Thompson Cortisol Hypothesis proposes that the stress hormone, cortisol, is responsible for yawning and fatigue especially in people with incomplete innervation such as multiple sclero...

  8. Effects of melody and technique on acoustical and musical features of western operatic singing voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrouy-Maestri, Pauline; Magis, David; Morsomme, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    The operatic singing technique is frequently used in classical music. Several acoustical parameters of this specific technique have been studied but how these parameters combine remains unclear. This study aims to further characterize the Western operatic singing technique by observing the effects of melody and technique on acoustical and musical parameters of the singing voice. Fifty professional singers performed two contrasting melodies (popular song and romantic melody) with two vocal techniques (with and without operatic singing technique). The common quality parameters (energy distribution, vibrato rate, and extent), perturbation parameters (standard deviation of the fundamental frequency, signal-to-noise ratio, jitter, and shimmer), and musical features (fundamental frequency of the starting note, average tempo, and sound pressure level) of the 200 sung performances were analyzed. The results regarding the effect of melody and technique on the acoustical and musical parameters show that the choice of melody had a limited impact on the parameters observed, whereas a particular vocal profile appeared depending on the vocal technique used. This study confirms that vocal technique affects most of the parameters examined. In addition, the observation of quality, perturbation, and musical parameters contributes to a better understanding of the Western operatic singing technique. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of exercise-induced arousal on chosen tempi for familiar melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Halpern, Andrea R; Grierson, Mick; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-04-01

    Many previous studies have shown that arousal affects time perception, suggesting a direct influence of arousal on the speed of the pacemaker of the internal clock. However, it is unknown whether arousal influences the mental representation of tempo (speed) for highly familiar and complex stimuli, such as well-known melodies, that have long-term representations in memory. Previous research suggests that mental representations of the tempo of familiar melodies are stable over time; the aim of the present study was to investigate whether these representations can be systematically altered via an increase in physiological arousal. Participants adjusted the tempo of 14 familiar melodies in real time until they found a tempo that matched their internal representation of the appropriate tempo for that piece. The task was carried out before and after a physiologically arousing (exercise) or nonarousing (anagrams) manipulation. Participants completed this task both while hearing the melodies aloud and while imagining them. Chosen tempi increased significantly following exercise-induced arousal, regardless of whether a melody was heard aloud or imagined. These findings suggest that a change in internal clock speed affects temporal judgments even for highly familiar and complex stimuli such as music.

  10. Predicting Variation of Folk Songs: A Corpus Analysis Study on the Memorability of Melodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Janssen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a hypothesis-driven study on the variation of melody phrases in a collection of Dutch folk songs. We investigate the variation of phrases within the folk songs through a pattern matching method which detects occurrences of these phrases within folk song variants, and ask the question: do the phrases which show less variation have different properties than those which do? We hypothesize that theories on melody recall may predict variation, and as such, investigate phrase length, the position and number of repetitions of a given phrase in the melody in which it occurs, as well as expectancy and motif repetivity. We show that all of these predictors account for the observed variation to a moderate degree, and that, as hypothesized, those phrases vary less which are rather short, contain highly expected melodic material, occur relatively early in the melody, and contain small pitch intervals. A large portion of the variance is left unexplained by the current model, however, which leads us to a discussion of future approaches to study memorability of melodies.

  11. Music Information Retrieval from a Singing Voice Using Lyrics and Melody Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Makino

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several music information retrieval (MIR systems which retrieve musical pieces by the user's singing voice have been developed. All of these systems use only melody information for retrieval, although lyrics information is also useful for retrieval. In this paper, we propose a new MIR system that uses both lyrics and melody information. First, we propose a new lyrics recognition method. A finite state automaton (FSA is used as recognition grammar, and about 86% retrieval accuracy was obtained. We also develop an algorithm for verifying a hypothesis output by a lyrics recognizer. Melody information is extracted from an input song using several pieces of information of the hypothesis, and a total score is calculated from the recognition score and the verification score. From the experimental results, 95.0% retrieval accuracy was obtained with a query consisting of five words.

  12. Music Information Retrieval from a Singing Voice Using Lyrics and Melody Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Motoyuki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several music information retrieval (MIR systems which retrieve musical pieces by the user's singing voice have been developed. All of these systems use only melody information for retrieval, although lyrics information is also useful for retrieval. In this paper, we propose a new MIR system that uses both lyrics and melody information. First, we propose a new lyrics recognition method. A finite state automaton (FSA is used as recognition grammar, and about retrieval accuracy was obtained. We also develop an algorithm for verifying a hypothesis output by a lyrics recognizer. Melody information is extracted from an input song using several pieces of information of the hypothesis, and a total score is calculated from the recognition score and the verification score. From the experimental results, 95.0 retrieval accuracy was obtained with a query consisting of five words.

  13. Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI). Strategic research agenda for low dose radiation risk research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, M. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, BfS, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany); Auvinen, A. [University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); STUK, Helsinki (Finland); Cardis, E. [ISGlobal, Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Barcelona (Spain); Durante, M. [Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, TIFPA, Trento (Italy); Harms-Ringdahl, M. [Stockholm University, Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Jourdain, J.R. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Madas, B.G. [MTA Centre for Energy Research, Environmental Physics Department, Budapest (Hungary); Ottolenghi, A. [University of Pavia, Physics Department, Pavia (Italy); Pazzaglia, S. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Rome (Italy); Prise, K.M. [Queens University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Quintens, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Sabatier, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, Paris (France); Bouffler, S. [Public Health England, PHE, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    2018-03-15

    MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) is a European radiation protection research platform with focus on research on health risks after exposure to low-dose ionising radiation. It was founded in 2010 and currently includes 44 members from 18 countries. A major activity of MELODI is the continuous development of a long-term European Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) on low-dose risk for radiation protection. The SRA is intended to identify priorities for national and European radiation protection research programs as a basis for the preparation of competitive calls at the European level. Among those key priorities is the improvement of health risk estimates for exposures close to the dose limits for workers and to reference levels for the population in emergency situations. Another activity of MELODI is to ensure the availability of European key infrastructures for research activities, and the long-term maintenance of competences in radiation research via an integrated European approach for training and education. The MELODI SRA identifies three key research topics in low dose or low dose-rate radiation risk research: (1) dose and dose rate dependence of cancer risk, (2) radiation-induced non-cancer effects and (3) individual radiation sensitivity. The research required to improve the evidence base for each of the three key topics relates to three research lines: (1) research to improve understanding of the mechanisms contributing to radiogenic diseases, (2) epidemiological research to improve health risk evaluation of radiation exposure and (3) research to address the effects and risks associated with internal exposures, differing radiation qualities and inhomogeneous exposures. The full SRA and associated documents can be downloaded from the MELODI website (http://www.melodi-online.eu/sra.html). (orig.)

  14. Sex Differences in Music: A Female Advantage at Recognizing Familiar Melodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Scott A.; Miranda, Robbin A.; Ullman, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Although sex differences have been observed in various cognitive domains, there has been little work examining sex differences in the cognition of music. We tested the prediction that women would be better than men at recognizing familiar melodies, since memories of specific melodies are likely to be learned (at least in part) by declarative memory, which shows female advantages. Participants were 24 men and 24 women, with half musicians and half non-musicians in each group. The two groups were matched on age, education, and various measures of musical training. Participants were presented with well-known and novel melodies, and were asked to indicate their recognition of familiar melodies as rapidly as possible. The women were significantly faster than the men in responding, with a large effect size. The female advantage held across musicians and non-musicians, and across melodies with and without commonly associated lyrics, as evidenced by an absence of interactions between sex and these factors. Additionally, the results did not seem to be explained by sex differences in response biases, or in basic motor processes as tested in a control task. Though caution is warranted given that this is the first study to examine sex differences in familiar melody recognition, the results are consistent with the hypothesis motivating our prediction, namely that declarative memory underlies knowledge about music (particularly about familiar melodies), and that the female advantage at declarative memory may thus lead to female advantages in music cognition (particularly at familiar melody recognition). Additionally, the findings argue against the view that female advantages at tasks involving verbal (or verbalizable) material are due solely to a sex difference specific to the verbal domain. Further, the results may help explain previously reported cognitive commonalities between music and language: since declarative memory also underlies language, such commonalities may be

  15. Sex Differences in Music: A Female Advantage at Recognizing Familiar Melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Scott A; Miranda, Robbin A; Ullman, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Although sex differences have been observed in various cognitive domains, there has been little work examining sex differences in the cognition of music. We tested the prediction that women would be better than men at recognizing familiar melodies, since memories of specific melodies are likely to be learned (at least in part) by declarative memory, which shows female advantages. Participants were 24 men and 24 women, with half musicians and half non-musicians in each group. The two groups were matched on age, education, and various measures of musical training. Participants were presented with well-known and novel melodies, and were asked to indicate their recognition of familiar melodies as rapidly as possible. The women were significantly faster than the men in responding, with a large effect size. The female advantage held across musicians and non-musicians, and across melodies with and without commonly associated lyrics, as evidenced by an absence of interactions between sex and these factors. Additionally, the results did not seem to be explained by sex differences in response biases, or in basic motor processes as tested in a control task. Though caution is warranted given that this is the first study to examine sex differences in familiar melody recognition, the results are consistent with the hypothesis motivating our prediction, namely that declarative memory underlies knowledge about music (particularly about familiar melodies), and that the female advantage at declarative memory may thus lead to female advantages in music cognition (particularly at familiar melody recognition). Additionally, the findings argue against the view that female advantages at tasks involving verbal (or verbalizable) material are due solely to a sex difference specific to the verbal domain. Further, the results may help explain previously reported cognitive commonalities between music and language: since declarative memory also underlies language, such commonalities may be

  16. Sex Differences in Music: A Female Advantage at Recognizing Familiar Melodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Ullman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Although sex differences have been observed in various cognitive domains, there has been little work examining sex differences in the cognition of music. We tested the prediction that women would be better than men at recognizing familiar melodies, since memories of specific melodies are likely to be learned (at least in part by declarative memory, which shows female advantages. Participants were 24 men and 24 women, with half musicians and half non-musicians in each group. The two groups were matched on age, education, and various measures of musical training. Participants were presented with well-known and novel melodies, and were asked to indicate their recognition of familiar melodies as rapidly as possible. The women were significantly faster than the men in responding, with a large effect size. The female advantage held across musicians and non-musicians, and across melodies with and without commonly associated lyrics, as evidenced by an absence of interactions between sex and these factors. Additionally, the results did not seem to be explained by sex differences in response biases, or in basic auditory or motor processes as tested in a control task. Though caution is warranted given that this is the first study to examine sex differences in familiar melody recognition, the results are consistent with the hypothesis motivating our prediction, namely that declarative memory underlies knowledge about music (particularly about familiar melodies, and that the female advantage at declarative memory may thus lead to female advantages in music cognition (particularly at familiar melody recognition. Additionally, the findings argue against the view that female advantages at tasks involving verbal (or verbalizable material are due solely to a sex difference specific to the verbal domain. Further, the results may help explain previously-reported cognitive commonalities between music and language: since declarative memory also underlies language

  17. Three dimensional rotational angiography for assessment of coronary arteries during melody valve implantation: introducing a?technique that may improve outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Pockett, C. R.; Moore, J. W.; El-Said, H. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adverse events from Melody valve implantation may be catastrophic. To date a?role for three dimensional rotational angiography of the aortic root (3DRAA) during Melody valve implantation has not been established. Objectives To describe the role of 3DRAA in the assessment of Melody valve candidacy and to demonstrate that it may improve outcomes. Methods All patients who underwent cardiac catheterisation for Melody valve implantation and 3DRAA between August 2013 and February 2015 we...

  18. Context-Related Melodies in Oral Culture: An Attempt to Describe Words-and-Music Relationships in Local Singing Tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taive Särg

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In oral folk song traditions we often find many lyrics, but not nearly as many melodies. The terms “polyfunctionalism”, “group melodies” or “general melodies” have been used by Estonian researches to indicate the phenomenon that many lyrics were sung to only one, or a small handful, of tunes. The scarcity of melodies is supposed to be one of several related phenomena characteristic to an oral, text-centred singing culture.In this article the Estonian folk song tradition will be analysed against a quantity of melodies and their usage in the following aspects: word-and-melody relationships and context-and-melody relationships in Karksi parish (south Estonia; a singer; and native musical terms and the process of singing and (recreation.

  19. A MODIFIED GIFFLER AND THOMPSON ALGORITHM COMBINED WITH DYNAMIC SLACK TIME FOR SOLVING DYNAMIC SCHEDULE PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanti Octavia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A Modified Giffler and Thompson algorithm combined with dynamic slack time is used to allocate machines resources in dynamic nature. It was compared with a Real Time Order Promising (RTP algorithm. The performance of modified Giffler and Thompson and RTP algorithms are measured by mean tardiness. The result shows that modified Giffler and Thompson algorithm combined with dynamic slack time provides significantly better result compared with RTP algorithm in terms of mean tardiness.

  20. Endomorphisms of the Cuntz algebras and the Thompson groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlak, Selcuk; Hong, Jeong Hee; Szymanski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between endomorphisms of the Cuntz algebra O_2 and endomorphisms of the Thompson groups F, T and V represented inside the unitary group of O_2. For an endomorphism λ_u of O_2, we show that λ_u(V) is contained in V if and only if uεV. If λ_u is an automorphism of O_2...... then uεV is equivalent to the containment of λ_u(F) in V. Our investigations are facilitated by introduction of the concept of modestly scaling endomorphism of O_n, whose properties and examples are investigated....

  1. D'Arcy Thompson and the theory of transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Wallace

    2006-05-01

    D'Arcy Thompson was a biologist, a mathematician and a classicist. His writing was great literature as well as great science. He is primarily known for a single book--On Growth and Form--and indeed for a single chapter within it, on his 'theory of transformations', which shows how the differences between the forms of related species can be represented geometrically. This theory cries out for causal explanation, which is something the great man eschewed. Perhaps the time is close when comparative developmental genetics will be able to provide such an explanation.

  2. The Patterns of Music: Young Children Learning Mathematics through Beat, Rhythm, and Melody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; Geist, Eugene A.; Kuznik, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Research on music and music therapy suggests that math and music are related in the brain from very early in life. Musical elements such as steady beat, rhythm, melody, and tempo possess inherent mathematical principles such as spatial properties, sequencing, counting, patterning, and one-to-one correspondence. With new understanding about the…

  3. Changes in Resting-State Connectivity following Melody-Based Therapy in a Patient with Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali Bitan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Melody-based treatments for patients with aphasia rely on the notion of preserved musical abilities in the RH, following left hemisphere damage. However, despite evidence for their effectiveness, the role of the RH is still an open question. We measured changes in resting-state functional connectivity following melody-based intervention, to identify lateralization of treatment-related changes. A patient with aphasia due to left frontal and temporal hemorrhages following traumatic brain injuries (TBI more than three years earlier received 48 sessions of melody-based intervention. Behavioral measures improved and were maintained at the 8-week posttreatment follow-up. Resting-state fMRI data collected before and after treatment showed an increase in connectivity between motor speech control areas (bilateral supplementary motor areas and insulae and RH language areas (inferior frontal gyrus pars triangularis and pars opercularis. This change, which was specific for the RH, was greater than changes in a baseline interval measured before treatment. No changes in RH connectivity were found in a matched control TBI patient scanned at the same intervals. These results are compatible with a compensatory role for RH language areas following melody-based intervention. They further suggest that this therapy intervenes at the level of the interface between language areas and speech motor control areas necessary for language production.

  4. Singers' Recall for the Words and Melody of a New, Unaccompanied Song

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsborg, Jane; Sloboda, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between words and music in memory has been studied in a variety of ways, from investigations of listeners' recall for the words of songs stored in long-term memory to recall for novel information set to unfamiliar melodies. We asked singers to perform an unaccompanied song from memory following deliberate learning…

  5. Quantum electrical and chromodynamics treated through Thompson's approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassif, Claudio; Silva, P.R.

    2006-09-01

    In this work we apply Thompson's method (of the dimensions and scales) to study some features of the Quantum Electro and Chromodynamics. This heuristic method can be considered as a simple and alternative way to the Renormalisation Group (R.G.) approach and when applied to QED-Lagrangian is able to obtain in a first approximation both the running coupling constant behavior of α(μ) and the mass m(μ). The calculations are evaluated just at d c = 4, where d c is the upper critical dimension of the problem, so that we obtain the logarithmic behavior both for the coupling α and the excess of mass Δm on the energy scale μ. Although our results are well-known in the vast literature of field theories, the advantage of Thompson's method, beyond its simplicity is that it is able to extract directly from QED-Lagrangian the physical (finite) behavior of α(μ) and m(μ), bypassing hard problems of divergences which normally appear in the conventional renormalisation schemes applied to field theories like QED. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is also treated by the present method in order to obtain the quark condensate value. Besides this, the method is also able to evaluate the vacuum pressure at the boundary of the nucleon. This is done by assuming a step function behavior for the running coupling constant of the QCD, which fits nicely to some quantities related to the strong interaction evaluated through the MIT-bag model. (author)

  6. Music-to-Color Associations of Single-Line Piano Melodies in Non-synesthetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Stephen E; Langlois, Thomas A; Schloss, Karen B

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has shown that non-synesthetes' color associations to classical orchestral music are strongly mediated by emotion. The present study examines similar cross-modal music-to-color associations for much better controlled musical stimuli: 64 single-line piano melodies that were generated from four basic melodies by Mozart, whose global musical parameters were manipulated in tempo(slow/fast), note-density (sparse/dense), mode (major/minor) and pitch-height (low/high). Participants first chose the three colors (from 37) that they judged to be most consistent with (and, later, the three that were most inconsistent with) the music they were hearing. They later rated each melody and each color for the strength of its association along four emotional dimensions: happy/sad, agitated/calm, angry/not-angry and strong/weak. The cross-modal choices showed that faster music in the major mode was associated with lighter, more saturated, yellower (warmer) colors than slower music in the minor mode. These results replicate and extend those of Palmer et al. (2013, Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 110, 8836-8841) with more precisely controlled musical stimuli. Further results replicated strong evidence for emotional mediation of these cross-modal associations, in that the emotional ratings of the melodies were very highly correlated with the emotional associations of the colors chosen as going best/worst with the melodies (r = 0.92, 0.85, 0.82 and 0.70 for happy/sad, strong/weak,angry/not-angry and agitated/calm, respectively). The results are discussed in terms of common emotional associations forming a cross-modal bridge between highly disparate sensory inputs.

  7. Abstracts of the 4th International MELODI Workshop 12 -14 September 2012, Helsinki, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulonen, N.

    2012-08-01

    The Fourth International MELODI Workshop is organized by STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Helsinki, Finland, on 12-14 September 2012. The workshop offers an update of recent low-dose research issues, and an opportunity to participate in the MELODI Low Dose Research Platform, a major step in the long term goals that the European Low-Dose Risk research intends to achieve. The main goal of MELODI is to develop and maintain a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) in the field of low-dose radiation research, and to actively promote its implementation. DoReMi Network of Excellence funded by the European Commission is supporting the setting up of the Platform and addressing some of its research needs. In line with one of the main SRA goals, a major aim of the workshop was to set all topics in an interdisciplinary context. The Workshop abstracts cover plenary lectures as well as poster presentations related to topical discussions in breakout sessions. The theme of the first day 'Low dose risk research - state of the art' provides an introduction to the MELODI activities and the SRA and an update on recent epidemiological studies and dosimetric aspects of low dose studies. Potential implications of cardiovascular disease risk for radiation protection are also addressed. Discussion on the state-of-the art of MELODI SRA took place in three break-out groups addressing epidemiological approaches, cancer mechanisms and models and infrastructures and knowledge management. The second day 'Emerging scientific challenges' features the development of science and novel technologies, covering topics such as epigenetics, systems biology, stem cells as well as biomarkers that could be potentially used in molecular epidemiological studies. The associated breakout sessions explore the roadmap for future research, covering themes on biomarkers and biobanks, non-cancer effects, as well as low dose dosimetry and dose concept. The third day 'Integrating the research' provides

  8. The acoustic and perceptual cues affecting melody segregation for listeners with a cochlear implant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy eMarozeau

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to listen selectively to single sound sources in complex auditory environments is termed ‘auditory stream segregation.’ This ability is affected by peripheral disorders such as hearing loss, as well as plasticity in central processing such as occurs with musical training. Brain plasticity induced by musical training can enhance the ability to segregate sound, leading to improvements in a variety of auditory abilities. The melody segregation ability of 12 cochlear-implant recipients was tested using a new method to determine the perceptual distance needed to segregate a simple 4-note melody from a background of interleaved random-pitch distractor notes. In experiment 1, participants rated the difficulty of segregating the melody from distracter notes. Four physical properties of the distracter notes were changed. In experiment 2, listeners were asked to rate the dissimilarity between melody patterns whose notes differed on the four physical properties simultaneously. Multidimensional scaling analysis transformed the dissimilarity ratings into perceptual distances. Regression between physical and perceptual cues then derived the minimal perceptual distance needed to segregate the melody.The most efficient streaming cue for CI users was loudness. For the normal hearing listeners without musical backgrounds, a greater difference on the perceptual dimension correlated to the temporal envelope is needed for stream segregation in CI users. No differences in streaming efficiency were found between the perceptual dimensions linked to the F0 and the spectral envelope.Combined with our previous results in normally-hearing musicians and non-musicians, the results show that differences in training as well as differences in peripheral auditory processing (hearing impairment and the use of a hearing device influences the way that listeners use different acoustic cues for segregating interleaved musical streams.

  9. Thompson Receives 2013 Early Career Hydrologic Science Award: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    Sally Thompson grew up in Perth, where she was trained as an environmental engineer at the University of Western Australia. She graduated with honors in 2003 and worked for a few years as an environmental engineering consultant. Following the award of the Sir John Monash Fellowship in Australia, Sal accepted the admissions offer from the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University in 2006, completing her Ph.D. within 4 years and defending her dissertation in 2010. I was most fortunate to have Sal join me at Duke after an enthusiastic recommendation from Siva. Upon her arrival at Duke University, it was immediately clear to all that Sal is a special person with the remarkable skill of being able to identify the main aspects of a problem and throw at them the best that theory, experiment, and modeling tools offer.

  10. Second International MELODI Workshop on Low Dose Risk Research - Slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repussard, J.; Weiss, W.; Quintana Trias, O.; Rosario Perez, M. del; Andersen, M.; Rudiger Trott, K.; Ottolenghi, A.; Smyth, V.; Graw, J.; Little, M.P.; Yonai, S.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.; Bouffler, S.; Chevillard, S.; Jeggo, P.; Sabatier, L.; Baatout, S.; Niwa, O.; Oesch, F.; Atkinson, M.; Averbeck, D.; Lloyd, D.; O'Neill, P.

    2011-01-01

    The MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) mission is to impulse low dose risk research in Europe through a strategic research agenda (SRA) and road-map of priorities. The last presentation is dedicated to the SRA and its preference research programs. The other presentations deal principally with the low-dose exposure in medical uses of ionizing radiations, radiosensitivity, radiation-induced cataracts, or epidemiology and radiobiology of cardiovascular disease. This document is composed of the slides of the presentations

  11. Neural substrates for semantic memory of familiar songs: is there an interface between lyrics and melodies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Saito

    Full Text Available Findings on song perception and song production have increasingly suggested that common but partially distinct neural networks exist for processing lyrics and melody. However, the neural substrates of song recognition remain to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrates involved in the accessing "song lexicon" as corresponding to a representational system that might provide links between the musical and phonological lexicons using positron emission tomography (PET. We exposed participants to auditory stimuli consisting of familiar and unfamiliar songs presented in three ways: sung lyrics (song, sung lyrics on a single pitch (lyrics, and the sung syllable 'la' on original pitches (melody. The auditory stimuli were designed to have equivalent familiarity to participants, and they were recorded at exactly the same tempo. Eleven right-handed nonmusicians participated in four conditions: three familiarity decision tasks using song, lyrics, and melody and a sound type decision task (control that was designed to engage perceptual and prelexical processing but not lexical processing. The contrasts (familiarity decision tasks versus control showed no common areas of activation between lyrics and melody. This result indicates that essentially separate neural networks exist in semantic memory for the verbal and melodic processing of familiar songs. Verbal lexical processing recruited the left fusiform gyrus and the left inferior occipital gyrus, whereas melodic lexical processing engaged the right middle temporal sulcus and the bilateral temporo-occipital cortices. Moreover, we found that song specifically activated the left posterior inferior temporal cortex, which may serve as an interface between verbal and musical representations in order to facilitate song recognition.

  12. Neural substrates for semantic memory of familiar songs: is there an interface between lyrics and melodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoko; Ishii, Kenji; Sakuma, Naoko; Kawasaki, Keiichi; Oda, Keiichi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Findings on song perception and song production have increasingly suggested that common but partially distinct neural networks exist for processing lyrics and melody. However, the neural substrates of song recognition remain to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrates involved in the accessing "song lexicon" as corresponding to a representational system that might provide links between the musical and phonological lexicons using positron emission tomography (PET). We exposed participants to auditory stimuli consisting of familiar and unfamiliar songs presented in three ways: sung lyrics (song), sung lyrics on a single pitch (lyrics), and the sung syllable 'la' on original pitches (melody). The auditory stimuli were designed to have equivalent familiarity to participants, and they were recorded at exactly the same tempo. Eleven right-handed nonmusicians participated in four conditions: three familiarity decision tasks using song, lyrics, and melody and a sound type decision task (control) that was designed to engage perceptual and prelexical processing but not lexical processing. The contrasts (familiarity decision tasks versus control) showed no common areas of activation between lyrics and melody. This result indicates that essentially separate neural networks exist in semantic memory for the verbal and melodic processing of familiar songs. Verbal lexical processing recruited the left fusiform gyrus and the left inferior occipital gyrus, whereas melodic lexical processing engaged the right middle temporal sulcus and the bilateral temporo-occipital cortices. Moreover, we found that song specifically activated the left posterior inferior temporal cortex, which may serve as an interface between verbal and musical representations in order to facilitate song recognition.

  13. Melodie: a code for risk assessment of waste repositories in deep geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewi, J.; Mejon-Goula, M.J.; Cernes, A.

    1988-10-01

    In order to perform the safety evaluation of nuclear waste repositories, a global model, called MELODIE, is currently developed at the CEA/IPSN, in collaboration with order CEA teams and non-CEA like ENSMP (Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris). The version now in operation allows to assess the radiological consequences due to a repository located in a granitic formation on a period of several hundred thousands of years. The calculations are based on models which represent the physical and chemical phenomena in connection with: the release of the radionuclides from the waste matrixes and through the engineered barriers; their transfer through the geosphere; their behaviour in the biosphere. Three separate models have been developed for each of these subjects; they are integrated in the code through a modular flexible dataprocessing structure which calls these computational modules with their optimal time step and extracts the data from the data files where they are stored. In addition, a sensitivity and uncertainty analysis algorithm has been implemented into the code. It allows to evaluate the influence of the parameter values on the result and to assess the global uncertainty on it. After a quite general description of MELODIE, the calculations performed with it in the PAGIS (CCE) exercise: global dose calculations and ranking of the most important parameters through the sensitivity analysis, are presented. The studies performed only with the geosphere module of MELODIE (METIS), especially the participation to the HYDROCOIN (OECD/NEA) exercise, are also noticed. In addition, the main future development axes of MELODIE are outlined

  14. Melody pulmonary valve bacterial endocarditis: experience in four pediatric patients and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Juan; Baker, George Hamilton; Austin, Erle H; Miller, Stephen; Peng, Lynn; Beekman, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this manuscript are two-fold: (a) to describe the clinical characteristics and management of four pediatric patients with bacterial endocarditis (BE) after Melody pulmonary valve implantation (MPVI); and (b) to review the literature regarding Melody pulmonary valve endocarditis. There are several reports of BE following MPVI. The clinical course, BE management and outcome remain poorly defined. This is a multi-center report of four pediatric patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and BE after MPVI. Clinical presentation, echocardiogram findings, infecting organism, BE management, and follow-up assessment are described. We review available literature on Melody pulmonary valve endocarditis and discuss the prognosis and challenges in the management of these patients. Of our four BE patients, two had documented vegetations and three showed worsening pulmonary stenosis. All patients remain asymptomatic after medical treatment (4) and surgical prosthesis replacement (3) at follow-up of 17 to 40 months. Analysis of published data shows that over half of patients undergo bioprosthesis explantation and that there is a 13% overall mortality. The most common BE pathogens are the Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species. Our case series of four pediatric patients with repaired TOF confirms a risk for BE after MPVI. A high index of suspicion for BE should be observed after MPVI. All patients should be advised to follow lifelong BE prophylaxis after MPVI. In case of BE, surgery should be considered for valve dysfunction or no clinical improvement in spite of medical treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Harmonic Walk: An Interactive Physical Environment to Learn Tonal Melody Accompaniment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Mandanici

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Harmonic Walk is an interactive physical environment designed for learning and practicing the accompaniment of a tonal melody. Employing a highly innovative multimedia system, the application offers to the user the possibility of getting in touch with some fundamental tonal music features in a very simple and readily available way. Notwithstanding tonal music is very common in our lives, unskilled people as well as music students and even professionals are scarcely conscious of what these features actually are. The Harmonic Walk, through the body movement in space, can provide all these users a live experience of tonal melody structure, chords progressions, melody accompaniment, and improvisation. Enactive knowledge and embodied cognition allow the user to build an inner map of these musical features, which can be acted by moving on the active surface with a simple step. Thorough assessment tests with musicians and nonmusicians high school students could prove the high communicative power and efficiency of the Harmonic Walk application both in improving musical knowledge and in accomplishing complex musical tasks.

  16. Benjamin Thompson, Count Rumford Count Rumford on the nature of heat

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Sanborn C

    1967-01-01

    Men of Physics: Benjamin Thompson - Count Rumford: Count Rumford on the Nature of Heat covers the significant contributions of Count Rumford in the fields of physics. Count Rumford was born with the name Benjamin Thompson on March 23, 1753, in Woburn, Massachusetts. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 11 chapters, and begins with a presentation of Benjamin Thompson's biography and his interest in physics, particularly as an advocate of an """"anti-caloric"""" theory of heat. The subsequent chapters are devoted to his many discoveries that profoundly affected the physical thought

  17. Abstracts of the 4th International MELODI Workshop 12 -14 September 2012, Helsinki, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulonen, N. (ed.)

    2012-08-15

    The Fourth International MELODI Workshop is organized by STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Helsinki, Finland, on 12-14 September 2012. The workshop offers an update of recent low-dose research issues, and an opportunity to participate in the MELODI Low Dose Research Platform, a major step in the long term goals that the European Low-Dose Risk research intends to achieve. The main goal of MELODI is to develop and maintain a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) in the field of low-dose radiation research, and to actively promote its implementation. DoReMi Network of Excellence funded by the European Commission is supporting the setting up of the Platform and addressing some of its research needs. In line with one of the main SRA goals, a major aim of the workshop was to set all topics in an interdisciplinary context. The Workshop abstracts cover plenary lectures as well as poster presentations related to topical discussions in breakout sessions. The theme of the first day 'Low dose risk research - state of the art' provides an introduction to the MELODI activities and the SRA and an update on recent epidemiological studies and dosimetric aspects of low dose studies. Potential implications of cardiovascular disease risk for radiation protection are also addressed. Discussion on the state-of-the art of MELODI SRA took place in three break-out groups addressing epidemiological approaches, cancer mechanisms and models and infrastructures and knowledge management. The second day 'Emerging scientific challenges' features the development of science and novel technologies, covering topics such as epigenetics, systems biology, stem cells as well as biomarkers that could be potentially used in molecular epidemiological studies. The associated breakout sessions explore the roadmap for future research, covering themes on biomarkers and biobanks, non-cancer effects, as well as low dose dosimetry and dose concept. The third day 'Integrating the

  18. Final 2014 Remedial Action Report Project Chariot, Cape Thompson, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-03-01

    This report was prepared to document remedial action (RA) work performed at the former Project Chariot site located near Cape Thompson, Alaska during 2014. The work was managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Alaska District for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM). Due to the short field season and the tight barge schedule, all field work was conducted at the site July 6 through September 12, 2014. Excavation activities occurred between July 16 and August 26, 2014. A temporary field camp was constructed at the site prior to excavation activities to accommodate the workers at the remote, uninhabited location. A total of 785.6 tons of petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL)-contaminated soil was excavated from four former drill sites associated with test holes installed circa 1960. Diesel was used in the drilling process during test hole installations and resulted in impacts to surface and subsurface soils at four of the five sites (no contamination was identified at Test Hole Able). Historic information is not definitive as to the usage for Test Hole X-1; it may have actually been a dump site and not a drill site. In addition to the contaminated soil, the steel test hole casings were decommissioned and associated debris was removed as part of the remedial effort.

  19. Thompson e Gramsci: história, política e processos de formação Thompson and Gramsci: history, politics and educational processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Vieira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pretende-se apresentar e explorar as conexões entre as ideias de dois destacados pensadores sociais do século xx, o italiano Antonio Gramsci e o inglês Edward Thompson. O intuito é refletir sobre a centralidade conferida pelas obras desses intelectuais à política, à cultura e à formação humana. Considerando que uma das fontes do pensamento historiográfico de Thompson é a obra de Gramsci, pretendemos dimensionar os pontos de contato entre as duas obras com o fim de pensar nas possibilidades heurísticas que este diálogo poderá ensejar no campo educacional. Concluímos demonstrando que as reflexões de Thompson e de Gramsci convergem em três aspectos principais: a ênfase na história das classes subalternas, a opção pela abordagem historicista do conhecimento e a problematização das concepções de cultura e de formação.This paper investigates the connections between the ideas of two prominent twentieth century's social thinkers, the Italian Antonio Gramsci and the English Edward Thompson. It sets a discussion on the importance these intellectuals granted to politics, culture and human education to highlight similar aspects in both works yet considering that one of the main sources of Thompson's historiographic thought is Gramsci's work. It then reflects on the heuristic possibilities this dialogue may bring to the field of education. It concludes that Gramsci and Thompson's reflections converge on three main aspects: the emphasis on working class history, the option for a historical approach of knowledge and the discussion on the conceptions of culture and education.

  20. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON from 19920323 to 19921020 (NODC Accession 9700194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oxygen production, abundance of marine snow, and other data were collected from bottle and video camera casts in the Pacific Ocean from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON from...

  1. The Golden-Thompson inequality: Historical aspects and random matrix applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, Peter J.; Thompson, Colin J.

    2014-01-01

    The Golden-Thompson inequality, Tr (e A+B ) ⩽ Tr (e A e B ) for A, B Hermitian matrices, appeared in independent works by Golden and Thompson published in 1965. Both of these were motivated by considerations in statistical mechanics. In recent years the Golden-Thompson inequality has found applications to random matrix theory. In this article, we detail some historical aspects relating to Thompson's work, giving in particular a hitherto unpublished proof due to Dyson, and correspondence with Pólya. We show too how the 2 × 2 case relates to hyperbolic geometry, and how the original inequality holds true with the trace operation replaced by any unitarily invariant norm. In relation to the random matrix applications, we review its use in the derivation of concentration type lemmas for sums of random matrices due to Ahlswede-Winter, and Oliveira, generalizing various classical results

  2. Optimal control of information epidemics modeled as Maki Thompson rumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandhway, Kundan; Kuri, Joy

    2014-12-01

    We model the spread of information in a homogeneously mixed population using the Maki Thompson rumor model. We formulate an optimal control problem, from the perspective of single campaigner, to maximize the spread of information when the campaign budget is fixed. Control signals, such as advertising in the mass media, attempt to convert ignorants and stiflers into spreaders. We show the existence of a solution to the optimal control problem when the campaigning incurs non-linear costs under the isoperimetric budget constraint. The solution employs Pontryagin's Minimum Principle and a modified version of forward backward sweep technique for numerical computation to accommodate the isoperimetric budget constraint. The techniques developed in this paper are general and can be applied to similar optimal control problems in other areas. We have allowed the spreading rate of the information epidemic to vary over the campaign duration to model practical situations when the interest level of the population in the subject of the campaign changes with time. The shape of the optimal control signal is studied for different model parameters and spreading rate profiles. We have also studied the variation of the optimal campaigning costs with respect to various model parameters. Results indicate that, for some model parameters, significant improvements can be achieved by the optimal strategy compared to the static control strategy. The static strategy respects the same budget constraint as the optimal strategy and has a constant value throughout the campaign horizon. This work finds application in election and social awareness campaigns, product advertising, movie promotion and crowdfunding campaigns.

  3. The Thompson Encephalopathy Score and Short-Term Outcomes in Asphyxiated Newborns Treated With Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Patricia; Jansen-van der Weide, Martine C; Groenendaal, Floris; Onland, Wes; van Straaten, Henrika L M; Zonnenberg, Inge; Vermeulen, Jeroen R; Dijk, Peter H; Dudink, Jeroen; Rijken, Monique; van Heijst, Arno; Dijkman, Koen P; Cools, Filip; Zecic, Alexandra; van Kaam, Anton H; de Haan, Timo R

    2016-07-01

    The Thompson encephalopathy score is a clinical score to assess newborns suffering from perinatal asphyxia. Previous studies revealed a high sensitivity and specificity of the Thompson encephalopathy score for adverse outcomes (death or severe disability). Because the Thompson encephalopathy score was developed before the use of therapeutic hypothermia, its value was reassessed. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of the Thompson encephalopathy score with adverse short-term outcomes, defined as death before discharge, development of severe epilepsy, or the presence of multiple organ failure in asphyxiated newborns undergoing therapeutic hypothermia. The study period ranged from November 2010 to October 2014. A total of 12 tertiary neonatal intensive care units participated. Demographic and clinical data were collected from the "PharmaCool" multicenter study, an observational cohort study analyzing pharmacokinetics of medication during therapeutic hypothermia. With multiple logistic regression analyses the association of the Thompson encephalopathy scores with outcomes was studied. Data of 142 newborns were analyzed (male: 86; female: 56). Median Thompson score was 9 (interquartile range: 8 to 12). Median gestational age was 40 weeks (interquartile range 38 to 41), mean birth weight was 3362 grams (standard deviation: 605). All newborns manifested perinatal asphyxia and underwent therapeutic hypothermia. Death before discharge occurred in 23.9% and severe epilepsy in 21.1% of the cases. In total, 59.2% of the patients had multiple organ failure. The Thompson encephalopathy score was not associated with multiple organ failure, but a Thompson encephalopathy score ≥12 was associated with death before discharge (odds ratio: 3.9; confidence interval: 1.3 to 11.2) and with development of severe epilepsy (odds ratio: 8.4; confidence interval: 2.5 to 27.8). The Thompson encephalopathy score is a useful clinical tool, even in cooled asphyxiated

  4. Continuous loudness response to acoustic intensity dynamics in melodies: effects of melodic contour, tempo, and tonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kirk N; Stevens, Catherine J; Dean, Roger T; Bailes, Freya

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate perceived loudness change in response to melodies that increase (up-ramp) or decrease (down-ramp) in acoustic intensity, and the interaction with other musical factors such as melodic contour, tempo, and tonality (tonal/atonal). A within-subjects design manipulated direction of linear intensity change (up-ramp, down-ramp), melodic contour (ascending, descending), tempo, and tonality, using single ramp trials and paired ramp trials, where single up-ramps and down-ramps were assembled to create continuous up-ramp/down-ramp or down-ramp/up-ramp pairs. Twenty-nine (Exp 1) and thirty-six (Exp 2) participants rated loudness continuously in response to trials with monophonic 13-note piano melodies lasting either 6.4s or 12s. Linear correlation coefficients >.89 between loudness and time show that time-series loudness responses to dynamic up-ramp and down-ramp melodies are essentially linear across all melodies. Therefore, 'indirect' loudness change derived from the difference in loudness at the beginning and end points of the continuous response was calculated. Down-ramps were perceived to change significantly more in loudness than up-ramps in both tonalities and at a relatively slow tempo. Loudness change was also greater for down-ramps presented with a congruent descending melodic contour, relative to an incongruent pairing (down-ramp and ascending melodic contour). No differential effect of intensity ramp/melodic contour congruency was observed for up-ramps. In paired ramp trials assessing the possible impact of ramp context, loudness change in response to up-ramps was significantly greater when preceded by down-ramps, than when not preceded by another ramp. Ramp context did not affect down-ramp perception. The contribution to the fields of music perception and psychoacoustics are discussed in the context of real-time perception of music, principles of music composition, and performance of musical dynamics. Copyright © 2014

  5. Learning and liking of melody and harmony: further studies in artificial grammar learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Psyche

    2012-10-01

    Much of what we know and love about music is based on implicitly acquired mental representations of musical pitches and the relationships between them. While previous studies have shown that these mental representations of music can be acquired rapidly and can influence preference, it is still unclear which aspects of music influence learning and preference formation. This article reports two experiments that use an artificial musical system to examine two questions: (1) which aspects of music matter most for learning, and (2) which aspects of music matter most for preference formation. Two aspects of music are tested: melody and harmony. In Experiment 1 we tested the learning and liking of a new musical system that is manipulated melodically so that only some of the possible conditional probabilities between successive notes are presented. In Experiment 2 we administered the same tests for learning and liking, but we used a musical system that is manipulated harmonically to eliminate the property of harmonic whole-integer ratios between pitches. Results show that disrupting melody (Experiment 1) disabled the learning of music without disrupting preference formation, whereas disrupting harmony (Experiment 2) does not affect learning and memory but disrupts preference formation. Results point to a possible dissociation between learning and preference in musical knowledge. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  6. Corrections to the Walker-Thompson estimate of the cascade volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminarayan, S.; Nastasi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Sigmund [P. Sigmund, Appl. Phys. Lett. 25 (1974) 169] analytically predicted that the ratio of cascade volume to energy distribution volume should follow a universal curve that is sigmoidal in shape. Subsequent Monte Carlo simulations by Walker and Thompson [R.S. Walker, D.A. Thompson, Radiat. Eff. 37 (1978) 113] showed that although this curve is sigmoidal in shape, the curve is different for different materials with large deviations from Sigmund's prediction at high M 2 /M 1 . Our analysis of the Walker and Thompson approach has revealed an error in the analytical equations used. A correct analysis of volume ratios using a different set of equations is presented. Analysis of data produced by SRIM [J.F. Ziegler, J.P. Biersack, U. Littmark, in: The Stopping and Range of Ions in solids, Pergamon, New York, 1985] (Monte Carlo) simulations gives results that are in good agreement with Sigmund's predictions.

  7. Environmental Restoration of Diesel-Range Organics from Project Chariot, Cape Thompson, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautsky, Mark [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Hutton, Rick [Navarro Research & Engineering; Miller, Judy [Navarro Research & Engineering

    2016-03-06

    The Chariot site is located in the Ogotoruk Valley in the Cape Thompson region of northwest Alaska. Project Chariot was part of the Plowshare Program, created in 1957 by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE), to study peaceful uses for atomic energy. Project Chariot began in 1958 when a scientific field team chose Cape Thompson as a potential site to excavate a harbor using a series of nuclear explosions. AEC, with assistance from other agencies, conducted more than 40 pretest bioenvironmental studies of the Cape Thompson area between 1959 and 1962; however, the Plowshare Program work at the Project Chariot site (Figure 1) was cancelled because of strong public opposition [1]. No nuclear explosions were ever conducted at the site.

  8. Simulating the Effects of Spread of Electric Excitation on Musical Tuning and Melody Identification with a Cochlear Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, Anthony J.; Litvak, Leonid M.; Dorman, Michael F.; Bohanan, Ashley R.; Mishra, Lakshmi N.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine why, in a pilot study, only 1 of 11 cochlear implant listeners was able to reliably identify a frequency-to-electrode map where the intervals of a familiar melody were played on the correct musical scale. The authors sought to validate their method and to assess the effect of pitch strength on musical scale recognition in…

  9. An fMRI comparison of neural activity associated with recognition of familiar melodies in younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Ritu; Cuddy, Lola L; Johnsrude, Ingrid S; Vanstone, Ashley D

    2015-01-01

    Several studies of semantic memory in non-musical domains involving recognition of items from long-term memory have shown an age-related shift from the medial temporal lobe structures to the frontal lobe. However, the effects of aging on musical semantic memory remain unexamined. We compared activation associated with recognition of familiar melodies in younger and older adults. Recognition follows successful retrieval from the musical lexicon that comprises a lifetime of learned musical phrases. We used the sparse-sampling technique in fMRI to determine the neural correlates of melody recognition by comparing activation when listening to familiar vs. unfamiliar melodies, and to identify age differences. Recognition-related cortical activation was detected in the right superior temporal, bilateral inferior and superior frontal, left middle orbitofrontal, bilateral precentral, and left supramarginal gyri. Region-of-interest analysis showed greater activation for younger adults in the left superior temporal gyrus and for older adults in the left superior frontal, left angular, and bilateral superior parietal regions. Our study provides powerful evidence for these musical memory networks due to a large sample (N = 40) that includes older adults. This study is the first to investigate the neural basis of melody recognition in older adults and to compare the findings to younger adults.

  10. An fMRI comparison of neural activity associated with recognition of familiar melodies in younger and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu eSikka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies of semantic memory in non-musical domains involving recognition of items from long-term memory have shown an age-related shift from the medial temporal lobe structures to the frontal lobe. However, the effects of aging on musical semantic memory remain unexamined. We compared activation associated with recognition of familiar melodies in younger and older adults. Recognition follows successful retrieval from the musical lexicon that comprises a lifetime of learned musical phrases. We used the sparse-sampling technique in fMRI to determine the neural correlates of melody recognition by comparing activation when listening to familiar versus unfamiliar melodies, and to identify age differences. Recognition-related cortical activation was detected in the right superior temporal, bilateral inferior and superior frontal, left middle orbitofrontal, bilateral precentral, and left supramarginal gyri. Region-of-interest analysis showed greater activation for younger adults in the left superior temporal gyrus and for older adults in the left superior frontal, left angular, and bilateral superior parietal regions. Our study provides powerful evidence for these musical memory networks due to a large sample (N = 40 that includes older adults. This study is the first to investigate the neural basis of melody recognition in older adults and to compare the findings to younger adults.

  11. "Miríades por toda a eternidade": a atualidade de E. P. Thompson "Myriads of eternity": the actuality of E. P. Thompson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fortes

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo reexamina o trabalho clássico de E. P. Thompson, nele identificando elementos relevantes para o estudo do contexto histórico contemporâneo. Critica as abordagens que buscaram sintetizar um "método thompsoniano" em algumas fórmulas do prefácio da obra recorrentemente citadas. Defende ainda que a compreensão do persistente apelo do livro deve ser buscada na análise de sua estrutura narrativa.The article re-examines the classic work by E. P. Thompson, The making of the English working class, identifying many elements relevant to the study of the contemporary historical context. It criticizes those approaches that look to synthesize a 'Thompsonian method' in a number of recurrently cited formulas found in the preface to the work. It also argues that the persistent appeal of the book can be explained through an analysis of its narrative structure.

  12. Efficacy of melody-based aphasia therapy may strongly depend on rhythm and conversational speech formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Stahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Left-hemisphere stroke patients suffering from language and speech disorders are often able to sing entire pieces of text fluently. This finding has inspired a number of melody-based rehabilitation programs – most notable among them a treatment known as Melodic Intonation Therapy – as well as two fundamental research questions. When the experimental design focuses on one point in time (cross section, one may determine whether or not singing has an immediate effect on syllable production in patients with language and speech disorders. When the design focuses on changes over several points in time (longitudinal section, one may gain insight as to whether or not singing has a long-term effect on language and speech recovery. The current work addresses both of these questions with two separate experiments that investigate the interplay of melody, rhythm and lyric type in 32 patients with non-fluent aphasia and apraxia of speech (Stahl et al., 2011; Stahl et al., 2013. Taken together, the experiments deliver three main results. First, singing and rhythmic pacing proved to be equally effective in facilitating immediate syllable production and long-term language and speech recovery. Controlling for various influences such as prosody, syllable duration and phonetic complexity, the data did not reveal any advantage of singing over rhythmic speech. This result was independent of lesion size and lesion location in the patients. Second, patients with extensive left-sided basal ganglia lesions produced more correct syllables when their speech was paced by rhythmic drumbeats. This observation is consistent with the idea that regular auditory cues may partially compensate for corticostriatal damage and thereby improve speech-motor planning (Grahn & Watson, 2013. Third, conversational speech formulas and well-known song lyrics yielded higher rates of correct syllable production than novel word sequences – whether patients were singing or speaking

  13. Exploiting Open Environmental Data using Linked Data and Cloud Computing: the MELODIES project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Jon; Gonçalves, Pedro; Caumont, Hervé; Koubarakis, Manolis; Perkins, Bethan

    2015-04-01

    The European Open Data Strategy establishes important new principles that ensure that European public sector data will be released at no cost (or marginal cost), in machine-readable, commonly-understood formats, and with liberal licences enabling wide reuse. These data encompass both scientific data about the environment (from Earth Observation and other fields) and other public sector information, including diverse topics such as demographics, health and crime. Many open geospatial datasets (e.g. land use) are already available through the INSPIRE directive and made available through infrastructures such as the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The intention of the Open Data Strategy is to stimulate the growth of research and value-adding services that build upon these data streams; however, the potential value inherent in open data, and the benefits that can be gained by combining previously-disparate sources of information are only just starting to become understood. The MELODIES project (Maximising the Exploitation of Linked Open Data In Enterprise and Science) is developing eight innovative and sustainable services, based upon Open Data, for users in research, government, industry and the general public in a broad range of societal and environmental benefit areas. MELODIES (http://melodiesproject.eu) is a European FP7 project that is coordinated by the University of Reading and has sixteen partners (including nine SMEs) from eight European countries. It started in November 2013 and will run for three years. The project is therefore in its early stages and therefore we will value the opportunity that this workshop affords to present our plans and interact with the wider Linked Geospatial Data community. The project is developing eight new services[1] covering a range of domains including agriculture, urban ecosystems, land use management, marine information, desertification, crisis management and hydrology. These services will combine Earth

  14. Maquinações Satânicas: Edward Thompson e as leituras do sistema fabril

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Marson

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The author elaborates Ihroagh the writings of Andrew Ure different interpretations of labor changes as interpreted by Marx and by the historian Edward P. Thompson. From the scientificist argument of the invention of a technological mechanism for re-organizing human relation, Marx detected the dialectical process of exploitation of the working class. Thompson, on the other hand, discerns different mediations in this process, mainly the role of religious faith in the UiscipHnnrizalion of industrial labor. The historian is mainly interested in reconstituting antagonistic values that opposed entrepreuneurial hegemony and the making of the working classes.

  15. Edith Marie Thompson (1877–1961), sports and empire settlement administrator

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Thompson, Edith Marie (1877–1961), sports and empire settlement administrator, was born at 44 Russell Road, Kensington, London, on 19 May 1877, the only daughter of William Frederic Thompson (1847/8–1921), barrister and mineral and chemical merchant, and his wife, Marie Charlotte, née Warde (1849/50–1900). She was educated at Norland Place School and was a boarder at Cheltenham Ladies' College in 1892–3, at a period when there was still very little sport played at the school. In January 1895,...

  16. Test pilots 1962 - Armstrong, Walker, Dana, Peterson, McKay, Thompson, Butchart

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    The research pilots at what in 1962 was called the Flight Research Center standing in front of the X-1E. They are (left to right) Neil Armstrong, Joe Walker, Bill Dana, Bruce Peterson, Jack McKay, Milt Thompson, and Stan Butchart. of the group, Armstrong, Walker, Dana, McKay and Thompson all flew the X-15. Bruce Peterson flew the M2-F2 and HL-10 lifting bodies, while Stan Butchart was the B-29 drop plane pilot for many of the D-558-II and X-1 series research aircraft.

  17. Three dimensional rotational angiography for assessment of coronary arteries during melody valve implantation: introducing a technique that may improve outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockett, C R; Moore, J W; El-Said, H G

    2017-02-01

    Adverse events from Melody valve implantation may be catastrophic. To date a role for three dimensional rotational angiography of the aortic root (3DRAA) during Melody valve implantation has not been established. To describe the role of 3DRAA in the assessment of Melody valve candidacy and to demonstrate that it may improve outcomes. All patients who underwent cardiac catheterisation for Melody valve implantation and 3DRAA between August 2013 and February 2015 were reviewed. 31 patients had 3DRAA with balloon sizing. Ten were deemed not Melody candidates (5 coronary compression, 2 aortic root distortion with cusp flattening, 2 RVOT was too large, and 1 had complex branch stenosis and a short landing zone). Of the 21 patients who were Melody candidates, 12 had conduits, 6 prosthetic valves and 3 native RVOTs. In patients with conduits, the technique of stenting the conduit prior to dilation was used after measuring the distance between the conduit and the coronary arteries on 3DRAA. In the Melody patients, we had 100% procedural success and no serious adverse events (coronary compression, tears, stent fracture or endocarditis). As a tool for case selection, 3DRAA may facilitate higher procedural success and decreased risk of serious adverse events. Furthermore, 3D rotational angiography allows stenting of the conduit prior to dilation, which may prevent tears and possibly endocarditis.

  18. Word and melody in the opus of Momčilo and Svetomir Nastasijević

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peno Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the house of artistically gifted family Nastasijević where renowned Belgrade artists used to gather together during the twenties and thirties of the previous century, music was nothing but an excuse for regular meetings. The art of sound represented a backbone of one system of poetics in the shaping of which Nastasijević brothers as well as their close contemporaries and faithful friends truly found the common ground. Rethinking the music phenomenon brought them close to their otherwise remote relatives by thought - to Greek philosophers, but also to French and especially Russian symbolists whose opinions they shared. A pursue for, on one hand, an authentically native but, on the other, cosmopolitan spirit and universal values, marked the creative output of Momčilo, a writer and a pivot of Nastasijević family, but also the overall creative engagement of his brothers. They all shared common aesthetic standards, attempting to apply these in their respective artistic media as well as in synergy, in their joint ventures. In music dramas entitled Međuluško blago and Đurađ Branković, for which Momčilo wrote the script and Svetomir composed the music, the brothers tried to transform into deeds the Nastasijević-like convictions regarding music. The aim was to re-find and turn a native - homeland melody into sound. This melody represented a “golden ratio point” in which all arts meet; it is a kind of a spiritual totality embodying one form of spiritual existence which cannot be reached otherwise but from the “homeland soil”. They believed they would reach the archetype of national identity and, at the same time, of the universal being by harking at and perpetual crying for the forgotten sound of words. Momčilo’s poetic concept demanded necessary interventions in respect to the dramatic genre. In his essay Dramsko stvaralaštvo i pozorište kod nas, he unequivocally opposed to what he argued to be a decadent and artistically

  19. MELODI - Multidisciplinary European Low dose Initiative - First Draft of Strategic Research Agenda (SRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.; Lloyd, D.; O'Neill, P.

    2010-01-01

    The SRA Working Group of MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) was tasked to develop a long-term strategic research agenda (SRA) to guide the coherent integration of national low dose research programmes. Priorities that need to be addressed concern fundamental mechanistic research ranging from radiation track structure and the deposition of energy in biologically important molecules; the resultant homeostatic perturbations and the steps in the cellular and tissue metabolic pathways that eventually lead to disease pathologies. In fact, the main priorities are here the step-wise elucidation of the mechanisms of radiation-induced (oxidative) stress responses and their impact on radiation-induced cancers and non cancer diseases. To achieve this a holistic approach is proposed staring with radiation-specific effects, radiation-induced molecular, biological and pathological effects involving a systems biology approach as well as molecular epidemiology and mathematical modelling in order to come up with more solid low dose health risk assessments. The pathologies considered are outlined in the report where the need is stressed for the MELODI platform to involve a constellation of classical and emerging technologies in a highly multidisciplinary approach. Elucidating the shapes of low-dose response relationships and resolving the question of thresholds is paramount to resolving questions of risk for both populations and individuals. Much is known about radiation-induced cancer in humans and animal models but this needs to be pursued particularly at low doses. More recently, the scientific community has realised that low radiation-induced health effects range well beyond cancer. The priority non-cancer areas that need to be brought into focus are cardiovascular, neurological and ophthalmic. (A.C.)

  20. E. P. Thompson, un marxista contra el marxismo como “materialismo histórico”

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Acha

    2013-01-01

    Análisis de la obra de Thompson como historiador marxista. Fil: Acha, José Omar. Consejo Nacional de Invest.cientif.y Tecnicas. Oficina de Coordinacion Administrativa Saavedra 15. Instituto de Historia Argentina y Americana "dr. Emilio Ravignani";

  1. Matrix algebra and sampling theory : The case of the Horvitz-Thompson estimator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, W.; Steerneman, A.G.M.; Wansbeek, T.J.

    Matrix algebra is a tool not commonly employed in sampling theory. The intention of this paper is to help change this situation by showing, in the context of the Horvitz-Thompson (HT) estimator, the convenience of the use of a number of matrix-algebra results. Sufficient conditions for the

  2. Dr. Steve Thompson, Chief Executive, The Royal Society of New Zealand

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    L. to r.: Dr Austin Ball, Deputy Technical Coordinator, CMS experiment; Dr Roland Horisberger, Paul Scherrer Institute and CERN, CMS experiment; Dr Steve Thompson, Chief Executive, The Royal Society of New Zealand; Dr Michel Della Negra, Spokesman, CMS experiment and Dr Alick Macpherson, Paul Scherrer Institute and CERN, CMS experiment, in the CMS Silicon Tracker assembly hall.

  3. MOMFER: A Search Engine of Thompson's Motif-Index of Folk Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, F.B.; van der Meulen, Marten; Meder, Theo; van den Bosch, Antal

    2015-01-01

    More than fifty years after the first edition of Thompson's seminal Motif-Indexof Folk Literature, we present an online search engine tailored to fully disclose the index digitally. This search engine, called MOMFER, greatly enhances the searchability of the Motif-Index and provides exciting new

  4. Simplified solutions of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering method at fixed energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmai, Tamas; Apagyi, Barnabas; Horvath, Miklos

    2008-01-01

    Simplified solutions of the Cox-Thompson inverse quantum scattering method at fixed energy are derived if a finite number of partial waves with only even or odd angular momenta contribute to the scattering process. Based on new formulae various approximate methods are introduced which also prove applicable to the generic scattering events

  5. CARBON TRACE GASES IN LAKE AND BEAVER POND ICE NEAR THOMPSON, MANITOBA, CANADA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concentrations of CO2, CO, and CH4 were measured in beaver pond and lake ice in April 1996 near Thompson, Manitoba to derive information on possible impacts of ice melting on corresponding atmospheric trace gas concentrations. CH4 concentrations in beaver pond and lake ice ranged...

  6. Propagação por enxertia de atemoia 'Thompson' sobre espécies de Rollinia 'Thompson' atemoya grafting onto Rollinia rootstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Paes de Almeida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve por finalidade avaliar o índice de sobrevivência do enxerto de atemoia 'Thompson' sobre dois porta-enxertos. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, em esquema fatorial 2 x 2, dois porta-enxertos [araticum-de-terra-fria (Rollinia sp. e biribá (Rollinia mucosa] e dois métodos de enxertia (topo em fenda lateral e topo à inglesa simples, em 6 blocos, 4 tratamentos e 5 plantas por parcela, totalizando 120 plantas. Para as condições locais, verificou-se que a atemoia pode ser propagada com sucesso via enxertia, usando o porta-enxerto araticum-de-terra-fria, com diferença significativa em relação ao biribá. O melhor método de enxertia para araticum-de-terra-fria foi o inglês simples, com índice de sobrevivência do enxerto de 90%. Observou-se baixo índice de sobrevivência do enxerto, utilizando-se de ambos os métodos de enxertia para o porta-enxerto biribá.This study aimed to evaluate the survival rate of atemoya 'Thompson' on two rootstocks.The experimental design used was in randomized blocks with factorial scheme 2 x 2 consisting of 6 blocks, 4 treatments and 5 replicates per parcel totaling 120 plants. Two grafting methods (side cleft graft and whip graft and two rootstocks [araticum-de-terra-fria (Rollinia sp. and biriba (Rollinia mucosa] were evaluated for propagation of 'Thompson' atemoya. Scion survival rate was evaluated and analyzed by Tukey test, with 5% of significance level. Atemoya tree under local conditions can be propagated successfully by grafting using araticum-de-terra-fria rootstock. Whip graft was the best grafting method for araticum-de-terra-fria rootstock with 90% survival. Both grafting methods for biriba rootstock resulted in low scion survival rate.

  7. The Rosslyn Code: Can Physics Explain a 500-Year Old Melody Etched in the Walls of a Scottish Chapel?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Chris [State Magazine

    2011-10-19

    For centuries, historians have puzzled over a series of 213 symbols carved into the stone of Scotland’s Rosslyn Chapel. (Disclaimer: You may recognize this chapel from The Da Vinci Code, but this is real and unrelated!) Several years ago, a composer and science enthusiast noticed that the symbols bore a striking similarity to Chladni patterns, the elegant images that form on a two- dimensional surface when it vibrates at certain frequencies. This man’s theory: A 500-year-old melody was inscribed in the chapel using the language of physics. But not everyone is convinced. Slate senior editor Chris Wilson travelled to Scotland to investigate the claims and listen to this mysterious melody, whatever it is. Come find out what he discovered, including images of the patterns and audio of the music they inspired.

  8. A new one-step procedure for pulmonary valve implantation of the melody valve: Simultaneous prestenting and valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjemline, Younes

    2018-01-01

    To describe a new modification, the one-step procedure, that allows interventionists to pre-stent and implant a Melody valve simultaneously. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) is the standard of care for managing patients with dysfunctional right ventricular outflow tract, and the approach is standardized. Patients undergoing PPVI using the one-step procedure were identified in our database. Procedural data and radiation exposure were compared to those in a matched group of patients who underwent PPVI using the conventional two-step procedure. Between January 2016 and January 2017, PPVI was performed in 27 patients (median age/range, 19.1/10-55 years) using the one-step procedure involving manual crimping of one to three bare metal stents over the Melody valve. The stent and Melody valve were delivered successfully using the Ensemble delivery system. No complications occurred. All patients had excellent hemodynamic results (median/range post-PPVI right ventricular to pulmonary artery gradient, 9/0-20 mmHg). Valve function was excellent. Median procedural and fluoroscopic times were 56 and 10.2 min, respectively, which significantly differed from those of the two-step procedure group. Similarly, the dose area product (DAP), and radiation time were statistically lower in the one-step group than in the two-step group (P step procedure is a safe modification that allows interventionists to prestent and implants the Melody valve simultaneously. It significantly reduces procedural and fluoroscopic times, and radiation exposure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Language and music: differential hemispheric dominance in detecting unexpected errors in the lyrics and melody of memorized songs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takuya; Kaga, Kimitaka; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L

    2009-02-01

    Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we report here the hemispheric dominance of the auditory cortex that is selectively modulated by unexpected errors in the lyrics and melody of songs (lyrics and melody deviants), thereby elucidating under which conditions the lateralization of auditory processing changes. In experiment 1 using familiar songs, we found that the dipole strength of responses to the lyrics deviants was left-dominant at 140 ms (M140), whereas that of responses to the melody deviants was right-dominant at 130 ms (M130). In experiment 2 using familiar songs with a constant syllable or pitch, the dipole strength of frequency mismatch negativity elicited by oddballs was left-dominant. There were significant main effects of experiment (1 and 2) for the peak latencies and for the coordinates of the dipoles, indicating that the M140 and M130 were not the frequency mismatch negativity. In experiment 3 using newly memorized songs, the right-dominant M130 was observed only when the presented note was unexpected one, independent of perceiving unnatural pitch transitions (i.e., perceptual saliency) and of selective attention to the melody of songs. The consistent right-dominance of the M130 between experiments 1 and 3 suggests that the M130 in experiment 1 is due to unexpected notes deviating from well-memorized songs. On the other hand, the left-dominant M140 was elicited by lyrics deviants, suggesting the influence of top-down linguistic information and the memory of the familiar songs. We thus conclude that the left- lateralized M140 and right-lateralized M130 reflect the expectation based on top-down information of language and music, respectively.

  10. Syntheses by rules of the speech signal in its amplitude-time representation - melody study - phonetic, translation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamarina, Carole

    1975-01-01

    The present paper deals with the real-time speech synthesis implemented on a minicomputer. A first program translates the orthographic text into a string of phonetic codes, which is then processed by the synthesis program itself. The method used, a synthesis by rules, directly computes the speech signal in its amplitude-time representation. Emphasis has been put on special cases (diphthongs, 'e muet', consonant-consonant transition) and the implementation of the rhythm and of the melody. (author) [fr

  11. How knowledge of the song influences the matching of "melodies" to rhythm sequences tapped in the right and left palms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, M W; Bormann, L; Harts, K

    1990-12-01

    Previous work by O'Boyle and Sanford (1988) has demonstrated that the right hemisphere (RH) is superior to the left hemisphere (LH) in the matching of tape-recorded melodies to rhythm sequences tapped in the palms of the hands. This asymmetrical advantage was attributed to a RH superiority in the perceptual processing of intonation as compared to the rhythm component of these musical stimuli. In the present study, subjects were taught that the monotone sound of two wooden drumsticks struck together in a specified rhythm actually represented non-melodic translations of songs with identifiable melodies. After such mental associations had been formed, these non-melodic stimuli (which produced no asymmetric performance in Exp. 2 of the O'Boyle and Sanford study), now produced a RH advantage that was comparable to that induced by the original melodies. This finding suggests that the physical presence of intonation and its subsequent perceptual analysis, are not necessarily critical to the RH advantage reported by O'Boyle and Sanford (1988). Rather, the asymmetry may be related to a superior ability of the RH to generate and/or manipulate echoic images in memory.

  12. EEG alpha desynchronization in musicians and nonmusicians in response to changes in melody, tempo, and key in classical music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Amy A; Hoge, Jessica; Dale, J Alexander; Cross, Jeffrey D; Chien, Alec

    2003-10-01

    Two experiments were performed to examine musicians' and nonmusicians' electroencephalographic (EEG) responses to changes in major dimensions (tempo, melody, and key) of classical music. In Exp. 1, 12 nonmusicians' and 12 musicians' EEGs during melody and tempo changes in classical music showed more alpha desynchronization in the left hemisphere (F3) for changes in tempo than in the right. For melody, the nonmusicians were more right-sided (F4) than left in activation, and musicians showed no left-right differences. In Exp. 2, 18 musicians' and 18 nonmusicians' EEG after a key change in classical music showed that distant key changes elicited more right frontal (F4) alpha desynchronization than left. Musicians showed more reaction to key changes than nonmusicians and instructions to attend to key changes had no significant effect. Classical music, given its well-defined structure, offers a unique set of stimuli to study the brain. Results support the concept of hierarchical modularity in music processing that may be automatic.

  13. Análise musical de Six Melodies (1950, de John Cage: contexto e procedimentos composicionais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Leticia Crozetta Zomer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho apresentamos uma análise da obra Six Melodies, do compositor norte-americano John Cage (1912-1992. Criada em 1950, a obra pertence ao seu segundo período composicional, denominado Período Romântico (1938-1950 por Solomon (1998, 2002. A análise musical se deu a partir da investigação dos processos composicionais (micro-macrocosmic form e gamut technique, abordando aspectos formais e estruturais da obra. Dessa forma, procuramos revelar detalhes a respeito da estética de Cage durante seus primeiros anos como compositor e da influência que seu companheiro, Merce Cunningham, exerceu sobre as obras deste período. O estudo das técnicas composicionais desenvolvidas durante o Período Romântico reflete a mudança no pensamento estético-filosófico do compositor.

  14. No disillusions in auditory extinction: perceiving a melody comprised of unperceived notes

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    Leon Y Deouell

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation of coherent percepts requires grouping together spatio-temporally disparate sensory inputs. Two major questions arise: (1 is awareness necessary for this process; and (2 can non-conscious elements of the sensory input be grouped into a conscious perceptµ To address this question, we tested two patients suffering from severe left auditory extinction following right hemisphere damage. In extinction, patients are unaware of the presence of left side stimuli when they are presented simultaneously with right side stimuli. We used the ‘scale illusion’ to test whether extinguished tones on the left can be incorporated into the content of conscious awareness. In the scale illusion, healthy listeners obtain the illusion of distinct melodies, which are the result of grouping of information from both ears into illusory auditory streams. We show that the two patients were susceptible to the scale illusion while being consciously unaware of the stimuli presented on their left. This suggests that awareness is not necessary for auditory grouping and non-conscious elements can be incorporated into a conscious percept.

  15. Mental reversal of imagined melodies: a role for the posterior parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, Robert J; Halpern, Andrea R; Bouffard, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Two fMRI experiments explored the neural substrates of a musical imagery task that required manipulation of the imagined sounds: temporal reversal of a melody. Musicians were presented with the first few notes of a familiar tune (Experiment 1) or its title (Experiment 2), followed by a string of notes that was either an exact or an inexact reversal. The task was to judge whether the second string was correct or not by mentally reversing all its notes, thus requiring both maintenance and manipulation of the represented string. Both experiments showed considerable activation of the superior parietal lobe (intraparietal sulcus) during the reversal process. Ventrolateral and dorsolateral frontal cortices were also activated, consistent with the memory load required during the task. We also found weaker evidence for some activation of right auditory cortex in both studies, congruent with results from previous simpler music imagery tasks. We interpret these results in the context of other mental transformation tasks, such as mental rotation in the visual domain, which are known to recruit the intraparietal sulcus region, and we propose that this region subserves general computations that require transformations of a sensory input. Mental imagery tasks may thus have both task or modality-specific components as well as components that supersede any specific codes and instead represent amodal mental manipulation.

  16. Solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem using finite set of phase shifts

    CERN Document Server

    Apagyi, B; Scheid, W

    2003-01-01

    A system of nonlinear equations is presented for the solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem (1970 J. Math. Phys. 11 805) at fixed energy. From a given finite set of phase shifts for physical angular momenta, the nonlinear equations determine related sets of asymptotic normalization constants and nonphysical (shifted) angular momenta from which all quantities of interest, including the inversion potential itself, can be calculated. As a first application of the method we use input data consisting of a finite set of phase shifts calculated from Woods-Saxon and box potentials representing interactions with diffuse or sharp surfaces, respectively. The results for the inversion potentials, their first moments and asymptotic properties are compared with those provided by the Newton-Sabatier quantum inversion procedure. It is found that in order to achieve inversion potentials of similar quality, the Cox-Thompson method requires a smaller set of phase shifts than the Newton-Sabatier procedure.

  17. Solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem using finite set of phase shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apagyi, Barnabas; Harman, Zoltan; Scheid, Werner

    2003-01-01

    A system of nonlinear equations is presented for the solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem (1970 J. Math. Phys. 11 805) at fixed energy. From a given finite set of phase shifts for physical angular momenta, the nonlinear equations determine related sets of asymptotic normalization constants and nonphysical (shifted) angular momenta from which all quantities of interest, including the inversion potential itself, can be calculated. As a first application of the method we use input data consisting of a finite set of phase shifts calculated from Woods-Saxon and box potentials representing interactions with diffuse or sharp surfaces, respectively. The results for the inversion potentials, their first moments and asymptotic properties are compared with those provided by the Newton-Sabatier quantum inversion procedure. It is found that in order to achieve inversion potentials of similar quality, the Cox-Thompson method requires a smaller set of phase shifts than the Newton-Sabatier procedure

  18. "Miríades por toda a eternidade": a atualidade de E. P. Thompson

    OpenAIRE

    Fortes,Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    O artigo reexamina o trabalho clássico de E. P. Thompson, nele identificando elementos relevantes para o estudo do contexto histórico contemporâneo. Critica as abordagens que buscaram sintetizar um "método thompsoniano" em algumas fórmulas do prefácio da obra recorrentemente citadas. Defende ainda que a compreensão do persistente apelo do livro deve ser buscada na análise de sua estrutura narrativa.

  19. Review of "Echinococcus and Echinococcosis, Part A." edited by R. C. Andrew Thompson, Alan J. Lymbery and Peter Deplazes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akira

    2017-09-04

    Thompson RCA, Deplazes P, Lymbery AJ, Editors. Echinococcus and Echinococcosis, Part A. Volume 95, Advances in Parasitology 95. Academic Press; 2017. 525 pages, ISBN 978-0-12-8114711 (hardcover); 9780128114728 (eBook).

  20. Thirty Years Later: Reflections of the Big Thompson Flood, Colorado, 1976 to 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, R. D.; Costa, J. E.; Brunstein, F. C.; Quesenberry, C. A.; Vandas, S. J.; Capesius, J. P.; O'Neill, G. B.

    2006-12-01

    Thirty years ago, over 300 mm of rain fell in about 4 to 6 hours in the middle reaches of the Big Thompson River Basin during the devastating flash flood on July 31, 1976. The rainstorm produced flood discharges that exceeded 40 m3/s/km2. A peak discharge of 883 m3/s was estimated at the Big Thompson River near Drake streamflow-gaging station. The raging waters left 144 people dead, 250 injured, and over 800 people were evacuated by helicopter. Four-hundred eighteen homes and businesses were destroyed, as well as 438 automobiles, and damage to infrastructure left the canyon reachable only via helicopter. Total damage was estimated in excess of $116 million (2006 dollars). Natural hazards similar to the Big Thompson flood are rare, but the probability of a similar event hitting the Front Range, other parts of Colorado, or other parts of the Nation is real. Although much smaller in scale than the Big Thompson flood, several flash floods have happened during the monsoon in early July 2006 in the Colorado foothills that reemphasized the hazards associated with flash flooding. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducts flood research to help understand and predict the magnitude and likelihood of large streamflow events such as the Big Thompson flood. A summary of hydrologic conditions of the 1976 flood, what the 1976 flood can teach us about flash floods, a description of some of the advances in USGS flood science as a consequence of this disaster, and lessons that we learned to help reduce loss of life from this extraordinary flash flood are discussed. In the 30 years since the Big Thompson flood, there have been important advances in streamflow monitoring and flood warning. The National Weather Service (NWS) NEXRAD radar allows real-time monitoring of precipitation in most places in the United States. The USGS currently (2006) operates about 7,250 real-time streamflow-gaging stations in the United States that are monitored by the USGS, the NWS, and emergency managers

  1. What musicians do to induce the sensation of groove in simple and complex melodies, and how listeners perceive it

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    Guy eMadison

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Groove is the experience of wanting to move when hearing music, such as snapping fingers or tapping feet. This is a central aspect of much music, in particular of music intended for dancing. While previous research has found considerable consistency in ratings of groove across individuals, it remains unclear how groove is induced, that is, what are the physical properties of the acoustic signal that differ between more and less groove-inducing versions. Here, we examined this issue with a performance experiment, in which 4 musicians performed 6 simple and 6 complex melodies in two conditions with the intention of minimizing and maximizing groove. Analyses of rhythmical and temporal properties from the performances demonstrated some general effects. For example, more groove was associated with more notes on faster metrical levels and syncopation, and less groove was associated with deadpan timing and destruction of the regular pulse. We did not observe that deviations from the metrical grid (i.e. micro-timing were a predictor of groove. A listener experiment confirmed that the musicians’ manipulations had the intended effects on the experience of groove. A Brunswikian lens model was applied, which estimates the performer-perceiver communication across the two experiments. It showed that the communication achievement for simple melodies was 0.62, and that the matching of performers’ and listeners’ use of 9 rhythmical cues was 0.83. For complex melodies with an already high level of groove, the corresponding values were 0.39 and 0.34, showing that it was much more difficult to take out groove from musical structures designed to induce groove.

  2. Activation and connectivity patterns of the presupplementary and dorsal premotor areas during free improvisation of melodies and rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Manzano, Örjan; Ullén, Fredrik

    2012-10-15

    Free, i.e. non-externally cued generation of movement sequences is fundamental to human behavior. We have earlier hypothesized that the dorsal premotor cortex (PMD), which has been consistently implicated in cognitive aspects of planning and selection of spatial motor sequences may be particularly important for the free generation of spatial movement sequences, whereas the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), which shows increased activation during perception, learning and reproduction of temporal sequences, may contribute more to the generation of temporal structures. Here we test this hypothesis using fMRI and musical improvisation in professional pianists as a model behavior. We employed a 2 × 2 factorial design with the factors Melody (Specified/Improvised) and Rhythm (Specified/Improvised). The main effect analyses partly confirmed our hypothesis: there was a main effect of Melody in the PMD; the pre-SMA was present in the main effect of Rhythm, as predicted, as well as in the main effect of Melody. A psychophysiological interaction analysis of functional connectivity demonstrated that the correlation in activity between the pre-SMA and cerebellum was higher during rhythmic improvisation than during the other conditions. In summary, there were only subtle differences in activity level between the pre-SMA and PMD during improvisation, regardless of condition. Consequently, the free generation of rhythmic and melodic structures, appears to be largely integrated processes but the functional connectivity between premotor areas and other regions may change during free generation in response to sequence-specific spatiotemporal demands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Revisiting Intel Xeon Phi optimization of Thompson cloud microphysics scheme in Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen

    2015-10-01

    The Thompson cloud microphysics scheme is a sophisticated cloud microphysics scheme in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The scheme is very suitable for massively parallel computation as there are no interactions among horizontal grid points. Compared to the earlier microphysics schemes, the Thompson scheme incorporates a large number of improvements. Thus, we have optimized the speed of this important part of WRF. Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) ushers in a new era of supercomputing speed, performance, and compatibility. It allows the developers to run code at trillions of calculations per second using the familiar programming model. In this paper, we present our results of optimizing the Thompson microphysics scheme on Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC) hardware. The Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor is the first product based on Intel MIC architecture, and it consists of up to 61 cores connected by a high performance on-die bidirectional interconnect. The coprocessor supports all important Intel development tools. Thus, the development environment is familiar one to a vast number of CPU developers. Although, getting a maximum performance out of MICs will require using some novel optimization techniques. New optimizations for an updated Thompson scheme are discusses in this paper. The optimizations improved the performance of the original Thompson code on Xeon Phi 7120P by a factor of 1.8x. Furthermore, the same optimizations improved the performance of the Thompson on a dual socket configuration of eight core Intel Xeon E5-2670 CPUs by a factor of 1.8x compared to the original Thompson code.

  4. At the crossroads of evolutionary computation and music: self-programming synthesizers, swarm orchestras and the origins of melody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces three approaches to using Evolutionary Computation (EC) in Music (namely, engineering, creative and musicological approaches) and discusses examples of representative systems that have been developed within the last decade, with emphasis on more recent and innovative works. We begin by reviewing engineering applications of EC in Music Technology such as Genetic Algorithms and Cellular Automata sound synthesis, followed by an introduction to applications where EC has been used to generate musical compositions. Next, we introduce ongoing research into EC models to study the origins of music and detail our own research work on modelling the evolution of melody. Copryright 2004 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  5. Stent fracture, valve dysfunction, and right ventricular outflow tract reintervention after transcatheter pulmonary valve implantation: patient-related and procedural risk factors in the US Melody Valve Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhinney, Doff B; Cheatham, John P; Jones, Thomas K; Lock, James E; Vincent, Julie A; Zahn, Evan M; Hellenbrand, William E

    2011-12-01

    Among patients undergoing transcatheter pulmonary valve (TPV) replacement with the Melody valve, risk factors for Melody stent fracture (MSF) and right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) reintervention have not been well defined. From January 2007 to January 2010, 150 patients (median age, 19 years) underwent TPV implantation in the Melody valve Investigational Device Exemption trial. Existing conduit stents from a prior catheterization were present in 37 patients (25%, fractured in 12); 1 or more new prestents were placed at the TPV implant catheterization in 51 patients. During follow-up (median, 30 months), MSF was diagnosed in 39 patients. Freedom from a diagnosis of MSF was 77±4% at 14 months (after the 1-year evaluation window) and 60±9% at 39 months (3-year window). On multivariable analysis, implant within an existing stent, new prestent, or bioprosthetic valve (combined variable) was associated with longer freedom from MSF (Pbioprosthetic valve was associated with lower risk of MSF and reintervention.

  6. Land use, fishing, climate change, and decline of Thompson River, British Columbia, coho salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradford, M. J.; Irvine, J. R. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, BC (Canada)

    2000-01-01

    Reasons for the decline in abundance of Pacific salmon population in the Thompson River watershed in British Columbia was investigated. Results suggests that the decline could be the result of a declining trend in productivity related to changes in ocean conditions, overfishing, and changes in the freshwater habitat. The abundance of salmon correlated with agricultural land use, road density, and qualitative changes in stream habitat status; logging appeared to have had no such effect. It was concluded that salmon populations will continue to decline unless limits on fishing are strictly enforced, and unless salmon producing watersheds are restored and ocean conditions are significantly improved . 12 refs., 2 figs.

  7. On the Relationships Between Words and Melody in the Pulangihon-Umayamnon Bukidnon Uwaging

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    José S. Buenconsejo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Singers of indigenous, long narratives in the Philippines employ a number of tunes in setting the verses. In this paper, I examine the tunes that Datu Sinuhoy Kaligunan utilized in his UWAGING performance, lasting near 11 hours, that I recorded in May 2005. Datu Sinuhoy is a Pulangihon-Umayamnon Bukidnon speaker. His tunes are named according to: (1 non-lexical formulaic expressions, (2 the places where the tunes are perceived to originate, and (3 even names of individual beings–persons and spirits–from those places.An investigation of the recording of the Pulangihon-Umayamnon uwaging performance in its entirety reveals that some tunes are used to project the moods and feelings attendant to the actions of the narrative but they are not emblematic of the characters in the narrative per se as in the Palawan TULTUL. I argue that tunes are important in uwaging performance for they facilitate the linear grouping of words into verse units that generally span eight (musical pulses, each of which is assigned one syllable each. Like most epics in the Philippines (e.g., ULLALIM, GASUMBI, HUDHUD, KATA-KATA, ULAGING, UWAEGING of Agusan Manobos, Pulangihon-Umayamnon Bukidnon uwaging has prosodic features that fit euphoniously with the tunes (e.g., the shapes of the tunes reinforce the sound parallelisms in the words. In addition, like the versions of the epic in Bukidnon, the Pulangihon-Umayamnon uwaging can be recited, MANTUKAW, minus the melody. This fact implies an important corollary; the internalization of uwaging prosody is acquired separately from the setting of words to tunes. In fact, singers internalize the prosody of the verses by reciting them from the memory of other singers’ performances, attempting to intone them (with the formulaic tunes only after they have mastered and memorized a fair amount of verses. In my fieldwork, Datu Sinuhoy dictated to my linguistic assistant a set of textual epithets forming poems called “unturan ne

  8. The MUSOS (MUsic SOftware System) Toolkit: A computer-based, open source application for testing memory for melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, M; Palmer, M A; Paine, G

    2018-04-01

    Despite numerous innovative studies, rates of replication in the field of music psychology are extremely low (Frieler et al., 2013). Two key methodological challenges affecting researchers wishing to administer and reproduce studies in music cognition are the difficulty of measuring musical responses, particularly when conducting free-recall studies, and access to a reliable set of novel stimuli unrestricted by copyright or licensing issues. In this article, we propose a solution for these challenges in computer-based administration. We present a computer-based application for testing memory for melodies. Created using the software Max/MSP (Cycling '74, 2014a), the MUSOS (Music Software System) Toolkit uses a simple modular framework configurable for testing common paradigms such as recall, old-new recognition, and stem completion. The program is accompanied by a stimulus set of 156 novel, copyright-free melodies, in audio and Max/MSP file formats. Two pilot tests were conducted to establish the properties of the accompanying stimulus set that are relevant to music cognition and general memory research. By using this software, a researcher without specialist musical training may administer and accurately measure responses from common paradigms used in the study of memory for music.

  9. Consul Thompson, the Bostonians and the Formation of the Chichen Galaxy, 1893-1903

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Palacios

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article continues the narrative of the experiences of the businessmen-academics and collectors connected to Harvard University –the so-called Bostonians– in the archaeological sites of Yucatán, which were explored towards the end of the 1880s by Edward H. Thompson under their patronage, including his appointment as the U.S. consul in Mérida – as a form of protection – on their recommendation. This article reconstructs the loss of control of the strategic consulate by the Bostonians between 1893 and 1897. This narrative covers the occupation and the beginning of the looting of Chichen Itza, as well as the pseudo-scientific narrative the excavation provokes. It also analyzes the networks of alliances and rivalries resulting from the arrival of other U.S. archaeologists and archaeological institutions. It concludes with the paths Thompson pursued to undertake the adventure of his lifetime: the dredging of Chichen Itza’s Sacred Cenote.

  10. Learning piano melodies in visuo-motor or audio-motor training conditions and the neural correlates of their cross-modal transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Annerose; Bangert, Marc; Horbank, David; Hijmans, Brenda S.; Wilkens, Katharina; Keller, Peter E.; Keysers, Christian

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the cross-modal transfer of movement patterns necessary to perform melodies on the piano, 22 non-musicians learned to play short sequences on a piano keyboard by 1) merely listening and replaying (vision of own fingers occluded) or 2) merely observing silent finger movements and

  11. Relationship between Root Growth of 'Thompson Seedless' Grapevines and Soil Temperature Relación entre el Crecimiento Radical de Vid 'Thompson Seedless' y la Temperatura del Suelo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Callejas R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of characterizing the growth of the root system of table grapes (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Thompson Seedless and its relationship with soil temperature, research was carried out during the 2004-2005 growing season in vineyards in the Copiapó and Huasco Valleys. Four plants were chosen and rhizotrons were used to measure the growth of the root system. Measurements were performed once a week from September 2004 to September 2005, estimating the intensity of root growth and its annual distribution in the ranges of 0 to 40, 40 to 80 and 80 to 120 cm of soil depth. Temperature sensors were installed in four plants at 25, 50, 75 and 100 cm of soil depth, and the temperature was registered every 1 h. The thermal diffusivity of the soil was calculated based on the annual mean temperature and annual thermal amplitude values. Root growth occurred throughout the year, presenting lower intensity in July (winter. Root systems presented different patterns in the distribution of growth intensity in the three soil depths, with variations in the order of five times in maximum annual growth intensity among sites. High thermal diffusivity in soils favored root growth.Con el objetivo de caracterizar el crecimiento del sistema radical de la vid (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Thompson Seedless y su relación con la temperatura del suelo, durante la temporada 2004-2005 se llevó a cabo un estudio en parronales ubicados en los valles de Copiapó y Huasco. Se instalaron cuatro cámaras de observación de raíces o rizotrones en plantas homogéneas, en plena producción, pie franco, sanas, y ubicadas en diferentes localidades de la región. Las mediciones del crecimiento de las raíces se efectuaron semanalmente, desde septiembre de 2004 hasta completar 1 año, estimándose la intensidad de crecimiento radical anual y su distribución en los rangos de 0 a 40, 40 a 80 y 80 a 120 cm de profundidad. Adicionalmente, se instalaron sensores de temperatura a 25, 50, 75 y

  12. Lazer, modernidade, capitalismo: um olhar a partir da obra de Edward Palmer Thompson

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    Victor Andrade de Melo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O processo de consolidação do modo de produção fabril paulatinamente configurou uma clara distinção entre a jornada de trabalho e um tempo livre. Que relação se pode estabelecer entre essa nova dinâmica dos tempos sociais e as tensões relacionadas à construção de um novo conjunto de comportamentos considerados adequados para a consolidação do capitalismo? Esse estudo tem por objetivo discutir o trato dessa questão na obra de Edward Palmer Thompson. Parece possível afirmar que, para ele, o controle do tempo do não-trabalho e das práticas de lazer foi compreendido como uma dimensão fundamental para garantir o "progresso".

  13. Materialismo histórico, cultura e educação: Gramsci, Thompson e Williams

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    Angela Martins

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo destaca pontos de confluência das contribuições de Antonio Gramsci, Edward Palmer Thompson e Raymond Williams para romper com a tradição do materialismo histórico, denominada por eles, respectivamente, de materialismo economicista, marxismo idealista e materialismo mecânico. Ao recuperar a historicidade do materialismo histórico no século XX, os três autores ampliam as noções de cultura e de educação, atribuindo-lhes um papel estratégico nos processos de dominação de classe, de transformação social e de emancipação humana.

  14. Os alicerces metateóricos da teoria social de John B. Thompson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes, Felipe Tavares Paes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, objetivamos discutir os pressupostos metateóricos que embasam a teoria social de John B. Thompson. Para tanto, estruturamos o trabalho em três partes. Num primeiro momento, apresentamos e analisamos os pressupostos dessa teoria que dizem respeito à filosofia da ciência, ou seja, aqueles que se referem à ontologia, à epistemologia, à natureza humana e à metodologia. Num segundo momento, abordamos aqueles referentes à teoria sobre a sociedade, isto é, aqueles que se referem à natureza do mundo social. Num terceiro e último momento, analisamos a forma como a teoria social em questão amarra esses dois conjuntos de pressupostos e as implicações éticas decorrentes dessa amarra

  15. Quantum electrical and chromodynamics treated through Thompson's approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassif, Claudio [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: cnassifCBPF@yahoo.com.br; Silva, P.R. [Minas Gerais Univ. (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Fisica]. E-mail: prsilva@fisica.ufmg.br

    2006-09-15

    In this work we apply Thompson's method (of the dimensions and scales) to study some features of the Quantum Electro and Chromodynamics. This heuristic method can be considered as a simple and alternative way to the Renormalisation Group (R.G.) approach and when applied to QED-Lagrangian is able to obtain in a first approximation both the running coupling constant behavior of {alpha}({mu}) and the mass m({mu}). The calculations are evaluated just at d{sub c} = 4, where d{sub c} is the upper critical dimension of the problem, so that we obtain the logarithmic behavior both for the coupling {alpha} and the excess of mass {delta}m on the energy scale {mu}. Although our results are well-known in the vast literature of field theories, the advantage of Thompson's method, beyond its simplicity is that it is able to extract directly from QED-Lagrangian the physical (finite) behavior of {alpha}({mu}) and m({mu}), bypassing hard problems of divergences which normally appear in the conventional renormalisation schemes applied to field theories like QED. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is also treated by the present method in order to obtain the quark condensate value. Besides this, the method is also able to evaluate the vacuum pressure at the boundary of the nucleon. This is done by assuming a step function behavior for the running coupling constant of the QCD, which fits nicely to some quantities related to the strong interaction evaluated through the MIT-bag model. (author)

  16. Vasiljević’s collections of folk melodies: A Serbian musical treasure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radinović Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Miodrag A. Vasiljević (1903-1963 was given a unique opportunity to span two great developmental stages in the history of Serbian ethnomusicology, occurring in the middle of the 20th century. The first of them was between the two World Wars, the stage in which Serbian musical folklore became Vasiljević’s life passion and in which he accomplished his early professional achievements. In the next stage, which started after World War II, he reached the zenith of his creation in slightly less than twenty years, setting new standards of the discipline, and providing fundamental directions for his successors, thereby immeasurably enlarging the corpus of collected material. Due all of these revolutionary innovations from the post-war period, Vasiljević is rightly considered to be not only the founder of modern Serbian ethnomusicology, but also the first person in Serbia worthy of being called an ethnomusicologist in the full sense of the word. Of the numerous results by which Vasiljević permanently indebted his people, the most pronounced does not belong to the category of pioneering endeavours, but is manifested in his melographic opus - an achievement which even today has not been surpassed in Serbia in terms of its span, scope and value. Such great productivity in recording resulted from the fact that Vasiljević had been devoted to melography from his childhood, and most intensely from 1932 to the end of his life. The exact number of examples which Vasiljević transcribed directly in the field before 1951 and those which he recorded on a tape-recorder after that time is still unknown, since many of them are still unavailable to the public, but it can be assumed that there are several thousand melodies in total. Among them are 3,198 which have already been published. That precious corpus of Vasiljević’s available material is contained in twelve collections (the largest number ever regarding any collector in Serbia so far, issued from 1950 to

  17. Rhythm and Melody Tasks for School-Aged Children With and Without Musical Training: Age-Equivalent Scores and Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kierla Ireland

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Measuring musical abilities in childhood can be challenging. When music training and maturation occur simultaneously, it is difficult to separate the effects of specific experience from age-based changes in cognitive and motor abilities. The goal of this study was to develop age-equivalent scores for two measures of musical ability that could be reliably used with school-aged children (7–13 with and without musical training. The children's Rhythm Synchronization Task (c-RST and the children's Melody Discrimination Task (c-MDT were adapted from adult tasks developed and used in our laboratories. The c-RST is a motor task in which children listen and then try to synchronize their taps with the notes of a woodblock rhythm while it plays twice in a row. The c-MDT is a perceptual task in which the child listens to two melodies and decides if the second was the same or different. We administered these tasks to 213 children in music camps (musicians, n = 130 and science camps (non-musicians, n = 83. We also measured children's paced tapping, non-paced tapping, and phonemic discrimination as baseline motor and auditory abilities We estimated internal-consistency reliability for both tasks, and compared children's performance to results from studies with adults. As expected, musically trained children outperformed those without music lessons, scores decreased as difficulty increased, and older children performed the best. Using non-musicians as a reference group, we generated a set of age-based z-scores, and used them to predict task performance with additional years of training. Years of lessons significantly predicted performance on both tasks, over and above the effect of age. We also assessed the relation between musician's scores on music tasks, baseline tasks, auditory working memory, and non-verbal reasoning. Unexpectedly, musician children outperformed non-musicians in two of three baseline tasks. The c-RST and c-MDT fill an important need for

  18. Rhythm and Melody Tasks for School-Aged Children With and Without Musical Training: Age-Equivalent Scores and Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Kierla; Parker, Averil; Foster, Nicholas; Penhune, Virginia

    2018-01-01

    Measuring musical abilities in childhood can be challenging. When music training and maturation occur simultaneously, it is difficult to separate the effects of specific experience from age-based changes in cognitive and motor abilities. The goal of this study was to develop age-equivalent scores for two measures of musical ability that could be reliably used with school-aged children (7-13) with and without musical training. The children's Rhythm Synchronization Task (c-RST) and the children's Melody Discrimination Task (c-MDT) were adapted from adult tasks developed and used in our laboratories. The c-RST is a motor task in which children listen and then try to synchronize their taps with the notes of a woodblock rhythm while it plays twice in a row. The c-MDT is a perceptual task in which the child listens to two melodies and decides if the second was the same or different. We administered these tasks to 213 children in music camps (musicians, n = 130) and science camps (non-musicians, n = 83). We also measured children's paced tapping, non-paced tapping, and phonemic discrimination as baseline motor and auditory abilities We estimated internal-consistency reliability for both tasks, and compared children's performance to results from studies with adults. As expected, musically trained children outperformed those without music lessons, scores decreased as difficulty increased, and older children performed the best. Using non-musicians as a reference group, we generated a set of age-based z-scores, and used them to predict task performance with additional years of training. Years of lessons significantly predicted performance on both tasks, over and above the effect of age. We also assessed the relation between musician's scores on music tasks, baseline tasks, auditory working memory, and non-verbal reasoning. Unexpectedly, musician children outperformed non-musicians in two of three baseline tasks. The c-RST and c-MDT fill an important need for researchers

  19. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.S.; Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Oceanographic and Atmospheric Sciences Div.

    1996-12-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project, along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996 on the R/V T.G. Thompson. Seven of the cruises follow a standard cruise track, taking hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The rest of the cruises, which take place generally within the standard cruise region defined by a set track, are for the deployment and recovery of moored equipment and towing of a SeaSoar. Detailed description of ADCP hardware, the AutoADCP data acquisition system, and the collection of navigation and compass data on the Thompson is documented in Section 2. Followed by data collection for each cruise together with a cruise track, Section 3 presents the processing and analysis of velocity and acoustic backscatter intensity data. Section 5 shows results of profile quality diagnosis.

  20. Transcriptome analysis during ripening of table grape berry cv. Thompson Seedless.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Balic

    Full Text Available Ripening is one of the key processes associated with the development of major organoleptic characteristics of the fruit. This process has been extensively characterized in climacteric fruit, in contrast with non-climacteric fruit such as grape, where the process is less understood. With the aim of studying changes in gene expression during ripening of non-climacteric fruit, an Illumina based RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis was performed on four developmental stages, between veraison and harvest, on table grapes berries cv Thompson Seedless. Functional analysis showed a transcriptional increase in genes related with degradation processes of chlorophyll, lipids, macromolecules recycling and nucleosomes organization; accompanied by a decrease in genes related with chloroplasts integrity and amino acid synthesis pathways. It was possible to identify several processes described during leaf senescence, particularly close to harvest. Before this point, the results suggest a high transcriptional activity associated with the regulation of gene expression, cytoskeletal organization and cell wall metabolism, which can be related to growth of berries and firmness loss characteristic to this stage of development. This high metabolic activity could be associated with an increase in the transcription of genes related with glycolysis and respiration, unexpected for a non-climacteric fruit ripening.

  1. A celebration of mechanics: from nano to macro. The J. Michael T. Thompson Festschrift issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elishakoff, Isaac

    2013-06-28

    This Theme Issue is dedicated to the topic 'Mechanics: from nano to macro' and marks the 75th birthday of Dr J. Michael T. Thompson, Fellow of the Royal Society, whose current affiliations are as follows: (i) Honorary Fellow, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge; (ii) Emeritus Professor of Nonlinear Dynamics, Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London; and (iii) Professor of Theoretical and Applied Dynamics (Distinguished Sixth Century Chair, part-time), University of Aberdeen. He also serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors at ES-Consult (consulting engineers) in Copenhagen, Denmark. The pertinent question that arises from the very start is: should we first salute Michael and then describe the Theme Issue, or vice versa? Indeed, according to Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), the last thing one discovers in composing a work is what to put first. I would like to take the liberty of deviating from the tradition of the Philosophical Transactions and start with the tribute to Michael; after all he is the prime cause of this Theme Issue.

  2. Communication and Control in Organizations: Applying the Work of James Thompson and Gregory Bateson to Interpretive Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    developing integrated theories of organization and administration . His theoretical lineage and written work is explicitly structuralist . He drew much...1979). ’Unobtrusive Measures in Organizational Theory : A Reminder’. Administrative Science SQarJt .XJly, 24, 650-659. Weick, K. (1974). ’Middle...the work of James Thompson and Gregory Bateson. (3) It is a treatise about the application of interpretive methods and theory to organizational research

  3. PHYTOPLANKTON - WET WEIGHT and Other Data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON From TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 19920325 to 19921021 (NODC Accession 9700085)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Picophytoplankton and bacteria were collected from the Thomas G. Thompson as part of the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program. Data were collected...

  4. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON From TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 19920130 to 19921021 (NODC Accession 9700050)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hydrochemical, hydrophysical, and other data were collected from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON from January 30, 1992 to October 21, 1992. Data were submitted by Dr. Robert...

  5. Chemical data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON using CTD and bottle casts in Arabian Sea from 08 January 1995 to 26 November 1995 (NODC Accession 9800161)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical data were collected using CTD and bottle casts in the Arabian Sea from THOMAS G. THOMPSON. Data were collected from 08 January 1995 to 26 November 1995 by...

  6. PHYTOPLANKTON - WET WEIGHT and Other Data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON From TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 19920203 to 19921213 (NODC Accession 9700068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton were collected from the Thomas G. Thompson as part of the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program to assess biomass and abundance. Data...

  7. ZOOPLANKTON SPECIES IDENTITIES and Other Data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON From TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 19920203 to 19921021 (NODC Accession 9700062)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abundance, biovolume, and biomass of (Cyanobacteria, phototrophic, heterotrophic eucaryotic pico and nanoplanktons) were collected from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON from...

  8. ZOOPLANKTON SPECIES IDENTITIES and Other Data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON From TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 19920203 to 19921021 (NODC Accession 9700058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Depth, abundance and biomass of (Radiolarians, Formainiferans, Acantharians) were collected from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON from February 3, 1992 to October 21, 1992....

  9. Zooplankton, chemical, and other data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in Arabian Sea; 09 January 1995 to 07 April 1995 (NODC Accession 9800109)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton, chemical, and other data were collected using zooplankton net casts in Arabian Sea from THOMAS G. THOMPSON. Data were collected from 09 January 1995 to...

  10. Cloud amount/frequency, NITRATE and other data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON from 1983-11-14 to 1984-10-28 (NODC Accession 9000206)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) data were collected during 83 casts from Ship T.G. THOMPSON. The data was collected over a period spanning from...

  11. Viable-but-Nonculturable Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica Serovar Thompson Induced by Chlorine Stress Remain Infectious

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callum J. Highmore

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological safety of fresh produce is monitored almost exclusively by culture-based detection methods. However, bacterial food-borne pathogens are known to enter a viable-but-nonculturable (VBNC state in response to environmental stresses such as chlorine, which is commonly used for fresh produce decontamination. Here, complete VBNC induction of green fluorescent protein-tagged Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson was achieved by exposure to 12 and 3 ppm chlorine, respectively. The pathogens were subjected to chlorine washing following incubation on spinach leaves. Culture data revealed that total viable L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Thompson populations became VBNC by 50 and 100 ppm chlorine, respectively, while enumeration by direct viable counting found that chlorine caused a <1-log reduction in viability. The pathogenicity of chlorine-induced VBNC L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Thompson was assessed by using Caenorhabditis elegans. Ingestion of VBNC pathogens by C. elegans resulted in a significant life span reduction (P = 0.0064 and P < 0.0001, and no significant difference between the life span reductions caused by the VBNC and culturable L. monocytogenes treatments was observed. L. monocytogenes was visualized beyond the nematode intestinal lumen, indicating resuscitation and cell invasion. These data emphasize the risk that VBNC food-borne pathogens could pose to public health should they continue to go undetected.

  12. On the Melody Types between the North and the South Dong Folks%南北侗族民歌的旋律类型探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏金梅

    2014-01-01

    South and North Dong Minority , the two branches of Dong , have remarkable differences in the music style of folk songs . South Dong'folk song is mild and obscure while North Dong'folk song is lyric and straightforward . The formation of their differences is closely related to their melody types :the melody type of South Dong's folk song is mainly small wave while the melody type of North Dong's folk song is with ups and small wave ;though both South and North Dong's folk songs enjoy small wave type , there are differences in the music development mode of small wave type . The differences of melody types in South and North Dong's folk songs are connected with their own cultural ecology , i . e , the differences of South and North Dong area's ecological and cultural environment mold out the characteristics of South and North Dong's folk song which is reflected in their different melody types .%南、北侗族作为侗族旗下的两个分支,在民歌音乐风格方面差别显著:南侗民歌平和、含蓄,北侗民歌抒情、直白。这种差异的形成与二者的旋律类型存有紧密联系:南侗民歌的旋律类型仅以小波浪式为主,北侗民歌以跌宕式与小波浪式两种类型为主;南北侗族民歌虽都喜好小波浪式,但二者的小波浪式在音乐发展模式上也不同。而南、北侗族民歌旋律类型的差异正好与彼此所处的文化生态是相互耦合的,也即是说,南、北侗族地区生态文化环境的差异模塑出南北侗族民歌的特性,这一特性在其民歌的旋律类型中得以表现。

  13. Water quality and trend analysis of Colorado--Big Thompson system reservoirs and related conveyances, 1969 through 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in an ongoing cooperative monitoring program with the Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District, Bureau of Reclamation, and City of Fort Collins, has collected water-quality data in north-central Colorado since 1969 in reservoirs and conveyances, such as canals and tunnels, related to the Colorado?Big Thompson Project, a water-storage, collection, and distribution system. Ongoing changes in water use among agricultural and municipal users on the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, changing land use in reservoir watersheds, and other water-quality issues among Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District customers necessitated a reexamination of water-quality trends in the Colorado?Big Thompson system reservoirs and related conveyances. The sampling sites are on reservoirs, canals, and tunnels in the headwaters of the Colorado River (on the western side of the transcontinental diversion operations) and the headwaters of the Big Thompson River (on the eastern side of the transcontinental diversion operations). Carter Lake Reservoir and Horsetooth Reservoir are off-channel water-storage facilities, located in the foothills of the northern Colorado Front Range, for water supplied from the Colorado?Big Thompson Project. The length of water-quality record ranges from approximately 3 to 30 years depending on the site and the type of measurement or constituent. Changes in sampling frequency, analytical methods, and minimum reporting limits have occurred repeatedly over the period of record. The objective of this report was to complete a retrospective water-quality and trend analysis of reservoir profiles, nutrients, major ions, selected trace elements, chlorophyll-a, and hypolimnetic oxygen data from 1969 through 2000 in Lake Granby, Shadow Mountain Lake, and the Granby Pump Canal in Grand County, Colorado, and Horsetooth Reservoir, Carter Lake, Lake Estes, Alva B. Adams Tunnel, and Olympus Tunnel in Larimer County, Colorado

  14. Geochronology of the Thompson Creek Mo Deposit: Evidence for the Formation of Arc-related Mo Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C. D.; Coleman, D. S.; Stein, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Thompson Creek Mo deposit in central ID, has been categorized as an arc-related Mo deposit due to the location, grade of Mo, and relative lack of enrichments in F, Rb, and Nb, compared to the Climax-type Mo deposits. Geochronology from this arc-related deposit provides an opportunity to compare and contrast magmatism, and mineralization to that in Climax-type deposits. Distinct pulses of magmatism were required to form the Thompson Creek Mo deposit, which is consistent with recent geochronology from Climax-type deposits. Molybdenite Re-Os geochronology from five veins requires at least three pulses of magmatism and mineralization between 89.39 +/- 0.37 and 88.47 +/- 0.16 Ma. Zircon U-Pb ages from these mineralized samples overlap with molybdenite mineralization, but show a much wider range (91.01 +/- 0.37 to 87.27 +/- 0.69). Previous work from Climax-type Mo deposits suggest a correlation between a super eruption, and the subsequent rapid (<1 Ma) onset, and completion of Mo mineralizing intrusions. The longer life (3-4 Ma) for the Thompson Creek Mo deposit suggests that the mineralizing intrusions for arc-related Mo deposits may not need to have as high [Mo] as the Climax-type deposits. This study also finds a shift in the source of magmatism from the pre- to syn-mineralizing intrusions. Zircons from pre-mineralizing intrusions have much higher (15-60 pg) concentrations of radiogenic Pb than zircons from mineralized intrusions, which all have less than 15 pg, though whole rock [U] are similar.

  15. Reply to J. C. Thompson, Jr. 's comments on the paper 'Radiation doses from iodine-129 in the environment'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldat, J K [Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, Wash. (USA)

    1976-09-01

    Reference is made to comments by Thompson (Health Phys.; 31: 287 (1976)) on the present author's paper on 'Radiation Doses from /sup 129/I in the Environment' (Health Phys; Jan 1976) concerning the human and bovine consumption data that were used to arrive at thyroid dose estimates. Clarification is given of the diet and consumption data used in the original work and the sources of such data cited. Should modified diet data be accepted the thyroid dose estimates from unit concentrations of /sup 129/I in air originally tabulated could easily be altered in proportion to the diet assumed.

  16. Early Stages of Melody Processing: Stimulus-Sequence and Task-Dependent Neuronal Activity in Monkey Auditory Cortical Fields A1 and R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Pingbo; Mishkin, Mortimer; Sutter, Mitchell; Fritz, Jonathan B.

    2008-01-01

    To explore the effects of acoustic and behavioral context on neuronal responses in the core of auditory cortex (fields A1 and R), two monkeys were trained on a go/no-go discrimination task in which they learned to respond selectively to a four-note target (S+) melody and withhold response to a variety of other nontarget (S−) sounds. We analyzed evoked activity from 683 units in A1/R of the trained monkeys during task performance and from 125 units in A1/R of two naive monkeys. We characterized two broad classes of neural activity that were modulated by task performance. Class I consisted of tone-sequence–sensitive enhancement and suppression responses. Enhanced or suppressed responses to specific tonal components of the S+ melody were frequently observed in trained monkeys, but enhanced responses were rarely seen in naive monkeys. Both facilitatory and suppressive responses in the trained monkeys showed a temporal pattern different from that observed in naive monkeys. Class II consisted of nonacoustic activity, characterized by a task-related component that correlated with bar release, the behavioral response leading to reward. We observed a significantly higher percentage of both Class I and Class II neurons in field R than in A1. Class I responses may help encode a long-term representation of the behaviorally salient target melody. Class II activity may reflect a variety of nonacoustic influences, such as attention, reward expectancy, somatosensory inputs, and/or motor set and may help link auditory perception and behavioral response. Both types of neuronal activity are likely to contribute to the performance of the auditory task. PMID:18842950

  17. Changes in growth, photosynthetic activities, biochemical parameters and amino acid profile of Thompson Seedless grapes (Vitis vinifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkuwar, R G; Bahetwar, Anita; Khan, I; Satisha, J; Ramteke, S D; Itroutwar, Prerna; Bhongale, Aarti; Oulkar, Dashrath

    2014-11-01

    The study on photosynthetic activity and biochemical parameters in Thompson Seedless grapes grafted on Dog Ridge rootstock and its impact on growth, yield and amino acid profile at various stages of berry development was conducted during the year 2012-2013. Leaf and berry samples from ten year old vines of Thompson Seedless were collected at different growth and berry developmental stages. The analysis showed difference in photosynthetic activity, biochemical parameters and amino acid status with the changes in berry development stage. Higher photosynthetic rate of 17.39 umol cm(-2) s(-1) was recorded during 3-4mm berry size and the lowest (10.08 umol cm(-2) s(-1)) was recorded during the veraison stage. The photosynthetic activity showed gradual decrease with the onset of harvest while the different biochemical parameters showed increase and decrease from one stage to another in both berry and leaves. Changes in photosynthetic activity and biochemical parameters thereby affected the growth, yield and amino acid content of the berry. Positive correlation of leaf area and photosynthetic rate was recorded during the period of study. Reducing sugar (352.25 mg g(-1)) and total carbohydrate (132.52 mg g(-1)) was more in berries as compared to leaf. Amino acid profile showed variations in different stages of berry development. Marked variations in photosynthetic as well as biochemical and amino acid content at various berry development stages was recorded and thereby its cumulative effect on the development of fruit quality.

  18. Automatic Melody Segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez López, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation investigates music segmentation. In the field of Musicology, segmentation refers to a score analysis technique, whereby notated pieces or passages of these pieces are divided into “units” referred to as sections, periods, phrases, and so on. Segmentation

  19. Semi-analytic equations to the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering method at fixed energy for special cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmai, T.; Apagyi, B.; Horvath, M.

    2008-01-01

    Solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem at fixed energy 1-3 is reformulated resulting in semi-analytic equations. The new set of equations for the normalization constants and the nonphysical (shifted) angular momenta are free of matrix inversion operations. This simplification is a result of treating only the input phase shifts of partial waves of a given parity. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied for identical particle scattering of the bosonic type (or for certain cases of identical fermionic scattering). The new formulae are expected to be numerically more efficient than the previous ones. Based on the semi-analytic equations an approximate method is proposed for the generic inverse scattering problem, when partial waves of arbitrary parity are considered. (author)

  20. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabine, C.L.; Key, R.M.; Hall, M.; Kozyr, A.

    1999-08-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), and radiocarbon (delta 14C), at hydrographic stations, as well as the underway partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) during the R/V Thomas G. Thompson oceanographic cruise in the Pacific Ocean (Section P10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Suva, Fiji, on October 5, 1993, and ended in Yokohama, Japan, on November 10, 1993. Measurements made along WOCE Section P10 included pressure, temperature, salinity [measured by conductivity temperature, and depth sensor (CTD)], bottle salinity, bottle oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12), TCO2, TALK, delta 14C, and underway pCO2.

  1. The old and new faces of morphology: the legacy of D'Arcy Thompson's 'theory of transformations' and 'laws of growth'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abzhanov, Arhat

    2017-12-01

    In 1917, the publication of On Growth and Form by D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson challenged both mathematicians and naturalists to think about biological shapes and diversity as more than a confusion of chaotic forms generated at random, but rather as geometric shapes that could be described by principles of physics and mathematics. Thompson's work was based on the ideas of Galileo and Goethe on morphology and of Russell on functionalism, but he was first to postulate that physical forces and internal growth parameters regulate biological forms and could be revealed via geometric transformations in morphological space. Such precise mathematical structure suggested a unifying generative process, as reflected in the title of the book. To Thompson it was growth that could explain the generation of any particular biological form, and changes in ontogeny, rather than natural selection, could then explain the diversity of biological shapes. Whereas adaptationism, widely accepted in evolutionary biology, gives primacy to extrinsic factors in producing morphological variation, Thompson's 'laws of growth' provide intrinsic directives and constraints for the generation of individual shapes, helping to explain the 'profusion of forms, colours, and other modifications' observed in the living world. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Generation of animal form by the Chordin/Tolloid/BMP gradient: 100 years after D'Arcy Thompson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Edward M; Moriyama, Yuki; Colozza, Gabriele

    2017-09-01

    The classic book "On Growth and Form" by naturalist D'Arcy Thompson was published 100 years ago. To celebrate this landmark, we present experiments in the Xenopus embryo that provide a framework for understanding how simple, quantitative transformations of a morphogen gradient might have affected evolution and morphological diversity of organisms. D'Arcy Thompson proposed that different morphologies might be generated by modifying physical parameters in an underlying system of Cartesian coordinates that pre-existed in Nature and arose during evolutionary history. Chordin is a BMP antagonist secreted by the Spemann organizer located on the dorsal side of the gastrula. Chordin generates a morphogen gradient as first proposed by mathematician Alan Turing. The rate-limiting step of this dorsal-ventral (D-V) morphogen is the degradation of Chordin by the Tolloid metalloproteinase in the ventral side. Chordin is expressed at gastrula on the dorsal side where BMP signaling is low, while at the opposite side peak levels of BMP signaling are reached. In fishes, amphibians, reptiles and birds, high BMP signaling in the ventral region induces transcription of a secreted inhibitor of Tolloid called Sizzled. By depleting Sizzled exclusively in the ventral half of the embryo we were able to expand the ventro-posterior region in an otherwise normal embryo. Conversely, ventral depletion of Tolloid, which stabilizes Chordin, decreased ventral and tail structures, phenocopying the tolloid zebrafish mutation. We explain how historical constraints recorded in the language of DNA become subject to the universal laws of physics when an ancestral reaction-diffusion morphogen gradient dictates form. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  3. Thompson revisited. Ein empirisch fundiertes Modell zur Qualität von „Quality-TV“ aus Nutzersicht

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Harnischmacher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Was bedeutet das Attribut „Quality-TV“ eigentlich für das Publikum? Nach welchen Kriterien beurteilen Zuschauerinnen und Zuschauer, ob eine Serie Qualitätsfernsehen ist oder nicht? Im Bereich der rezipientenorientierten Qualitätsforschung bezüglich Fernsehserien sind bislang fast ausschließlich qualitativ erhobene Modelle bedeutsam, am bekanntesten sicherlich die bereits 1996 von Robert J. Thompson vorgeschlagenen 12 Kriterien. Die vorliegende Untersuchung widmet sich nun der Frage, ob diese Qualitätskriterien tatsächlich die „richtigen“ sind. Sind sie für die Zuschauer/innen von Serien bedeutsam für die Einschätzung, ob ein Programm „Quality-TV“ ist oder nicht? Bislang fehlt eine empirische Fundierung der einzelnen Merkmale. Ebenso ungeklärt ist bislang, ob es eine Rangfolge dieser Merkmale gibt. Welche sind bedeutsamer, welche weniger wichtig für die Wahrnehmung einer Serie als Qualitätsprodukt? Die Studie hat Thompsons Vorschlag (unter Bezugnahme auf weitere Studien zum Thema (z.B. Cardwell 2007; Feuer 2007; Dreher 2010; Blanchett 2011; Kumpf 2011 operationalisiert und in einer standardisierten Befragung der Nutzer von 13 Onlineforen zu Qualitätsserien (n=1382 getestet. Auf Basis dieser Befragung kann statistisch nachgewiesen werden, welche Merkmale von den Zuschauer/innen als besonders wichtig angesehen werden und wie diese zu Qualitätsfaktoren zusammengefasst werden können, die das Phänomen „Quality-TV“ aus Zuschauersicht tatsächlich beschreiben können.

  4. The effect of MELatOnin on Depression, anxietY, cognitive function and sleep disturbances in patients with breast cancer. The MELODY trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Melissa Voigt; Madsen, Michael Tvilling; Hageman, Ida

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer represents about one-third of all cancer diagnoses and accounts for about 15% of cancer deaths in women. Many of these patients experience depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction. This may adversely affect quality of life and also contribute......-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial is to investigate whether treatment with oral melatonin has a prophylactic or ameliorating effect on depressive symptoms, anxiety, sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction in women with breast cancer. Furthermore, the authors will examine whether a specific clock......-gene, PER3, is correlated with an increased risk of depressive symptoms, sleep disturbances or cognitive dysfunction. The MELODY trial is a prospective double-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled trial in which the authors intend to include 260 patients. The primary outcome is depressive symptoms...

  5. Asian Cross-border Marriage Migration. Demographic Patterns and Social Issues, Wen-Shan Yang & Melody Chia-Wen Lu (éds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre de Saint-Aubert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet ouvrage collectif, qui est le résultat d’une collaboration entre l’International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS, des Pays-Bas, et la National Science Council (NSC, de Taïwan, est le fruit d’une conférence qui s’est tenue en septembre2006 sur le thème des « mariages transfrontaliers en Asie et en Europe ». Les coordinateurs de l’ouvrage sont Wen-Shan Yang, chercheur à l’Institut of Sociology, Academia Sinica de Taïwan, et Melody Chia-Wen Lu, chercheur à l’International Institute for A...

  6. As contribuições teórico-metodológicas de E. P. Thompson: experiência e cultura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Aparecida Martins

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo destaca as contribuições teórico-metodológicas do historiador marxista Edward Palmer Thompson e que podem ser úteis para a pesquisa sociológica. A partir de pesquisa bibliográfica, apresenta-se uma breve biografia do autor e em seguida algumas categorias importantes desenvolvidas por ele, como experiência e cultura. Ressalta-se também a ênfase de Thompson em tratar as categorias teóricas considerando-se a processualidade histórica. Por fim, são levantadas algumas possibilidades de análise da juventude do campo na atualidade a partir das contribuições teórico-metodológicas desse autor.

  7. Sam Thompson, Stewart Parker, and the lineage of northern Irish dramaDOI:10.5007/2175-8026.2010n58p179

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilynn Richtarik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Northern Irish dramatist Stewart Parker (1941-1988 wrote plays typically valued for their wit, intellectual content, and formal experimentation. Nonetheless, he was profoundly influenced as a young man by a very different sort of playwright. Sam Thompson (1916-1965, who began his working life in the Belfast shipyards, squarely confronted Northern Irish sectarianism in his plays. His sense of the political potential of drama left an enduring mark on Parker, who organized and edited Thompson's manuscripts several years after his untimely death. Although their dramatic writings bear little resemblance to each other, the two writers should be regarded as united in a common Northern Irish dramatic tradition by virtue of their shared socialist outlook, belief in the importance of individual stands against conformity, and sense of theatre's social mission.

  8. Distribution of the species of Lucifer Thompson, 1829 in the subtropical South Atlantic between parallels 20º and 30ºs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Marafon-Almeida

    Full Text Available Abstract The distribution of the species of Lucifer Thompson, 1829 (Decapoda: Luciferidae in the South Atlantic Subtropical Gyre was assessed by the Brazil Transatlantic Commission in November and December 2009. The samples were collected at 83 stations on two profiles between Brazil and Africa (20 º and 30 ºS. Oblique hauls were performed with a WP-2 net up to 150 meters deep. A distinct sexual relationship was noted between the two species found and L. faxoni presented a significantly higher number of females relative to males 1:0.5 (X2 = 21.77, p = 0.0001. The L. typus sex ratio had significantly more males than females 1.86:1 (X2=50.84, p = 0.0001. The distribution of L. typus occurred in both the western and the eastern portions of the Mid-Oceanic Ridge. This distribution was significantly related to salinity (R2 = 0:13; F = 3.79, p = 0.009, which was higher in the western portion of the study area. In addition, the recordings of the two species were extended to the Atlantic Subtropical Gyre. Overall, Luciferidae shrimp were more common and abundant at the stations west of the Mid-Oceanic Ridge and L. typus was the most frequent and abundant species.

  9. A PMBGA to Optimize the Selection of Rules for Job Shop Scheduling Based on the Giffler-Thompson Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most existing research on the job shop scheduling problem has been focused on the minimization of makespan (i.e., the completion time of the last job. However, in the fiercely competitive market nowadays, delivery punctuality is more important for maintaining a high service reputation. So in this paper, we aim at solving job shop scheduling problems with the total weighted tardiness objective. Several dispatching rules are adopted in the Giffler-Thompson algorithm for constructing active schedules. It is noticeable that the rule selections for scheduling consecutive operations are not mutually independent but actually interrelated. Under such circumstances, a probabilistic model-building genetic algorithm (PMBGA is proposed to optimize the sequence of selected rules. First, we use Bayesian networks to model the distribution characteristics of high-quality solutions in the population. Then, the new generation of individuals is produced by sampling the established Bayesian network. Finally, some elitist individuals are further improved by a special local search module based on parameter perturbation. The superiority of the proposed approach is verified by extensive computational experiments and comparisons.

  10. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Sook; Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Yan

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data is part of the core data for the U.S. JGOFS Arabian Sea project, along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996 on the R/V T.G. Thompson. They are numbered consecutively from the ship`s commissioning with the first JGOFS cruise designated TN039. Table 1 lists start and end dates of each cruise with its mission. All but the first cruise have been or will be staged from Muscat, Oman. Each cruise is scheduled for a duration of between two weeks and one month. Seven of the cruises, referred to as process cruises, follow a standard cruise track, taking hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The rest of the cruises, which take place generally within the standard cruise region defined by a set track, are for the deployment and recovery of moored equipments and towing of a SeaSoar. ADCP data are collected using an autonomous data acquisition system developed for ship-of-opportunity cruises, named the AutoADCP system. The system is an extension of RD instrument`s DAS version 2.48 using enhancements made possible with {open_quotes}user-exit{close_quotes} programs. It makes it possible to collect ADCP data without the constant monitoring usually necessary and insures constant data coverage and uniform data quality.

  11. A cost-benefit analysis of preventative management for zebra and quagga mussels in the Colorado-Big Thompson System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Catherine M.

    2010-01-01

    net benefits of preventative management strategies. This study builds a bioeconomic simulation model to predict and compare the expected economic costs of the CDOW boat inspection program ot the benefits of reduced expected control costs to water conveyance systems, hydropower generation stations, and minicipal water treatment facilities. The model is based on a case study water delivery and storage system, the Colorado-Big Thompson system. The Colorado-Big Thomspon system is an excellent example of water systems in the Rocky Mountain West. The system is nearly entirely man-made, with all of its reservoirs and delivery points connected via pipelines, tunnels, and canals. The structures and hydropower systems of the Colorado-Big Thompson system are common to other western storage and delivery systems, making the methods and insight developed from this case study transferal to other western systems. The model developed in this study contributes to the bioeconomic literature in several ways. Foremost, the model predicts the spread of dreissena mussels and associated damage costs for a connected water system in the Rocky Mountain West. Very few zebra mussel studies have focused on western water systems. Another distinguishing factor is the simultaneous consideration of spread from propagules introduced by boats and by flows. Most zebra mussel dispersal models consider boater movement patterns combined with limnological characteristics as predictors of spread. A separate set of studies have addressed mussel spread via downstream flows. To the author's knowledge, this is the first study that builds a zebra mussel spread model that specifically accounts for propagule pressure from boat introductions and from downstream flow introductions. By modeling an entire connected system, the study highlights how the spatial layout of a system, and the risk of invasion within a system affect the benefits of preventative management. This report is presented in five chapters. The first

  12. Inversion of real and complex phase shifts to potentials by the generalized Cox-Thompson inverse scattering method at fixed energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchert, O; Scheid, W; Apagyi, B

    2006-01-01

    The Cox-Thompson inverse scattering method at fixed energy has been generalized to treat complex phase shifts derived from experiments. New formulae for relating phase shifts to shifted angular momenta are derived. The method is applied to phase shifts of known potentials in order to test its quality and stability and, further, it is used to invert experimental n-α and n- 12 C phase shifts

  13. Physical and nutrient data from bottle and CTD casts from the THOMAS THOMPSON from the equatorial Pacific Ocean from 30 January 1992 to 09 March 1992 (NODC Accession 9600091)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and nutrient data were collected from bottle and CTD casts from the THOMAS THOMPSON from the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Data were collected by the Bigelow...

  14. Physical, chemical and biological CTD and bottle data from R/V Thomas G. Thompson cruise TN278 in eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean from March 19 to April 20, 2012 (NODC Accession 0109846)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report contains data from R/V Thomas G. Thompson cruise TN278 to the eastern tropical north pacific oxygen deficient zone. The objective of the cruise was to...

  15. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1985-08-04 to 1985-09-07 (NCEI Accession 0143394)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143394 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1985-08-04 to 1985-09-07 and...

  16. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the South Pacific Ocean from 2013-10-25 to 2013-12-20 (NCEI Accession 0163186)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163186 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the South Pacific Ocean from 2013-10-25 to...

  17. Cloud amount/frequency, NITRATE and other data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the TOGA Area - Pacific from 1985-06-18 to 1985-07-15 (NODC Accession 9000124)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) data were collected as part of El Nino watch. R/V Thomas G. Thompson was used to collect data from TOGA Area-Pacific...

  18. Nutrients data from the R/V ALPHA HELIX and T.G. THOMPSON as part of the Inner Shelf Transfer and Recycling Project from 17 April 1987 to 21 July 1988 (NODC Accession 0000296)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, silicate, and other data were collected from the R/V ALPHA HELIX and THOMAS G. THOMPSON from April 17, 1987 to July 21, 1988. Data were...

  19. Physical data from CTD casts in the North Pacific Ocean from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON and the THOMAS WASHINGTON in support of the Marathon 2 Project from 05 May 1985 to 07 September 1987 (NODC Accession 9400131)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from CTD casts in the North Pacific Ocean from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON and the THOMAS WASHINGTON. Data were collected...

  20. Turbidity, SOLAR RADIATION - ATMOSPHERIC and other data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the TOGA Area - Pacific, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1992-03-19 to 1992-09-24 (NODC Accession 9700039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hydrochemical, hydrophysical, and other data were collected from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON from March 19, 1992 to September 24, 1992. Data were submitted by Dr. Curt...

  1. Finite-Element Investigation of the Structural Behavior of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP- Reinforced Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC Decks Slabs in Thompson Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingzhu Zhou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for a sustainable development and improved whole life performance of concrete infrastructure has led to the requirement of more durable and sustainable concrete bridges alongside accurate predictive analysis tools. Using the combination of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC with industrial by-products and fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP, reinforcement is anticipated to address the concerns of high carbon footprint and corrosion in traditional steel-reinforced concrete structures. This paper presents a numerical investigation of the structural behavior of basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP-reinforced SCC deck slabs in a real bridge, named Thompson Bridge, constructed in Northern Ireland, U.K. A non-linear finite element (FE model is proposed by using ABAQUS 6.10 in this study, which is aimed at extending the previous investigation of the field test in Thompson Bridge. The results of this field test were used to validate the accuracy of the proposed finite element model. The results showed good agreement between the test results and the numerical results; more importantly, the compressive membrane action (CMA inside the slabs could be well demonstrated by this FE model. Subsequently, a series of parametric studies was conducted to investigate the influence of different parameters on the structural performance of the deck slabs in Thompson Bridge. The results of the analyses are discussed, and conclusions on the behavior of the SCC deck slabs reinforced by BFRP bars are presented.

  2. Kevorkian v. Thompson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Court Decision: 947 Federal Supplement 1152; 1997 Jan 6 (date of decision). The United States District Court of the Eastern District of Michigan held that a mentally competent patient who is terminally ill or intractably suffering does not have a liberty interest in assisted suicide under the due process clause of the Fourth Amendment and is not denied equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment. Plaintiff Jack Kevorkian is a physician who advocates the right to die and assisted patients to commit suicide. Plaintiff Janet Good, the former president of the Michigan Hemlock Society, suffers from terminal pancreatic cancer. The plaintiffs claimed that Michigan's statute prohibiting physician-assisted suicide is unconstitutional. The District Court held that there is no cognizable constitutional right to assisted suicide because the right to suicide or assisted suicide is not deeply rooted in the nation's history and traditions, and because the statute does not infringe on any fundamental right or liberty. The court noted a difference between the withdrawal of life support and acts to hasten death by assisted suicide. The court also held that the law against physician-assisted suicide furthered legitimate state interests in denying to physicians "the role of killers of their patients," in regulating circumstances under which life may be ended, and in protecting the vulnerable but viable from "self-interested importuning of third parties."

  3. Conocimientos y aplicación de normas de bioseguridad del servicio de Ginecoobstetricia del Hospital Alberto Leopoldo Barton Thompson, Callao 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Salas Zegarra, Rita Maribel

    2016-01-01

    El objetivo del presente trabajo de investigación es determinar la relación que existe entre los conocimientos de normas de bioseguridad y la aplicación de normas de bioseguridad en el servicio de Ginecoobstetricia en el Hospital Alberto Leopoldo Barton Thompson en el Callao, periodo 2016; la población conformada por los técnicos de enfermería, ginecoobstetrasy obstetras del servicio ginecoobstetricia de 75 trabajadores, la muestra consideró toda la población, en los cuales se ...

  4. An Approach to the Characteristics of the Mongolian Short tune Folk Song Melody Style%科尔沁蒙古族短调民歌旋律风格特征探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世相

    2012-01-01

    The academic circle has long been paying more attention to the division of the folk style color area,but less of an academic research organization,the combination of music rhythm,melody exhibition derivative of folk melody pitch of the style.Mongolian short tune folk songs are unique with melodic style of "smooth rap","symmetry of rhythm combination "and the use of " lining the cavity of the lyric" and the "richness of tonal thinking".%长期以来,学术界对如何划分民歌风格色彩区关注较多,而对于各风格色彩区民歌的旋律音高组织、音乐节奏组合、旋律展衍规律等学理上的研究较少。科尔沁蒙古族短调民歌独具特色,旋律风格体现于"平稳进行的说唱性""节奏组合的对称性""善用衬腔的抒情性"与"调性思维的丰富性"等方面。

  5. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabine, C.L.; Key, R.M.; Hall, M.; Kozyr, A.

    1999-01-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), and radiocarbon (delta 14C), at hydrographic stations, as well as the underway partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) during the R/V Thomas G. Thompson oceanographic cruise in the Pacific Ocean (Section P10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Suva, Fiji, on October 5, 1993, and ended in Yokohama, Japan, on November 10, 1993. Measurements made along WOCE Section P10 included pressure, temperature, salinity[measured by conductivity temperature, and depth sensor (CTD)], bottle salinity, bottle oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12), TCO2, TALK, delta 14C, and underway pCO2

  6. Cloud amount/frequency, NITRATE and other data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the TOGA Area - Pacific from 1985-03-30 to 1985-06-03 (NODC Accession 9100164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data Trans-Pacific Section 24 Bottle data in this accession was collected in th TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) in 1984 using ship THOMAS G. THOMPSON. The...

  7. Model Development to Predict Phenological scale of Table Grapes (cvs. Thompson, Crimson and Superior Seedless and Red Globe using Growing Degree Days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Verdugo-Vásquez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Phenological models have been made mainly for winegrape cultivars, despite the economic importance of table grapes. The aim of this work was to develop and validate models for predicting phenological scales of table grapes (cvs. Thompson, Crimson and Superior Seedless and Red Globe grown under semi-arid conditions. Measurements of phenology were carried out weekly from budburst to harvest during four growing seasons (2009-2013. Phenology models were developed using the Mitscherlich monomolecular equation where the dependent and independent variables were the Eichhorn and Lorenz phenological (ELP scale modified by Coombe and the growing degree days (GDD, respectively. Results indicated that there were strong non-linear correlations between the ELP scale and GDD for the four cultivars with coefficient of determinations (R2 ranging between 0.97-0.99. Also, validation indicated that the models were able to predict ELP scale with a root mean square (RMSE and mean absolute error (MAE ranging between 2.1-2.4 and 1.35-1.69, respectively. The prediction variability (expressed in days was between 4.4-19.4 days, obtaining the best results for the flowering period. This study suggested that the phenological models based on GDD could be useful planning tools for farming, especially from budburst to veraison of table grape cultivars.

  8. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean and Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument from 1985-03-30 to 1985-04-30 (NCEI Accession 0143395)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143395 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean and Papahanaumokuakea Marine National...

  9. Physical, chemical, and other data from bottle casts from the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Coastal Upwelling Ecosystems Analysis (IDOE/CUEA) from 1973-07-11 to 1973-07-21 (NODC Accession 7601145)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical, and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON from 11 July 1973 to 21...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the South Pacific Ocean from 1994-01-25 to 1994-02-19 (NODC Accession 0115762)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115762 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the South Pacific Ocean from 1994-01-25 to...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway, discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Bismarck Sea, Coral Sea and others from 1993-10-05 to 1993-11-10 (NODC Accession 0115019)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115019 includes Surface underway, chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1993-07-05 to 1993-09-02 (NODC Accession 0115008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115008 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean and...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-11-01 to 1997-11-11 (NODC Accession 0115176)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115176 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1997-11-01 to...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Gulf of Alaska, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2006-02-13 to 2006-03-30 (NODC Accession 0108062)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108062 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Gulf of Alaska, North...

  15. Temperature profile data collected using bottle casts from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1985-03-30 to 1985-06-03 (NODC Accession 8700228)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature, depth, and other data were collected using meteorological sensors, secchi disks, and bottle casts from THOMAS G. THOMPSON...

  16. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the East China Sea, North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 1985-05-04 to 1985-06-03 (NCEI Accession 0156918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0156918 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the East China Sea (Tung Hai), North...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 2004-04-24 to 2004-06-01 (NODC Accession 0115590)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115590 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 2004-04-24 to 2004-06-01. These...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 2008-08-26 to 2008-09-17 (NODC Accession 0108130)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108130 includes chemical, discrete sample, optical, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  19. Physical, chemical, nutrient, and other data from the Gulf of California from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Coastal Upwelling Ecosystems Analysis (IDOE/CUEA) from 05 March 1972 to 09 April 1972 (NODC Accession 7400405)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical, nutrient, and other data were collected from the Gulf of California from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON from 05 March 1972 to 09 April 1972. Data were...

  20. Estimating incidence of problem drug use using the Horwitz-Thompson estimator - A new approach applied to people who inject drugs in Oslo 1985-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Ellen J; Bretteville-Jensen, Anne L; Kraus, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    The trend in the number of new problem drug users per year (incidence) is the most important measure for studying the diffusion of problem drug use. Due to sparse data sources and complicated statistical models, estimation of incidence of problem drug use is challenging. The aim of this study is to widen the palette of available methods and data types for estimating incidence of problem drug use over time, and for identifying the trends. This study presents a new method of incidence estimation, applied to people who inject drugs (PWID) in Oslo. The method took into account the transition between different phases of drug use progression - active use, temporary cessation, and permanent cessation. The Horwitz-Thompson estimator was applied. Data included 16 cross-sectional samples of problem drug users who reported their onset of injecting drug use. We explored variation in results for selected probable scenarios of parameter variation for disease progression, as well as the stability of the results based on fewer years of cross-sectional samples. The method yielded incidence estimates of problem drug use, over time. When applied to people in Oslo who inject drugs, we found a significant reduction of incidence of 63% from 1985 to 2008. This downward trend was also present when the estimates were based on fewer surveys (five) and in the results of sensitivity analysis for likely scenarios of disease progression. This new method, which incorporates temporarily inactive problem drug users, may become a useful tool for estimating the incidence of problem drug use over time. The method may be less data intensive than other methods based on first entry to treatment and may be generalized to other groups of substance users. Further studies on drug use progression would improve the validity of the results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Producción de ácido indol-3-acético por Pseudomonas veronii R4 y formación de raíces en hojas de vid “Thompson seedless” in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Peñafiel Jaramillo; Alexandra Elizabeth Barrera Álvarez; Emma Danielly Torres Navarrete; Hayron Fabricio Canchignia Martínez; Humberto Prieto-Encalada; Jaime Morante Carriel

    2016-01-01

    Rizobacterias con actividad antagonista son empleadas a problemas patológicos y promueven el desarrollo de tejido radicular de especies vegetales El objetivo del estudio fue evaluar la capacidad en síntesis de ácido indol-3-acetico (AIA) y la formación de raíces en hojas de vid “Thompson Seedless”, por el empleo de Pseudomonas veronii R4 in vitro. La bacteria, fue incubada en medio mínimo M9 y se verificó la producción de AIA a 24, 48 y 72 h de muestreo, los sobrenadantes fueron analizandos p...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using CTD, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific Ocean from 1993-05-15 to 1993-06-26 (NODC Accession 0115172)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115172 includes chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using automated Multi-parameter Inorganic Carbon Analyzer (MICA) for autonomous measurement of pH, carbon dioxide (CO2) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Gulf of Alaska, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2006-02-13 to 2006-03-30 (NCEI Accession 0157411)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157411 includes Surface underway, chemical and physical data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Gulf of Alaska, North Pacific Ocean and South...

  4. Living Melodies - Coevolution Of Sonic Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle; Nordahl, Mats G.

    2001-01-01

    The authors have constructed an artificial world of coevolving communicating agents. The behavior of the agents is described in terms of a simple genetic programming framework, which allows the evolution of foraging behavior and movement in order to reproduce, as well as sonic communication....... The sound of the entire world is used as musical raw material for the work. Musically interesting and useful structures are found to emerge....

  5. Some structural determinants of melody recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, M

    1991-05-01

    Sophisticated musicians were asked to recall, using musical notation, a set of unfamiliar folk tunes that varied in rhythmic structure and referents of tonality. The results showed that memory was facilitated by tonic triad members marking phrase endings, but only when their presence was highlighted by a corresponding pattern of temporal accents. Conversely, recall significantly declined when tonal information was either absent or obscured by rhythmic structure. Error analyses further revealed that the retention of overall pitch contour and information at phrase ending points varied as a function of these manipulations. The results are discussed in terms of a framework that links the acts of perceiving and remembering to a common attentional scheme.

  6. De Las Vegas a Marina D'or. O como llegar desde el New Jornalism norteamericano de Hunter S. Thompson hasta la nueva narrativa española de Robert Juan-Cantavella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Angulo Egea

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The north-american trend called 'New Journalism' born in the 60's, was a revolution for the USA traditional Journalism, for its use of literary elements with other ones that belong to the journalistic research. Hunter S. Thompson, author of Fear and loathing in Las Vegas (1971, with his gonzo style, was going to shed new light on the New Journalism proposals, improving the immersión process using drugs until he gets implied personally in his reports and taking all his narrative influences from the 50's beat movement. Almost 35 years later, in El Dorado, Juan-Cantavella makes a paralellism between Las Vegas and the holiday city in the mediterranean coast, Marina D'Or and he develops in this space a novel, where his alter ego, the punk journalist Escargot, plays the lead. Novel, journalism, gonzo, fiction, story, punk, essay, report, 'aportaje', discursive fragmentation, dialogs, internal monologues, descriptions, memorandums, telegrams, emails, press releases, radio news, songs, slogans, all fits to reenact genres, to re-read journalistic and literary traditions and to build something new. This work analyses this process, that goes from the gonzo journalism of Fear and loathing in Las Vegas to the current Spanish narrative of El Dorado. It tries to distinguish the literary resources that the gonzo journalist uses to build his reports and the journalistic tools that nourish Juan-Cantavella's 'punk narrative'. A particular example of literary-journalistic symbiosisLa corriente norteamericana llamada 'Nuevo periodismo', nacida en los años sesenta, supuso para la Periodística tradicional de Estados Unidos toda una revolución por la combinación de elementos literarios con otros propios de la investigación periodística. Hunter S. Thompson, autor de Miedo y asco en las Vegas (1971, con su periodismo gonzo, le iba a dar una vuelta más a la propuesta del New Journalism, llevando al extremo el proceso de inmersión, hasta implicarse personalmente

  7. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. THOMPSON: TN043, January 8, 1995--February 4, 1995; TN044, February 8, 1995--February 25, 1995; TN045, March 14, 1995--April 10, 1995; TN046, April 14, 1995--April 29, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flagg, C.N.; Kim, H.S.; Shi, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data from the R/V T.G. THOMPSON is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises on the THOMPSON are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996. This is the second in a series of data reports covering the ADCP data from the Arabian Sea JGOFS cruises TNO43 through TNO46. ADCP data are being collected on all the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises using an autonomous data acquisition system developed for ship-of-opportunity cruises. This system, referred to as the AutoADCP, makes it possible to collect the ADCP data without the constant monitoring usually necessary and assures constant data coverage and uniform data quality. This data report presents ADCP results from the second group of four JGOFS cruises, TNO43 through TNO46, concentrating on the data collection and processing methods. The ADCP data itself reside in a CODAS data base at Brookhaven National Laboratory and is generally available to JGOFS investigators through contact with the authors. The CODAS data base and associated ADCP processing software were developed over a number of years by Eric Firing and his group at the University of Hawaii. The CODAS software is shareware available for PC`s or Unix computers and is the single most widely used ADCP processing program for ship mounted units.

  8. The Pied Piper: A Parasitic Beetle's Melodies Modulate Ant Behaviours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Di Giulio

    Full Text Available Ants use various communication channels to regulate their social organisation. The main channel that drives almost all the ants' activities and behaviours is the chemical one, but it is long acknowledged that the acoustic channel also plays an important role. However, very little is known regarding exploitation of the acoustical channel by myrmecophile parasites to infiltrate the ant society. Among social parasites, the ant nest beetles (Paussus are obligate myrmecophiles able to move throughout the colony at will and prey on the ants, surprisingly never eliciting aggression from the colonies. It has been recently postulated that stridulatory organs in Paussus might be evolved as an acoustic mechanism to interact with ants. Here, we survey the role of acoustic signals employed in the Paussus beetle-Pheidole ant system. Ants parasitised by Paussus beetles produce caste-specific stridulations. We found that Paussus can "speak" three different "languages", each similar to sounds produced by different ant castes (workers, soldiers, queen. Playback experiments were used to test how host ants respond to the sounds emitted by Paussus. Our data suggest that, by mimicking the stridulations of the queen, Paussus is able to dupe the workers of its host and to be treated as royalty. This is the first report of acoustic mimicry in a beetle parasite of ants.

  9. Unchained Melody: Revisiting the Estimation of SF-6D Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In the original SF-6D valuation study, the analytical design inherited conventions that detrimentally affected its ability to predict values on a quality-adjusted life year (QALY) scale. Our objective is to estimate UK values for SF-6D states using the original data and multi-attribute utility (MAU) regression after addressing its limitations and to compare the revised SF-6D and EQ-5D value predictions. Methods Using the unaltered data (611 respondents, 3503 SG responses), the parameters of the original MAU model were re-estimated under 3 alternative error specifications, known as the instant, episodic, and angular random utility models. Value predictions on a QALY scale were compared to EQ-5D3L predictions using the 1996 Health Survey for England. Results Contrary to the original results, the revised SF-6D value predictions range below 0 QALYs (i.e., worse than death) and agree largely with EQ-5D predictions after adjusting for scale. Although a QALY is defined as a year in optimal health, the SF-6D sets a higher standard for optimal health than the EQ-5D-3L; therefore, it has larger units on a QALY scale by construction (20.9% more). Conclusions Much of the debate in health valuation has focused on differences between preference elicitation tasks, sampling, and instruments. After correcting errant econometric practices and adjusting for differences in QALY scale between the EQ-5D and SF-6D values, the revised predictions demonstrate convergent validity, making them more suitable for UK economic evaluations compared to original estimates. PMID:26359242

  10. Imagery, melody and gesture in cross-cultural perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Fatone, Gina A.; Clayton, Martin; Leante, Laura; Rahaim, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Musical action is also physical action. This is obvious in cases such as moving the arm to direct a bow across a cello string, turning the hand to control the vibrations of a drumhead or inclining the cartilages of the larynx to raise the pitch of a sung note. In addition to producing sound, however, physical motion can also serve as a means of conceiving and conveying music: motion is linked in turn to visual imagery and other aspects of the conceptualization of music. Auditor...

  11. Counting Melodies: Recursion through Music for a Liberal Arts Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwick, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    In the study of music from a mathematical perspective, several types of counting problems naturally arise. For example, how many different rhythms of a specified length (in beats) can be written if we restrict ourselves to only quarter notes (one beat) and half notes (two beats)? What if we allow whole notes, dotted half notes, etc.? Or, what if…

  12. Melodie: A global risk assessment model for radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewi, J.; Assouline, M.; Bareau, J.; Raimbault, P.

    1987-03-01

    The Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN), which is part of the French Atomic Energy Commission (C.E.A.) develops since 1984 in collaboration with different groups inside and outside the C.E.A. a computer model for risk assessment of nuclear waste repositories in deep geological formations. The main characteristics of the submodels, the data processing structure and some examples of applications are presented

  13. Automatic Phrase Continuation from Guitar and Bass guitar Melodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherla, Srikanth; Purwins, Hendrik; Marchini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    A framework is proposed for generating interesting, and musically similar variations of a givenmonophonicmelody. The focus is on rock/pop guitar and bass-guitarmelodies with the aim of eventual extensions to other instruments and musical styles. It is demonstrated here how learning musical style...... evaluated through a questionnaire by a group of experts, and received an overall positive response....

  14. Unsettling Melodies: A Cognitive Approach to Incongruent Film Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Steven; Kiss, Miklós

    2013-01-01

    Incongruent film music is a soundtrack, either diegetic or non- diegetic, which expresses qualities that stand in contrast to the emotions evoked by the events seen. The present article aims at covering two interconnected areas; the first is comprised of a critical recapitulation of available

  15. Konuşma ve Ses Eğitimi Arasında Konuşmanın Ezgisi Açısından Akrabalık İlişkisi Kindship of Speaking and Voice Education Through Speaking Melody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kıvanç AYCAN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Voice education is interdisciplinary individual education, whichconsists of sub-matters like speaking and singing. It is also aneducation in which the individuals acquire the necessary behaviors touse their voices in compatible with the anatomical and physiologicalstructures, while they are speaking and singing. On the other hand,speech training is defined as "diction", "oratory", "rhetoric" which isdoctrines in Turkish language for this purpose. The person who wantsto talk with clear diction and to use his language in a appropriate wayand express himself properly, has to understand and apply voice andbreath control and has to acquire knowledge about phonetic, accent,intonation and enclisis. People who earns money through speaking asin advocators, public speaker, politicians and teachers, should learn tokeep their voices for a healthy voice. To make people to use innatespeaking ability in an accurate and ordered way, speaking educationpossession in school life is crucial. General purpose of speaking lessonsin the educational institution is to gain effective and fitting individualexpression ability through the student’s opinion, observation, ambitionand desires. Starting from these point students should understand themain structure and function of respiratory systems, diaphragm andabdominal muscles, larynx muscles and voice tube. Speakingeducation’s theoretical content is finding practical corresponds in voiceeducation through breath management exercises. The kinship betweenvoice and speaking education is the relationship between the theoreticalcontent of speaking education and practical content of vocal education,which relies on the melody of speaking. This article is a descriptivereview which contains kinship of voice and speaking education. Ses eğitimi; konuşma, şarkı söyleme ve şan gibi alt basamakları içeren disiplinler arası bir özel eğitim alanıdır. Bireylere konuşurken ve şarkı söylerken anatomik ve fizyolojik yap

  16. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/Vs Roger Revelle and Thomas Thompson repeat hydrography cruises in the Pacific Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 sections P16S-2005 (9 January - 19 February, 2005) and P16N-2006 (13 February - 30 March, 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyr, Alex [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Feely, R. A. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Sabine, C. L. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Millero, F. J. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Langdon, C. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Dickson, A. G. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Fine, R. A. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Bullister, J. L. [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Hansell, D. A. [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Carlson, C. A. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Sloyan, B. M. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States); McNichol, A. P. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Key, R. M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Byrne, R. H. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Wanninkhof, R. [Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA, Miami, FL (United States)

    2009-05-01

    This report presents methods, and analytical and quality control procedures for salinity, oxygen, nutrients, total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), pH, discrete CO2 partial pressure (pCO2), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), radiocarbon, δ13C, and underway carbon measurements performed during the P16S-2005 (9 January - 19 February 2005) and P16N-2006 (13 February - 30 March, 2006) cruises in the Pacific Ocean. The research vessel (R/V) Roger Revelle departed Papeete, Tahiti, on January 9, 2005 for the Repeat Section P16S, nominally along 150°W, ending in Wellington, New Zealand, on February 19. During this cruise, samples were taken from 36 depths at 111 CTD stations between 16°S and 71°S. The Repeat Section P16N, nominally along 152°W, consisted of two legs. Leg 1 started on February 13, 2006 in Papeete, Tahiti, and finished on March 3, in Honolulu, Hawaii. The R/V Thomas G. Thompson departed Honolulu for Leg 2 on March 10, 2006 and arrived in Kodiak, Alaska, on March 30. During the P16N cruises, samples were taken from 34 or 36 depths at 84 stations between 17°S and 56.28°N. The research conducted on these cruises was part of a series of repeat hydrography sections jointly funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the Climate Variability Program (CLIVAR)/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program. The P16S and P16N data sets are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  17. Bi-orderings on pure braided Thompson's groups

    OpenAIRE

    Burillo, Jose; Gonzalez-Meneses, Juan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper it is proved that the pure braided Thompson’s group BF admits a bi-order, analog to the bi-order of the pure braid groups. Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional

  18. Combined Reverse-Brayton Joule Thompson Hydrogen Liquefaction Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimko, Martin A. [Gas Equipment Engineering Corporation, Milford, CT (United States); Dunn, Paul M. [Gas Equipment Engineering Corporation, Milford, CT (United States)

    2011-12-31

    The following is a compilation of Annual Progress Reports submitted to the DOE’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office by Gas Equipment Engineering Corp. for contract DE-FG36-05GO15021. The reports cover the project activities from August 2005 through June 2010. The purpose of this project is to produce a pilot-scale liquefaction plant that demonstrates GEECO’s ability to meet or exceed the efficiency targets set by the DOE. This plant will be used as a model to commercialize this technology for use in the distribution infrastructure of hydrogen fuel. It could also be applied to markets distributing hydrogen for industrial gas applications. Extensive modeling of plant performance will be used in the early part of the project to identify the liquefaction cycle architecture that optimizes the twin goals of increased efficiency and reduced cost. The major challenge of the project is to optimize/balance the performance (efficiency) of the plant against the cost of the plant so that the fully amortized cost of liquefying hydrogen meets the aggressive goals set by DOE. This project will design and build a small-scale pilot plant (several hundred kg/day) that will be both a hardware demonstration and a model for scaling to larger plant sizes (>50,000 kg/day). Though an effort will be made to use commercial or near-commercial components, key components that will need development for either a pilot- or full-scale plant will be identified. Prior to starting pilot plant fabrication, these components will be demonstrated at the appropriate scale to demonstrate sufficient performance for use in the pilot plant and the potential to achieve the performance used in modeling the full-scale plant.

  19. Misdiagnosis of intraspinal lesions in childhood | Thompson | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three children with intraspinal mass lesions in whom the diagnosis was initially missed are described. Their case histories highlight the specific clinical features of and diagnostic difficulties with the syndromes produced by lesions of the craniocervical junction, the mid-thoracic spinal cord and the cauda equina.

  20. Colonial Military Intelligence in the Zulu Rebellion, 1906 | Thompson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the Zulu Rebellion of 1906, the Natal Militia defeated the Zulu rebels without British imperial forces having to intervene in the conflict. The colonial forces were well adapted to the local circumstances, but in one important respect they drew heavily on imperial experience, namely military field intelligence. Colonial military ...

  1. Shapes and timing in charismatic speech - Evidence from sounds and melodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niebuhr, Oliver; Thumm, Jana; Michalsky, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Our paper presents a phonetic analysis at the intersection of segments and prosodies. We look in detail at the previous finding that high pitch and a clear pronunciation contribute to a speaker's perceived charisma. To that end, we compare two popular CEOs, Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg, who...

  2. Munajat Dalam Tarekat Naqsyabandiah Babussalam Langkat: Kajian Terhadap Fungsi, Makna Teks, Dan Struktur Melodi

    OpenAIRE

    Nasution, Wiwin Syahputra

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the analysis of form, function and meaning Munajat as ideology and the media in keeping the congregation Naqsyabandiah lineage in the village of Padang Tualang Besilam Langkat District, North Sumatra Province. The study was conducted to provide a thorough understanding of the role of the congregation chanting Munajat Naqsyabandiah used as a sign of the entry of Fajr prayers, Maqhrib and Friday prayers. As the creator and the civilizing traditions of chanting Munajat read...

  3. Melody as Prosody: Toward a Usage-Based Theory of Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, Thomas Mathew

    2014-01-01

    Rationalist modes of inquiry have dominated the cognitive science of music over the past several decades. This dissertation contests many rationalist assumptions, including its core tenets of nativism, modularity, and computationism, by drawing on a wide range of evidence from psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, and cognitive music theory, as…

  4. A wavelet-based approach to the discovery of themes and sections in monophonic melodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velarde, Gissel; Meredith, David

    We present the computational method submitted to the MIREX 2014 Discovery of Repeated Themes & Sections task, and the results on the monophonic version of the JKU Patterns Development Database. In the context of pattern discovery in monophonic music, the idea behind our method is that, with a good...

  5. What is a melody? On the relationship between pitch and brightness of timbre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Marion; Carcagno, Samuele; Demany, Laurent; Pressnitzer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies showed that the perceptual processing of sound sequences is more efficient when the sounds vary in pitch than when they vary in loudness. We show here that sequences of sounds varying in brightness of timbre are processed with the same efficiency as pitch sequences. The sounds used consisted of two simultaneous pure tones one octave apart, and the listeners' task was to make same/different judgments on pairs of sequences varying in length (one, two, or four sounds). In one condition, brightness of timbre was varied within the sequences by changing the relative level of the two pure tones. In other conditions, pitch was varied by changing fundamental frequency, or loudness was varied by changing the overall level. In all conditions, only two possible sounds could be used in a given sequence, and these two sounds were equally discriminable. When sequence length increased from one to four, discrimination performance decreased substantially for loudness sequences, but to a smaller extent for brightness sequences and pitch sequences. In the latter two conditions, sequence length had a similar effect on performance. These results suggest that the processes dedicated to pitch and brightness analysis, when probed with a sequence-discrimination task, share unexpected similarities.

  6. What is a melody? On the relationship between pitch and brightness of timbre

    OpenAIRE

    Cousineau, Marion; Carcagno, Samuele; Demany, Laurent; Pressnitzer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that the perceptual processing of sound sequences is more efficient when the sounds vary in pitch than when they vary in loudness. We show here that sequences of sounds varying in brightness of timbre are processed with the same efficiency as pitch sequences. The sounds used consisted of two simultaneous pure tones one octave apart, and the listeners’ task was to make same/different judgments on pairs of sequences varying in length (one, two, or four sounds). In one co...

  7. Teaching Improvisation through Melody and Blues-Based Harmony: A Comprehensive and Sequential Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Leila

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a sequential approach to improvisation teaching that can be used with students at various age and ability levels by any educator, regardless of improvisation experience. The 2014 National Core Music Standards include improvisation as a central component in musical learning and promote instructional approaches that are…

  8. Melodies and maladies: reflections on Shakespeare and his portrayal of disease and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranab Chatterjee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Shakespeare has long been acknowledged to be a pioneer in understanding the functions and dysfunctions of the human mind. However, very little discussion has centered on his knowledge of the physical science of medicine. In this article the authors reflect on Shakespeare’s portrayal of diseases and death in his work and conclude that he had significant knowledge of the contemporary medical sciences.

  9. A rose is a rose is a melody: Mapping Julio Cortázar's musical narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pérez Mukdsi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, many of Julio Cortázar’s ground-breaking works were re-launched over the world to commemorate the centenary of the birth of the Argentine writer. A major figure of world literature, Cortázar’s fictions are known to break out of the prison of words and conventional practices. His “counternovel” Hopscotch (1963, a milestone in Latin American fiction writing, is nothing less than a linguistic revolution. Part of what makes this novel revolutionary is the way it explores the boundaries of language and reality. The other part are its profuse references to jazz music, making it a work of unparalleled sonority. In fact, the presence of music – jazz, classical music, and tango – is significant not only in this novel but also in at least in half of Cortázar’s tremendous production. Most scholarship about Cortázar agrees that the author uses music as an alternative form of expression, one that complements and contradicts traditional language. Nevertheless, scholarship has not yet fashioned a convincing and comprehensive theoretical approach to his musically-infused production. The present article starts by examining what scholars have thus far said regarding music and, more specifically, jazz in Cortázar’s work. Then the essay raises critical questions about the cultural and linguistic myopia resulting from typical approaches to music in the author’s work. Finally, it points out avenues which might lead scholarship to a comprehensive vision of Cortázar’s strategic use of music.

  10. A Proposal of a Color Music Notation System on a Single Melody for Music Beginners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Ting; Chuang, Ming-Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Music teachers often encounter obstructions in teaching beginners in music reading. Conventional notational symbols require beginners to spend significant amount of time in memorizing, which discourages learning at early stage. This article proposes a newly-developed color music notation system that may improve the recognition of the staff and the…

  11. Priming in Melody Perception: Tracking Down the Strength of Cognitive Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmel, Frederic; Tillmann, Barbara; Delbe, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The musical priming paradigm has shown facilitated processing for tonally related over less-related targets. However, the congruence between tonal relatedness and the psychoacoustical properties of music challenges cognitive interpretations of the involved processes. Our goal was to show that cognitive expectations (based on listeners' tonal…

  12. New music to an old melody: The 66th AAAAI meeting in New Orleans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasseda, Xavier

    2010-04-01

    With the images of the earthquake in Haiti still fresh in the memory, and a similar disaster just occurring in Chile, coming again to New Orleans brought back vivid images of the Hurricane Katrina disaster. The city has for the most part recovered from that experience, although molds persist in many historical and ancient buildings, putting allergy sufferers at risk as they breathe in allergens. The city of New Orleans is almost fully restored to its former glory, however, and music again pours out through doors and windows of the French Quarter, calling people in to share drinks and food while clearly stating which specific products contain or may contain traces of nuts, so that people with allergies do not need to run to their epinephrine autoinjector to treat life-threatening anaphylactic attacks. Against this background, and under heavy, rainy and windy skies, the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (AAAAI) held its 2010 annual meeting in the Ernst E. Memorial Convention Center, where 4 days packed with presentations and discussions displaced most other thoughts from the attendees' minds. Indeed, nights on Bourbon Street had never been so uncrowded as they were during the meeting, suggesting that attendees were perhaps sequestered in their hotel rooms, working with new information obtained at the meeting. Copyright 2010 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  13. Geological-Seismological Evaluation of Earthquake Hazards at West Thompson Damsite, Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    Connecticut, N of 41.61N 72.12W 1.5 - Norwich ( Foreshock ) 29 Jun 80 Connecticut, N of 41.46N 72.09W 1.8 - Norwich 28 Jul 80 Connecticut, N of 41.52N...the event was judged to be either an aftershock or foreshock ; the geographic location is given as north latitude and west longitude, to the nearest 0.10

  14. Distribution of the Planktonic Shrimp Lucifer (Thompson, 1829 (Decapoda, Sergestoidea off the Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NFAC Melo

    Full Text Available Lucifer faxoni (BORRADAILE, 1915 and L. typus (EDWARDS, 1837 are species first identified in the neritic and oceanic waters off the Amazon. Samplings were made aboard the vessel “Antares” at 22 stations in July and August, 2001 with a bongo net (500-µm mesh size. Hydrological data were taken simultaneously for comparative purposes. L. faxoni was present at thirteen of the fourteen neritic stations analysed, as well as at five of the eight oceanic stations. L. typus was present at three of the fourteen neritic stations and in one of the eight oceanic stations. The highest density of L. faxoni in the neritic province was 7,000 ind.m–3 (St. 82 and 159 ind.m–3 (St. 75 in the oceanic area. For L. typus, the highest density observed was 41 ind.m–3 (St. 64 in the neritic province. In the oceanic province, the highest single density value was recorded at station 75 (5 ind.m–3. Overall, L. faxonitypically presented the highest densities.

  15. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON from 19920223 to 19921020 (NODC Accession 9700196)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Thorium-234 activity in particulate and dissolved components were calculated from water samples collected along a 140 west transect in Hawaiian waters. Samples were...

  16. Marxism, Culture and Anthropology. Gramsci, Thompson and Williams’s contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Liaudat

    2017-03-01

    Through the literature review we developed two analysis levels. On one side, the discussions points of these authors with Marxist economism, the commonalities and differences between them and their main conceptual contributions in the construction of a critical Marxism. On the other side, we develop the influence of Gramsci in anthropology, which interpretations have been made by this author?, the role played by the British Marxism in these interpretations and the specific contributions that anthropology could make to build Marxism not economicist.

  17. Don’t be fooled by a name: a reply to Thompson and Davis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hulme, P. E.; Pyšek, Petr; Duncan, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 7 (2011), s. 318-318 ISSN 0169-5347 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : biological invasions * species traits * New Zealand Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 15.748, year: 2011

  18. Deconvolution of H-alpha profiles measured by Thompson scattering collecting optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, B.; Grek, B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses that optically fast multichannel Thomson scattering optics that can be used for H-alpha emission profile measurement. A technique based on the fact that a particular volume element of the overall field of view can be seen by many channels, depending on its location, is discussed. It is applied to measurement made on PDX with the vertically viewing TVTS collecting optics (56 channels). The authors found that for this case, about 28 Fourier modes are optimum to represent the spatial behavior of the plasma emissivity. The coefficients for these modes are obtained by doing a least-square-fit to the data subjet to certain constraints. The important constraints are non-negative emissivity, the assumed up and down symmetry and zero emissivity beyond the liners. H-alpha deconvolutions are presented for diverted and circular discharges

  19. Signal Transfer Function of the Knox-Thompson Speckle Imaging Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-15

    r - q/2) - ¢[r’ + (q - A )/2] 4. P. Nisenson, R. V. Stachnik, M. Karovska , and R. W. Noyes, " A + O’ - (q - A /2 1 2 1 new optical source associated...AD- A 197 716 opR 0 UMENTArON PAGE unclassified 4 - E MARKINGS i" 2a SECURITY CLASSIFICATION AUTHORI Y " I C #. DISTRIBUTION IAVAILABILITY OF REPORT...City, State, and ZIPCode) 7b ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) LHanscom AFB Ma.ssachusettai, 01731-5000 a . NAME OF FUNDING/SPONSORING 18b OFFICE

  20. The health literacy needs of women living with HIV/AIDS | Thompson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Women in Sub-Saharan Africa are disproportionately affected by the virus and constitute 60% of the total HIV/AIDS infections in this region. Current recommendations endorse the involvement of people living with HIV in the development of programmes for people living with the virus. The purpose of the study was to explore ...

  1. How fast can a black hole eat. [Equation stationary spherically symmetric solutions, Thompson scattering, mass flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kafka, P; Meszaros, P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Muenchen (Germany, F.R.)

    1976-11-01

    Stationary spherically symmetric solutions of the equations for accretion of large mass flows onto a black hole, including the interaction of matter and radiation due to Thomson scattering in diffusion approximation are constructed. The relevance of these solutions is discussed with respect to the question of whether the limitation of the luminosity (Eddington limit) also implies an upper bound to the possible rate of mass flow. The question remains open until all instabilities have been studied. At the moment a negative answer is favoured.

  2. Inter-individual differences in audio-motor learning of piano melodies and white matter fiber tract architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Annerose; Hijmans, Brenda S.; Cerliani, Leonardo; Bangert, Marc; Nanetti, Luca; Keller, Peter E.; Keysers, Christian

    Humans vary substantially in their ability to learn new motor skills. Here, we examined inter-individual differences in learning to play the piano, with the goal of identifying relations to structural properties of white matter fiber tracts relevant to audio-motor learning. Non-musicians (n = 18)

  3. The influence of music-elicited emotions and relative pitch on absolute pitch memory for familiar melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Müllensiefen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Levitin's findings that nonmusicians could produce from memory the absolute pitches of self-selected pop songs have been widely cited in the music psychology literature. These findings suggest that latent absolute pitch (AP) memory may be a more widespread trait within the population than traditional AP labelling ability. However, it has been left unclear what factors may facilitate absolute pitch retention for familiar pieces of music. The aim of the present paper was to investigate factors that may contribute to latent AP memory using Levitin's sung production paradigm for AP memory and comparing results to the outcomes of a pitch labelling task, a relative pitch memory test, measures of music-induced emotions, and various measures of participants' musical backgrounds. Our results suggest that relative pitch memory and the quality and degree of music-elicited emotions impact on latent AP memory.

  4. Study on the Effect of Combined Application of Manure and Chemical Fertilizers on Some Properties of Thompson Novel Orange Juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shahsavani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Citrus are one of the important orchard fruit production that after banana is second in production at the world level and every year, Chemical fertilizers having most important role in increasing crops productions, but in long application of fertilizers cause soil destructions and polluting underground water. Also soils of dry regions are very poor in organic matter level. Nowadays in most countries, climatically condition and poor management cause poor organic matter content of soils. In Iran more than 60 percent of cultivated lands having less than 0.5 up to 1 percent organic matter. This may be due to intensive cultivation and poor managements For this reason if we have combine applications of manure and chemical fertilizers, the results would be much better. The aim of this research was to evaluate suitable ratio of manure and chemical fertilizer in order to reduce the chemical fertilizer use in citrus orchard in north of Iran. Materials and Methods: This experiment was conducted in one of the orchard at Sari district with low organic C. This research carried out on five years old citrus threes. This experiment carried out as factorial experiment on the base of complete randomized block design with 9 treatments and three replications. Treatments included three manure levels (0, 6 and 12 kg per tree and three levels of macro fertilizer including potassium sulphate, ammonium sulphate and super phosphate triple (o, 30 and 60 percent on the bases of soil test. Total treatment were 27 plots, (each plots were includes two threes.all treatments were applied at March. All analysis was done with standard methods. This experiment was done as factorial on the bases of complete randomized block design with 9 treatments and three replications. The treatments were as follows: T1: Zero percent chemical fertilizer and zero kg manure T2: 30 percent chemical fertilizer (potassium sulphate 50 kgha-1, ammonium sulphate 30 kg ha-1 and super phosphate triple 45 kg ha-1 and zero kg manure. T3: 60 percent chemical fertilizer (potassium sulphate 100 kgha-1, ammonium sulphate 60 kg ha-1 and super phosphate triple 90 kg ha-1 and zero kg manure. T4: Zero percent chemical fertilizer and 6 kg manure T5: 30 percent chemical fertilizer (potassium sulphate 50 kgha-1, ammonium sulphate 30 kg ha-1 and super phosphate triple 45 kg ha-1 and 6 kg manure. T6: 60 percent chemical fertilizer (potassium sulphate 100 kgha-1, ammonium sulphate 60 kg ha-1 and super phosphate triple 90 kg ha-1 and 6 kg manure. T7: Zero percent chemical fertilizer and 12 kg manure T8: 30 percent chemical fertilizer (potassium sulphate 50 kgha-1, ammonium sulphate 30 kg ha-1 and super phosphate triple 45 kg ha-1 and 12 kg manure. T9: 60 percent chemical fertilizer (potassium sulphate 100 kgha-1, ammonium sulphate 60 kg ha-1 and super phosphate triple 90 kg ha-1 and 12 kg manure. All data analysis was done with MSTATC software and mean data comparison done with Duncan test levels at 1 or 5 percent levels. Results and Discussion: The results of analysis of variance showed that simple effect of manure and fertilizers and their interactions had no significant effect on TSS, but simple effect of fertilizer and their interactions between them had significant effect. The simple effect of chemical fertilizer and its interaction with manure were significant at 1 percent level on titration able pH of fruit juice and the simple effect of manure effect on fruit juice pH were significant at 5 percent level. The simple chemical fertilizer effect on C vitamin was not significant but simple effect of manure and its interaction effect with chemical fertilizer were significant at 5 percent level. The analysis of variance showed that simple effect of chemical fertilizer on fruit juice potassium were not significant, but simple effect of manure and its interaction with chemical fertilizer were significant at 5 percent level. Analysis of variance showed that simple effect of manure and fertilizer on the fruit juice calcium was significant at 1 percent level but their interactions were significant at 5 percent level. Simple effect of manure and fertilizer and their interactions on the fruit magnesium, iron manganese, zinc and copper were significant at 1 percent level. Analysis of variance showed that simple effect of manure and fertilizer and their interactions on the fruit juice magnesium, manganese, iron and copper was significant at 1 percent level, but simple effect of manure on fruit juice zinc were significant at 5 percent level. Conclusion: In this study the treatment with combined application of 30 percent and 12 kg manure had highest Ca, Mg , Fe, Mn and zinc concentration in fruit, also combined application of 60 percent fertilizer and 12 kg manure had effect on pH and potassium of fruit juice.

  5. Headquarters, 172nd Military Airlift Group Mississippi Air National Guard, A.C. Thompson Field, Jackson, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    industrial hygiene evaluations of aircraft operations, paint stripping, indcJstriat radiography , microwave radiation, laser and other industrial...environmental firpact and appropriate workplace environmental conditions. Member of the Base Envirorimental Protection Committee. Designed anid implemented a

  6. 78 FR 60698 - Safety Zone, Lucas Oil Drag Boat Racing Series; Thompson Bay, Lake Havasu City, AZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... this rule because the logistical details of the Lucas Oil Drag Boat Racing Series were not finalized... be enforced from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on October 11, 2013 thru October 13, 2013. (c) Definitions. The following definition applies to this section: designated representative, means any commissioned, warrant, or...

  7. Effects of tomato variety, temperature differential and post-stem removal time on internalization of Salmonella Thompson into tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatoes have been implicated in several Salmonellosis outbreaks due to possible contamination through bacterial infiltration into tomatoes during post-harvest handling. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of tomato variety, dump tank water to tomato pulp temperature differential, and...

  8. [POL-PAVTI--Polish report on transcatheter pulmonary artery valve implantation of Melody-Medtronic prosthesis in the first 14 patients in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzyłło, Witold; Demkow, Marcin; Włodarska, Elzbieta K; Kowalski, Mirosław; Spiewak, Mateusz; Siudalska, Hanna; Wolski, Piotr; Miśko, Jolanta; Hoffman, Piotr; Kusa, Jacek; Szkutnik, Małgorzata; Białkowski, Jacek; Fiszer, Roland; Urbańska, Ewa; Sondergaard, Lars

    2009-10-01

    To assess the early results of the pulmonary artery valve transcatheter implantation (PAVTI) in pts included into POL-PAVTI registry. Detailed medical and economic analyses were performed. Pulmonary artery valve implantation was performed in 14 pts (9 men), aged 16-31 (mean 24.6 +/- 4.8) years, with pulmonary homograft dysfunction after total repair of tetralogy of Fallot (4 pts), pulmonary atresia (2 pts), pulmonary stenosis (1 pt), common arterial trunk type I (1 pt), Ross procedure (3 pts) and TGA - Rastelli operation (3 pts). Eleven pts underwent in the past 2-5 surgical or/and catheter interventions. Indication for PAVTI was based on clinical evaluation and echocardiographic studies. Assessment of morphological and functional features of the right ventricle (RV) and homograft with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) was performed in 10 cases. Pulmonary stenosis (max. pulmonary gradient 32-119, mean 72 +/- 28 mmHg) was observed in 13 pts and/or significant pulmonary regurgitation in 10 pts. The procedure was performed in general anesthesia. The deployment of a valved stent in the pulmonary valve position was preceded by a metal stent implantation. Results were evaluated by echocardiography two days after the procedure and one month later. Four patients were evaluated 6 months after procedure. Time of the procedure varied 60-190 (mean 127 +/- 35) min, time of fluoroscopy ranged 12-31 (mean 21 +/- 11) min. PAVTI was successfully performed in all pts without serious complications. Patients were discharged from the hospital 48-293 (mean 120 +/- 71) h after procedure. Significant reduction of pulmonary gradient after the procedure assessed by echocardiography was observed on the second day (20-60, mean 38 +/- 12 mmHg, p < 0.0001) and one month (19-52, mean 34 +/- 9 mmHg, p < 0.0001). Mild pulmonary regurgitation was observed in 2 pts. In 5 pts evaluated 6 months after procedure haemodynamic parameters were unchanged; no late complications were observed. Average cost of the procedure including a price of the valve (82 000 PLN) was 98 000 PLN. Pulmonary artery valve transvascular implantation is an effective and safe method of non-surgical treatment for patients with homograft dysfunction. Cost-effectiveness is approvable.

  9. Multibeam collection for TN273: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2011-12-22 to 2012-01-22, Apra, Guam to Apra, Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  10. Multibeam collection for TN272: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2011-11-05 to 2011-12-17, Honolulu, HI to Apra, Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  11. Multibeam collection for TN233: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2009-04-20 to 2009-05-01, Apra, Guam to Apia, Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  12. Multibeam collection for TN275: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2012-02-11 to 2012-02-21, Apra, Guam to Honolulu, HI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  13. Multibeam collection for TN290B: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2013-01-16 to 2013-01-20, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  14. Multibeam collection for TN267: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2011-07-29 to 2011-08-09, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  15. Multibeam collection for TN274: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2012-01-25 to 2012-02-09, Apra, Guam to Apra, Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  16. Reconnaissance Observations of Long-Term Natural Vegetation Recovery in the Cape Thompson Region, Alaska, and Additions to the Checklist of Flora,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    and allied genera in North America. Opera. disappearance is not supported by this study. In- Botanica , 42: 1-164. deed the most striking feature of...Ecology, 5: 135-138. Karnefelt, 1. (1979) The brown fruticose species of Linkins, A.E., R.M. Atlas and P. Gustin (1978) Cetraria. Opera. Botanica , 46

  17. Multibeam collection for TN159: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2003-07-28 to 2003-08-20, Victoria, Canada to Astoria, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  18. High-gain thompson-scattering X-ray free-electron laser by time-synchronic laterally tilted optical wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao; Tang, Chuanxiang; Wu, Juhao

    2017-05-09

    An improved optical undulator for use in connection with free electron radiation sources is provided. A tilt is introduced between phase fronts of an optical pulse and the pulse front. Two such pulses in a counter-propagating geometry overlap to create a standing wave pattern. A line focus is used to increase the intensity of this standing wave pattern. An electron beam is aligned with the line focus. The relative angle between pulse front and phase fronts is adjusted such that there is a velocity match between the electron beam and the overlapping optical pulses along the line focus. This allows one to provide a long interaction length using short and intense optical pulses, thereby greatly increasing the radiation output from the electron beam as it passes through this optical undulator.

  19. Multibeam collection for TN080: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 1998-07-14 to 1998-07-15, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  20. Multibeam collection for TN244: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2009-12-05 to 2009-12-08, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  1. Multibeam collection for TN331: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2015-10-01 to 2015-10-15, Newport, OR to Newport, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  2. Multibeam collection for TN183: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2005-09-02 to 2005-10-04, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  3. Multibeam collection for TN153: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2003-02-09 to 2003-03-05, Guam to Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  4. Multibeam collection for TN242: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2009-11-02 to 2009-11-06, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  5. Merajut Strategi dan “Merubahnya” Menjadi Aksi (Kajian Buku : “Strategy Maps” oleh Kaplan & Norton, dan Crafting And Executing Strategy oleh Thompson & Strickland)

    OpenAIRE

    Rizal Rivai, Alimuddin

    2006-01-01

    Strategies are important for an organization. Basic framework in the study of management strategy is that the strategy is built base on the right and proper organization's situation and condition. However, empirically, it is failvery often in the implementation. That's why the execution strategy level requires the correct socialized, structured, and systematically process which is done in the right time. The strategy will be useful for a company if it isexecuted consistently by all management...

  6. Ensaios sobre a metodologia do estudo da influência de três herbicidas em Spirodela punctata (G.F.W. Meyer Thompson (Lemnaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durvalina Maria Mathias dos Santos

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho visa conhecer a taxa de multiplicação e o índice de mortalidade de S. punctata a diversas concentrações do butaclora, propanila e glifosato bem como comparar dois métodos diferentes de investigações (ensaio 1 e 2. Os dados indicaram que no ensaio 1 as concentrações foram pouco tóxicas provocando baixos índices de mortalidade embora tenha ocorrido inibição do crescimento nas concentrações mais fortes. O ensaio 2 mostrou que a butaclora e a propanila são mais tóxicas que o glifosato, com valores de mortalidade de 100% em apenas 48 horas. A taxa de multiplicação, neste ensaio, somente foi determinada para o glifosato, pois os demais herbicidas foram altamente tóxicos para a espécie. Verificou-se, na comparação dos dois métodos diferentes, que os recipientes utilizados no ensaio 2 foram mais adequados ao cultivo da espécie e que os efeitos tóxicos devem ser observados em frondes consideradas individualmente e não em plantas inteiras.The present work looks for a knowledge of multiplícate rate and mortality index of. S. punctata to several concentrations of butachlor, propanil and gliphosate as well as to compare two different methods. On essay 1 the concentrations were a little toxic provoking low index of mortality in spite of it has occured inhibition of increasing on stronger concentrations. The essay 2 showed what, the butachlor and the propanil are more toxics than the gliphosate, with values of mortality of 100% in only 48 hours. The multiplícate rate, on this essay, was only determinated to the gliphosate, because the other herbicides were highly toxic to the species. It was checked on the comparation of the two different methods the posts used on essay 2 were more appropriate to the cultive specie and the toxic effects must be observated on considered individualy and not on whole plants.

  7. Multibeam collection for TN264: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2011-05-21 to 2011-05-24, Honolulu, HI to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  8. Multibeam collection for TN296: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2013-04-22 to 2013-04-26, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  9. Multibeam collection for TN281: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2012-05-24 to 2012-05-26, Seattle, WA to Esquimalt Harbor, Canada

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  10. Multibeam collection for TN323: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2015-05-29 to 2015-06-14, Seattle, WA to Dutch Harbor, AK

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  11. Multibeam collection for TN240: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2009-09-28 to 2009-10-14, Apia, Samoa to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  12. Multibeam collection for TN232: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2009-04-02 to 2009-04-08, Apra, Guam to Apra, Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  13. North Pacific Ocean. Subarctic Front Central Pacific, R/V Thomas G. Thompson: 8 September - 9 October 1975. CTD Data Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    39 27 144 32 333 27 340 96 4 9 Y9 3783 2 3474 6 7 66 2 654 4 3 SI 3 534 34 :47 27 355 3C 2:3 2’ ISO 95 5 9 943 3929 5 1474 7 7 5 6𔃿 2 669 3 3 546 3 5...775 27003 105 5 10 922 3557 5 1476 6 14 4 2 5’ 5 46, 3’ 05 27 026 29 870 27 024 108 0 11 086 4121 1 1416 5 11 6 253c :62 4 14 34 7 27 043 25 Q54 27 038...531 1526 4,597 547.7 1483.6 21 7 225 0 223 6 7 427 7.406 33.984 26.562 27588 26 559 ISO 1 4.824 617 9 1483.0 17 8 240 0 236.5 7.254 7.232 33.987

  14. Multibeam collection for TN231: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2009-03-15 to 2009-03-28, Auckland, New Zealand to Apra, Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  15. Multibeam collection for TN303: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2013-10-25 to 2013-12-20, Manta, Ecuador to Papeete, French Polynesia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  16. North Pacific Ocean. Tradewind Region East of Hawaii, R/V Thomas G. Thompson: 25 September - 1 November 1972. STD Data Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    3464. 6.3 9430 59I 4.35 4604 8*43 2.29 11.31 27.200 Is30 373 111 0114.5 3464.4 1.91 85 0 968.7 4.640 4.1113 SO 464 BY 09 83 697 27.133 07 7 17 ISO ...8217 5 107 S 051 84 162 27001 A 0.174 26.999 112 4 15.674 644.4 1481.6 9.7 06.0 700 9 5 032 4 975 34 10 27026 80.266 27.021 110 3 15.641 6900.7 1461.6 21...1240 0 1280 0 226 S. ISO 34 49 27 474 a8.215 27 460 6965 197680 107414A 1498.8 2.7 1260 1849.6 S6196 S8106 04008 27 47q 88069 27 470 69 1 296W4 10898

  17. North Pacific Ocean. Subtropical Front North of Hawaii, R/V Thomas G. Thompson: 7 January - 10 February 1974. CTD Data Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    3 140 421.7 18.9 05 pM 74 318 a&15.0 N 153 30. 0 W 5894 1016.2 5 190 M2.1 19.2 06pM 74 320 28 0.0ON 153 31.0 W 5349 10.4.0 a ISO 21. 7 18.9 06 PW 74...1018.7r 13 ISO 32.8 19.4 ON pM V4 8M5 21 30.0 N 153 30. 0 W 4709 1018.4 21 70 23.1 30.0 06 pm 74 826 21 18.0 N 153 33.0 W 4987 1019.4 16 70 33.3 30.0 06...6421 26990 1212 9964 3243.9 1476.1 9 140 0 5359 49 4M7 34 126 27 066 2494 27001 110 3 10070 33962 14160 360 5550 1507 4,719 4 746 34 142 210024 29M

  18. Multibeam collection for TN277: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2012-03-01 to 2012-03-11, Honolulu, HI to San Diego, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  19. Multibeam collection for TN293: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2013-03-16 to 2013-04-01, Honolulu, HI to Honolulu, HI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  20. Multibeam collection for TN279: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2012-04-26 to 2012-04-30, San Diego, CA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  1. Multibeam collection for TN292: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2013-03-05 to 2013-03-14, Seattle, WA to Honolulu, HI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  2. Multibeam collection for TN160: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2003-08-28 to 2003-09-06, Astoria, OR to Victoria, Canada

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  3. Multibeam collection for TN259: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2010-11-23 to 2010-12-22, Seattle, WA to Honolulu, HI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  4. Multibeam collection for TN314: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2014-10-10 to 2014-10-19, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  5. Multibeam collection for TN245: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2009-12-14 to 2010-01-09, Seattle, WA to Punta Arenas, Chile

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  6. Multibeam collection for TN282: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2012-05-26 to 2012-06-27, Esquimalt Harbor, Canada to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  7. Multibeam collection for TN334: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2015-12-10 to 2015-12-20, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  8. Multibeam collection for TN263: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2011-04-30 to 2011-05-21, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  9. Multibeam collection for TN333: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2015-11-12 to 2015-11-22, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  10. Multibeam collection for TN237: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2009-07-11 to 2009-07-28, Apia, Samoa to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  11. Multibeam collection for TN167: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2004-03-27 to 2004-04-17, Guam to Yokohama, Japan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  12. Multibeam collection for TN283: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2012-07-10 to 2012-07-24, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  13. Multibeam collection for TN149: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2002-07-09 to 2002-07-10, Seattle, WA to Victoria, Canada

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  14. Multibeam collection for TN311: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2014-06-10 to 2014-06-14, Newport, OR to Newport, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  15. Multibeam collection for TN268: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2011-08-11 to 2011-09-01, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  16. Multibeam collection for TN313: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2014-07-13 to 2014-10-06, Seattle, WA to Seattle, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  17. MORPHOLOGICAL INTEGRATION OF NATIVE SOUTH AMERICAN UNGULATE MANDIBLES. A TRIBUTE TO D’ARCY THOMPSON IN THE CENTENNIAL OF “ON GROWTH AND FORM”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassini, Guillermo H.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available South American native ungulates include several extinct lineages that evolved within the context of South American Cenozoic geographic isolation. By the late early Miocene Santacrucian Age, the orders Notoungulata, Litopterna, and Astrapotheria were differentiated. Recent ecomorphological studies highlighted complex functional patterns between their habitat/diet and hypsodonty. In order to understand these relationships in an evolutionary context we used geometric morphometrics methods (27 3-D landmarks to evaluate the morphological integration of two of the primary functional units of the mandible: the alveolar region and the ascending ramus. Principal component analyses (PCA and two blocks Partial Least Squares analyses (PLS were used to explore the patterns of variation and covariation between these two modules. The main variation in shape is related to the robusticity and curvature of the mandibular corpus, and the relative size of the angular and coronoid process. The PLS analyses show a very strong morphological integration within the Litopterna, but a pattern of modularity in the Notoungulata. There is a common pattern of covariation in Astrapotheria and Litopterna, which might be due to similar constraints. The different covariation patterns in notoungulates with respect to litopterns are in concordance with both the taxonomic and morphological diversity of the clades, particularly in the typotheres. The modularity present in notoungulates could have allowed specializations in each module of the mandible, related to crown height or muscle attachments, without a high morphological constrain. This could have resulted in their high morphological diversity, in contrast with the more conservative morphology present in litopterns.

  18. BAROMETRIC PRESSURE and Other Data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON and Other Platforms From TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 19921013 to 19921213 (NODC Accession 9600065)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data in this accession was collected as part of Joint Global Ocean Flux Study/Equatorial Pacific Basin Study (JGOFS/EQPAC) in TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S)...

  19. Long-term memory for pitch in six-month-old infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Judy; Trainor, Laurel J

    2003-11-01

    We examined 6-month-old infants' long-term memory representations for the pitch of familiar melodies. Infants remembered the relative pitch of the melodies, but the absolute pitch was either not remembered or not a particularly salient attribute.

  20. Ang Himig at Dalumat ng Pagtutol sa “Parang Sabil nina Abdulla at Putli’ Isara” ng mga Tausug (The Melody and Concept of Resistance in “The Parang Sabil of Abdulla and Putli’ Isara” of the Tausug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Jomar F. Quintos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the discourse of Philippine national history, the ethnolinguistic groups in the marginalized islands of Visayas and Mindanao play an important role in the construction of the nation. For instance, the parang sabil of the Tausug may be considered as a form of resistance against the colonizers vis-à-vis the 1896 revolution of the Katipuneros in Luzon. The term parang sabil comes from parang, meaning war or sword, and sabil, meaning killed in the way of God. It is a traditional Tausug practice by which the Tausugs defend their religion Islam against the threatening infidels. This paper will make use of an ethnic narrative song of the Tausug of Sulu entitled “The Parang Sabil of Abdulla and Putli’ Isara,” as a tool to understand how the group fought based on their cultural beliefs, from the armed struggle against a country who treats them as outsiders up to the battles invoked in the name of religion.

  1. Sensitivity to musical emotion is influenced by tonal structure in congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cunmei; Liu, Fang; Wong, Patrick C M

    2017-08-08

    Emotional communication in music depends on multiple attributes including psychoacoustic features and tonal system information, the latter of which is unique to music. The present study investigated whether congenital amusia, a lifelong disorder of musical processing, impacts sensitivity to musical emotion elicited by timbre and tonal system information. Twenty-six amusics and 26 matched controls made tension judgments on Western (familiar) and Indian (unfamiliar) melodies played on piano and sitar. Like controls, amusics used timbre cues to judge musical tension in Western and Indian melodies. While controls assigned significantly lower tension ratings to Western melodies compared to Indian melodies, thus showing a tonal familiarity effect on tension ratings, amusics provided comparable tension ratings for Western and Indian melodies on both timbres. Furthermore, amusics rated Western melodies as more tense compared to controls, as they relied less on tonality cues than controls in rating tension for Western melodies. The implications of these findings in terms of emotional responses to music are discussed.

  2. Multibeam collection for TN255: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2010-10-16 to 2010-10-20, Dutch Harbor, AK to Dutch Harbor, AK

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  3. CHLOROPHYLL A - INTEGRATED, CARBON ASSIMILATION - INTEGRATED and other data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the Bering Sea from 1978-04-10 to 1980-08-15 (NODC Accession 9100027)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD), Primary production and underway data were collected as part of Processes and Resources of the Bering Sea Shelf...

  4. Multibeam collection for TN250: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2010-06-16 to 2010-07-14, Dutch Harbor, AK to Dutch Harbor, AK

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  5. Multibeam collection for TN307: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2014-02-28 to 2014-03-31, Noumea, New Caledonia to Noumea, New Caledonia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  6. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients and productivity profile data from THOMAS G. THOMPSON Cruise 001, 19651014 to 19651207 in the Caribbean Sea and the northeastern tropical Pacific Ocean (NODC Accession 7100507)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains a copy of University of Washington Department of Oceanography Technical Report No. 249, Physical, chemical, and productivity data from a...

  7. Multibeam collection for TN061: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 1996-05-22 to 1996-06-16, Papeete, French Polynesia to San Diego, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  8. Multibeam collection for TN249: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2010-05-10 to 2010-06-14, Dutch Harbor, AK to Dutch Harbor, AK

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  9. Multibeam collection for TN230: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2009-03-02 to 2009-03-12, Lyttelton, New Zealand to Auckland, New Zealand

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  10. Multibeam collection for TN235: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2009-05-16 to 2009-06-08, Apia, Samoa to Nuku'alofa, Tonga

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  11. Multibeam collection for TN188: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2005-11-28 to 2005-11-29, San Diego, CA to Puerto Ayora, Ecuador

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  12. Multibeam collection for TN189: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2006-01-21 to 2006-01-28, Puerto Ayora, Ecuador to Puerto Ayora, Ecuador

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  13. Multibeam collection for TN278: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2012-03-17 to 2012-04-23, San Diego, CA to San Diego, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  14. Multibeam collection for TN324: Multibeam data collected aboard Thomas G. Thompson from 2015-06-18 to 2015-06-21, Dutch Harbor, AK to Dutch Harbor, AK

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  15. Water temperature, salinity, and other data collected from R/V Thomas G. Thompson in Pacific Ocean near San Diego, California from 2016-02-13 to 2016-02-19 (NCEI Accession 0161328)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Beginning in 2011 the University National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS) began a program of Chief Scientist training cruises to introduce prospective early...

  16. Influence of Pitch Height on the Perception of Submissiveness and Threat in Musical Passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Huron

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Bolinger, Ohala, Morton and others have established that vocal pitch height is perceived to be associated with social signals of dominance and submissiveness: higher vocal pitch is associated with submissiveness, whereas lower vocal pitch is associated with social dominance. An experiment was carried out to test this relationship in the perception of non-vocal melodies. Results show a parallel situation in music: higher-pitched melodies sound more submissive (less threatening than lower-pitched melodies.

  17. Exposure effects on music preference and recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, I; Gaudreau, D; Bonnel, A M

    1998-09-01

    In three experiments, the effects of exposure to melodies on their subsequent liking and recognition were explored. In each experiment, the subjects first listened to a set of familiar and unfamiliar melodies in a study phase. In the subsequent test phase, the melodies were repeated, along with a set of distractors matched in familiarity. Half the subjects were required to rate their liking of each melody, and half had to identify the melodies they had heard earlier in the study phase. Repetition of the studied melodies was found to increase liking of the unfamiliar melodies in the affect task and to be best for detection of familiar melodies in the recognition task (Experiments 1, 2, and 3). These memory effects were found to fade at different time delays between study and test in the affect and recognition tasks, with the latter leading to the most persistent effects (Experiment 2). Both study-to-test changes in melody timbre and manipulation of study tasks had a marked impact on recognition and little influence on liking judgments (Experiment 3). Thus, all manipulated variables were found to dissociate the memory effects in the two tasks. The results are consistent with the view that memory effects in the affect and recognition tasks pertain to the implicit and explicit forms of memory, respectively. Part of the results are, however, at variance with the literature on implicit and explicit memory in the auditory domain. Attribution of these differences to the use of musical material is discussed.

  18. Music Recognition in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Julene K; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Brambati, Simona M; Migliaccio, Raffaella; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L; Janata, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare music recognition in patients with frontotemporal dementia, semantic dementia, Alzheimer disease, and controls and to evaluate the relationship between music recognition and brain volume. Background Recognition of familiar music depends on several levels of processing. There are few studies about how patients with dementia recognize familiar music. Methods Subjects were administered tasks that assess pitch and melody discrimination, detection of pitch errors in familiar melodies, and naming of familiar melodies. Results There were no group differences on pitch and melody discrimination tasks. However, patients with semantic dementia had considerable difficulty naming familiar melodies and also scored the lowest when asked to identify pitch errors in the same melodies. Naming familiar melodies, but not other music tasks, was strongly related to measures of semantic memory. Voxel-based morphometry analysis of brain MRI showed that difficulty in naming songs was associated with the bilateral temporal lobes and inferior frontal gyrus, whereas difficulty in identifying pitch errors in familiar melodies correlated with primarily the right temporal lobe. Conclusions The results support a view that the anterior temporal lobes play a role in familiar melody recognition, and that musical functions are affected differentially across forms of dementia. PMID:21617528

  19. Music recognition in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Julene K; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Brambati, Simona M; Migliaccio, Raffaella; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L; Janata, Petr

    2011-06-01

    To compare music recognition in patients with frontotemporal dementia, semantic dementia, Alzheimer disease, and controls and to evaluate the relationship between music recognition and brain volume. Recognition of familiar music depends on several levels of processing. There are few studies about how patients with dementia recognize familiar music. Subjects were administered tasks that assess pitch and melody discrimination, detection of pitch errors in familiar melodies, and naming of familiar melodies. There were no group differences on pitch and melody discrimination tasks. However, patients with semantic dementia had considerable difficulty naming familiar melodies and also scored the lowest when asked to identify pitch errors in the same melodies. Naming familiar melodies, but not other music tasks, was strongly related to measures of semantic memory. Voxel-based morphometry analysis of brain magnetic resonance imaging showed that difficulty in naming songs was associated with the bilateral temporal lobes and inferior frontal gyrus, whereas difficulty in identifying pitch errors in familiar melodies correlated with primarily the right temporal lobe. The results support a view that the anterior temporal lobes play a role in familiar melody recognition, and that musical functions are affected differentially across forms of dementia.

  20. Digital bedrock geologic map of parts of the Huntington, Richmond, Bolton and Waterbury quadrangles, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG95-9A Thompson, PJ�and Thompson, TB, 1995, Digital bedrock geologic map of parts of the Huntington, Richmond, Bolton and Waterbury quadrangles,...

  1. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Hinesburg Quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from Thompson, P., Thompson, T.B., and Doolan, B., 2004, Bedrock Geology of the Hinesburg quadrangle, Vermont. The bedrock geologic map data at a scale...

  2. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Mount Mansfield 7.5 Minute Quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG2017-2 Thompson, P. J., and Thompson, T. B., 2017, Bedrock Geologic Map of the Mount Mansfield 7.5 Minute Quadrangle, Vermont: VGS Open-File...

  3. The Effect of Vocalization on Melodic Memory Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembrook, Randall G.

    1987-01-01

    Reports on a study which reinforces prior findings on melodic memory that show a majority of students do not sing accurately enough after only one hearing of a melody to benefit from vocalization memory techniques. Questions whether vocalization can be a memory reinforcer in melodies that are shorter and simpler than those used in this research.…

  4. Shared Musical Knowledge in 11-Month-Old Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Samuel A.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2018-01-01

    Five-month-old infants selectively attend to novel people who sing melodies originally learned from a parent, but not melodies learned from a musical toy or from an unfamiliar singing adult, suggesting that music conveys social information to infant listeners. Here, we test this interpretation further in older infants with a more direct measure of…

  5. Finding occurrences of melodic segments in folk songs employing symbolic similarity measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Berit; van Kranenburg, P.; Volk, A.

    2017-01-01

    Much research has been devoted to the classification of folk songs, revealing that variants are recognised based on salient melodic segments, such as phrases and motifs, while other musical material in a melody might vary considerably. In order to judge similarity of melodies on the level of melodic

  6. Effects of Some Aspects of Rhythm on Tempo Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cecilia Chu

    1984-01-01

    Results indicated that significantly more time is needed to perceive tempo increase than tempo decrease, uneven rhythm then even rhythm, and melody alone than melody with accompaniment. Furthermore, significant interaction effects involving beat locations of tempo change suggest that differential groupings may be a factor in tempo discrimination.…

  7. Effects of Model Performances on Music Skill Acquisition and Overnight Memory Consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Carla D.; Allen, Sarah E.; Simmons, Amy L.; Duke, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the extent to which the presentation of an auditory model prior to learning a novel melody affects performance during active practice and the overnight consolidation of procedural memory. During evening training sessions, 32 nonpianist musicians practiced a 13-note keyboard melody with their left…

  8. The Effects of Limited, Restricted Music Practice on Overnight Memory Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sarah E.; Duke, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    During evening practice sessions, 32 nonpianist musicians learned a short melody on piano, and then either learned a second short piano melody, learned a difficult unfamiliar piece on their principal instruments, practiced familiar material on their principal instruments, or engaged in no other music-related motor behavior prior to sleep; practice…

  9. Seeing music: The perception of melodic 'ups and downs' modulates the spatial processing of visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Rivas, Carlos; Vera-Constán, Fátima; Rodríguez-Cuadrado, Sara; Puigcerver, Laura; Fernández-Prieto, Irune; Navarra, Jordi

    2018-05-10

    Musical melodies have "peaks" and "valleys". Although the vertical component of pitch and music is well-known, the mechanisms underlying its mental representation still remain elusive. We show evidence regarding the importance of previous experience with melodies for crossmodal interactions to emerge. The impact of these crossmodal interactions on other perceptual and attentional processes was also studied. Melodies including two tones with different frequency (e.g., E4 and D3) were repeatedly presented during the study. These melodies could either generate strong predictions (e.g., E4-D3-E4-D3-E4-[D3]) or not (e.g., E4-D3-E4-E4-D3-[?]). After the presentation of each melody, the participants had to judge the colour of a visual stimulus that appeared in a position that was, according to the traditional vertical connotations of pitch, either congruent (e.g., high-low-high-low-[up]), incongruent (high-low-high-low-[down]) or unpredicted with respect to the melody. Behavioural and electroencephalographic responses to the visual stimuli were obtained. Congruent visual stimuli elicited faster responses at the end of the experiment than at the beginning. Additionally, incongruent visual stimuli that broke the spatial prediction generated by the melody elicited larger P3b amplitudes (reflecting 'surprise' responses). Our results suggest that the passive (but repeated) exposure to melodies elicits spatial predictions that modulate the processing of other sensory events. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Retained or lost in transmission? : Analyzing and predicting stability in Dutch folk songs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, B.D.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of the dissertation is to investigate the transmission of Dutch folk songs: which parts of melodies change, and which remain stable? To this end, melodies are compared computationally, using similarity measures established in Music Information Retrieval. The computational comparison

  11. Selective propensity of bovine jugular vein material to bacterial adhesions: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Zakaria; Galmiche, Louise; Lebeaux, David; Villemain, Olivier; Brugada, Georgia; Patel, Mehul; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Beloin, Christophe; Boudjemline, Younes

    2015-11-01

    Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) using Melody valve made of bovine jugular vein is safe and effective. However, infective endocarditis has been reported for unclear reasons. We sought to assess the impact of valvular substrates on selective bacterial adhesion. Three valved stents (Melody valve, homemade stents with bovine and porcine pericardium) were tested in-vitro for bacterial adhesion using Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus sanguinis strains. Bacterial adhesion was higher on bovine jugular venous wall for S. aureus and on Melody valvular leaflets for S. sanguinis in control groups and significantly increased in traumatized Melody valvular leaflets with both bacteria (traumatized vs non traumatized: p=0.05). Bacterial adhesion was lower on bovine pericardial leaflets. Selective adhesion of S. aureus and S. sanguinis pathogenic strains to Melody valve tissue was noted on healthy tissue and increased after implantation procedural steps. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Studying Musical and Linguistic Prediction in Comparable Ways: The Melodic Cloze Probability Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Allison R; Rosenberg, Jason C; Lehman, Frank M; Kuperberg, Gina R; Patel, Aniruddh D

    2015-01-01

    Prediction or expectancy is thought to play an important role in both music and language processing. However, prediction is currently studied independently in the two domains, limiting research on relations between predictive mechanisms in music and language. One limitation is a difference in how expectancy is quantified. In language, expectancy is typically measured using the cloze probability task, in which listeners are asked to complete a sentence fragment with the first word that comes to mind. In contrast, previous production-based studies of melodic expectancy have asked participants to sing continuations following only one to two notes. We have developed a melodic cloze probability task in which listeners are presented with the beginning of a novel tonal melody (5-9 notes) and are asked to sing the note they expect to come next. Half of the melodies had an underlying harmonic structure designed to constrain expectations for the next note, based on an implied authentic cadence (AC) within the melody. Each such 'authentic cadence' melody was matched to a 'non-cadential' (NC) melody matched in terms of length, rhythm and melodic contour, but differing in implied harmonic structure. Participants showed much greater consistency in the notes sung following AC vs. NC melodies on average. However, significant variation in degree of consistency was observed within both AC and NC melodies. Analysis of individual melodies suggests that pitch prediction in tonal melodies depends on the interplay of local factors just prior to the target note (e.g., local pitch interval patterns) and larger-scale structural relationships (e.g., melodic patterns and implied harmonic structure). We illustrate how the melodic cloze method can be used to test a computational model of melodic expectation. Future uses for the method include exploring the interplay of different factors shaping melodic expectation, and designing experiments that compare the cognitive mechanisms of prediction in

  13. Deliberate practice theory: perceived relevance, effort, and inherent enjoyment of music practice: study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyllegard, Randy; Bories, Tamara L

    2009-10-01

    This study, based on the theory of deliberate practice, examined the practice relevance, effort, and inherent enjoyment aspects of the theory. 25 college undergraduates practiced playing a melody on an electronic keyboard for three 20-min. practice sessions. Following each session, the perceived relevance of the practice for improving performance of the melody, the effort needed to learn the melody, and the inherent enjoyment of the practice were each rated on 10-point scales. Findings were consistent with theory and similar to previous studies also involving music practice and other tasks.

  14. ブルクミュラー指導に関する一考察 : より音楽的な演奏をめざして

    OpenAIRE

    諸冨, 満希子

    2013-01-01

    For students, it is difficult to play the works of Burgmüller well. 6 students played the melody of “La Pastorale” and 3 teachers checked whether they were able to play it musically or not. Students had images for the melody of “La Pastorale”, but they didn't have enough technique to express their feeling in music compared with a professional pianist. I suggest 3 ideas. The first is to make a short story for each part of melodies. The second is to use their abilities of athletic sports, becau...

  15. Listen, learn, like! Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex involved in the mere exposure effect in music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders Christian; Bærentsen, Klaus B.; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans

    2012-01-01

    , participants rated liking for each melody and, later, their recognition of them. Participants showed learning effects, better recognising melodies heard more often. Melodies heard most often were most liked, consistent with the mere exposure effect. We found neural activations as a function of previous...... exposure in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, probably reflecting retrieval and working memory-related processes. This was despite the fact that the task during scanning was to judge liking, not recognition, thus suggesting that appreciation of music relies strongly on memory...

  16. Library holdings for Exploring Hydrothermal System Response to Magma Supply and Crustal Thickness Gradients Along the Galapagos Spreading Center, 89.5-94W on the R/V Thomas G. Thompson in the Galapagos Islands between December 3, 2005 and January 10, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Library Catalog may include: Data Management Plans, Cruise Plans, Cruise Summary Reports, Scientific "Quick Look Reports", Video Annotation Logs, Image Collections,...

  17. Marine mammal observations conducted during US National Science Foundation geophysical research cruises in the global oceans from the platforms Maurice Ewing, Marcus G. Langseth, Thomas G. Thompson, and the R/V Knorr from 28 May 2003 to 25 August 2009 (NODC Accession 0083783)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — All marine mammals and sea turtles that were visually observed during a marine geophysical survey were recorded to: 1) determine whether a mitigation measure needed...

  18. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), temperature, salinity and other variables collected from surface underway observations using shower head equilibrator, carbon dioxide gas detector and other instruments from the R/V Thomas G. Thompson in the Pacific Ocean from 2016-03-02 to 2016-04-18 (NCEI Accession 0158483)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains underway measurements of pCO2, salinity, sea surface temperature, and other parameters collected in the Pacific ocean on the R/V...

  19. Statement of Hugh L. Thompson, Jr. Director, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, accompanied by Robert E. Browning, Director, Division of High Level Waste Management; and Richard E. Cunningham, Director, Division of Fuel Cycle, Medical, Academic, and Commercial Use Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The author would like to thank you this morning, Mr. Chairman, for the opportunity to provide the NRC staff views on several matters related to the Department of Energy's civilian high level radioactive waste program that are of interest to you and other members of the committee. As requested in your letter in invitation, I will first discuss NRC staff comments on DOE's final environmental assessments. The NRC comments on DOE's environmental assessments were also the subject of your letter of March 10th, 1987, to the Commission; and the Commission's April 13th, 1987 reply. With your permission, Mr. Chairman, I would like to introduce these letters into the record

  20. Preliminary Evaluation of the Multipurpose Arcade Combat Simulator (MACS) for the M16, M203, and M72A2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    8217 .. = . . - , . . ’ ’ ’- . .’- ’, . -. . ’ -. . . .- . -. .. .. - . . % , -. . REFERENCES * Belier , F. H., Thompson, T. J., &Osborne, A. D. (Draft, 1981). Basic rifle marksmanship

  1. Long-term memory for music: infants remember tempo and timbre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Laurel J; Wu, Luann; Tsang, Christine D

    2004-06-01

    We show that infants' long-term memory representations for melodies are not just reduced to the structural features of relative pitches and durations, but contain surface or performance tempo- and timbre-specific information. Using a head turn preference procedure, we found that after a one week exposure to an old English folk song, infants preferred to listen to a novel folk song, indicating that they remembered the familiarized melody. However, if the tempo (25% faster or slower) or instrument timbre (harp vs. piano) of the familiarized melody was changed at test, infants showed no preference, indicating that they remembered the specific tempo and timbre of the melodies. The results are consistent with an exemplar-based model of memory in infancy rather than one in which structural features are extracted and performance features forgotten.

  2. James Blunt matuselaulude edetabeli tipus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Bereavement Registeri andmetel Suurbritannias matustel tellitavate laulude edetabelis: James Blunt "Goodbye My Lover", Robbie Williams "Angels", Jennifer Warnes ja Bill Medley "I've Had the Time Of My Life", Elton John "Candle in the Wind", Righteous Brothers "Unchained Melody"

  3. Modeling Musical Complexity: Commentary on Eerola (2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Albrecht

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In his paper, "Expectancy violation and information-theoretic models of melodic complexity," Eerola compares a number of models that correlate musical features of monophonic melodies with participant ratings of perceived melodic complexity. He finds that fairly strong results can be achieved using several different approaches to modeling perceived melodic complexity. The data used in this study are gathered from several previously published studies that use widely different types of melodies, including isochronous folk melodies, isochronous 12-tone rows, and rhythmically complex African folk melodies. This commentary first briefly reviews the article's method and main findings, then suggests a rethinking of the theoretical framework of the study. Finally, some of the methodological issues of the study are discussed.

  4. Two Shared Rapid Turn Taking Sound Interfaces for Novices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2012-01-01

    in an interleaved fashion: Systems A and B used a fuzzy logic algorithm and pattern recognition to respond with modifications of a background rhythms. In an experiment with a pen tablet interface as the music instrument, users aged 10-13 were to tap tones and continue each other’s melody. The sound systems rewarded......This paper presents the results of user interaction with two explorative music environments (sound system A and B) that were inspired from the Banda Linda music tradition in two different ways. The sound systems adapted to how a team of two players improvised and made a melody together...... users sonically, if they managed to add tones to their mutual melody in a rapid turn taking manner with rhythmical patterns. Videos of experiment sessions show that user teams contributed to a melody in ways that resemble conversation. Interaction data show that each sound system made player teams play...

  5. Plaadid / Brigitta Davidjants

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Davidjants, Brigitta, 1983-

    2007-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest Solveig Slettahjell & Slow Motion Quintet "Good Rain", Indigolapsed "Voorimehe viis", "A broke down melody", "Happy feet", JZ Belle "Teemant", Depeche Mode "The Best Of, Volume 1", "Demogustico"

  6. Neural correlates of prosody and information structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitrova, Diana Valentinova

    2012-01-01

    Dit proefschrift onderzoekt welke neurocognitieve processen geactiveerd worden in de hersenen wanneer luisteraars gesproken taal verwerken, met name de melodie en ritme van gesproken zinnen die bekend is als prosodie. De resultaten van de uitgevoerde elektrofysiologische studies laten zien dat

  7. Modelling short- and long-term statistical learning of music as a process of predictive entropy reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Christian; Loui, Psyche; Vuust, Peter

    Statistical learning underlies the generation of expectations with different degrees of uncertainty. In music, uncertainty applies to expectations for pitches in a melody. This uncertainty can be quantified by Shannon entropy from distributions of expectedness ratings for multiple continuations o...

  8. Music of the Twentieth Century : A Study of Its Elements and Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, de Ton

    2005-01-01

    Aan de hand van voorbeelden van invloedrijke twintigste eeuwse componisten, onderzoekt Ton de Leeuw de fundamentele muzikale elementen zoals ritme, melodie, samenklank en timbre. Deze heldere analyse verschaft een breder inzicht in concepten die nooit tevoren systematisch onderzocht waren, waarbij

  9. Listen, Learn, Like! Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Involved in the Mere Exposure Effect in Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders C. Green

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural basis of the mere exposure effect in music listening, which links previous exposure to liking. Prior to scanning, participants underwent a learning phase, where exposure to melodies was systematically varied. During scanning, participants rated liking for each melody and, later, their recognition of them. Participants showed learning effects, better recognising melodies heard more often. Melodies heard most often were most liked, consistent with the mere exposure effect. We found neural activations as a function of previous exposure in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, probably reflecting retrieval and working memory-related processes. This was despite the fact that the task during scanning was to judge liking, not recognition, thus suggesting that appreciation of music relies strongly on memory processes. Subjective liking per se caused differential activation in the left hemisphere, of the anterior insula, the caudate nucleus, and the putamen.

  10. Listen, learn, like! Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex involved in the mere exposure effect in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Anders C; Bærentsen, Klaus B; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Roepstorff, Andreas; Vuust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural basis of the mere exposure effect in music listening, which links previous exposure to liking. Prior to scanning, participants underwent a learning phase, where exposure to melodies was systematically varied. During scanning, participants rated liking for each melody and, later, their recognition of them. Participants showed learning effects, better recognising melodies heard more often. Melodies heard most often were most liked, consistent with the mere exposure effect. We found neural activations as a function of previous exposure in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, probably reflecting retrieval and working memory-related processes. This was despite the fact that the task during scanning was to judge liking, not recognition, thus suggesting that appreciation of music relies strongly on memory processes. Subjective liking per se caused differential activation in the left hemisphere, of the anterior insula, the caudate nucleus, and the putamen.

  11. Plaadid / Kaarel Kressa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kressa, Kaarel, 1983-

    2007-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest Kasabian "Empire", Katrin Mandel ja Lauri Saatpalu "Ei kunagi", The Hold Steady "Boys & Girls in America", "Corinne Bailey Rae", FAll Out Boy "Infinity On High", Laleh "Prinsessor", Melody Club "Scream"

  12. Uued plaadid / Koit Raudsepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raudsepp, Koit

    1999-01-01

    Uute plaatide Mishka "Sembalembo", "Universal Soldier", Destiny"s Child "The Writing"s On The Wall", Ziggy Marley And The Melody MAkers "Spirit Of Music", Macy Gray "On How Life Is", Aztec Camera "The Best Of" tutvustus

  13. Music, memory, and Alzheimer's disease: is music recognition spared in dementia, and how can it be assessed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Lola L; Duffin, Jacalyn

    2005-01-01

    Despite intriguing and suggestive clinical observations, no formal research has assessed the possible sparing of musical recognition and memory in Alzheimer's dementia (AD). A case study is presented of an 84-year old woman with severe cognitive impairment implicating AD, but for whom music recognition and memory, according to her caregivers, appeared to be spared. The hypotheses addressed were, first, that memory for familiar music may be spared in dementia, and second, that musical recognition and memory may be reliably assessed with existing tests if behavioral observation is employed to overcome the problem of verbal or written communication. Our hypotheses were stimulated by the patient EN, for whom diagnosis of AD became probable in 2000. With severe problems in memory, language, and cognition, she now has a mini-mental status score of 8 (out of 30) and is unable to understand or recall standard instructions. In order to assess her music recognition abilities, three tests from the previous literature were adapted for behavioral observation. Two tests involved the discrimination of familiar melodies from unfamiliar melodies. The third involved the detection of distortions ("wrong" notes) in familiar melodies and discrimination of distorted melodies from melodies correctly reproduced. Test melodies were presented to EN on a CD player and her responses were observed by two test administrators. EN responded to familiar melodies by singing along, usually with the words, and often continuing to sing after the stimulus had stopped. She never responded to the unfamiliar melodies. She responded to distorted melodies with facial expressions - surprise, laughter, a frown, or an exclamation, "Oh, dear!"; she never responded in this way to the undistorted melodies. Allowing these responses as indicators of detection, the results for EN were in the normal or near normal range of scores for elderly controls. As well, lyrics to familiar melodies, spoken in a conversational

  14. Expectations in Culturally Unfamiliar Music: Influences of Proximal and Distal Cues and Timbral Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J Stevens

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Listeners’ musical perception is influenced by cues that can be stored in short-term memory (e.g. within the same musical piece or long-term memory (e.g. based on one’s own musical culture. The present study tested how these cues (referred to as respectively proximal and distal cues influence the perception of music from an unfamiliar culture. Western listeners who were naïve to Gamelan music judged completeness and coherence for newly constructed melodies in the Balinese gamelan tradition. In these melodies, we manipulated the final tone with three possibilities: the original gong tone, an in-scale tone replacement or an out-of-scale tone replacement. We also manipulated the musical timbre employed in Gamelan pieces. We hypothesized that novice listeners are sensitive to out-of-scale changes, but not in-scale changes, and that this might be influenced by the more unfamiliar timbre created by Gamelan sister instruments whose harmonics beat with the harmonics of the other instrument, creating a timbrally shimmering sound. The results showed: 1 out-of-scale endings were judged less complete than original gong and in-scale endings; 2 for melodies played with sister instruments, in-scale endings were judged as less complete than original endings. Furthermore, melodies using the original scale tones were judged more coherent than melodies containing few or multiple tone replacements; melodies played on single instruments were judged more coherent than the same melodies played on sister instruments. Additionally, there is some indication of within-session statistical learning, with expectations for the initially-novel materials developing during the course of the experiment. The data suggest the influence of both distal cues (e.g. previously unfamiliar timbres and proximal cues (within the same sequence and over the experimental session on the perception of melodies from other cultural systems based on unfamiliar tunings and scale systems.

  15. Pitch discrimination and melodic memory in children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanutz, Sandy; Wapnick, Joel; Burack, Jacob A

    2014-02-01

    Pitch perception is enhanced among persons with autism. We extended this finding to memory for pitch and melody among school-aged children. The purpose of this study was to investigate pitch memory in musically untrained children with autism spectrum disorders, aged 7-13 years, and to compare it to that of age- and IQ-matched typically developing children. The children were required to discriminate isolated tones in two differing contexts as well to remember melodies after a period of 1 week. The tasks were designed to employ both short- and long-term memory for music. For the pitch discrimination task, the children first had to indicate whether two isolated tones were the same or different when the second was the same or had been altered to be 25, 35, or 45 cents sharp or flat. Second, the children discriminated the tones within the context of melody. They were asked whether two melodies were the same or different when the leading tone of the second melody was the same or had been altered to be 25, 35, or 45 cents sharp or flat. Long-term memory for melody was also investigated, as the children attempted to recall four different two-bar melodies after 1 week. The children with autism spectrum disorders demonstrated elevated pitch discrimination ability in the single-tone and melodic context as well as superior long-term memory for melody. Pitch memory correlated positively with scores on measures of nonverbal fluid reasoning ability. Superior short- and long-term pitch memory was found among children with autism spectrum disorders. The results indicate an aspect to cognitive functioning that may predict both enhanced nonverbal reasoning ability and atypical language development.

  16. Audio-visual interactions uniquely contribute to resolution of visual conflict in people possessing absolute pitch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Kim

    Full Text Available Individuals possessing absolute pitch (AP are able to identify a given musical tone or to reproduce it without reference to another tone. The present study sought to learn whether this exceptional auditory ability impacts visual perception under stimulus conditions that provoke visual competition in the form of binocular rivalry. Nineteen adult participants with 3-19 years of musical training were divided into two groups according to their performance on a task involving identification of the specific note associated with hearing a given musical pitch. During test trials lasting just over half a minute, participants dichoptically viewed a scrolling musical score presented to one eye and a drifting sinusoidal grating presented to the other eye; throughout the trial they pressed buttons to track the alternations in visual awareness produced by these dissimilar monocular stimuli. On "pitch-congruent" trials, participants heard an auditory melody that was congruent in pitch with the visual score, on "pitch-incongruent" trials they heard a transposed auditory melody that was congruent with the score in melody but not in pitch, and on "melody-incongruent" trials they heard an auditory melody completely different from the visual score. For both groups, the visual musical scores predominated over the gratings when the auditory melody was congruent compared to when it was incongruent. Moreover, the AP participants experienced greater predominance of the visual score when it was accompanied by the pitch-congruent melody compared to the same melody transposed in pitch; for non-AP musicians, pitch-congruent and pitch-incongruent trials yielded equivalent predominance. Analysis of individual durations of dominance revealed differential effects on dominance and suppression durations for AP and non-AP participants. These results reveal that AP is accompanied by a robust form of bisensory interaction between tonal frequencies and musical notation that boosts

  17. Decision-Based Transcription of Jazz Guitar Solos Using a Harmonic Bident Analysis Filter Bank and Spectral Distribution Weighting

    OpenAIRE

    Gorlow, Stanislaw; Ramona, Mathieu; Pachet, François

    2016-01-01

    Jazz guitar solos are improvised melody lines played on one instrument on top of a chordal accompaniment (comping). As the improvisation happens spontaneously, a reference score is non-existent, only a lead sheet. There are situations, however, when one would like to have the original melody lines in the form of notated music, see the Real Book. The motivation is either for the purpose of practice and imitation or for musical analysis. In this work, an automatic transcriber for jazz guitar so...

  18. A melodic contour repeatedly experienced by human near-term fetuses elicits a profound cardiac reaction one month after birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granier-Deferre, Carolyn; Bassereau, Sophie; Ribeiro, Aurélie; Jacquet, Anne-Yvonne; Decasper, Anthony J

    2011-02-23

    Human hearing develops progressively during the last trimester of gestation. Near-term fetuses can discriminate acoustic features, such as frequencies and spectra, and process complex auditory streams. Fetal and neonatal studies show that they can remember frequently recurring sounds. However, existing data can only show retention intervals up to several days after birth. Here we show that auditory memories can last at least six weeks. Experimental fetuses were given precisely controlled exposure to a descending piano melody twice daily during the 35(th), 36(th), and 37(th) weeks of gestation. Six weeks later we assessed the cardiac responses of 25 exposed infants and 25 naive control infants, while in quiet sleep, to the descending melody and to an ascending control piano melody. The melodies had precisely inverse contours, but similar spectra, identical duration, tempo and rhythm, thus, almost identical amplitude envelopes. All infants displayed a significant heart rate change. In exposed infants, the descending melody evoked a cardiac deceleration that was twice larger than the decelerations elicited by the ascending melody and by both melodies in control infants. Thus, 3-weeks of prenatal exposure to a specific melodic contour affects infants 'auditory processing' or perception, i.e., impacts the autonomic nervous system at least six weeks later, when infants are 1-month old. Our results extend the retention interval over which a prenatally acquired memory of a specific sound stream can be observed from 3-4 days to six weeks. The long-term memory for the descending melody is interpreted in terms of enduring neurophysiological tuning and its significance for the developmental psychobiology of attention and perception, including early speech perception, is discussed.

  19. Expectations in culturally unfamiliar music: influences of proximal and distal cues and timbral characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Catherine J; Tardieu, Julien; Dunbar-Hall, Peter; Best, Catherine T; Tillmann, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Listeners' musical perception is influenced by cues that can be stored in short-term memory (e.g., within the same musical piece) or long-term memory (e.g., based on one's own musical culture). The present study tested how these cues (referred to as, respectively, proximal and distal cues) influence the perception of music from an unfamiliar culture. Western listeners who were naïve to Gamelan music judged completeness and coherence for newly constructed melodies in the Balinese gamelan tradition. In these melodies, we manipulated the final tone with three possibilities: the original gong tone, an in-scale tone replacement or an out-of-scale tone replacement. We also manipulated the musical timbre employed in Gamelan pieces. We hypothesized that novice listeners are sensitive to out-of-scale changes, but not in-scale changes, and that this might be influenced by the more unfamiliar timbre created by Gamelan "sister" instruments whose harmonics beat with the harmonics of the other instrument, creating a timbrally "shimmering" sound. The results showed: (1) out-of-scale endings were judged less complete than original gong and in-scale endings; (2) for melodies played with "sister" instruments, in-scale endings were judged as less complete than original endings. Furthermore, melodies using the original scale tones were judged more coherent than melodies containing few or multiple tone replacements; melodies played on single instruments were judged more coherent than the same melodies played on sister instruments. Additionally, there is some indication of within-session statistical learning, with expectations for the initially-novel materials developing during the course of the experiment. The data suggest the influence of both distal cues (e.g., previously unfamiliar timbres) and proximal cues (within the same sequence and over the experimental session) on the perception of melodies from other cultural systems based on unfamiliar tunings and scale systems.

  20. An Evaluative Review of Hemispheric Learning Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    Multiple resources in divided attention : a cross-modal te&t o£ the independence of hemispheric resources. Journal of < Experimental Psychology...found, for example, in a pianist who could play melodies without difficulty, compose new melodies at the piano, and write them down accurately...of the pair at the oppo- site ear; this procedure, referred to as dichotic presentation, has its origins in experiments on selective attention

  1. A melodic contour repeatedly experienced by human near-term fetuses elicits a profound cardiac reaction one month after birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Granier-Deferre

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Human hearing develops progressively during the last trimester of gestation. Near-term fetuses can discriminate acoustic features, such as frequencies and spectra, and process complex auditory streams. Fetal and neonatal studies show that they can remember frequently recurring sounds. However, existing data can only show retention intervals up to several days after birth.Here we show that auditory memories can last at least six weeks. Experimental fetuses were given precisely controlled exposure to a descending piano melody twice daily during the 35(th, 36(th, and 37(th weeks of gestation. Six weeks later we assessed the cardiac responses of 25 exposed infants and 25 naive control infants, while in quiet sleep, to the descending melody and to an ascending control piano melody. The melodies had precisely inverse contours, but similar spectra, identical duration, tempo and rhythm, thus, almost identical amplitude envelopes. All infants displayed a significant heart rate change. In exposed infants, the descending melody evoked a cardiac deceleration that was twice larger than the decelerations elicited by the ascending melody and by both melodies in control infants.Thus, 3-weeks of prenatal exposure to a specific melodic contour affects infants 'auditory processing' or perception, i.e., impacts the autonomic nervous system at least six weeks later, when infants are 1-month old. Our results extend the retention interval over which a prenatally acquired memory of a specific sound stream can be observed from 3-4 days to six weeks. The long-term memory for the descending melody is interpreted in terms of enduring neurophysiological tuning and its significance for the developmental psychobiology of attention and perception, including early speech perception, is discussed.

  2. Infective endocarditis following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Gary; Vejlstrup, Niels; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult.......Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult....

  3. Sensory, Cognitive, and Sensorimotor Learning Effects in Recognition Memory for Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Brian; Tillmann, Barbara; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Recent research suggests that perception and action are strongly interrelated and that motor experience may aid memory recognition. We investigated the role of motor experience in auditory memory recognition processes by musicians using behavioral, ERP, and neural source current density measures. Skilled pianists learned one set of novel melodies by producing them and another set by perception only. Pianists then completed an auditory memory recognition test during which the previously learned melodies were presented with or without an out-of-key pitch alteration while the EEG was recorded. Pianists indicated whether each melody was altered from or identical to one of the original melodies. Altered pitches elicited a larger N2 ERP component than original pitches, and pitches within previously produced melodies elicited a larger N2 than pitches in previously perceived melodies. Cortical motor planning regions were more strongly activated within the time frame of the N2 following altered pitches in previously produced melodies compared with previously perceived melodies, and larger N2 amplitudes were associated with greater detection accuracy following production learning than perception learning. Early sensory (N1) and later cognitive (P3a) components elicited by pitch alterations correlated with predictions of sensory echoic and schematic tonality models, respectively, but only for the perception learning condition, suggesting that production experience alters the extent to which performers rely on sensory and tonal recognition cues. These findings provide evidence for distinct time courses of sensory, schematic, and motoric influences within the same recognition task and suggest that learned auditory-motor associations influence responses to out-of-key pitches.

  4. Time and Space in W.A. Mozart's Ave Verum Corpus (1791)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2015-01-01

    A discussion and interpretation of Mozart's famous motet contextualised through historical considerations of music, theology and aesthetics inspired by K.E. Løgstrup's notion of the fictive space of a melody.......A discussion and interpretation of Mozart's famous motet contextualised through historical considerations of music, theology and aesthetics inspired by K.E. Løgstrup's notion of the fictive space of a melody....

  5. Effects of music on memory for text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell-Webb, Patricia; Speelman, Craig P

    2008-06-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of song can facilitate recall of text. This study examined the effect of repetition of a melody across verses, familiarity with the melody, rhythm, and other structural processing hypotheses to explain this phenomenon. Two experiments were conducted, each with 100 participants recruited from undergraduate Psychology programs (44 men, 156 women, M age = 28.5 yr., SD = 9.4). In Exp. 1, participants learned a four-verse ballad in one of five encoding conditions (familiar melody, unfamiliar melody, unknown rhythm, known rhythm, and spoken). Exp. 2 assessed the effect of familiarity in rhythm-only conditions and of pre-exposure with a previously unfamiliar melody. Measures taken were number of verbatim words recalled and number of lines produced with correct syllabic structure. Analysis indicated that rhythm, with or without musical accompaniment, can facilitate recall of text, suggesting that rhythm may provide a schematic frame to which text can be attached. Similarly, familiarity with the rhythm or melody facilitated recall. Findings are discussed in terms of integration and dual-processing theories.

  6. Auditory profiles of classical, jazz, and rock musicians: Genre-specific sensitivity to musical sound features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari eTervaniemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When compared with individuals without explicit training in music, adult musicians have facilitated neural functions in several modalities. They also display structural changes in various brain areas, these changes corresponding to the intensity and duration of their musical training. Previous studies have focused on investigating musicians with training in Western classical music. However, musicians involved in different musical genres may display highly differentiated auditory profiles according to the demands set by their genre, i.e. varying importance of different musical sound features. This hypothesis was tested in a novel melody paradigm including deviants in tuning, timbre, rhythm, melody transpositions, and melody contour. Using this paradigm while the participants were watching a silent video and instructed to ignore the sounds, we compared classical, jazz, and rock musicians’ and non-musicians’ accuracy of neural encoding of the melody. In all groups of participants, all deviants elicited an MMN response, which is a cortical index of deviance discrimination. The strength of the MMN and the subsequent attentional P3a responses reflected the importance of various sound features in each music genre: these automatic brain responses were selectively enhanced to deviants in tuning (classical musicians, timing (classical and jazz musicians, transposition (jazz musicians, and melody contour (jazz and rock musicians. Taken together, these results indicate that musicians with different training history have highly specialized cortical reactivity to sounds which violate the neural template for melody content.

  7. Auditory Profiles of Classical, Jazz, and Rock Musicians: Genre-Specific Sensitivity to Musical Sound Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaniemi, Mari; Janhunen, Lauri; Kruck, Stefanie; Putkinen, Vesa; Huotilainen, Minna

    2015-01-01

    When compared with individuals without explicit training in music, adult musicians have facilitated neural functions in several modalities. They also display structural changes in various brain areas, these changes corresponding to the intensity and duration of their musical training. Previous studies have focused on investigating musicians with training in Western classical music. However, musicians involved in different musical genres may display highly differentiated auditory profiles according to the demands set by their genre, i.e., varying importance of different musical sound features. This hypothesis was tested in a novel melody paradigm including deviants in tuning, timbre, rhythm, melody transpositions, and melody contour. Using this paradigm while the participants were watching a silent video and instructed to ignore the sounds, we compared classical, jazz, and rock musicians' and non-musicians' accuracy of neural encoding of the melody. In all groups of participants, all deviants elicited an MMN response, which is a cortical index of deviance discrimination. The strength of the MMN and the subsequent attentional P3a responses reflected the importance of various sound features in each music genre: these automatic brain responses were selectively enhanced to deviants in tuning (classical musicians), timing (classical and jazz musicians), transposition (jazz musicians), and melody contour (jazz and rock musicians). Taken together, these results indicate that musicians with different training history have highly specialized cortical reactivity to sounds which violate the neural template for melody content.

  8. DMPD: Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18280610 Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. Thompson JM...how Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. PubmedID 18280610 Title Toll-like recepto...rs regulation of viral infection and disease. Authors Thompson JM, Iwasaki A. Pub

  9. On The Use Of Network Sampling In Diabetic Surveys | Nafiu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two estimators: Hansen-Hurwitz estimator and Horvitz-Thompson estimator were considered; and the results were obtained using a program written in Microsoft Visual C++ programming language. Keywords: Graph, Sampling Frame, Households, Hansen-Hurwitz estimator and Horvitz-Thompson estimator. JORIND Vol.

  10. Cross-Validation of AFOQT Form S for Cyberspace Operations - Cyberspace Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-20

    TECHNICIAN, ACADEMIC, VERBAL, and QUANTITATIVE. Thompson, Skinner , Gould, Alley, & Shore (2010) provided a full description of the subtest and the...Strategic Research and Assessment Branch. Thompson, N., Skinner , J., Gould, R. B., Alley, W., & Shore, W. (2010). Development of the Air Force

  11. Community Learning Campus: It Takes a Simple Message to Build a Complex Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    Education Canada asked Tom Thompson, president of Olds College and a prime mover behind the Community Learning Campus (CLC): What were the lessons learned from this unusually ambitious education project? Thompson mentions six lessons he learned from this complex project which include: (1) Dream big, build small, act now; (2) Keep a low profile at…

  12. 75 FR 78209 - Notice of Request for Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... wealth and job opportunities in Rural Areas and among individuals living in such areas through the... from Cheryl Thompson, Regulations and Paperwork Management Branch, Support Services Division at (202... information technology. Comments may be sent to Cheryl Thompson, Regulations and Paperwork Management Branch...

  13. Fostering a culture of land. Commentary on "Agrarian philosophy and ecological ethics".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyfogle, Eric T

    2008-12-01

    Paul Thompson's essay, "Agrarian Philosophy and Ecological Ethics," [1] usefully highlights some of the defects in the now-dominant strands of environmental ethics. It offers an agrarian alternative that solves many of them. Thompson's agrarianism, in turn, has its own limitations, yet it nonetheless merits close attention.

  14. Characterization of PGL(2, p) by its order and one conjugacy class ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    validity of a conjecture of J. G. Thompson is generalized to the group PGL(2, p) by a new way. Keywords. Finite group; conjugacy class size; Thompson's ..... class size, J. Inequalities Appl. (2012) 310. [13] Conway J H, Curtis R T, Norton S P, Parker R A and Wilson R A, Atlas of Finite Groups. (1985) (Oxford: Clarendon ...

  15. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Johnson quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG98-2 Thompson, PJ�and Thompson, TB, 1998,�Digital bedrock geologic map of the Johnson quadrangle, Vermont: VGS Open-File Report VG98-2, 2 plates,...

  16. Rawls, Race, and Education: A Challenge to the Ideal/Nonideal Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Winston C.

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, Winston C. Thompson questions the rigidity of the boundary between ideal and nonideal theory, suggesting a porosity that allows elements of both to be brought to bear upon educational issues in singularly incisive ways. In the service of this goal, Thompson challenges and extends John Rawls's theory of justice as fairness, bringing…

  17. On Predicting the Leeway and Drift of A Survival Suit Clad Person In-Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    1977; Morgan 1978, Scobie and Thompson, 1979; Osmer, Edwards, and Breitler, 1982; and Nash and Willcox, 1985) on drifting objects. Leeway is defined...34, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 26 PP. Scobie , R.W., and D.L. Thompson, 1979. "Life Raft Study", U.S. Coast Guard, Oceanographic Unit Technical

  18. On Predicting the Person-in-Water Drift for Search and Rescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    and Broida, 1974 Morgan, et al 1977; Morgan 1975, Scobie and Thompson, 1979; Osmer, Edwards and Breitler, 1982; Nash and Willcox 1985). Leeway is...Rubber Rafts’, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 26 pp. Scobie , R.W. and Thompson, D.L., 1979, ."Life Raft Study", Department of Transportation

  19. Can Music Foster Learning – Effects of Different Text Modalities on Learning and Information Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina A. M. Lehmann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the possibilities of fostering learning based on differences in recall and comprehension after learning with texts which were presented in one of three modalities: either in a spoken, written, or sung version. All three texts differ regarding their processing, especially when considering working memory. Overall, we assume the best recall performance after learning with the written text and the best comprehension performance after learning with the sung text, respectively, compared to both other text modalities. We also analyzed whether the melody of the sung material functions as a mnemonic aid for the learners in the sung text condition. If melody and text of the sung version are closely linked, presentation of the melody during the post-test phase could foster text retrieval. 108 students either learned from a sung text performed by a professional singer, a printed text, or the same text read out loud. Half of the participants worked on the post-test while listening to the melody used for the musical learning material and the other half did not listen to a melody. The written learning modality led to significantly better recall than with the spoken (d = 0.97 or sung text (d = 0.78. However, comprehension after learning with the sung modality was significantly superior compared to when learning with the written learning modality (d = 0.40. Reading leads to more focus on details, which is required to answer recall questions, while listening fosters a general understanding of the text, leading to higher levels of comprehension. Listening to the melody during the post-test phase negatively affected comprehension, irrespective of the modality during the learning phase. This can be explained by the seductive detail effect, as listening to the melody during the post-test phase may distract learners from their main task. In closing, theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  20. The effect of pitch, rhythm, and familiarity on working memory and anxiety as measured by digit recall performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate and quantitatively evaluate the effects of pitch and rhythm of unfamiliar and familiar melodies on working memory and anxiety as measured by sequential digit recall performance. Participants (N = 60) listened to 6 treatment conditions each consisting of 9 randomized monosyllabic digits. The digits were paired with (a) a familiar melody and pitch only, (b) a familiar melody and rhythm only, (c) a familiar melody with both pitch and rhythm, (d) an unfamiliar melody with pitch only, (e) an unfamiliar melody with rhythm only, and (f) an unfamiliar melody with both pitch and rhythm. The 6 different treatments were counterbalanced using a Latin square design in an attempt to control for order effects. Participants rated their state anxiety on a Likert-type scale before, midway through, and after the digits test. No statistically significant order, learning, or practice effects were found. A 3-way repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a statistically significant difference in digit recall performance across musical element conditions and groups. Results indicated that music majors outperformed nonmusic majors on the digit recall task. Participants were able to recall digits from the rhythm condition most accurately while recalling digits from pitch only and both pitch and rhythm conditions the least accurately. Graphic analysis of treatment as a function of sequential position indicated digit recall was best during conditions of primacy and recency. No main effects were found for the familiarity condition. Additionally, no main effects or interactions were found for the anxiety variable. The results of this study are congruent with existing working memory and music literature suggesting that pairing information with rhythm can facilitate recall, music majors outperform non-music majors, and recall accuracy is best in positions of primacy and recency. Implications for practice in therapy and education are made as well as suggestions for

  1. Can Music Foster Learning - Effects of Different Text Modalities on Learning and Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Janina A M; Seufert, Tina

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the possibilities of fostering learning based on differences in recall and comprehension after learning with texts which were presented in one of three modalities: either in a spoken, written, or sung version. All three texts differ regarding their processing, especially when considering working memory. Overall, we assume the best recall performance after learning with the written text and the best comprehension performance after learning with the sung text, respectively, compared to both other text modalities. We also analyzed whether the melody of the sung material functions as a mnemonic aid for the learners in the sung text condition. If melody and text of the sung version are closely linked, presentation of the melody during the post-test phase could foster text retrieval. 108 students either learned from a sung text performed by a professional singer, a printed text, or the same text read out loud. Half of the participants worked on the post-test while listening to the melody used for the musical learning material and the other half did not listen to a melody. The written learning modality led to significantly better recall than with the spoken ( d = 0.97) or sung text ( d = 0.78). However, comprehension after learning with the sung modality was significantly superior compared to when learning with the written learning modality ( d = 0.40). Reading leads to more focus on details, which is required to answer recall questions, while listening fosters a general understanding of the text, leading to higher levels of comprehension. Listening to the melody during the post-test phase negatively affected comprehension, irrespective of the modality during the learning phase. This can be explained by the seductive detail effect, as listening to the melody during the post-test phase may distract learners from their main task. In closing, theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  2. Musical Expertise Increases Top–Down Modulation Over Hippocampal Activation during Familiarity Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Gagnepain

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus has classically been associated with episodic memory, but is sometimes also recruited during semantic memory tasks, especially for the skilled exploration of familiar information. Cognitive control mechanisms guiding semantic memory search may benefit from the set of cognitive processes at stake during musical training. Here, we examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging, whether musical expertise would promote the top–down control of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG over the generation of hippocampally based goal-directed thoughts mediating the familiarity judgment of proverbs and musical items. Analyses of behavioral data confirmed that musical experts more efficiently access familiar melodies than non-musicians although such increased ability did not transfer to verbal semantic memory. At the brain level, musical expertise specifically enhanced the recruitment of the hippocampus during semantic access to melodies, but not proverbs. Additionally, hippocampal activation contributed to speed of access to familiar melodies, but only in musicians. Critically, causal modeling of neural dynamics between LIFG and the hippocampus further showed that top–down excitatory regulation over the hippocampus during familiarity decision specifically increases with musical expertise – an effect that generalized across melodies and proverbs. At the local level, our data show that musical expertise modulates the online recruitment of hippocampal response to serve semantic memory retrieval of familiar melodies. The reconfiguration of memory network dynamics following musical training could constitute a promising framework to understand its ability to preserve brain functions.

  3. Effects of prior exposure on music liking and recognition in patients with temporal lobe lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Séverine; Peretz, Isabelle

    2005-12-01

    Prior exposure to music typically increases liking. This manifestation of implicit memory can be dissociated from explicit memory recognition. To examine the contribution of the medial temporal lobe to musical preference and recognition, we tested patients with either left (LTL) or right (RTL) temporal lobe lesions as well as normal control (NC) participants using the procedure of Peretz et al. The results in the affect task showed that NC and LTL participants preferred the studied over nonstudied melodies, thereby demonstrating an implicit exposure effect on liking judgments, whereas RTL patients failed to exhibit this effect. Explicit recognition was impaired in both LTL and RTL patients as compared to NC participants. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that RTL structures play a critical role in the formation of melody representations that support both priming and memory recognition, whereas LTL structures are more involved in the explicit retrieval of melodies. Furthermore, we were able to test an amnesic patient (PC) with bilateral lesions of the temporal lobe. In this case, the exposure effect on liking was also absent. However, repeated exposure to melodies was found to enhance both liking and recognition judgments. This remarkable sparing of memory observed through melody repetition suggests that extensive exposure may assist both implicit and explicit memory in the presence of global amnesia.

  4. Neural basis of music imagery and the effect of musical expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Knief, Arne; Pantev, Christo

    2008-12-01

    Although the influence of long-term musical training on the processing of heard music has been the subject of many studies, the neural basis of music imagery and the effect of musical expertise remain insufficiently understood. By means of magnetoencephalography (MEG) we compared musicians and nonmusicians in a musical imagery task with familiar melodies. Subjects listened to the beginnings of the melodies, continued them in their imagination and then heard a tone which was either a correct or an incorrect further continuation of the melody. Only in musicians was the imagery of these melodies strong enough to elicit an early preattentive brain response to unexpected incorrect continuations of the imagined melodies; this response, the imagery mismatch negativity (iMMN), peaked approximately 175 ms after tone onset and was right-lateralized. In contrast to previous studies the iMMN was not based on a heard but on a purely imagined memory trace. Our results suggest that in trained musicians imagery and perception rely on similar neuronal correlates, and that the musicians' intense musical training has modified this network to achieve a superior ability for imagery and preattentive processing of music.

  5. Music playing and memory trace: evidence from event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Keiko; Katahira, Kentaro; Abla, Dilshat; Hori, Koji; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2010-08-01

    We examined the relationship between motor practice and auditory memory for sound sequences to evaluate the hypothesis that practice involving physical performance might enhance auditory memory. Participants learned two unfamiliar sound sequences using different training methods. Under the key-press condition, they learned a melody while pressing a key during auditory input. Under the no-key-press condition, they listened to another melody without any key pressing. The two melodies were presented alternately, and all participants were trained in both methods. Participants were instructed to pay attention under both conditions. After training, they listened to the two melodies again without pressing keys, and ERPs were recorded. During the ERP recordings, 10% of the tones in these melodies deviated from the originals. The grand-average ERPs showed that the amplitude of mismatch negativity (MMN) elicited by deviant stimuli was larger under the key-press condition than under the no-key-press condition. This effect appeared only in the high absolute pitch group, which included those with a pronounced ability to identify a note without external reference. This result suggests that the effect of training with key pressing was mediated by individual musical skills. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Drug Response and Resistance in Advanced NF1-Associated Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    2003;13(1):20-7. 3. Maris JM, Wiersma SR, Mahgoub N, Thompson P, Geyer RJ, Lange BJ, Shannon KM. Monosomy 7 myelodysplastic syndrome and other second...myeloid disorders. N Engl J Med. 1994;330:597-601. 13. Side L, Taylor B, Cayouette M, Conner E, Thompson P, Luce M, Shannon K. Homozygous inactivation of...47. Bollag G, Adler F, elMasry N, McCabe PC, Conner E, Thompson P, McCormick F, Shannon K. Biochemical characterization of a novel KRAS insertional

  7. Implicit memory for music in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, A R; O'Connor, M G

    2000-07-01

    Short, unfamiliar melodies were presented to young and older adults and to Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in an implicit and an explicit memory task. The explicit task was yes-no recognition, and the implicit task was pleasantness ratings, in which memory was shown by higher ratings for old versus new melodies (the mere exposure effect). Young adults showed retention of the melodies in both tasks. Older adults showed little explicit memory but did show the mere exposure effect. The AD patients showed neither. The authors considered and rejected several artifactual reasons for this null effect in the context of the many studies that have shown implicit memory among AD patients. As the previous studies have almost always used the visual modality for presentation, they speculate that auditory presentation, especially of nonverbal material, may be compromised in AD because of neural degeneration in auditory areas in the temporal lobes.

  8. The role of familiarity in episodic memory and metamemory for music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenman, Lisa M; Peynircioglu, Zehra F

    2004-07-01

    Participants heard music snippets of varying melodic and instrumental familiarity paired with animal-name titles. They then recalled the target when given either the melody or the title as a cue, or they gave name feeling-of-knowing (FOK) ratings. In general, recall for titles was better than it was for melodies, and recall was enhanced with increasing melodic familiarity of both the cues and the targets. Accuracy of FOK ratings, but not magnitude, also increased with increasing familiarity. Although similar ratings were given after melody and title cues, accuracy was better with title cues. Finally, knowledge of the real titles of the familiar music enhanced recall but had, by and large, no effect on the FOK ratings. Copyright 2004 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Living, Breathing Songs: Singing Along with Bob Dylan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Negus

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Taking issue with approaches to Bob Dylan’s art that are preoccupied with his lyrics, this article suggests a route into thinking about his music by focusing on how Dylan’s vocal melodies work at the intersection of speech and singing. Drawing on Gino Stefani’s work on popular melodies, this article explores this issue through a discussion of how people sing along with Dylan’s songs at concerts. The discussion focuses on the song “It Ain’t Me Babe,” and examines more general points about the ways in which Dylan’s melodies connect with the everyday lives of his listeners.

  10. Results of transcatheter pulmonary valvulation in native or patched right ventricular outflow tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzadeh-Milani, Sophie; Ladouceur, Magalie; Cohen, Sarah; Iserin, Laurence; Boudjemline, Younes

    2014-11-01

    Although widely accepted worldwide, indications for percutaneous valve replacement are limited to treatment of dysfunction of prosthetic conduits inserted in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT). There has been little evaluation of the use of the Melody(®) valve for patched non-circular pulmonary pathways. To evaluate the outcomes of Melody valve insertion in patients with a patched non-circular RVOT. We analysed procedural and outcomes data from 34 patients who underwent Melody valve implantation for a non-circular RVOT. RVOT preparation was done in all patients, using different techniques (conventional, Russian doll and/or PA jailing). Melody valve insertion was performed concomitantly in most patients. All procedures were successful. Sixteen patients had complex additional procedures, including the jailing technique (n=5), the Russian doll technique (n=6) and multiple stent implantations (Russian jailing; n=5). The remaining patients were treated using the conventional technique with systematic prestenting. Three early complications occurred: one haemoptysis; one residual RVOT obstruction needing recatheterization 48 hours after percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation; and one stent embolization during advancement of the Ensemble(®) delivery system. The mean follow-up period was 2.6 years postprocedure. There was no stent fracture, migration or embolization. Two patients developed a significant paraprosthetic leak and one received a second Melody valve. Careful patient selection, balloon sizing and RVOT preparation with prestenting are required to create a safe landing zone for the Melody valve. Short-term follow-up shows excellent results with no stent fracture or migration and appears promising. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. [The comparative analysis of changes of short pieces of EEG at perception of music on the basis of the event-related synchronization/desynchronization and wavelet-synchrony].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oknina, L B; Kuptsova, S V; Romanov, A S; Masherov, E L; Kuznetsova, O A; Sharova, E V

    2012-01-01

    The going of present pilot study is an analysis of features changes of EEG short pieces registered from 32 sites, at perception of musical melodies healthy examinees depending on logic (cognizance) and emotional (it was pleasant it was not pleasant) melody estimations. For this purpose changes of event-related synchronization/desynchronization, and also wavelet-synchrony of EEG-responses at 31 healthy examinees at the age from 18 till 60 years were compared. It is shown that at a logic estimation of music the melody cognizance is accompanied the event-related desynchronization in the left fronto-parietal-temporal area. At an emotional estimation of a melody the event-related synchronization in left fronto - temporal area for the pleasant melodies, desynchronization in temporal area for not pleasant and desynchronization in occipital area for the melodies which are not causing the emotional response is typical. At the analysis of wavelet-synchrony of EEG characterizing jet changes of interaction of cortical zones, it is revealed that the most distinct topographical distinctions concern type of processing of the heard music: logic (has learned-hasn't learned) or emotional (it was pleasant-it was not pleasant). If at an emotional estimation changes interhemispheric communications between associative cortical zones (central, frontal, temporal), are more expressed at logic - between inter - and intrahemispheric communications of projective zones of the acoustic analyzer (temporal area). It is supposed that the revealed event-related synchronization/desynhronization reflects, most likely, an activation component of an estimation of musical fragments whereas the wavelet-analysis provides guidance on character of processing of musical stimulus.

  12. Broca’s area processes the hierarchical organization of observed action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumi eWakita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Broca’s area has been suggested as the area responsible for the domain-general hierarchical processing of language and music. Although meaningful action shares a common hierarchical structure with language and music, the role of Broca’s area in this domain remains controversial. To address the involvement of Broca’s area in the processing action hierarchy, the activation of Broca’s area was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. Measurements were taken while participants watched silent movies that featured hand movements playing familiar and unfamiliar melodies. The unfamiliar melodies were reversed versions of the familiar melodies. Additionally, to investigate the effect of a motor experience on the activation of Broca’s area, the participants were divided into well-trained and less-trained groups. The results showed that Broca’s area in the well-trained participants demonstrated a significantly larger activation in response to the hand motion when an unfamiliar melody was played than when a familiar melody was played. However, Broca’s area in the less-trained participants did not show a contrast between conditions despite identical abilities of the two participant groups to identify the melodies by watching key pressing actions. These results are consistent with previous findings that Broca’s area exhibits increased activation in response to grammatically violated sentences and musically deviated chord progressions as well as the finding that this region does not represent the processing of grammatical structure in less-proficient foreign language speakers. Thus, the current study suggests that Broca’s area represents action hierarchy and that sufficiently long motor training is necessary for it to become sensitive to motor syntax. Therefore, the notion that hierarchical processing in Broca’s area is a common function shared between language and music may help to explain the role of Broca’s area in action perception.

  13. Melodic Priming of Motor Sequence Performance: The Role of the Dorsal Premotor Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Anke Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to specific auditory sequences leads to the induction of new motor memories and to investigate the role of the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC in this crossmodal learning process. Fifty-two young healthy non-musicians were familiarized with the sound to key-press mapping on a computer keyboard and tested on their baseline motor performance. Each participant received subsequently either continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS or sham stimulation over the dPMC and was then asked to remember a 12-note melody without moving. For half of the participants, the contour of the melody memorized was congruent to a subsequently performed, but never practiced, finger movement sequence (Congruent group. For the other half, the melody memorized was incongruent to the subsequent finger movement sequence (Incongruent group. Hearing a congruent melody led to significantly faster performance of a motor sequence immediately thereafter compared to hearing an incongruent melody. In addition, cTBS speeded up motor performance in both groups, possibly by relieving motor consolidation from interference by the declarative melody memorization task. Our findings substantiate recent evidence that exposure to a movement-related tone sequence can induce specific, crossmodal encoding of a movement sequence representation. They further suggest that cTBS over the dPMC may enhance early offline procedural motor skill consolidation in cognitive states where motor consolidation would normally be disturbed by concurrent declarative memory processes. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of auditory-motor system interactions and have implications for the development of new motor rehabilitation approaches using sound and non-invasive brain stimulation as neuromodulatory tools.

  14. Neural mechanisms underlying melodic perception and memory for pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, R J; Evans, A C; Meyer, E

    1994-04-01

    The neural correlates of music perception were studied by measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes with positron emission tomography (PET). Twelve volunteers were scanned using the bolus water method under four separate conditions: (1) listening to a sequence of noise bursts, (2) listening to unfamiliar tonal melodies, (3) comparing the pitch of the first two notes of the same set of melodies, and (4) comparing the pitch of the first and last notes of the melodies. The latter two conditions were designed to investigate short-term pitch retention under low or high memory load, respectively. Subtraction of the obtained PET images, superimposed on matched MRI scans, provides anatomical localization of CBF changes associated with specific cognitive functions. Listening to melodies, relative to acoustically matched noise sequences, resulted in CBF increases in the right superior temporal and right occipital cortices. Pitch judgments of the first two notes of each melody, relative to passive listening to the same stimuli, resulted in right frontal-lobe activation. Analysis of the high memory load condition relative to passive listening revealed the participation of a number of cortical and subcortical regions, notably in the right frontal and right temporal lobes, as well as in parietal and insular cortex. Both pitch judgment conditions also revealed CBF decreases within the left primary auditory cortex. We conclude that specialized neural systems in the right superior temporal cortex participate in perceptual analysis of melodies; pitch comparisons are effected via a neural network that includes right prefrontal cortex, but active retention of pitch involves the interaction of right temporal and frontal cortices.

  15. SMUG: Scientific Music Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scirea, Marco; A B Barros, Gabriella; Togelius, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Music is based on the real world. Composers use their day-to-day lives as inspiration to create rhythm and lyrics. Procedural music generators are capable of creating good quality pieces, and while some already use the world as inspiration, there is still much to be explored in this. We describe...... a system to generate lyrics and melodies from real-world data, in particular from academic papers. Through this we want to create a playful experience and establish a novel way of generating content (textual and musical) that could be applied to other domains, in particular to games. For melody generation...

  16. Experiences in adapting post-byzantine chant into foreign languages: Research and praxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olkinuora Jaakko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the current state of the research and practical methodology of the adaptation of Byzantine melodies written in the “New Method” into foreign languages, with Romanian, English and Finnish serving as examples. The adaptation of independent, “fixed” melodies as well as metrical liturgical texts (prosomoia and canons are examined. The challenges emerging in adapting Byzantine chant into Finnish are also discussed. The author also suggests some future subjects for research, which include the synthesis of examining arrangements in both “Old” and “New Method”.

  17. モンテッソーリ・メソッドにおけるA.M.マッケローニの幼児・児童を対象とした音楽指導法 : Music Book: Melodyの検討を中心に

    OpenAIRE

    藤尾, かの子

    2017-01-01

    A.M. Maccheroni developed a music education approach for preschool- and elementary school-aged children using the Montessori Method. To clarify the tenets of Maccheroni’s musical teaching method, we focus on her Music Book. The Music Book consists of 6 volumes; in this study, we start by analyzing Music Book: Melody (Vol. 5), intended for children over 5 years old. As a result of our study, the following becomes clear;1) Music Book: Melody (Vol. 5) aims to increase children’s capacity for mus...

  18. Imagery mismatch negativity in musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Knief, Arne; Pantev, Christo

    2009-07-01

    The present study investigated musical imagery in musicians and nonmusicians by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). We used a new paradigm in which subjects had to continue familiar melodies in their mind and then judged if a further presented tone was a correct continuation of the melody. Incorrect tones elicited an imagery mismatch negativity (iMMN) in musicians but not in nonmusicians. This finding suggests that the MMN component can be based on an imagined instead of a sensory memory trace and that imagery of music is modulated by musical expertise.

  19. CONCERT-'European Joint Programme for the Integration at Radiation Protection Research'; CONCERT-''European Joint Programme for the Integration at Radiation Protection Research''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birschwilks, Mandy; Schmitt-Hannig, Annemarie [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Internationale und Nationale Zusammenarbeit im Strahlenschutz; Jung, Thomas [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Strahlenschutz und Gesundheit

    2016-08-01

    In 2009 the High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on low dose research recommended the development of a scientific platform for low dose radiation research. The foundation of MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) occurred in 2010. In 2015 a new project on radiation protection research was established: CONCERT (European Joint Programme for the Integration at Radiation Protection Research). The aim is the coordination of the already existing scientific platforms MELODI (radiation effects and interactions), ALLIANCE (radioecology), NERIS (nuclear and radiological emergency protection) and EURADOS (radiation dosimetry). With CONCERT an efficient use of this infrastructure for research cooperation and transparency is intended.

  20. 76 FR 26252 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... development, University of Maryland MSE Study, Surfclam Ocean Quahog Excessive Share Project, and ACL/AM... meeting date. Dated: May 3, 2011. Tracey L. Thompson, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries...

  1. Nutrition and athletic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exercise - nutrition; Exercise - fluids; Exercise - hydration ... Bird R. Nutrition. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  2. A Rutherford Scattering Simulation with Microcomputer Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Wright, Lavonia F.

    1989-01-01

    Lists a program for a simulation of Rutherford's gold foil experiment in BASIC for both Apple II and IBM compatible computers. Compares Rutherford's model of the atom with Thompson's plum pudding model of the atom. (MVL)

  3. The Impact of Functional Literacy on Socio-Economic Lives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth

    Agona District of Ghana using an Interview Guide on the Impact of Functional. Literacy Programme on ... economic growth and the quality of formal education provided to their citizens (Thompson, 1981). ..... References. Abadze, H. (1994) Adult ...

  4. 76 FR 80926 - Cortez Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ..., Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On December 1, 2011, INCA Engineers, Inc., Washington...: Mr. Donald Thompson, INCA Engineers, Inc., 400, 112th Ave. NE., Suite 400, Bellevue, WA 98004; phone...

  5. 77 FR 16219 - Cortez Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ..., Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On November 30, 2011, INCA Engineers, Inc., Washington...: Mr. Donald Thompson, INCA Engineers, Inc., 400 112th Ave. NE., Suite 400 Bellevue, WA 98004; phone...

  6. 77 FR 43866 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... principal place of business at 288 Dolphin Cove Court, Del Mar, CA 92014. The patent rights in this... licensing can be found online at http://technology.nasa.gov/ . Sumara M. Thompson-King, Acting Deputy...

  7. IRAKI NEW.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    I gave out the questionnaires to the students of the two different Japanese language .... Thompson (1981) argues that teachers' attitude and classroom management style contribute to learners' character building that would have impact on.

  8. Bamboo structures: evoke the spirit workshop [organisation, facilitation, research] Brescia, Italy; 1-14 July 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Kolakowski, Marcin M.; Thompson, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Student workshop run by MM Kolakowski and Alan Thompson for architectural students. Construction of large scale bamboo structures: 18-metre high tower, 9-metre high wheel arches and other bamboo constructions.

  9. 77 FR 31327 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... fisheries, including Columbia River fisheries issues, the NOAA Habitat Blueprint, and the Council's.... Thompson, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc...

  10. Achilles tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your Achilles tendon to point your toes and push off your foot when walking. If your Achilles ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  11. Kinematograafiline rätsepakunst / Jaan Ruus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruus, Jaan, 1938-2017

    2007-01-01

    Taivani päritolu režissöör Ang Lee tema mängufilm "Mõistus ja tunded" ("Sense and Sensibility") : stsenarist Jane Austeni romaani põhjal Emma Thompson : Suurbritannia - Ameerika Ühendriigid 2005

  12. UHMW Ziegler–Natta polyethylene: Synthesis, crystallization, and melt behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Atiqullah, Muhammad; Adamu, Sagir; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2017-01-01

    nonisothermal crystallization model, Flory's equilibrium theory and ethylene sequence length distribution concept (SLD), Gibbs–Thompson equation, and DSC experiments. By using this approach, the effects of MW, 1-hexene incorporation, ethylene SLD, the level

  13. Back pain and sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Running - back pain; Weightlifting - back pain; Lumbar pain - sports; Sciatica - sports; Low back pain - sports ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  14. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the tissues of the largemouth yellowfish, Labeobarbus kimberleyensis (Gilchrist and Thompson, 1913), from the Vaal Dam, South Africa, and associated consumption risks.

  15. Diabetes and exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 21. Read More Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions ACE ...

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    The dermatoglyphic patterns of each student were compared to the cumulative academic ... of the student's cognitive (learning) ability (Rohde and Thompson, 2007 ..... and music, and in some emotions (Milner, 1974). However functional ...

  17. Chemical, temperature, pressure, and salinity data from bottle and CTD casts in the Arabian Sea as part of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study / Arabian Sea Process Studies (JGOFS/Arabian) project, from 1995-07-17 to 1995-09-15 (NODC Accession 9800037)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, temperature, pressure, and salinity data were collected using bottle and CTD casts from the R/V Thomas G. Thompson in the Arabian Sea. Data were collected...

  18. Kepiga korda loomas / Kaisa Karu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karu, Kaisa

    2010-01-01

    Režissöör Susanna White'i koguperefilmist "Nanny McPhee ja suur pauk" (USA-Prantsuse-Suurbritannia, 2009). Film tugineb Christiana Brandi raamatutel "Nurse Matilda". Stsenaariumi kirjutas ja peaosa kehastab Emma Thompson

  19. Paraquat poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herbicide). In the past, the United States encouraged Mexico to use it to destroy marijuana plants. Later, ... Saunders; 2016:chap 75. Welker K, Thompson TM. Pesticides. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, ...

  20. 75 FR 65261 - Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act; Public Accommodation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... Condominium Ass'n, 2005 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 41601 (November 22, 2005) (condominium buildings may be covered as... characteristics normally associated with a hotel, motel, or inn); Thompson v. Sand Cliffs Owners Ass'n, Inc., 1998...

  1. 75 FR 27616 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    .... Collins, William A. Donais, Lance L. Fuller, Johnny Gardner, Jr., Gregory S. Ghent, Mark D. Golden.... Sironen, Rodney L. Stoltenberg, David Switala, Stanley C. Tarvidas, Jim D. Thomas, Florence E. Thompson...

  2. 78 FR 39727 - FFP Missouri 2, LLC; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service List for a Programmatic Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ..., MA Melacon Drive, Marksville, LA 02114. 71351. Dr. Ian Thompson, THPO, Choctaw Nation Emman Spain.... If historic properties might be identified within the motion, please use a separate page and label it...

  3. An analysis of the use of mass appraisal methods for agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is important for relevant stakeholders such as valuers, financial institutions ... Thompson (2008: 1) argued that quantitative methods are under- going a massive ...... Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, 16(4), pp. 369-385. https://doi.

  4. 151---8 Dec 2009.indd [ Final version].indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-08

    Dec 8, 2009 ... and sustained polemic against Paul himself. (Sim 2002:777). Here Sim .... implicit points resemble Luke's more explicit presentation in .... I now turn my attention. Matthew's ...... in memory of William G. Thompson, pp. 22–41 ...

  5. 77 FR 49782 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Hearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... hour after the hearing start time, the hearing may be closed. Some GPS navigation units may provide... prior to the hearing date. Dated: August 14, 2012. Tracey L. Thompson, Acting Deputy Director, Office of...

  6. 77 FR 22285 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... halfway through a hearing or later, the hearing may be closed. Some GPS navigation units may provide.... Dated: April 10, 2012. Tracey L. Thompson, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National...

  7. Carbuncle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to determine the bacteria causing the infection (bacterial culture). The test result helps your provider determine the ... Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee & Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  8. 50 CFR 660.330 - Open access fishery-management measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....S./Mexico border) is permitted within the nontrawl RCA with fixed gear only under the following... coordinates at §§ 660.398-.399: Thompson Seamount, President Jackson Seamount, Cordell Bank (50-fm (91-m...

  9. Mountaineering Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Maher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: Mountaineering Tourism Edited by Ghazali Musa, James Higham, and Anna Thompson-Carr. Abingdon, United Kingdom: Routledge, 2015. xxvi + 358 pp. Hardcover. US$ 145.00. ISBN 978-1-138-78237-2.

  10. Bedrock geologic map of the town of Williston, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG07-4, Kim, J., Gale, M., Thompson, P.J. and Derman, K., 2007, Bedrock geologic map of the town of Williston, Vermont: Vermont Geological Survey...

  11. Meperidine hydrochloride overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JG, ed. Emergency Medicine . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 147. Lank PM, Kusin S. Ethanol ... JG, ed. Emergency Medicine . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 154. Nikolaides JK, Thompson TM. ...

  12. CrossTalk: The Journal of Defense Software Engineering. Volume 20, Number 11, November 2007

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    ...: Partnership for Project Success." Jennifer Tucker and Hile Rutledge describe the necessity of maximizing team performance in "Shaping Motivation and Emotion in Technology Teams," and Kasey Thompson and Tim Border teach managers...

  13. Fatty acids in sediments and phytoplankton data were collected from the Equatorial Pacific Ocean as part of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study/Equatorial Pacific Basin Study (JGOFS/EQPAC) project., from 1992-02-03 to 1992-12-13 (NODC Accession 9700180)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fatty acids in sediments and phytoplankton data were collected using plankton tow, sediments sampler - corer, pump and CTD casts from the R/V THOMAS THOMPSON in the...

  14. Heavy Metals in Soils and Tomatoes Grown in Urban Fringe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    4Dept. of Industrial Safety and Environmental Management, Delta State School of Marine Technology, Warri, Nigeria. ... nutrients, which are usually in short supply (Thompson and Kelly, 1990). ..... Health risk assessment of ... food chains.

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Extracted Heights from Topographic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abebrese

    1 Department of Geomatic Engineering, KNUST, Ghana. 2 Building ... investigate numerical techniques that could improve the solution to the Thompson's polynomial. ..... Geo-EAS (Geostatistical Environment Assessment Software) Las Vegas.

  16. Celebration of Scientific Anniversaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of the Electron 100 years ago by J.J.Thompson is celebrated. Details about the discovery is reviewed. A longer nonpublished article on the subject is available from the author.......The discovery of the Electron 100 years ago by J.J.Thompson is celebrated. Details about the discovery is reviewed. A longer nonpublished article on the subject is available from the author....

  17. Environmental magnetism and application in the continental shelf sediments of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.

    contamination in soils and sediments and in the investigation of the compositional properties of rocks, sediments and soils (Thompson and Oldfield, 1986; Walden et al., 1999; Maher and Thompson, 1999). Magnetic minerals in soils are derived either from... to the magnetic properties of soils. Accumulation of anthropogenic ferrimagnetic particles, originating during high temperature combustion of fossil fuels (e.g. Vassilev 1992; Dekkers and Pietersen 1992), results in significant enhancement of topsoil magnetic...

  18. Risk Quantification for Sustaining Coastal Military Installation Asset and Mission Capabilities (RC-1701)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-06

    5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Risk Quantification for Sustaining Coastal Military Installation Asset and Mission Capabilities (RC-1701) 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) wind model TC96 (Thompson and Cardone 1996), 2) Surge has been simulated using the ADvanced CIRCulation model ADCIRC...coefficient, and h is the depth of the PBL (Thompson and Cardone 1996). The cyclone pressure is defined by an axisymmetrical exponential pressure or by

  19. Risk Quantification for Sustaining Coastal Military Installation Assets and Mission Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Sustaining Coastal Military Assets and 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Mission Capabilities: Final Technical Report 5b. GRANT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Burks-Copes...critical assets system wide: 1) Hurricane winds have been generated using the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) wind model TC96 (Thompson and Cardone 1996...mean air density, pc is pressure representing the tropical cyclone, CD is the drag coefficient, and h is the depth of the PBL (Thompson and Cardone

  20. The Revision of FM 3-24 is Overdue: Rethinking Classical Counterinsurgency to Defeat Contemporary Insurgents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    in the 1950s and 1960s, in particular, French officer David Galula and British officer Sir Robert Thompson, respectively. Contemporary experts are...relates to its heavy reliance on examples provided from the “ glorious heyday of revolutionary warfare” between 1950 and 1970 where Thompson and Galula... food supplies after the harvest to ensure that it is distributed effectively over the year until the next harvest. This is an important

  1. Attention as an Organ System: Implications for Education, Training and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    the field of cognitive neuroscience as part of the Office of Naval Research?s Distinguished Lecture Series 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16...2002 P 1980osner, P 1980osner, Thompson, et al 2005 Thompson et al 2005 AUTISM AND ORIENTING EXECUTIVE NETWORK CONFLICT SELF REGULATION STROOP... EFFECT BLUE GREEN Yellow Red COGNITION ANDEMOTIONAL CONTROL IN THE CINGULATE CORTEX BUSH, LUU & POSNER, 2000 Linking Self-Regulation and Attention

  2. Ensemble Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xiuyuan; Van Roy, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Thompson sampling has emerged as an effective heuristic for a broad range of online decision problems. In its basic form, the algorithm requires computing and sampling from a posterior distribution over models, which is tractable only for simple special cases. This paper develops ensemble sampling, which aims to approximate Thompson sampling while maintaining tractability even in the face of complex models such as neural networks. Ensemble sampling dramatically expands on the range of applica...

  3. Common scale features of the recent Greek and Serbian church chant traditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peno Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to show the similarity between the Serbian and Greek Post-Byzantine chanting traditions, especially those which relate to the scale organization of modes. Three teachers and reformers from Constantinople, Chrisantos, Gregorios and Chourmousios, established a fairly firm theoretical system for the first time during the long history of church chant. One of the main results of their reform, beside changes relating to neums, was the assignment of strict sizes to the intervals in the natural tonal system. There are three kinds of natural scales: diatonic, chromatic and encharmonic. They all have their place in the Greek Anastasimatarion chant book, whose first edition was prepared by Petar Peloponesios, and later edited by Ionnes Protopsaltes. The first, first plagal and forth plagal modes are diatonic in each of their melos, with very few exceptions; the second and second plagal are soft and hard chromatic, while the third and varis are encharmonic. It is important to note that the Greek chanter is very conscious of the scale foundation of the melody, so he begins to chant the apechima foremost, the intonation formula that comprehends all indisposed details to enter the adequate mode, i. e. melos. One mode could use one sort of scale for all groups of melodies - melos. However, in some modes there are different melos, whose scale organisation is not equal at all. That means that it is not proper to equate mode with scale, but rather to look for the specific scale's shape through the melodies that belong to the melos. The absence of formal Serbian church music theory and, especially, the very conservative way in which church melodies are learnt by ear and by heart, has caused significant gaps, which preclude an adequate approach to the essentional principals of Serbian chant. Over the years many Serbian chanters and musicians have noted down church melodies, especially those from the Octoechos, in F or in G, with the key

  4. 'Praise beyond Words': Psalm 150 as grand finale of the crescendo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    2010-09-01

    Sep 1, 2010 ... historical approaches to the interpretation of the Book of Psalms, Psalm 150 can be interpreted as part of the ..... as the climatic doxology of the final Hallel.16. Text and ...... rhythm and melody, or contact with the divine; they.

  5. Novel Music Segmentation Interface and the Jazz Tune Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez López, M.E.; Bountouridis, D.; Volk, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present MOSSA, an easy-to-use interface for mobile devices, developed to annotate the segment structure of music. Moreover, we present the jazz tune collection (JTC), a database of 125 Jazz melodies annotated using MOSSA, and developed specifically for benchmarking of computational

  6. Using character valence in computer generated music to produce variation aligned to a storyline

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Featherstone, Coral

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is to describes a method for interposing computer generated melody with tone linked to unique entities within the text of a novel. Background: A recent study describing a piece of software called “TransProse” has already shown...

  7. 77 FR 59085 - Final Waivers and Extensions of Project Periods; American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ...) Number: 84.250C] AGENCY: Rehabilitation Services Administration, Office of Special Education and...), provide vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians with disabilities who reside on or near... documents published by the Department. Dated: September 20, 2012. Melody Musgrove, Director of Special...

  8. Experiencia Pedagogica con Adolescentes Paraliticos Cerebrales: La Musica, Un Elemento Rehabilitador (A Pedagogical Experience with Teenage Cerebral Paralytics Using Music as a Rehabilitating Element).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer, Marta; And Others

    The monograph describes efforts carried out in the Department of Work Therapy of a center for cerebral paralysis in Barcelona, Spain. The rehabilitation program incorporated music and movement in an attempt to develop the musical ear, sensitivity, and a sensorial education. The program stresses rhythm, melody, harmony, voice, musical audition, and…

  9. Pitch and tonality in contemporary African music: Nigerian gospel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Like melody, language and rhythm, pitch and tonality are major indicators of African identity in music. In traditional African musical forms, these elements are obvious, but in contemporary African musical expressions which are influenced by several external factors, it is necessary to know the extent to which the elements ...

  10. Long Intonations and Kalophonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The paper shows that the melodic material in quasi-improvised intonation melodies (echemata) in the period from c. 1200 to 1400 develop from being drawn from the traditional genres - especially the pasltikon and asmatikon - to acquiring a more free and decidely 'kalophonic' character....

  11. Subdividing the beat: auditory and motor contributions to synchronization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loehr, J.D.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    THE CURRENT STUDY EXAMINED HOW AUDITORY AND kinematic information influenced pianists' ability to synchronize musical sequences with a metronome. Pianists performed melodies in which quarter-note beats were subdivided by intervening eighth notes that resulted from auditory information (heard tones),

  12. Instrumental Techniques: Guitar, Course Number: Music: 5631.3-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennitt, Barth; Thum, Marie-Jo

    A course which is an introduction to music emphasizing modes and forms is outlined. Objectives include: (1) The student will select the title of a familiar melody from a list provided; (2) The student will identify by ear the performing medium from the following choices: violin, voice, piano, guitar, clarinet, trombone, organ, string bass,…

  13. Learning Science Using Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinski, Keith

    2011-01-01

    For thousands of years, people have used music to transfer information and narrate stories. The musical structure, consisting of words set to melodies in rhythmic patterns, made the content easier to remember. Researchers have investigated the long- and short-term effects of song on memory and found that music aided in the recall of information.…

  14. MetaCompose: A Compositional Evolutionary Music Composer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scirea, Marco; Togelius, Julian; Eklund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a compositional, extensible framework for music composition and a user study to systematically evaluate its core components. These components include a graph traversal-based chord sequence generator, a search-based melody generator and a pattern-based accompaniment generator...

  15. Audio-Visual Integration Modifies Emotional Judgment in Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Yuan Su

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The conventional view that perceived emotion in music is derived mainly from auditory signals has led to neglect of the contribution of visual image. In this study, we manipulated mode (major vs. minor and examined the influence of a video image on emotional judgment in music. Melodies in either major or minor mode were controlled for tempo and rhythm and played to the participants. We found that Taiwanese participants, like Westerners, judged major melodies as expressing positive, and minor melodies negative, emotions. The major or minor melodies were then paired with video images of the singers, which were either emotionally congruent or incongruent with their modes. Results showed that participants perceived stronger positive or negative emotions with congruent audio-visual stimuli. Compared to listening to music alone, stronger emotions were perceived when an emotionally congruent video image was added and weaker emotions were perceived when an incongruent image was added. We therefore demonstrate that mode is important to perceive the emotional valence in music and that treating musical art as a purely auditory event might lose the enhanced emotional strength perceived in music, since going to a concert may lead to stronger perceived emotion than listening to the CD at home.

  16. [The role of temporal fine structure in tone recognition and music perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Gu, X; Liu, B

    2017-11-07

    The sound signal can be decomposed into temporal envelope and temporal fine structure information. The temporal envelope information is crucial for speech perception in quiet environment, and the temporal fine structure information plays an important role in speech perception in noise, Mandarin tone recognition and music perception, especially the pitch and melody perception.

  17. Making Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckstep, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Contends teachers must resist the temptation to suggest that, while children can create stories and melodies, they cannot create mathematics. Quotes mathematician G. H. Hardy: "A mathematician, like a painter or poet, is a 'maker' of patterns." Considers mathematics should be able to stand up for itself. (BT)

  18. Results of a pilot study on the involvement of bilateral inferior frontal gyri in emotional prosody perception: an rTMS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekert, Marjolijn; Vingerhoets, Guy; Aleman, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Background: The right hemisphere may play an important role in paralinguistic features such as the emotional melody in speech. The extent of this involvement however is unclear. Imaging studies have shown involvement of both left and right inferior frontal gyri in emotional prosody perception. The

  19. Musical and Verbal Memory in Alzheimer's Disease: A Study of Long-Term and Short-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Marie-Claude; Belleville, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    Musical memory was tested in Alzheimer patients and in healthy older adults using long-term and short-term memory tasks. Long-term memory (LTM) was tested with a recognition procedure using unfamiliar melodies. Short-term memory (STM) was evaluated with same/different judgment tasks on short series of notes. Musical memory was compared to verbal…

  20. Pop / Tõnu Kaalep

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaalep, Tõnu, 1966-2018

    2007-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Chicago "XXX", Love Of Diagrams "Love Of Diagrams", James Holden "The Idiots Are Winning", Melody Club "Scream", Yo La Tengo "I Am Not Afraid Of You And I Will Beat Your Ass", Mogwai "Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait (OST)"

  1. Music Appreciation and Technology: An Evaluation of a Creativity-Based Approach Using a MIDI Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Ernest R.; Heeler, Phillip J.

    One component of a model of creativity, the application of an understanding of elements, was explored through a study of college students applying their understanding of such musical elements as harmony, melody, rhythm, timbre, and dynamics. The 24 subjects were students in a music appreciation class, and the project was implemented using a…

  2. Player Collaboration in the Explorative Sound Environment ToneInk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Marie S.; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2016-01-01

    mutual awareness, and in general were more passive when they needed to monitor a screen interface that supported the sound environment. Player collaboration was strongest when players negotiated rhythm, while the negotiation of melody was temporally offset and consisted of long individual explorations....

  3. The perception of musical spontaneity in improvised and imitated jazz performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annerose eEngel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to evaluate spontaneity in human behavior is called upon in the aesthetic appreciation of dramatic arts and music. The current study addresses the behavioral and brain mechanisms that mediate the perception of spontaneity in music performance. In a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging experiment, 22 jazz musicians listened to piano melodies and judged whether they were improvised or imitated. Judgment accuracy (mean 55%; range 44-65%, which was low but above chance, was positively correlated with musical experience and empathy. Analysis of listeners’ hemodynamic responses revealed that amygdala activation was stronger for improvisations than imitations. This activation correlated with the variability of performance timing and intensity (loudness in the melodies, suggesting that the amygdala is involved in the detection of behavioral uncertainty. An analysis based on the subjective classification of melodies according to listeners’ judgments revealed that a network including the pre-supplementary motor area, frontal operculum, and anterior insula was most strongly activated for melodies judged to be improvised. This may reflect the increased engagement of an action simulation network when melodic predictions are rendered challenging due to perceived instability in the performer’s actions. Taken together, our results suggest that, while certain brain regions in skilled individuals may be generally sensitive to objective cues to spontaneity in human behavior, the ability to evaluate spontaneity accurately depends upon whether an individual’s action-related experience and perspective taking skills enable faithful internal simulation of the given behavior.

  4. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Noam Chomsky titled 'Language and Freedom'. Rahul describes the principal universal aspects of music, and the difficulties of defining objectively the subjective qualities of pleasant melodies and sounds on the one hand and jarring ones on the other. He concentrates on Western classical music, and in particular on the ...

  5. Neural and Behavioral Correlates of Song Prosody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Reyna Leigh

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation studies the neural basis of song, a universal human behavior. The relationship of words and melodies in the perception of song at phonological, semantic, melodic, and rhythmic levels of processing was investigated using the fine temporal resolution of Electroencephalography (EEG). The observations reported here may shed light on…

  6. The Effects of Harmonic Accompaniment on the Tonal Improvisations of Students in First through Sixth Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbault, Denise Marie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of harmonic accompaniment on the tonal improvisations of elementary school students. Specifically, this study was designed to (a) determine if the addition of a root melody accompaniment to song instruction affects the implied harmonic changes and harmonic rhythm in the tonal improvisations…

  7. Idea Bank: I Can't Do That! Improvisation for Classically Trained Musicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonviri, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The Partnership for 21st Century Skills lists among its top priorities for students the development of "learning and innovation skills," of which the first are "creativity and innovation." The third National Standard from the National Association for Music Education is "Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments." These guiding…

  8. JPRS Report, Near East & South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-28

    34 a socio-economic essay whose gist is that the world financial casino finances the world money printer, the economy of the United States. Just...JPRS-NEA-90-054 28 September 1990 "Neither the melody nor the lyrics express the Zionist revolution, but ’Hatiqvah’ was sanctified in ceremonies in

  9. Effects of tempo and timing of simple musical rhythms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repp, B.H.; Windsor, W.L.; Desain, P.W.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether and how the timing of musical rhythms changes with tempo. Twelve skilled pianists played a monophonic 8-bar melody in 21 different rhythmic versions at 4 different tempi. Within bars, the rhythms represented all possible ordered pairs and triplets of note values

  10. A socio-musical analysis of Ayo Bankole's choral music: Fun Mi N ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... diverse African elements and major features of African music are present in the melody, rhythm and harmony of the vocal work. The paper concluded that Fun Mi N'Ibeji contained both elements of traditional Nigerian music and Western classical music which are employed in expressing the traditional beliefs of the Yoruba ...

  11. Aquatic Sentinels Forecasting Human Exposure To Emerging Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most of us have heard the axiom, “canary in the coal mine”. These melodious exposure indicators - a necessity in U.K. mines well into the 20th century - were especially sensitive to methane and carbon monoxide gases, and would cease singing (and oftentimes die) at le...

  12. The Guide to Teaching with Popular Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music Educators National Conference, Reston, VA.

    Popular music is often characterized as a short work with a prominent melody and simple chordal accompaniment. Yet, teaching with pop music in the era of standards-based curriculum can present challenges. These standards offer teachers a blueprint for teaching music performance, composition, improvisation, and the relationship of music to other…

  13. Factors Influencing Pop Music Preferences of Young Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, J. David; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Examined and compared self-reported reasons for pop music preferences of 397 students in grades five, seven, nine, eleven, and college. Results revealed that characteristics such as melody, mood, rhythm, and lyrics were the most important reasons for selection. Differences in response by age and background characteristics were noted. (Author/SJL)

  14. Curricular Content for Pupils' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Seyed Hossein; Keshtiaray, Narges; Aghaei, Asghar; Yousefy, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Present-day curricular designs have to take the pupils' psychological needs in account, thus becoming melodies of mental health and happiness for the next generation. Emphasizing the findings from previous investigations using the research synthesis methodology, the present study has been conducted aiming at achieving some integrative knowledge…

  15. Emotional ornamentation in performances of a Handel sonata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, R.; Ashley, R.

    2007-01-01

    ORNAMENTATION IS ONE ASPECT OF MUSIC ASSOCIATED with emotional affect in Baroque music. In an empirical study, the relationship between ornamentation and emotion was investigated by asking a violinist and flutist to ornament three melodies in different ways to express four emotions: happiness,

  16. An unusual case of coronary artery compression that did not preclude successful transcatheter pulmonary valve placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Matthew C; Felix, Donald; Iacono, Karen; Nykanen, David

    2018-04-16

    During transcatheter pulmonary valve placement, coronary compression observed during simultaneous right ventricular outflow tract angioplasty and coronary angiography typically contraindicates valve implantation. We present a unique patient with tetralogy of Fallot who underwent successful transcatheter Melody valve placement despite coronary compression observed during right ventricular outflow tract balloon angioplasty. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Cognitive rehabilitation of amusia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill-Chounlamountry, A; Soyez-Gayout, L; Tessier, C; Pradat-Diehl, P

    2008-06-01

    The cognitive model of music processing has a modular architecture with two main pathways (a melody pathway and a time pathway) for processing the musical "message" and thus enabling music recognition. It also features a music-specific module for tonal encoding of pitch which stands apart from all other known cognitive systems (including language processing). To the best of our knowledge, rehabilitation therapy for amusia has not yet been reported. We developed a therapeutic method (inspired by work on word deafness) in order to determine whether specific rehabilitation based on melody discrimination could prompt the regression of amusia. We report the case of a patient having developed receptive, acquired amusia four years previously. His tone deafness disorder was assessed using the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA), which revealed impairment of the melody pathway but no deficiency in the time pathway. A computer-assisted rehabilitation method was implemented; it used melody discrimination tasks and an errorless learning paradigm with progressively fading visual cues. After therapy, we noted an improvement in the overall MBEA score and its component subscores which could not be explained by spontaneous recovery (in view of the number of years since the neurological accident). The improvement was maintained at seven months post-therapy. Although post-therapy improvement in daily life was not systematically assessed, the patient started listening to his favourite music again. Specific amusia therapy has shown efficacy.

  18. Laterality for music perception in musicians, mathematicians, and dancers: jumping to conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, H W

    1993-06-01

    Group differences for ear asymmetries for a melodies task were reported for talented music, mathematics, and dance students. Evidence is presented that it is premature to conclude that these group differences were the result of specialized training in their areas of expertise.

  19. Shaping Your Own Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peijnenburg, J

    A distinction is made between imagination in the narrow sense and in the broad sense. Narrow imagination is characterised as the ability to "see" pictures in the mind's eye or to "hear" melodies in the head. Broad imagination is taken to be the faculty of creating, either in the strict sense of

  20. Defining African traditional musical traits: Resource material for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... descending melodic line, the pentatonic and non-pentatonic scales, speech inflected melody, melisma and embellishment, preference for thirds, form, lack of modulations and texture. It could be concluded that indigenous African music has a potential for development from a utilitarian (functional) to an abstract (art for art's ...

  1. The perception of musical spontaneity in improvised and imitated jazz performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Annerose; Keller, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    The ability to evaluate spontaneity in human behavior is called upon in the esthetic appreciation of dramatic arts and music. The current study addresses the behavioral and brain mechanisms that mediate the perception of spontaneity in music performance. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, 22 jazz musicians listened to piano melodies and judged whether they were improvised or imitated. Judgment accuracy (mean 55%; range 44-65%), which was low but above chance, was positively correlated with musical experience and empathy. Analysis of listeners' hemodynamic responses revealed that amygdala activation was stronger for improvisations than imitations. This activation correlated with the variability of performance timing and intensity (loudness) in the melodies, suggesting that the amygdala is involved in the detection of behavioral uncertainty. An analysis based on the subjective classification of melodies according to listeners' judgments revealed that a network including the pre-supplementary motor area, frontal operculum, and anterior insula was most strongly activated for melodies judged to be improvised. This may reflect the increased engagement of an action simulation network when melodic predictions are rendered challenging due to perceived instability in the performer's actions. Taken together, our results suggest that, while certain brain regions in skilled individuals may be generally sensitive to objective cues to spontaneity in human behavior, the ability to evaluate spontaneity accurately depends upon whether an individual's action-related experience and perspective taking skills enable faithful internal simulation of the given behavior.

  2. 1/f noise in music and speech. [Power spectrum studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, R.F.; Clarke, J.

    1975-11-27

    The power spectrum, S(f), of many fluctuating physical variables, V(t), is approximately ''1/f-like.'' Loudness fluctuations in music and speech and pitch (melody) fluctuations in music were found to exhibit 1/f power spectra. This observation has implications for stochastic music composition. 3 figures. (RWR)

  3. Auditory Stream Segregation in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Benefits and Downsides of Superior Perceptual Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Lucie; Mottron, Laurent; Valdois, Sylviane; Donnadieu, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Auditory stream segregation allows us to organize our sound environment, by focusing on specific information and ignoring what is unimportant. One previous study reported difficulty in stream segregation ability in children with Asperger syndrome. In order to investigate this question further, we used an interleaved melody recognition task with…

  4. A Dynamical Model of Pitch Memory Provides an Improved Basis for Implied Harmony Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Chul

    2017-01-01

    Tonal melody can imply vertical harmony through a sequence of tones. Current methods for automatic chord estimation commonly use chroma-based features extracted from audio signals. However, the implied harmony of unaccompanied melodies can be difficult to estimate on the basis of chroma content in the presence of frequent nonchord tones. Here we present a novel approach to automatic chord estimation based on the human perception of pitch sequences. We use cohesion and inhibition between pitches in auditory short-term memory to differentiate chord tones and nonchord tones in tonal melodies. We model short-term pitch memory as a gradient frequency neural network, which is a biologically realistic model of auditory neural processing. The model is a dynamical system consisting of a network of tonotopically tuned nonlinear oscillators driven by audio signals. The oscillators interact with each other through nonlinear resonance and lateral inhibition, and the pattern of oscillatory traces emerging from the interactions is taken as a measure of pitch salience. We test the model with a collection of unaccompanied tonal melodies to evaluate it as a feature extractor for chord estimation. We show that chord tones are selectively enhanced in the response of the model, thereby increasing the accuracy of implied harmony estimation. We also find that, like other existing features for chord estimation, the performance of the model can be improved by using segmented input signals. We discuss possible ways to expand the present model into a full chord estimation system within the dynamical systems framework. PMID:28522983

  5. Long-Term Memory for Music: Infants Remember Tempo and Timbre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Laurel J.; Wu, Luann; Tsang, Christine D.

    2004-01-01

    We show that infants' long-term memory representations for melodies are not just reduced to the structural features of relative pitches and durations, but contain surface or performance tempo- and timbre-specific information. Using a head turn preference procedure, we found that after a one week exposure to an old English folk song, infants…

  6. Crosslinguistic Perception of Pitch in Language and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Evan David

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the ways in which experience with lexical tone influences the perception of musical melody, and how musical training influences the perception of lexical tone. The central theoretical basis for the study is a model of perceptual learning, Reverse Hierarchy Theory (Ahissar et al., 2009), in which cognitive processes…

  7. The Rise and Fall of a Songwriting Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The working relationship of two novice songwriters is examined in this ethnographic study, which highlights the importance of common goals and values in a songwriting collaboration. Stemming from this core there are a number of sub-themes: the pair saw a popular song as consisting of melody, harmony, and lyrics; they played on the strengths and…

  8. Assessment of the impacts of the French nuclear program on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudet, G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is an assessment of the impact of the French nuclear program on investments, on electricity price, on electricity and energy demand and especially on environment. The impact on atmosphere pollution which is based on a macro economic long term model (called MELODY), particularly detailed for the energy sector, is outlined. (TEC). 10 figs., 1 tab., 4 refs

  9. Acoustic Communication in Birds-Differences in Songs and Calls ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Songs, calls and visual displays of the Oriental magpie robin have been studied in detail. In northern India, this species breeds between May and August raising several broods. During this period, males sing complex and melodious songs in their respective territories for the advertisement of territories and mate acquisition.

  10. Studying Variation in Tunes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, B.; van Kranenburg, P.

    2014-01-01

    Variation in music can be caused by different phenomena: conscious, creative manipulation of musical ideas; but also unconscious variation during music recall. It is the latter phenomenon that we wish to study: variation which occurs in oral transmission, in which a melody is taught without the help

  11. 76 FR 70711 - Senior Executive Service; Performance Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... L BEKKEDAHL, LARRY N BELL, MELODY C BIENIAWSKI, ANDREW J BIERBOWER, WILLIAM J BISHOP, CLARENCE T... BROWN, FRED L BROWN, STEPHANIE H BRUCE, SANDRA D BRYAN, PAUL F BRYAN, WILLIAM N BURROWS, CHARLES W BUTTRESS, LARRY D BUZZARD, CHRISTINE M CADIEUX, GENA E CALBOS, PHILIP T CALLAHAN, SAMUEL N CAMPAGNONE, MARI...

  12. 75 FR 69061 - Senior Executive Service; Performance Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ..., Linda C Burrows, Charles W Buttress, Larry D Buzzard, Christine M Cadieux, Gena E Callahan, Samuel N... Bekkedahl, Larry N Bell, Melody C Berkowitz, Barry E Bieniawski, Andrew J Bishop, Clarence T Bishop, Tracey..., Douglas E Kane, Michael C Kaplan, Stan M Kearney, James H Kelly, Henry C Kelly, Larry C Kenchington, Henry...

  13. 78 FR 70027 - Senior Executive Service; Performance Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ..., WILLIAM N. BURROWS, CHARLES W. BUTTRESS, LARRY D. CADIEUX, GENA E. CALBOS, PHILIP T. CALLAHAN, SAMUEL N..., LARRY N. BELL, MELODY C. BESTANI, ROBERT M. BIENIAWSKI, ANDREW J. BIERBOWER, WILLIAM J. BINKLEY, JOHN S..., STAN M. KEARNEY, JAMES H. KELLY, HENRY C. KELLY, JOHN E. KELLY, LARRY C. KENCHINGTON, HENRY S. KENDELL...

  14. Modeling pitch perception of complex tones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtsma, A.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    When one listens to a series of harmonic complex tones that have no acoustic energy at their fundamental frequencies, one usually still hears a melody that corresponds to those missing fundamentals. Since it has become evident some two decades ago that neither Helmholtz's difference tone theory nor

  15. Neural Correlates of Music Recognition in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virji-Babul, N.; Moiseev, A.; Sun, W.; Feng, T.; Moiseeva, N.; Watt, K. J.; Huotilainen, M.

    2013-01-01

    The brain mechanisms that subserve music recognition remain unclear despite increasing interest in this process. Here we report the results of a magnetoencephalography experiment to determine the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of brain regions activated during listening to a familiar and unfamiliar instrumental melody in control adults…

  16. O perníkové chaloupce na Hukvaldech aneb Lidka Sládkvá vypráví Janáčkovi pohádku

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Jarmila

    -, č. 10 (2006), s. 91-92 ISSN 1801-4755 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90580513 Keywords : Leoš Janáček * melodies of speech * Moravian folk tale * Hukvaldy Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  17. Music Outlier Detection Using Multiple Sequence Alignment and Independent Ensembles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bountouridis, D.; Koops, Hendrik Vincent; Wiering, F.; Veltkamp, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    The automated retrieval of related music documents, such as cover songs or folk melodies belonging to the same tune, has been an important task in the field of Music Information Retrieval (MIR). Yet outlier detection, the process of identifying those documents that deviate significantly from the

  18. Symbolic Segmentation: A Corpus-Based Analysis of Melodic Phrases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez López, M.E.; Volk, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Gestalt-based segmentation models constitute the current state of the art in automatic segmentation of melodies. These models commonly assume that segment boundary perception is mainly triggered by local discontinuities, i.e. by abrupt changes in pitch and/or duration between neighbouring notes.

  19. Developing Singing in Third-Grade Music Classrooms: The Effect of a Concurrent-Feedback Computer Game on Pitch-Matching Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paney, Andrew S.; Kay, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of concurrent visual feedback on pitch-matching skill development in third-grade students. Participants played a computer game, "SingingCoach," which scored the accuracy of their singing of the song "America." They followed the contour of the melody on the screen as the…

  20. Auditory-motor learning influences auditory memory for music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel M; Palmer, Caroline

    2012-05-01

    In two experiments, we investigated how auditory-motor learning influences performers' memory for music. Skilled pianists learned novel melodies in four conditions: auditory only (listening), motor only (performing without sound), strongly coupled auditory-motor (normal performance), and weakly coupled auditory-motor (performing along with auditory recordings). Pianists' recognition of the learned melodies was better following auditory-only or auditory-motor (weakly coupled and strongly coupled) learning than following motor-only learning, and better following strongly coupled auditory-motor learning than following auditory-only learning. Auditory and motor imagery abilities modulated the learning effects: Pianists with high auditory imagery scores had better recognition following motor-only learning, suggesting that auditory imagery compensated for missing auditory feedback at the learning stage. Experiment 2 replicated the findings of Experiment 1 with melodies that contained greater variation in acoustic features. Melodies that were slower and less variable in tempo and intensity were remembered better following weakly coupled auditory-motor learning. These findings suggest that motor learning can aid performers' auditory recognition of music beyond auditory learning alone, and that motor learning is influenced by individual abilities in mental imagery and by variation in acoustic features.