WorldWideScience

Sample records for grocery products brokers

  1. Toward retail product recognition on grocery shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Gül; Kuzu, Rıdvan S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of retail product recognition on grocery shelf images. We present a technique for accomplishing this task with a low time complexity. We decompose the problem into detection and recognition. The former is achieved by a generic product detection module which is trained on a specific class of products (e.g. tobacco packages). Cascade object detection framework of Viola and Jones [1] is used for this purpose. We further make use of Support Vector Machines (SVMs) to recognize the brand inside each detected region. We extract both shape and color information; and apply feature-level fusion from two separate descriptors computed with the bag of words approach. Furthermore, we introduce a dataset (available on request) that we have collected for similar research purposes. Results are presented on this dataset of more than 5,000 images consisting of 10 tobacco brands. We show that satisfactory detection and classification can be achieved on devices with cheap computational power. Potential applications of the proposed approach include planogram compliance control, inventory management and assisting visually impaired people during shopping.

  2. An innovative approach to the development of consumer-oriented grocery products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Viktorovna Leyberova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data on the development of products with specified application properties based on the descriptor methods of analysis. Especially important is the development of specialized products, including confectionery products for people with celiac disease, taking into account the relatively high prevalence of this disease. In development of grocery products, the priority indicators of grocery quality are the organoleptic advantages of the product (attractive taste and flavour, nutritional value and safety. Studies have shown that main consumer preferences are: products of highest quality with natural flavour and texture, made according to traditional methods and of natural ingredients. The degree of satisfaction of human needs for food should be determined not only by the level of conformity of the actual commodity consumption (describing the quantitative parameters of consumption, but compliance with a number of subjective parameters that characterize the quality of food consumption. It is determined that by using an innovative approach to product development with prescribed consumer properties using generalized index of quality, it is possible to create products demanded by certain groups of consumers.

  3. Prevalence of Artificial Food Colors in Grocery Store Products Marketed to Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batada, Ameena; Jacobson, Michael F

    2016-10-01

    Artificial food colors (AFCs) in foods and beverages may be harmful to children. This study assesses the percentage of grocery store products marketed to children that contain AFCs, by category and company. The research team collected product and food-color information about 810 products in one grocery store in North Carolina in 2014. Overall, 350 products (43.2%) contained AFCs. The most common AFCs were Red 40 (29.8% of products), Blue 1 (24.2%), Yellow 5 (20.5%), and Yellow 6 (19.5%). Produce was the only category that did not have any AFCs. The highest percentage of products with AFCs was found in candies (96.3%), fruit-flavored snacks (94%), and drink mixes/powders (89.7%). Forty-one of the 66 companies marketed products containing AFCs. Given concerns about health effects of AFCs and high proportions of high-AFC categories, clinicians, parents, food companies, and the government can take steps to support children's healthy eating and development by reducing AFCs in children's diets. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. An analysis of Bronx-based online grocery store circulars for nutritional content of food and beverage products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethan, Danna; Samuel, Lalitha; Basch, Corey H

    2013-06-01

    With the rising rates of diabetes and obesity in New York City's poorest communities, efforts to assist low-income residents in spending money to promote nutritious food consumption have increased. The objective of this study was to assess the extent to which Bronx-based grocery stores offered nutritious foods on sale through their weekly circulars. Over a 2-month period, we analyzed 2,311 food and beverage products placed on the first page of online circulars for fifteen Bronx-based grocery stores. For each circular, we recorded the number of starchy and non-starchy fruits and vegetables; for each product, total fiber and carbohydrate content per serving (in grams), whether the product was processed, and sale price were recorded. Total sugar content (in grams) was recorded for all sugar-sweetened beverages. Over 84 % of the products were processed, and almost 40 % had at least one carbohydrate choice (15 g) per food serving. Only 16.5 % of the products were fresh fruits and green leafy vegetables, and 1.4 % had fiber content of 5 or more grams per serving. Requiring the purchase of multiples of unhealthy products to receive the sale price was also noted. Almost three-quarters of the sugar-sweetened beverages were advertised with promotional sales compared to over half of the fresh fruits and only one-third of fresh vegetables. We identified no other studies that address nutritional content of foods found in grocery store circulars. More research is necessary to determine if purchasing nutritious products at grocery stores in low-income neighborhoods is influenced by sale prices.

  5. Online Sales Promotions of Grocery and Other FMCG Products in Chennai Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C.V.J. Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to reveal the online sales promotions of grocery and other FMCG products in Chennai entity along with the explosion of Internet users, Internet has been considered as the new channel for companies implementing their sales promotion activities. Online Sales promotions are generally looked at as tools that undermine the brand; yet a tool that is necessarily meant to speed up sales by attractive promos. Consumer online sales promotion in Chennai entity takes up a large share of the total marketing expenditure despite which it remains an area that still attracts attention as an essential component of the promotion mix meant to increase short term sales. It is therefore not surprising that most of the Chennai marketers resort to sales promotions to attract the competitor's market share. Consequently, this study seeks to offer insight into how popular Chennai online promotions (price-discount, coupon and free shipping influence consumer's quality perception and purchase intentions. Moreover, brand awareness was expected to moderate the relationship between promotion and consumer responses. Findings from this study will be able to provide useful knowledge for online sellers to choose appropriate sales promotion tools to successfully induce consumer's purchase intentions.

  6. A Comparison of the Nutritional Quality of Food Products Advertised in Grocery Store Circulars of High- versus Low-Income New York City Zip Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danna Ethan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Grocery stores can be an important resource for health and nutrition with the variety and economic value of foods offered. Weekly circulars are a means of promoting foods at a sale price. To date, little is known about the extent that nutritious foods are advertised and prominently placed in circulars. This study’s aim was to compare the nutritional quality of products advertised on the front page of online circulars from grocery stores in high- versus low-income neighborhoods in New York City (NYC. Circulars from grocery stores in the five highest and five lowest median household income NYC zip codes were analyzed. Nutrition information for food products was collected over a two-month period with a total of 805 products coded. The study found no significant difference between the nutritional quality of products advertised on the front page of online circulars from grocery stores in high- versus low-income neighborhoods in New York City (NYC. In both groups, almost two-thirds of the products advertised were processed, one-quarter were high in carbohydrates, and few to no products were low-sodium, high-fiber, or reduced-, low- or zero fat. Through innovative partnerships with health professionals, grocery stores are increasingly implementing in-store and online health promotion strategies. Weekly circulars can be used as a means to regularly advertise and prominently place more healthful and seasonal foods at an affordable price, particularly for populations at higher risk for nutrition-related chronic disease.

  7. Consumer protection and grocery

    OpenAIRE

    Sklář, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with consumer protection and grocery section regulations. It's objective is to evaluate whether grocery stores stick to law while selling food and to analyze attitudes and behavior of consumers. The theoretical part deals with definition of consumer and other related concepts and with obligations of food sellers and consumer rights. The practical part consists of three parts that contain expert commentary, own research performed through grocery stores and survey tak...

  8. CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR DURING ONLINE GROCERY SHOPPING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabriela Hanus

    2016-01-01

    .... With online grocery supermarkets there are no limitations connected with localization and opening hours, and consumers have access to a large range of stores and products online across the world...

  9. Grocery E-commerce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Niels; Bjerre, Mogens

    This book attempts to shed light on why it is so difficult to develop and maintain successful businesses in the grocery e-commerce arena. Within the last five years, "Grocery e-commerce" has experienced both consistent successes such as Tesco.com and irrevocable failures such as Webvan.com. Niels...... Kornum and Mogens Bjerre bring key researchers together to investigate the factors contributing to the success of "Grocery e-commerce", particularly in countries that had the earliest and most extensive experiences in this field: the USA, the UK and Scandinavia. The authors argue that "Grocery e-commerce...... country comparisons and new empirical evidence in order to address the long-term prospects for the survival of "Grocery e-commerce". Recommendations as to how managers should respond to its challenges are also made. Academics, students and researchers focussing on marketing, consumer behaviour, logistics...

  10. CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR DURING ONLINE GROCERY SHOPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hanus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Today consumers can buy almost any product using the Internet. Online nutritional and grocery shopping is becoming increasingly popular. The aim of this paper is to present the conditions of online grocery shopping and consumers’ attitude towards buying food via the Internet based. The assessment is based on secondary information sources. With online grocery supermarkets there are no limitations connected with localization and opening hours, and consumers have access to a large range of stores and products online across the world. The most important advantages of online shopping are convenience and time saving, while the most significant disadvantages for consumers involve the risk of incorrectly valuating some products and apprehension about the selection and handling of perishables, such as vegetables, eggs, and meat products.

  11. Knowledge brokering:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    In the recent years a number of studies have explored different inter-organizational search strategies in relation to knowledge brokering and innovation performance. So far there has been very limited research that involves a crossing of both organizational and technological boundaries that also......-organizational search strategy that spans technological boundaries and involves the formation and search among weak ties. The findings show how knowledge brokering is influenced by the make-up of the technology involved, the technological distance between the two parties and why weak ties are less likely to collaborate...... on such an opportunity, than a strong tie would be. Furthermore, a number of organizational enablers for this open inter-organizational search and knowledge brokering strategy are identified. The main arguments point to the role of a general technological competence and the R&D department being the networking department....

  12. Knowledge brokering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine how the spanning of inter-organizational weak ties and technological boundaries influences knowledge brokering. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on original fieldwork and employs a case study research design, investigating a Danish...... HTSF’s inter-organizational activities. Findings – The findings show how an inter-organizational search that crosses technological boundaries and is based on a network structure of weak ties can imply a reduced risk of unwanted knowledge spill-over. Research limitations/implications – By not engaging...... in strong tie collaborations a knowledge brokering organization can reduce the risk of unwanted knowledge spill-over. The risks and opportunities of knowledge spill-over furthermore rely on the nature of the technology involved and to what extent technological boundaries are crossed. Practical implications...

  13. Knowledge brokering:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    In the recent years a number of studies have explored different inter-organizational search strategies in relation to knowledge brokering and innovation performance. So far there has been very limited research that involves a crossing of both organizational and technological boundaries that also...... includes a perspective on the strength of the organizational relation. In this paper, an in-depth case study of a High-Tech-Small-Firm (HTSF) is presented. By combining the literature on inter-organizational search and social networks, the study contributes by showing the implications of an inter......-organizational search strategy that spans technological boundaries and involves the formation and search among weak ties. The findings show how knowledge brokering is influenced by the make-up of the technology involved, the technological distance between the two parties and why weak ties are less likely to collaborate...

  14. Price learning during grocery shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    of what consumers learn about prices during grocery shopping. Three measures of price knowledge corresponding to different levels of price information processing were applied. Results indicate that price learning does take place and that episodic price knowledge after store exit is far more widespread...... than expected. Consequently, a new view of how consumer price knowledge evolves during grocery shopping is presented....

  15. Price learning during grocery shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    Many attempts have been made to measure consumers' price knowledge for groceries. However, the results have varied considerably and conflict with results of reference price research. This is the first study to examine price knowledge before, during, and after store visit, thus enabling a study...... of what consumers learn about prices during grocery shopping. Three measures of price knowledge corresponding to different levels of price information processing were applied. Results indicate that price learning does take place and that episodic price knowledge after store exit is far more widespread...... than expected. Consequently, a new view of how consumer price knowledge evolves during grocery shopping is presented....

  16. Consumer Online Grocery Buying Intention

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Jan Møller; Solgaard, Hans Stubbe

    2003-01-01

    This paper tests the ability of two consumer theories - the theory of reasoned action and the theory of planned behavior - in predicting consumer online grocery buying intention. In addition, a comparison of the two theories is conducted. Data were collected from two web-based surveys of Danish (n=1222) and Swedish (n=1038) consumers using self-administered questionnaires. Lisrel results suggest that the theory of planned behavior (with the inclusion of a path from subjective norm to attitude...

  17. 17 CFR 41.27 - Prohibition of dual trading in security futures products by floor brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... predetermined algorithm, a transaction for the same security futures product on the same designated contract... place advantage or the ability to override a predetermined algorithm must submit an appropriate rule... predetermined algorithm from trading a security futures product for accounts in which these same...

  18. ‘Down-Stream’ Network Characteristics, Broker Functions and New Product Development Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Salomo, Søren; Li, Ying

    2011-01-01

    are becoming an increasingly important part of the system, the so-called Contract Research Organizations (CROs). Therefore, the pharmaceutical industry is an interesting case for exploring the influence of multilevel network relation’s influence on product approvals. In this paper, the connection between...

  19. The evolution of green food products and retailers’ eco-strategizing and green competitiveness in the Danish and Brazilian grocery sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzero, Marcelo Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Grounded on the evolutionary approach, this thesis adds an understanding about the dynamics of the greening of the economy, particularly highlighting the neglected demand side aspect of the greening of markets. Since the emergence of green food markets in the 1980s and 1990s, this study...... investigates the role of retail groups in the development of the green food market in Denmark and Brazil. Accordingly, it investigates the rate and direction of the greening of this process in those markets as well as their sectoral convergence of retailers’ eco-strategizing. Using the dynamic capabilities...... framework, it examines why, how and when the eco-strategizing, green performance and competitiveness of grocery retail groups co-evolved with the development of the green food market in Denmark and Brazil. This thesis contributes innovatively to research on at least three more aspects. Firstly, it advances...

  20. EVALUATING FACTORS INFLUENCING GROCERY STORE CHOICE

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Marco A.; Emerson, Robert D.; House, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes consumer preferences toward grocery store choices given a set of attributes of stores. This information will then be used to make inferences on how the opening of a Wal-Mart supercenter would affect the other grocery stores in a small city.

  1. Intelligent Electricity Broker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grode, Jesper Nicolai Riis; Væggemose, Poul Erik; Kulik, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    The Intelligent Electricity Broker (IEB) is a new energy storage and energy broker facility that serves two purposes. Firstly, it allows for storing excessive energy in the Smart Grid [1, 2, 3] it is connected to. Secondly, it runs a broker-algorithm that ensures that energy is purchased and sold...... when feasible to the system owner. This paper describes how the IEB can be used by house owners, in building clusters, and/or by energy providers to take advantage of electricity stock market prices and weather forecasts to control energy surplus storage suffers as well as to lower electricity bills...

  2. Price knowledge during grocery shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Grunert, Klaus G

    2014-01-01

    Past research on consumer price knowledge has varied considerably partly due to differences in how and when price knowledge is measured.This paper applies a multi-point, multi-measure approach to reconcile differences in past price knowledge research by examining systematicrelationships between...... accessible at the store exit. These findings enable the authors to reconcile diverging results from past research,showing how consumer price knowledge evolves and suggesting that the vast majority of consumers learn about prices, whether consciously orunconsciously, during grocery shopping. Thus, when...... applying a multi-point, multi-measure approach, consumers appear to know more aboutprices than suggested by past research. Determinants of price knowledge are also examined and the results indicate that price knowledge buildsup not only because of active search but also due to accidental exposure to prices...

  3. UNDERSTANDING THE BARRIERS: GROCERY STORES AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED SHOPPERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Khattab

    2015-11-01

    Grocery stores include many different zones and services with the aisles area being one of the main barriers to access for people with impaired vision.  This area features many different sections such as canned goods, dry packaged goods, spices, drinks and snacks, baking supplies, baby items, cereals, cleaning products, pet supplies, and health and beauty items.  For visually impaired individuals, however, it can be hard to reach these various sections and to find the relevant products.  The purpose of this paper is to present a study that sought to understand the barriers that shoppers with vision impairment (VI face in the grocery store`s built environment. The research approach was based on the application of the ethnography method, Think-aloud Protocol (TAP, Interviews, and behavioural mapping method.

  4. Identifying Consumer Preferences for Nutrition Information on Grocery Store Shelf Labels

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua P. Berning; Chouinard, Hayley; Manning, Kenneth; Jill J. McCluskey; Sprott, David

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition labels can potentially benefit consumers by increasing product knowledge and reducing search costs. However, the global increase in obesity rates leads one to question the effectiveness of current nutrition information formats. Alternative formats for providing nutrition information may be more effective. Shoppers at a major grocery chain participated in choice experiments designed to identify preferences for nutrition information provided on grocery store shelf labels. Shoppers dem...

  5. Online grocery retailing: What do consumers think?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2005-01-01

    Kingdom and three in Denmark, were conducted among consumers with different degrees of experience with internet grocery shopping. This diversification of respondents was chosen to capture a broad range of the consumer beliefs that predict intentions to buy groceries online or not. The TPB framework...... of consumers in an underperforming and understudied branch of internet retailing. Barriers in the consumers' minds to shop for groceries online are identified using an established theoretical framework.......Purpose: To use the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework to explore in depth the range of beliefs held by consumers about internet shopping in general and internet grocery shopping in particular. Design/methodology/approach: Seven focus group interviews, four in the United...

  6. Online grocery retailing: What do consumers think?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To use the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework to explore in depth the range of beliefs held by consumers about internet shopping in general and internet grocery shopping in particular. Design/methodology/approach: Seven focus group interviews, four in the United...... Kingdom and three in Denmark, were conducted among consumers with different degrees of experience with internet grocery shopping. This diversification of respondents was chosen to capture a broad range of the consumer beliefs that predict intentions to buy groceries online or not. The TPB framework...... beliefs in predicting internet shopping behavior. Practical implications: The findings could be used to direct attention to consumer beliefs about internet grocery shopping which have the potential of acting as barriers to this line of e-commerce. Originality/value: To shed some light on the role...

  7. Energy Efficiency in Grocery Distribution in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    Evaluation of the development of the energy efficiency of grocery distribution from 1960 to the present in Denmark, covering both the distribution to the shops and the shopping transport (distribution from shops to individual homes)......Evaluation of the development of the energy efficiency of grocery distribution from 1960 to the present in Denmark, covering both the distribution to the shops and the shopping transport (distribution from shops to individual homes)...

  8. The need for knowledge brokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansfeld, van M.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the hypothesis is put forward that transdisciplinary knowledge in spatial planning can only be achieved if there is a ¿knowledge broker¿ between the constituent research disciplines and the complex reality of land use. A `knowledge broker¿ is defined as a person that tries to

  9. Formal Aspects of Grid Brokering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Kertész

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Coordination in distributed environments, like Grids, involves selecting the most appropriate services, resources or compositions to carry out the planned activities. Such functionalities appear at various levels of the infrastructure and in various means forming a blurry domain, where it is hard to see how the participating components are related and what their relevant properties are. In this paper we focus on a subset of these problems: resource brokering in Grid middleware. This paper aims at establishing a semantical model for brokering and related activities by defining brokering agents at three levels of the Grid middleware for resource, host and broker selection. The main contribution of this paper is the definition and decomposition of different brokering components in Grids by providing a formal model using Abstract State Machines.

  10. Formal Aspects of Grid Brokering

    CERN Document Server

    Kertész, Attila; 10.4204/EPTCS.14.2

    2009-01-01

    Coordination in distributed environments, like Grids, involves selecting the most appropriate services, resources or compositions to carry out the planned activities. Such functionalities appear at various levels of the infrastructure and in various means forming a blurry domain, where it is hard to see how the participating components are related and what their relevant properties are. In this paper we focus on a subset of these problems: resource brokering in Grid middleware. This paper aims at establishing a semantical model for brokering and related activities by defining brokering agents at three levels of the Grid middleware for resource, host and broker selection. The main contribution of this paper is the definition and decomposition of different brokering components in Grids by providing a formal model using Abstract State Machines.

  11. A study of the potential of grocery shopping on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Grunert, Klaus G.

    for online grocery shopping. It builds the model on 2 components, intention formation (which is basically the TPB) and a learning component. 614 respondents in Denmark participated in the study. The results show that Perceived Behavioral Control has little influence on the intention to buy grocery products......Internet shopping is a rapid growing form of shopping. A variety of studies have tried to profile shoppers on the Internet, but little effort has been done to provide a theoretical foundation for the research. This paper uses the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to investigate the potential...

  12. A study of the potential of grocery shopping on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Grunert, Klaus G.

    for online grocery shopping. It builds the model on 2 components, intention formation (which is basically the TPB) and a learning component. 614 respondents in Denmark participated in the study. The results show that Perceived Behavioral Control has little influence on the intention to buy grocery products......Internet shopping is a rapid growing form of shopping. A variety of studies have tried to profile shoppers on the Internet, but little effort has been done to provide a theoretical foundation for the research. This paper uses the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to investigate the potential...

  13. A study of the potential of grocery shopping on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne

    Internet shopping is a rapid growing form of shopping. A variety of studies have tried to profile shoppers on the Internet, but little effort has been done to provide a theoretical foundation for the research. This paper uses the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to investigate the potential...... for online grocery shopping. It builds the model on 2 components, intention formation (which is basically the TPB) and a learning component. 614 respondents in Denmark participated in the study. The results show that Perceived Behavioral Control has little influence on the intention to buy grocery products...

  14. Discussion on Training of the Agricultural Product Broker in Higher Vocational Colleges%高职院校培养新型农产品经纪人探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐明

    2015-01-01

    高职院校在服务社会领域可以发挥师资队伍、专业课程、实训平台、校企合作等资源优势,为“互联网+”时代的新型农产品经纪人提供电子商务、连锁经营及物流配送、法律政策、外语等实用技能培训,提供农产品交易线上线下营销策划推广及展会服务。同时,高职院校在发挥服务社会功能过程中,教学科研方向与产业实践紧密结合,在产业实践的引领推动下,人才培养整体水准得以提升。%Higher vocational colleges can make full use of their advantages in faculties,specialized courses, training platform and the cooperation between colleges and the enterprises. Furthermore,they provide practi⁃cal skills training for new agricultural product brokers in the Internet+era on some aspects,such as e-com⁃merce,chain operations and logistics distribution,laws and policies,foreign languages;they offer exhibition services as well as marketing planning and promotion of online and offline commodities trading. At the same time,in the course of social service,the subjects of teaching and scientific research should be com⁃bined with industry practice,which may promote the overall level of talent training.

  15. Not All Brokers Are Alike

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stea, Diego; Pedersen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Brokers are expected to be more creative than employees embedded in closed social structures because they occupy a position in the social space that provides them with access to non-redundant knowledge. However, the extant research provides partly inconsistent findings on the creative implications...... of brokerage, which raises important questions about when and how brokering between otherwise disconnected colleagues leads to individual creativity. We advance the relational perspective on individual creativity by adopting a contingency view, and showing that a curvilinear (inverted U-shape) specification...... of the relationship between brokerage and creativity applies particularly when brokers work in research and development, as they are more likely to intensively exploit their structural opportunities. In addition, we show that brokers who work in research and development are more sensitive to work environments...

  16. Forecast Collaboration in Grocery Supply Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aastrup, Jesper; Gammelgaard, Britta

    -requisites, degree of forecast collaboration, demand related contingency factors and outcomes/KPIs based. The hypotheses are tested in a survey among Danish grocery suppliers. The survey findings provide evidence of a positive effect of collaborative orientation and retailer competencies and trustworthiness...... on the degress of forecast collaboration. Also, campaign frequency as a demand related contingency variable is found to positively affect degree of forecast collaboration. Finally, the survey findings provide evidence of a positive effect of degree of forecast collaboration on inventory levels and forecast...

  17. Business Concept as a Relational Message: Supermarket vs Independent Grocery as Competitors for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Mikkola

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with competition for sustainability between two business concepts, the supermarket and the independent grocery, both selling local and organic food. The paper is based on Finnish case evidence with very oligopolistic retail structure and its empirical and the theoretical interest focuses on the nature of economic exchange relations of these business concepts. The study shows how the supermarket is driven by market and hierarchic as well as power relations, regarding both suppliers and consumers. The business concept includes weak choice editing and indicates ‘consumer versus producer via retailer’ set-up. The independent grocery is at its core a social and partnership based endeavour, entailing strong choice editing for sustainability through the ‘consumer cum producer via retailer’ set-up. However, the supermarket may include more local and organic food in its product range on market conditions, in need of customer management, while the grocery can expand by decentralized multiplication of its business concept. The grocery also adds a new market channel for family farmers enabling better use of local resources, thereby renewing the market. This study shows the importance of the business concept as a condition and limitation for further growth, and explains the business concept as a relational message for sustainability.

  18. Research on Supply Chain Operation of Connecting Agriculture with Supermarkets Based on Agricultural Brokers System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of expounding the research results of using relevant knowledge about Game Theory for supply chain of agricultural products at home and abroad,we use principal-agent model in Game Theory to research the new function that the supermarkets entrust supervision and control over quality of agricultural products to agricultural brokers in the circulation model of connecting agriculture with supermarkets;then design the optimal incentive contract and influencing factors between agricultural broker and supermarket,and explain the fundamental role of agricultural brokers in the process of circulation;finally in light of the role of government in promoting development and application of agricultural brokers,put forward corresponding policy suggestions:establish government support policy;set relevant standard of industry;establish cooperative organizations of agricultural brokers.

  19. State sales tax rates for soft drinks and snacks sold through grocery stores and vending machines, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriqui, Jamie F; Eidson, Shelby S; Bates, Hannalori; Kowalczyk, Shelly; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2008-07-01

    Junk food consumption is associated with rising obesity rates in the United States. While a "junk food" specific tax is a potential public health intervention, a majority of states already impose sales taxes on certain junk food and soft drinks. This study reviews the state sales tax variance for soft drinks and selected snack products sold through grocery stores and vending machines as of January 2007. Sales taxes vary by state, intended retail location (grocery store vs. vending machine), and product. Vended snacks and soft drinks are taxed at a higher rate than grocery items and other food products, generally, indicative of a "disfavored" tax status attributed to vended items. Soft drinks, candy, and gum are taxed at higher rates than are other items examined. Similar tax schemes in other countries and the potential implications of these findings relative to the relationship between price and consumption are discussed.

  20. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or business... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS...

  1. The brand architecture of grocery retailers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Esbjerg, Lars

    2009-01-01

    on these concepts has taken an internal management perspective on how retailers can manipulate aspects of the retail setting to serve their own interests. Then, we develop an alternative conceptualisation of retailer brand architecture that takes into account that consumers (and other constituents) are active co......This article discusses how the brand architecture of grocery retailers set material and symbolic boundaries for consumer choice, thus limiting consumer sovereignty. The article first discusses previous work on store atmospherics, servicescapes and brand architecture. It is argued that work based......- constructors of material and symbolic aspects of retail settings. It is discussed how consumers participate in constructing retailer brand architecture and how this concept differs from previous research. Implications for both research and practice are discussed....

  2. The brand architecture of grocery retailers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Esbjerg, Lars

    2009-01-01

    on these concepts has taken an internal management perspective on how retailers can manipulate aspects of the retail setting to serve their own interests. Then, we develop an alternative conceptualisation of retailer brand architecture that takes into account that consumers (and other constituents) are active co......This article discusses how the brand architecture of grocery retailers set material and symbolic boundaries for consumer choice, thus limiting consumer sovereignty. The article first discusses previous work on store atmospherics, servicescapes and brand architecture. It is argued that work based......- constructors of material and symbolic aspects of retail settings. It is discussed how consumers participate in constructing retailer brand architecture and how this concept differs from previous research. Implications for both research and practice are discussed....

  3. AliEn Resource Brokers

    CERN Document Server

    Saiz, P; Peters, A J; Saiz, Pablo; Buncic, Predrag; Peters, Andreas J.

    2003-01-01

    AliEn (ALICE Environment) is a lightweight GRID framework developed by the Alice Collaboration. When the experiment starts running, it will collect data at a rate of approximately 2 PB per year, producing O(109) files per year. All these files, including all simulated events generated during the preparation phase of the experiment, must be accounted and reliably tracked in the GRID environment. The backbone of AliEn is a distributed file catalogue, which associates universal logical file name to physical file names for each dataset and provides transparent access to datasets independently of physical location. The file replication and transport is carried out under the control of the File Transport Broker. In addition, the file catalogue maintains information about every job running in the system. The jobs are distributed by the Job Resource Broker that is implemented using a simplified pull (as opposed to traditional push) architecture. This paper describes the Job and File Transport Resource Brokers and sho...

  4. Development and Evaluation of a Nutritional Smartphone Application for Making Smart and Healthy Choices in Grocery Shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Desiree; Torres, Michelle; Vélez, Jammy; Grullon, Jhensen; Negrón, Edwin; Pérez, Cynthia M; Palacios, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    This study developed a smartphone nutritional application (app) for making smart and healthy choices when purchasing food in grocery stores and tested its feasibility, usability, satisfaction and acceptability. "MyNutriCart" was developed following the ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation) model. The goals of the app were to improve food selection when purchasing foods in the grocery stores based on a pre-defined budget, to improve dietary patterns based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and to improve weight status. It was evaluated within a pilot randomized trial using a convenient sample of 26 overweight or obese adults aged 21-45 years for 8 weeks. The developed app provided a grocery list of healthy foods to meet the individual requirements of all family members within a budget following the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The average use of the app was 75% on each purchase and only 37% of the recommended products were purchased. The main reasons for not purchasing the recommended items were that participants did not like these (28.5%) and that the item was unavailable in the supermarket (24.3%). Over 50% of participants considered the app as feasible, usable, satisfactory, and acceptable (p < 0.05). "MyNutriCart" is the first available app for making smart and healthy choices when purchasing food in grocery stores. This app could be used as a tool to translate recommendations into a practical grocery list that meet the needs of a family within a budget.

  5. Development and Evaluation of a Nutritional Smartphone Application for Making Smart and Healthy Choices in Grocery Shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Desiree; Torres, Michelle; Vélez, Jammy; Grullon, Jhensen; Negrón, Edwin; Pérez, Cynthia M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study developed a smartphone nutritional application (app) for making smart and healthy choices when purchasing food in grocery stores and tested its feasibility, usability, satisfaction and acceptability. Methods “MyNutriCart” was developed following the ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation) model. The goals of the app were to improve food selection when purchasing foods in the grocery stores based on a pre-defined budget, to improve dietary patterns based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and to improve weight status. It was evaluated within a pilot randomized trial using a convenient sample of 26 overweight or obese adults aged 21–45 years for 8 weeks. Results The developed app provided a grocery list of healthy foods to meet the individual requirements of all family members within a budget following the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The average use of the app was 75% on each purchase and only 37% of the recommended products were purchased. The main reasons for not purchasing the recommended items were that participants did not like these (28.5%) and that the item was unavailable in the supermarket (24.3%). Over 50% of participants considered the app as feasible, usable, satisfactory, and acceptable (p app for making smart and healthy choices when purchasing food in grocery stores. This app could be used as a tool to translate recommendations into a practical grocery list that meet the needs of a family within a budget. PMID:28261527

  6. Cultural influences for college student language brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskirch, Robert S; Kim, Su Yeong; Zamboanga, Byron L; Schwartz, Seth J; Bersamin, Melina; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Children from immigrant families often translate communication for parents, a process known as language brokering (LB). LB begins in childhood, but may continue through emerging adulthood, even when individuals are in college. We surveyed 1,222 university students with two immigrant parents and compared non-language brokers, infrequent language brokers, and frequent language brokers on a variety of ethnic, cultural, and identity measures. Significant differences emerged for cultural heritage value orientation, ethnic identity, and dimensions of acculturation with frequent language brokers scoring highest, infrequent language brokers scoring in the middle, and non-language brokers scoring the lowest on these measures. There were no significant differences on acculturative stress among these three groups. These results suggest that LB experiences may contribute to the development of psychological assets for ethnic minority, emerging adults from immigrant families.

  7. 78 FR 41299 - Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 19 CFR Part 111 Customs Brokers CFR Correction In Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 0 to 140, revised as of April 1, 2013,...

  8. e-Learning Resource Brokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retalis, Symeon; Papasalouros, Andreas; Avgeriou, Paris; Siassiakos, Kostas

    2004-01-01

    There is an exponentially increasing demand for provisioning of high-quality learning resources, which is not satisfied by current web technologies and systems. E-Learning Resource Brokers are a potential solution to this problem, as they represent the state-of-the-art in facilitating the exchange o

  9. e-Learning Resource Brokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retalis, Symeon; Papasalouros, Andreas; Avgeriou, Paris; Siassiakos, Kostas

    2004-01-01

    There is an exponentially increasing demand for provisioning of high-quality learning resources, which is not satisfied by current web technologies and systems. E-Learning Resource Brokers are a potential solution to this problem, as they represent the state-of-the-art in facilitating the exchange

  10. Opportunity and Implications of Grocery E-Commerce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangkilde, Mads

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To incorporate the element of sustainability of advantages into the concept ofFirst-Mover Advantage for analysis on grocery e-commerce. Grocery e-commerce is a relatively unexplored phenomenon in Denmark and I seek to explain this via the concept of FMA. In order to fully understand...... and coupled with previous empirical findings on grocery e-commerce. Findings: a) Providing insights into the concept of first- mover advantage, b) sustainability of advantages and c) providing a framework for analysis on advantages sought by acting entrepreneurial. Value: The applicability of the concept...... of first-mover advantage is very descriptive to date. With thispaper and hopefully more to follow, I wish to transform the FMA concepts into a tool for analysis addressing the very crucial element that is not dealt with today -sustainability.Keywords : First-Mover Advantage; e-commerce; grocery industry...

  11. Drivers of perceived service quality in selected informal grocery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Driver of perceived service quality in selected informal grocery retail stores in ... Understanding and meeting customers' needs are essential for the success of ..... 1In developing the data-gathering instrument, an extensive literature review was.

  12. ADOPTION OF ECR PRACTICES IN MINNESOTA GROCERY STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Paul F. PHUMPIU; King, Robert P.

    1997-01-01

    Efficient Consumer Response (ECR) is an industry-wide, collaborative initiative to re-engineer the grocery supply chain. This report presents findings from a study of ECR adoption in Minnesota grocery stores. Data were collected through interviews with managers of forty stores that are broadly distributed over store sizes, locations, and organizational forms. The interviews focused on business practices and technologies related to inventory management and ordering, shelf-space allocation and ...

  13. The impact of investments on e-grocery logistics operations

    OpenAIRE

    Kämäräinen, Vesa

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, various business models have been implemented in e-grocery retailing, however, in most cases, without success. The biggest stumbling block has been logistics, and some inefficient operation has frequently led to capital being used up on operating expenses. Therefore, improving overall logistical efficiency can be seen as one of the most important steps towards profitability. This dissertation aims at understanding different e-grocery logistics system implementation alternativ...

  14. Energy and Environmental Effects of Grocery Distribution: Transportation Means Catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1996-01-01

    The report serves as a background report for the project "Energy and Environmental Effects of Grocery Distribution". It contains a systematic overview of physical characteristics of the typical technologies, including energy and environmental effects.......The report serves as a background report for the project "Energy and Environmental Effects of Grocery Distribution". It contains a systematic overview of physical characteristics of the typical technologies, including energy and environmental effects....

  15. Analyzing the Efficient Execution of In-Store Logistics Processes in Grocery Retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiner, Gerald; Teller, Christop; Kotzab, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we examine in-store logistics processes for handling dairy products, from the incoming dock to the shelves of supermarkets and hypermarkets. The efficient execution of the in-store logistics related to such fast-moving, sensitive, and essential items is challenging and crucial...... for grocery retailers' sales, profits, and image. In our empirical study, we survey in-store logistics processes in 202 grocery supermarkets and hypermarkets belonging to a major retail chain in central Europe. Using a data envelopment analysis (DEA) and simulation, we facilitate process benchmarking....... In particular, we identify ways of improving in-store logistics processes by showing the performance impacts of different managerial strategies and tactics. The DEA results indicate different efficiency levels for different store formats; the hybrid store format of the small hypermarket exhibits a comparatively...

  16. The use of reverse logistics for waste management in a Brazilian grocery retailer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Karina T S; Braga Junior, Sergio S

    2016-01-01

    Retail growth is a result of the diversification of departments with the intention to look to consumer's needs and level of demand. Pressed by consumers and by the law, the adoption of environmental preservation practices is becoming stronger among grocery retailers. The objective of this research was to analyse the practices of reverse logistics performed by a retailer and measure the amount of waste generated by each department. To reach the proposed goal, a field research study was conducted to directly observe a grocery retailer in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, for a period of 6 months and monitor the amounts of cardboard and plastic discarded by each department. Using the Wuppertal method, the first result observed was that the retailer stopped its monthly production of approximately 20 tonne of biotic and abiotic material, which influence global warming and degradation of the ozone layer. Another result observed with the implementation of reverse logistics, was that the general grocery department mostly used cardboard and plastic. This sector includes products such as food cupboard, drinks, household, health and beauty, and pet articles. The fresh fruit and vegetable department and the meat, chicken and frozen department were increasingly using less plastic and cardboard packaging, increasing the use of returnable and durable packaging and thus promoting sustainability.

  17. Impact of the world agricultural grocery markets on self-development of regional agrarian systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veniamin Vasil'evich Drokin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the impact of foreign economic grocery relations on the state of self-development and self-regulation in the agrarian sector of the country and regions. A definition of the concept of «self-regulation of the agrarian sector in the region» is given. The characteristic of long-term trends in food independence is given. In this regard, the current state of food self-sufficiency in the regions of Russia on essential grocery is analyzed. It is concluded that the majority of regions are characterized by low levels of selfsufficiency in grocery. The main trends of Russian food exports in recent years are shown. The reasons for the sharp growth in grain exports are analyzed. The estimation of the possibilities for further increase of exports of these products in connection with the planned growth of consumption and production of staple food as predicted by the Russian government is made. In general, the authors believe that low levels of food self-sufficiency of the country may be not only at significant food imports, but also at low volumes of imports, coupled with the high volume of agricultural exports. Accordingly, in both cases the possibility of selfdevelopment of the regional agrarian scope is undermined because of the influence of external factors (low levels of food self-sufficiency in the country.

  18. Investigating the Sustainability of Kesko’s Grocery Supply Chain: Comparison and Recommendation for Grocery Supply Chain in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Dinh, Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to investigate Kesko’s grocery supply chain and find out sustainable practices along it. The main objective of the thesis is to compare Kesko’s sustainable supply chain practices with Vietnamese grocery retailers’ and through which draws out a set of recommendation for the latter. The literature review revisits related terms and concepts, which are retail, supply chain management, sustainability and sustainable supply chain management (SSCM). Also in this part, a SSCM fra...

  19. Assessing Reliability and Validity of the "GroPromo" Audit Tool for Evaluation of Grocery Store Marketing and Promotional Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Sallis, James F.; Bromby, Erica; Glanz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate reliability and validity of a new tool for assessing the placement and promotional environment in grocery stores. Methods: Trained observers used the "GroPromo" instrument in 40 stores to code the placement of 7 products in 9 locations within a store, along with other promotional characteristics. To test construct validity,…

  20. Incorporating Brokers within Collaboration Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R.; de Torcy, A.

    2013-12-01

    A collaboration environment, such as the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (iRODS - http://irods.diceresearch.org), provides interoperability mechanisms for accessing storage systems, authentication systems, messaging systems, information catalogs, networks, and policy engines from a wide variety of clients. The interoperability mechanisms function as brokers, translating actions requested by clients to the protocol required by a specific technology. The iRODS data grid is used to enable collaborative research within hydrology, seismology, earth science, climate, oceanography, plant biology, astronomy, physics, and genomics disciplines. Although each domain has unique resources, data formats, semantics, and protocols, the iRODS system provides a generic framework that is capable of managing collaborative research initiatives that span multiple disciplines. Each interoperability mechanism (broker) is linked to a name space that enables unified access across the heterogeneous systems. The collaboration environment provides not only support for brokers, but also support for virtualization of name spaces for users, files, collections, storage systems, metadata, and policies. The broker enables access to data or information in a remote system using the appropriate protocol, while the collaboration environment provides a uniform naming convention for accessing and manipulating each object. Within the NSF DataNet Federation Consortium project (http://www.datafed.org), three basic types of interoperability mechanisms have been identified and applied: 1) drivers for managing manipulation at the remote resource (such as data subsetting), 2) micro-services that execute the protocol required by the remote resource, and 3) policies for controlling the execution. For example, drivers have been written for manipulating NetCDF and HDF formatted files within THREDDS servers. Micro-services have been written that manage interactions with the CUAHSI data repository, the Data

  1. Managing critical incidents in grocery shopping by community-living people with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsson, Anna; Ohman, Annika; Cutchin, Malcolm; Nygård, Louise

    2013-07-01

    People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain in their ordinary housing and continue to use public space despite increasing disabilities. The aim of this study was to discover and describe problematic situations and critical incidents that took place when people with AD performed the ordinary outside-home activity of grocery shopping and how these were met by them. Individual interviews (n = 12) and participant observations (n = 8) with six informants were performed and analysed using a grounded theory approach. The findings are presented in six categories and each category describes different critical incidents and actions used to meet these. The categories were: (a) Remembering to bring things when leaving home, (b) Finding the way to and from the grocery shop without getting lost, (c) Finding a way through traffic when not feeling safe, (d) Finding objects when organization is disrupted, (e) Choosing when a lot of objects and products are available, and (f) Finding a method to pay when payment opportunities are restricted. The core category, "A challenging and unstable process of meeting critical incidents in grocery shopping", was characterised by reflections and creativity to achieve relative harmony in each critical incident. In conclusion, it is important that relatives and professionals take into account relevant actions to help people with AD coordinate with their environment.

  2. Children's Influence -Regarding Home Delivery Grocery Bags with Familyfood Optima AB in Focus.

    OpenAIRE

    Haglund, Josefin; Stenberg, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Background Children are influencing the family’s decision making process regarding food products. The children’s spending power is increasing and they become consumers in an early age. By influencing the parents, the children make them buy products that they had not planned to buy or make the parents avoid products that they usually would have bought. Online food shopping is increasing in Sweden and the home delivery grocery bag is the category of online food that has increased the most from ...

  3. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; (2) Act as broker for the purchase or swap of crude oil of Iranian origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Iran; (3) Act as broker for the provision of financing, a financial guarantee or an... of financing, a financial guarantee or an extension of credit to any person specifically to...

  4. SAFETY OF LIFE ACTIVITY AND ECOLOGICAL COMPATIBILITY IN THE GROCERY DEPARTMENT OF A BEET-SUGAR FACTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ageev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Beet-sugar factory - is a large, well-equipped with modern technology, the company that operates in a continuous circuit. In the technological structure of a sugar factory there are three production divisions: beet processing department, juice purification house and grocery department. In the grocery department of a sugar factory dangerous and harmful factors may encounter while using equipment such as vacuum devices, centrifuges, and crystallizer tank, massecuite distributor, driers and classifiers sugar. The working area of the service of machinery may appear dangerous or harmful factors, which are divided into the following groups: physical, chemical, biological and physiological. To maintain microclimate parameters can be applied general ventilation, in which the replacement of the warm air to the cold going around the room volume. Heating in the grocery department in the production season is not carried out, since it is sufficient to heat generated by the equipment. In the grocery department uses natural and artificial lighting. In the sugar factory used the following measures to protect against vibration: perform detailed assembly, eliminate defects and looseness of individual parts; way to isolate the transmission of vibrations from the machine to the foundation apply vibration isolators. Widespread use of electrical installations in a sugar factory creates the risk of electric shock to persons. Causes of electrical shocks are often disadvantages of construction and installation of the equipment, its operation is wrong. During drying and transportation of sugar produced by static electricity. To remove the static electricity equipment grounded; also used the increase in humidity; air ionization. To reduce the consumption of fresh industrial water from reservoirs provides for the establishment of the system of working circuits cleaning and maximum reuse of industrial water. Thus, safety and environmental compliance in the grocery

  5. Retail grocery store marketing strategies and obesity: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanz, Karen; Bader, Michael D M; Iyer, Shally

    2012-05-01

    In-store food marketing can influence food-purchasing behaviors and warrants increased attention given the dramatic rise in obesity. Descriptive and experimental studies of key marketing components have been conducted by consumer scientists, marketing researchers, and public health experts. This review synthesizes research and publications from industry and academic sources and provides direction for developing and evaluating promising interventions. Literature sources for the review were English-language articles published from 1995 to 2010, identified from multidisciplinary search indexes, backward searches of cited articles, review articles, industry reports, and online sources. Only articles that focused on physical grocery stores and food products were included. Data collection occurred in 2010 and 2011. Articles were classified in the categories of product, price, placement, and promotion and divided into controlled laboratory experiments, observation, and field experiments; 125 primary peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria. Narrative synthesis methods were used. Key findings were synthesized by category of focus and study design. Evidence synthesis was completed in 2011. Findings suggest several strategies for in-store marketing to promote healthful eating by increasing availability, affordability, prominence, and promotion of healthful foods and/or restricting or de-marketing unhealthy foods. Key results of research in controlled laboratory studies should be adapted and tested in real-world in-store settings. Industry methods for assessing consumer behavior, such as electronic sales data and individually linked sales information from loyalty card holders, can help public health researchers increase the scientific rigor of field studies. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Grocery e-commerce in the UK and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Niels; Bjerre, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    is exemplified by examining the interaction of the forces having created grocery e-commerce markets in the UK and Denmark. The application of the model reveals that besides the usual identification of competition intensity, the persistency of market reach efforts of a focal firm and the value attraction of its...

  7. Prevalence of phosphorus containing food additives in grocery stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeen B. Leon

    2012-06-01

    In conclusion, phosphorus additives are commonly present in groceries and contribute significantly to the phosphorus content of foods. Moreover, phosphorus additive foods are less costly than additive-free foods. As a result, phosphorus additives may be an important contributor to hyperphosphatemia among persons with chronic kidney disease

  8. Effective Factors in Environmental Health Status of Grocery Stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Asadi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims of the Study: This study was carried out to determine the effective factors in environmental health status of grocery stores in the city of Qom (located in the center of Iran. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 283 grocery stores from 3 different regions were selected randomly using stratified sampling. Data were gathered through observation, interview, and questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of two sections: section 1 dealt with some shop managers’ features including the age, educational level, job satisfaction, passing “food and occupational hygiene training courses”, store ownership, duration of employment, and features of stores including their location (Region and environmental health condition. And section 2 dealt with the important aspects of regulations of Article 13. The data analyzed using statistical procedures such as Spearman Rank Correlation and Multivariate Regression Analysis. P-values less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results: Among the investigated factors, the manager’s educational level had a greater impact on the environmental health conditions of grocery stores. The ownership status of grocery stores, Job satisfaction and passing “food and occupational hygiene training courses” were next in the ranking, respectively (p <0.001 for all measures, except for shop ownership, for which p-value was <0.02. Conclusions: Planning and implementation of effective operational and strategic programs addressing the above mentioned issues seems to be necessary. Such programs will improve the health status of the stores over time.

  9. The Grocery Sector from the 1960s to the Present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1996-01-01

    , the paper serves as a case study of the introduction of the motor vehicle in Denmark. Both the supply of goods to the retail outlets (the wholesale side) and the shopping transport are covered. The period covered has seen both a profound restructuring of the grocery sector structure (incl. a reduction...

  10. Gains and losses of exclusivity in grocery retailing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekimpe, M.G.; Gielens, K.J.P.; Gijsbrechts, E.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional wisdom dictates that convenience goods should be distributed as intensively as possible. Still, exclusivity arrangements are rapidly gaining way in grocery retailing. We discuss the possible performance outcomes of exclusivity deals, and propose a unified framework (i) to quantify the g

  11. What information do consumers consider, and how do they look for it, when shopping for groceries online?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Yael; Webb, Thomas L; Chang, Betty P I; Reidy, John

    2015-06-01

    Previous research investigating what information shoppers seek when purchasing groceries has used either lab-experiments or observed shoppers in supermarkets. The present research investigates this question in a relatively naturalistic online-grocery environment. Forty participants completed their weekly shopping online while their eye-movements were recorded. Ten of the participants were subsequently interviewed to gain insight into their information seeking behaviour. We found that, when looking for products, 95% of participants navigated through the 'virtual departments', 80% used the 'search' facility, and 68% browsed the special offer pages. Once on the product pages, participants tended to look at the pictures of products, rather than examine detailed product information. To explain these findings, we suggest that online grocery sites simulate familiar supermarket environments, which may explain why consumers prefer to browse categories of products rather than use search terms. We also suggest that additional strategies are needed if consumers are to be encouraged to view detailed product information. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. What information do consumers consider, and how do they look for it, when shopping for groceries online?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Yael; Webb, Thomas L.; Chang, Betty P.I.; Reidy, John

    2015-01-01

    Previous research investigating what information shoppers seek when purchasing groceries has used either lab-experiments or observed shoppers in supermarkets. The present research investigates this question in a relatively naturalistic online-grocery environment. Forty participants completed their weekly shopping online while their eye-movements were recorded. Ten of the participants were subsequently interviewed to gain insight into their information seeking behaviour. We found that, when looking for products, 95% of participants navigated through the ‘virtual departments’, 80% used the ‘search’ facility, and 68% browsed the special offer pages. Once on the product pages, participants tended to look at the pictures of products, rather than examine detailed product information. To explain these findings, we suggest that online grocery sites simulate familiar supermarket environments, which may explain why consumers prefer to browse categories of products rather than use search terms. We also suggest that additional strategies are needed if consumers are to be encouraged to view detailed product information. PMID:25660339

  13. Piloting an online grocery store simulation to assess children's food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Amy M; Harris, Jennifer L; Liu, Sai; Schwartz, Marlene B; Li, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Public health interventions must address poor diet among U.S. children, but research is needed to better understand factors influencing children's food choices. Using an online grocery store simulation, this research piloted a novel method to assess children's snack selection in a controlled but naturalistic laboratory setting, evaluate predictors of choice, and experimentally test whether promotions on food packages altered choices. Children (7-12 years, N = 61) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: promotions on healthy products; promotions on unhealthy products; and no promotions (control). They selected from a variety of healthy and unhealthy foods and beverages and rated all products on healthfulness and taste. Promotions on food packaging did not affect snack selection in this study, but findings supported our other hypothesis that perceived taste would be the strongest predictor of food choice. Children accurately rated product healthfulness, but these ratings did not predict healthy snack choices or taste ratings for healthy or unhealthy snacks. These results suggest that interventions to improve children's food choices should focus on increasing availability of healthy options and identifying opportunities to enhance children's liking of healthy options. However, nutrition education alone is unlikely to improve children's diets. Further testing is required, but the simulated online grocery store method shows potential for measuring children's food choices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DATA COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.14 Broker....

  15. Consumers' multifaceted deal knowledge in a grocery retail setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2016-01-01

    of deal price status, typical deal price knowledge, and deal-spotting ability. Results show reasonably stable knowledge of typical deal prices, while knowledge of deal price status and deal-spotting ability improves significantly during grocery shopping. Surprisingly, consumers’ deal knowledge...... is not conditional on purchasing a special thus indicating that most consumers, consciously or unconsciously, scan for promotion signals when shopping groceries. In addition, the results suggest consumers are not easily fooled, as the vast majority is able to spot ‘good’ and ‘bad’ deals, while also possessing...... typical deal price knowledge. Furthermore, the findings suggest that consumers store internal reference deal prices. Retailers are therefore well advised to consider mixed depth and creative discount patterns to prevent ‘perfect’ perceptions of typical deal prices....

  16. Consumers' multifaceted deal knowledge in a grocery retail setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Despite its relevance to retailers, studies of consumers’ deal knowledge have been few. This study explores consumers’ deal knowledge before, during, and after the store visit applying a between-subjects field-study design with 1204 respondents. In particular, the authors investigate perception...... of deal price status, typical deal price knowledge, and deal-spotting ability. Results show reasonably stable knowledge of typical deal prices, while knowledge of deal price status and deal-spotting ability improves significantly during grocery shopping. Surprisingly, consumers’ deal knowledge...... is not conditional on purchasing a special thus indicating that most consumers, consciously or unconsciously, scan for promotion signals when shopping groceries. In addition, the results suggest consumers are not easily fooled, as the vast majority is able to spot ‘good’ and ‘bad’ deals, while also possessing...

  17. Customer satisfaction with individual shopping trip experiences in grocery retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    on individual shopping trips is a prerequisite for developing customer loyalty. However, there is surprisingly little research focusing on satisfaction with individual shopping trips. On the contrary, satisfaction is normally conceptualised and studied as an overall evaluation of a given retailer based on all...... encounters with that retailer. There are relatively few studies of satisfaction within the grocery retail sector. However, because grocery shopping is a frequently recurring activity that is often routine and task-oriented in nature, and thus dominated by utilitarian rather than hedonic concerns, different...... mechanisms may be at work than in other retail settings such as themed flagship stores, which are visited less regularly and are oriented more towards creating hedonic shopping experiences. This paper develops a conceptual framework for analysing customer satisfaction with individual shopping trip...

  18. [Organization and technology in the grocery store sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambetti, Edy

    2014-01-01

    In Italy, grocery stores develop an annual turnover of 92 billion of , (data referred to 2013) and have 28.232 stores spread over a commercial area of 17.224.000 m2. The business involved are 252, linked with 30 important distribution leader companies. The total workforce is about 280.000 people. The grocery stores structure is composed by suppliers and producers warehouses and different kinds of stores (hypermarkets, supermarkets, shops and discounts). In the stores, the technological progress concerns fundamentally back-office operations; the improvement of information and computer science is the main renewal source. Other tasks as receiving goods and stocking shelves are still executed without specific inovations. In terms of organization, we observed a strong increase of part-time workers, the development of atypical contract and thie inclination to contract the easiest jobs (for example, stocking shelves). Also the warehouses often use to sub-contract the picking tasks. The increase of on-line shopping, also concerning the groceries, represents the most relevant evolution in tire near future.

  19. Gazetteer Brokering through Semantic Mediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobona, G.; Bermudez, L. E.; Brackin, R.

    2013-12-01

    A gazetteer is a geographical directory containing some information regarding places. It provides names, location and other attributes for places which may include points of interest (e.g. buildings, oilfields and boreholes), and other features. These features can be published via web services conforming to the Gazetteer Application Profile of the Web Feature Service (WFS) standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). Against the backdrop of advances in geophysical surveys, there has been a significant increase in the amount of data referenced to locations. Gazetteers services have played a significant role in facilitating access to such data, including through provision of specialized queries such as text, spatial and fuzzy search. Recent developments in the OGC have led to advances in gazetteers such as support for multilingualism, diacritics, and querying via advanced spatial constraints (e.g. search by radial search and nearest neighbor). A challenge remaining however, is that gazetteers produced by different organizations have typically been modeled differently. Inconsistencies from gazetteers produced by different organizations may include naming the same feature in a different way, naming the attributes differently, locating the feature in a different location, and providing fewer or more attributes than the other services. The Gazetteer application profile of the WFS is a starting point to address such inconsistencies by providing a standardized interface based on rules specified in ISO 19112, the international standard for spatial referencing by geographic identifiers. The profile, however, does not provide rules to deal with semantic inconsistencies. The USGS and NGA commissioned research into the potential for a Single Point of Entry Global Gazetteer (SPEGG). The research was conducted by the Cross Community Interoperability thread of the OGC testbed, referenced OWS-9. The testbed prototyped approaches for brokering gazetteers through use of semantic

  20. Market Concentration and Profitability of the Grocery Retailers in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindřich Špička

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article was to internationally compare the market concentration of grocery retailers in the six countries of Central Europe – Austria, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia. The market concentration was measured by CR4 ratio, Herfindahl-Hirschman Index and the GRS index. Data covered the period 2010 – 2015. The secondary data came from the Euromonitor International and Bureau van Dijk databases. The results showed that the market structure of the Central European grocery retailers has mostly a character of asymmetric oligopoly. The pairwise correlation did not reveal any strong relationship between the market power and profitability of the grocery retailers. The Central European grocery market is controlled by strong national retail chains and multinational companies which operate modern grocery retail formats. However, traditional grocery retailers are still popular in Hungary while traditional individual grocers in other countries are disappearing or gradually joining the networking system based on franchising.

  1. 76 FR 71591 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... SECURITY Bureau of Customs and Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Customs broker... Federal Regulations at section 111.30(d), the following Customs broker licenses are revoked...

  2. 78 FR 48458 - Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Reinstatement of customs broker license. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a customs broker's license has been...

  3. 78 FR 48460 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of revocation of a customs broker license. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a customs broker license is being revoked...

  4. 76 FR 71584 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Customs broker license... of the Code of Federal Regulations at Sec. 111.30(d), the following Customs broker licenses...

  5. 78 FR 48456 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Customs broker license cancellations. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the customs broker licenses and any and all...

  6. 76 FR 65741 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2012 AGENCY: Customs and Border... to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by a broker.... Customs and Border Protection announces this date of payment for 2012 in accordance with the Tax...

  7. Factors affecting Purchase behavior of Women grocery consumer- An Insight

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra, Dr. Anu Nagpal

    2014-01-01

    Women are most powerful consumers in the world as they control almost 80 percent of the household spending. And no longer can the womens spending powers and influence be neglected. The role of women in the society and their effects has changed. Most of the marketers know that women are different, but we actually need a deep rooted understanding of how and why they are different. Studying women could be interesting as Family grocery shopping is the accepted domain of women; however, modern so...

  8. Competition and Oligopoly: A Case of UK Grocery Retailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A. Lawler

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a model of Bertrand price competition with uncertainty as to the number of bidders. The auction models predict retail price dispersion as an observable feature of price discrimination. The implications of the auction models are tested using a logit model on primary data. Some simulations of the logit model further enrich and capture critical states of chain-store rivalry. The findings show that consumer characteristics define type of store choice and that an auction model of price competition with uncertainty is an appropriate way to model retail grocery competition.

  9. FOOD SAFETY SYSTEMS’ FUNCTIONING IN POLISH NETWORKS OF GROCERY STORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł NOWICKI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the way how the food safety systems are functioning in Polish networks of grocery stores. The study was conducted in the fourth quarter of 2012 in the south‐eastern Poland. There were chosen three organizations that meet certain conditions: medium size Polish grocery network without participation of foreign capital and up to 30 retail locations within the group. Studies based on a case study model. The research found that regular and unannounced inspections carried out to each store's, impact on increasing safety of food offered and the verification of GHP requirements on the headquarters level has a significant impact on the safety of food offered as well as on the knowledge and behavior of employees. In addition it was found that the verification and analysis of food safety management system is an effective tool for improving food safety. It was also shown that in most cases there is no formal crisis management system for the food protection in the surveyed companies and employees are only informed of what to do in case of an emergency.

  10. Multi-outlet/multi-format grocery retailing : Some issues and insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haans, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Several trends and shifts in consumer behavior (e.g., desire for convenience) have resulted in grocery retailers opening more stores and new formats (e.g., AH ToGo and AH XL) next to their existing ones (regular supermarket). By using this strategy grocery retailers try to attract new customers

  11. Multi-outlet/multi-format grocery retailing : Some issues and insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haans, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Several trends and shifts in consumer behavior (e.g., desire for convenience) have resulted in grocery retailers opening more stores and new formats (e.g., AH ToGo and AH XL) next to their existing ones (regular supermarket). By using this strategy grocery retailers try to attract new customers (inc

  12. Dynamic resource management using bandwidth brokers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Chengzhi; Song Hantao; Hou Xianjun; Pan Chengsheng

    2006-01-01

    The admission control issue in the design of a centralized bandwidth broker model for dynamic control and management of QoS provisioning is studied. A two-phase differentiated flow treatment based dynamic admission control scheme under the centralized bandwidth broker model is proposed. In the proposed scheme, the flow requests are classified into two classes and get differentiated treatment according to their QoS demands. We demonstrate that this admission control scheme can not only improve the resource utilization but also guarantee the flows' QoS. Furthermore, the admission control is divided into two phases: edge admission control and interior admissio-n control. During the interior phase, the PoQ scheme is adopted, which enhances the call processing capability of the bandwidth broker. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme can result in lower flow blocking probability and higher resource utilization. And it also reduces the number of QoS state accesses/updates, thereby increasing the overall call processing capability of the bandwidth broker.

  13. Geospatial Brokering - Challenges and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    An important feature of many brokers is to facilitate straightforward human access to scientific data while maintaining programmatic access to it for system solutions. Standards-based protocols are critical for this, and there are a number of protocols to choose from. In this discussion, we will present a web application solution that leverages certain protocols - e.g., OGC CSW, REST, and OpenSearch - to provide programmatic as well as human access to geospatial resources. We will also discuss managing resources to reduce duplication yet increase discoverability, federated search solutions, and architectures that combine human-friendly interfaces with powerful underlying data management. The changing requirements witnessed in brokering solutions over time, our recent experience participating in the EarthCube brokering hack-a-thon, and evolving interoperability standards provide insight to future technological and philosophical directions planned for geospatial broker solutions. There has been much change over the past decade, but with the unprecedented data collaboration of recent years, in many ways the challenges and opportunities are just beginning.

  14. 76 FR 37571 - Broker-Dealer Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... practice of conducting the Study is relatively unique to broker-dealer audits and, while audit literature... included in contemporary audit standards governing the work to be performed by an independent public... auditing literature. The Commission is proposing to remove the reference to ``material inadequacies''...

  15. Factors Influencing Consumers Intention for Online Grocery Shopping - A Proposed Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzi, SFF; Thoo, AC; Tan, LC; Muharam, FM; Talib, NA

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, Internet is one of the most popular platforms for people to do online shopping including grocery items. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the determinants of customer intentions for online grocery shopping. Till now, there is no consensus on what are the factors that actually influencing people to shop grocery items through Internet. This paper aims to explore the factors such as social influences, facilitating conditions, hedonic motivations, perceived risk and perceived trust that influence the consumer intention to purchase grocery online. Questionnaires will be the main instrument of the study and they will be distributed to target respondents using Internet survey. Respondents of the study will be selected using convenience sampling. After data collection, Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) will be employed for data analysis. Overall, the result of the study is important to retailers to identify the important factors in increasing their customers’ intention to purchase grocery online.

  16. An integrative conceptual framework for analyzing customer satisfaction with shopping trip experiences in grocery retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Grocery retailers aim to satisfy customers, and because grocery shopping trips are frequently recurring, they must do socontinuously. Surprisingly, little research has addressed satisfaction with individual grocery shopping trips. This article therefore develops a conceptual framework for analyzing...... customer satisfaction with individual grocery shopping trip experiences within a overall ‘disconfirmation of expectations model’ of customer satisfaction. The contribution of the framework is twofold. First, by focusing on satisfaction with individual grocery shopping trips, previous research...... on satisfaction is extended to a context marked by frequently recurring, often tedious and routine activities. Understanding what causes satisfaction/dissatisfaction with individual shopping trips is required to explain overall, cumulative satisfaction with a retailer, which has been the focus of prior research...

  17. Customer satisfaction with individual shopping trip experiences in grocery retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    on individual shopping trips is a prerequisite for developing customer loyalty. However, there is surprisingly little research focusing on satisfaction with individual shopping trips. On the contrary, satisfaction is normally conceptualised and studied as an overall evaluation of a given retailer based on all...... mechanisms may be at work than in other retail settings such as themed flagship stores, which are visited less regularly and are oriented more towards creating hedonic shopping experiences. This paper develops a conceptual framework for analysing customer satisfaction with individual shopping trip...... experiences in grocery retailing. The framework makes at least two important contributions to the literature. First, it focuses on customer satisfaction with individual shopping trips whereas previous research and theoretical frameworks have addressed either overall satisfaction with the retailer, service...

  18. Proposição de um modelo para a gestão da demanda: um estudo entre os elos atacadista e fornecedores de produtos de mercearia básica A proposed framework for demand management: a study involving wholesalers and suppliers of grocery products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela de Castro Melo

    2012-12-01

    diversity of products. The objective of this study was to develop a framework for demand management in the supply chain of grocery products considering the dyadic relationship between the supplier and wholesaler. Therefore, a case study was conducted in the wholesale company Martins and nine of its suppliers. The research revealed that the demand management implementation process can be divided into three phases: 1 joint alignment of strategic policies, 2 formulation of business plan, and 3 implementation and monitoring of the business plan. Moreover, this process consists of three elements: top management involvement, inter and intra-firm interactions, and benefits of demand management. The benefits include profitability increase by improving efficiency and effectiveness, as well as knowledge sharing and learning.

  19. The stressful (and not so stressful) nature of language brokering: identifying when brokering functions as a cultural stressor for Latino immigrant children in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Jennifer A; Lazarevic, Vanja

    2014-12-01

    Language brokering remains prevalent among immigrant families, but it is widely assumed that brokering functions as a cultural stressor, resulting in adverse health outcomes for immigrant youth. Few studies, however, have tested this assumption, particularly while using longitudinal data and capturing multiple dimensions of brokering. Thus, this study examined how depressive symptoms and family-based acculturation stress mediated the relationships between various aspects of brokering (i.e., frequency of brokering, positive and negative feelings about brokering, brokering norms, and brokering efficacy) and alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use and other risky behaviors. Using longitudinal survey data from 234 Latino early adolescents in 6th-8th grades (M age  = 12.4 years; Females = 46.2 %), brokering for parents indirectly affected alcohol and marijuana use through family-based acculturation stress; however, these significant indirect effects became non-significant when taking into account negative brokering feelings and brokering as a burden on one's time. Feeling positively or efficacious about brokering or having pro-brokering norms did not directly predict any adverse mental and behavioral health outcomes. Moderation analyses, however, revealed that brokering for parents did not seem to function as a stressor when Latino early adolescents were high in brokering efficacy (e.g., feeling confident in one's ability to broker) or descriptive brokering norms (e.g., perceiving one's peers as brokering often). By contrast, when Latino early adolescents perceived brokering as a burden, brokering for parents functioned as a stressor, placing Latino early adolescents at risk for family-based acculturation stress, and in turn, alcohol and marijuana use. Such findings point to the complexity of brokering.

  20. Connecting the Science User With Science Data and Services via the BCube Broker and Crawler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, S. J. S.

    2015-12-01

    BCube, an NSF EarthCube Building Block project, aims to improve efficiency and productivity of geoscientists who work across disciplinary boundaries by facilitating discovery and access of geoscience data, linking major data facilities, and creating a new paradigm for data advertising and discovery. In this presentation we describe the achievements to date of the BCube brokering and web crawling efforts, addressing focus areas and outcomes in both cyberinfrastructure and geocsciences. We describe science scenarios illustrating the research in the ocean, climate, hydrology and polar domains that is being supported by the BCube Broker. By providing mediation between a diversity of standards and protocols the broker makes it possible for the geoscientists working in these demains to discover and access high-value datasets via a cloud-based interface. An Accessor Development Kit (ADK) enables the community to develop modules that extend the capabilities of the broker. In addition, we describe the web crawling and semantic technologies that are being applied to find new geoscience-relevant datasets and services on the web.

  1. ANTARES: A Prototype Transient Broker System

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The Arizona-NOAO Temporal Analysis and Response to Events System (ANTARES) is a joint project of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory and the Department of Computer Science at the University of Arizona. The goal is to build the software infrastructure necessary to process and filter alerts produced by time-domain surveys, with the ultimate source of such alerts being the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). The ANTARES broker will add value to alerts by annotating them with informati...

  2. Staying in the Light: Evaluating Sustainability Models for Brokering Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, L. A.; Benedict, K. K.; Best, M.; Fyfe, S.; Jacobs, C. A.; Michener, W. K.; Pearlman, J.; Turner, A.; Nativi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Business Models Team of the Research Data Alliance Brokering Governance Working Group examined several support models proposed to promote the long-term sustainability of brokering middleware. The business model analysis includes examination of funding source, implementation frameworks and obstacles, and policy and legal considerations. The issue of sustainability is not unique to brokering software and these models may be relevant to many applications. Results of this comprehensive analysis highlight advantages and disadvantages of the various models in respect to the specific requirements for brokering services. We offer recommendations based on the outcomes of this analysis while recognizing that all software is part of an evolutionary process and has a lifespan.

  3. Efficient Consumer Response (ECR: a survey of the Australian grocery industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Swatman

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficient consumer response (ECR is a U.S. supply chain management strategy which attempts to address the inefficiencies which have led to excessive inventory and unnecessary costs at all levels within the grocery industry supply chain. This paper discusses the traditional grocery store format, the supermarket, and the ways in which inefficient business practices developed in the U.S. grocery supply chain; and discusses the major business activities needed for successful implementation of ECR. The paper then presents a brief summary of the results of a survey of ECR knowledge and usage within the Australian grocery industry, which is the initial phase of a long term research project whose main purpose is to evaluate ECR as it applies to that industry.

  4. Shopper marketing nutrition interventions: Social norms on grocery carts increase produce spending without increasing shopper budgets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin R. Payne

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Descriptive and provincial social norm messages (i.e., on grocery cart placards may be an overlooked tool to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability and increasing shopper budgets.

  5. Relationship between Fear of Falling and Preceived Difficulty with Grocery Shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C S; McLeod, K M

    2017-01-01

    Fear of falling is associated with self-imposed restrictions of basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL/IADL), leading greater risk for functional decline and falls. The inability to independently grocery shop, a food-related IADL, negatively affects nutritional status and survival among seniors. Thus, this study examined the relationship between the fear of falling and difficulty with grocery shopping among seniors (n=98, mean age=82, 83% female), taking into account their functional capacity. Demographic profile, eating problems, physical fitness (mobility, balance, endurance, leg strength), and fear of falling (balance confidence, falls efficacy) were measured. Fifty-six percent of participants reported difficulty with grocery shopping. Those who reported difficulty had significantly lower scores for dynamic balance, balance confidence and fall efficacy compared to those who did not. This study revealed a relationship between the fear of falling and perceived difficulty with grocery shopping. Interventions should address fear of falling among the frail seniors.

  6. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores--50% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of grocery store buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

  7. Examining Specialty Crop Price Relationships between Farmers Markets and Grocery Stores

    OpenAIRE

    Gunderson, Michael A.; Earl, Ashley N.

    2010-01-01

    Farmers markets across the state of Florida have been increasing in popularity over the past two years. Very little information is available regarding the price relationship between farmers markets and nearby grocery stores. Further investigation of this relationship is necessary and could yield vital infor­mation to support further understanding of pricing trends among these two sources. By obtaining prices from both farmers markets and grocery stores that are closest to each of the markets...

  8. The effects of geographical competition and demand on grocery price premium

    OpenAIRE

    Halme, Kari; Akpinar, Murat; Neuvonen, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Due to the duopolistic characteristics of the Finnish grocery retail trade proprietor-run stores operate as adaptive price setters on the market. This paper examined the effects of geographical competition and demand on proprietor-run grocery stores’ pricing in Finland’s most populated province –Uusimaa. The assumption is that the price premium of a proprietoroperated store compared to the nearest co-operative competitor reflects the characteristics of competition and demand. Hypotheses on th...

  9. Analysis of Expectations of Electronic Grocery Shopping for Potential Customer Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikkila Jukka

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The special nature of groceries, especially perishables, challenges the possibilities of digital channels i.e. computers and networks to improve customer service. We report the findings of theme interviews on the potential of electronic commerce (EC of groceries with 33 experts of grocery industry and EC, most of them senior executives, in 23 organisations in Finland during the Autumn of 1997. The specific areas of interest in the study are the predicted volume of EC in grocery shopping, the most potential customer segments, the anticipated benefits of EC to customers, and supplier strategies and infrastructure alternatives. Benefits of ECS (electronic grocery shopping are analysed for three selected potential customer groups in terms of phases in consumer buying process as well as two different infrastructure solutions. It seems that an EGS build on top of current grocery industry infrastructure can only satisfy one major consumer group. In order to gain momentum EGS needs a dedicated infrastructure within which logistic efficiency can be increased.

  10. Are introverts better at partnership brokering? Exploring brokering skills across the introvert-extrovert continuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    This article raises the question of whether it matters if a partnership broker is introverted or extroverted[1], [2]. A recent public discussion about Susan Cain’s book ‘Quiet: The power of introverts in a world that can’t stop talking’ has highlighted the importance of recognising one’s temperament

  11. Mother-Child Communication Quality during Language Brokering: Validation of Four Measures of Brokering Interaction Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntzviller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    One hundred dyads of low-income, Spanish-speaking mothers and their bilingual children (age = 12-18; M = 14.12, SD = 1.89) who have language brokered for the mother (i.e., culturally or linguistically mediated between the mother and English speakers) were surveyed. Multiple goals theory posits that mothers and children who do not recognize and…

  12. Mental Health Risk Factors Associated with Childhood Language Brokering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Vanessa R.; Flores, Valerie; Morrison, Robert G.; David, E. J. R.; Silton, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Serving as a language translator (broker) for family members during childhood can affect cognitive and emotional functions in both beneficial and detrimental ways. Child language brokers translate in a variety of contexts including conversations between their parents and financial, legal and medical professionals. Pressure to be involved in these…

  13. Educational Brokering; A New Service for Adult Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, James M.; And Others

    The emerging educational brokering service, functioning between adult learners and educational resources, aims to help them find their way into formal postsecondary education via counseling, advocacy, assessment and referral services. This monograph presents nine major issues concerning the educational brokering service: (1) definition and…

  14. 12 CFR 303.243 - Brokered deposit waivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brokered deposit waivers. 303.243 Section 303.243 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION PROCEDURE AND RULES OF PRACTICE FILING... brokered deposits in the institution's overall funding and liquidity management program; (3) The...

  15. 76 FR 1626 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2011 AGENCY: Customs and... provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by a..., 2011. Customs and Border Protection announces this date of payment for 2011 in accordance with the...

  16. 78 FR 48457 - Correction of Document Revoking Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Correction of Document Revoking Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Correction of document revoking certain customs broker licenses. SUMMARY: In a notice published in the Federal Register...

  17. 77 FR 74201 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2013 AGENCY: U.S. Customs... provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by a..., 2013. U.S. Customs and Border Protection announces this date of payment for 2013 in accordance with...

  18. 78 FR 77140 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2014 AGENCY: U.S. Customs... provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by a..., 2014. U.S. Customs and Border Protection announces this date of payment for 2014 in accordance with...

  19. 28 CFR 50.24 - Annuity broker minimum qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... insurance policy, or an equivalent form of insurance; (4) The broker must never have had a license to be a... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annuity broker minimum qualifications. 50.24 Section 50.24 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) STATEMENTS OF POLICY §...

  20. 17 CFR 155.4 - Trading standards for introducing brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trading standards for introducing brokers. 155.4 Section 155.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION TRADING STANDARDS § 155.4 Trading standards for introducing brokers. (a) Each introducing...

  1. 17 CFR 155.2 - Trading standards for floor brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trading standards for floor brokers. 155.2 Section 155.2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION TRADING STANDARDS § 155.2 Trading standards for floor brokers. Each contract market shall adopt and...

  2. Dream characteristics of stock brokers after a major market downturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroth, Jerry; Thompson, Lisa; Jackson, Judy; Pascali, Lesa; Ferreira, Marie

    2002-06-01

    Dream characteristics of 28 stock brokers during the second worst weekly performance of the Dow Jones Industrial Average in the last 11 yr. were measured using the KJP Dream Inventory. Additional measures of powerlessness and stress were administered as well. Significant correlations appeared between the amount of stress brokers reported during this week and the appearance of recurring nightmares (.59), feelings of being chased (.42), and dreams' pleasantness (-.64). The brokers' clients' investment performance was correlated significantly with changes in the brokers' experience of traumatic dreams (-.57) and dreams of falling (-.43). Further, as the brokers' own personal investments deteriorated overall, dreaming increased (.48), suggesting compensatory mechanisms. Results were discussed in terms of the relationship between onset of acute traumatic states and dreaming.

  3. Consumer Poultry Handling Behavior in the Grocery Store and In-Home Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Amy K; Chambers, Delores H; Chambers, Edgar; Godwin, Sandria L; Cates, Sheryl C

    2016-04-01

    Considerable work on consumers' food safety habits has highlighted issues associated with home food preparation. However, consumer handling of foods, such as poultry, during shopping and storage has not been noted. The objective of this study was to determine consumer behaviors during purchasing and initial storage of raw poultry to determine potential cross-contamination issues. A shop-along observational study was conducted to determine actual shopping, transportation, and storage behavior of consumers who purchase raw poultry products. Neither hand sanitizer nor wipes were observed in 71% of grocery store meat sections of stores visited. Plastic bags could be found in the meat section 85% of the time, but only 25% of shoppers used the bag for their raw poultry purchases. During checkout, the poultry was bagged separately from other products 71% of the time. A majority of shoppers stored raw poultry in the original package without an additional container or overwrap. Overall, there needs to be an increase in food safety education on the handling of poultry during purchasing, transportation, and storage.

  4. 78 FR 64234 - Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker Licenses; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker Licenses; Correction AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice; correction... had reinstated the broker licenses of certain brokers. Notice is hereby given that the broker...

  5. 75 FR 71723 - Policies and Procedures Pertaining to Changes in Listing Brokers Participating in the Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Policies and Procedures Pertaining to Changes in Listing Brokers Participating in the... notice describes how duly licensed real estate brokers may participate as Listing or Selling brokers under FHA's Management and Marketing III (M&M III) program. All brokers may participate as...

  6. Facilitators and Inhibitors of Supply Chain Innovation-prospects for Supply Chain Managment in the Irish Grocery Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Keegan, Joan; O'Callaghan, Edmund; Wilcox, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Supply chain management is one of the most significant strategic challenges currently facing the Irish grocery sector. The UK grocery market with its emphasis on composite deliveries via regional distribution centres is extremely sophisticated; the Irish grocery sector, however, is in the embryonic stage of implementing central distribution. The potential to develop innovative supply chain systems is mediated by both national logistic-related variables and company characteristics. In additio...

  7. Direct Marketing of Specialty Crops by Producers: A Price-Comparison between Farmers' Markets and Grocery Stores

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Jonathan Adam; Gunderson, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Oftentimes, prices at farmers' markets are much cheaper than those at grocery stores. However, little is known about the pricing relationship between farmers' markets and nearby grocery stores. Only by further analyzing this relationship can we gain a better understanding of these pricing trends. Although this trend is seemingly consistent, further research is necessary to test this assumption. Through the collection of prices at both locales, farmers' markets and grocery stores, producers as...

  8. 17 CFR 17.00 - Information to be furnished by futures commission merchants, clearing members and foreign brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... products, the full date must be reported. For other options and futures, this field is used to report the... merchants, clearing members and foreign brokers. (a) Special accounts—reportable futures and options... quantity of exchanges of futures for commodities or for derivatives positions and the number of...

  9. Do Latino and non-Latino grocery stores differ in the availability and affordability of healthy food items in a low-income, metropolitan region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emond, Jennifer A; Madanat, Hala N; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2012-02-01

    To compare non-ethnically based supermarkets and Latino grocery stores (tiendas) in a lower-income region with regard to the availability, quality and cost of several healthy v. unhealthy food items. A cross-sectional study conducted by three independent observers to audit twenty-five grocery stores identified as the main source of groceries for 80 % of Latino families enrolled in a childhood obesity study. Stores were classified as supermarkets and tiendas on the basis of key characteristics. South San Diego County. Ten tiendas and fifteen supermarkets. Tiendas were smaller than supermarkets (five v. twelve aisles, P = 0·003). Availability of fresh produce did not differ by store type; quality differed for one fruit item. Price per unit (pound or piece) was lower in tiendas for most fresh produce. The cost of meeting the US Department of Agriculture's recommended weekly servings of produce based on an 8368 kJ (2000 kcal)/d diet was $US 3·00 lower in tiendas compared with supermarkets (P quality, fresh produce within lower-income communities. However, efforts are needed to increase the access and affordability of healthy dairy and meat products.

  10. [An exploratory synthesis of knowledge brokering in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridde, Valéry; Dagenais, Christian; Boileau, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    There is a call for public health policies and interventions to be evidence-based. Also, using knowledge brokers to foster the use of research results is increasingly recommended. This article presents an exploratory synthesis of the current state of knowledge on this new strategy We conducted a scoping study by consulting the main databases. Nineteen articles were included in the analysis, which was designed with a grid developed iteratively. The synthesis shows that knowledge brokering initiatives include i) planning activities (stakeholder identification, creation of networks and partnerships, context analysis, problem identification, needs identification), ii) support to the brokers (training, technical support, development of a practice guide), and iii) the brokerage activities themselves (information management, liaison between knowledge producers and users, training of users). Only four articles presented empirical data on the effects of brokers' activities. Three were associated with increased knowledge in the target audience. No study showed any impact on clinical behaviours or on public policy content. This synthesis highlights the challenges involved in knowledge brokering activities, as well as the characteristics and skills a broker should possess. While knowledge brokering appears promising, efforts must now be made to evaluate it more systematically to demonstrate its effectiveness.

  11. Gender and age are associated with healthy food purchases via grocery voucher redemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin-Fanning, Frances; Gokun, Yevgeniya

    2014-01-01

    Grocery vouchers that specifically target foods associated with reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk result in increased consumption of those foods. In regions with disproportionately high CVD rates, there is little research concerning the impact of vouchers on purchases of risk-reducing foods when there are no restrictions placed on grocery voucher redemption. Since many food assistance programs place few restrictions on type of foods that can be purchased, identifying demographic factors associated with purchasing habits is a prerequisite to promoting healthy eating. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations of age, gender, education and income level with purchasing of healthful foods through the use of a grocery voucher in a rural food desert (poverty rate of ≥20% and ≥33% of residents living >16 km from a large grocery store) with high rates of chronic disease. The effectiveness of an intervention that included a media campaign, a $5 grocery voucher, local heart healthy food branding and a grocery store event was tested. Brief nutritional articles were published in both local newspapers during four consecutive weeks. These articles explained the physiological actions of healthy foods and listed a health-promoting recipe. During the fourth week of the media campaign, a voucher for a $5 grocery gift card redeemable at one of either community grocery stores was also printed in both local newspapers. In each store, foods that are known to be associated with a reduced risk of CVD were marked with a blue logo. Participants (N=311) completed a questionnaire that assessed demographics and usual servings of fruits, vegetables and grains. Participants received a $5 grocery card and a list of labelled foods. Returned grocery receipts were stapled to the questionnaires to analyse the relationship between demographics and food choices. Participants who bought at least one labelled food item were older (M=48.5, SD=14.7) than those who did not buy

  12. BCube: A Broker Framework for Next Generation Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, S. S.; Pearlman, J.; Nativi, S.

    2013-12-01

    EarthCube is an NSF initiative that aims to transform the conduct of research through the creation of community-guided cyberinfrastructure enabling the integration information and data across the geosciences. Following an initial phase of concept and community development activities, NSF has made awards for the development of cyberinfrastructure 'building blocks.' In this talk we describe the goals and methods for one of these projects - BCube, for Brokering Building Blocks. BCube addresses the need for effective and efficient multi-disciplinary collaboration and interoperability through the introduction of brokering technologies. Brokers, as information systems middleware, have existed for many years and are found in diverse domains and industries such as financial systems, business-to-business interfaces, medicine and the automotive industry, to name a few. However, the emergence of brokers in science is relatively new and is now being piloted with great promise in cyberinfrastructure and science communities in the U.S., Europe, and elsewhere. Brokers act as intermediaries between information systems that implement well-defined interfaces, providing a bridge between communities using different specifications. The BCube project is helping to build a truly cross-disciplinary, global platform for data providers, cyberinfrastructure developers, and data users to make data more available and interoperable through a brokering framework. Building on the GEOSS Discover and Access Broker (DAB), BCube will develop new modules and services including * Expanded semantic brokering * Business Model support for work flows * Automated metadata generation * Automated linking to services discovered via web crawling * Plug and play for most community service buses * Credential passing for seamless access to data * Ranking of search results from brokered catalogs Because facilitating cross-discipline research involves cultural and well as technical challenges, BCube is also

  13. A brokered market with heterogeneous suppliers and consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Righter, Rhonda

    1999-01-01

    We consider a brokered market with heterogeneous suppliers and consumers of identical items or services. Each supplier determines a minimum acceptable price for the items it supplies, based on its costs and target rate of return. The broker begins with a fixed set of items from the suppliers. Customers arrive periodically to the market and offer a bid for an item. If a customer wants more than one item, a set of bids is made. If the broker accepts a bid it must be assigned an i...

  14. ANTARES: A Prototype Transient Broker System

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Abhijit; Snodgrass, Richard; Kececioglu, John; Narayan, Gautham; Seaman, Robert; Jenness, Tim; Axelrod, Tim

    2014-01-01

    The Arizona-NOAO Temporal Analysis and Response to Events System (ANTARES) is a joint project of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory and the Department of Computer Science at the University of Arizona. The goal is to build the software infrastructure necessary to process and filter alerts produced by time-domain surveys, with the ultimate source of such alerts being the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). The ANTARES broker will add value to alerts by annotating them with information from external sources such as previous surveys from across the electromagnetic spectrum. In addition, the temporal history of annotated alerts will provide further annotation for analysis. These alerts will go through a cascade of filters to select interesting candidates. For the prototype, `interesting' is defined as the rarest or most unusual alert, but future systems will accommodate multiple filtering goals. The system is designed to be flexible, allowing users to access the stream at multiple points throughout the...

  15. The European Commission as Network Broker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Borrás

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent transformations in the European Union have been putting significant pressure on the management function of the European Commission. Examining its brokerage position in policy networks, this article asks what kind of role does the Commission have in the political interactions in Brussels after the year 2000. Developing a conceptual framework about brokerage roles in EU policy, the article uses a combination of quantitative and qualitative data in an empirical analysis of two very different cases where the Commission has been embattled the past years. The article argues that previous reports of the Commission’s demise are much exaggerated, because it continues playing a leading role in managing interaction between multiple actors at different levels of governance. The empirical results show that the Commission is a resilient central network broker.

  16. The Six-Food Elimination Diet for Eosinophilic Esophagitis Increases Grocery Shopping Cost and Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher Wolf, W; Huang, Kevin Z; Durban, Raquel; Iqbal, Zahra J; Robey, Benjamin S; Khalid, Farah J; Dellon, Evan S

    2016-12-01

    The six-food elimination diet (SFED), where dairy, wheat, eggs, soy, nuts, and seafood are avoided, is an effective treatment for eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Patient-related costs of this approach, however, are unknown. We aimed to assess the cost of and ease of shopping for an SFED compared to an unrestricted diet. A dietitian with expertise in EoE generated menus meeting dietary requirements for a week's worth of meals for the SFED and an unrestricted diet. We compared prices and the number of missing items for both diets at standard and specialty grocery stores. The average weekly price of the SFED at a standard supermarket was $92.54 compared to $79.84 for an unrestricted diet (p = 0.0001). A patient shopping at a standard grocery store needed a higher proportion of items from a second store compared to an unrestricted diet (32 vs. 3 %, p = 0.0001). The prices of the SFED and unrestricted diet using a specialty supermarket were comparable ($106.47 vs. $105.96, p = 0.81), as was the percentage of items requiring a trip to a second store (6 vs. 2 % items, p = 0.03). Shopping at a specialty grocery store increased weekly grocery costs by $13.93 (p = 0.04) for the SFED and $26.12 (p = 0.03) for the unrestricted diet. In conclusion, for patients shopping at standard grocery stores, the cost of an SFED is higher, and an SFED requires more items from a second store. These differences disappear at specialty grocery stores, but costs were significantly higher. This cost and logistical burden can inform patients when selecting dietary therapy.

  17. African Logistics Agents and Middlemen as Cultural Brokers in Guangzhou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Mathews

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article begins by asking how African traders learn to adjust to the foreign world of Guangzhou, China, and suggests that African logistics agents and middlemen serve as cultural brokers for these traders. After defining “cultural broker” and discussing why these brokers are not usually Chinese, it explores this role as played by ten logistics agents/middlemen from Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. As logistics agents, these people help their customers in practically adjusting to Chinese life, and as middlemen they serve to grease the wheels of commerce between African customers and Chinese suppliers. This is despite their own ambivalent views of China as a place to live. They play an essential role in enabling harmonious relations between Africans and Chinese in Guangzhou, even though they see themselves not as cultural brokers but simply as businessmen.

  18. 7 CFR 46.28 - Duties of brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... receives information valuable to the owner in connection with carrier claim rights, the broker should... the net amount due the owner, after deducting the agreed or customary charges for handling the claim...

  19. The Effect of Entry by Wal-Mart Supercenters on Retail Grocery Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Bobby J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. retail grocery industry shifted from an industry dominated by small grocers serving local markets to one characterized by large retailers present in international markets. Average retail grocery concentration as measured by CR4 increased from 19.9 in 1997 to 31.0 in 2002 (U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, 2000; 2005). Wal-Mart’s tremendous growth is the catalyst to this change, but little is known about Wal-Mart’s effect on market concentration. This analysis eva...

  20. THE EFFECT OF ENTRY BY WAL-MART SUPERCENTERS ON RETAIL GROCERY CONCENTRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Bobby J.; Dooley, Frank J.; Kim, Sounghun

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. retail grocery industry shifted from an industry dominated by small grocers serving local markets to one characterized by large retailers present in international markets. Average retail grocery concentration as measured by CR4 increased from 17.8 in 1982 to 43.0 in 1999 (U.S. Census Bureau, 1982; Trade Dimensions Marketing Guidebook, 2000). Wal-Mart's tremendous growth is the catalyst to this change. Although Wal-Mart has been studied from multiple perspectives, little is known abou...

  1. A shopper's eye view of food safety at retail stores: lessons from photographs taken while grocery shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retail grocery stores are the source of over 50% of food sales in the U.S., representing the most important sector for consumer food choices. Food safety-related infrastructure, procedures, and practices at retail grocery stores play an important role in protecting public health. Beyond actual risk ...

  2. Teaching Grocery Store Purchasing Skills to Students with Intellectual Disabilities Using a Computer-Based Instruction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David L.; Morgan, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    This research evaluated effects of a multi-media computer-based instruction (CBI) program designed to teach grocery store purchasing skills to three high-school students with intellectual disabilities. A multiple baseline design across participants used measures of computer performance mastery and grocery store probes to evaluate the CBI. All…

  3. Efficient Service Broker Policy For Large-Scale Cloud Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Radi, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Algorithms, policies, and methodologies are necessary to achieve high user satisfaction and practical utilization in cloud computing by ensuring the efficient and fair allocation of every computing resource. Whenever a new job arrives in cloud environments, the service broker is responsible for selecting the data center that will execute that job. Selecting data centers serves an important function in enhancing the performance of a cloud environment. This study proposes a new service broker p...

  4. 26 CFR 31.3406(d)-4 - Special rules for readily tradable instruments acquired through a broker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...)) and the broker is not a broker holding a security (including stock) for a customer in street name, the... section satisfies the payor's requirement to give notice to the payee. If the broker notifies the...

  5. Trip distribution for limited destinations: a case study for grocery shopping trips in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Sander; Thomas, Tom; Tutert, Bas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new trip distribution model for destinations that are not homogeneously distributed. The model is a gravity model in which the spatial configuration of destinations is incorporated in the modeling process. The performance was tested on a survey with reported grocery sho

  6. Grocery Store Genetics: A PCR-Based Genetics Lab that Links Genotype to Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briju, Betsy J.; Wyatt, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors often present Mendelian genetics and molecular biology separately. As a result, students often fail to connect the two topics in a tangible manner. We have adopted a simple experiment to help link these two important topics in a basic biology course, using red and white onions bought from a local grocery store. A lack of red coloration…

  7. Grocery Store Genetics: A PCR-Based Genetics Lab that Links Genotype to Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briju, Betsy J.; Wyatt, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors often present Mendelian genetics and molecular biology separately. As a result, students often fail to connect the two topics in a tangible manner. We have adopted a simple experiment to help link these two important topics in a basic biology course, using red and white onions bought from a local grocery store. A lack of red coloration…

  8. Trying Harder and Doing Worse: How Grocery Shoppers Track In-Store Spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ittersum, van K.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Wansink, B.

    2010-01-01

    Although almost one in three U.S. households shops on a budget, it remains unclear whether and how shoppers track their in-store spending to stay within those budgets. A field study and two laboratory studies offer four key generalizations about budget shoppers in grocery stores: (1) They predominan

  9. Trying Harder and Doing Worse : How Grocery Shoppers Track In-Store Spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ittersum, Koert; Pennings, Joost M. E.; Wansink, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Although almost one in three U.S. households shops on a budget, it remains unclear whether and how shoppers track their in-store spending to stay within those budgets. A field study and two laboratory studies offer four key generalizations about budget shoppers in grocery stores: (1) They predominan

  10. Using health primes to reduce unhealthy snack purchases among overweight consumers in a grocery store

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papies, E. K.; Potjes, I.; Keesman, M.; Schwinghammer, S.; Van Koningsbruggen, G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective:Healthy-eating intentions of overweight individuals are often thwarted by the presence of attractive food temptations in grocery stores and the home environment. To support healthy-eating intentions, we tested the effectiveness of a simple health prime to reduce the purchases of energy-den

  11. Drivers and barriers of reverse logistics practices: A study of large grocery retailers in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Meyer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reverse logistics (RL practices have previously been viewed as a cost drain, but have received greater attention from practitioners because of increasing competition and dwindling margins.Purpose: The purpose of this generic qualitative study was to uncover the main internal and external drivers and barriers of RL within major South African grocery retailers.Method: Eleven face-to-face, semi-structured interviews and one telephonic interview were conducted with participants from four large grocery retailers.Findings: Optimising profitability and cost reduction goals are the identified internal drivers, whereas the main external driver was to reduce the organisations’ environmental impact. A lack of information systems – such as enterprise resource planning systems or warehouse management system software – and infrastructure were revealed as the main internal barriers for organisations’ RL practices, whereas supplier non-compliance and transportation inefficiencies were the main external barriers exposed.Managerial implications: In order to optimise the efficiency of the reverse flow, managers are recommended to devote more capital to RL infrastructure, develop policies to manage supplier behaviour, focus on RL as a revenue generating stream as well as implement information systems to manage the entire reverse flow.Conclusion: All participating grocery retailers follow similar RL processes. Growth in RL practices as well as infrastructure to perform those practices is a future priority for all the reviewed grocery retailers. RL is no longer only a key cost driver, but also provides organisations with many additional opportunities.

  12. Video-Based Grocery Shopping Intervention Effect on Purchasing Behaviors Among Latina Shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Hortensia; Cortés, Dharma E; Garcia, Samantha; Duan, Lei; Black, David S

    2017-05-01

    To compare changes in food-purchasing knowledge, self-efficacy, and behavior after viewing nutrition education videos among Los Angeles, California Latinas responsible for household grocery shopping. From February to May 2015, a convenience sample of 113 Latinas watched 1 video (El Carrito Saludable) featuring MyPlate guidelines applied to grocery shopping (1-video intervention) and another convenience sample of 105 Latinas watched 2 videos (El Carrito Saludable and Ser Consciente), the latter featuring mindfulness to support attention and overcome distractions while grocery shopping (2-video intervention). We administered questionnaires before and after intervention. A preselected sample in each intervention condition (n = 72) completed questionnaires at 2-months after intervention and provided grocery receipts (before and 2-months after intervention). Knowledge improved in both intervention groups (P shopping list (both P < .05) and purchased more healthy foods (d = 0.60; P < .05) at 2 months than did the 1-video group. Culturally tailored videos that model food-purchasing behavior and mindfulness show promise for improving the quality of foods that Latinas bring into the home.

  13. Brokered dialogue: A new research method for controversial health and social issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Janet A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dialogue is a foundational feature of social life and an important way in which we come to understand one another. In situations of controversy dialogue is often absent because of a range of social barriers. We have developed a new film-based qualitative research method for studying controversial issues in healthcare and social policy. We call this method Brokered Dialogue. Theoretically informed by the traditions in narrative inquiry and visual anthropology, the method is premised on the idea that dialogue possesses features making it unique as a generator of new knowledge and opportunities for social intervention. Film is not only an extraordinarily rich data source, but an excellent medium for knowledge transfer and dissemination. Discussion The paper introduces the Brokered Dialogue method. We outline its critical steps, including the procedures for sampling, data collection and data analysis of both textual and visual data. Participants in a Brokered Dialogue engage in filmed interviews that capture their perspectives on a given topic; they then share their perspectives with, and pose questions of, one another through the medium of film. Using a participatory editing process, only footage that participants feel comfortable showing to others is incorporated. This technique offers participants a ‘safe’ space for respectful interaction. The editing process itself is analytic, and the final assembly of footage approximates a dialogue on the topic at hand. A link to a film produced from a project piloting the method is provided to demonstrate its real world application. Summary Brokered Dialogue is a method for promoting respectful interactions among those with seemingly divergent views on a controversial topic and for discovering critical points of divergence that may represent pathways for improvement. While the end product is a ‘film’, the goal is to have these films used as catalysts for ongoing respectful

  14. Survey on supply and demand of medicinal plants in Lorestan province groceries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fatemeh Naderi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of activities related to medicinal plant industry lead to maintenance and progress (improvement of society health. Attention to situation of medicinal plants in groceries, diagnosis different species, Value of consumption and supplier regions as most important factors in medicinal plants forum can be used for programming and politics in medicinal industry in our country. So via proper scientific programming we can achieve to better culture of medicinal plants consumption and we can improve health parameters in lorestan province. Materials and methods The research was accomplished with Cross-Sectional study and questionary technique was used for data collection. The questionnaire consist of 3 parts were included questions related to socioeconomic trait, number of medicinal plant and medicinal properties. All of the groceries in the lorestan province were studied as statistical society. Sampling method was availability sample and samples size was 69 groceries. Results Results showed that the numbers of medicinal plants in groceries were about 336 species, mean of sold weight Was 128.48 kg. 94.5% and 5.5% of medicinal plants were supplied from out of Lorestan and Lorestan province respectively. Conclusion Existence of special plains and mountains plentiful running water, high storage of under round water and different Climate in the lorestan province cause a considerable diversity in this province. Whereas the results of this study showed that the most important suppliers of medicinal plants were located out of this province therefore programming in the case of these valuable sources of medicinal plants will be because higher preoccupation and existence of these crops in the groceries of lorestan province, even can export these to other countries.

  15. Shopper marketing nutrition interventions: Social norms on grocery carts increase produce spending without increasing shopper budgets☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Collin R.; Niculescu, Mihai; Just, David R.; Kelly, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We assessed the efficacy of an easy-to-implement shopper marketing nutrition intervention in a pilot and two additional studies to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability or increasing shopper budgets. Methods We created grocery cart placards that detailed the number of produce items purchased (i.e., descriptive norm) at particular stores (i.e., provincial norm). The effect of these placards on produce spending was assessed across 971,706 individual person grocery store transactions aggregated by day. The pilot study designated a baseline period (in both control and intervention store) followed by installation of grocery cart placards (in the intervention store) for two weeks. The pilot study was conducted in Texas in 2012. In two additional stores, we designated baseline periods followed by 28 days of the same grocery cart placard intervention as in the pilot. Additional interventions were conducted in New Mexico in 2013. Results The pilot study resulted in a significant difference between average produce spending per day per person across treatment periods (i.e., intervention versus same time period in control) (16%) and the difference between average produce spending per day per person across stores in the control periods (4%); Furthermore, the same intervention in two additional stores resulted in significant produce spending increases of 12.4% and 7.5% per day per person respectively. In all stores, total spending did not change. Conclusions Descriptive and provincial social norm messages (i.e., on grocery cart placards) may be an overlooked tool to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability and increasing shopper budgets. PMID:26844084

  16. ANTARES: a prototype transient broker system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhijit; Matheson, Thomas; Snodgrass, Richard; Kececioglu, John; Narayan, Gautham; Seaman, Robert; Jenness, Tim; Axelrod, Tim

    2014-07-01

    The Arizona-NOAO Temporal Analysis and Response to Events System (ANTARES) is a joint project of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory and the Department of Computer Science at the University of Arizona. The goal is to build the software infrastructure necessary to process and filter alerts produced by time-domain surveys, with the ultimate source of such alerts being the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). The ANTARES broker will add value to alerts by annotating them with information from external sources such as previous surveys from across the electromagnetic spectrum. In addition, the temporal history of annotated alerts will provide further annotation for analysis. These alerts will go through a cascade of filters to select interesting candidates. For the prototype, `interesting' is defined as the rarest or most unusual alert, but future systems will accommodate multiple filtering goals. The system is designed to be flexible, allowing users to access the stream at multiple points throughout the process, and to insert custom filters where necessary. We describe the basic architecture of ANTARES and the principles that will guide development and implementation.

  17. Kształcenie brokerów informacji w Polsce / Education information brokers in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Kustra

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We współczesnym świecie, w dobie Internetu, to informacja jest najważniejsza, ale żeby ocenić czy jest wiarygodna potrzebni są specjaliści – brokerzy informacji. W Polsce ten zawód jest jeszcze młody, a jego przedstawiciele nie mając własnego stowarzyszenia, stosują się do zasad kodeksu etyki infobrokerskiej stworzonego przez Association of Independent Information Professionals. Oferta kształcenia infobrokerów w Polsce jest coraz szersza i przyszli brokerzy informacji mogą się przygotowywać do zawodu na studiach I i II stopnia, studiach podyplomowych oraz na szkoleniach i kursach. English abstractIn the modern world, the age of the Internet, the information is important, but to assess whether there is credible experts are needed – information brokers. In Poland, the profession is still young, and it’s representatives don’t have their own associations, follow the rules of the Code of Ethical Business Practiced created by the Association of Independent Information Professionals. Offer infobrokerów education in Poland is getting wider and future information brokers can prepare for the profession at the undergraduate and secondary education, post-graduate studies and training courses.

  18. Designing and implementing a Quality Broker: the GeoViQua experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papeschi, Fabrizio; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Masò, Joan; Nativi, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    concerns the association between the user feedbacks and the affected products that are target of the report. This association is usually achieved by means of a Product Identifier (PID), but actually just a few products are annotated with their PID; recent studies show that on a total of more than 100000 Clearinghouse products, only some tens have the Product Identifier. Furthermore the association should be persistent within the GeoViQua scope. This work is focused on the typical use case in which the GeoViQua Broker performs data discovery from different data providers, and then integrates in the Quality Information Model the producer quality report with the feedback given by users. In particular, this work highlights the problems faced by the GeoViQua Broker and the techniques adopted to ensure consistency and persistency also for quality reports whose target products are not annotated with a PID.

  19. 77 FR 74546 - Posting of Pamphlet Provided for in the International Marriage Broker Regulation Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... of Pamphlet Provided for in the International Marriage Broker Regulation Act ACTION: Notice of posting of pamphlet provided for in section 833(a) of the International Marriage Broker Regulation Act, Title D of Public Law 109-162. SUMMARY: Section 833(a) of the International Marriage Broker...

  20. 75 FR 5620 - New Date for April 2010 Customs Brokers License Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection New Date for April 2010 Customs Brokers License Examination.... DATES: The customs broker's license examination scheduled for April 2010 will be held on Wednesday... partnership) must hold a valid customs broker's license and permit in order to transact customs business...

  1. 77 FR 39502 - New Date for the October 2012 Customs Broker License Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection New Date for the October 2012 Customs Broker License... October 2012. DATES: The customs broker's license examination scheduled for October 2012 will be held on... partnership) must hold a valid customs broker's license and permit in order to transact customs business...

  2. 17 CFR 240.17a-11 - Notification provisions for brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: Formula for Determination Reserve Requirement of Brokers and Dealers under § 240.15c3-3; or (3) If a... section. The notice shall specify the broker or dealer's net capital requirement and its current amount of... requirements of paragraph (b)(1) of this section, an OTC derivatives dealer or broker or dealer permitted...

  3. 49 CFR 387.307 - Property broker surety bond or trust fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Property broker surety bond or trust fund. 387.307... MINIMUM LEVELS OF FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR MOTOR CARRIERS Surety Bonds and Policies of Insurance for Motor Carriers and Property Brokers § 387.307 Property broker surety bond or trust fund. (a) Security....

  4. 49 CFR 375.409 - May household goods brokers provide estimates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May household goods brokers provide estimates? 375... Estimating Charges § 375.409 May household goods brokers provide estimates? A household goods broker must not provide an individual shipper with an estimate of charges for the transportation of household goods...

  5. Interconnecting Multidiscilinary Data Infrastructures: From Federation to Brokering Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Standardization and federation activities have been played an essential role to push interoperability at the disciplinary and cross-disciplinary level. However, they demonstrated not to be sufficient to resolve important interoperability challenges, including: disciplinary heterogeneity, cross-organizations diversities, cultural differences. Significant international initiatives like GEOSS, IODE, and CEOS demonstrated that a federation system dealing with global and multi-disciplinary domain turns out to be rater complex, raising more the already high entry level barriers for both Providers and Users. In particular, GEOSS demonstrated that standardization and federation actions must be accompanied and complemented by a brokering approach. Brokering architecture and its implementing technologies are able to implement an effective interoperability level among multi-disciplinary systems, lowering the entry level barriers for both data providers and users. This presentation will discuss the brokering philosophy as a complementary approach for standardization and federation to interconnect existing and heterogeneous infrastructures and systems. The GEOSS experience will be analyzed, specially.

  6. Market Definition in Grocery Retailing: The Whole Foods Case

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Jódar-Rosell; Jordi Gual

    2008-01-01

    As in many other antitrust cases, the delineation of the relevant product market was the critical issue in the Whole Foods and Wild Oats merger. Setting the market boundaries containing the set of products in direct competition with those of the merging parties is a very difficult task in the presence of product differentiation. The varieties produced by each of the firms differ in several dimensions.

  7. Building a High Performance Metadata Broker using Clojure, NoSQL and Message Queues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truslove, I.; Reed, S.

    2013-12-01

    In practice, Earth and Space Science Informatics often relies on getting more done with less: fewer hardware resources, less IT staff, fewer lines of code. As a capacity-building exercise focused on rapid development of high-performance geoinformatics software, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) built a prototype metadata brokering system using a new JVM language, modern database engines and virtualized or cloud computing resources. The metadata brokering system was developed with the overarching goals of (i) demonstrating a technically viable product with as little development effort as possible, (ii) using very new yet very popular tools and technologies in order to get the most value from the least legacy-encumbered code bases, and (iii) being a high-performance system by using scalable subcomponents, and implementation patterns typically used in web architectures. We implemented the system using the Clojure programming language (an interactive, dynamic, Lisp-like JVM language), Redis (a fast in-memory key-value store) as both the data store for original XML metadata content and as the provider for the message queueing service, and ElasticSearch for its search and indexing capabilities to generate search results. On evaluating the results of the prototyping process, we believe that the technical choices did in fact allow us to do more for less, due to the expressive nature of the Clojure programming language and its easy interoperability with Java libraries, and the successful reuse or re-application of high performance products or designs. This presentation will describe the architecture of the metadata brokering system, cover the tools and techniques used, and describe lessons learned, conclusions, and potential next steps.

  8. Fast-food outlets and grocery stores near school and adolescents' eating habits and overweight in Finland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimäki, Hanne; Ervasti, Jenni; Oksanen, Tuula; Pentti, Jaana; Kouvonen, Anne; Halonen, Jaana I; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    .... However, the contribution of school neighbourhood environment is poorly understood. This study examined the association between proximity of a fast-food outlet or grocery store to school and adolescents' eating habits and overweight...

  9. Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (sios): Facilitating Easy Access to Multidisciplinary Arctic Data Through the Brokering Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, B. L.; Godøy, Ø.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental and climate changes are important elements of our global challenges. They are observed at a global scale and in particular in the Arctic. In order to give better estimates of the future changes, the Arctic has to be monitored and analyzed by a multi-disciplinary observation system that will improve Earth System Models. The best chance to achieve significant results within a relatively short time frame is found in regions with a large natural climate gradient, and where processes sensitive to the expected changes are particularly important. Svalbard and the surrounding ocean areas fulfil all these criteria. The vision for SIOS is to be a regional observational system for long term acquisition and proliferation of fundamental knowledge on global environmental change within an Earth System Science perspective in and around Svalbard. SIOS will systematically develop and implement methods for how observational networks are to be construed. The distributed SIOS data management system (SDMS) will be implemented through a combination of technologies tailored to the multi-disciplinary nature of the Arctic data. One of these technologies is The Brokering approach or "Framework". The Brokering approach provides a series of services such as discovery, access, transformation and semantics support to enable translation from one discipline/culture to another. This is exactly the challenges the SDMS will have to handle and thus the Brokering approach is integrated in the design of the system. A description of the design strategy for the SDMS that includes The Brokering approach will be presented. The design and implementation plans for the SDMS are based on research done in the EU funded ESFRI project SIOS and examples of solutions for interoperable systems producing Arctic datasets and products coordinated through SIOS will be showcased. The reported experience from SIOS brokering approach will feed into the process of developing a sustainable brokering governance

  10. Grocery store podcast about omega-3 fatty acids influences shopping behaviors: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangia, Deepika; Palmer-Keenan, Debra M

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether listening to a podcast about omega-3 fatty acids (n-3s) while grocery shopping increased shoppers' awareness about and purchases of seafood and other foods rich in n-3s. Repeated-measures design with a convenience sample (n = 56) of grocery shoppers who listened to the podcast while shopping. Pre- and postintervention semistructured interviews were conducted. The Theory of Reasoned Action was the study's framework. Shoppers were primarily females (mean age, 41 ± 15.3 years). Their perceived ability to buy [t(55) = 6.27, P Podcasts may effectively communicate nutrition information. More research with a larger sample size is needed to evaluate the effects of the podcast on long-term changes in shopping behavior. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Electronic Commerce Readiness in Developing Countries: The Case of the Chinese Grocery Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kurnia, Sherah; Peng, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Currently, e-Commerce has been used within the industry to various degrees, with retailers leading the way in incorporating e-Commerce technologies into the majority of their daily operations. Some of the major retailers have already introduced transactional and interactive websites to facilitate B2C and B2B e-Commerce. However the majority of the businesses within the grocery industry possess only standalone internal computer networks and websites. The e-Commerce readiness of the Chinese gro...

  12. Analysis of the potential of virtual stores for german online grocery retailing

    OpenAIRE

    Thelen, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    Research Problem – The effects of digitalization had a huge impact on people’s everyday life. With increased use of internet, E-Commerce became hugely popular and pressurized classic brick and mortar retailers. However, the grocery market is one of the few markets without a remarkable share of online sales. Recently various players entered the small but promising market. Still, it is not foreseeable which player and which kind of sales approach will prevail and retailers are se...

  13. The Consumer Direct Services Revolution in Grocery Retailing: an exploratory investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Teller, C; Kotzab, H; Grant, D B

    2006-01-01

    Purpose - To provide empirical evidence and explanation of the phenomenon that providers of home delivery of groceries are still of minor importance in highly concentrated retail markets. Design/methodology/approach - Based on a critical literature review three propositions were set up. A web based survey was conducted with two prospective consumer groups for home delivery providers: time starved consumers and consumers with Internet affinity. A structural equation modeling analysis was appli...

  14. Cooking-related PM2.5 and acrolein measured in grocery stores and comparison with other retail types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, W R; Sidheswaran, M; Sullivan, D P; Cohn, S; Fisk, W J

    2016-06-01

    We measured particulate matter (PM), acrolein, and other indoor air contaminants in eight visits to grocery stores in California. Retail stores of other types (hardware, furniture, and apparel) were also sampled on additional visits. Based on tracer gas decay data, most stores had adequate ventilation according to minimum ventilation rate standards. Grocery stores had significantly higher concentrations of acrolein, fine and ultrafine PM, compared to other retail stores, likely attributable to cooking. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 and acrolein exceeded health guidelines in all tested grocery stores. Acrolein emission rates to indoors in grocery stores had a mean estimate about 30 times higher than in other retail store types. About 80% of the indoor PM2.5 measured in grocery stores was emitted indoors, compared to only 20% for the other retail store types. Calculations suggest a substantial increase in outdoor air ventilation rate by a factor of three from current level is needed to reduce indoor acrolein concentrations. Alternatively, acrolein emission to indoors needs to be reduced 70% by better capturing of cooking exhaust. To maintain indoor PM2.5 below the California annual ambient standard of 12 μg/m(3) , grocery stores need to use air filters with an efficiency rating higher than the MERV 8 air filters commonly used today.

  15. Supporting grocery shopping for students with intellectual disability:a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C; Satsangi, Rajiv; Bartlett, Whitney

    2017-08-01

    Decades of research exist supporting various types of self-operating prompting systems, including picture, audio and video to help students with disabilities acquire skills, especially to teach life skills. While many facets of life skills are important to target for instruction for secondary students with intellectual disability, one receiving declining attention is grocery shopping. Using a single subject alternating treatment design with two high school students with intellectual disability, the authors analysed the impact of three self-operating prompts systems - picture, audio and video - on students' successful selection of grocery items, independence in completing the task (i.e., percent of steps not prompted), and task completion time. Results showed video prompting to be most successful prompting system for both students for selecting grocery items. However, independence and task completion time varied significantly for the students across the prompting systems. It is important to match the correct prompting system to individual students' skills, needs and preference, but also to balance efficiency - both for educators and students. Implications for Rehabilitation Video prompting is an effective instructional strategy, but must be considered in light of time and skill to create the video prompts as well as social stigmatization of use in natural community settings. It is important to match the correct prompting system to each student, but also to balance efficiency - both for educators and students.

  16. Effects of cultural brokering on individual wellbeing and family dynamics among immigrant youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarevic, Vanja

    2017-02-01

    Over 90% of immigrant youth help their parents navigate the mainstream US culture, a process known as cultural brokering. Past research has indicated that brokering can often have negative effects on development of immigrant youth and their families. The current study builds on the past literature by examining how various aspects of brokering may impact individual wellbeing and family dynamics among first generation immigrant and refugee youth from Eastern Europe (N = 197, Mage = 22.93 (SD = 2.89), 63.5% female) currently residing in the United States. The results show that family conflict mediates the relationship between brokering and youth psychological wellbeing. The findings suggest that there are distinct patterns of association between frequency of brokering and feelings toward brokering, pointing to the need to further understand the ways in which we can capitalize on positive aspects and minimize negative aspects of cultural brokering among immigrants.

  17. 7 CFR 1955.130 - Real estate brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., proposed innovative promotion methods, and financial capability. The responsibilities of the broker under... notice of initial listing, withdrawal, price change, terms change, relisting, sale cancellation... this subpart. (d) Price. No offer for less than the listed price will be accepted during the period...

  18. 78 FR 14848 - Duties of Brokers, Dealers, and Investment Advisers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ....C. 80b-11(g)(2). \\2\\ In 2006, the SEC retained the RANDCorporation's Institute for Civil Justice... Institute for Civil Justice, Investor and Industry Perspectives on Investment Advisers and Broker-Dealers... advisers. See, e.g., United States v. Skelly, 442 F.3d 94, 98 (2d Cir. 2006); United States v. Szur, 289...

  19. Knowledge Sharing in Construction Partnering - Redundancy, Boundary Objects and Brokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Thuesen, Christian Langhoff

    2013-01-01

    common assignment of meaning, brokers (e.g. design managers), boundary objects (e.g. drawings) and arenas (e.g. meetings). The paper presents an ethnographic case study of a project partnership between engineers, architects and contractors in construction using the partnering concept. The focus is on two...

  20. As Endowment Values Plummet, Some Institutions Consider Suing Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that as many as five colleges or charitable foundations whose endowments have suffered significant investment losses or were unable to access money in their accounts in recent months are considering legal action against their brokers or investment managers, alleging misrepresentation of risk or mismanagement. Jacob H.…

  1. 75 FR 47825 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  2. 75 FR 47825 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 USC 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  3. 76 FR 44032 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  4. 77 FR 16249 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  5. 76 FR 22912 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs And Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations...

  6. 77 FR 5819 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 USC 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  7. 75 FR 11898 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 USC 1641), and the U.S. Customs...

  8. 77 FR 45647 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-18739] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland..., (19 USC 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51), the...

  9. 77 FR 74022 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  10. 76 FR 2918 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  11. 76 FR 7873 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1641), and the U.S. Customs...

  12. 77 FR 43609 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  13. 75 FR 52456 - Customs Broker License Examination Individual Eligibility Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection 19 CFR Part 111 RIN 1651-AA74 Customs Broker License Examination Individual Eligibility Requirements AGENCY: Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland.... Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations regarding the requirements that an individual must...

  14. 76 FR 13205 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  15. 76 FR 22912 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1641), and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations...

  16. 75 FR 11899 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  17. 75 FR 76998 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  18. 75 FR 5618 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 USC 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  19. 75 FR 75691 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs...

  20. 76 FR 65742 - Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant...

  1. A grid broker pricing mechanism for temporal and budget guarantees

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanagh, RE; Djemame, KD

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a pricing mechanism for Grid computing, with the aim of showing how a broker can accept the most appropriate jobs to be computed on time and on budget. We analyse the mechanism’s performance via discrete event simulation, and illustrate its viability, the benefits of a new admission policy and to how slack relates to machine heterogeneity.

  2. An Education Broker Toolset for Web Course Customization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbach, Christian; Bodendorf, Freimut

    Within an electronic education market, an electronic education mall is defined as a virtual service center to support various transaction processes by providing a technological platform with appropriate value-added services and interfaces for suppliers and customers. In this context, an education broker service is of central importance, because…

  3. Designing a Robot for Cultural Brokering in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yanghee

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of English language learning children in U.S. classrooms and the need for effective programs that support these children present a great challenge to the current educational paradigm. The challenge may be met, at least in part, by an innovative humanoid robot serving as a cultural broker that mediates collaborative…

  4. Evaluating Sustainability Models for Interoperability through Brokering Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Jay; Benedict, Karl; Best, Mairi; Fyfe, Sue; Jacobs, Cliff; Michener, William; Nativi, Stefano; Powers, Lindsay; Turner, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Sustainability of software and research support systems is an element of innovation that is not often discussed. Yet, sustainment is essential if we expect research communities to make the time investment to learn and adopt new technologies. As the Research Data Alliance (RDA) is developing new approaches to interoperability, the question of uptake and sustainability is important. Brokering software sustainability is one of the areas that is being addressed in RDA. The Business Models Team of the Research Data Alliance Brokering Governance Working Group examined several support models proposed to promote the long-term sustainability of brokering middleware. The business model analysis includes examination of funding source, implementation frameworks and challenges, and policy and legal considerations. Results of this comprehensive analysis highlight advantages and disadvantages of the various models with respect to the specific requirements for brokering services. We offer recommendations based on the outcomes of this analysis that suggest that hybrid funding models present the most likely avenue to long term sustainability.

  5. Semantic Web-based Vocabulary Broker for Open Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, B.; Neher, G.; Iyemori, T.; Murayama, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Koyama, Y.; King, T. A.; Galkin, I. A.; Fung, S. F.; Wharton, S.; Cecconi, B.

    2016-12-01

    Keyword vocabularies are used to tag and to identify data of science data repositories. Such vocabularies consist of controlled terms and the appropriate concepts, such as GCMD1 keywords or the ESPAS2 keyword ontology. The Semantic Web-based mash-up of domain-specific, cross- or even trans-domain vocabularies provides unique capabilities in the network of appropriate data resources. Based on a collaboration between GFZ3, the FHP4, the WDC for Geomagnetism5 and the NICT6 we developed the concept of a vocabulary broker for inter- and trans-disciplinary data detection and integration. Our prototype of the Semantic Web-based vocabulary broker uses OSF7 for the mash-up of geo and space research vocabularies, such as GCMD keywords, ESPAS keyword ontology and SPASE8 keyword vocabulary. The vocabulary broker starts the search with "free" keywords or terms of a specific vocabulary scheme. The vocabulary broker almost automatically connects the different science data repositories which are tagged by terms of the aforementioned vocabularies. Therefore the mash-up of the SKOS9 based vocabularies with appropriate metadata from different domains can be realized by addressing LOD10 resources or virtual SPARQL11 endpoints which maps relational structures into the RDF format12. In order to demonstrate such a mash-up approach in real life, we installed and use a D2RQ13 server for the integration of IUGONET14 data which are managed by a relational database. The OSF based vocabulary broker and the D2RQ platform are installed at virtual LINUX machines at the Kyoto University. The vocabulary broker meets the standard of a main component of the WDS15 knowledge network. The Web address of the vocabulary broker is http://wdcosf.kugi.kyoto-u.ac.jp 1 Global Change Master Directory2 Near earth space data infrastructure for e-science3 German Research Centre for Geosciences4 University of Applied Sciences Potsdam5 World Data Center for Geomagnetism Kyoto6 National Institute of Information and

  6. The Brokering Approach for Multidisciplinary Data Discovery and Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Global sustainability research requires an integrated multidisciplinary effort underpinned by a collaborative environment discovering and accessing heterogeneous data across disciplines. Traditionally, interoperability has been achieved by implementing federation of systems. The federating approach entails the adoption of a set of common technologies and standards. This presentation argues that for complex (and uncontrolled) environments such as global, multidisciplinary, and voluntary-based infrastructures, federated solutions proved not to be well-accepted. In fact, the adoption of a limited common set of technologies and standards raises a couple of important issues: (a) high level entry barriers for both data producers and users; (b) lack of appropriateness to address domain specificities. More recently, a new interoperability approach was successfully experimented: the brokering approach. This presentation identifies the principles of brokering, and gives examples of practical implementation relating to data discovery, semantic searching, and data access. The benefit of the brokering approach includes: (a) lowers barriers to participation in distributed systems for both users and resource providers (minimal burden or cost impact on existing systems); (b) accelerates interconnection of disparate systems; (c) facilitates sustainability, reusability, extensibility, and flexibility of multidisciplinary infrastructures; (d) removes need to impose common (e.g. federal, "top-down") specifications and software components enabling a more adaptive "bottom-up" evolution of infrastructures. The Brokering approach was considered and successfully adopted by cross-disciplinary initiatives (e.g. GEOSS: Global Earth Observation System of Systems; several European FP7 programmes, NSIDC, etc. ); recently, the NSF EarthCube initiative funded a project dealing with "Data Broker".

  7. Collaborative development and implementation of a knowledge brokering program to promote research use in Burkina Faso, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dagenais

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts expended over recent decades, there is a persistent gap between the production of scientific evidence and its use. This is mainly due to the difficulty of bringing such knowledge to health workers and decision-makers so that it can inform practices and decisions on a timely basis. One strategy for transferring knowledge to potential users, that is, gaining increasing legitimacy, is knowledge brokering (KB, effectiveness of which in certain conditions has been demonstrated through empirical research. However, little is known about how to implement such a strategy, especially in the African context. The KB program presented here is aimed specifically at narrowing the gap by making scientific knowledge available to users with the potential to improve health-related practices and decision making in Burkina Faso. The program involves Canadian and African researchers, a knowledge broker, health practitioners, and policy-makers. This article presents the collaborative development of the KB strategy and the evaluation of its implementation at year 1. The KB strategy was developed in stages, beginning with a scoping study to ensure the most recent studies were considered. Two one-day workshops were then conducted to explore the problem of low research use and to adapt the strategy to the Burkinabè context. Based on these workshops, the KB program was developed and brokers were recruited and trained. Evaluation of the program's implementation after the first year showed that: 1 the preparatory activities were greatly appreciated by participants, and most considered the content useful for their work; 2 the broker had carried out his role in accordance with the logic model; and 3 this role was seen as important by the participants targeted by the activities and outputs. Participants made suggestions for program improvements in subsequent years, stressing particularly the need to involve decision-makers at the central level.

  8. Collaborative development and implementation of a knowledge brokering program to promote research use in Burkina Faso, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenais, Christian; Somé, Télesphore D; Boileau-Falardeau, Michèle; McSween-Cadieux, Esther; Ridde, Valéry

    2015-01-01

    Despite efforts expended over recent decades, there is a persistent gap between the production of scientific evidence and its use. This is mainly due to the difficulty of bringing such knowledge to health workers and decision-makers so that it can inform practices and decisions on a timely basis. One strategy for transferring knowledge to potential users, that is, gaining increasing legitimacy, is knowledge brokering (KB), effectiveness of which in certain conditions has been demonstrated through empirical research. However, little is known about how to implement such a strategy, especially in the African context. The KB program presented here is aimed specifically at narrowing the gap by making scientific knowledge available to users with the potential to improve health-related practices and decision making in Burkina Faso. The program involves Canadian and African researchers, a knowledge broker, health practitioners, and policy-makers. This article presents the collaborative development of the KB strategy and the evaluation of its implementation at year 1. The KB strategy was developed in stages, beginning with a scoping study to ensure the most recent studies were considered. Two one-day workshops were then conducted to explore the problem of low research use and to adapt the strategy to the Burkinabè context. Based on these workshops, the KB program was developed and brokers were recruited and trained. Evaluation of the program's implementation after the first year showed that: 1) the preparatory activities were greatly appreciated by participants, and most considered the content useful for their work; 2) the broker had carried out his role in accordance with the logic model; and 3) this role was seen as important by the participants targeted by the activities and outputs. Participants made suggestions for program improvements in subsequent years, stressing particularly the need to involve decision-makers at the central level.

  9. Collaborative development and implementation of a knowledge brokering program to promote research use in Burkina Faso, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenais, Christian; Somé, Télesphore D.; Boileau-Falardeau, Michèle; McSween-Cadieux, Esther; Ridde, Valéry

    2015-01-01

    Despite efforts expended over recent decades, there is a persistent gap between the production of scientific evidence and its use. This is mainly due to the difficulty of bringing such knowledge to health workers and decision-makers so that it can inform practices and decisions on a timely basis. One strategy for transferring knowledge to potential users, that is, gaining increasing legitimacy, is knowledge brokering (KB), effectiveness of which in certain conditions has been demonstrated through empirical research. However, little is known about how to implement such a strategy, especially in the African context. The KB program presented here is aimed specifically at narrowing the gap by making scientific knowledge available to users with the potential to improve health-related practices and decision making in Burkina Faso. The program involves Canadian and African researchers, a knowledge broker, health practitioners, and policy-makers. This article presents the collaborative development of the KB strategy and the evaluation of its implementation at year 1. The KB strategy was developed in stages, beginning with a scoping study to ensure the most recent studies were considered. Two one-day workshops were then conducted to explore the problem of low research use and to adapt the strategy to the Burkinabè context. Based on these workshops, the KB program was developed and brokers were recruited and trained. Evaluation of the program's implementation after the first year showed that: 1) the preparatory activities were greatly appreciated by participants, and most considered the content useful for their work; 2) the broker had carried out his role in accordance with the logic model; and 3) this role was seen as important by the participants targeted by the activities and outputs. Participants made suggestions for program improvements in subsequent years, stressing particularly the need to involve decision-makers at the central level. PMID:25630708

  10. Extending the GI Brokering Suite to Support New Interoperability Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, E.; Papeschi, F.; Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The GI brokering suite provides the discovery, access, and semantic Brokers (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem) that empower a Brokering framework for multi-disciplinary and multi-organizational interoperability. GI suite has been successfully deployed in the framework of several programmes and initiatives, such as European Union funded projects, NSF BCube, and the intergovernmental coordinated effort Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Each GI suite Broker facilitates interoperability for a particular functionality (i.e. discovery, access, semantic extension) among a set of brokered resources published by autonomous providers (e.g. data repositories, web services, semantic assets) and a set of heterogeneous consumers (e.g. client applications, portals, apps). A wide set of data models, encoding formats, and service protocols are already supported by the GI suite, such as the ones defined by international standardizing organizations like OGC and ISO (e.g. WxS, CSW, SWE, GML, netCDF) and by Community specifications (e.g. THREDDS, OpenSearch, OPeNDAP, ESRI APIs). Using GI suite, resources published by a particular Community or organization through their specific technology (e.g. OPeNDAP/netCDF) can be transparently discovered, accessed, and used by different Communities utilizing their preferred tools (e.g. a GIS visualizing WMS layers). Since Information Technology is a moving target, new standards and technologies continuously emerge and are adopted in the Earth Science context too. Therefore, GI Brokering suite was conceived to be flexible and accommodate new interoperability protocols and data models. For example, GI suite has recently added support to well-used specifications, introduced to implement Linked data, Semantic Web and precise community needs. Amongst the others, they included: DCAT: a RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between Web data catalogs. CKAN: a data management system for data distribution, particularly used by

  11. One-to-one modeling and simulation: a new approach in customer relationship management for grocery retail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydar, Cem M.

    2002-03-01

    The ever-increasing competition in retail industry puts pressure on retailers to deal with their customers more efficiently. Currently most companies use Customer Relationship Management (CRM) systems to maximize the customer satisfaction level by trying to understand more about their behaviors. However, one disadvantage of the current approaches is that they focus on the segmentation of customers into homogenous groups and they disregard examining the one-to-one relationship of each individual's behavior toward each product. Therefore, individual behavior cannot be captured in detail. Modeling individual behavior for each product enables several strategies of pricing by keeping the customer satisfaction at the maximum level. One example is offering a personal discount on a particular item to a customer who is price sensitive to that particular product. Therefore, you can still sell other products at the non-discounted level to this customer by keeping him satisfied. In this paper, individual pricing approach is discussed. The aim of this study is to develop a conceptual framework to analyze the feasibility of individual pricing. Customer behaviors can be modeled individually with respect to each product for a grocery store. Several factors can be used to determine these behaviors such as customer's need, brand loyalty and price sensitivity. Each customer can be modeled as an adaptive agent using qualitative descriptions of behaviors (i.e., highly price sensitive). Then, the overall shopping behavior can be simulated using a multi-agent Monte-Carlo simulation. It is expected that with this approach, retailers will be able to determine better strategies to obtain more profits, better sales and better customer satisfaction.

  12. Country-of-origin labeling prior to and at the point of purchase: an exploration of the information environment in Baltimore City grocery stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagasse, Lisa P; Love, David C; Smith, Katherine Clegg

    2014-01-01

    The country-of-origin labeling (COOL) law requires United States grocers to indicate the origin and procurement method (farm-raised or wild-caught) for seafood. This study explored the presentation of COOL on fresh, frozen, packaged, and unpackaged seafood in Baltimore City grocery stores. Eight stores were visited bi-monthly to photograph seafood labels, and circulars were collected weekly from fourteen stores over three months. Ninety-six percent of products were labeled correctly. Forty-eight percent of advertisements included COOL. While in-store labels did not highlight COOL, advertising featured references to domestic and wild-caught seafood, signaling to customers that these are high-value product qualities.

  13. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Grocery Stores (Revised) (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, B.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders successfully plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited in these guides. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. Grocery stores were selected as one of the highest priority sectors, because they represent one of the most energy-intensive market segments.

  14. Towards a Brokering Framework for Business Process Execution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Mattia; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Roncella, Roberto; Mazzetti, Paolo; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Advancing our knowledge of environmental phenomena and their interconnections requires an intensive use of environmental models. Due to the complexity of Earth system, the representation of complex environmental processes often requires the use of more than one model (often from different disciplines). The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) launched the Model Web initiative to increase present accessibility and interoperability of environmental models, allowing their flexible composition into complex Business Processes (BPs). A few, basic principles are at the base of the Model Web concept (Nativi, et al.): (i) Open access, (ii) Minimal entry-barriers, (iii) Service-driven approach, and (iv) Scalability. This work proposes an architectural solution, based on the Brokering approach for multidisciplinary interoperability, aiming to contribute to the Model Web vision. The Brokering approach is currently adopted in the new GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) as was presented at the last GEO Plenary meeting in Istanbul, November 2011. We designed and prototyped a component called BP Broker. The high-level functionalities provided by the BP Broker are: • Discover the needed model implementations in an open, distributed and heterogeneous environment; • Check I/O consistency of BPs and provide suggestions for mismatches resolving: • Publish the EBP as a standard model resource for re-use. • Submit the compiled BP (EBP) to a WF-engine for execution. A BP Broker has the following features: • Support multiple abstract BP specifications; • Support encoding in multiple WF-engine languages. According to the Brokering principles, the designed system is flexible enough to support the use of multiple BP design (visual) tools, heterogeneous Web interfaces for model execution (e.g. OGC WPS, WSDL, etc.), and different Workflow engines. The present implementation makes use of BPMN 2.0 notation for BP design and jBPM workflow engine for eBP execution; however, the strong

  15. Determining the Optimum Level of Diversification of Home Broker Investors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Nascimento de Oliveira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper has the objective of determining the number of stocks that diversify a portfólio of Bovespa stocks of home brokers investors. We find the number of stocks that diversifies the portfólio by equalizing the benefit with the cost of including one more stock in the portfólio. To find the benefit, we use a methodology that is similar to Statman (1987. To find the cost we use an original methodology, in which we weight the costs of major brokers taking in consideration the volume transacted by them. The number of stocks that diversify our portfólio is 12. (Full article in Portuguese only

  16. A Review on Broker Based Cloud Service Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Rajganesh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing emerged as a utility oriented computing that facilitates resource sharing under pay-as-you-go model. Nowadays, cloud offerings are not limited to range of services and anything can be shared as a service through the Internet. In this work, a detailed literature survey with respect to cloud service discovery and composition has been accounted. A proposed architecture with the inclusion of cloud broker is presented in our work. It focuses the importance of suitable service selection and its ranking towards fulfilling the customer’s service requirements. The proposed cloud broker advocates techniques such as reasoning and decision making capabilities for the improved cloud service selection and composition.

  17. SCIMITAR: Scalable Stream-Processing for Sensor Information Brokering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    surveillance platforms. Cloud computing is the technology of choice for providing the resources and services needed to enable and mange large-scale...Brokering 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...to enable and mange large-scale distributed computation. To date, there has been little work to develop highly scalable dynamic IM processing and

  18. Fringe Benefits Compensation of Real Estate Agents and Brokers

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel T. Winkler; W. Keener Hughen

    2012-01-01

    Fringe benefits compensation offered by employers has grown rapidly over the past 50 years. Research in this area has been primarily limited to hourly and salaried employees. This study examines employer-based fringe benefits compensation of real estate agents and brokers. A model is developed that jointly estimates the income, hours worked, and fringe benefits compensation. The findings indicate that fringe benefits increase according to hours worked and the sales professional¡¦s contributio...

  19. A Review on Broker Based Cloud Service Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nagarajan Rajganesh; Thirunavukarasu Ramkumar

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing emerged as a utility oriented computing that facilitates resource sharing under pay-as-you-go model. Nowadays, cloud offerings are not limited to range of services and anything can be shared as a service through the Internet. In this work, a detailed literature survey with respect to cloud service discovery and composition has been accounted. A proposed architecture with the inclusion of cloud broker is presented in our work. It focuses the importance of suitable service se...

  20. Determinants and consequences of child culture brokering in families from the former Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Curtis J; Trickett, Edison J; Birman, Dina

    2012-09-01

    Child culture brokering occurs when immigrant children help their families navigate the new culture and language. The present study develops a model of the child culture broker role that situates it within the family and community economic and acculturative contexts of 328 families from the former Soviet Union. Path analysis was utilized to explore the relationships of community and family economic and cultural contexts with child culture brokering, child emotional distress, and family disagreements. All children reported some culture brokering for their parents. Less English proficient parents with lower status jobs, and living in areas with more Russian speaking families tended to utilize their children as brokers more often. Further, community economic conditions also predicted brokering indirectly, mediated by parent job social status. Brokering was related to child emotional distress and family disagreements. Further, culture brokering was a mediator of the impact of parent job social status on both child emotional distress and family disagreements. These results add to our understanding of the culture broker role and emphasize the utility of approaching research on it from an ecological perspective.

  1. Food safety issues and training methods for ready-to-eat foods in the grocery industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Margaret; Ghiselli, Richard

    2005-10-01

    As Americans have become more pressed for time, the use of convenient, simplified meals become a way of life. One aspect of this trend, known as Home Meal Replacement (IIMR), has increased in sales since its inception. Between 1999 and 2001, the average annual expenditure per consumer rose 5.6 pereent, and $958 per person per year was spent in 2002. Along with this growth, food safety risks may have increased. The study reported here examined efforts being undertaken by grocery and convenience stores to control the wholesomeness of INR food items. After a convenience sample of 500 grocery store executives was identified, a 32-item questionnaire was developed and mailed to the executives. The results indicate that the industry has taken food safety seriously with only 10 pereent reporting that they have no food safety training. The executives cited employee turnover as a major concern in food safety today, along with lack of food safety knowledge of the consumer and improper holding temperatures.

  2. Strategies to Save 50% Site Energy in Grocery and General Merchandise Stores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, A.; Hale, E.; Leach, M.

    2011-03-01

    This paper summarizes the methodology and main results of two recently published Technical Support Documents. These reports explore the feasibility of designing general merchandise and grocery stores that use half the energy of a minimally code-compliant building, as measured on a whole-building basis. We used an optimization algorithm to trace out a minimum cost curve and identify designs that satisfy the 50% energy savings goal. We started from baseline building energy use and progressed to more energy-efficient designs by sequentially adding energy design measures (EDMs). Certain EDMs figured prominently in reaching the 50% energy savings goal for both building types: (1) reduced lighting power density; (2) optimized area fraction and construction of view glass or skylights, or both, as part of a daylighting system tuned to 46.5 fc (500 lux); (3) reduced infiltration with a main entrance vestibule or an envelope air barrier, or both; and (4) energy recovery ventilators, especially in humid and cold climates. In grocery stores, the most effective EDM, which was chosen for all climates, was replacing baseline medium-temperature refrigerated cases with high-efficiency models that have doors.

  3. A framework for understanding grocery purchasing in a low-income urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, Drew A; Palmer, Anne M; Beckham, Sarah W; Surkan, Pamela J

    2013-05-01

    Research demonstrates that food desert environments limit low-income shoppers' ability to purchase healthy foods, thereby increasing their likelihood of diet-related illnesses. We sought to understand how individuals in an urban American food desert make grocery-purchasing decisions, and specifically why unhealthy purchases arise. Analysis is based on ethnographic data from participant observation, 37 in-depth interviews, and three focus groups with low-income, primarily African American shoppers with children. We found participants had detailed knowledge of and preference for healthy foods, but the obligation to consistently provide food for their families required them to apply specific decision criteria which, combined with structural qualities of the supermarket environment, increased unhealthy purchases and decreased healthy purchases. Applying situated cognition theory, we constructed an emic model explaining this widely shared grocery-purchasing decision process and its implications. This context-specific understanding of behavior suggests that multifaceted, system-level approaches to intervention are needed to increase healthy purchasing in food deserts.

  4. Ensuring consistency and persistence to the Quality Information Model - The role of the GeoViQua Broker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, Lorenzo; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Nativi, Stefano; Bastin, Lucy; Masó, Joan

    2013-04-01

    a few products are annotated with their PID; recent studies show that on a total of about 100000 Clearinghouse products, only 37 have the Product Identifier. Furthermore the association should be persistent within the GeoViQua scope. GeoViQua architecture is built on the brokering approach successfully experimented within the EuroGEOSS project and realized by the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker). Part of the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI), the GEO DAB allows for harmonization and distribution in a transparent way for both users and data providers. This way, GeoViQua can effectively complement and extend the GEO DAB obtaining a Quality-augmentation broker (GeoViQua Broker) which plays a central role in ensuring the consistency of the Producer and User quality models. This work is focused on the typical use case in which the GeoViQua Broker performs data discovery from different data providers, and then integrates in the Quality Information Model the producer quality report with the feedback given by users. In particular, this work highlights the problems faced by the GeoViQua Broker and the techniques adopted to ensure consistency and persistency also for quality reports whose target products are not annotated with a PID. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement n° 265178.

  5. Brokering technologies to realize the hydrology scenario in NSF BCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, Enrico; Easton, Zachary; Fuka, Daniel; Pearlman, Jay; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In the National Science Foundation (NSF) BCube project an international team composed of cyber infrastructure experts, geoscientists, social scientists and educators are working together to explore the use of brokering technologies, initially focusing on four domains: hydrology, oceans, polar, and weather. In the hydrology domain, environmental models are fundamental to understand the behaviour of hydrological systems. A specific model usually requires datasets coming from different disciplines for its initialization (e.g. elevation models from Earth observation, weather data from Atmospheric sciences, etc.). Scientific datasets are usually available on heterogeneous publishing services, such as inventory and access services (e.g. OGC Web Coverage Service, THREDDS Data Server, etc.). Indeed, datasets are published according to different protocols, moreover they usually come in different formats, resolutions, Coordinate Reference Systems (CRSs): in short different grid environments depending on the original data and the publishing service processing capabilities. Scientists can thus be impeded by the burden of discovery, access and normalize the desired datasets to the grid environment required by the model. These technological tasks of course divert scientists from their main, scientific goals. The use of GI-axe brokering framework has been experimented in a hydrology scenario where scientists needed to compare a particular hydrological model with two different input datasets (digital elevation models): - the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) dataset, v.2. - the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset, v.3. These datasets were published by means of Hyrax Server technology, which can provide NetCDF files at their original resolution and CRS. Scientists had their model running on ArcGIS, so the main goal was to import the datasets using the available ArcPy library and have EPSG:4326 with the same resolution grid as the

  6. Evaluation of a Cooperative Extension Service Curriculum on Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Grocery Shop, Prepare Food, and Eat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Janice R.; Johnston, Jan H.; Brosi, Whitney A.; Jaco, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Shop, Cook and Eat curriculum was designed to provide education about concepts of empowerment and assistive technology for grocery shopping, preparing food, and eating. The curriculum included examples and hands-on demonstrations of assistive technology devices for grocery shopping, food…

  7. Evaluation of a Cooperative Extension Service Curriculum on Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Grocery Shop, Prepare Food, and Eat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Janice R.; Johnston, Jan H.; Brosi, Whitney A.; Jaco, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Shop, Cook and Eat curriculum was designed to provide education about concepts of empowerment and assistive technology for grocery shopping, preparing food, and eating. The curriculum included examples and hands-on demonstrations of assistive technology devices for grocery shopping, food…

  8. Semantic Mediation via Access Broker: the OWS-9 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Mattia; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Craglia, Massimo; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Even with the use of common data models standards to publish and share geospatial data, users may still face semantic inconsistencies when they use Spatial Data Infrastructures - especially in multidisciplinary contexts. Several semantic mediation solutions exist to address this issue; they span from simple XSLT documents to transform from one data model schema to another, to more complex services based on the use of ontologies. This work presents the activity done in the context of the OGC Web Services Phase 9 (OWS-9) Cross Community Interoperability to develop a semantic mediation solution by enhancing the GEOSS Discovery and Access Broker (DAB). This is a middleware component that provides harmonized access to geospatial datasets according to client applications preferred service interface (Nativi et al. 2012, Vaccari et al. 2012). Given a set of remote feature data encoded in different feature schemas, the objective of the activity was to use the DAB to enable client applications to transparently access the feature data according to one single schema. Due to the flexible architecture of the Access Broker, it was possible to introduce a new transformation type in the configured chain of transformations. In fact, the Access Broker already provided the following transformations: Coordinate Reference System (CRS), spatial resolution, spatial extent (e.g., a subset of a data set), and data encoding format. A new software module was developed to invoke the needed external semantic mediation service and harmonize the accessed features. In OWS-9 the Access Broker invokes a SPARQL WPS to retrieve mapping rules for the OWS-9 schemas: USGS, and NGA schema. The solution implemented to address this problem shows the flexibility and extensibility of the brokering framework underpinning the GEO DAB: new services can be added to augment the number of supported schemas without the need to modify other components and/or software modules. Moreover, all other transformations (CRS

  9. Role Domains of Knowledge Brokering: A Model for the Health Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glegg, Stephanie M; Hoens, Alison

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge brokering is a strategy to support collaborations and partnerships within and across clinical, research, and policy worlds to improve the generation and use of research knowledge. Knowledge brokers function in multiple roles to facilitate the use of evidence by leveraging the power of these partnerships. The application of theory can provide clarity in understanding the processes, influences, expected mechanisms of action, and desired outcomes of knowledge brokering. Viewing knowledge brokering from the perspective of its role domains can provide a means of organizing these elements to advance our understanding of knowledge brokering. The objectives of this special interest article are (1) to describe the context for knowledge brokering in health care, (2) to provide an overview of knowledge translation theories applied to knowledge brokering, and (3) to propose a model outlining the role domains assumed in knowledge brokering. The Role Model for Knowledge Brokering is composed of 5 role domains, including information manager, linking agent, capacity builder, facilitator, and evaluator. We provide examples from the literature and our real-world experience to demonstrate the application of the model. This model can be used to inform the practice of knowledge brokering as well as professional development and evaluation strategies. In addition, it may be used to inform theory-driven research examining the effectiveness of knowledge brokering on knowledge generation and translation outcomes in the health care field, as well as on patient health outcomes.Video Abstract is available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A126).

  10. Economic Incentives, Institutions, and Racial Discrimination: The Case of Real Estate Brokers. Discussion Paper D78-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinger, John

    This paper examines the economic incentives and institutions that support racial discrimination by real estate brokers. The economic incentives are derived from a search model of broker behavior in which a broker searches for buyers and listings (i.e., sellers who will sell through him) and then attempts to match buyers with his listings. This…

  11. 31 CFR 560.535 - Letters of credit and brokering services relating to certain foodstuffs and carpets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TREASURY IRANIAN TRANSACTIONS REGULATIONS Licenses, Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560...) Brokering. United States persons, wherever located, are authorized to act as brokers for the purchase or...-country national. (3) A United States person may broker the sale of Iranian-origin carpets from Iran to...

  12. 49 CFR 385.14 - Motor carriers, brokers, and freight forwarders delinquent in paying civil penalties: prohibition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor carriers, brokers, and freight forwarders....14 Motor carriers, brokers, and freight forwarders delinquent in paying civil penalties: prohibition... commerce under 49 CFR 386.83. (b) A broker, freight forwarder, or for-hire motor carrier that has failed to...

  13. Economic Incentives, Institutions, and Racial Discrimination: The Case of Real Estate Brokers. Discussion Paper D78-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinger, John

    This paper examines the economic incentives and institutions that support racial discrimination by real estate brokers. The economic incentives are derived from a search model of broker behavior in which a broker searches for buyers and listings (i.e., sellers who will sell through him) and then attempts to match buyers with his listings. This…

  14. 75 FR 72987 - Brokers of Household Goods Transportation by Motor Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 371, 375, 386, and 387 RIN 2126-AA84 Brokers of Household Goods Transportation by Motor Vehicle AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety... household goods brokers which ``shall provide for the protection of shippers by motor vehicle'' (49...

  15. 19 CFR 111.79 - Employment of broker who has lost license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employment of broker who has lost license. 111.79 Section 111.79 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BROKERS Cancellation, Suspension, or Revocation of License or Permit,...

  16. 77 FR 25729 - Notice of Correction of Revoked Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Correction of Revoked Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Reinstatement of... Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations at section 111.30(d), the following Customs broker...

  17. 77 FR 17367 - Permissible Sharing of Client Records by Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection 19 CFR Part 111 RIN 1651-AA80 Permissible Sharing of Client Records by Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security... Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations that would allow brokers, upon the client's consent in...

  18. 78 FR 76851 - Agency Information Collection Activities: BP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: BP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland... requirement concerning the CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers (19 CFR Part 111). This request...

  19. 78 FR 48458 - Notice of Reinstatement of Revoked Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Reinstatement of Revoked Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Reinstatement of customs broker licenses that were erroneously revoked. SUMMARY: CBP erroneously revoked without...

  20. 75 FR 67094 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security... concerning the: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers (19 CFR Part 111). This request for comment...

  1. Language Brokering, Acculturation, and Empowerment: Evidence from South Asian Canadian Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cila, Jorida; Lalonde, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the practice of language brokering (LB) among South Asian Canadian college-age adults and how such practice relates to acculturation to mainstream and heritage cultures, as well as personal empowerment. One hundred and twenty-four young adults reported on three different indices of LB (brokering frequency, diversity of…

  2. 31 CFR 103.122 - Customer identification programs for broker-dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... broker-dealers. 103.122 Section 103.122 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... through any acquisition, merger, purchase of assets, or assumption of liabilities; or (B) An account... written notice. (iii) Sample notice. If appropriate, a broker-dealer may use the following sample language...

  3. 78 FR 78472 - Registration and Financial Security Requirements for Brokers of Property and Freight Forwarders...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... of Property and Freight Forwarders; Association of Independent Property Brokers and Agents' Exemption... brokers and freight forwarders from the $75,000 bond provision included in section 32918 of the Moving... freight forwarders. FMCSA requests comments from all interested parties on AIPBA's exemption request...

  4. Language Brokering, Acculturation, and Empowerment: Evidence from South Asian Canadian Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cila, Jorida; Lalonde, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the practice of language brokering (LB) among South Asian Canadian college-age adults and how such practice relates to acculturation to mainstream and heritage cultures, as well as personal empowerment. One hundred and twenty-four young adults reported on three different indices of LB (brokering frequency, diversity of…

  5. 77 FR 27150 - Amendments to Financial Responsibility Rules for Broker-Dealers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 240 RIN 3235-AJ85 Amendments to Financial Responsibility Rules for Broker-Dealers... requirements for broker-dealers. They also would update the financial responsibility rules and make certain...

  6. On2broker: Semantic-Based Access to Information Sources at the WWW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensel, Dieter; Angele, Jurgen; Decker, Stefan; Erdmann, Michael; Schnurr, Hans-Peter; Staab, Steffen; Studer, Rudi; Witt, Andreas

    On2broker provides brokering services to improve access to heterogeneous, distributed, and semistructured information sources as they are presented in the World Wide Web. It relies on the use of ontologies to make explicit the semantics of Web pages. This paper discusses the general architecture and main components (i.e., query engine, information…

  7. Cooperation between Non-Profit Fee-Based Information Services and For-Profit Brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Suzanne M.

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of U.S. nonprofit fee-based information services with emphasis on Purdue University's Technical Information Service. Discusses how these services can benefit profit-making brokers by supplying them documents on a nonprofit basis and by referring clients to brokers for specialized information projects. (Author/AEF)

  8. The Relationship of Language Brokering to Ethnic Identity for Latino Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskirch, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    Children of immigrant parents often translate written and face-to-face communication for parents and other adults, also known as language brokering. Fifty-five sixth-grade, Latino adolescents report their experiences and feelings toward language brokering, their level of acculturation, and their ethnic identity in a questionnaire. Generally, the…

  9. 17 CFR 230.139a - Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dealers distributing asset-backed securities. 230.139a Section 230.139a Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities. The publication or distribution by a broker or dealer of information, an opinion or a recommendation with respect to asset-backed securities...

  10. The feasibility and utility of grocery receipt analyses for dietary assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Yan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To establish the feasibility and utility of a simple data collection methodology for dietary assessment. Design Using a cross-sectional design, trained data collectors approached adults (~20 – 40 years of age at local grocery stores and asked whether they would volunteer their grocery receipts and answer a few questions for a small stipend ($1. Methods The grocery data were divided into 3 categories: "fats, oils, and sweets," "processed foods," and "low-fat/low-calorie substitutions" as a percentage of the total food purchase price. The questions assessed the shopper's general eating habits (eg, fast-food consumption and a few demographic characteristics and health aspects (eg, perception of body size. Statistical Analyses Performed. Descriptive and analytic analyses using non-parametric tests were conducted in SAS. Results Forty-eight receipts and questionnaires were collected. Nearly every respondent reported eating fast food at least once per month; 27% ate out once or twice a day. Frequency of fast-food consumption was positively related to perceived body size of the respondent (p = 0.02. Overall, 30% of the food purchase price was for fats, oils, sweets, 10% was for processed foods, and almost 6% was for low-fat/low-calorie substitutions. Households where no one was perceived to be overweight spent a smaller proportion of their food budget on fats, oils, and sweets than did households where at least one person was perceived to be overweight (p = 0.10; household where the spouse was not perceived to be overweight spent less on fats, oils, and sweets (p = 0.02 and more on low-fat/low-calorie substitutions (p = 0.09 than did households where the spouse was perceived to be overweight; and, respondents who perceived themselves to be overweight spent more on processed foods than did respondents who did not perceive themselves to be overweight (p = 0.06. Conclusion This simple dietary assessment method, although global in

  11. Making working in retailing interesting: A study of human resource management practices in Danish grocery retail chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.; Buck, Nuka

    In this paper we investigate the human resource management practices of five Danish grocery retail chains from the perspective of both retailers and employees. We present an analytical framework for analysing the social and institutional context of Danish retailing and interpret our case study...

  12. Comparing Self-Management Strategies Delivered via an iPhone to Promote Grocery Shopping and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Karen H.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Langone, John

    2015-01-01

    Four students with moderate intellectual disabilities used electronic lists delivered on an iPhone to assist them in skills related to community-based grocery shopping. An alternating treatments design was used to assist in comparing the effectiveness and efficiency of three different types of lists (Text Only, Audio + Text, and Picture + Text).…

  13. Comparing Self-Management Strategies Delivered via an iPhone to Promote Grocery Shopping and Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Karen H.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Langone, John

    2015-01-01

    Four students with moderate intellectual disabilities used electronic lists delivered on an iPhone to assist them in skills related to community-based grocery shopping. An alternating treatments design was used to assist in comparing the effectiveness and efficiency of three different types of lists (Text Only, Audio + Text, and Picture + Text).…

  14. Making working in retailing interesting: A study of human resource management practices in Danish grocery retail chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.; Buck, Nuka

    In this paper we investigate the human resource management practices of five Danish grocery retail chains from the perspective of both retailers and employees. We present an analytical framework for analysing the social and institutional context of Danish retailing and interpret our case study...

  15. IMPLEMENTAÇÃO DE UM SERVICE BROKER

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Engenharia Informática (Arquitectura, Sistemas e Redes de Computadores), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2010 A implementação de um Service Broker surgiu no contexto da criação de uma nova Framework de desenvolvimento modular por parte da empresa onde este projecto foi realizado, a AMBISIG (Ambiente e Sistemas de Informação Geográfica, S.A.). Esta nova Framework tem o intuito de permitir a criação de soluções e aplicações que correspondam às necessidades do...

  16. Risk factors of the upper limb disorders among cashiers in grocery retail industries: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhaidi, Muhammad Fareez Ahmad; Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Cashiers have been appointed as one of top ten occupations in developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) particularly on the upper limb. Many of the workers are still in high risk injury due to incorrect workstations and lack of employee education in basic biomechanical principles. Normally, cashiers are exposed in several risk factors such as awkward and static postures, repetition motion and forceful exertions. Thus, cashiers in supermarket are considered at risk from developing upper limb disorders (ULDs). This review evaluates selected papers that have studied risk factors of the upper limb disorders among cashiers in grocery retail industries. In addition, other studies from related industry were reviewed as applicable. In order to understand risk factors of the upper limb disorders among cashiers, it is recommended that future studies are needed in evaluating these risk factors among cashiers.

  17. Analysing the maximum level of customer satisfaction in grocery stores: the influence of feature advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pilar Martínez Ruiz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available From the initial consideration of the store attributes that the marketing literature has identified as key in order that grocery retailers manage to design their differentiation strategies, this work identifies the main factors underlying the above mentioned attributes. The goal is to analyze which of these factors exert a bigger influence on the highest level of customer satisfaction. With this intention, we have examined a sample of 422 consumers who had carried out their purchase in different types of store formats in Spain, considering the influence of feature advertising on the clientele behavior. Interesting conclusions related to the aspects that most impact on the maximum level of customer satisfaction depending on the influence of feature advertising stem from this work.

  18. What is the effectiveness of obesity related interventions at retail grocery stores and supermarkets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Abdulfatah; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

    2016-01-01

    interventions have been carried out in retail grocery/supermarket settings as part of an effort to understand and influence consumption of healthful foods. The review’s key outcome variable is sale/purchase of healthy foods as a result of the interventions. This systematic review sheds light...... on the effectiveness of food store interventions intended to promote the consumption of healthy foods and the methodological quality of studies reporting them. Methods Systematic literature search spanning from 2003 to 2015 (inclusive both years), and confined to papers in the English language was conducted. Studies...... fulfilling search criteria were identified and critically appraised. Studies included in this review report health interventions at physical food stores including supermarkets and corner stores, and with outcome variable of adopting healthier food purchasing/consumption behavior. The methodological quality...

  19. Emolabeling effectively reduces the influence of ambiguous labeling on food packages among grocery store shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privitera, Gregory J; Brown, Caitlin J; Gillespie, James J

    2014-12-16

    Despite increased regulations and policy enforcement for nutrition labeling, ambiguous labels on food items can still have deleterious effects on consumer perceptions of health. The present study used a counterbalanced within-subjects design to test if emolabeling - the use of emoticons to convey health information (happy = healthy; sad = not healthy) - will reduce the effects of ambiguous labels on consumer perceptions of the healthfulness of a food item. 85 grocery store shoppers were shown nutrition labels for a low calorie (LC) and a high calorie (HC) food with/without emolabels, and with an ambiguous label that either implied the food was healthy or unhealthy. Results showed that emolabels reduced the effectiveness of ambiguous labels: consumers rated the LC food as healthier and the HC food as less healthy when emolabels were added. The results suggest that, if implemented, this image-based emolabeling system could possibly be an effective buffer against the use of ambiguous labeling by food manufacturers.

  20. Total energy requirements of shopping for food. [Supermarkets, Grocery Stores, Dairies, Butcheries, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, M.G.; Earle, M.D.

    1982-12-01

    This survey investigated the total energy requirements of shopping for food in New Zealand. It is part of the Food Technology Research Centre's ongoing research into total energy use in the New Zealand food system. A sample survey of over 700 customers of 7 selected shops in Palmerston North was undertaken. An examination of the sample parameters and other factors indicate that the Palmerston North sample is probably representative of the national situation. However, there may be some need to verify this with other surveys particularly of large supermarkets. The primary objective of this survey was to determine representative energy intensities (MJ of energy per kilogram of food purchased) for the shopping step of the food chain. However, in the process much data were generated which may be of use and interest to a wider audience. These data include analysis of round trip distance, trip purpose, energy use per trip, characteristics of the shopping population, total transport cost of shopping, and purchase details. The mean energy intensity was found to be 13.21 MJ/kg (+- 7.7%). This energy intensity varied according to the shop type: Supermarkets (12.79 MJ/kg), Groceries (12.87 MJ/kg), Dairies (16.36 MJ/kg), Butcheries (16.35 MJ/kg) and Green groceries (7.17 MJ/kg). These energy intensities were found to very significantly according to the customer's sex and the shopping day. The total energy requirements of shopping for food in New Zealand were estimated to be 11.58 PJ/yr. Indirect energy requirements (energy embodied in the vehicles and transport infrastructures) were found to account for 63% of this total. The direct energy requirements (fuel) were estimated to be 4.3 PJ/yr ($70 million on 15 November 1981 costings).

  1. Building future generation service-oriented information broker networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Bourimi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Future generation networks target collecting intelligence from multiple sources based on end-users' data and their social interaction in order to draw useful conclusions on enabling users to execute their rights to online privacy. These networks form a rising class of service-oriented broker platforms. Designers and providers of such network platforms during the design and development of their systems focus primarily on technical specifications and issues. However, given the importance and richness of user information collected, they should already at the design phase take into account legal and ethical requirements. Failure to do so, may result in privacy violations, which may, in turn, affect the success of the network due to increasing awareness with respect to users’ privacy and security concerns, and may incur future costs. In this paper, we show how the di.me system balanced technical and legal requirements through both its design and implementation, while building a decentralized social networking platform. We report on our advances and experiences through a prototypical technology realizing such a platform, analyze the legal implications within the EU legal framework, and provide recommendations and conclusions for user-friendly service-oriented broker platforms.

  2. Knowledge Brokers in the Making: Opportunities to Connect Researchers and Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, K. G.; Pennell, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental science and engineering graduate students often lack training on how to communicate with policy decision makers who are grappling with questions to which research is responding. They communicate directly with mutual experts, but are many times unable to engage with non-experts about their research, thereby limiting the reach and impact of their findings. This presentation highlights opportunities within environmental science and engineering research to create opportunities for researchers to hone skills as knowledge brokers, so they learn ways to meaningfully engage with a range of stakeholders. A knowledge broker is an individual who connects scientific experts and relevant stakeholders with meaningful and useable information. Recognizing that information must flow in multiple directions, the knowledge broker must quickly and effectively translate needs and questions using established relationships. It is these relationships, as well as the synthesis of scientific knowledge into useable information, on which the success of the knowledge broker lies. Using lessons learned, as well as communication science theory related to knowledge brokering, this presentation highlights training opportunities for knowledge brokers who are primarily educated in science and engineering fields, yet seek to engage with societally relevant stakeholders. We present case study examples of knowledge brokering within two large multi-disciplinary research centers. These centers provide unique experiences for researchers to build relationships with stakeholders, so that the scientific experts not only create novel research within their specific discipline, but also inform policy decision makers, community members and regulatory officials.

  3. Establishing the role of honest broker: bridging the gap between protecting personal health data and clinical research efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Joung Choi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this study is to propose the four conditions for the roles of honest brokers through a review of literature published by ten institutions that are successfully utilizing honest brokers. Furthermore, the study aims to examine whether the Asan Medical Center’s (AMC honest brokers satisfy the four conditions, and examine the need to enhance their roles.Methods. We analyzed the roles, tasks, and types of honest brokers at 10 organizations by reviewing the literature. We also established a Task Force (TF in our institution for setting the roles and processes of the honest broker system and the honest brokers. The findings of the literature search were compared with the existing systems at AMC—which introduced the honest broker system for the first time in Korea.Results. Only one organization employed an honest broker for validating anonymized clinical data and monitoring the anonymity verifications of the honest broker system. Six organizations complied with HIPAA privacy regulations, while four organizations did not disclose compliance. By comparing functions with those of the AMC, the following four main characteristics of honest brokers were determined: (1 de-identification of clinical data; (2 independence; (3 checking that the data are used only for purposes approved by the IRB; and (4 provision of de-identified data to researchers. These roles were then compared with those of honest brokers at the AMC.Discussion. First, guidelines that regulate the definitions, purposes, roles, and requirements for honest brokers are needed, since there are no currently existing regulations. Second, Korean clinical research institutions and national regulatory departments need to reach a consensus on a Korean version of Limited Data Sets (LDS, since there are no lists that describe the use of personal identification information. Lastly, satisfaction surveys on honest brokers by researchers are necessary to improve the quality of

  4. Establishing the role of honest broker: bridging the gap between protecting personal health data and clinical research efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyo Joung; Lee, Min Joung; Choi, Chang-Min; Lee, JaeHo; Shin, Soo-Yong; Lyu, Yungman; Park, Yu Rang; Yoo, Soyoung

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study is to propose the four conditions for the roles of honest brokers through a review of literature published by ten institutions that are successfully utilizing honest brokers. Furthermore, the study aims to examine whether the Asan Medical Center's (AMC) honest brokers satisfy the four conditions, and examine the need to enhance their roles. Methods. We analyzed the roles, tasks, and types of honest brokers at 10 organizations by reviewing the literature. We also established a Task Force (TF) in our institution for setting the roles and processes of the honest broker system and the honest brokers. The findings of the literature search were compared with the existing systems at AMC-which introduced the honest broker system for the first time in Korea. Results. Only one organization employed an honest broker for validating anonymized clinical data and monitoring the anonymity verifications of the honest broker system. Six organizations complied with HIPAA privacy regulations, while four organizations did not disclose compliance. By comparing functions with those of the AMC, the following four main characteristics of honest brokers were determined: (1) de-identification of clinical data; (2) independence; (3) checking that the data are used only for purposes approved by the IRB; and (4) provision of de-identified data to researchers. These roles were then compared with those of honest brokers at the AMC. Discussion. First, guidelines that regulate the definitions, purposes, roles, and requirements for honest brokers are needed, since there are no currently existing regulations. Second, Korean clinical research institutions and national regulatory departments need to reach a consensus on a Korean version of Limited Data Sets (LDS), since there are no lists that describe the use of personal identification information. Lastly, satisfaction surveys on honest brokers by researchers are necessary to improve the quality of honest

  5. Brokers and brokerage in the process of trading in commodity futures markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremić Milan B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly deals with the analysis of a very complex process of brokerage in commodity futures markets. Unlike a classical commodity market in which brokers are not a necessity, sales and purchases in commodity futures markets cannot be carried out without brokers. Brokers who act as agents of buyers and sellers of futures are a necessary condition for trading in organized markets, such as commodity futures markets. The structure of brokers in futures trading is multilayer and involves participants in futures trading from floor brokers, immediate futures traders and the members of clearing and the clearing house itself, on the one hand, to numerous other necessary actors whose activities out of the stock exchange and the clearing house contribute to the efficient functioning of futures market. The fact that transactions between buyers and sellers in futures markets are not carried out directly but through brokers means that the obligations of buyers and sellers are formally conveyed to brokers, providing at the same time the guarantee by the broker that the actual buyer and the actual seller will fulfill their contractual obligations. At the very beginning of futures trading, the relationship between the seller and the buyer is transformed into a relationship between two brokers. Since that moment on, the original relationship is conveyed to higher levels of brokerage reaching the level of the clearing house. In the process of transformation of the buyer-seller relationship and transmitting obligations and guaranteeing their fulfillment, the clearing house itself becomes the buyer relative to all sellers and the seller relative to all buyers. In this way, it guarantees that obligations regarding all transactions in futures market will be fulfilled. The whole process is carried out in accordance with the prescribed procedures conducted on the floor of commodity exchange, in its administrative departments and in the clearing house itself.

  6. 76 FR 74696 - Implementation of the Methamphetamine Production Prevention Act of 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ...., grocery store, general merchandise store, drug store) (21 U.S.C. 802(46), (49)) or a mobile retail vendor... purchasers or who deal directly with purchasers by obtaining payments for the products (21 U.S.C....

  7. State anxiety as a moderator of real world grocery shopping performance among people with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Elise H; Fowler, Christopher A; Rempfer, Melisa V

    2016-12-30

    Anxiety is frequently overlooked as a factor when examining task performance among individuals with serious mental illness. Given the known effects of anxiety on performance in general populations, it is important to examine anxiety and performance within a serious mental illness population. This study examined state anxiety during a grocery-shopping task among 106 individuals diagnosed with a serious mental illness. Results indicate that state anxiety may impact task performance through its relationship with knowledge about grocery-shopping skills. These data suggest the need to examine further the impact of anxiety on task performance in serious mental illness. Furthermore, the identification and treatment of anxiety in persons with SMI may serve to improve functional outcomes and rehabilitation efforts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Towards Corporate Shared Value in Retail Sector: A Comparative Study over Grocery and Banking Between Italy and the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Candelo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The research investigates the extent to which Banking and Grocery retailers use Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in accordance to evolving consumers’ expectations and build a strategic model of Corporate Shared Value (CSV to strive for economic and social returns simultaneously. The paper adopts a qualitative approach, based on the comparative case study methodology by investigating a sample of twelve Banking and Grocery retailers in Italy and the UK. Differences and similarities in CSR as new strategic model among countries and retail sectors emerge, with UK companies from both the sectors showing the most formalized integration of CSR within their business strategy. The chance for both Italian and UK retail companies is to adopt the best practices emerging from the case studies to turn their CSR programs into a strategic business model of CSV that will allow a stronger retailer-consumer relationship based on social improvements and a reinforcement of their brand image.

  9. Estimating Willingness to Pay for Continued Use of Plastic Grocery Bags and Willingness to Accept for Switching Completely to Reusable Bags

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we provide a theoretical framework for a dichotomous-choice contingent valuation survey for plastic and reusable shopping bags and consequential analysis of that data. By using interval regression analysis, a mean willingness to pay for continued use of plastic grocery bags and a mean willingness to accept to use reusable bags for all grocery shopping trips are estimated. The subsidy level was statistically robust while the tax level was not; this led us to the conclusion as ci...

  10. Fast-food outlets and grocery stores near school and adolescents' eating habits and overweight in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimäki, Hanne; Ervasti, Jenni; Oksanen, Tuula; Pentti, Jaana; Kouvonen, Anne; Halonen, Jaana I; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2015-08-01

    Environmental factors may affect adolescents' eating habits and thereby body weight. However, the contribution of school neighbourhood environment is poorly understood. This study examined the association between proximity of a fast-food outlet or grocery store to school and adolescents' eating habits and overweight. Participants were 23 182 adolescents (mean age 15 years) who responded to a classroom survey in 181 lower secondary schools in Finland (2008-09). School location was linked to data on distance from school to the nearest fast-food outlet or grocery store (≤100 m, 101-500 m, >500 m) using global positioning system-coordinate databases. Outcomes were irregular eating habits (skipping breakfast, skipping free school lunch, skipping free school-provided snacks and not having family dinners), the accumulation of these habits and overweight, including obesity (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2)). Thirteen percentage of the participants were overweight. Having a fast-food outlet or grocery store near school was associated with skipping often breakfast and free school lunch, and the accumulation of irregular eating habits. The proximity of a fast-food outlet or grocery store was associated with a 1.25-fold (95% confidence interval 1.03-1.52) risk of overweight among adolescent with a low socioeconomic status but not among those with higher socioeconomic status. This association was partly (12%) explained by the accumulation of irregular eating habits. Among adolescents from low socioeconomic background, the presence of fast-food retailers near schools is associated with accumulation of irregular eating habits and greater overweight. These findings suggest that obesogenic school neighbourhoods may contribute to social inequalities in overweight. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  11. The Grid Resource Broker, A Ubiquitous Grid Computing Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Aloisio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Portals to computational/data grids provide the scientific community with a friendly environment in order to solve large-scale computational problems. The Grid Resource Broker (GRB is a grid portal that allows trusted users to create and handle computational/data grids on the fly exploiting a simple and friendly web-based GUI. GRB provides location-transparent secure access to Globus services, automatic discovery of resources matching the user's criteria, selection and scheduling on behalf of the user. Moreover, users are not required to learn Globus and they do not need to write specialized code or to rewrite their existing legacy codes. We describe GRB architecture, its components and current GRB features addressing the main differences between our approach and related work in the area.

  12. Brokering health policy: coalitions, parties, and interest group influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Michael T

    2006-10-01

    Assuming a position as broker between disconnected interests is one way for an interest group to influence the making of federal health policy. This study demonstrates how groups use their connections with political parties and lobbying coalitions to augment their brokerage positions and enhance their influence over policy making. Evidence is drawn from statistical analysis of 263 interviews with health policy elites and a qualitative case study of the debate over the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003. The results explain, in part, how interest groups play their brokerage roles as dispersed actors in a decentralized system, rather than as central mediators that intervene in a wide range of policy disputes.

  13. Toward Mending Two Nation-Scale Brokered Identification Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandão Luís T. A. N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Available online public/governmental services requiring authentication by citizens have considerably expanded in recent years. This has hindered the usability and security associated with credential management by users and service providers. To address the problem, some countries have proposed nation-scale identification/authentication systems that intend to greatly reduce the burden of credential management, while seemingly offering desirable privacy benefits. In this paper we analyze two such systems: the Federal Cloud Credential Exchange (FCCX in the United States and GOV.UK Verify in the United Kingdom, which altogether aim at serving more than a hundred million citizens. Both systems propose a brokered identification architecture, where an online central hub mediates user authentications between identity providers and service providers. We show that both FCCX and GOV.UK Verify suffer from serious privacy and security shortcomings, fail to comply with privacy-preserving guidelines they are meant to follow, and may actually degrade user privacy. Notably, the hub can link interactions of the same user across different service providers and has visibility over private identifiable information of citizens. In case of malicious compromise it is also able to undetectably impersonate users. Within the structural design constraints placed on these nation-scale brokered identification systems, we propose feasible technical solutions to the privacy and security issues we identified. We conclude with a strong recommendation that FCCX and GOV.UK Verify be subject to a more in-depth technical and public review, based on a defined and comprehensive threat model, and adopt adequate structural adjustments.

  14. Effects of Working Memory Capacity and Domain Knowledge on Recall for Grocery Prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, Douglas; Gardner, Michael K; Woltz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Hambrick and Engle (2002) proposed 3 models of how domain knowledge and working memory capacity may work together to influence episodic memory: a "rich-get-richer" model, a "building blocks" model, and a "compensatory" model. Their results supported the rich-get-richer model, although later work by Hambrick and Oswald (2005) found support for a building blocks model. We investigated the effects of domain knowledge and working memory on recall of studied grocery prices. Working memory was measured with 3 simple span tasks. A contrast of realistic versus fictitious foods in the episodic memory task served as our manipulation of domain knowledge, because participants could not have domain knowledge of fictitious food prices. There was a strong effect for domain knowledge (realistic food-price pairs were easier to remember) and a moderate effect for working memory capacity (higher working memory capacity produced better recall). Furthermore, the interaction between domain knowledge and working memory produced a small but significant interaction in 1 measure of price recall. This supported the compensatory model and stands in contrast to previous research.

  15. Musculoskeletal symptoms and ergonomic hazards among material handlers in grocery retail industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd; Zuhaidi, Muhammad Fareez Ahmad

    2017-08-01

    Grocery retail work can be physically demanding as material handler’s tasks involve manual lifting, lowering, carrying, pushing and pulling loads. The nature of this work puts them at a risk for serious low back pain, shoulder pain and other musculoskeletal injuries. This study was conducted by using two different types of tools which were Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) as a survey and Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA) Checklist as a direct observation method. Among 46 males and 14 females material handlers were involved throughout this study. For NMQ, the highest body part trouble in the last 12 months was low back pain (88.3%), followed by upper back (68.3%), neck (55.3%) and shoulder (36.7%). While for WISHA Checklist, most of them experienced hazard level involving awkward posture and high hand force. From the research conducted, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and ergonomic risk factors (ERFs) do related as it showed that musculoskeletal disorders may arise if the workers ignored the safety in ergonomic hazards.

  16. Adoption of automatic identification systems by grocery retailersin the Johannesburg area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Darlington

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Retailers not only need the right data capture technology to meet the requirements of their applications, they must also decide on what the optimum technology is from the different symbologies that have been developed over the years. Automatic identification systems (AIS are a priority to decision makers as they attempt to obtain the best blend of equipment to ensure greater loss prevention and higher reliability in data capture. However there is a risk of having too simplistic a view of adopting AIS, since no one solution is applicable across an industry or business model. This problem is addressed through an exploratory, descriptive study, where the nature and value of AIS adoption by grocery retailers in the Johannesburg area is interrogated. Mixed empirical results indicate that, as retailers adopt AIS in order to improve their supply chain management systems, different types of applications are associated with various constraints and opportunities. Overall this study is in line with previous research that supports the notion that supply chain decisions are of a strategic nature even though efficient management of information is a day-to-day business operational decision.

  17. An epidemiological profile of cashiers holders carpal tunnel syndrome in a grocery store chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, R; Barros, R; Campos, D; Lima, D; Barbosa, Geórgia

    2012-01-01

    Occupational diseases are those acquired in the work. Statistics show an increase number of cases, victims like typists, telephone's operators, cashiers and many others with varied levels of involvement. It is composed of disorders affecting the upper limbs being recognized by the Ministry of Social Welfare. Among these diseases stands out for its high occurrence Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). It has been considered a disease of the century, because its incidence has increased in 40.8% of repetitive stress disorders, with prevalence in females, and predominant age ranging from 25 to 40 years. It is characterized by pain and paresthesia in the first four fingers and wrists, and arm pain, weakness, numbness in the territory of the median nerve, preserving or not the palmar sensation and numbness in the median sensory distribution. This study aims to assess functional capacity and severity of symptoms presented by cashiers diagnosed with CTS. It is a descriptive and quantitative in nature. The population consists of 13 grocery store cashiers of both sexes, with a workload of 42 hours. We will be used as an instrument called the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. That purports to be an effective means of measuring the numbness and pain in hands and wrists. Exclusion criteria we consider the subjects who have other diseases associated with CTS. The collection is with the possibility of partial results to be entered in a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel for data analysis and subsequent discussion and correlation with the current literature.

  18. Hidden Markov Model Application to Transfer The Trader Online Forex Brokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Suharleni

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hidden Markov Model is elaboration of Markov chain, which is applicable to cases that can’t directly observe. In this research, Hidden Markov Model is used to know trader’s transition to broker forex online. In Hidden Markov Model, observed state is observable part and hidden state is hidden part. Hidden Markov Model allows modeling system that contains interrelated observed state and hidden state. As observed state in trader’s transition to broker forex online is category 1, category 2, category 3, category 4, category 5 by condition of every broker forex online, whereas as hidden state is broker forex online Marketiva, Masterforex, Instaforex, FBS and Others. First step on application of Hidden Markov Model in this research is making construction model by making a probability of transition matrix (A from every broker forex online. Next step is making a probability of observation matrix (B by making conditional probability of five categories, that is category 1, category 2, category 3, category 4, category 5 by condition of every broker forex online and also need to determine an initial state probability (π from every broker forex online. The last step is using Viterbi algorithm to find hidden state sequences that is broker forex online sequences which is the most possible based on model and observed state that is the five categories. Application of Hidden Markov Model is done by making program with Viterbi algorithm using Delphi 7.0 software with observed state based on simulation data. Example: By the number of observation T = 5 and observed state sequences O = (2,4,3,5,1 is found hidden state sequences which the most possible with observed state O as following : where X1 = FBS, X2 = Masterforex, X3 = Marketiva, X4 = Others, and X5 = Instaforex.

  19. Structured P2P overlay of mobile brokers for realizing publish/subscribe communication in VANET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Tulika; Garg, Deepak; Gore, Manoj Madhava

    2014-01-01

    Publish/subscribe communication paradigm provides asynchrony and decoupling, making it an elegant alternative for designing applications in distributed and dynamic environment such as vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). In this paradigm, the broker is the most important component that decouples other two components, namely, publisher and subscriber. Previous research efforts have either utilized the deployment of distributed brokers on stationary road side info-stations or have assigned the role of broker to any moving vehicle on ad hoc basis. In one approach, lots of preinstalled infrastructures are needed whereas, in another, the quality of service is not guaranteed due to unpredictable moving and stopping patterns of vehicles. In this paper, we present the architecture of distributed mobile brokers which are dynamically reconfigurable in the form of structured P2P overlay and act as rendezvous points for matching publications and subscriptions. We have taken city buses in urban settings to act as mobile brokers whereas other vehicles are considered to be in role of publishers and subscribers. These mobile brokers also assist in locating a vehicle for successful and timely transfer of notifications. We have performed an extensive simulation study to compare our approach with previously proposed approaches. Simulation results establish the applicability of our approach.

  20. Structured P2P Overlay of Mobile Brokers for Realizing Publish/Subscribe Communication in VANET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Tulika; Garg, Deepak; Gore, Manoj Madhava

    2014-01-01

    Publish/subscribe communication paradigm provides asynchrony and decoupling, making it an elegant alternative for designing applications in distributed and dynamic environment such as vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). In this paradigm, the broker is the most important component that decouples other two components, namely, publisher and subscriber. Previous research efforts have either utilized the deployment of distributed brokers on stationary road side info-stations or have assigned the role of broker to any moving vehicle on ad hoc basis. In one approach, lots of preinstalled infrastructures are needed whereas, in another, the quality of service is not guaranteed due to unpredictable moving and stopping patterns of vehicles. In this paper, we present the architecture of distributed mobile brokers which are dynamically reconfigurable in the form of structured P2P overlay and act as rendezvous points for matching publications and subscriptions. We have taken city buses in urban settings to act as mobile brokers whereas other vehicles are considered to be in role of publishers and subscribers. These mobile brokers also assist in locating a vehicle for successful and timely transfer of notifications. We have performed an extensive simulation study to compare our approach with previously proposed approaches. Simulation results establish the applicability of our approach. PMID:24523629

  1. Structured P2P Overlay of Mobile Brokers for Realizing Publish/Subscribe Communication in VANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Publish/subscribe communication paradigm provides asynchrony and decoupling, making it an elegant alternative for designing applications in distributed and dynamic environment such as vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs. In this paradigm, the broker is the most important component that decouples other two components, namely, publisher and subscriber. Previous research efforts have either utilized the deployment of distributed brokers on stationary road side info-stations or have assigned the role of broker to any moving vehicle on ad hoc basis. In one approach, lots of preinstalled infrastructures are needed whereas, in another, the quality of service is not guaranteed due to unpredictable moving and stopping patterns of vehicles. In this paper, we present the architecture of distributed mobile brokers which are dynamically reconfigurable in the form of structured P2P overlay and act as rendezvous points for matching publications and subscriptions. We have taken city buses in urban settings to act as mobile brokers whereas other vehicles are considered to be in role of publishers and subscribers. These mobile brokers also assist in locating a vehicle for successful and timely transfer of notifications. We have performed an extensive simulation study to compare our approach with previously proposed approaches. Simulation results establish the applicability of our approach.

  2. Emolabeling increases healthy food choices among grade school children in a structured grocery aisle setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privitera, Gregory J; Phillips, Taylor E; Zuraikat, Faris M; Paque, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Health literacy, the ability to acquire health-related knowledge and make appropriate health-related decisions, is regarded as a key barrier to meaningfully convey health information to children and can impact food choice. Emolabeling is an image-based labeling strategy aimed at addressing this problem by conveying health information using emotional correlates of health using emoticons (happy = healthy; sad = not healthy). To test the utility of such a method to promote healthy food choices among children, 64 children (59% girls, foods in each of 2 aisles structured to mimic a grocery aisle - there were 12 identical foods placed in the same location in each aisle with half being low calorie and half high calorie snacks. Foods were emolabeled in one aisle; no emolabels were used in the other aisle; the order that children were brought in each aisle was counterbalanced. Results showed that adding emolabels increased the number (M ± SD) of healthy foods chosen (3.6 ± 0.7 with vs. 2.3 ± 1.1 without emolabels present [95% CI 1.0, 1.5], R(2) = .67) and reduced the total calories (M ± SD) of foods chosen (193.5 ± 88.5 Cal with vs. 374.3 ± 152.6 Cal without emolabels present [95% CI -212.6, -149.0], R(2) = .70). Hence, adding emolabels was associated with healthier food choices among children, thereby demonstrating one possible strategy to effectively overcome health literacy barriers at these ages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bridging research and environmental regulatory processes: the role of knowledge brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Kelly G; Thompson, Marcella; Rice, James W; Senier, Laura; Brown, Phil; Suuberg, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Federal funding agencies increasingly require research investigators to ensure that federally sponsored research demonstrates broader societal impact. Specifically, the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Research Program (SRP) requires research centers to include research translation and community engagement cores to achieve broader impacts, with special emphasis on improving environmental health policies through better scientific understanding. This paper draws on theoretical insights from the social sciences to show how incorporating knowledge brokers in research centers can facilitate translation of scientific expertise to influence regulatory processes and thus promote public health. Knowledge brokers connect academic researchers with decision-makers, to facilitate the translation of research findings into policies and programs. In this article, we describe the stages of the regulatory process and highlight the role of the knowledge broker and scientific expert at each stage. We illustrate the cooperation of knowledge brokers, scientific experts and policymakers using a case from the Brown University (Brown) SRP. We show how the Brown SRP incorporated knowledge brokers to engage scientific experts with regulatory officials around the emerging public health problem of vapor intrusion (VI). In the Brown SRP, the knowledge broker brought regulatory officials into the research process, to help scientific experts understand the critical nature of this emerging public health threat, and helped scientific experts develop a research agenda that would inform the development of timely measures to protect public health. Our experience shows that knowledge brokers can enhance the impact of environmental research on public health by connecting policy decision-makers with scientific experts at critical points throughout the regulatory process.

  4. Discovering Physical Samples Through Identifiers, Metadata, and Brokering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arctur, D. K.; Hills, D. J.; Jenkyns, R.

    2015-12-01

    Physical samples, particularly in the geosciences, are key to understanding the Earth system, its history, and its evolution. Our record of the Earth as captured by physical samples is difficult to explain and mine for understanding, due to incomplete, disconnected, and evolving metadata content. This is further complicated by differing ways of classifying, cataloguing, publishing, and searching the metadata, especially when specimens do not fit neatly into a single domain—for example, fossils cross disciplinary boundaries (mineral and biological). Sometimes even the fundamental classification systems evolve, such as the geological time scale, triggering daunting processes to update existing specimen databases. Increasingly, we need to consider ways of leveraging permanent, unique identifiers, as well as advancements in metadata publishing that link digital records with physical samples in a robust, adaptive way. An NSF EarthCube Research Coordination Network (RCN) called the Internet of Samples (iSamples) is now working to bridge the metadata schemas for biological and geological domains. We are leveraging the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) that provides a versatile system of registering physical samples, and working to harmonize this with the DataCite schema for Digital Object Identifiers (DOI). A brokering approach for linking disparate catalogues and classification systems could help scale discovery and access to the many large collections now being managed (sometimes millions of specimens per collection). This presentation is about our community building efforts, research directions, and insights to date.

  5. What role do local grocery stores play in urban food environments? A case study of Hartford-Connecticut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie S Martin

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Research on urban food environments emphasizes limited access to healthy food, with fewer large supermarkets and higher food prices. Many residents of Hartford, Connecticut, which is often considered a food desert, buy most of their food from small and medium-sized grocery stores. We examined the food environment in greater Hartford, comparing stores in Hartford to those in the surrounding suburbs, and by store size (small, medium, and large. METHODS: We surveyed all small (over 1,000 ft2, medium, and large-sized supermarkets within a 2-mile radius of Hartford (36 total stores. We measured the distance to stores, availability, price and quality of a market basket of 25 items, and rated each store on internal and external appearance. Geographic Information System (GIS was used for mapping distance to the stores and variation of food availability, quality, and appearance. RESULTS: Contrary to common literature, no significant differences were found in food availability and price between Hartford and suburban stores. However, produce quality, internal, and external store appearance were significantly lower in Hartford compared to suburban stores (all p<0.05. Medium-sized stores had significantly lower prices than small or large supermarkets (p<0.05. Large stores had better scores for internal (p<0.05, external, and produce quality (p<0.01. Most Hartford residents live within 0.5 to 1 mile distance to a grocery store. DISCUSSION: Classifying urban areas with few large supermarkets as 'food deserts' may overlook the availability of healthy foods and low prices that exist within small and medium-sized groceries common in inner cities. Improving produce quality and store appearance can potentially impact the food purchasing decisions of low-income residents in Hartford.

  6. Home grocery delivery improves the household food environments of behavioral weight loss participants: Results of an 8-week pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemeier Heather M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Household food availability is consistently linked to dietary intake; yet behavioral weight control treatment includes only minimal instruction on how to change the home environment to support dietary goals. This pilot study examined whether it is feasible to change the household food environments of behavioral weight loss participants through the use of a commercially available grocery home delivery service. Methods Overweight participants (N = 28; BMI = 31.7 ± 3.6 kg/m2; 89.3% women, 47.9 ± 9.5 years were randomly assigned to 8-weeks of standard behavioral weight loss (SBT or to SBT plus home food delivery (SBT+Home. SBT+Home participants were instructed to do their household grocery shopping via an online service affiliated with a regional supermarket chain and were reimbursed for delivery charges. Results Compared to SBT, SBT+Home produced significantly greater reductions in the total number of foods in the home (p = .01 and number of foods that were high in fat (p = .002. While the groups did not differ in 8-week weight losses, within SBT+Home there was a trend for the number of home deliveries to be associated with weight loss (p = .08. Participants reported that the home delivery service was easy to use and that it helped decrease impulse purchases and lead to healthier choices; however, few planned to continue using the service after the study. Conclusion Encouraging weight loss participants to use a commercially available online grocery ordering and home delivery service reduces the overall number of food items in the home and decreases access to high-fat food choices. More research is needed to determine whether this is a viable strategy to strengthen stimulus control and improve weight loss outcomes.

  7. 17 CFR 240.15c1-3 - Misrepresentation by brokers, dealers and municipal securities dealers as to registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Misrepresentation by brokers, dealers and municipal securities dealers as to registration. 240.15c1-3 Section 240.15c1-3 Commodity and...-The-Counter Markets § 240.15c1-3 Misrepresentation by brokers, dealers and municipal securities...

  8. 17 CFR 240.17a-4 - Records to be preserved by certain exchange members, brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Preservation of Records... the activities of each natural person associated with the member, broker or dealer until three years..., broker, or dealer exclusively using electronic storage media for some or all of its record preservation...

  9. 17 CFR 400.6 - Notice of withdrawal from business as a government securities broker or dealer by a financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... business as a government securities broker or dealer by a financial institution. 400.6 Section 400.6... SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 RULES OF GENERAL APPLICATION § 400.6 Notice of withdrawal from business as a government securities broker or dealer by a financial institution. (a) Whenever a financial institution...

  10. She Is My Language Broker: How Does Cultural Capital Benefit Asian Immigrant Children in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md-Yunus, Sham'ah

    2011-01-01

    Cultural capital benefits Asian immigrant children when they become language brokers. This skill can also benefit their parents and families in the United States. Language brokering may shape and possibly enhance students' academic performance and can further children's linguistic and academic achievement. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  11. Language Brokering, Autonomy, Parent-Child Bonding, Biculturalism, and Depression: A Study of Mexican American Adolescents from Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Julia A.; Buriel, Raymond

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between language brokering, parent-child bonding, perceived autonomy, biculturalism, and depression for Mexican American adolescents. It was hypothesized that adolescent language brokers who reported a strong parent-child bond and high levels of psychological autonomy, privilege, and responsibility would also…

  12. 17 CFR 249.509 - Form 9-M, consent to service of process by a partnership nonresident broker-dealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of process by a partnership nonresident broker-dealer. This form shall be filed pursuant to Rule 15b1... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form 9-M, consent to service of process by a partnership nonresident broker-dealer. 249.509 Section 249.509 Commodity...

  13. 7 CFR 4290.1630 - Regulation of Brokers and Dealers and disclosure to purchasers of Leverage or Trust Certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... otherwise formally charged with a misdemeanor or felony bearing on its fitness, such broker or dealer may be... transactions or relationships, participation in the market for Debentures or TCs may be terminated. (c) Termination/suspension proceedings. A broker's or dealer's participation in the market for Debentures or...

  14. Architecture of a Process Broker for Interoperable Geospatial Modeling on the Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Bigagli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of appropriate mechanisms for process sharing and reuse by means of composition is considered a key enabler for the effective uptake of a global Earth Observation infrastructure, currently pursued by the international geospatial research community. Modelers in need of running complex workflows may benefit from outsourcing process composition to a dedicated external service, according to the brokering approach. This work introduces our architecture of a process broker, as a distributed information system for creating, validating, editing, storing, publishing and executing geospatial-modeling workflows. The broker provides a service framework for adaptation, reuse and complementation of existing processing resources (including models and geospatial services in general in the form of interoperable, executable workflows. The described solution has been experimentally applied in several use scenarios in the context of EU-funded projects and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems.

  15. What role do local grocery stores play in urban food environments? A case study of Hartford-Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Katie S; Ghosh, Debarchana; Page, Martha; Wolff, Michele; McMinimee, Kate; Zhang, Mengyao

    2014-01-01

    Research on urban food environments emphasizes limited access to healthy food, with fewer large supermarkets and higher food prices. Many residents of Hartford, Connecticut, which is often considered a food desert, buy most of their food from small and medium-sized grocery stores. We examined the food environment in greater Hartford, comparing stores in Hartford to those in the surrounding suburbs, and by store size (small, medium, and large). We surveyed all small (over 1,000 ft2), medium, and large-sized supermarkets within a 2-mile radius of Hartford (36 total stores). We measured the distance to stores, availability, price and quality of a market basket of 25 items, and rated each store on internal and external appearance. Geographic Information System (GIS) was used for mapping distance to the stores and variation of food availability, quality, and appearance. Contrary to common literature, no significant differences were found in food availability and price between Hartford and suburban stores. However, produce quality, internal, and external store appearance were significantly lower in Hartford compared to suburban stores (all plower prices than small or large supermarkets (pquality (pprices that exist within small and medium-sized groceries common in inner cities. Improving produce quality and store appearance can potentially impact the food purchasing decisions of low-income residents in Hartford.

  16. Examining associations among obesity and per capita farmers' markets, grocery stores/supermarkets, and supercenters in US counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilcott, Stephanie B; Keyserling, Thomas; Crawford, Thomas; McGuirt, Jared T; Ammerman, Alice S

    2011-04-01

    Fruit and vegetable consumption is an important component of a healthful diet, yet fruits and vegetables are underconsumed, especially among low-income groups with high prevalence rates of obesity. This study used data from the US Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service Food Environment Atlas to examine county-level associations among obesity prevalence and per capita farmers' markets, grocery stores/supermarkets, and supercenters, adjusted for natural amenities, percent black, percent Hispanic, median age, and median household income, stratified by county metropolitan status. In models that included all three of the food venues, supercenters and grocery stores per capita were inversely associated with obesity in the combined (metro and nonmetro) and metro counties. Farmers' markets were not significant in the model for combined (metro and nonmetro) or for metro counties alone, but were significantly inversely related to obesity rates in the model for nonmetro counties. In this ecologic study, density of food venues was inversely associated with county-level obesity prevalence. Thus, future research should examine similar associations at the individual-level.

  17. Information broker: a useless overhead or a necessity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitan, Jacek

    1996-01-01

    The richness and diversity of information available over the Internet, its size, convenience of access, and its dynamic growth will create new ways to offer better education opportunities in medicine. The Internet will especially benefit medical training process that is expensive and requires continuous updating. The use of the Internet will lower the delivery cost and make medical information available to all potential users. On the other hand, since medical information must be trusted and new policies must be developed to support these capabilities, technologies alone are not enough. In general, we must deal with issues of liability, remuneration for educational and professional services, and general issues of ethics associated with patient-physician relationship in a complicated environment created by a mix of managed and private care combined with modern information technology. In this paper we will focus only on the need to create, to manage and to operate open system over the Internet, or similar low-cost and easy access networks, for the purpose of medical education process. Finally, using business analysis, we argue why the medical education infrastructure needs an information broker, a third party organization that will help the users to access the information and the publishers to display their titles. The first section outlines recent trends in medical education. In the second section, we discuss transfusion medicine requirements. In the third section we provide a summary of the American Red Cross (ARC) transfusion audit system; we discuss the relevance of the assumptions used in this system to other areas of medicine. In the fourth section we describe the overall system architecture and discuss key components. The fifth section covers business issues associated with medical education systems and with the potential role of ARC in particular. The last section provides a summary of findings.

  18. Kształcenie brokerów informacji w Polsce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasik Agnieszka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the impact of the development of information technology for the collection, processing and sharing of information. The impact of cyberspace and the Internet on the development of modern information sector is discussed. The following terms are explained: information broker, infobroker, the information society, information noise. A brief history of the origins of information retrieval is presented, and the most important international organizations and associations related to information retrieval are discussed. The article presents the characteristics of the competencies and skills required in persons engaged in acquiring information. The educational offer of Polish universities educating future information brokers is also described.

  19. A cloud based brokering framework to support hydrology at global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, E.; Pecora, S.; Bordini, F.; Nativi, S.

    2016-12-01

    This work presents the hydrology broker designed and deployed in the context of a collaboration between the Regional Agency for Environmental Protection in the Italian region Emilia-Romagna (ARPA-ER) and CNR-IIA (National Research Council of Italy). The hydrology brokering platform eases the task of discovering and accessing hydrological observation data, usually acquired and made available by national agencies by means of a set of heterogeneous services (e.g. CUAHSI HIS servers, OGC services, FTP servers) and formats (e.g. WaterML, O&M, ...). The hydrology broker makes all the already published data available according to one or more of the desired and well known discovery protocols, access protocols, and formats . As a result, the user is able to search and access the available hydrological data through his preferred client (e.g. CUAHSI HydroDesktop, 52North SWE client). It is also easy to build a hydrological web portal on top of the broker, using the user friendly js API. The hydrology broker has been deployed on the Amazon cloud to ensure scalability and tested in the context of the work of the Commission for Hydrology of WMO on three different scenarios: the La Plata river basin, the Sava river basin and the Arctic-HYCOS project. In each scenario the hydrology broker discovered and accessed heterogeneous data formats (e.g. Waterml 1.0/2.0, proprietary CSV documents) from the heterogeneous services (e.g. CUAHSI HIS servers, FTP service and agency proprietary services) managed by several national agencies and international commissions. The hydrology broker made possible to present all the available data uniformly through the user desired service type and format (e.g. an HIS server publishing Waterml 2.0), producing a great improvement in both system interoperability and data exchange. Interoperability tests were also successfully conducted with WMO Information System (WIS) nodes, making possible for a specific Global Information Center System (GISC) to gather

  20. The Association between Self-Reported Grocery Store Access, Fruit and Vegetable Intake, Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, and Obesity in a Racially Diverse, Low-Income Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren Nichol; DeFosset, Amelia Rose; Smith, Lisa V; Kuo, Tony

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to examine the relationship between self-reported time and distance to the nearest retail grocery store, healthy and unhealthy food consumption, and objectively measured body mass index (BMI). We conducted a survey with 1,503 racially diverse, low-income residents at five public health centers in Los Angeles County. Most participants reported shopping at a supermarket (86.7%) and driving (59.9%) to their usual source for groceries. Over half reported living less than a mile from (58.9%) and traveling 5 min or less to reach (50.3%) the nearest grocery store. In the multivariable regression models, neither self-reported distance nor time to the nearest grocery store was consistently associated with fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, or BMI. Results suggest that the need to consider access and quality as well as urban planning and transportation, when examining the relationship between the retail food environment and health outcomes.

  1. The association between self-reported grocery store access, fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, and obesity in a racially diverse, low-income population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Nichol Gase

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to examine the relationship between self-reported time and distance to the nearest retail grocery store, healthy and unhealthy food consumption, and objectively measured body mass index. We conducted a survey with 1,503 racially diverse, low-income residents at five public health centers in Los Angeles County. Most participants reported shopping at a supermarket (86.7% and driving (59.9% to their usual source for groceries. Over half reported living less than a mile from (58.9% and traveling five minutes or less to reach (50.3% the nearest grocery store. In the multivariable regression models, neither self-reported distance nor time to the nearest grocery store was consistently associated with fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, or body mass index. Results suggest the need to consider access and quality as well as urban planning and transportation, when examining the relationship between the retail food environment and health outcomes.

  2. Effects of Computer-Based Video Instruction on the Acquisition and Generalization of Grocery Purchasing Skills for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Minkowan; Therrien, William J.; Hua, Youjia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) on teaching grocery purchasing skills to students with moderate intellectual disability (ID). Four high school students with mild to moderate ID participated in the study. A multiple-probe design across students was used to examine the effects. Results…

  3. General and food-selection specific parenting style in relation to the healthfulness of parent-child choices while grocery shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G; Graham, Dan J; Ullrich, Emily; MacPhee, David

    2017-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated that parenting style is related to children's health and eating patterns, and that parenting can vary across time and context. However, there is little evidence about similarities and differences between general, self-reported parenting style and observed parenting during grocery shopping. The goals of this study were to investigate links between general parenting style, parental warmth and limit setting (important dimensions of parenting style) during grocery shopping, and the healthfulness of foods chosen. Participants were 153 parent (88 mothers) - child (6-9 years old) dyads. Dyads were brought to a laboratory set up like a grocery store aisle and asked to choose two items from each of three categories (cookies/crackers, cereals, chips/snacks). Parents were observed in terms of warmth, responsiveness, autonomy granting, and limit setting; children were observed in terms of resistance and negotiation. Parents reported behaviors related to general parenting. Regression analyses were used to test study hypotheses. Observed parental limit setting was related to general parenting style; observed warmth was not. Observed limit setting (but not observed warmth or self-reported parenting style) was related to the healthfulness of food choices. Limit setting appears to be the dimension of parenting style that is expressed during grocery shopping, and that promotes healthier food choices. Implications are discussed regarding consistencies in parenting style across situations as well as contributions of parenting style to the development of children's healthy eating.

  4. Effects of Computer-Based Video Instruction on the Acquisition and Generalization of Grocery Purchasing Skills for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Minkowan; Therrien, William J.; Hua, Youjia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) on teaching grocery purchasing skills to students with moderate intellectual disability (ID). Four high school students with mild to moderate ID participated in the study. A multiple-probe design across students was used to examine the effects. Results…

  5. 76 FR 78578 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Registration and Licensing of Brokers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... article or defense service. The proposal would delete the phrase ``who acts as an agent for others'' that... services such as providing or arranging office space and equipment, hospitality, advertising, or clerical..., whose brokering activities: (a) Involve only the defense articles or services that are currently subject...

  6. Language Brokering among Mexican-Immigrant Families in the Midwest: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Alejandro; Yakushko, Oksana F.; Castro, Antonio J.

    2012-01-01

    Language brokering (LB) is the act of translating and interpreting within immigrant families by children and adolescents for their parents, other family members, and other adults. Although LB is a common phenomenon among immigrant families in the United States, research regarding its impact on immigrant families mainly focuses on the experiences…

  7. Caught in the Middle: Child Language Brokering as a Form of Unrecognised Language Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Rachele

    2016-01-01

    This paper will present the findings of a wide-scale research aimed at studying the phenomenon of Child Language Brokering (henceforth CLB) in Italy. After providing a description of recent immigration patterns and the provision of language services in Italy, and an overview of current research in this field, this study will discuss narrative data…

  8. 75 FR 13699 - Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... in their place the words ``CBP Recordkeeping'' and removing the language ``the Customs Electronic... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 19 CFR Parts 111 and 163 RIN 1505-AC12 Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention...

  9. Cultural and Social Processes of Language Brokering among Arab, Asian, and Latin Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shu-Sha Angie; Nash, Afaf; Orellana, Marjorie Faulstich

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how language and culture brokering (translating and interpreting language and culture for others) influences the acculturative experiences and self-perceptions of young adults from immigrant Arab, Asian, and Latino American backgrounds. Semi-structured interviews with 10 participants suggest that mediating information for…

  10. 77 FR 37729 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collections: DDTC Brokering Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... Controls, PM/DDTC. Form Number: None. Respondents: Business and Nonprofit Organizations. Estimated Number..., Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, PM/DDTC. Form Number: None. Respondents: Business and Nonprofit... Collection: Annual Brokering Report. OMB Control Number: 1405-0141. Type of Request: Extension of...

  11. Advances in Knowledge Brokering in the Agricultural Sector: Towards Innovation System Facilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerkx, L.W.A.; Schut, M.; Leeuwis, C.; Kilelu, C.W.

    2012-01-01

    The process of knowledge brokering in the agricultural sector, where it is generally called agricultural extension, has been studied since the 1950s. While agricultural extension initially employed research push models, it gradually moved towards research pull and collaborative research models. The

  12. 17 CFR 240.15a-6 - Exemption of certain foreign brokers or dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... communications with the U.S. institutional investor or the major U.S institutional investor; and (2) Transactions... or dealer; or (2) Furnishes research reports to major U.S. institutional investors, and effects... investors, provided that: (i) The research reports do not recommend the use of the foreign broker or...

  13. 26 CFR 1.6045-1 - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... purchases an option to enter into a short regulated futures contract of $100,000 face value U.S. Treasury... agricultural commodities pursuant to regulated futures contracts, sales of derivative interests in agricultural... section and § 1.6045-2: (1) The term broker means any person (other than a person who is required...

  14. Learning To Learn for the Customs Brokers Exam. The Port of Baltimore Workplace Skills Development Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewski, Kathryn; Permut, Cathy

    This set of learning modules was developed during a project to deliver workplace literacy instruction to individuals employed in the more than 50 businesses related to the activities of the Port of Baltimore. It is intended to prepare students for the Customs Brokers examination within a 6-week course period. Actual material from past Customs…

  15. 78 FR 52680 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Registration and Licensing of Brokers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-26

    ... their comments via www.regulations.gov , leaving the fields that would identify the commenter blank and... the actions of non-employee brokers, and could result in multiple license requirements for the same... sections 6903- 6906, relating to missile systems designed to destroy aircraft (18 U.S.C....

  16. 78 FR 78474 - Knowledge Testing of New Entrant Motor Carriers, Freight Forwarders and Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... registration system, discloses the cumulative information to be collected in the URS, and provides a... January 13, 2014, to solicit ideas and information concerning sections 32101 and 32916 of the Moving Ahead... authority as motor carriers (property, passenger, and household goods (HHG)), freight forwarders and brokers...

  17. 78 FR 23116 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Debt Instruments and Options...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... broker and for an organizational action that affects the basis of a debt instrument or an option..., ``Report of Organizational Actions Affecting Basis of Securities,'' when revised to request the additional... Department and the IRS have concluded that the best way to balance certainty and flexibility is to require...

  18. Book Review: "The Honest Broker: Making Sense of Science in Policy and Politics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Honest Broker is a must-read for any scientist with even a modest interest in environmental policy or politics, and I recommend it especially to scientists unfamiliar with the continuing controversy over how scientists misuse science in environmental policy and politics. The ...

  19. 78 FR 78375 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers Correction In notice document 2013-30220 appearing on page 76851 of the...

  20. 75 FR 66050 - Permissible Sharing of Client Records by Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection 19 CFR Part 111 RIN 1651-AA80 Permissible Sharing of Client Records by Customs Brokers AGENCIES: Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: This document proposes to amend Customs and...

  1. 77 FR 33964 - Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 19 CFR Parts 111 and 163 RIN 1515-AD66 (Formerly RIN 1505-AC12) Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention AGENCIES: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland...

  2. 76 FR 163 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3) Enhance the... Forms 3124 and 3124E may be found at http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/forms/ . Further information about the customs broker exam and how to apply for it may be found at http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/trade...

  3. 31 CFR 103.19 - Reports by brokers or dealers in securities of suspicious transactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reports by brokers or dealers in securities of suspicious transactions. 103.19 Section 103.19 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN...

  4. 75 FR 75896 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR 1 RIN 1545-BI66 Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock Correction In rule document 2010-25504 beginning on page 64072 in the issue of...

  5. 75 FR 6166 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts, 1, 31, and 301 RIN 1545-Bl66 Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock Correction In proposed rule document E9-29855 beginning on...

  6. 31 CFR 103.123 - Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Money and Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN... through any acquisition, merger, purchase of assets, or assumption of liabilities; or (B) An account... broker may use the following sample language to provide notice to its customers: Important Information...

  7. 78 FR 54720 - Registration and Financial Security Requirements for Brokers of Property and Freight Forwarders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... of Property and Freight Forwarders AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT... or a freight forwarder. Section 32915 of MAP-21 requires anyone acting as a broker or a freight... freight forwarder authority from FMCSA. Section 32918 amended the financial security requirements...

  8. 76 FR 38293 - Risk Management Controls for Brokers or Dealers With Market Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 240 RIN 3235-AK53 Risk Management Controls for Brokers or Dealers With Market Access... establish, document, and maintain a system of risk management controls and supervisory procedures that... develop, test, and implement the relevant risk management controls and supervisory procedures...

  9. Research Mediation in Education: A Typology of Research Brokering Organizations that Exist across Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Amanda Mae

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the increasingly prominent role of research brokering organizations (RBOs) in strengthening connections between education research, policy and practice across Canada. This paper is organized in three sections. First, it provides a literature review of research mediation--exploring terminology, models and empirical work (albeit…

  10. 77 FR 20686 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collections: Two DDTC Brokering Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... collection: The export, temporary import, temporary export and brokering of defense articles, defense... Export Control Act. Those of the public who manufacture or export defense articles, defense services, and... delivery. Dated: March 25, 2012. Robert S. Kovac, Managing Director of Defense Trade Controls, Bureau...

  11. Amartya Sen's Capability Approach and the Brokering of Learning Provision for Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harreveld, Roberta E.; Singh, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper argues that Amartya Sen's ("Development as freedom," New York: Random House, 1999) concept of "capabilities" provides a useful framework for interpreting the brokering of learning provisions that emerged as a key feature of reforms to education and training in Queensland (Australia) for young people. Sen's capability…

  12. 47 CFR 73.3556 - Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of programming on commonly owned or....3556 Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. (a) No commercial AM or FM... service area of either station. (b) For purposes of this section, duplication means the broadcasting...

  13. 17 CFR 1.62 - Contract market requirement for floor broker and floor trader registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contract market requirement for floor broker and floor trader registration. 1.62 Section 1.62 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION GENERAL REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Miscellaneous § 1...

  14. 17 CFR 1.57 - Operations and activities of introducing brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operations and activities of introducing brokers. 1.57 Section 1.57 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION GENERAL REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Miscellaneous § 1.57 Operations and activities of...

  15. 17 CFR 1.10 - Financial reports of futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Financial reports of futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1.10 Section 1.10 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION GENERAL REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Minimum Financial and...

  16. Orchestrating innovation networks: The case of innovation brokers in the agri-food sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batterink, M.H.; Wubben, E.F.M.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2010-01-01

    This explorative study of network orchestration processes conducted by innovation brokers addresses new issues in bridging small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and research institutes in innovation networks. The study includes four in-depth case studies in the agri-food sector from different co

  17. The Study of Child Language Brokering: Past, Current and Emerging Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Rachele

    2010-01-01

    This special issue of "mediAzioni," the online journal of the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies on Translation, Languages and Culture (SITLeC) of the University of Bologna at Forli, derives from the "Study Day on Child Language Brokering" held in Forli in 2008. The Study Day began with a morning session during which…

  18. Caught in the Middle: Child Language Brokering as a Form of Unrecognised Language Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Rachele

    2016-01-01

    This paper will present the findings of a wide-scale research aimed at studying the phenomenon of Child Language Brokering (henceforth CLB) in Italy. After providing a description of recent immigration patterns and the provision of language services in Italy, and an overview of current research in this field, this study will discuss narrative data…

  19. The Positions of Virtual Knowledge Brokers in the Core Process of Open Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hacievliyagil, N.K.; Maisonneuve, Y.E.; Auger, J.F.; Hartmann, L.

    2007-01-01

    Several companies are implementing the strategy of open innovation in their research and development operations. They become more dependent, therefore, on their capabilities to exchange knowledge and technology with external parties. To facilitate these exchanges, virtual knowledge brokers use web-b

  20. Brokering Capabilities for EarthCube - supporting Multi-disciplinary Earth Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodha Khalsa, Siri; Pearlman, Jay; Nativi, Stefano; Browdy, Steve; Parsons, Mark; Duerr, Ruth; Pearlman, Francoise

    2013-04-01

    The goal of NSF's EarthCube is to create a sustainable infrastructure that enables the sharing of all geosciences data, information, and knowledge in an open, transparent and inclusive manner. Brokering of data and improvements in discovery and access are a key to data exchange and promotion of collaboration across the geosciences. In this presentation we describe an evolutionary process of infrastructure and interoperability development focused on participation of existing science research infrastructures and augmenting them for improved access. All geosciences communities already have, to a greater or lesser degree, elements of an information infrastructure in place. These elements include resources such as data archives, catalogs, and portals as well as vocabularies, data models, protocols, best practices and other community conventions. What is necessary now is a process for levering these diverse infrastructure elements into an overall infrastructure that provides easy discovery, access and utilization of resources across disciplinary boundaries. Brokers connect disparate systems with only minimal burdens upon those systems, and enable the infrastructure to adjust to new technical developments and scientific requirements as they emerge. Robust cyberinfrastructure will arise only when social, organizational, and cultural issues are resolved in tandem with the creation of technology-based services. This is a governance issue, but is facilitated by infrastructure capabilities that can impact the uptake of new interdisciplinary collaborations and exchange. Thus brokering must address both the cyberinfrastructure and computer technology requirements and also the social issues to allow improved cross-domain collaborations. This is best done through use-case-driven requirements and agile, iterative development methods. It is important to start by solving real (not hypothetical) information access and use problems via small pilot projects that develop capabilities

  1. Roadmap for Developing of Brokering as a Component of EarthCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, J.; Khalsa, S. S.; Browdy, S.; Duerr, R. E.; Nativi, S.; Parsons, M. A.; Pearlman, F.; Robinson, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of NSF's EarthCube is to create a sustainable infrastructure that enables the sharing of all geosciences data, information, and knowledge in an open, transparent and inclusive manner. Key to achieving the EarthCube vision is establishing a process that will guide the evolution of the infrastructure through community engagement and appropriate investment so that the infrastructure is embraced and utilized by the entire geosciences community. In this presentation we describe a roadmap, developed through the EarthCube Brokering Concept Award, for an evolutionary process of infrastructure and interoperability development. All geoscience communities already have, to a greater or lesser degree, elements of an information infrastructure in place. These elements include resources such as data archives, catalogs, and portals as well as vocabularies, data models, protocols, best practices and other community conventions. What is necessary now is a process for consolidating these diverse infrastructure elements into an overall infrastructure that provides easy discovery, access and utilization of resources across disciplinary boundaries. This process of consolidation will be achieved by creating "interfaces," what we call "brokers," between systems. Brokers connect disparate systems without imposing new burdens upon those systems, and enable the infrastructure to adjust to new technical developments and scientific requirements as they emerge. Robust cyberinfrastructure will arise only when social, organizational, and cultural issues are resolved in tandem with the creation of technology-based services. This is best done through use-case-driven requirements and agile, iterative development methods. It is important to start by solving real (not hypothetical) information access and use problems via small pilot projects that develop capabilities targeted to specific communities. These pilots can then grow into larger prototypes addressing intercommunity problems working

  2. What is the effectiveness of obesity related interventions at retail grocery stores and supermarkets? - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Abdulfatah; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

    2016-01-01

    effective in promoting purchase of healthy foods. Conclusion Given the diverse study settings and despite the challenges of methodological quality for some papers, we find efficacy of in-store healthy food interventions in terms of increased purchase of healthy foods. Researchers need to take risk of bias...... interventions have been carried out in retail grocery/supermarket settings as part of an effort to understand and influence consumption of healthful foods. The review’s key outcome variable is sale/purchase of healthy foods as a result of the interventions. This systematic review sheds light...... on the effectiveness of food store interventions intended to promote the consumption of healthy foods and the methodological quality of studies reporting them. Methods Systematic literature search spanning from 2003 to 2015 (inclusive both years), and confined to papers in the English language was conducted. Studies...

  3. A Quality of Service Broker Based Process Model for Dynamic Web Service Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Rathore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: With fast spreading of web services technology over the Internet, the quality aspects of a web service has received significant attention to the practitioners. The quality of web service includes both functional and nonfunctional details. In order to provide the correct and meaningful information to web service consumer, sometimes there is a need to compose existing web services in order to create new web service. Approach: We have proposed a Quality of Service (QoS broker based process model for Dynamic Web Service Composition (DWSC. The QoS broker in the proposed model is responsible for web service collection, selection, optimization and composition based on the service consumer’s requirements. It also verifies and certifies the functional and QoS specifications provided by service provider at the time of web service registration before publishing it in Universal Description, Discovery and Integration (UDDI registry. The detailed working of QoS broker is also presented in the study with functionality of each component. We will also discuss the process flowchart for new web service registration and web service composition at runtime. Results: The proposed QoS broker based model for dynamic web service composition solves the problems associated with quality of web service. It also prevents the central repository from malicious service provider to publish wrong information. Conclusion: The QoS broker-based process model for dynamic web service composition guarantees the quality of delivered service to web service consumers and improve the efficiency of composition.

  4. Supermarket and Grocery Store–Based Interventions to Promote Healthful Food Choices and Eating Practices: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinen, Amy M.; Nitzke, Susan A.; Martinez-Donate, Ana P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Increasingly high rates of obesity have heightened interest among researchers and practitioners in identifying evidence-based interventions to increase access to healthful foods and beverages. Because most food purchasing decisions are made in food stores, such settings are optimal for interventions aimed at influencing these decisions. The objective of this review was to synthesize the evidence on supermarket and grocery store interventions to promote healthful food choices. Methods We searched PubMed through July 2012 to identify original research articles evaluating supermarket and grocery store interventions that promoted healthful food choices. We categorized each intervention by type of intervention strategy and extracted and summarized data on each intervention. We developed a scoring system for evaluating each intervention and assigned points for study design, effectiveness, reach, and availability of evidence. We averaged points for each intervention category and compared the strength of the evidence for each category. Results We identified 58 articles and characterized 33 interventions. We found 7 strategies used alone or in combination. The most frequently used strategy was the combination of point-of-purchase and promotion and advertising (15 interventions); evidence for this category was scored as sufficient. On average, of 3 points possible, the intervention categories scored 2.6 for study design, 1.1 for effectiveness, 0.3 for reach, and 2 for availability of evidence. Three categories showed sufficient evidence; 4 showed insufficient evidence; none showed strong evidence. Conclusion More rigorous testing of interventions aimed at improving food and beverage choices in food stores, including their effect on diet and health outcomes, is needed. PMID:23578398

  5. Supermarket and grocery store-based interventions to promote healthful food choices and eating practices: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaron, Anne L; Meinen, Amy M; Nitzke, Susan A; Martinez-Donate, Ana P

    2013-04-11

    Increasingly high rates of obesity have heightened interest among researchers and practitioners in identifying evidence-based interventions to increase access to healthful foods and beverages. Because most food purchasing decisions are made in food stores, such settings are optimal for interventions aimed at influencing these decisions. The objective of this review was to synthesize the evidence on supermarket and grocery store interventions to promote healthful food choices. We searched PubMed through July 2012 to identify original research articles evaluating supermarket and grocery store interventions that promoted healthful food choices. We categorized each intervention by type of intervention strategy and extracted and summarized data on each intervention. We developed a scoring system for evaluating each intervention and assigned points for study design, effectiveness, reach, and availability of evidence. We averaged points for each intervention category and compared the strength of the evidence for each category. We identified 58 articles and characterized 33 interventions. We found 7 strategies used alone or in combination. The most frequently used strategy was the combination of point-of-purchase and promotion and advertising (15 interventions); evidence for this category was scored as sufficient. On average, of 3 points possible, the intervention categories scored 2.6 for study design, 1.1 for effectiveness, 0.3 for reach, and 2 for availability of evidence. Three categories showed sufficient evidence; 4 showed insufficient evidence; none showed strong evidence. More rigorous testing of interventions aimed at improving food and beverage choices in food stores, including their effect on diet and health outcomes, is needed.

  6. Integrating ArcGIS Online with GEOSS Data Access Broker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchi, Roberto; Hogeweg, Marten

    2014-05-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) seeks to address 9 societal benefit areas for Earth observations to address: disasters, health, energy, climate, agriculture, ecosystems, biodiversity, water, and weather. As governments and their partners continue to monitor the face of the Earth, the collection, storage, analysis, and sharing of these observations remain fragmented, incomplete, or redundant. Major observational gaps also remain (particularly as we seek to look beneath the surface of the land and the water). As such, GEO's credo is that "decision makers need a global, coordinated, comprehensive, and sustained system of observing systems." Not surprisingly, one of the largest block of issues facing GEOSS is in the area of data: the access to data (including the building services to make the data more accessible), inadequate data integration and interoperability, error and uncertainty of observations, spatial and temporal gaps in observations, and the related issues of user involvement and capacity building. This is especially for people who stand to gain the most benefit from the datasets, but don't have the resources or knowledge to use them. Esri has millions of GIS and imagery users in hundreds of thousands of organizations around the world that work in the aforementioned 9 GEO societal benefit areas. Esri is therefore proud to have entered into a partnership with GEOSS, more specifically by way of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Esri and the Earth and Space Science Informatics (ESSI) Laboratory of Prof. Stefano Nativi at the CNR (National Research Council of Italy) Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research. Esri is working with the ESSI Lab to integrate ArcGIS Online by way of the ArcGIS Online API into the GEOSS Data Access Broker (DAB), resulting in the discoverability of all public content from ArcGIS Online through many of the search portals that participate in this network (e.g., DataOne, CEOS, CUAHSI, OneGeology, IOOS

  7. Advertising and Product Confusion: A Case Study of Grapefruit Juice

    OpenAIRE

    Mark G. Brown; Lee, Jonq-Ying; Behr, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    Demand relationships for two closely related products -- grapefruit juice and grapefruit-juice cocktail -- were estimated from grocery-store scanner data to analyze the contention that consumer confusion exists between the two products. Results suggest confusion may exist, with grapefruit-juice advertising not only increasing the demand for grapefruit juice but also for grapefruit-juice cocktail.

  8. An exploratory study of knowledge brokering in hospital settings: facilitating knowledge sharing and learning for patient safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Justin; Currie, Graeme; Crompton, Amanda; Bishop, Simon

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study of intra-organisational knowledge brokers working within three large acute hospitals in the English National Health Services. Knowledge brokering is promoted as a strategy for supporting knowledge sharing and learning in healthcare, especially in the diffusion of research evidence into practice. Less attention has been given to brokers who support knowledge sharing and learning within healthcare organisations. With specific reference to the need for learning around patient safety, this paper focuses on the structural position and role of four types of intra-organisational brokers. Through ethnographic research it examines how variations in formal role, location and relationships shape how they share and support the use of knowledge across organisational and occupational boundaries. It suggests those occupying hybrid organisational roles, such as clinical-managers, are often best positioned to support knowledge sharing and learning because of their 'ambassadorial' type position and legitimacy to participate in multiple communities through dual-directed relationships.

  9. Buyer Search and the Role of Broker in an Emerging Housing Market: A Case Study of Guangzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Siqi; LIU Hongyu; Rebecca Lee

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines homebuyer's search process and the role of real estate broker in China's urban housing market, where inactive housing resale transactions and an immature brokerage industry are distinct characteristics. Guangzhou is used as a case study to model the intensity and duration of the search process. This study finds that buyers make trade-off between two search costs, activity cost and duration cost. The study also demonstrates that despite the industry's immature nature, buyers using brokers do increase search intensity and shorten search duration by reducing the activity cost. Empirical results show that there is no specific buyer group who can effectively lower their search cost by their own efforts, due to the poor information transparency in the current housing market. The broker-choice model shows that besides search cost, buyers' confidence in broker's service quality can also greatly influence their choice, so improvement in service quality and reputation has important implications for China's brokerage industry.

  10. Bilinguals' Plausibility Judgments for Phrases with a Literal vs. Non-literal Meaning: The Influence of Language Brokering Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belem G. López

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that prior experience in language brokering (informal translation may facilitate the processing of meaning within and across language boundaries. The present investigation examined the influence of brokering on bilinguals' processing of two word collocations with either a literal or a figurative meaning in each language. Proficient Spanish-English bilinguals classified as brokers or non-brokers were asked to judge if adjective+noun phrases presented in each language made sense or not. Phrases with a literal meaning (e.g., stinging insect were interspersed with phrases with a figurative meaning (e.g., stinging insult and non-sensical phrases (e.g., stinging picnic. It was hypothesized that plausibility judgments would be facilitated for literal relative to figurative meanings in each language but that experience in language brokering would be associated with a more equivalent pattern of responding across languages. These predictions were confirmed. The findings add to the body of empirical work on individual differences in language processing in bilinguals associated with prior language brokering experience.

  11. 国内外技术经纪人发展现状%Development Status of Domestic and Foreign Technology Brokers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张友轩; 张桂华; 韩令正; 宋澄; 张旸

    2015-01-01

    Technology broker appeared earlier in Tianjin but the development of broker groupsis not good enough and it is urgent to build up a technology broker system in Tianjin. The service system and characteristics of technology brokers in advanced countries were described. Based on the current situation of technology brokers in Tianjin and other cities and prov-inces in China and even in the world,this paper proposes some suggestions for the construction of technology broker system in the city.%天津市技术经纪人起步较早,但发展不够健全。实现科技创新,构建天津市的技术经纪人体系迫在眉睫。介绍了主要发达国家技术经纪人服务体系和特点,从天津市和国内外技术经纪人的现状出发,对构建天津市技术经纪人体系提出了一些建议。

  12. A MAS-Based Cloud Service Brokering System to Respond Security Needs of Cloud Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Talbi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is becoming a key factor in computer science and an important technology for many organizations to deliver different types of services. The companies which provide services to customers are called as cloud service providers. The cloud users (CUs increase and require secure, reliable and trustworthy cloud service providers (CSPs from the market. So, it’s a challenge for a new customer to choose the highly secure provider. This paper presents a cloud service brokering system in order to analyze and rank the secured cloud service provider among the available providers list. This model uses an autonomous and flexible agent in multi-agent system (MASs that have an intelligent behavior and suitable tools for helping the brokering system to assess the security risks for the group of cloud providers which make decision of the more secured provider and justify the business needs of users in terms of security and reliability.

  13. Hierarchical Brokering with Feedback Control Framework in Mobile Device-Centric Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Lieh Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a hierarchical brokering architecture (HiBA and Mobile Multicloud Networking (MMCN feedback control framework for mobile device-centric cloud (MDC2 computing. Exploiting the MMCN framework and RESTful web-based interconnection, each tier broker probes resource state of its federation for control and management. Real-time and seamless services were developed. Case studies including intrafederation energy-aware balancing based on fuzzy feedback control and higher tier load balancing are further demonstrated to show how HiBA with MMCN relieves the embedding of algorithms when developing services. Theoretical performance model and real-world experiments both show that an MDC2 based on HiBA features better quality in terms of resource availability and network latency if it federates devices with enough resources distributed in lower tier hierarchy. The proposed HiBA realizes a development platform for MDC2 computing which is a feasible solution to User-Centric Networks (UCNs.

  14. What is the effectiveness of obesity related interventions at retail grocery stores and supermarkets? -a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Abdulfatah; Jensen, Jørgen D

    2016-12-28

    The Prevalence of obesity and overweight has been increasing in many countries. Many factors have been identified as contributing to obesity including the food environment, especially the access, availability and affordability of healthy foods in grocery stores and supermarkets. Several interventions have been carried out in retail grocery/supermarket settings as part of an effort to understand and influence consumption of healthful foods. The review's key outcome variable is sale/purchase of healthy foods as a result of the interventions. This systematic review sheds light on the effectiveness of food store interventions intended to promote the consumption of healthy foods and the methodological quality of studies reporting them. Systematic literature search spanning from 2003 to 2015 (inclusive both years), and confined to papers in the English language was conducted. Studies fulfilling search criteria were identified and critically appraised. Studies included in this review report health interventions at physical food stores including supermarkets and corner stores, and with outcome variable of adopting healthier food purchasing/consumption behavior. The methodological quality of all included articles has been determined using a validated 16-item quality assessment tool (QATSDD). The literature search identified 1580 publications, of which 42 met the inclusion criteria. Most interventions used a combination of information (e.g. awareness raising through food labeling, promotions, campaigns, etc.) and increasing availability of healthy foods such as fruits and vegetables. Few used price interventions. The average quality score for all papers is 65.0%, or an overall medium methodological quality. Apart from few studies, most studies reported that store interventions were effective in promoting purchase of healthy foods. Given the diverse study settings and despite the challenges of methodological quality for some papers, we find efficacy of in-store healthy food

  15. Kształcenie brokerów informacji w Polsce

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasik Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the impact of the development of information technology for the collection, processing and sharing of information. The impact of cyberspace and the Internet on the development of modern information sector is discussed. The following terms are explained: information broker, infobroker, the information society, information noise. A brief history of the origins of information retrieval is presented, and the most important international organizations and associations related ...

  16. Using message brokering and data mediation on earth science data to enhance global maritime situational awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, C.; Alessandrini, A.; Greidanus, H.

    2016-04-01

    Maritime Situational Awareness is the understanding of anything associated with the maritime domain that could impact the security, safety, economy, or environment. The European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) has developed an in-house data collection, data analysis and data visualiztion facility, known as the Blue Hub. The Blue Hub operates as a research and development platform for integrated maritime surveillance and maritime situational awareness. It has global coverage and has been applied, for example, to support counter-piracy around Africa, to investigate fishing activity and to monitor the growing ship traffic in the Arctic. In order to improve maritime awareness and support risk assessment, the JRC has started to integrate data from the marine and atmosheric science community. In particular the JRC is interested in using forecasts from operational ocean models and weather models. For the Blue Hub a new type of data server, called ERDDAP, that performs message brokering and data mediation has become an essential tool for the accessing of ocean forecast data as quickly as possible in easy to use formats. NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the USA) is making global oceanography and weather data available through the Environmental Research Division's Data Access Program (ERDDAP) data broker. ERDDAP provides RESTful machine to machine communication, data brokering and data mediation by converting data to a number of standard and developer friendly formats, including some Open Geospatial Consortium formats. In this paper, we demonstrate how data brokering and mediation is making complex scientific data accessible. We show how such data is being integrated into the Blue Hub system to enhance maritime situational awareness.

  17. Morals, medicine and change: morality brokers, social phobias, and French psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Stephanie

    2008-06-01

    This paper will examine how French neurotics are being transformed into 'social phobics' and how the appearance of this group may be tied to new personal and social ideals. There are many people and factors that contribute to this changing definition of mental illness. Amongst these, I will focus on the role of three groups who are most vocally acting as morality brokers in the creation of these new subjects: psychiatrists, patients' groups and pharmaceutical companies.

  18. Joining the dots: the role of brokers in nutrition policy in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullerton, Katherine; Donnet, Timothy; Lee, Amanda; Gallegos, Danielle

    2017-04-08

    Poor diet is the leading preventable risk factor contributing to the burden of disease in Australia. A range of cost-effective, comprehensive population-focussed strategies are available to address these dietary-related diseases. However, despite evidence of their effectiveness, minimal federal resources are directed to this area. To better understand the limited public health nutrition policy action in Australia, we sought to identify the key policy brokers in the Australian nutrition policy network and consider their level of influence over nutrition policymaking. A social network analysis involving four rounds of data collection was undertaken using a modified reputational snowball method to identify the nutrition policy network of individuals in direct contact with each other. Centrality measures, in particular betweenness centrality, and a visualisation of the network were used to identify key policy brokers. Three hundred and ninety (390) individual actors with 1917 direct ties were identified within the Australian nutrition policy network. The network revealed two key brokers; a Nutrition Academic and a General Health professional from a non-government organisation (NGO), with the latter being in the greatest strategic position for influencing policymakers. The results of this social network analysis illustrate there are two dominant brokers within the nutrition policy network in Australia. However their structural position in the network means their brokerage roles have different purposes and different levels of influence on policymaking. The results suggest that brokerage in isolation may not adequately represent influence in nutrition policy in Australia. Other factors, such as direct access to decision-makers and the saliency of the solution, must also be considered.

  19. Study on uncertainty of geospatial semantic Web services composition based on broker approach and Bayesian networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Cui, Weihong; Liu, Zhen; Ouyang, Fucheng

    2008-10-01

    The Semantic Web has a major weakness which is lacking of a principled means to represent and reason about uncertainty. This is also located in the services composition approaches such as BPEL4WS and Semantic Description Model. We analyze the uncertainty of Geospatial Web Service composition through mining the knowledge in historical records of composition based on Broker approach and Bayesian Networks. We proved this approach is effective and efficient through a sample scenario in this paper.

  20. Connecting agriculture with supermarkets Research on Supply Chain Operation of Connecting Agriculture with Supermarkets Based on Agricultural Brokers System%基于农业经纪人制度的“农超对接”供应链运作研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡司阳; 方炫; 王翥; 浦徐进

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of expounding the research results of using relevant knowledge about Game Theory for supply chain of agricultural products at home and abroad, we use principal-agent model in Game Theory to research the new function that the supermarkets entrust supervision and control over quality of agricultural products to agricultural brokers in the circulation model of connecting agriculture with supermarkets; then design the optimal incentive contract and influencing factors between agricultural broker and supermarket, and explain the fundamental role of agricultural brokers in the process of circulation; finally in light of the role of government in promoting development and application of agricultural brokers, put forward corresponding policy suggestions: establish government support policy; set relevant standard of industry ; establish cooperative organizations of agricultural brokers.%在概述国内外将博弈论相关知识运用于农产品供应链研究的基础上,运用博弈论中的委托一代理模型,对在“农超对接”的流通模式中超市委托农业经纪人对农产品质量进行监督、控制的这一新职能进行了研究;然后设计了农业经纪人与超市之间的最优激励合同及影响因素,并说明了农业经纪人在流通过程中起到的巨大作用;最后对政府在推动农业经纪人的发展与应用中可发挥的作用提出了建立政府扶持政策、制定相关的行业标准和建立农业经纪人合作组织等相关政策建议.

  1. Supply chain design approaches for supply chain resilience: A qualitative study of South African fast-moving consumer goods grocery manufacturers

    OpenAIRE

    Assilah Agigi; Wesley Niemann; Theuns Kotzé

    2016-01-01

    Orientation: In today’s globalised and complex business environment, firms are ever more vulnerable to supply chain disruptions, originating both internally and externally from the supply chain. Supply chain resilience minimises the impact of a disruption through design approaches, which allows the supply chain to respond appropriately to disruptive events.Research purpose: This article investigated the supply chain risks faced by grocery manufacturers in the South African fast-moving consume...

  2. Web Services in Earth Science Data Systems: Realities of Brokering, Chaining and Federating Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, M.; Seablom, M.; Pfister, R.

    2004-12-01

    The key to the next-generation of science will be unlocked through synergy between resources held by many differing individuals and organizations. These resources include missions, information, data, models, algorithms and related operations/services. Key infrastructure technology can enable this synergy - allowing scientists to discover and utilize these resources in innovative and efficient ways. Currently, the process to invoke data operations without the use of service brokering capabilities can be laborious. Scientists must first find data of interest, locate appropriate service(s) (e.g. subsetting), download, manage and execute the service on their own server before they can start the process of doing their job of science analysis or research. The vision of the future is that a scientist sits in front of a laptop computer thinking about a science problem. Scenario: A scientist in Illinois wants to study the re-vegetation process over recently active volcanoes and needs satellite images that are 1) mostly cloud-free, 2) exist in the green, red, and near-infrared portions of the spectrum, and 3) occur over specific, discrete regions of the Northern Hemisphere. The multi-instrument data, need to be co-registered, re-projection and delivered in NetCDF format. In this scenario, the user interacts with information about the data and services to identify data resources needed to analyze science question. Of the petabytes of data and hundreds of data services available, the scientist is able to rapidly get a comprehensive, seamless view tailored to her research and analyze the issue. It is not necessary for the scientist to know that behind the scenes exists an enterprise of seamless, distributed data and services that find the data and streams it to a series of chained services in physically disparate locations to apply data transformation algorithms that meet the user's specifications and ultimately delivers the data to the user's laptop. However, the scientist

  3. Preschoolers' influence on and help with beverage selection at the grocery store is linked to maternal responsiveness and child beverage intake: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Karina R; Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Guzman, Melissa; Wakefield, Dorothy; Sisson, Susan B; Mayeux, Lara

    2016-12-01

    Children's involvement in beverage selection or purchase has seldom been investigated. The responsiveness dimension of parental feeding styles has been related to healthy maternal feeding practices. Assessing mothers' reports of responsiveness and demandingness in grocery stores may shed light on influences on purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and fruit juice (FJ). Study objectives were to explore whether (1) maternal responsiveness and demandingness were associated with preschoolers' a) help with selection of and b) influence on SSB and FJ purchases during grocery shopping and whether (2) preschoolers' a) help with selection of and b) influence on SSB and FJ purchases were associated with child intake of these beverages. Mothers of 3-to-5-year-old children (n=185) who co-shopped with the child completed the Caregiver Feeding Style Questionnaire, reported frequency of child help with selection and influence on beverage purchase via questionnaire, and provided a one-day weekend food recall for the child. In adjusted logistic regressions, responsiveness was associated with child help selecting FJ (OR=6.50, 95% CI[1.04, 40.75], pparenting behaviors associated with grocery shopping should be explored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. What Role Do Local Grocery Stores Play in Urban Food Environments? A Case Study of Hartford-Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Katie S.; Ghosh, Debarchana; Page, Martha; Wolff, Michele; McMinimee, Kate; Zhang, Mengyao

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Research on urban food environments emphasizes limited access to healthy food, with fewer large supermarkets and higher food prices. Many residents of Hartford, Connecticut, which is often considered a food desert, buy most of their food from small and medium-sized grocery stores. We examined the food environment in greater Hartford, comparing stores in Hartford to those in the surrounding suburbs, and by store size (small, medium, and large). Methods We surveyed all small (over 1,000 ft2), medium, and large-sized supermarkets within a 2-mile radius of Hartford (36 total stores). We measured the distance to stores, availability, price and quality of a market basket of 25 items, and rated each store on internal and external appearance. Geographic Information System (GIS) was used for mapping distance to the stores and variation of food availability, quality, and appearance. Results Contrary to common literature, no significant differences were found in food availability and price between Hartford and suburban stores. However, produce quality, internal, and external store appearance were significantly lower in Hartford compared to suburban stores (all pgroceries common in inner cities. Improving produce quality and store appearance can potentially impact the food purchasing decisions of low-income residents in Hartford. PMID:24718579

  5. BP-Broker use-cases in the UncertWeb framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncella, Roberto; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Schulz, Michael; Stasch, Christoph; Proß, Benjamin; Jones, Richard; Santoro, Mattia

    2013-04-01

    The UncertWeb framework is a distributed, Web-based Information and Communication Technology (ICT) system to support scientific data modeling in presence of uncertainty. We designed and prototyped a core component of the UncertWeb framework: the Business Process Broker. The BP-Broker implements several functionalities, such as: discovery of available processes/BPs, preprocessing of a BP into its executable form (EBP), publication of EBPs and their execution through a workflow-engine. According to the Composition-as-a-Service (CaaS) approach, the BP-Broker supports discovery and chaining of modeling resources (and processing resources in general), providing the necessary interoperability services for creating, validating, editing, storing, publishing, and executing scientific workflows. The UncertWeb project targeted several scenarios, which were used to evaluate and test the BP-Broker. The scenarios cover the following environmental application domains: biodiversity and habitat change, land use and policy modeling, local air quality forecasting, and individual activity in the environment. This work reports on the study of a number of use-cases, by means of the BP-Broker, namely: - eHabitat use-case: implements a Monte Carlo simulation performed on a deterministic ecological model; an extended use-case supports inter-comparison of model outputs; - FERA use-case: is composed of a set of models for predicting land-use and crop yield response to climatic and economic change; - NILU use-case: is composed of a Probabilistic Air Quality Forecasting model for predicting concentrations of air pollutants; - Albatross use-case: includes two model services for simulating activity-travel patterns of individuals in time and space; - Overlay use-case: integrates the NILU scenario with the Albatross scenario to calculate the exposure to air pollutants of individuals. Our aim was to prove the feasibility of describing composite modeling processes with a high-level, abstract

  6. Implementation of an HL7/DICOM broker for automated patient demographic data entry in computed radiography systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Steven G.; Stewart, Brent K.

    1998-07-01

    As radiology departments move closer to enterprise-wide electronic imaging systems, the importance of timely and accurate patient and exam information cannot be overstated. In addition, automated entry of patient and exam information into image acquisition modalities (e.g., computed radiography, CR) enhances technologist productivity, which is critical in high volume practices (e.g. a major trauma center). A difficulty arises, however, since the authoritative source of patient and exam information may be a Radiology Information System (RIS) or a Hospital Information System (HIS) packages its data differently than most imaging modalities. To bridge this gap, we have implemented an interface engine to affect the translation of Health Level Seven (HL7) messages from the RIS (or HIS) into Digital Imaging Communications In Medicine (DICOM) messages for seven CR systems (Fuji Medical Systems, Burbank, CA). Recent measurements suggest that manual technologist transcription of information into the CR unit takes 45.4 plus or minus 3.0 seconds. Since the introduction of the HL7/DICOM broker, the time has dropped to 5.4 plus or minus 0.1 seconds to produce the same information.

  7. Customer satisfaction enhancement in Russian fresh grocery distribution platform, case company: Partiya Edi

    OpenAIRE

    Cherkashina, Daria

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, customers are the most important contributors to the successful business operation and their level of satisfaction is a top priority for the management team. Thus, top-managers do adopt a business model which is mainly oriented on the customers, their needs and wants. In contrast, several years ago, the majority of companies were focused on the product development and its features without any effort to increase customer satisfaction. Whereas the recent situation changed greatly, com...

  8. Brokering Knowledge Mobilization Networks: Policy Reforms, Partnerships, and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng-A-Fook, Nicholas; Kane, Ruth G.; Butler, Jesse K.; Glithero, Lisa; Forte, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Educational researchers and policy-makers are now expected by funding agencies and their institutions to innovate the multi-directional ways in which our production of knowledge can impact the classrooms of teachers (practitioners), while also integrating their experiential knowledge into the landscape of our research. In this article, we draw on…

  9. The efficiency, energy intensity and visual impact of the accent lighting in the retail grocery stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Nagyová

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, topics of displaying, presentation, lighting, energy saving and issues related to the environment while selling the fresh food (fruits, vegetable, bakery products, meat are becoming an important matter among traders. However, just bigger companies with transnational capital have devoted their attention to this issue yet. Generally, the energy costs make up 70% of operating costs in retail stores where the cooling system and lighting are the most energy consuming. Accent lighting in modern retails is largely involved in the overall design and atmosphere in shops and plays a crucial role in presenting the goods as well. Using of accent lighting can draw the customer's attention to a specific part of the sales area and achieve the overall harmonization in the store. With the rational using of combination of energy saving and effective accent lighting retailers can achieve not only attractive presentation of displayed products but also appreciable savings in the operation of their stores. It is the only factor that can be exactly measured and controlled. Using a Colour and Lux Meters we found out the intensity and color temperature of accent lighting used in domestic and foreign retail chains for the different kinds of fresh food products. Based on the obtained values we have compiled graphs, which are showing visual comfort. We also identified different types of accent lighting, which we assigned to their impact on emotional involvement of consumers. The starting points were the tests we conducted in simulated laboratory conditions. While searching of a compromise between effective and energy efficient accent lighting we take into consideration consumers' emotional response as well as the annual electricity consumption of different types of light sources. At the end we recommend options for energy-efficient, effective and spectacular lighting while using the optimal number of light sources and their logical organization

  10. Framing medical tourism: an analysis of persuasive appeals, risks and benefits, and new media features of medical tourism broker websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunmin; Wright, Kevin B; O'Connor, Michaela; Wombacher, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the benefits and risks featured in medical tourism broker websites, as well as the types of persuasive appeals that these websites use to attract potential customers, from a framing theory perspective. In addition, it examines relationships among types of appeals and specific types of health-related services offered by medical facilities abroad and the role of new media modalities within medical tourism broker sites. A content analysis of 91 medical tourism broker websites was conducted. The results indicate that the websites highly emphasized benefits while downplaying the risks. Specifically, despite offering consumers complicated and risky medical procedures, the websites failed to report any procedural, postoperative, or legal concerns associated with them. Moreover, the results indicated that the websites relied on heavy use of new media features to enhance the appeal of the medical services that were offered. The implications of these findings, future directions for research, and limitations of the study are discussed.

  11. Adolescent language brokering in diverse contexts: associations with parenting and parent-youth relationships in a new immigrant destination area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Kathleen M; Lambert, Sharon F; Ghazarian, Sharon R; Little, Todd D

    2015-01-01

    In the US, children in immigrant families have a longstanding history of language brokering for their parents. Scholars have surmised that youth's role in language brokering may influence the nature of parenting practices and parent-child relationships that are important to the positive adjustment of adolescent youth. Research findings in this regard, however, have been mixed. Drawing from the family stress model and the concept of adolescent helpfulness, the present study examined how language brokering across different contexts-school, community, and home-was associated with indicators of parental support and parental behavioral control. The sample included 118 (53% female) primarily Mexican- and Central American-origin 7th, 9th, and 11th grade children in Latino immigrant families living in suburban Atlanta, an important new immigrant destination. The results from structural equation models indicated that language brokering at home-translations for items such as bills, credit card statements, and insurance forms-was associated with less parental decision-making authority, lower levels of parental knowledge, and less parent-child closeness. Language brokering pertinent to school and community contexts, on the other hand, was not associated with variations in parenting. The adverse consequences for parenting conferred by youth translating insurance forms and family financial bills may stem from the excessive cognitive demands placed on youth in these situations, as well as the elevated power that youth gain in relationship to their immigrant parents. For the country's rapidly growing population of youth being raised by immigrant Latino parents, it is important to consider that youth's role as language broker at home may affect closeness in the parent-child relationship as well as the degree to which parents are able to maintain authority over youth's behaviors.

  12. The Future of the Small Rural Grocery Store: A Qualitative Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinard, Courtney A; Fricke, Hollyanne E; Smith, Teresa M; Carpenter, Leah R; Yaroch, Amy L

    2016-11-01

    Rural communities face unique challenges to and opportunities for offering more healthful foods and are often understudied in comparison to their urban counterparts. The purpose of this study was to conduct a qualitative assessment of rural storeowners' perceptions of their communities, their business practices, and factors that influences their viability, sustainability, and ability to support healthy food choices. We conducted interviews with storeowners (N = 15) in small stores in rural Nebraska and explored perceptions of business practices, role in the community, and consumer demand for more healthful foods. The storeowners reported strategies they employ to remain competitive, such as selling alcohol and tobacco, focusing on customer service, and ensuring quality of products. Manufacturer and distributor agreements often put constraints on their business models. Key challenges reported included a dwindling population and competition with larger chains in neighboring towns set in a sparsely populated landscape. Goals for the future included expanding equipment, largely to offer more prepared foods. This study adds to the literature around food access in rural communities, and can inform future implementation strategies to work with storeowners to improve healthy food access.

  13. Knowledge sharing in construction partnering projects - redundancy, boundary objects and brokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Thuesen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    common assignment of meaning, brokers (e.g., design managers), boundary objects (e.g., drawings) and arenas (e.g., meetings). The paper presents an ethnographic case study of a project partnership between engineers, architects and contractors in construction using the partnering concept. The focus......, multiple memberships and different levels of participation, and accompanied by a governance frame. The paper discusses central mechanisms for coordinating knowledge in such a complex construction project. The knowledge relations are conceptualised through focusing on redundancy, understood as negotiated...

  14. Bridges, brokers and boundary spanners in collaborative networks: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Janet C; Cunningham, Frances C.; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Bridges, brokers and boundary spanners facilitate transactions and the flow of information between people or groups who either have no physical or cognitive access to one another, or alternatively, who have no basis on which to trust each other. The health care sector is a context that is rich in isolated clusters, such as silos and professional “tribes,” in need of connectivity. It is a key challenge in health service management to understand, analyse and exploit the role of key a...

  15. Risk communication and informed consent in the medical tourism industry: A thematic content analysis of canadian broker websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the risks and benefits of undergoing surgery or other procedures abroad to their clientele. This raises important ethical concerns regarding processes such as informed consent and the liability of brokers in the event that complications arise from procedures. The purpose of this article is to examine the language, information, and online marketing of Canadian medical tourism brokers' websites in light of such ethical concerns. Methods An exhaustive online search using multiple search engines and keywords was performed to compile a comprehensive directory of English-language Canadian medical tourism brokerage websites. These websites were examined using thematic content analysis, which included identifying informational themes, generating frequency counts of these themes, and comparing trends in these counts to the established literature. Results Seventeen websites were identified for inclusion in this study. It was found that Canadian medical tourism broker websites varied widely in scope, content, professionalism and depth of information. Three themes emerged from the thematic content analysis: training and accreditation, risk communication, and business dimensions. Third party accreditation bodies of debatable regulatory value were regularly mentioned on the reviewed websites, and discussion of surgical risk was absent on 47% of the websites reviewed, with limited discussion of risk on the remaining ones. Terminology describing brokers' roles was somewhat inconsistent across

  16. Risk communication and informed consent in the medical tourism industry: A thematic content analysis of canadian broker websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crooks Valorie A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the risks and benefits of undergoing surgery or other procedures abroad to their clientele. This raises important ethical concerns regarding processes such as informed consent and the liability of brokers in the event that complications arise from procedures. The purpose of this article is to examine the language, information, and online marketing of Canadian medical tourism brokers' websites in light of such ethical concerns. Methods An exhaustive online search using multiple search engines and keywords was performed to compile a comprehensive directory of English-language Canadian medical tourism brokerage websites. These websites were examined using thematic content analysis, which included identifying informational themes, generating frequency counts of these themes, and comparing trends in these counts to the established literature. Results Seventeen websites were identified for inclusion in this study. It was found that Canadian medical tourism broker websites varied widely in scope, content, professionalism and depth of information. Three themes emerged from the thematic content analysis: training and accreditation, risk communication, and business dimensions. Third party accreditation bodies of debatable regulatory value were regularly mentioned on the reviewed websites, and discussion of surgical risk was absent on 47% of the websites reviewed, with limited discussion of risk on the remaining ones. Terminology describing brokers' roles was

  17. Risk communication and informed consent in the medical tourism industry: a thematic content analysis of Canadian broker websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Kali; Snyder, Jeremy; Crooks, Valorie A; Johnston, Rory

    2011-09-26

    Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the risks and benefits of undergoing surgery or other procedures abroad to their clientele. This raises important ethical concerns regarding processes such as informed consent and the liability of brokers in the event that complications arise from procedures. The purpose of this article is to examine the language, information, and online marketing of Canadian medical tourism brokers' websites in light of such ethical concerns. An exhaustive online search using multiple search engines and keywords was performed to compile a comprehensive directory of English-language Canadian medical tourism brokerage websites. These websites were examined using thematic content analysis, which included identifying informational themes, generating frequency counts of these themes, and comparing trends in these counts to the established literature. Seventeen websites were identified for inclusion in this study. It was found that Canadian medical tourism broker websites varied widely in scope, content, professionalism and depth of information. Three themes emerged from the thematic content analysis: training and accreditation, risk communication, and business dimensions. Third party accreditation bodies of debatable regulatory value were regularly mentioned on the reviewed websites, and discussion of surgical risk was absent on 47% of the websites reviewed, with limited discussion of risk on the remaining ones. Terminology describing brokers' roles was somewhat inconsistent across the websites. Finally

  18. Use of a knowledge broker to establish healthy public policies in a city district: a developmental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeveld, Kirsten; Stronks, Karien; Harting, Janneke

    2016-03-15

    Public health is to a large extent determined by non-health-sector policies. One approach to address this apparent paradox is to establish healthy public policies. This requires policy makers in non-health sectors to become more aware of the health impacts of their policies, and more willing to adopt evidence-informed policy measures to improve health. We employed a knowledge broker to set the agenda for health and to specify health-promoting policy alternatives. This study aimed at gaining in-depth understanding of how this knowledge broker approach works. In the context of a long-term partnership between the two universities in Amsterdam and the municipal public health service, we employed a knowledge broker who worked part-time at a university and part-time for an Amsterdam city district. When setting an agenda and specifying evidence-informed policy alternatives, we considered three individual policy portfolios as well as the policy organization of the city district. We evaluated and developed the knowledge broker approach through action research using participant observation. Our knowledge brokering strategy led to the adoption of several policy alternatives in individual policy portfolios, and was especially successful in agenda-setting for health. More specifically, health became an issue on the formal policy agenda as evidenced by its uptake in the city district's mid-term review and the appointment of a policy analyst for health. Our study corroborated the importance of process factors such as building trust, clearly distinguishing the knowledge broker role, and adequate management support. We also saw the benefits of multilevel agenda-setting and specifying policy alternatives at appropriate policy levels. Sector-specific responsibilities hampered the adoption of cross-sectoral policy alternatives, while thematically designed policy documents offered opportunities for including them. Further interpretation revealed three additional themes in knowledge

  19. Effects of financial incentives for the purchase of healthy groceries on dietary intake and weight outcomes among older adults: A randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Tanja V E; Bannon, Annika L; Moore, Reneé H

    2016-05-01

    Providing financial incentives can be a useful behavioral economics strategy for increasing fruit and vegetable intake among consumers. It remains to be determined whether financial incentives can promote intake of other low energy-dense foods and if consumers who are already using promotional tools for their grocery purchases may be especially responsive to receiving incentives. This randomized controlled trial tested the effects of offering financial incentives for the purchase of healthy groceries on 3-month changes in dietary intake, weight outcomes, and the home food environment among older adults. A secondary aim was to compare frequent coupon users (FCU) and non-coupon users (NCU) on weight status, home food environment, and grocery shopping behavior. FCU (n = 28) and NCU (n = 26) were randomly assigned to either an incentive or a control group. Participants in the incentive group received $1 for every healthy food or beverage they purchased. All participants completed 3-day food records and a home food inventory and had their height, weight, and waist circumference measured at baseline and after 3 months. Participants who were responsive to the intervention and received financial incentives significantly increased their daily vegetable intake (P = 0.04). Participants in both groups showed significant improvements in their home food environment (P = 0.0003). No significant changes were observed in daily energy intake or weight-related outcomes across groups (P 0.73). Increased consumption of vegetables did not replace intake of more energy-dense foods. Incentivizing consumers to make healthy food choices while simultaneously reducing less healthy food choices may be important.

  20. What influences Latino grocery shopping behavior? Perspectives on the small food store environment from managers and employees in San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Flack, Jennifer C; Baquero, Barbara; Linnan, Laura A; Gittelsohn, Joel; Pickrel, Julie L; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2016-01-01

    To inform the design of a multilevel in-store intervention, this qualitative study utilized in-depth semistructured interviews with 28 managers and 10 employees of small-to-medium-sized Latino food stores (tiendas) in San Diego, California, to identify factors within the tienda that may influence Latino customers' grocery-shopping experiences and behaviors. Qualitative data analysis, guided by grounded theory, was performed using open coding. Results suggest that future interventions should focus on the physical (i.e., built structures) and social (i.e., economic and sociocultural) dimensions of store environments, including areas where the two dimensions interact, to promote the purchase of healthy food among customers.

  1. Knowledge Brokering: An Innovative Model for Supporting Evidence-Informed Practice in Respiratory Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Hoens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of adopting research findings in the clinical setting is challenging, regardless of the area of practice. One strategy to facilitate this process is the use of knowledge brokering. Knowledge brokers (KBs are individuals who work to bridge the gap between researchers and knowledge users. In the health care setting, KBs work closely with clinicians to facilitate enhanced uptake of research findings into clinical practice. They also work with researchers to ensure research findings are translatable and meaningful to clinical practice. The present article discusses a KB’s role in a respiratory care setting. Working closely with both researchers and clinicians, the KB has led teams in the process of conceptualizing, developing, testing, disseminating and evaluating several projects related to respiratory care, including projects related to mobility in critical care settings and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; inspiratory muscle training; and the use of incentive spirometry in postsurgical populations. The KB role has provided an important communication link between researcher and knowledge user that has facilitated evidence-informed practice to improve patient care.

  2. Distributed Broker-Agent Architecture for Multimedia Communications Traversing NAT/Firewall in NGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苟先太; 金炜东

    2004-01-01

    The forthcoming Next Generation Network (NGN) is an all IP network. Multimedia communications over IP networks are a type of bundled session communications, which cannot directly traverse Network Address Translations (NATs) and firewalls even in NGN. To solve the problem that the existing traversal methods are not suitable for service providers to set up a real system in NGN,a Distributed Broker-agent Architecture (DBA) is addressed. DBA is secure and realizable for service providers and enterprises because it is easy to set up and does not need to upgrade the existing devices like Firewalls, NATs or endpoint devices of subscribers.DBA is composed of two-layer distributed agents, the server proxies and the client agents, in which all multimedia communications use shared tunnels to carry signaling messages and media data between broker-agents, and the call signaling is encrypted over Security Socket Layer (SSL) to guarantee the security of calling. Moreover, the function model and multiplexed connection messages format of DBA are designed, which lays a basis for the protocol in the future NGN. In addition, a simple implementation based on H.323 verifyies the main function of traversing firewalls and NATs.

  3. BALTEX - A science broker for the Baltic Sea Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckermann, M.; von Storch, H.; Langner, J.; Omstedt, A. T.

    2010-12-01

    BALTEX (the Baltic Sea Experiment) is an interdisciplinary research network of scientists involved in environmental research dedicated to the Baltic Sea drainage basin (including disciplines such as meteorology, hydrology, oceanography, biogeochemistry and climate research). Originally founded in 1992 as a Continental Scale Experiment in GEWEX (the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment within the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) of the World Meteorological Organization, WMO), it was intended to form a common science, communication and data platform with the overall goal to integrate efforts to gain a better understanding of the water and energy cycle in the Baltic Sea basin. BALTEX Phase II (since 2003) has extended the scope to research on regional climate change and variability, climate change impacts on biogeochemistry and water management, but also made first steps towards overarching social and political issues as cross-cutting activities in the context of the scientific objectives. An important aspect of BALTEX Phase II is a more holistic approach towards observing, understanding and modelling major environmental relevant for the entire Baltic Sea region. Parts of the BALTEX Phase II research activities thus contribute to the establishment of a high resolution integrated modelling system for Northern Europe, embedded in an Earth System Model. An outstanding product of BALTEX as a “knowledge broker” for regional political institutions is the BACC report. Following to a large extent the method of IPCC, a regional assessment report on climate change in the Baltic Sea basin was compiled, which summarizes the published scientifically legitimate knowledge on regional climate change in the Baltic Sea basin and its impacts. The assessment, known as the BACC report (BALTEX Assessment of Climate Change for the Baltic Sea Basin; BACC author team 2008, Reckermann et al., 2008) was published in 2008 as a book. A survey among climate researchers in the area

  4. Language Brokering and Self-Concept: An Exploratory Study of Latino Students' Experiences in Middle and High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Kate; Kumpiene, Gerda

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the relationships among individual characteristics, language brokering experiences and attitudes, and multiple dimensions of self-concept among a sample of Latino adolescents. The sample was comprised of 66 Latino students in 6th through 11th grades who were proficient in both Spanish and English. Results from…

  5. 31 CFR 103.35 - Additional records to be made and retained by brokers or dealers in securities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional records to be made and retained by brokers or dealers in securities. 103.35 Section 103.35 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN...

  6. From Language Learner to Language User in English-Medium Higher Education: Language Development Brokers outside the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaj-Ward, Lia

    2017-01-01

    This article explores, from within the social constructivist paradigm and drawing on data from twenty-one semi-structured interviews with international postgraduate university students approaching the end of a one-year full-time taught Masters degree in the UK, the range of language development brokers that have had an impact on these students'…

  7. National Policy Brokering and the Construction of the European Education Space in England, Sweden, Finland and Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grek, Sotiria; Lawn, Martin; Lingard, Bob; Ozga, Jenny; Rinne, Risto; Segerholm, Christina; Simola, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    This paper draws on a comparative study of the growth of data and the changing governance of education in Europe. It looks at data and the "making" of a European Education Policy Space, with a focus on "policy brokers" in translating and mediating demands for data from the European Commission. It considers the ways in which…

  8. Beyond knowledge brokering: an exploratory study on innovation intermediaries in an evolving smallholder agricultural system in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilelu, C.W.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Leeuwis, C.; Hall, A.

    2011-01-01

    The recognition that innovation occurs in networks of heterogeneous actors and requires broad systemic support beyond knowledge brokering has resulted in a changing landscape in the intermediary domain in the increasingly market-driven agricultural sector in developing countries. This paper presents

  9. 76 FR 22912 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS. ACTION: General...

  10. 76 FR 44033 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of...

  11. 75 FR 11899 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland...

  12. 77 FR 45648 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 148 (Wednesday, August 1, 2012)] [Notices] [Page 45648] [FR Doc No: 2012-18740] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder AGENCY: U.S. Customs and...

  13. 77 FR 16249 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of...

  14. 76 FR 2918 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of...

  15. 78 FR 22895 - Test To Allow Customs Brokers To Pre-Certify Importers for Participation in the Importer Self...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... that could benefit both CBP and brokers while addressing the challenges of 21st Century commerce. An... and ending with the total number of emails received. CBP will then use random number generating...) business days from April 17, 2013. Comments may be submitted to the email address indicated in...

  16. Language Brokering and Self-Concept: An Exploratory Study of Latino Students' Experiences in Middle and High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Kate; Kumpiene, Gerda

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the relationships among individual characteristics, language brokering experiences and attitudes, and multiple dimensions of self-concept among a sample of Latino adolescents. The sample was comprised of 66 Latino students in 6th through 11th grades who were proficient in both Spanish and English. Results from…

  17. 17 CFR 230.139 - Publications or distributions of research reports by brokers or dealers distributing securities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for sale or an offer to sell a security or general solicitation or general advertising, in connection... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Publications or distributions of research reports by brokers or dealers distributing securities. 230.139 Section 230.139...

  18. 17 CFR 240.17a-3 - Records to be made by certain exchange members, brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... record: (i) As to each associated person of each written customer complaint received by the member... disposition of the complaint. (ii) Indicating that each customer of the member, broker or dealer has been... accounts (or other records) itemizing separately as to each cash and margin account of every customer...

  19. 13 CFR 108.1630 - SBA regulation of Brokers and Dealers and disclosure to purchasers of Leverage or Trust...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA... charged with a misdemeanor or felony bearing on its fitness, such broker or dealer may be suspended while... relationships, participation in the market for Debentures or TCs may be terminated. (c)...

  20. Healthy grocery shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the list of ingredients. These are unhealthy trans fats. The closer to the beginning of the list ... food contains. The label will give the total trans fat content, and you want this to be zero. ...

  1. Agricultural production contract in American law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Lipińska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays agricultural production is more and more based on the production contracts. There are many types of them that can be conducted by a farmer and processing plants, brokers, etc. Signing the contract a farmer reduces the production risk and stabilizes his revenue. Because the legal system varies from state to state there are some regularities and models that can be followed. Unfortunately the differences do not allow to define one common pattern of contact.

  2. Establishment of the Secure Channel between Broker Nodes in Pub/Sub System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shuren

    2006-01-01

    The paper mainly discusses the integrity of the forwarded subscription message guaranteed by secure channel which encrypted in data communication by using data encryption standard (DES) algorithm and chaos code algorithm between broker nodes in the routing process of the content-based publish/subscribe system. It analyzes the security of the secure channel encrypted with data communication by DES algorithm and chaos code algorithm, and finds out the secure channel can be easily attacked by known plain text. Therefore, the paper proposes the improved algorithm of message encryption and authentication, combining encryption and the generation of the message authentication code together to finish scanning at one time, which enhances both the secure degree and running efficiency. This secure channel system has a certain reference value to the pub/sub system requiring highly communication security.

  3. Brokered virtual hubs for facilitating access and use of geospatial Open Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Paolo; Latre, Miguel; Kamali, Nargess; Brumana, Raffaella; Braumann, Stefan; Nativi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    , beyond a certain extent, heterogeneity is irreducible especially in interdisciplinary contexts. ENERGIC OD Virtual Hubs address heterogeneity adopting a mediation and brokering approach: specific components (brokers) are dedicated to harmonize service interfaces, metadata and data models, enabling seamless discovery and access to heterogeneous infrastructures and datasets. As an innovation project, ENERGIC OD integrates several existing technologies to implement Virtual Hubs as single points of access to geospatial datasets provided by new or existing platforms and infrastructures, including INSPIRE-compliant systems and Copernicus services. A first version of the ENERGIC OD brokers has been implemented based on the GI-Suite Brokering Framework developed by CNR-IIA, and complemented with other tools under integration and development. It already enables mediated discovery and harmonized access to different geospatial Open Data sources. It is accessible by users as Software-as-a-Service through a browser. Moreover, open APIs and a Javascript library are available for application developers. Six ENERGIC OD Virtual Hubs have been currently deployed: one at regional level (Berlin metropolitan area) and five at national-level (in France, Germany, Italy, Poland and Spain). Each Virtual Hub manager decided the deployment strategy (local infrastructure or commercial Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud), and the list of connected Open Data sources. The ENERGIC OD Virtual Hubs are under test and validation through the development of ten different mobile and Web applications.

  4. Adolescent culture brokering and family functioning: a study of families from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickett, Edison J; Jones, Curtis J

    2007-04-01

    In immigrant families, culture brokering (CB) refers to the ways in which children and adolescents serve as mediator between their family and aspects of the new culture. This study focused on the debate in the literature about whether CB implies "role reversal" in the family and "adultification" of the adolescent or whether CB is better understood as simply one of the many ways that immigrant children contribute to family functioning. Results indicated a mixed picture with respect to this debate. Greater amounts of adolescent CB were indeed related to higher adolescent reports of family conflict, but also to greater family adaptability. In addition, the amount of CB was unrelated to family satisfaction and family cohesion. Secondary questions centered on the relationship of CB to adolescent and parent demographic and acculturation variables. Here, CB was related to parent acculturation patterns but not those of adolescents. Implications for future research on the CB role are discussed.

  5. A SOA broker solution for standard discovery and access services: the GI-cat framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, Enrico

    2010-05-01

    GI-cat ideal users are data providers or service providers within the geoscience community. The former have their data already available through an access service (e.g. an OGC Web Service) and would have it published through a standard catalog service, in a seamless way. The latter would develop a catalog broker and let users query and access different geospatial resources through one or more standard interfaces and Application Profiles (AP) (e.g. OGC CSW ISO AP, CSW ebRIM/EO AP, etc.). GI-cat actually implements a broker components (i.e. a middleware service) which carries out distribution and mediation functionalities among "well-adopted" catalog interfaces and data access protocols. GI-cat also publishes different discovery interfaces: the OGC CSW ISO and ebRIM Application Profiles (the latter coming with support for the EO and CIM extension packages) and two different OpenSearch interfaces developed in order to explore Web 2.0 possibilities. An extended interface is also available to exploit all available GI-cat features, such as interruptible incremental queries and queries feedback. Interoperability tests performed in the context of different projects have also pointed out the importance to enforce compatibility with existing and wide-spread tools of the open source community (e.g. GeoNetwork and Deegree catalogs), which was then achieved. Based on a service-oriented framework of modular components, GI-cat can effectively be customized and tailored to support different deployment scenarios. In addition to the distribution functionality an harvesting approach has been lately experimented, allowing the user to switch between a distributed and a local search giving thus more possibilities to support different deployment scenarios. A configurator tool is available in order to enable an effective high level configuration of the broker service. A specific geobrowser was also naturally developed, for demonstrating the advanced GI-cat functionalities. This client

  6. Middleware Proxy: A Request-Driven Messaging Broker For High Volume Data Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Sliwinski, W; Dworak, A

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, all major infrastructures and data centres (commercial and scientific) make an extensive use of the publish-subscribe messaging paradigm, which helps to decouple the message sender (publisher) from the message receiver (consumer). This paradigm is also heavily used in the CERN Accelerator Control system, in Proxy broker - critical part of the Controls Middleware (CMW) project. Proxy provides the aforementioned publish-subscribe facility and also supports execution of synchronous read and write operations. Moreover, it enables service scalability and dramatically reduces the network resources and overhead (CPU and memory) on publisher machine, required to serve all subscriptions. Proxy was developed in modern C++, using state of the art programming techniques (e.g. Boost) and following recommended software patterns for achieving low-latency and high concurrency. The outstanding performance of the Proxy infrastructure was confirmed during the last 3 years by delivering the high volume of LHC equipment...

  7. Brokering Community Engagement: Proactive Strategies for Supporting Indigenous Australians with Mental Health Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Jan Maree; Hunt, Glenn E; Cleary, Michelle; Burmeister, Oliver K

    2016-12-01

    This qualitative study explored the experiences of mental health employees working with Indigenous clients living with mental illness. Interviews were conducted with 20 mental health workers to identify strategies they adopt to facilitate community engagement with Indigenous clients. Using a thematic analysis approach, 'Brokering community engagement' was the umbrella theme from which two subthemes related to community engagement for the service and clients emerged (1) enabling connections -community and family; and (2) recovery and reconnecting with community. Participant insights enabled a deeper understanding of the role of community in the recovery process for Indigenous clients and highlight the importance of community engagement as a primary, yet multifaceted strategy used by mental health workers in the communities they serve.

  8. Factors Affecting Satisfaction in Online Financial Transactions: a study of Brazilian home brokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Brantes Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluated consumers’ perceptions of Brazilian Home Broker services in the online environment. Based on the model suggested by Balasubramanian, Konana and Menon (2003, the effects of relevant online consumer behavior constructs on customer satisfaction with the service were analyzed. Constructs such as perceived operational competence, willingness to trust and perceived environmental security were employed, in a model fully mediated by trust. A questionnaire with scales previously used in literature was employed to measure the relevant constructs and structural equations applied to analyze the relationships found. Results show a strong relationship between perceived environment security and perceived operational competence, indicating that trust formation precedes satisfaction in online financial services transactions within the Brazilian context.

  9. Knowledge brokers, companions, and navigators: a qualitative examination of informal caregivers' roles in medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Victoria; Crooks, Valorie A; Snyder, Jeremy; Turner, Leigh

    2013-12-01

    Many studies examining the phenomena of medical tourism have identified health equity issues associated with this global health services practice. However, there is a notable lack of attention in this existing research to the informal care provided by the friends and family members who typically accompany medical tourists abroad. To date, researchers have not examined the care roles filled by informal caregivers travelling with medical tourists. In this article, we fill this gap by examining these informal caregivers and the roles they take on towards supporting medical tourists' health and wellbeing. We conducted 21 interviews with International Patient Coordinators (IPCs) working at medical tourism hospitals across ten countries. IPCs work closely with informal caregivers as providers of non-medical personal assistance, and can therefore offer broad insight on caregiver roles. The interviews were coded and analyzed thematically. Three roles emerged: knowledge broker, companion, and navigator. As knowledge brokers, caregivers facilitate the transfer of information between the medical tourist and formal health care providers as well as other staff members at medical tourism facilities. The companion role involves providing medical tourists with physical and emotional care. Meanwhile, responsibilities associated with handling documents and coordinating often complex journeys are part of the navigation role. This is the first study to examine informal caregiving roles in medical tourism. Many of the roles identified are similar to those of conventional informal caregivers while others are specific to the transnational context. We conclude that these roles make informal caregivers an integral part of the larger phenomenon of medical tourism. We further contend that examining the roles taken on by a heretofore-unconsidered medical tourism stakeholder group sheds valuable insight into how this industry operates and that such knowledge is necessary in order to respond to

  10. Communities of practice in life sciences and the need for brokering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Etienne Wenger's work on communities of practice is influential in teaching and learning in higher education. A core work of many postgraduate certificate in teaching and learning (PGCert) courses for new lecturers, it is studied, in the main, as a means to understand how to support and encourage students to achieve more effective learning. Communities of practice can also be applied to academics. In the context of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) and its predecessors, the gulf between research-focused and teaching-Focused academics in life sciences has widened, so that in many institutions, these two groups have evolved into two distinct communities of practice; one whose priority is disciplinary research, the other's learning and teaching. However, in 2015, the UK government announced that a Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) would be introduced into higher education in England, as early as 2017. While the exact details of TEF remain unclear, it is certain that "excellence" and "student satisfaction" will be high on the agenda. It is vital, therefore, that the two communities of practice, research-focused and teaching-focused, find ways to come together in order to ensure high quality teaching and learning. Wenger proposes that this can be done through the process of "brokering", which allows expertise from both communities of practice to cross from one to the other, strengthening both. This should be encouraged at departmental and institutional level, but another vital origin of brokering can be forged at a(n) (inter)national level at meetings such as the SEB Annual Conference, where teaching-focused academics have the opportunity to mix with research-active colleagues. While this paper is informed by recent and current events in the UK Higher Education sector, it is of interest to academics who work in an environment where research and teaching have become separate to any extent.

  11. Knowledge brokers, companions, and navigators: a qualitative examination of informal caregivers’ roles in medical tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many studies examining the phenomena of medical tourism have identified health equity issues associated with this global health services practice. However, there is a notable lack of attention in this existing research to the informal care provided by the friends and family members who typically accompany medical tourists abroad. To date, researchers have not examined the care roles filled by informal caregivers travelling with medical tourists. In this article, we fill this gap by examining these informal caregivers and the roles they take on towards supporting medical tourists’ health and wellbeing. Methods We conducted 21 interviews with International Patient Coordinators (IPCs) working at medical tourism hospitals across ten countries. IPCs work closely with informal caregivers as providers of non-medical personal assistance, and can therefore offer broad insight on caregiver roles. The interviews were coded and analyzed thematically. Results Three roles emerged: knowledge broker, companion, and navigator. As knowledge brokers, caregivers facilitate the transfer of information between the medical tourist and formal health care providers as well as other staff members at medical tourism facilities. The companion role involves providing medical tourists with physical and emotional care. Meanwhile, responsibilities associated with handling documents and coordinating often complex journeys are part of the navigation role. Conclusions This is the first study to examine informal caregiving roles in medical tourism. Many of the roles identified are similar to those of conventional informal caregivers while others are specific to the transnational context. We conclude that these roles make informal caregivers an integral part of the larger phenomenon of medical tourism. We further contend that examining the roles taken on by a heretofore-unconsidered medical tourism stakeholder group sheds valuable insight into how this industry operates and that such

  12. The illogicality of stock-brokers: psychological experiments on the effects of prior knowledge and belief biases on logical reasoning in stock trading

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knauff, Markus; Budeck, Claudia; Wolf, Ann G; Hamburger, Kai

    2010-01-01

    .... So far, this question has been explored only to a limited extent. We report two experiments on logical reasoning competences of nineteen stock-brokers with long-lasting vocational experiences at the stock market...

  13. The Illogicality of Stock-Brokers: Psychological Experiments on the Effects of Prior Knowledge and Belief Biases on Logical Reasoning in Stock Trading: e13483

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Markus Knauff; Claudia Budeck; Ann G Wolf; Kai Hamburger

    2010-01-01

    .... So far, this question has been explored only to a limited extent. Methods We report two experiments on logical reasoning competences of nineteen stock-brokers with long-lasting vocational experiences at the stock market...

  14. Are Sale Signs Less Effective When More Products Have Them?

    OpenAIRE

    Eric T. Anderson; Duncan I. Simester

    2001-01-01

    We analyze data from a variety of sources, including historical data from a women's clothing catalog, a field study in that catalog, survey responses to catalog stimuli, and grocery store data for frozen juice, toothpaste, and tuna. The analysis yields three conclusions. First, sale signs are less effective at increasing demand when more items have them. Second, total category sales are maximized when some but not all products have sale signs. Third, placing a sale sign on a product reduces t...

  15. Supply chain design approaches for supply chain resilience: A qualitative study of South African fast-moving consumer goods grocery manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assilah Agigi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: In today’s globalised and complex business environment, firms are ever more vulnerable to supply chain disruptions, originating both internally and externally from the supply chain. Supply chain resilience minimises the impact of a disruption through design approaches, which allows the supply chain to respond appropriately to disruptive events.Research purpose: This article investigated the supply chain risks faced by grocery manufacturers in the South African fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG industry and explored supply chain design approaches that enable supply chain resilience.Motivation for the study: South African grocery manufacturers are faced with distinct risks. Whilst supply chain risk management studies have provided firms with certain guidelines to mitigate risk, supply chains are still vulnerable to unanticipated risks. Literature on supply chain resilience in the South African context is scant. The concept of supply chain resilience provides firms with strategies that are built into the supply chain that allow firms to react and recover swiftly from disruptions. Furthermore, supply chain resilience strategies assist firms in becoming less vulnerable to possible disruptions.Research design approach and method: This study was conducted by using a descriptive qualitative research design. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with senior supply chain practitioners specifically within the South African FMCG grocery manufacturing industry.Main findings: The study found that labour unrest is the most common risk faced by the industry. Furthermore, strategic stock and supply chain mapping are of the most useful design approaches to enhance supply chain resilience.Practical/managerial implications: The study provides managers with new insights in guiding supply chain design decisions for resilient supply chains. Through the identification of risks and appropriate solutions linked to the various risks, the

  16. 17 CFR 240.15c3-1e - Deductions for market and credit risk for certain brokers or dealers (Appendix E to 17 CFR 240...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... credit risk for certain brokers or dealers (Appendix E to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1). 240.15c3-1e Section 240....15c3-1(c)(2)(vi) and (c)(2)(vii) and to compute deductions for credit risk pursuant to this Appendix E... the broker or dealer will use to calculate deductions for market and credit risk on those...

  17. Plights and Countermeasures for the Development of Rural Labor Broker——Based on the Investigation of Rural Labor Brokers in Chongqing Munitipality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the investigation into the rural labor brokers in Chongqing Municipality,the developmental momentum of rural labor brokers in Chongqing Municipality is introduced.The valid questionnaires show that the main factors which limit the development of rural labor brokers in Chongqing Municipality are the scant effective information,low quality,insufficient education and training,absent of specialized policies and regulations,low degree of organization,and low social recognition.The requirements for the healthy development of rural labor brokers are concluded,which include healthy policies and regulations,healthy social culture and the external support from the government.Besides,the rural labor brokers should have high competence,high professional ethnics,strong awareness of law and relatively high educational level.At last,the targeted countermeasures are put forward,which cover strengthening the construction of rural infrastructure;perfecting the information platform;enhancing training efforts and improving the competence of labor brokers;establishing and consolidating laws and regulations,and fostering well legal atmosphere;paying attention to the construction of organization and trying to famous the famous brands of rural labors;intensifying the promotion and creating favorable cultural environment.These countermeasures aim at enhancing the capability of attracting rural surplus labors,accelerating the structure of income distribution and coordinating the urban and rural development.

  18. Open-refrigerated retail display case temperature profile and its impact on product quality and microbiota of stored baby spinach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Open-refrigerated display cabinets are widely used in supermarkets and grocery chains around the globe. However, the temperature conditions in these display cases are variable which may impact product quality and safety. Therefore, we investigated the quality and microbiological populations of bagge...

  19. The effect of visualizing healthy eaters and mortality reminders on nutritious grocery purchases: an integrative terror management and prototype willingness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Simon; Arndt, Jamie; Goldenberg, Jamie L; Vess, Matthew; Vail, Kenneth E; Gibbons, Frederick X; Rogers, Ross

    2015-03-01

    To use insights from an integration of the terror management health model and the prototype willingness model to inform and improve nutrition-related behavior using an ecologically valid outcome. Prior to shopping, grocery shoppers were exposed to a reminder of mortality (or pain) and then visualized a healthy (vs. neutral) prototype. Receipts were collected postshopping and food items purchased were coded using a nutrition database. Compared with those in the control conditions, participants who received the mortality reminder and who were led to visualize a healthy eater prototype purchased more nutritious foods. The integration of the terror management health model and the prototype willingness model has the potential for both basic and applied advances and offers a generative ground for future research. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Human trafficking, labor brokering, and mining in southern Africa: responding to a decentralized and hidden public health disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Many southern African economies are dependent on the extractive industries. These industries rely on low-cost labor, often supplied by migrants, typically acquired through labor brokers. Very little attention has so far been paid to trafficking of men into extractive industries or its connection with trafficked women in the region's mining hubs. Recent reports suggest that labor-brokering practices foster human trafficking, both by exposing migrant men to lack of pay and exploitative conditions and by creating male migratory patterns that generate demand for sex workers and associated trafficking of women and girls. While trafficking in persons violates human rights, and thus remains a priority issue globally, there is little or no evidence of an effective political response to mine-related trafficking in southern Africa. This article concludes with recommendations for legal and policy interventions, as well as an enhanced public health response, which if implemented would help reduce human trafficking toward mining sites.

  1. Children Grocery Assessment with Zscore in Beijing%北京市儿童青少年副食摄入现况评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童方; 米杰; 程红; 侯冬青; 赵小元

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]To assess the children grocery intakes in Beijing to afford basic evidences of nutritional strategy. [Method]Data were from the Metabolic Syndrome Survey of focal program of Beijing Science and Technology Committee. Got 20 867 children aged 3-18 years by stratified cluster representative sample. Children overweight and obesity were defined according to Body Mass Index (BMI) cutoffs reeonmaended by the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) reference. There were 10 groups of grocery, such as meat, bean, sea food, dairy, vegetable, fruit, fried, western fast food, soup, and soft drink. Filled in 5 grads in each by parents, which was 1 = everyday, 2 = 3--5 times per week, 3 = 1--2 times per week, 4 = once per 2 weeks, 5 = seldom or never. Refilled them with times or week and assessed with Weight Grade Method and Zscore. [Result]The presented of grocery showed meat and fruit presented increasingdecreasingincreasing trend, vegetable presented increasing but dairy decreasing by age. Meat was taken higher but fruit lower in boys than in girls. Meat and dairy were taken higher but vegetable lower in urban than in rural. Meat was taken lower but vegetable lower in normal than in overweight and obe sity. Zscore charts showed intercrossed between boys and girls, urban and rural as well. The correlations were more of negative than of posi tive. There was some opposed Zscore of groceries among different types of body size. [Conclusion]Grocery intake study showed childrens' nu tritional condition in nutrition transition stage in Beijing. There were negative correlations of Zscore among most of them. Different body type had reversal grocery model.%目的:对北京市儿童青少年副食摄入现况进行评估,阐述营养转型期儿童发展与副食关系内在规律性,为决策提供依据。方法:资料来自北京市儿童青少年代谢综合征分层随机整群抽样调查样本,截取3-18岁儿童青少年20867人,约男女各半。

  2. A 'health broker' role as a catalyst of change to promote health: an experiment in deprived Dutch neighbourhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, Janneke; Kunst, Anton E; Kwan, Albert; Stronks, Karien

    2011-03-01

    Urban social entrepreneurs have been suggested to play an essential part in the success of local health promotion initiatives. Up to now, roles like these have only been identified in retrospect. This prospective collaborative study explored the possibilities of institutionalizing a comparable role for a 'health broker' in four Dutch municipalities as an additional investment to promote health in deprived neighbourhoods. The theoretical notions of public and policy entrepreneurs as well as of boundary spanners were adopted as a reference framework. Documents produced by the collaborative project served as input for a qualitative analysis of the developments. We succeeded in implementing a 'health broker' role comparable to that of a bureaucratic public entrepreneur holding a formal non-leadership position. The role was empowered by sharing it among multiple professionals. Although positioned within one sector, the occupants of the new role felt more entitled to cross sectoral borders and to connect to local residents, compared to other within-sector functions. The 'health broker' role had the potential to operate as an 'anchoring point' for the municipal health sector (policy), public health services (practice) and/or the local residents (public). It was also possible to specify potential 'broking points', i.e. opportunities for health promotion agenda setting and opportunities to improve cross-sectoral collaboration, citizen participation and political and administrative support for health promotion efforts. The 'health broker' role we developed and implemented reflects the notion of systematic rather than individual entrepreneurship. Such a collective entrepreneurship may create additional opportunities to gradually strengthen local health promotion efforts.

  3. Raising the Barcode Scanner: Technology and Productivity in the Retail Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Emek Basker

    2011-01-01

    Barcodes and barcode scanners transformed the grocery industry in the 1970s. I use store-level data from the 1972, 1977, and 1982 Census of Retail Trade, matched to data on store scanner installations, to estimate scanners' effect on labor productivity. I find that early scanners increased a store's labor productivity, on average, by approximately 4.5 percent in the first few years. The effect was larger in stores carrying more packaged products, consistent with the presence of network extern...

  4. The illogicality of stock-brokers: psychological experiments on the effects of prior knowledge and belief biases on logical reasoning in stock trading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Knauff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explanations for the current worldwide financial crisis are primarily provided by economists and politicians. However, in the present work we focus on the psychological-cognitive factors that most likely affect the thinking of people on the economic stage and thus might also have had an effect on the progression of the crises. One of these factors might be the effect of prior beliefs on reasoning and decision-making. So far, this question has been explored only to a limited extent. METHODS: We report two experiments on logical reasoning competences of nineteen stock-brokers with long-lasting vocational experiences at the stock market. The premises of reasoning problems concerned stock trading and the experiments varied whether or not their conclusions--a proposition which is reached after considering the premises--agreed with the brokers' prior beliefs. Half of the problems had a conclusion that was highly plausible for stock-brokers while the other half had a highly implausible conclusion. RESULTS: The data show a strong belief bias. Stock-brokers were strongly biased by their prior knowledge. Lowest performance was found for inferences in which the problems caused a conflict between logical validity and the experts' belief. In these cases, the stock-brokers tended to make logically invalid inferences rather than give up their existing beliefs. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the thesis that cognitive factors have an effect on the decision-making on the financial market. In the present study, stock-brokers were guided more by past experience and existing beliefs than by logical thinking and rational decision-making. They had difficulties to disengage themselves from vastly anchored thinking patterns. However, we believe, that it is wrong to accuse the brokers for their "malfunctions", because such hard-wired cognitive principles are difficult to suppress even if the person is aware of them.

  5. The illogicality of stock-brokers: psychological experiments on the effects of prior knowledge and belief biases on logical reasoning in stock trading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauff, Markus; Budeck, Claudia; Wolf, Ann G; Hamburger, Kai

    2010-10-18

    Explanations for the current worldwide financial crisis are primarily provided by economists and politicians. However, in the present work we focus on the psychological-cognitive factors that most likely affect the thinking of people on the economic stage and thus might also have had an effect on the progression of the crises. One of these factors might be the effect of prior beliefs on reasoning and decision-making. So far, this question has been explored only to a limited extent. We report two experiments on logical reasoning competences of nineteen stock-brokers with long-lasting vocational experiences at the stock market. The premises of reasoning problems concerned stock trading and the experiments varied whether or not their conclusions--a proposition which is reached after considering the premises--agreed with the brokers' prior beliefs. Half of the problems had a conclusion that was highly plausible for stock-brokers while the other half had a highly implausible conclusion. The data show a strong belief bias. Stock-brokers were strongly biased by their prior knowledge. Lowest performance was found for inferences in which the problems caused a conflict between logical validity and the experts' belief. In these cases, the stock-brokers tended to make logically invalid inferences rather than give up their existing beliefs. Our findings support the thesis that cognitive factors have an effect on the decision-making on the financial market. In the present study, stock-brokers were guided more by past experience and existing beliefs than by logical thinking and rational decision-making. They had difficulties to disengage themselves from vastly anchored thinking patterns. However, we believe, that it is wrong to accuse the brokers for their "malfunctions", because such hard-wired cognitive principles are difficult to suppress even if the person is aware of them.

  6. Beyond Apprenticeship: Knowledge Brokers and Sustainability of Apprentice-Based Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huasheng Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge learning and diffusion have long been discussed in the literature on the dynamics of industrial clusters, but recent literature provides little evidence for how different actors serve as knowledge brokers in the upgrading process of apprentice-based clusters, and does not dynamically consider how to preserve the sustainability of these clusters. This paper uses empirical evidence from an antique furniture manufacturing cluster in Xianyou, Fujian Province, in southeastern China, to examine the growth trajectory of the knowledge learning system of an antique furniture manufacturing cluster. It appears that the apprentice-based learning system is crucial during early stages of the cluster evolution, but later becomes complemented and relatively substituted by the role of both local governments and focal outsiders. This finding addresses the context of economic transformation and provides empirical insights into knowledge acquisition in apprentice-based clusters to question the rationality based on European and North American cases, and to provide a broader perspective for policy makers to trigger and sustain the development of apprentice-based clusters.

  7. Geopan AT@S: a Brokering Based Gateway to Georeferenced Historical Maps for Risk Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previtali, M.

    2017-08-01

    Importance of ancient and historical maps is nowadays recognized in many applications (e.g., urban planning, landscape valorisation and preservation, land changes identification, etc.). In the last years a great effort has been done by different institutions, such as Geographical Institutes, Public Administrations, and collaborative communities, for digitizing and publishing online collections of historical maps. In spite of this variety and availability of data, information overload makes difficult their discovery and management: without knowing the specific repository where the data are stored, it is difficult to find the information required. In addition, problems of interconnection between different data sources and their restricted interoperability may arise. This paper describe a new brokering based gateway developed to assure interoperability between data, in particular georeferenced historical maps and geographic data, gathered from different data providers, with various features and referring to different historical periods. The developed approach is exemplified by a new application named GeoPAN Atl@s that is aimed at linking in Northern Italy area land changes with risk analysis (local seismicity amplification and flooding risk) by using multi-temporal data sources and historic maps.

  8. a Virtual Hub Brokering Approach for Integration of Historical and Modern Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, N.; Previtali, M.; Barazzetti, L.; Brumana, R.; Roncella, R.

    2016-06-01

    Geospatial data are today more and more widespread. Many different institutions, such as Geographical Institutes, Public Administrations, collaborative communities (e.g., OSM) and web companies, make available nowadays a large number of maps. Besides this cartography, projects of digitizing, georeferencing and web publication of historical maps have increasingly spread in the recent years. In spite of these variety and availability of data, information overload makes difficult their discovery and management: without knowing the specific repository where the data are stored, it is difficult to find the information required and problems of interconnection between different data sources and their restricted interoperability limit a wide utilization of available geo-data. This paper aims to describe some actions performed to assure interoperability between data, in particular spatial and geographic data, gathered from different data providers, with different features and referring to different historical periods. The article summarizes and exemplifies how, starting from projects of historical map digitizing and Historical GIS implementation, respectively for the Lombardy and for the city of Parma, the interoperability is possible in the framework of the ENERGIC OD project. The European project ENERGIC OD, thanks to a specific component - the virtual hub - based on a brokering framework, copes with the previous listed problems and allows the interoperability between different data sources.

  9. Migrant farmers as information brokers: agroecosystem management in the transition zone of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marney E. Isaac

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally induced farmer migration is an important livelihood strategy, yet little is known of the effects on the destination region agroecosystem information networks and management practices. In the forest-savanna transition zone (Brong Ahafo Region of Ghana, where migration from northern regions (migrant and from neighboring regions (settler is active, we chart the role of migrant famers and the type of agroecosystem management practices embedded in information networks using a social networks approach. Based on empirical network data from 44 respondents across three communities, we illustrate a diffuse information network, with variable tie frequency between settlement categories (local, settler, or migrant of farmers. The cohesion of this network is dependent on a few strategic bridging ties initiated by migrant farmers, who are thus centrally positioned to exchange agroecosystem management practices between geographically and socially distant groups. At the individual level, migrant and settler farmers are more likely: (1 to have larger networks with more ties between members of their networks, (2 to be brokers positioned between non-migrant farmers, and (3 to tend (although not statistically significantly to use pro-environmental management regimes, including agroforestry practices, new planting methods, and plot-scale weeding. We conceptualize this phenomenon as extended social and environmental experience and the deployment of social-ecological memory, with migrant farmers as potential agents of innovation and adaptive management.

  10. Child welfare caseworkers as brokers of mental health services: a pilot evaluation of Project Focus Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Monica M; Torres, Marcela M; Shipman, Kimberly; Gorrono, Jessica; Kerns, Suzanne E U; Dorsey, Shannon

    2015-02-01

    Youth in the child welfare system (CWS) have substantially higher rates of mental health needs compared to the general population, yet they rarely receive targeted, evidence-based practices (EBPs). Caseworkers play the critically important role of "service broker" for CWS youth and families. This study examines preliminary caseworker-level outcomes of Project Focus Colorado (PF-C), a training and consultation program designed to improve access to EBPs for CWS youth. PF-C evaluation occurred in four child welfare offices (two intervention [n = 16 caseworkers] vs. two practice-as-usual, wait-list control [WLC; n = 12 caseworkers]). Receipt of PF-C was associated with significantly increased caseworker knowledge of (a) EBPs, (b) child mental health problems, (c) evidence-based treatment components targeting mental health problem areas, and (d) mental health screening instruments, compared to WLC. Dose of training and consultation was associated with greater ability to correctly classify mental health problems and match them to EBPs. These preliminary results suggest that targeted training and consultation help to improve caseworker knowledge of children's mental health needs, EBPs for mental health, and mental health screening instruments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. eLearning, knowledge brokering, and nursing: strengthening collaborative practice in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabisky, Brenda; Humbert, Jennie; Stodel, Emma J; MacDonald, Colla J; Chambers, Larry W; Doucette, Suzanne; Dalziel, William B; Conklin, James

    2010-01-01

    Interprofessional collaboration is vital to the delivery of quality care in long-term care settings; however, caregivers in long-term care face barriers to participating in training programs to improve collaborative practices. Consequently, eLearning can be used to create an environment that combines convenient, individual learning with collaborative experiential learning. Findings of this study revealed that learners enjoyed the flexibility of the Working Together learning resource. They acquired new knowledge and skills that they were able to use in their practice setting to achieve higher levels of collaborative practice. Nurses were identified as team leaders because of their pivotal role in the long-term care home and collaboration with all patient care providers. Nurses are ideal as knowledge brokers for the collaborative practice team. Quantitative findings showed no change in learner's attitudes regarding collaborative practice; however, interviews provided examples of positive changes experienced. Face-to-face collaboration was found to be a challenge, and changes to organizations, systems, and technology need to be made to facilitate this process. The Working Together learning resource is an important first step toward strengthening collaboration in long-term care, and the pilot implementation provides insights that further our understanding of both interprofessional collaboration and effective eLearning.

  12. The Italian Cloud-based brokering Infrastructure to sustain Interoperability for Operative Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, E.; Pecora, S.; Bussettini, M.; Bordini, F.; Nativi, S.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents the informatics platform carried out to implement the National Hydrological Operative Information System of Italy. In particular, the presentation will focus on the governing aspects of the cloud infrastructure and brokering software that make possible to sustain the hydrology data flow between heterogeneous user clients and data providers.The Institute for Environmental Protection and Research, ISPRA (Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale) in collaboration with the Regional Agency for Environmental Protection in the Emilia-Romagna region, ARPA-ER (Agenzia Regionale per la Prevenzione e l´Ambiente dell´Emilia-Romagna) and CNR-IIA (National Research Council of Italy) designed and developed an innovative platform for the discovery and access of hydrological data coming from 19 Italian administrative regions and 2 Italian autonomous provinces, in near real time. ISPRA has deployed and governs such a system. The presentation will introduce and discuss the technological barriers for interoperability as well as social and policy ones. The adopted solutions will be described outlining the sustainability challenges and benefits.

  13. Professional culture brokers: Nursing faculty perceptions of nursing culture and their role in student formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Susan M; Nickerson, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Socialization, or formation of students to the professional nurse role, is an expectation of nursing education. This process is complex and challenging for students, who continue to experience culture shock moving from academe to practice settings. Viewing formation as enculturation is one way to address culture shock. Nursing faculty are key figures in this process, yet their views are not known. This focused ethnography study explored nursing faculty's perceptions about the culture of nursing and how they bring students into that culture. Data collected at two accredited, undergraduate pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed using Leininger's four phases of data analysis. Four themes emerged: 1. The culture of nursing is multifaceted, multivalent and at times contradictory 2. Many factors interact and have influence on the culture of nursing 3. Navigating the subcultures (academia, service and organizational culture) is challenging for faculty, and 4. Nursing faculty believe that the right conditions facilitate the enculturation of students. Nursing faculty believe nursing has a professional culture and they bring students into that culture. Viewing the faculty role in enculturation to professional nursing as a culture broker can facilitate the process for students and mitigate the culture shock new graduate nurses experience.

  14. A VIRTUAL HUB BROKERING APPROACH FOR INTEGRATION OF HISTORICAL AND MODERN MAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bruno

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Geospatial data are today more and more widespread. Many different institutions, such as Geographical Institutes, Public Administrations, collaborative communities (e.g., OSM and web companies, make available nowadays a large number of maps. Besides this cartography, projects of digitizing, georeferencing and web publication of historical maps have increasingly spread in the recent years. In spite of these variety and availability of data, information overload makes difficult their discovery and management: without knowing the specific repository where the data are stored, it is difficult to find the information required and problems of interconnection between different data sources and their restricted interoperability limit a wide utilization of available geo-data. This paper aims to describe some actions performed to assure interoperability between data, in particular spatial and geographic data, gathered from different data providers, with different features and referring to different historical periods. The article summarizes and exemplifies how, starting from projects of historical map digitizing and Historical GIS implementation, respectively for the Lombardy and for the city of Parma, the interoperability is possible in the framework of the ENERGIC OD project. The European project ENERGIC OD, thanks to a specific component – the virtual hub – based on a brokering framework, copes with the previous listed problems and allows the interoperability between different data sources.

  15. Grocery Stores, LAGIC is consulting with local parish GIS departments to create spatially accurate point and polygons data sets including the locations and building footprints of schools, churches, government buildings, law enforcement and emergency response offices, pha, Published in 2011, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, LSU Louisiana Geographic Information Center (LAGIC).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Grocery Stores dataset current as of 2011. LAGIC is consulting with local parish GIS departments to create spatially accurate point and polygons data sets including...

  16. Grocery Stores, LAGIC is consulting with local parish GIS departments to create spatially accurate point and polygons data sets including the locations and building footprints of schools, churches, government buildings, law enforcement and emergency response offices, pha, Published in 2011, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Louisiana Geographic Information Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Grocery Stores dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2011. It is described as 'LAGIC...

  17. The Path to Convergence: Design, Coordination and Social Issues in the Implementation of a Middleware Data Broker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slota, S.; Khalsa, S. J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Infrastructures are the result of systems, networks, and inter-networks that accrete, overlay and segment one another over time. As a result, working infrastructures represent a broad heterogeneity of elements - data types, computational resources, material substrates (computing hardware, physical infrastructure, labs, physical information resources, etc.) as well as organizational and social functions which result in divergent outputs and goals. Cyber infrastructure's engineering often defaults to a separation of the social from the technical that results in the engineering succeeding in limited ways, or the exposure of unanticipated points of failure within the system. Studying the development of middleware intended to mediate interactions among systems within an earth systems science infrastructure exposes organizational, technical and standards-focused negotiations endemic to a fundamental trait of infrastructure: its characteristic invisibility in use. Intended to perform a core function within the EarthCube cyberinfrastructure, the development, governance and maintenance of an automated brokering system is a microcosm of large-scale infrastructural efforts. Points of potential system failure, regardless of the extent to which they are more social or more technical in nature, can be considered in terms of the reverse salient: a point of social and material configuration that momentarily lags behind the progress of an emerging or maturing infrastructure. The implementation of the BCube data broker has exposed reverse salients in regards to the overall EarthCube infrastructure (and the role of middleware brokering) in the form of organizational factors such as infrastructural alignment, maintenance and resilience; differing and incompatible practices of data discovery and evaluation among users and stakeholders; and a preponderance of local variations in the implementation of standards and authentication in data access. These issues are characterized by their

  18. qDIET: toward an automated, self-sustaining knowledge base to facilitate linking point-of-sale grocery items to nutritional content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Valliammai; Brewster, Philip J; Jordan, Kristine C; Hurdle, John F

    2013-01-01

    The United States, indeed the world, struggles with a serious obesity epidemic. The costs of this epidemic in terms of healthcare dollar expenditures and human morbidity/mortality are staggering. Surprisingly, clinicians are ill-equipped in general to advise patients on effective, longitudinal weight loss strategies. We argue that one factor hindering clinicians and patients in effective shared decision-making about weight loss is the absence of a metric that can be reasoned about and monitored over time, as clinicians do routinely with, say, serum lipid levels or HgA1C. We propose that a dietary quality measure championed by the USDA and NCI, the HEI-2005/2010, is an ideal metric for this purpose. We describe a new tool, the quality Dietary Information Extraction Tool (qDIET), which is a step toward an automated, self-sustaining process that can link retail grocery purchase data to the appropriate USDA databases to permit the calculation of the HEI-2005/2010.

  19. Scale-Crossing Brokers and Network Governance of Urban Ecosystem Services: The Case of Stockholm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Ernstson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban ecosystem services are crucial for human well-being and the livability of cities. A central challenge for sustaining ecosystem services lies in addressing scale mismatches between ecological processes on one hand, and social processes of governance on the other. This article synthesizes a set of case studies from urban green areas in Stockholm, Sweden - allotment gardens, urban parks, cemeteries and protected areas - and discusses how governmental agencies and civil society groups engaged in urban green area management can be linked through social networks so as to better match spatial scales of ecosystem processes. The article develops a framework that combines ecological scales with social network structure, with the latter being taken as the patterns of interaction between actor groups. Based on this framework, the article (1 assesses current ecosystem governance, and (2 develops a theoretical understanding of how social network structure influences ecosystem governance and how certain actors can work as agents to promote beneficial network structures. The main results show that the mesoscale of what is conceptualized as city scale green networks (i.e., functionally interconnected local green areas is not addressed by any actor in Stockholm, and that the management practices of civil society groups engaged in local ecosystem management play a crucial but neglected role in upholding ecosystem services. The article proposes an alternative network structure and discusses the role of midscale managers (for improving ecological functioning and scale-crossing brokers (engaged in practices to connect actors across ecological scales. Dilemmas, strategies, and practices for establishing this governance system are discussed.

  20. Use of a knowledge broker to establish healthy public policies in a city district: a developmental evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Langeveld, Kirsten; Stronks, Karien; Harting, Janneke

    2016-01-01

    Background Public health is to a large extent determined by non-health-sector policies. One approach to address this apparent paradox is to establish healthy public policies. This requires policy makers in non-health sectors to become more aware of the health impacts of their policies, and more willing to adopt evidence-informed policy measures to improve health. We employed a knowledge broker to set the agenda for health and to specify health-promoting policy alternatives. This study aimed a...

  1. 75 FR 11472 - Perishable Agricultural Commodities Act: Increase in License Fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... commission merchants, brokers, and dealers (other than grocery wholesalers and retailers) the annual license... out license fees by retailers and grocery wholesalers and the provisions to phase in triennial license renewal for retailers and grocery wholesalers as these processes have already occurred. We also propose...

  2. "The Virtual Grocery Store: A Proposal to Improve the Quality of Life for Retail Customers through a Virtual Environment"

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Katrina Jones

    2004-01-01

    With the prevalence and integration of the Internet in our lives, online shopping has become a popular and convenient method of obtaining goods. However, there is an important experience that occurs between the customer and the product as well as the customer and the space in the actual, physical store which does not yet occur in the virtual store (Raijas, 2002). Customersâ increased use of new technology and the Internet illustrates that an incredible growth potential exists in the elect...

  3. Shopping for fruits and vegetables. Food and retail qualities of importance to low-income households at the grocery store.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Caroline B; Sobal, Jeffery; Dollahite, Jamie S

    2010-04-01

    Purchasing fruits and vegetables is an integral part of managing food consumption and dietary quality. This study examined how low-income adults who had primary responsibility for household food purchases considered retail produce decisions. We used a qualitative research approach based on grounded theory and an ecological conceptual framework. Twenty-eight low-income rural, village, and inner city heads of households in upstate New York, USA, were selected by purposive and theoretical sampling and interviewed about fruit and vegetable shopping habits, attitudes toward local food stores, and where and how they would prefer to buy produce. Analyses revealed their concerns were organized around five themes: store venue; internal store environment; product quality; product price; relationships with the stores. An unanticipated finding was the differing social relations that appear to exist between participant consumers, store employees and management, and the store itself as a representation of the larger retail food system. Attitudes toward retail food stores in this study are described as passive or fatalistic indifference, supportive, opportunistic, and confrontational (change agents). These attitudes are related to how shoppers considered retail fruit and vegetable choice, access, and availability. These findings suggest ways to individualize nutrition education and consumer education messages.

  4. Laboratory Determined Sugar Content and Composition of Commercial Infant Formulas, Baby Foods and Common Grocery Items Targeted to Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ryan W; Goran, Michael I

    2015-07-16

    Excess added sugar consumption is tied to poor health outcomes in children. The sugar content of beverages and foods children are exposed to is mostly unknown, yet this information is imperative for understanding potential risks from overconsumption of sugars in early life. We determined actual sugar content by conducting a blinded laboratory analysis in infant formulas, breakfast cereals, packaged baked goods and yogurts. One hundred samples were sent to an independent laboratory for analysis via gas chromatography. Sugar content and composition was determined and total sugar was compared against nutrition labels. Of the 100 samples analyzed, 74% contained ≥20% of total calories per serving from added sugars. Nutrient label data underestimated or overestimated actual sugars and ~25% of all samples had actual total sugar values that were either 10% of labeled total sugar. Many products that are frequently marketed to and consumed by infants and young children contain sugars in amounts that differ from nutrition labels and often in excess of recommended daily levels. These findings provide further support for adding more comprehensive sugar labeling to food and beverage products, specifically those marketed to, or commonly consumed by, children.

  5. Making Knowledge from Numbers : The Shale Network as an Honest Broker for Evaluating and Educating about the Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing in the Marcellus Shale Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, J.; Brantley, S.; Williams, J.; Dykhoff, S.; Brazil, L. I.

    2015-12-01

    The Marcellus Shale Network is an NSF-funded project that investigates the impacts of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas development on water resources in and around the state of Pennsylvania. It is a collaborative effort that aims to be an honest broker in the shale gas conversation by involving multiple entities (including universities, government agencies, industry groups, nonprofits, etc.) to collect, analyze, and disseminate data that describe the past and current conditions of water in the Marcellus shale region. A critical component of this project has been to engage multiple types of stakeholders - academia, government agencies, industry, and citizen science groups - in annual workshops to present and discuss how to ensure the integrity of water resources in light of the challenges that natural gas extraction can present. Each workshop has included a hands-on activity that allows participants to access water quality data using the tools provided by the CUAHSI Water Data Center. One of these tools is HydroDesktop, which is an open source GIS application that can be used in formal and informal education settings as a geoscience research tool. In addition to being a GIS, HydroDesktop accesses CUAHSI's large catalog of water data thus enabling students, professional researchers, and citizen scientists to discover data that can expand the understanding of water quality issues in one's local environment and beyond. This presentation will highlight the goals of the Shale Network project and the stakeholders involved in addition to how cyberinfrastructure is being used to create a democratic, data-driven conversation about the relationship between energy production from shale gas and our water resources.

  6. A Study of the Role of Small Ethnic Retail Grocery Stores in Urban Renewal in a Social Housing Project, Toronto, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komakech, Morris D C; Jackson, Suzanne F

    2016-06-01

    Urban renewal often drives away the original residents, replacing them with higher income residents who can afford the new spaces, leading to gentrification. Urban renewal that takes place over many years can create uncertainties for retailers and residents, exacerbating the gentrification process. This qualitative study explored how the urban renewal process in a multi-cultural social housing neighborhood in Toronto (Regent Park) affected the small ethnic retail grocery stores (SERGS) that supplied ethnic foods and items to the ethnic populations living there. Interviews were conducted with ten SERGS store owners/managers and 16 ethnic residents who lived in Regent Park before renewal and were displaced, or who were displaced and returned. The SERGS stated that they provided culturally familiar items and offered a social credit scheme that recognized existing social relationships and allowed low-income residents to afford food and other amenities in a dignified manner and pay later, without penalty or interest. At the same time, the SERGS were unsupported during the renewal, were excluded from the civic planning processes, could not compete for space in the new buildings, and experienced declining sales and loss of business. The residents stated that the SERGS were trusted, provided a valued cultural social spaces for ethnic identity formation, and ethnic food security but they faced many uncertainties about the role of SERGS in a renewed neighborhood. Based on this study, it is recommended that ethnic retailers be recognized for the role they play in formulating ethnic identities and food security in mixed-use mixed-income communities and that they be included in planning processes during urban renewal. Such recognition may enable more former residents to return and lessen the gentrification.

  7. 17 CFR 240.15g-3 - Broker or dealer disclosure of quotations and other information relating to the penny stock market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR 240.10b-10 of this chapter. (2) A broker or dealer, at the time of making the disclosure pursuant... such disclosure for the period specified in 17 CFR 240.17a-4(b). (c) Definitions. For purposes of...

  8. Shaping Collective Functions in Privatized Agricultural Knowledge and Information Systems: The Positioning and Embedding of a Network Broker in the Dutch Dairy Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerkx, L.W.A.; Leeuwis, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines new organizational arrangements that have emerged in the context of a privatized extension system. It investigates the positioning and embedding of a network broker aimed at enhancing interaction in the privatized agricultural knowledge and information system (AKIS), to assess wh

  9. A Tool to Assess and Compare Knowledge Mobilization Efforts of Faculties of Education, Research Brokering Organizations, Ministries of Education, and School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    There are few tools that exist to measure knowledge mobilization (KMb), the process of connecting research to policy and practice across diverse organizations and sectors. This article reports on a comparison of KMb efforts of 105 educational organizations: faculties of education (N = 21), research brokering organizations (N = 44), school…

  10. Retail Pricing Behavior for Perishable Produce Products in the US with Implications for Farmer Welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chenguang; Sexton, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    The typical model of retail pricing for produce products assumes retailers set price equal to the farm price plus a certain markup. However, observations from scanner data indicate a large degree of price dispersion in the grocery retailing market. In addition to markup pricing behavior, we document three alternative leading pricing patterns: fixed (constant) pricing, periodic sale, and high-low pricing. Retail price variations under these alternative pricing regimes in general have little co...

  11. MARKET-STRUCTURE DETERMINANTS OF NATIONAL BRAND-PRIVATE LABEL PRICE DIFFERENCES OF MANUFACTURED FOOD PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Connor, John M.; Peterson, Everett B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper estimates the relationships between market structure and the Lerner index of monopoly constructed from price data on processed food products sold through grocery stores. A theoretical model of a differentiated oligopoly specifies two determinants of price-cost margins: the Herfindahl-Hirschman index of seller concentration adjusted for the elasticity of demand and the industry advertising-to-sales ratio. The results indicate that the three principal determinants of price-cost margi...

  12. Mothers' self-reported grocery shopping behaviours with their 2- to 7-year-old children: relationship between feeding practices and mothers' willingness to purchase child-requested nutrient-poor, marketed foods, and fruits and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lively, Kathryn; Babawale, Oluborode; Thompson, David M; Morris, Amanda S; Harris, Jennifer L; Sisson, Susan B; Cheney, Marshall K; Lora, Karina R

    2017-09-07

    To assess relationships between mothers' feeding practices (food as a reward, food for emotion regulation, modelling of healthy eating) and mothers' willingness to purchase child-marketed foods and fruits/vegetables (F&V) requested by their children during grocery co-shopping. Cross-sectional. Mothers completed an online survey that included questions about feeding practices and willingness (i.e. intentions) to purchase child-requested foods during grocery co-shopping. Feeding practices scores were dichotomized at the median. Foods were grouped as nutrient-poor or nutrient-dense (F&V) based on national nutrition guidelines. Regression models compared mothers with above-the-median v. at-or-below-the-median feeding practices scores on their willingness to purchase child-requested food groupings, adjusting for demographic covariates. Participants completed an online survey generated at a public university in the USA. Mothers (n 318) of 2- to 7-year-old children. Mothers who scored above-the-median on using food as a reward were more willing to purchase nutrient-poor foods (β=0·60, P<0·0001), mothers who scored above-the-median on use of food for emotion regulation were more willing to purchase nutrient-poor foods (β=0·29, P<0·0031) and mothers who scored above-the-median on modelling of healthy eating were more willing to purchase nutrient-dense foods (β=0·22, P<0·001) than were mothers with at-or-below-the-median scores, adjusting for demographic covariates. Mothers who reported using food to control children's behaviour were more willing to purchase child-requested, nutrient-poor foods. Parental feeding practices may facilitate or limit children's foods requested in grocery stores. Parent-child food consumer behaviours should be investigated as a route that may contribute to children's eating patterns.

  13. Museums as brokers of participation: how visitors view the emerging role of European science centres and museums in policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bandelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Science centres and museums in Europe traditionally offer opportunities for public participation, such as dialogues, debates and workshops. In recent years, starting with the support of grants from the European Commission, the purpose of these initiatives is increasingly more connected with the policy making processes where science centres play a role as brokers between the public and other stakeholders. This article begins an investigation on how these two levels of participation – the participation of museums in policy, and the participation of visitors in museums – are related in seven European science centres and museums. The results suggest that science centres and museums are regarded by their visitors as potential platforms to facilitate public participation in policy, especially in countries where the general infrastructure for public participation in science is weak.

  14. Bridging the science–policy interface: A new era for South African research and the role of knowledge brokering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki Funke

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Government departments and agencies are faced with issues of increasing socio-ecological complexities around environmental sustainability and global change, which require them to make decisions that have the potential to impact greatly on society and economies. As a result, they are under increasing pressure to develop policies that consider a wide spectrum of scientific and indigenous knowledge. It is acknowledged that in South Africa, as elsewhere, a gap typically exists between the scientific or research community and the policymaking community, due to a number of underlying reasons at both ends. This gap often results in a unidirectional ‘push of evidence’ by researchers to policymakers, with a hope that policymakers will take up these findings and use them in policy identification, formulation or implementation. To support the uptake of evidence in policy, it is also important to stimulate an environment of ‘evidence pull’ by the policy community from the research community, as well as increasing the dialogue between these communities. A model of knowledge brokering is proposed in this paper as a means to bridge this gap between science and policy and, thereby, ensure the uptake of evidence in policy development and implementation. This model looks at the need for institutional mechanisms, such as knowledge-brokering offices, both within research organisations and government departments. It also highlights the importance of researchers involving policymakers from the onset of their research process, with a continuous dialogue between the two parties, both during and after the research, as a means of increasing the likelihood of research uptake.

  15. A study of the relationship between UK consumers purchase intention and store brand food products -- Take Nottingham city consumers for example

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Kaochun

    2008-01-01

    Recently, store brands play an important role in retail grocery strategy. More and more retailers put their effort to develop and market new store brands because consumers have been accepting store brands. Therefore, store brands have gradually influenced consumers purchase behaviours in order to provide an in-depth investigation of consumers purchase intention in store brands, the study choose food products among many product categories because when consumers hear the store brand, they mus...

  16. 17 CFR 240.15c3-3a - Exhibit A-formula for determination reserve requirement of brokers and dealers under § 240.15c3-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... determination reserve requirement of brokers and dealers under § 240.15c3-3. 240.15c3-3a Section 240.15c3-3a... Rules Relating to Over-The-Counter Markets § 240.15c3-3a Exhibit A—formula for determination reserve requirement of brokers and dealers under § 240.15c3-3. Credits Debits 1. Free credit balances and other...

  17. Reflections on: Online grocery shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is included in the First Monday Special Issue #6: Commercial applications of the Internet, published in July 2006. Special Issue editor Mark A. Fox asked authors to submit additional comments regarding their articles.

  18. Reflections on: Online grocery shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    This paper is included in the First Monday Special Issue #6: Commercial applications of the Internet, published in July 2006. Special Issue editor Mark A. Fox asked authors to submit additional comments regarding their articles.

  19. / production

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    François Arleo; Pol-Bernard Gossiaux; Thierry Gousset; Jörg Aichelin

    2003-04-01

    For more than 25 years /Ψ production has helped to sharpen our understanding of QCD. In proton induced reaction some observations are rather well understood while others are still unclear. The current status of the theory of /Ψ production will be sketched, paying special attention to the issues of formation time and /Ψ re-interaction in a nuclear medium.

  20. Hayatın Değiştiği Yerde Bakkallık Grocery Which Has Changed In Life Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay PULLUKÇUOĞLU YAPUCU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available If it compared with past XIX. century is an age in which haschanged of life. 520Ottoman Empire tried to struggle politicial problemsin that process by which named modernization age. On the other handif we address in terms of social and economic condition of Ottoman wecould find some differences in that period. When social life andeconomic circumstances changed, cities of Ottoman developed in termsof social and economic position in XIX. century. Not only Ottoman citiesbut also countrysides, bazaars which have changed life timeparticipated in process of transformation. Historians interested in thisimprovement every time. Because it was estimated that transformationof economy and commercial life were affected by foreign capital.Furthermore bazaars of Ottoman even shops were invaded by goods wascome from foreign countries. Sometimes bazaars relocated in developedcities they were renew by themselves to provide inhabitants of cities.Nowadays grocery has lost its advantages for us but groceires andgrocers were important for bazaars and people in past thus they wereable to accomodate for new conditions. This study deals with groceriesof Ottoman. Firstly we’ll cope with their role of commercial life andprocess of their transformation in a changed and modernizatedeconomy beginning from XIX. century. Another topic of this study isgrocery which located in Western Anatolia. Reason of this apporach is adiscourse, in general it is believed that foreign capital more affectedWestern Anatolia than other regions of Ottoman so this area could showimportant examples to evaluate influence of foreign capital.Furthermore same reasons could help us to find trail of development inthis area thus Western Anatolia was chosen by us. Another importanttopic is Muslim and non Muslim groceries in Western Anatolia becausethere is a claim that all of the grocers were non Muslim in the OttomanEmpire especially Izmir and its periphery at the end of XIX. century . Isthis claim true

  1. A description of a knowledge broker role implemented as part of a randomized controlled trial evaluating three knowledge translation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Mara Linda

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A knowledge broker (KB is a popular knowledge translation and exchange (KTE strategy emerging in Canada to promote interaction between researchers and end users, as well as to develop capacity for evidence-informed decision making. A KB provides a link between research producers and end users by developing a mutual understanding of goals and cultures, collaborates with end users to identify issues and problems for which solutions are required, and facilitates the identification, access, assessment, interpretation, and translation of research evidence into local policy and practice. Knowledge-brokering can be carried out by individuals, groups and/or organizations, as well as entire countries. In each case, the KB is linked with a group of end users and focuses on promoting the integration of the best available evidence into policy and practice-related decisions. Methods A KB intervention comprised one of three KTE interventions evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. Results KB activities were classified into the following categories: initial and ongoing needs assessments; scanning the horizon; knowledge management; KTE; network development, maintenance, and facilitation; facilitation of individual capacity development in evidence informed decision making; and g facilitation of and support for organizational change. Conclusion As the KB role developed during this study, central themes that emerged as particularly important included relationship development, ongoing support, customized approaches, and opportunities for individual and organizational capacity development. The novelty of the KB role in public health provides a unique opportunity to assess the need for and reaction to the role and its associated activities. Future research should include studies to evaluate the effectiveness of KBs in different settings and among different health care professionals, and to explore the optimal preparation and training of KBs

  2. Hardwood supply chain and the role of log brokers in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iris Montague; Adrienn Andersch; Jan Wiedenbeck; Urs. Buehlmann

    2013-01-01

    The recent economic crisis has greatly affected how companies conduct business. To be competitive, companies had to make changes to their product lines, distribution channels, marketing, and overall business strategies. This study was conducted to describe and analyze the log supply component of the hardwood forest products distribution chain and to investigate changes...

  3. Knowledge brokering on emissions modelling in Strategic Environmental Assessment of Estonian energy policy with special reference to the LEAP model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuldna, Piret, E-mail: piret.kuldna@seit.ee [Stockholm Environment Institute Tallinn Centre, Lai 34, Tallinn 10133 (Estonia); Peterson, Kaja [Stockholm Environment Institute Tallinn Centre, Lai 34, Tallinn 10133 (Estonia); Kuhi-Thalfeldt, Reeli [Stockholm Environment Institute Tallinn Centre, Lai 34, Tallinn 10133 (Estonia); Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia)

    2015-09-15

    Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) serves as a platform for bringing together researchers, policy developers and other stakeholders to evaluate and communicate significant environmental and socio-economic effects of policies, plans and programmes. Quantitative computer models can facilitate knowledge exchange between various parties that strive to use scientific findings to guide policy-making decisions. The process of facilitating knowledge generation and exchange, i.e. knowledge brokerage, has been increasingly explored, but there is not much evidence in the literature on how knowledge brokerage activities are used in full cycles of SEAs which employ quantitative models. We report on the SEA process of the national energy plan with reflections on where and how the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) model was used for knowledge brokerage on emissions modelling between researchers and policy developers. Our main suggestion is that applying a quantitative model not only in ex ante, but also ex post scenario modelling and associated impact assessment can facilitate systematic and inspiring knowledge exchange process on a policy problem and capacity building of participating actors. - Highlights: • We examine the knowledge brokering on emissions modelling between researchers and policy developers in a full cycle of SEA. • Knowledge exchange process can evolve at any modelling stage within SEA. • Ex post scenario modelling enables systematic knowledge exchange and learning on a policy problem.

  4. The NIF LinkOut broker: a web resource to facilitate federated data integration using NCBI identifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenco, Luis; Ascoli, Giorgio A; Martone, Maryann E; Shepherd, Gordon M; Miller, Perry L

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the NIF LinkOut Broker (NLB) that has been built as part of the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF) project. The NLB is designed to coordinate the assembly of links to neuroscience information items (e.g., experimental data, knowledge bases, and software tools) that are (1) accessible via the Web, and (2) related to entries in the National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI's) Entrez system. The NLB collects these links from each resource and passes them to the NCBI which incorporates them into its Entrez LinkOut service. In this way, an Entrez user looking at a specific Entrez entry can LinkOut directly to related neuroscience information. The information stored in the NLB can also be utilized in other ways. A second approach, which is operational on a pilot basis, is for the NLB Web server to create dynamically its own Web page of LinkOut links for each NCBI identifier in the NLB database. This approach can allow other resources (in addition to the NCBI Entrez) to LinkOut to related neuroscience information. The paper describes the current NLB system and discusses certain design issues that arose during its implementation.

  5. The NIF LinkOut Broker: A Web Resource to Facilitate Federated Data Integration using NCBI Identifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Giorgio A.; Martone, Maryann E.; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Miller, Perry L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the NIF LinkOut Broker (NLB) that has been built as part of the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF) project. The NLB is designed to coordinate the assembly of links to neuroscience information items (e.g., experimental data, knowledge bases, and software tools) that are (1) accessible via the Web, and (2) related to entries in the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s (NCBI’s) Entrez system. The NLB collects these links from each resource and passes them to the NCBI which incorporates them into its Entrez LinkOut service. In this way, an Entrez user looking at a specific Entrez entry can LinkOut directly to related neuroscience information. The information stored in the NLB can also be utilized in other ways. A second approach, which is operational on a pilot basis, is for the NLB Web server to create dynamically its own Web page of LinkOut links for each NCBI identifier in the NLB database. This approach can allow other resources (in addition to the NCBI Entrez) to LinkOut to related neuroscience information. The paper describes the current NLB system and discusses certain design issues that arose during its implementation. PMID:18975149

  6. Association Between Grocery Consumption and Children Obesity in Beijing City%北京市儿童青少年肥胖与副食频次关系探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童方; 米杰; 程红; 侯冬青; 赵小元

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] To investigate the association between diagnostic overweight of children and adolescent and grocery consumption in Beijing city.[Method] Data were from the cross-sectional evaluation as a part of chronic diseases survey and control on children and adolescent of the Project of Beijing Science and Technology Committee.Subjects included 20 867 boys and girls aged 3-18 years.Grocery frequency and physical measurement indexes was analyzed by maximum likelihood in Logistic regression.The deep analysis were displayed by univariate and simple charts.[Result] There were differences in grocery consumption between boys and girls,urban and rural.The influence were unbalanced and interaction.There were significant differences in frequency of soup,meat taken by boys,fried and bean foods in urban and suburban respectively,and western fast food among normal,overweight and obesity children.The soup intake usually was a protective factor on children obesity.Too much meat and fried food were harmful to higher BMI.[Conclusion] Children's obesity was related to higher frequency of some grocery in Beijing city in the economic transition,which had significant differences between boys and girls,urban and suburban.%目的:阐明目前经济转型期北京市儿童青少年肥胖高流行与副食摄入频次的关系.方法:资料来源于北京市科技重点项目流行病学调查数据,提取3-18岁组20 867例膳食频次回顾性调查与体检测量指标值,剂量—反应关系采用Logistic多元回归最大似然法,个别副食精细深入分析使用多元方差与复合线图结合显示.结果:各副食搭配频次性别、城乡之间存在差异性,作用既不均衡,又交互影响.多元回归分析显示,正常与超重或肥胖儿童喝汤在各人群、男生肉频次、城区油炸食品、郊区豆制品,以及西式快餐摄入存在统计学差异.具体表现为喝汤对儿童肥胖的保护作用,过多肉类、油炸食品摄入为高BMI危险因

  7. Availability of Tobacco and Alcohol Products in Los Angeles Community Pharmacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Kim, Gilwan; Ambrose, Peter J.; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek

    2012-01-01

    The availability of tobacco and alcohol products in community pharmacies contradicts the pharmacists’ Code of Ethics and presents challenges for a profession that is overwhelmingly not in favor of the sale of these products in its practice settings. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the proportion of pharmacies that sell tobacco products and/or alcoholic beverages and to characterize promotion of these products. The proportion of pharmacies that sell non-prescription nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products as aids to smoking cessation also was estimated. Among 250 randomly-selected community pharmacies in Los Angeles, 32.8% sold cigarettes, and 26.0% sold alcohol products. Cigarettes were more likely to be available in traditional chain pharmacies and grocery stores than in independently-owned pharmacies (100% versus 10.8%; P chain drug stores and grocery stores were more likely to sell alcoholic beverages than were independently-owned pharmacies (87.5% vs. 5.4%; P pharmacies that sold cigarettes and 47 (72.3%) of the 65 pharmacies that sold alcohol also displayed promotional materials for these products. NRT products were merchandised by 58% of pharmacies. Results of this study suggest that when given a choice, pharmacists choose not to sell tobacco or alcohol products. PMID:21644021

  8. 9 CFR 2.76 - Records: Operators of auction sales and brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Records § 2.76 Records: Operators of auction sales and..., buying, or receiving the animals if he or she is licensed or registered under the Act; (4) The vehicle... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records: Operators of auction...

  9. New Governance and New Knowledge Brokers: Think Tanks and Universities as Boundary Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gary; De La Cruz, Pedro; López, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Educational researchers, along with universities in general, form part of the social field of knowledge production. Schools of education, as with all professional schools, are boundary organizations in the sense that they not only produce knowledge, but also train teachers, counselors, and administrators and have an impact on curriculum and…

  10. Consumer decision making regarding a "green" everyday product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John; Jørgensen, Anne-Katrine; Sandager, Sara

    2012-01-01

    to elevate consumer involvement in the choice of the product. However, there is a lack of research investigating whether adding such a “green” product attribute actually makes any difference to how consumers make choices. Does the way in which consumers make decisions about groceries change when both “green......One of the techniques marketers use to convert low-involvement products into high-involvement ones is adding an important product feature. A case in point is the common practice of adding a “green” or environmentally friendly product feature to an everyday product, something which is often assumed......” and conventional alternatives are available? Does it make them deliberate more or do they just develop another, simple choice heuristic? Based on observation and follow-up interviews of consumers at the milk counter in two supermarkets which stock both organic (a “green” attribute) and conventional milk...

  11. Pulga, a tiny open-source MQTT broker for flexible and secure IoT deployments

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa-Aranda, Jose Luis; Vallez, Noelia; Sanchez-Bueno, Carlos; Aguado-Araujo, Daniel; Bueno, Gloria; Deniz, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The Eyes of Things (EoT) EU H2020 project envisages a computer vision platform that can be used both standalone and embedded into more complex artifacts, particularly for wearable applications, robotics, home products, surveillance etc. The core hardware will be based on a number of technologies and components that have been designed for maximum performance of the always-demanding vision applications while keeping the lowest energy consumption. An important functionality is to be able to comm...

  12. 残疾人商业保险的经纪服务和监督服务%Broker Service and Supervision of Commercial Insurance for the Disabled

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房崇坚; 房斌

    2015-01-01

    Insurance broker service is an important measure to protect the benefits of the disabled. It's capable to provide demand-oriented insurance plan, the most favorable premium through group insurance, supervision of insurance company, coordination of claim settlement of the disabled and dispute mediation between the insurance company and the disabled. The IT service platform which connected and interacted among the disabled persons' federation, insurance brokers and insurance companies, helps to improve work efficiency as well as the collaboration mechanism between insurance companies and the disabled persons' federation at district, street or county level. This paper suggested that enhance broker service and supervision to insurance services, to better serve the interests of the disabled.%通过实践探索,保险经纪公司可以提供以需求为导向的保险方案、以团体投保方式争取最优惠保险方案、监督保险公司服务和协助残疾人理赔调解保险争议等服务,保险经纪服务是保障残疾人利益的重要手段.由残联、保险经纪公司和保险公司三方互联互动的信息化服务平台,完善了保险公司与区、街(镇)残联的协作机制,提高了工作效率.建议在残疾人商业保险服务实践和发展过程中,加强对保险服务的经纪服务和监督作用,最大限度保障残疾人利益.

  13. 78 FR 65605 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... persons who operate as commission merchants, dealers and brokers buying or selling fruit and or vegetables in interstate or foreign commerce to be licensed. The license for retailers and grocery...

  14. Crop advisors as climate information brokers: Building the capacity of US farmers to adapt to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmen Lemos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of crop advisors as brokers of climate information to support US corn farmers to adapt to climatic change. It uses quantitative data collected from a broad survey of crop advisors in the US Corn Belt to examine the factors that shape advisors’ use of (and willingness to provide climate information to their clients. Building upon a general model of climate information usability we argue that advisors’ willingness to provide climate advice to farmers is influenced by three main factors: their information seeking habits and behavior, their experience with innovation in the past, and how climate information interplays with other kinds of information that they provide—especially agronomic advice. We find that advisors’ willingness to provide climate related information depends both on factors at the individual and organizational level and on the type of advice they provide. First, at the individual and organizational levels, advisors who work in supportive organizations and who collaborate with other advisors are more likely to provide climate information. Second, advisors are more likely to provide climate information if it does not interfere with their main profit making business (e.g. provision of agronomic advice. Third, there is a significant positive relationship between trust in a greater number or sources of information and use of climate information. Fourth, the way advisors perceive short- and long-term risk also influences their willingness to provide climate information; the more concerned they are about long-term climate-related risks to farming, the more likely they are to provide (or want to provide advice based on climate information. Differently from other empirical work in the literature, our analytical model suggests that neither negative experiences with climate information in the past nor the high level of uncertainty characteristic of climate information appear to influence advisors

  15. Virtual management of radiology examinations in the virtual radiology environment using common object request broker architecture services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, R; Rozenblit, J; Cook, J F; Chacko, A K; Timboe, H L

    1999-05-01

    In the Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Medical Command is now embarking on an extremely exciting new project--creating a virtual radiology environment (VRE) for the management of radiology examinations. The business of radiology in the military is therefore being reengineered on several fronts by the VRE Project. In the VRE Project, a set of intelligent agent algorithms determine where examinations are to routed for reading bases on a knowledge base of the entire VRE. The set of algorithms, called the Meta-Manager, is hierarchical and uses object-based communications between medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and medical centers that have digital imaging network picture archiving and communications systems (DIN-PACS) networks. The communications is based on use of common object request broker architecture (CORBA) objects and services to send patient demographics and examination images from DIN-PACS networks in the MTFs to the DIN-PACS networks at the medical centers for diagnosis. The Meta-Manager is also responsible for updating the diagnosis at the originating MTF. CORBA services are used to perform secure message communications between DIN-PACS nodes in the VRE network. The Meta-Manager has a fail-safe architecture that allows the master Meta-Manager function to float to regional Meta-Manager sites in case of server failure. A prototype of the CORBA-based Meta-Manager is being developed by the University of Arizona's Computer Engineering Research Laboratory using the unified modeling language (UML) as a design tool. The prototype will implement the main functions described in the Meta-Manager design specification. The results of this project are expected to reengineer the process of radiology in the military and have extensions to commercial radiology environments.

  16. Regulators as agents: Modelling personality and power as evidence is brokered to support decisions on environmental risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, G.J. [Cranfield University, Centre for Environmental Risks and Futures, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Kendall, G. [University of Nottingham, School of Computer Science, Nottingham NG8 1BB (United Kingdom); University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Soane, E. [London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Management, London WC2A 2AE (United Kingdom); Li, J. [University of Nottingham, School of Computer Science, Nottingham NG8 1BB (United Kingdom); Rocks, S.A.; Jude, S.R. [Cranfield University, Centre for Environmental Risks and Futures, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Pollard, S.J.T., E-mail: s.pollard@cranfield.ac.uk [Cranfield University, Centre for Environmental Risks and Futures, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    Complex regulatory decisions about risk rely on the brokering of evidence between providers and recipients, and involve personality and power relationships that influence the confidence that recipients may place in the sufficiency of evidence and, therefore, the decision outcome. We explore these relationships in an agent-based model; drawing on concepts from environmental risk science, decision psychology and computer simulation. A two-agent model that accounts for the sufficiency of evidence is applied to decisions about salt intake, animal carcass disposal and radioactive waste. A dynamic version of the model assigned personality traits to agents, to explore their receptivity to evidence. Agents with ‘aggressor’ personality sets were most able to imbue fellow agents with enhanced receptivity (with ‘avoider’ personality sets less so) and clear confidence in the sufficiency of evidence. In a dynamic version of the model, when both recipient and provider were assigned the ‘aggressor’ personality set, this resulted in 10 successful evidence submissions in 71 days, compared with 96 days when both agents were assigned the ‘avoider’ personality set. These insights suggest implications for improving the efficiency and quality of regulatory decision making by understanding the role of personality and power. - Highlights: •The role of personality and power in regulatory decision-making is poorly represented. •We built a rudimentary two-agent model to explore environmental risk decisions. •Our two agent model accounted for decisions about the sufficiency of evidence. •We examined the influence personality and power has on confidence gained. •By giving agents personality we might predict the time taken to reach consensus.

  17. A hospital information system based on Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) for exchanging distributed medical objects--an approach to future environment of sharing healthcare information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohe, K

    1998-01-01

    Tightly related subsystems in a HIS have to exchange medical data flexibly by the data object rather than by the battery of the data. We developed a CPR subsystem based on Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) that retrieves and stores clinical information in the object-oriented database via Internet Intra-ORB Protocol (IIOP). The system is hybridized with the legacy HIS applications on the client terminals. We believe that our solution and the experiences will contribute to the future CORBA-based environment in which computerized patient information is shared among hospitals, clinics, and tightly related systems.

  18. Brokers and business cycles: Does financial market volatility cause real fluctuations?

    OpenAIRE

    Döpke, Jörg; Pierdzioch, Christian

    1998-01-01

    This paper elaborates on the link between financial market volatility and real economic activity. Using monthly data for Germany from 1968 to 1998, we specify GARCH models to capture the variability of stock market prices, of the real exchange rate, and of a long-term and of a short-term rate of interest and test for the impact of the conditional variance on the future stance of the business cycle and on the volatility of industrial production. The results of our empirical investigation lead ...

  19. VOLUME 31: HTA'S EVOLUTION: FROM CONSUMER TO HONEST BROKER TO ENGAGED COLLABORATOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendorf, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    In this issue, Facey and colleagues have eloquently summarized the product of the February 2015 HTAi Policy Forum discussion-the need for health technology assessment (HTA) to shift from a historically reactive role in both evaluating current evidence and requesting additional evidence generation to a more proactive role engaging with stakeholders to ensure that evidence produced is appropriate for any given intervention at different stages of the clinical development program. This makes logical a priori sense, of course, as proactive and engaged discussion is always superior to reactive and potentially adversarial interaction.

  20. The Public Health Responsibility Deal: brokering a deal for public health, but on whose terms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjwani, Clare; Caraher, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Coalitions of multinational food and drink businesses have pledged to reformulate their products and to market them responsibly. Largely business-led and self-regulated, the integrity of these voluntary initiatives has been questioned. The Public Health Responsibility Deal in England is an example of a voluntary initiative that is government-led. Does this approach provide evidence that with public leadership there is potential for voluntary actions to deliver meaningful results for public health? The subject of the research is the calorie reduction initiative of the Responsibility Deal. Source material was obtained primarily through a series of UK Freedom of Information requests and comprises previously unpublished Department of Health documentation relating to relevant meetings held during 2011 and 2012. The Responsibility Deal approach to calorie reduction deliberately involves the food industry in the specification of the measures it is to implement (reformulation and portion control). Finding the common ground between private and public interests has resulted in the deflection of public health objectives and the preclusion of adequate monitoring and evaluation. The Responsibility Deal approach is fundamentally flawed in its expectation that industry will take voluntary actions that prioritise public health interests above its own. Being government-led counts for little in the absence of sanctions to drive compliance. Instead the initiative affords private interests the opportunity to influence in their favour the public health policies and strategies that affect their products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Common object request broker architecture (CORBA)-based security services for the virtual radiology environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, R; Cole, C; Rozenblit, J; Cook, J F; Chacko, A K

    2000-05-01

    includes (a) radiologist schedules; (b) modality worklists; (c) routed case information; (d) DIN-PACS and Composite Health Care system (CHCS) messages, and Meta-Manager administrative and security information; and (e) patient case information. (3) Access control and communications security is required in the VRE to control who uses the VRE and Meta-Manager facilities and to secure the messages between VRE components. The CORBA Security Service Specification version 1.5 is designed to allow up to TCSEC's B2-level security for distributed objects. The CORBA Security Service Specification defines the functionality of several security features: identification and authentication, authorization and access control, security auditing, communication security, nonrepudiation, and security administration. This report describes the enhanced security features for the VRE and their implementation using commercial CORBA Security Service software products.

  2. 时间之环--《解忧杂货店》的时间变形%The ring of time--The time deformation of "The melancholy grocery store"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李天

    2015-01-01

    The melancholy grocery store is non-deducibility model novel of contemporary Japanese reasoning novelist of Keigo Higashino. In his works, the author does not create tension, but bring readers moved and strive upward positive energy. Keigo Higashino’s work besides materials elegant, through flexible changes of narrative time, the narrative time of the novel form a closed circle, making five interlocking stories, structure is unique. The author tried to distance for clues to the analysis the charm of this work.%《解忧杂货店》是日本当代推理小说家东野圭吾的一部非推理小说。在该作品中,作者非但没有制造凶杀案与寻找真相的紧张感,反而给读者带来满满的感动以及拼搏向上的正能量。东野圭吾的这部作品除了选材精妙之外,他通过灵活变换叙述时间是小说的叙事时间形成了一个封闭的圆环,从而使五个故事环环相扣,结构十分独特。笔者试图以时距为线索来分析这部作品的魅力。

  3. 75 FR 23217 - Notice of Request for Extension and Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... licensing system. All commission merchants, dealers, and brokers engaged in business subject to the PACA must be licensed. Retailers and grocery wholesalers must renew their licenses every three years. All... response annually. Respondents: Commission merchants, dealers, and brokers engaged in the business...

  4. Business, brokers and borders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    in two border regions between Niger, Nigeria, and Benin. In a business environment where transaction costs are extremely high, we find that decentralized networks are well adapted to the various uncertainties induced by long-distance trade. We also find that long-distance trade relies both on the trust...... and cooperation shared among local traders, and on the distant ties developed with foreign partners from a different origin, religion or culture. Studying the spatial structure of trade networks, we find that in those markets where trade is recent and where most of the traders are not native of the region...

  5. Business, brokers and borders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier

    Using social network analysis, this paper studies the structure of trade networks that developed across West African borders. The first part aims to understand the centralization of cross-border trade networks. In a business environment where transaction costs are extremely high, we find that dec......Using social network analysis, this paper studies the structure of trade networks that developed across West African borders. The first part aims to understand the centralization of cross-border trade networks. In a business environment where transaction costs are extremely high, we find...... developed with foreign partners from a different origin, religion or culture. In the second part, we study the spatial structure of trade networks and the influence of national borders on the development of social ties. The paper shows that the spatial form of trade networks is constrained by the historical...

  6. Lowering the Barrier to Cross-Disciplinary Scientific Data Access via a Brokering Service Built Around a Unified Data Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, D. M.; Wilson, A.

    2012-12-01

    The steps many scientific data users go through to use data (after discovering it) can be rather tedious, even when dealing with datasets within their own discipline. Accessing data across domains often seems intractable. We present here, LaTiS, an Open Source brokering solution that bridges the gap between the source data and the user's code by defining a unified data model plus a plugin framework for "adapters" to read data from their native source, "filters" to perform server side data processing, and "writers" to output any number of desired formats or streaming protocols. A great deal of work is being done in the informatics community to promote multi-disciplinary science with a focus on search and discovery based on metadata - information about the data. The goal of LaTiS is to go that last step to provide a uniform interface to read the dataset into computer programs and other applications once it has been identified. The LaTiS solution for integrating a wide variety of data models is to return to mathematical fundamentals. The LaTiS data model emphasizes functional relationships between variables. For example, a time series of temperature measurements can be thought of as a function that maps a time to a temperature. With just three constructs: "Scalar" for a single variable, "Tuple" for a collection of variables, and "Function" to represent a set of independent and dependent variables, the LaTiS data model can represent most scientific datasets at a low level that enables uniform data access. Higher level abstractions can be built on top of the basic model to add more meaningful semantics for specific user communities. LaTiS defines its data model in terms of the Unified Modeling Language (UML). It also defines a very thin Java Interface that can be implemented by numerous existing data interfaces (e.g. NetCDF-Java) such that client code can access any dataset via the Java API, independent of the underlying data access mechanism. LaTiS also provides a

  7. Critical role of lay health cultural brokers in promoting the health of immigrants and refugees: A case study in the United States of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerono P. Rotich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The United States of America, a home to immigrants and refugees from various cultures and corners of the world continues to encounter waves of mass immigration. Some immigrated due to well-founded fears of persecution (i.e. religious, political, race, or social group or economic hardships. Others immigrated to, reunite with family members, seek economic and education opportunities, and better standards of living. Notwithstanding their channels of admission or entry and their pivotal role in enriching the culture and the economy of the United States of America, many confront several health and lifestyle related challenges as they acculturate and integrate into the mainstream of American life and culture. Although many individuals and organizations have created numerous programs and activities to help ease these difficulties, minimal documentation is available on the involvement and engagement of the non-traditional work force, such as the lay health cultural brokers.

  8. Governmental and industry roles and responsibilities with regard to international marriage brokers: equalizing the balance of power between foreign fiances and spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orloff, Leslye E; Sarangapani, Hema

    2007-05-01

    The unregulated nature of the international marriage broker (IMB) industry endangers women by denying them information necessary to make informed choices with respect to their intended U.S.-based citizen spouses. This article (a) provides an overview of the contemporary IMB industry, including a discussion of reasons underlying women's choices to use IMB agencies to meet and marry U.S.-based spouses, (b) discusses how this industry's marketing of marriages potentially endangers many women recruits, and (c) offers an update and analysis of new provisions under U.S. immigration law that strengthen protections available for women who immigrate as fiancés and spouses of U.S. citizens, including those in marriages arranged by IMBs.

  9. Impact of the Use of Object Request Broker Middleware for Inter-Component Communications in C6416 Digital Signal Processor Based Software Communications Architecture Radio Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I. Yousef

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study presents an in-depth analysis of the performance of Software Communications Architecture (SCA component-based waveform applications in terms of inter-component communications. The main limitation with SCA, in the context of embedded systems, is the additional cost introduced by the use of Object Request Broker (ORB middleware. The ORB middleware handles the interaction between components and objects in SCA distributed environment. This interaction should be highly efficient, due to the real time nature of SCA systems and transparent to the application programmer. Approach: We can achieve high efficiency in SCA systems by enhancing the Inter-Process Communications (IPC mechanisms in Operating systems (OS micro kernels, while we achieve transparency through Interface Definition Language (IDL. Different encoding mechanisms like “External Data Representation (XDR, Network Data Representation (NDR and Common Data Representation (CDR facilitate inter-component communication transparently and efficiently”. Marshalling procedures format data from the local machine representation to common network representations. A most common encoding mechanism for Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA systems is CDR representation. Measurements have been performed with ORBExpress DSP as a CORBA distribution and Open Source SCA Implementation Embedded (OSSIE for SCA implementation. In order to perform these measurements we proposed two metrics for profiling the ORB that are invocation and marshalling. In addition, we propose three elements of data types to evaluate the performance of ORB middleware that are, Basic, Array and Sequence data types. Results: The CORBA bus is really the part, which brings an overhead to the SCA radio systems. This overhead is due to method invocations that have been carried out by ORB middleware. Conclusion: Performance benchmarks of ORBExpress DSP middleware show that, although using CORBA for

  10. Do academic knowledge brokers exist? Using social network analysis to explore academic research-to-policy networks from six schools of public health in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessani, Nasreen S; Boulay, Marc G; Bennett, Sara C

    2016-06-01

    The potential for academic research institutions to facilitate knowledge exchange and influence evidence-informed decision-making has been gaining ground. Schools of public health (SPHs) may play a key knowledge brokering role-serving as agencies of and for development. Understanding academic-policymaker networks can facilitate the enhancement of links between policymakers and academic faculty at SPHs, as well as assist in identifying academic knowledge brokers (KBs). Using a census approach, we administered a sociometric survey to academic faculty across six SPHs in Kenya to construct academic-policymaker networks. We identified academic KBs using social network analysis (SNA) in a two-step approach: First, we ranked individuals based on (1) number of policymakers in their network; (2) number of academic peers who report seeking them out for advice on knowledge translation and (3) their network position as 'inter-group connectors'. Second, we triangulated the three scores and re-ranked individuals. Academic faculty scoring within the top decile across all three measures were classified as KBs. Results indicate that each SPH commands a variety of unique as well as overlapping relationships with national ministries in Kenya. Of 124 full-time faculty, we identified 7 KBs in 4 of the 6 SPHs. Those scoring high on the first measure were not necessarily the same individuals scoring high on the second. KBs were also situated in a wide range along the 'connector/betweenness' measure. We propose that a composite score rather than traditional 'betweenness centrality', provides an alternative means of identifying KBs within these networks. In conclusion, SNA is a valuable tool for identifying academic-policymaker networks in Kenya. More efforts to conduct similar network studies would permit SPH leadership to identify existing linkages between faculty and policymakers, shared linkages with other SPHs and gaps so as to contribute to evidence-informed health policies.

  11. The effects of retail concentration on retail dairy product prices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovhannisyan, V; Bozic, M

    2016-06-01

    This study provides an empirical investigation of the relationship between grocery retail concentration and retail dairy product prices in the United States. The analysis was performed based on a unique data set on store-level retail prices provided by the Information Resources Inc. Further, alternative measures of retail concentration were considered, which included revenue and store selling space-based Herfindahl-Hirschman Index that were computed based on a Nielsen TDLinx data set on store characteristics. Results from a reduced-form empirical framework estimated via panel data techniques indicated that grocery retail concentration had a positive statistically significant effect on retail dairy product prices in the analyzed locations during the analyzed period of time. Specifically, a 10% increase in concentration was found to lead to a 0.46% rise in retail dairy product prices. This central result was robust to the way in which retail concentration was measured and was consistent with broader empirical evidence in the literature on retail market power.

  12. A SURVEY OF THE STATUS QUO OF GRAIN BROKERS IN NENAN PROVINCE AND THE RULE OF LAW%河南省粮食经纪人现状调查及其法治引导

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    穆中杰

    2015-01-01

    Food brokers in Henan Province have three types:the mobile,the sitting shop and the agricultural enterprises partnership with the Food Industry Association as the center.The main positive role of food brokers is to serve food and agriculture,to form the foundation of the new system of grain circulation,increase the so-cial employment,and promote farmers’income.The major problems existing in the operation of the grain bro-ker system are as follows:insufficient funds,loan difficulties;well-informed market information,blocked poli-cy information;shorter validity period of purchase license,higher annual fees;lower income from selling grain,the level and the price of grain being very low;brokers being loosely organized,there being the bias that a peer is the enemy;simple warehouse facilities,thus buying now and selling at once.In view of the present situation of grain brokers,based on investigation and summary of the practices and exploration in Henan Province,the article puts forward some approaches to guiding the grain brokers such as strengthening relevant policy support and implementing the system of Qualification Access;giving full play to the role of in-dustry associations to guide the scale of operations;improving the supervision and inspection system of grain circulation and guiding in operation according to law;establishing the integrity file of the grain brokers and guiding in their law-abiding operation;establishing the information network system of grain brokers and impro-ving the market management.%河南省粮食经纪人大致有流动贩运型、坐店收购型以及与粮食行业协会为中心的农企合伙型等三种类型。粮食经纪人的主要积极作用在于直接为粮农服务、形成了粮食流通新体系的基石、增加了社会就业、促进了农民增收。粮食经纪人制度运行中存在的主要问题有:资金不足,贷款困难;市场信息灵通,政策信息闭塞;收购许可证有效期短,有的年

  13. Mining Health-Related Issues in Consumer Product Reviews by Using Scalable Text Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Manabu; Tilak, Sameer S; Doan, Son; Zisook, Daniel S; Fan, Jung-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In an era when most of our life activities are digitized and recorded, opportunities abound to gain insights about population health. Online product reviews present a unique data source that is currently underexplored. Health-related information, although scarce, can be systematically mined in online product reviews. Leveraging natural language processing and machine learning tools, we were able to mine 1.3 million grocery product reviews for health-related information. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis on the types of health issues found in consumer product reviews; (2) develop a machine learning classifier to detect reviews that contain health-related issues; and (3) gain insights about the task characteristics and challenges for text analytics to guide future research.

  14. Vegetable products as HACCP system’s subject in modern gastronomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gramza-Michałowska

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The intention of HACCP system is focusing to control at points in the operation, critical to the food safety. It is mandatory, preventative, and easy for monitoring food quality control system. Preventing the problems is the major direction of the HACCP system currently considered as one of the most efficient tools provided. Present research aimed at HACCP system adaptation and verification in production of vegetable food. The correctness of introduction and implementation of HACCP was also verified in practice. Research involved the description of selected vegetable grocery product groups and their production schemes, designation of critical control points (CCP in the processes, the danger and identification analysis sheet. Also monitoring system, prevention and correc-tion efforts were planned. On the basis of the obtained results chapters of HACCP book for gastronomy vegetable products were created.

  15. 知识中介在跨国子公司间知识转移中的角色%Knowledge Broker Role in Knowledge Transfer Among the Multinational Subsidiaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵云辉

    2015-01-01

    本研究基于知识中介和跨国公司知识转移理论, 对知识中介在知识转移中所具有的角色进行了梳理, 发现知识中介具有知识获取、知识调整、知识整合、知识扩散以及创建联系五种角色. 在跨国子公司知识转移的过程中, 知识中介的存在是由于组织之间分布的分散性和知识的差异性所决定. 为了克服和减少组织分布性和知识差异性对子公司子之间知识的"距离量", 提高知识的吸收和利用程度, 本研究从知识中介视角出发, 通过对以往文献的梳理, 构建跨国公司子公司间的知识转移模式. 同时, 本研究强调知识中介在跨国公司子公司的跨边界行为以及在转移双方之间的中介作用, 认为知识中介对提高跨国公司子公司间知识转移绩效起到重要的作用.%Based on the knowledge broker and theory of multinational company knowledge transfer , this study analyzes roles of the knowledge broker that show knowledge acquisition, knowledge adjustment, knowledge integration, knowledge spreading and creating contact. In the process of knowledge transfer, knowledge brokers exists because of the organization distribution and knowledge hetero-geneity. In order to overcome and reduce "distance" of knowledge between subsidiaries , and improve the degree of absorption and utilization of knowledge, this study, from the knowledge intermediate perspective, builds the model of knowledge transfer between the multinational company subsidiary. This study emphasizes knowledge brokers on cross-border activities between multinational company subsidiaries .This study considers the knowledge brokers important role to improve the performance of knowledge transfer between multinational company subsidiaries .

  16. ARE PLASTIC GROCERY BAGS SACKING THE ENVIRONMENT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangal Gogte

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is oriented on analysis impacts of plastic bags on environment. In this paper is analyzed did plastic bags are so harmful, and what are the main ingredients of it. One part of this paper is oriented on effects of plastic bags and management of their usage. There is also made comparative analysis between impacts of plastic and paper bags on environment.

  17. ARE PLASTIC GROCERY BAGS SACKING THE ENVIRONMENT?

    OpenAIRE

    Mangal Gogte

    2009-01-01

    This paper is oriented on analysis impacts of plastic bags on environment. In this paper is analyzed did plastic bags are so harmful, and what are the main ingredients of it. One part of this paper is oriented on effects of plastic bags and management of their usage. There is also made comparative analysis between impacts of plastic and paper bags on environment.

  18. APPLICATION OF INTERFIRM NETWORKS CONCEPTS IN THE RETAIL SECTION: AN APPLICATION OF THE BROKER CONCEPTS AND OPERATORS LOGISTICS IN DISTRIBUTING COMPANIES OF FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesinaldo Ataíde Cândido

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available One of main the practical ones adopted for the organizations in the current environment business-oriented and of management has been the application of the principles of nets, based in the concepts of the partnership, the association and the co-operation. The experiences of this new type of practical of management have been successful in diverse economic sectors, creating better conditions for the attainment of competitive advantages. In this work, a study is made to see the possibility of application in the sector of food distribution, inside of the new perspectives of the supply management and the logistic one. In this direction, the work makes a diagnosis of the retail sector, verifying the possibilities of the application of the principles of nets in a together operating company to the representation sector and food distribution, from a process of strategic change, considering a management model based in the concepts of brokers and logistic operator, which they substitute and/or they incorporate the diverse involved agents with the food distribution, which are: the commercial representative, the deliverer and the wholesaler. Key words: competitiveness, network organizational, chain of supply.

  19. The market chain of fruit production in Serbia: A case study of raspberry and sour cherry cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Katica

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The trade in fresh and frozen fruit is complex and fragmentary. Currently producers are forced to use a variety of marketing channels - farmers' markets, processing industries, trade companies and brokers. To increase quality, production, profitability and exports, it is essential to maximize cooperation between producers, processors, wholesalers and retailers. Vertically and laterally integrated fruit marketing channels demand the smallest number of intermediaries and direct relations with consumers. In past decades, fruit production in Serbia was characterized by irrational resource allocation. Neglect of the agribusiness marketing concept led to supply shortages. As a result, prices increased while quality decreased. Only integrated marketing concepts can boost quality, yields, profitability and competitiveness.

  20. Can nutritional information modify purchase of ultra-processed products? Results from a simulated online shopping experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machín, Leandro; Arrúa, Alejandra; Giménez, Ana; Curutchet, María Rosa; Martínez, Joseline; Ares, Gastón

    2017-07-18

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the influence of two front-of-pack nutrition information schemes (traffic-light system and Chilean warning system) on consumer purchase of ultra-processed foods in a simulated online grocery store. Following a between-subjects design, participants completed a simulated weekly food purchase in an online grocery store under one of three experimental conditions: (i) a control condition with no nutrition information, (ii) a traffic-light system and (iii) the Chilean warning system. Information about energy (calories), sugar, saturated fats and salt content was included in the nutrition information schemes. Participants were recruited from a consumer database and a Facebook advertisement. People from Montevideo (Uruguay), aged 18-77 years (n 437; 75 % female), participated in the study. All participants were in charge of food purchase in the household, at least occasionally. No significant differences between experimental conditions were found in the mean share of ultra-processed foods purchased by participants, both in terms of number of products and expenditure, or in the mean energy, sugar, saturated fat and salt content of the purchased items. However, the Chilean warning system decreased intended purchase of sweets and desserts. Results from this online simulation provided little evidence to suggest that the traffic-light system or the Chilean warning system in isolation could be effective in reducing purchase of ultra-processed foods or improving the nutritional composition of the purchased products.