WorldWideScience

Sample records for grocery products brokers

  1. Toward retail product recognition on grocery shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Gül; Kuzu, Rıdvan S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of retail product recognition on grocery shelf images. We present a technique for accomplishing this task with a low time complexity. We decompose the problem into detection and recognition. The former is achieved by a generic product detection module which is trained on a specific class of products (e.g. tobacco packages). Cascade object detection framework of Viola and Jones [1] is used for this purpose. We further make use of Support Vector Machines (SVMs) to recognize the brand inside each detected region. We extract both shape and color information; and apply feature-level fusion from two separate descriptors computed with the bag of words approach. Furthermore, we introduce a dataset (available on request) that we have collected for similar research purposes. Results are presented on this dataset of more than 5,000 images consisting of 10 tobacco brands. We show that satisfactory detection and classification can be achieved on devices with cheap computational power. Potential applications of the proposed approach include planogram compliance control, inventory management and assisting visually impaired people during shopping.

  2. On the Competitive Interaction Between Private Label and Branded Grocery Products

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald W. Cotterill; Ravi Dhar; William P. Putsis Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Recent research in marketing has focused on cross-category variation in the market share of private label products, while recent work in the economics and industrial organization literature has focused on the determinants of firm price setting behavior. In this paper, the authors develop a framework for estimating market share and price reaction equations simultaneously in an attempt to understand the nature of competitive interaction in the market for private label and branded grocery produc...

  3. 17 CFR 240.15a-10 - Exemption of certain brokers or dealers with respect to security futures products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption of certain brokers... Brokers and Dealers § 240.15a-10 Exemption of certain brokers or dealers with respect to security futures products. (a) A broker or dealer that is registered by notice with the Commission pursuant to section 15(b...

  4. IS ONLINE GROCERY SHOPPING INCREASING IN STRENGTH?

    OpenAIRE

    Corbett, James J.

    2001-01-01

    Online grocery shopping is a relatively new innovation with regard to the way in which one purchases groceries. Some interesting concepts- designed to enhance the process of making grocery products available for consumption of the ever-changing consumer- have entered the food distribution industry channels. A telephone survey was conducted in the Boston trading area to determine the profile of online grocery consumers who are familiar with online grocery shopping.

  5. Consumer perceptions of the sale of tobacco products in pharmacies and grocery stores among U.S. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Pallavi; McMillen, Robert; Winickoff, Jonathan P

    2013-07-09

    Pharmacy-based tobacco sales are a rapidly increasing segment of the U.S. retail tobacco market. Growing evidence links easy access to tobacco retail outlets such as pharmacies to increased tobacco use. This mixed-mode survey was the first to employ a nationally representative sample of consumers (n = 3057) to explore their opinions on sale of tobacco products in pharmacies and grocery stores. The majority reported that sale of tobacco products should be either 'allowed if products hidden from view' (29.9%, 25.6%) or 'not allowed at all' (24.0%, 31.3%) in grocery stores and pharmacies, respectively. Significantly fewer smokers, compared to non-smokers, reported agreement on point-of-sale restrictions on sales of tobacco products (grocery stores: 27.1% vs. 59.6%, p sales of tobacco in grocery stores and pharmacies or allowing sales only if the products are hidden from direct view. Both policy changes would represent a departure from the status quo. Consistent with the views of practicing pharmacists and professional pharmacy organizations, consumers are also largely supportive of more restrictive policies.

  6. Grocery E-commerce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Niels; Bjerre, Mogens

    Kornum and Mogens Bjerre bring key researchers together to investigate the factors contributing to the success of "Grocery e-commerce", particularly in countries that had the earliest and most extensive experiences in this field: the USA, the UK and Scandinavia. The authors argue that "Grocery e......-commerce" is especially difficult to implement because it differs from other types of consumer sales in numerous aspects including low profit margins, low value density of products and high frequency purchases. As well as examining these unique characteristics, the authors present research on consumer behaviour, cross...

  7. Production, characterization and fuel properties of alternative diesel fuel from pyrolysis of waste plastic grocery bags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrolysis of HDPE waste grocery bags followed by distillation resulted in a liquid hydrocarbon mixture that consisted of saturated aliphatic paraffins (96.8%), aliphatic olefins (2.6%), and aromatics (0.6%) that corresponded to the boiling range of conventional petroleum diesel fuel (#1 diesel 182–2...

  8. LOAN BROKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela IONESCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A loan is probably the most important financial decision we make in life. In a time when lack of time affects us in every way, including financially, we can only appeal to specialists if we want fast, reliable and quality long-term services. „The notion of “creditor” includes all legal entities, branches of credit institution and nonbankingfinancial institutions that operate in Romania and grant or undertake to grant loans in itscommercial of professional activity”. In the case of loans, the "specialist" has been called loan broker. Loan broker is a person trained in intermediating bank loans who offers advice on choosing the best financial solutions for each client. Through partnerships with banks in Romania, the broker has access to their credit products and assist customers in choosing the loan that best suits their financial needs and possibilities. Moreover, the broker will help in preparing loan application to be submitted to the bank and pursue it to its completion. Loan broker can be defined as the person authorized by the bank or non-bank financial institutions to promote their products through direct contact with natural or legal persons wishing to contract a loan, without any of the parties to have exclusivity. There can be defined as an independent bank or non-bank financial institution, as an intermediary between customers and banks. Through its financial advisors , the company helps customers overcome the difficulty of understanding the credit products, difficulties arising from the multitude of factors that compose such a product, especially in the case of a housing loan or mortgage. Each financial institution is doing everything possible through such partnerships to attract the largest possible portfolio of clients, therefore is developing a real network of brokers to be partners for local or national level (depending on the sites coverage of the branches of each institution on one or more types of credit products. The

  9. Rethinking the grocery store: inclusive wayfinding system for visually impaired shoppers in grocery stores

    OpenAIRE

    Khattab, Doaa

    2015-01-01

    Many people with disabilities face considerable barriers while shopping in grocery stores.  One such barrier is that they cannot find their way around easily, especially when they visit the grocery store for the first time and have not yet built a cognitive map in their memory. They may also experience delays in finding the right product or waiting for assistance from store employees, thus leading them to rely on family, friends, relatives, or volunteers to help them with their shopping. Prob...

  10. Knowledge brokering:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    -organizational search strategy that spans technological boundaries and involves the formation and search among weak ties. The findings show how knowledge brokering is influenced by the make-up of the technology involved, the technological distance between the two parties and why weak ties are less likely to collaborate...

  11. RETHINKING THE GROCERY STORE: INCLUSIVE WAYFINDING SYSTEM FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED SHOPPERS IN GROCERY STORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Khattab

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Many people with disabilities face considerable barriers while shopping in grocery stores.  One such barrier is that they cannot find their way around easily, especially when they visit the grocery store for the first time and have not yet built a cognitive map in their memory. They may also experience delays in finding the right product or waiting for assistance from store employees, thus leading them to rely on family, friends, relatives, or volunteers to help them with their shopping. Problems start when these people are not available, in which case the individual is forced to cancel their visit to the grocery store and reschedule the trip. Grocery stores include many different zones and services, the aisles area being one of the main barriers to access for people with different disabilities. This area features many different sections such as canned goods, dry packaged goods, spices, drinks and snacks, baking supplies, baby items, cereals, cleaning products, pet supplies, and health and beauty items. For visually impaired individuals, however, it can be hard to reach these various sections and find the relevant products. The objective of this research is to design an inclusive and innovative wayfinding system in grocery stores for visually impaired shoppers in order to help them find the center zone, orient between different aisles, decide where to go, move easily between different sections, and select products with ease. The research approach will be based on the literature review and the application of the Delphi method.

  12. Knowledge brokering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine how the spanning of inter-organizational weak ties and technological boundaries influences knowledge brokering. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on original fieldwork and employs a case study research design, investigating a Danish...... HTSF’s inter-organizational activities. Findings – The findings show how an inter-organizational search that crosses technological boundaries and is based on a network structure of weak ties can imply a reduced risk of unwanted knowledge spill-over. Research limitations/implications – By not engaging...... in strong tie collaborations a knowledge brokering organization can reduce the risk of unwanted knowledge spill-over. The risks and opportunities of knowledge spill-over furthermore rely on the nature of the technology involved and to what extent technological boundaries are crossed. Practical implications...

  13. Price learning during grocery shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    Many attempts have been made to measure consumers' price knowledge for groceries. However, the results have varied considerably and conflict with results of reference price research. This is the first study to examine price knowledge before, during, and after store visit, thus enabling a study...... of what consumers learn about prices during grocery shopping. Three measures of price knowledge corresponding to different levels of price information processing were applied. Results indicate that price learning does take place and that episodic price knowledge after store exit is far more widespread...... than expected. Consequently, a new view of how consumer price knowledge evolves during grocery shopping is presented....

  14. 17 CFR 41.27 - Prohibition of dual trading in security futures products by floor brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... trading in a security futures product on a designated contract market or registered derivatives...) Registered derivatives transaction execution facilities. Prior to listing a security futures product for... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibition of dual trading in...

  15. Salespersons as internal knowledge brokers and new product selling : uncovering a link to genetic makeup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den W.; Verbeke, W.; Bagozzi, R.; Worm, L.; Jong, de A.; Nijssen, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Managers increasingly realize the importance of involving the sales force in new product development. However, despite recent progress, research on the specific role of the sales force in product innovation-related activities remains scarce. In particular, the importance of a salespersons' internal

  16. ‘Down-Stream’ Network Characteristics, Broker Functions and New Product Development Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Salomo, Søren; Li, Ying

    2011-01-01

    that small entrepreneurial start up company’s supply knowledge to network alliances with well-established and financially strong companies. However, in the later stages of development the main influence of external partnerships is described as financial support and joining distribution efforts, rather than...... of later stage product development tasks. While networks can be characterized by a number of measures like breadth, density, and structural characteristics, more recent developments in network and alliance management need to be specifically accounted for. In particular, it is observed that companies today...... richness to our conceptual model, we further include qualitative case studies supporting grounded theory building. In sum, this paper contributes to the literature by the following: (1) We develop a systematic overview over network characteristics shown to have impact for new product development. (2) We...

  17. Healthy grocery shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... per serving.) Whole-wheat or other whole-grain pasta. Other grains such as millet, quinoa, amaranth, and bulgur. Rolled oats (not instant oatmeal). Limit refined grain or "white flour" products. ...

  18. Consumer Online Grocery Buying Intention

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Torben; Jensen, Jan Møller; Solgaard, Hans Stubbe

    2003-01-01

    This paper tests the ability of two consumer theories - the theory of reasoned action and the theory of planned behavior - in predicting consumer online grocery buying intention. In addition, a comparison of the two theories is conducted. Data were collected from two web-based surveys of Danish (n=1222) and Swedish (n=1038) consumers using self-administered questionnaires. Lisrel results suggest that the theory of planned behavior (with the inclusion of a path from subjective norm to attitude...

  19. FRDS.Broker Library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2018-01-01

    The FRDS.Broker library is a teaching oriented implementation of the Broker architectural pattern for distributed remote method invocation. It defines the central roles of the pattern and provides implementations of those roles that are not domain/use case specific. It provides a JSON based (GSon...... library) Requestor implementation, and implementations of the ClientRequestHandler and ServerRequestHandler roles in both a Java socket based and a Http/URI tunneling based variants. The latter us based upon the UniRest and Spark-Java libraries. The Broker pattern and the source code is explained...

  20. Intelligent Electricity Broker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grode, Jesper Nicolai Riis; Væggemose, Poul Erik; Kulik, Tomas

    The Intelligent Electricity Broker (IEB) is a new energy storage and energy broker facility that serves two purposes. Firstly, it allows for storing excessive energy in the Smart Grid [1, 2, 3] it is connected to. Secondly, it runs a broker-algorithm that ensures that energy is purchased and sold...... when feasible to the system owner. This paper describes how the IEB can be used by house owners, in building clusters, and/or by energy providers to take advantage of electricity stock market prices and weather forecasts to control energy surplus storage suffers as well as to lower electricity bills...

  1. [Occupational risks in grocery stores].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziosi, Francesca; Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Violante, Francesco S

    2014-01-01

    This work provides an overview of the spectrum of possible occupational risk factors in the retail grocery store/supermarket workplace. Literature on this theme, obtained consulting PubMed database and Google Scholar, was checked. We also exjlore results from the National bInstitute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). RESULTs: Contacts with objects, use of dangerous equipment (cutter, food slicer) and falls to the same level (slips, trips and falls) are the mainly described workplace hazards. Exposure to chemical (flour dust, components of detergents or disinfectants, volatile organic compounds and contact with nickel) and physical agents (cold exposure, nonionizing radiation and whole bpdy vibration) are reported by many authors. Relations between biomechanical and ergonomic risk factors and musculoskeletal disorders represent the main subjects of study. Few studies are found about biological agents (particularly among butchers). Data regarding psychosocial risks factors in this setting are still limited. Musculoskeletal disorders continue to be the most recurrent health problem between the grocery store workers (particularly low back pain and carpal tunnel syndrome among cashiers). Many technical documents and international Srecommendations are present to prevent these kinds of disorders. Psychosocial risk factors and risk of workplace violence should deserve further investigation.

  2. Brokers and Competitive Advantage

    OpenAIRE

    Michael D. Ryall; Olav Sorenson

    2007-01-01

    The broker profits by intermediating between two (or more) parties. Using a biform game, we examine whether such a position can confer a competitive advantage, as well as whether any such advantage could persist if actors formed relations strategically. Our analysis reveals that, if one considers exogenous the relations between actors, brokers can enjoy an advantage but only if (1) they do not face substitutes either for the connections they offer or the value they can create, (2) they interm...

  3. 27 CFR 31.63 - Agents, auctioneers, brokers, etc., acting on behalf of others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., brokers, etc., acting on behalf of others. 31.63 Section 31.63 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... Exemptions and Exceptions Persons Who Are Not Dealers in Liquors Or Beer § 31.63 Agents, auctioneers, brokers... auction on behalf of others; (b) Agents or brokers who solicit orders for liquors in the name of a...

  4. UNDERSTANDING THE BARRIERS: GROCERY STORES AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED SHOPPERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Khattab

    2015-11-01

    Grocery stores include many different zones and services with the aisles area being one of the main barriers to access for people with impaired vision.  This area features many different sections such as canned goods, dry packaged goods, spices, drinks and snacks, baking supplies, baby items, cereals, cleaning products, pet supplies, and health and beauty items.  For visually impaired individuals, however, it can be hard to reach these various sections and to find the relevant products.  The purpose of this paper is to present a study that sought to understand the barriers that shoppers with vision impairment (VI face in the grocery store`s built environment. The research approach was based on the application of the ethnography method, Think-aloud Protocol (TAP, Interviews, and behavioural mapping method.

  5. Customer satisfaction with individual shopping trip experiences in grocery retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    , whereas hedonic value reflects the potential entertainment and emotional worth associated with the shopping trip. Recognising this duality, in addition to enabling customers to satisfy utilitarian needs related to product-acquisition, grocery retailers increasingly try to offer customers pleasurable...... shopping experiences, even to entertain them. Because there is evidence suggesting even satisfied customers sometimes switch brands and retailers due to boredom, it is important for retailers to continuously engage consumers and stir interest in a given store. Satisfying customers again and again...

  6. Impact Of The International Grocery Chain On The US Online Grocery Business

    OpenAIRE

    Louis J. Zivic; Timothy P. Shea

    2011-01-01

    The established, United States based brick-and-mortar grocery chains have been slow to enter the online grocery business. This paper, the third in a series, explores whether that is still the case in 2001, how the new pure-play online grocers are doing in the aftermath of the collapse of the technical sector of stocks in early 2001, and the role that internationally-based grocery chains are taking in the US marketplace. Somewhat surprisingly, some internationally-based grocery chains are movi...

  7. Online grocery retailing: What do consumers think?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2005-01-01

    beliefs in predicting internet shopping behavior. Practical implications: The findings could be used to direct attention to consumer beliefs about internet grocery shopping which have the potential of acting as barriers to this line of e-commerce. Originality/value: To shed some light on the role...... Kingdom and three in Denmark, were conducted among consumers with different degrees of experience with internet grocery shopping. This diversification of respondents was chosen to capture a broad range of the consumer beliefs that predict intentions to buy groceries online or not. The TPB framework...... of consumers in an underperforming and understudied branch of internet retailing. Barriers in the consumers' minds to shop for groceries online are identified using an established theoretical framework....

  8. Energy Efficiency in Grocery Distribution in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    Evaluation of the development of the energy efficiency of grocery distribution from 1960 to the present in Denmark, covering both the distribution to the shops and the shopping transport (distribution from shops to individual homes)......Evaluation of the development of the energy efficiency of grocery distribution from 1960 to the present in Denmark, covering both the distribution to the shops and the shopping transport (distribution from shops to individual homes)...

  9. Online grocery retailing: What do consumers think?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To use the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework to explore in depth the range of beliefs held by consumers about internet shopping in general and internet grocery shopping in particular. Design/methodology/approach: Seven focus group interviews, four in the United...... beliefs in predicting internet shopping behavior. Practical implications: The findings could be used to direct attention to consumer beliefs about internet grocery shopping which have the potential of acting as barriers to this line of e-commerce. Originality/value: To shed some light on the role...

  10. Comet: Multifunction VOEvent broker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinbank, John

    2014-04-01

    Comet is a Python implementation of the VOEvent Transport Protocol (VTP). VOEvent is the IVOA system for describing transient celestial events. Details of transients detected by many projects, including Fermi, Swift, and the Catalina Sky Survey, are currently made available as VOEvents, which is also the standard alert format by future facilities such as LSST and SKA. The core of Comet is a multifunction VOEvent broker, capable of receiving events either by subscribing to one or more remote brokers or by direct connection from authors; it can then both process those events locally and forward them to its own subscribers. In addition, Comet provides a tool for publishing VOEvents to the global VOEvent backbone.

  11. Forecast Collaboration in Grocery Supply Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aastrup, Jesper; Gammelgaard, Britta

    -requisites, degree of forecast collaboration, demand related contingency factors and outcomes/KPIs based. The hypotheses are tested in a survey among Danish grocery suppliers. The survey findings provide evidence of a positive effect of collaborative orientation and retailer competencies and trustworthiness...

  12. Food category purchases vary by household education and race/ethnicity: results from grocery receipts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Karen; Baranowski, Tom; Watson, Kathy; Nicklas, Theresa; Fisher, Jennifer; O'Donnell, Sharon; Baranowski, Janice; Islam, Noemi; Missaghian, Mariam

    2007-10-01

    To characterize food group purchases from grocery receipts. Food shoppers (aged>or=19 years with at least one child agedfood purchaser) were recruited in front of grocery stores to participate in two interviews, separated by 6 weeks, and to save and mail grocery store receipts from the interim to researchers. Receipt items were coded by food categories; the percentage of total grocery dollars spent in each of the food categories each week was computed. Analyses of variance were performed on the total grocery dollar spent and the percentage spent in each food category by participant characteristics. The greatest percentage of purchases were for protein foods (24%), followed by drinks (12%), grains (9.2%), vegetables (8.8%), dairy (8.3%), mixed dishes (7.5%), and fruit (7%). Hispanics purchased a greater percentage of fruit and vegetables than African Americans. Whites purchased more alcohol products than African Americans. Whites purchased more mixed dishes than Hispanics, and African Americans purchased more protein foods than whites (all P<0.001). The use of this measurement procedure, unaffected by errors of self-report, should be more thoroughly explored to explain differences in disease prevalence.

  13. Proposals for enhancing tactical planning in grocery retailing with S&OP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Heidi Carin; Kiil, Kasper; Dukovska-Popovska, Iskra

    2018-01-01

    Purpose-The purpose of this paper is to explore tactical planning in grocery retailing and propose how process and integration mechanisms from sales and operations planning (S&OP) can enhance retail tactical planning.Design/methodology/approach-This work follows an explorative design with case...... studies from the grocery retailing industry in Finland, Norway, and the UK.Findings-The tactical planning process focuses on demand management and securing product availability from suppliers in order to reach sales targets. Less attention is directed toward balancing supply and demand or toward providing...... a single plan to guide company operations. Planning appeared to be functionally oriented with limited coordination between functional plans, but it did include external integration that improved forecast accuracy.Research limitations/implications-The study involves grocery retailer cases with variable...

  14. A study of the potential of grocery shopping on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne

    for online grocery shopping. It builds the model on 2 components, intention formation (which is basically the TPB) and a learning component. 614 respondents in Denmark participated in the study. The results show that Perceived Behavioral Control has little influence on the intention to buy grocery products......Internet shopping is a rapid growing form of shopping. A variety of studies have tried to profile shoppers on the Internet, but little effort has been done to provide a theoretical foundation for the research. This paper uses the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to investigate the potential...

  15. German Grocery Discounters: Dynamics and Regional Impact. the Case of Schleswig-Holstein (Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgens Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Grocery discount stores have long dominated developments in the German food retail sector, and they continue to grow. This paper discusses the reasons for this long-term success based on internal decision-making parameters such as price, adjustment of product range, choice of location, and size of new stores. The result is significant customer acceptance, but also adverse developments viewed critically in various governance constellations. The paper is based on expert interviews and a comprehensive collection of data on grocery discount stores and supermarkets in the German federal state of Schleswig-Holstein

  16. A study of the potential of grocery shopping on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Grunert, Klaus G.

    Internet shopping is a rapid growing form of shopping. A variety of studies have tried to profile shoppers on the Internet, but little effort has been done to provide a theoretical foundation for the research. This paper uses the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to investigate the potential...... for online grocery shopping. It builds the model on 2 components, intention formation (which is basically the TPB) and a learning component. 614 respondents in Denmark participated in the study. The results show that Perceived Behavioral Control has little influence on the intention to buy grocery products...

  17. The Prevalence of Phosphorus Containing Food Additives in Top Selling Foods in Grocery Stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Janeen B.; Sullivan, Catherine M.; Sehgal, Ashwini R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of phosphorus-containing food additives in best selling processed grocery products and to compare the phosphorus content of a subset of top selling foods with and without phosphorus additives. Design The labels of 2394 best selling branded grocery products in northeast Ohio were reviewed for phosphorus additives. The top 5 best selling products containing phosphorus additives from each food category were matched with similar products without phosphorus additives and analyzed for phosphorus content. Four days of sample meals consisting of foods with and without phosphorus additives were created and daily phosphorus and pricing differentials were computed. Setting Northeast Ohio Main outcome measures Presence of phosphorus-containing food additives, phosphorus content Results 44% of the best selling grocery items contained phosphorus additives. The additives were particularly common in prepared frozen foods (72%), dry food mixes (70%), packaged meat (65%), bread & baked goods (57%), soup (54%), and yogurt (51%) categories. Phosphorus additive containing foods averaged 67 mg phosphorus/100 gm more than matched non-additive containing foods (p=.03). Sample meals comprised mostly of phosphorus additive-containing foods had 736 mg more phosphorus per day compared to meals consisting of only additive-free foods. Phosphorus additive-free meals cost an average of $2.00 more per day. Conclusion Phosphorus additives are common in best selling processed groceries and contribute significantly to their phosphorus content. Moreover, phosphorus additive foods are less costly than phosphorus additive-free foods. As a result, persons with chronic kidney disease may purchase these popular low-cost groceries and unknowingly increase their intake of highly bioavailable phosphorus. PMID:23402914

  18. The prevalence of phosphorus-containing food additives in top-selling foods in grocery stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Janeen B; Sullivan, Catherine M; Sehgal, Ashwini R

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of phosphorus-containing food additives in best-selling processed grocery products and to compare the phosphorus content of a subset of top-selling foods with and without phosphorus additives. The labels of 2394 best-selling branded grocery products in northeast Ohio were reviewed for phosphorus additives. The top 5 best-selling products containing phosphorus additives from each food category were matched with similar products without phosphorus additives and analyzed for phosphorus content. Four days of sample meals consisting of foods with and without phosphorus additives were created, and daily phosphorus and pricing differentials were computed. Presence of phosphorus-containing food additives, phosphorus content. Forty-four percent of the best-selling grocery items contained phosphorus additives. The additives were particularly common in prepared frozen foods (72%), dry food mixes (70%), packaged meat (65%), bread and baked goods (57%), soup (54%), and yogurt (51%) categories. Phosphorus additive-containing foods averaged 67 mg phosphorus/100 g more than matched nonadditive-containing foods (P = .03). Sample meals comprised mostly of phosphorus additive-containing foods had 736 mg more phosphorus per day compared with meals consisting of only additive-free foods. Phosphorus additive-free meals cost an average of $2.00 more per day. Phosphorus additives are common in best-selling processed groceries and contribute significantly to their phosphorus content. Moreover, phosphorus additive foods are less costly than phosphorus additive-free foods. As a result, persons with chronic kidney disease may purchase these popular low-cost groceries and unknowingly increase their intake of highly bioavailable phosphorus. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Supply chain risk management processes for resilience: A study of South African grocery manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Simba

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The supply chain risk management (SCRM process is aimed at the implementation of strategies that assist in managing both daily and exceptional risks facing the supply chain through continuous risk assessment to reduce vulnerability and ensure continuity. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine whether the SCRM process enables supply chain resilience among grocery manufacturers in South Africa. The fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG-manufacturing industry faces increased risk because of the nature of their products being perishable with a limited shelf life. Method: This study was conducted using a descriptive qualitative research design. Data were collected by means of 12 semi-structured interviews with senior supply chain practitioners within the South African grocery manufacturing industry. Findings: The study found that most firms informally implement SCRM processes of risk identification, assessment, mitigation and monitoring to mitigate disruptions. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the SCRM processes facilitate resilience among grocery manufacturers in South Africa. Conclusion: The managerial implications show that supply chain managers of grocery manufacturers should formalise the SCRM process and develop risk assessment scales to better prioritise risks in order to run a resilient supply chain. The research contributes to the supply chain management field by adding to the scarce literature relating to SCRM as an enabler of supply chain resilience in a South African context.

  20. 7 CFR 1955.129 - Business brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Business brokers. 1955.129 Section 1955.129 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... Dispose of Inventory Property § 1955.129 Business brokers. The services of business brokers or business...

  1. Data brokers facing the new GDPR

    OpenAIRE

    Bui, Jade Ngoc Bich

    2017-01-01

    A legal analysis of the material effects of the GDPR on the Processing of personal data by data brokers for online marketing purposes. This thesis tackles the questions of how the GDPR's rules on extended applicability on data brokers outside the EU, the lawfulness criteria, and the rights of data subjects will impact data brokers' operations.

  2. 31 CFR 10.8 - Customhouse brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Customhouse brokers. 10.8 Section 10... REVENUE SERVICE Rules Governing Authority to Practice § 10.8 Customhouse brokers. Nothing contained in the regulations in this part will affect or limit the right of a customhouse broker, licensed as such by the...

  3. State sales tax rates for soft drinks and snacks sold through grocery stores and vending machines, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriqui, Jamie F; Eidson, Shelby S; Bates, Hannalori; Kowalczyk, Shelly; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2008-07-01

    Junk food consumption is associated with rising obesity rates in the United States. While a "junk food" specific tax is a potential public health intervention, a majority of states already impose sales taxes on certain junk food and soft drinks. This study reviews the state sales tax variance for soft drinks and selected snack products sold through grocery stores and vending machines as of January 2007. Sales taxes vary by state, intended retail location (grocery store vs. vending machine), and product. Vended snacks and soft drinks are taxed at a higher rate than grocery items and other food products, generally, indicative of a "disfavored" tax status attributed to vended items. Soft drinks, candy, and gum are taxed at higher rates than are other items examined. Similar tax schemes in other countries and the potential implications of these findings relative to the relationship between price and consumption are discussed.

  4. Network brokers in the periphery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Birgit; Gretzinger, Susanne; Ingstrup, Mads Bruun

    in a way that both enterprise development and regional competitiveness in rural-peripheral regions are supported. Based on a case study of four network brokers from peripheral regions in Germany, we shed light on the activities of brokers with regard to networking among local businesses and the effects...... on knowledge sharing. The paper will also critically discuss governance implications of network brokers in the periphery, which are associated with the (lack of) integration of such actors with established local and regional governance infrastructures.......Research on rural-peripheral regions stresses that such environments face multiple challenges in a globalised world, which, from a policy perspective, should be addressed to enhance regional competitiveness. These challenges are typically associated with a prevalence of small and medium...

  5. Brokering leadership in complex environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Miller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study, set in the United States, presents an in-depth analysis of leadership in schools and community-based organizations that helped connect students and families to vital education resources. Data were collected from 132 interviews with those who experienced the social and organizational complexities of homelessness. The findings suggest that brokering leadership supports learning, symbolism, identity development, and responsibility. The study indicates that brokering leadership has promise for cultivating opportunities for those who are traditionally disconnected from important resources and relationships.

  6. The brand architecture of grocery retailers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Esbjerg, Lars

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how the brand architecture of grocery retailers set material and symbolic boundaries for consumer choice, thus limiting consumer sovereignty. The article first discusses previous work on store atmospherics, servicescapes and brand architecture. It is argued that work based...... on these concepts has taken an internal management perspective on how retailers can manipulate aspects of the retail setting to serve their own interests. Then, we develop an alternative conceptualisation of retailer brand architecture that takes into account that consumers (and other constituents) are active co......- constructors of material and symbolic aspects of retail settings. It is discussed how consumers participate in constructing retailer brand architecture and how this concept differs from previous research. Implications for both research and practice are discussed....

  7. Designing pharmacy services based on grocery store patron preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Nicolette S Raya; Casper, Kristin A; Green, Tara R; Pedersen, Craig A

    2007-01-01

    To assess preferences of grocery store patrons concerning pharmacy services and identify study participant characteristics that may predict the success of pharmacy services in the community setting. Self-administered survey. Central Ohio from December 16, 2005, to January 12, 2006. 163 grocery store patrons. Eight grocery store survey events. Responses to survey items about (1) perceived importance of 28 pharmacy services, (2) identification of the 3 most important services, (3) frequency of grocery store and pharmacy use, (4) preferred methods of advertising pharmacy services, and (5) socioeconomic demographics. Preferred services delineated by various demographics also were analyzed. A total of 163 surveys were returned from study participants. Nine services appeared in both the top 12 overall preferred services and the 12 highest-ranked services. Statistically significant differences were observed among services ranked as important or very important by age, race, employment, income, caregiver status, and prescription drug coverage status. The three advertising tools selected most frequently included: weekly grocery store ads (68.6%), in-store signs (51.0%), and flyers attached to prescription bags (36.0%). Grocery store patrons would like a wide range of nontraditional pharmacy services that could be implemented into community pharmacies. Pharmacies in grocery stores need to provide both traditional and expanded pharmacy services to meet the desires and expectations of current and potential patients, and expanded marketing methods should be considered.

  8. Cultural influences for college student language brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskirch, Robert S; Kim, Su Yeong; Zamboanga, Byron L; Schwartz, Seth J; Bersamin, Melina; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Children from immigrant families often translate communication for parents, a process known as language brokering (LB). LB begins in childhood, but may continue through emerging adulthood, even when individuals are in college. We surveyed 1,222 university students with two immigrant parents and compared non-language brokers, infrequent language brokers, and frequent language brokers on a variety of ethnic, cultural, and identity measures. Significant differences emerged for cultural heritage value orientation, ethnic identity, and dimensions of acculturation with frequent language brokers scoring highest, infrequent language brokers scoring in the middle, and non-language brokers scoring the lowest on these measures. There were no significant differences on acculturative stress among these three groups. These results suggest that LB experiences may contribute to the development of psychological assets for ethnic minority, emerging adults from immigrant families.

  9. e-Learning Resource Brokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retalis, Symeon; Papasalouros, Andreas; Avgeriou, Paris; Siassiakos, Kostas

    2004-01-01

    There is an exponentially increasing demand for provisioning of high-quality learning resources, which is not satisfied by current web technologies and systems. E-Learning Resource Brokers are a potential solution to this problem, as they represent the state-of-the-art in facilitating the exchange

  10. Not All Brokers Are Alike

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stea, Diego; Pedersen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    of brokerage, which raises important questions about when and how brokering between otherwise disconnected colleagues leads to individual creativity. We advance the relational perspective on individual creativity by adopting a contingency view, and showing that a curvilinear (inverted U-shape) specification...

  11. 78 FR 41299 - Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 19 CFR Part 111 Customs Brokers CFR Correction In Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 0 to 140, revised as of April 1, 2013, on page 684, in Sec. 111.13, in paragraph (b), reinstate the second...

  12. The Grocery Sector from the 1960s to the Present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1996-01-01

    , the paper serves as a case study of the introduction of the motor vehicle in Denmark. Both the supply of goods to the retail outlets (the wholesale side) and the shopping transport are covered. The period covered has seen both a profound restructuring of the grocery sector structure (incl. a reduction...... of the retail shops by some 60%) and a complete change in shopping patterns. The transport demand for grocery shopping has grown 3.8 times, while freight transport of groceries has tripled. Fuel consumption and CO2-emissions are about 2.5 times higher today compared to 1960, whereas NOx-emissions are 3.6 times...

  13. In search of loyalty: private label packaging solutions for the retail grocery industry

    OpenAIRE

    Bullen, Christine Angela Holly

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. corrugated packaging industry is highly concentrated, competitive and mature, facing only modest growth in the United States. The objective of this paper is to understand the opportunity that private label grocery products present to the corrugated packaging industry and how Weyerhaeuser Company might increase demand of corrugated boxes. Industry analyses of both the U.S. retail and corrugated packaging industry are provided in conjunction with summaries of major firms in the respect...

  14. Energy and Environmental Effects of Grocery Distribution: Transportation Means Catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1996-01-01

    The report serves as a background report for the project "Energy and Environmental Effects of Grocery Distribution". It contains a systematic overview of physical characteristics of the typical technologies, including energy and environmental effects....

  15. Grocery e-commerce in the UK and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Niels; Bjerre, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose a framework for the analysis of market creation and apply this to the grocery e-commerce business. The article develops a model of four forces that interplay when companies engage in the process of creating new markets. The applicability of the model...... is exemplified by examining the interaction of the forces having created grocery e-commerce markets in the UK and Denmark. The application of the model reveals that besides the usual identification of competition intensity, the persistency of market reach efforts of a focal firm and the value attraction of its...... offerings play a significant role in the creation of grocery e-commerce markets. The practical implications are that retailers should not just transfer a grocery e-commerce set-up from one national market to another without considering the mentioned four forces in their own national markets....

  16. Opportunity and Implications of Grocery E-Commerce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangkilde, Mads

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To incorporate the element of sustainability of advantages into the concept ofFirst-Mover Advantage for analysis on grocery e-commerce. Grocery e-commerce is a relatively unexplored phenomenon in Denmark and I seek to explain this via the concept of FMA. In order to fully understand...... and coupled with previous empirical findings on grocery e-commerce. Findings: a) Providing insights into the concept of first- mover advantage, b) sustainability of advantages and c) providing a framework for analysis on advantages sought by acting entrepreneurial. Value: The applicability of the concept...... of first-mover advantage is very descriptive to date. With thispaper and hopefully more to follow, I wish to transform the FMA concepts into a tool for analysis addressing the very crucial element that is not dealt with today -sustainability.Keywords : First-Mover Advantage; e-commerce; grocery industry...

  17. Incorporating Brokers within Collaboration Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R.; de Torcy, A.

    2013-12-01

    A collaboration environment, such as the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (iRODS - http://irods.diceresearch.org), provides interoperability mechanisms for accessing storage systems, authentication systems, messaging systems, information catalogs, networks, and policy engines from a wide variety of clients. The interoperability mechanisms function as brokers, translating actions requested by clients to the protocol required by a specific technology. The iRODS data grid is used to enable collaborative research within hydrology, seismology, earth science, climate, oceanography, plant biology, astronomy, physics, and genomics disciplines. Although each domain has unique resources, data formats, semantics, and protocols, the iRODS system provides a generic framework that is capable of managing collaborative research initiatives that span multiple disciplines. Each interoperability mechanism (broker) is linked to a name space that enables unified access across the heterogeneous systems. The collaboration environment provides not only support for brokers, but also support for virtualization of name spaces for users, files, collections, storage systems, metadata, and policies. The broker enables access to data or information in a remote system using the appropriate protocol, while the collaboration environment provides a uniform naming convention for accessing and manipulating each object. Within the NSF DataNet Federation Consortium project (http://www.datafed.org), three basic types of interoperability mechanisms have been identified and applied: 1) drivers for managing manipulation at the remote resource (such as data subsetting), 2) micro-services that execute the protocol required by the remote resource, and 3) policies for controlling the execution. For example, drivers have been written for manipulating NetCDF and HDF formatted files within THREDDS servers. Micro-services have been written that manage interactions with the CUAHSI data repository, the Data

  18. Analyzing the Efficient Execution of In-Store Logistics Processes in Grocery Retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiner, Gerald; Teller, Christop; Kotzab, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we examine in-store logistics processes for handling dairy products, from the incoming dock to the shelves of supermarkets and hypermarkets. The efficient execution of the in-store logistics related to such fast-moving, sensitive, and essential items is challenging and crucial...... for grocery retailers' sales, profits, and image. In our empirical study, we survey in-store logistics processes in 202 grocery supermarkets and hypermarkets belonging to a major retail chain in central Europe. Using a data envelopment analysis (DEA) and simulation, we facilitate process benchmarking....... In particular, we identify ways of improving in-store logistics processes by showing the performance impacts of different managerial strategies and tactics. The DEA results indicate different efficiency levels for different store formats; the hybrid store format of the small hypermarket exhibits a comparatively...

  19. The use of reverse logistics for waste management in a Brazilian grocery retailer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Karina T S; Braga Junior, Sergio S

    2016-01-01

    Retail growth is a result of the diversification of departments with the intention to look to consumer's needs and level of demand. Pressed by consumers and by the law, the adoption of environmental preservation practices is becoming stronger among grocery retailers. The objective of this research was to analyse the practices of reverse logistics performed by a retailer and measure the amount of waste generated by each department. To reach the proposed goal, a field research study was conducted to directly observe a grocery retailer in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, for a period of 6 months and monitor the amounts of cardboard and plastic discarded by each department. Using the Wuppertal method, the first result observed was that the retailer stopped its monthly production of approximately 20 tonne of biotic and abiotic material, which influence global warming and degradation of the ozone layer. Another result observed with the implementation of reverse logistics, was that the general grocery department mostly used cardboard and plastic. This sector includes products such as food cupboard, drinks, household, health and beauty, and pet articles. The fresh fruit and vegetable department and the meat, chicken and frozen department were increasingly using less plastic and cardboard packaging, increasing the use of returnable and durable packaging and thus promoting sustainability. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Assessing Reliability and Validity of the "GroPromo" Audit Tool for Evaluation of Grocery Store Marketing and Promotional Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Sallis, James F.; Bromby, Erica; Glanz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate reliability and validity of a new tool for assessing the placement and promotional environment in grocery stores. Methods: Trained observers used the "GroPromo" instrument in 40 stores to code the placement of 7 products in 9 locations within a store, along with other promotional characteristics. To test construct validity,…

  1. Microbial brokers of insect-plant interactions revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Angela E

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in sequencing methods have transformed the field of microbial ecology, making it possible to determine the composition and functional capabilities of uncultured microorganisms. These technologies have been instrumental in the recognition that resident microorganisms can have profound effects on the phenotype and fitness of their animal hosts by modulating the animal signaling networks that regulate growth, development, behavior, etc. Against this backdrop, this review assesses the impact of microorganisms on insect-plant interactions, in the context of the hypothesis that microorganisms are biochemical brokers of plant utilization by insects. There is now overwhelming evidence for a microbial role in insect utilization of certain plant diets with an extremely low or unbalanced nutrient content. Specifically, microorganisms enable insect utilization of plant sap by synthesizing essential amino acids. They also can broker insect utilization of plant products of extremely high lignocellulose content, by enzymatic breakdown of complex plant polysaccharides, nitrogen fixation, and sterol synthesis. However, the experimental evidence for microbial-mediated detoxification of plant allelochemicals is limited. The significance of microorganisms as brokers of plant utilization by insects is predicted to vary, possibly widely, as a result of potentially complex interactions between the composition of the microbiota and the diet and insect developmental age or genotype. For every insect species feeding on plant material, the role of resident microbiota as biochemical brokers of plant utilization is a testable hypothesis.

  2. 76 FR 37571 - Broker-Dealer Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... ``review'' and appropriate tests of the broker-dealer's accounting system, internal accounting control and... further states that the scope of the audit and review of the accounting system, internal accounting... Accounting Oversight Board (the ``PCAOB'') to implement oversight of independent public accountants of broker...

  3. 7 CFR 926.14 - Broker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DATA COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.14 Broker. Broker...

  4. Effectiveness of brokering within account management organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, D.J.; Stokman, F.N.; Franses, P.H.B.F.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model that integrates the contradicting Burtian and Krackhardtian broker theories to explain effectiveness of brokering for individuals within account management organizations. Using data on a network of 55 individuals in a financial account management organization, we test how

  5. Strengthening regional innovation through network-based innovation brokering

    OpenAIRE

    Svare, Helge; Gausdal, Anne Haugen

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate how regional innovation system theory may be translated into manageable micro-level methods with the potential for strengthening the productive dynamics of a regional innovation system. The paper meets this objective by presenting network-based innovation brokering (NBIB), a practical method designed using insights from regional innovation system theory and trust theory. Five cases from two Norwegian regional innovation networks show that ...

  6. 17 CFR 240.16c-1 - Brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Brokers. 240.16c-1 Section 240... Act of 1934 Exemption of Certain Transactions from Section 16(c) § 240.16c-1 Brokers. Any transaction... a broker of an order for an account in which the broker has no direct or indirect interest. ...

  7. 49 CFR 371.10 - Duties and obligations of brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duties and obligations of brokers. 371.10 Section... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS BROKERS OF PROPERTY § 371.10 Duties and obligations of brokers. Where the broker acts on behalf of a person bound by...

  8. SAFETY OF LIFE ACTIVITY AND ECOLOGICAL COMPATIBILITY IN THE GROCERY DEPARTMENT OF A BEET-SUGAR FACTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ageev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Beet-sugar factory - is a large, well-equipped with modern technology, the company that operates in a continuous circuit. In the technological structure of a sugar factory there are three production divisions: beet processing department, juice purification house and grocery department. In the grocery department of a sugar factory dangerous and harmful factors may encounter while using equipment such as vacuum devices, centrifuges, and crystallizer tank, massecuite distributor, driers and classifiers sugar. The working area of the service of machinery may appear dangerous or harmful factors, which are divided into the following groups: physical, chemical, biological and physiological. To maintain microclimate parameters can be applied general ventilation, in which the replacement of the warm air to the cold going around the room volume. Heating in the grocery department in the production season is not carried out, since it is sufficient to heat generated by the equipment. In the grocery department uses natural and artificial lighting. In the sugar factory used the following measures to protect against vibration: perform detailed assembly, eliminate defects and looseness of individual parts; way to isolate the transmission of vibrations from the machine to the foundation apply vibration isolators. Widespread use of electrical installations in a sugar factory creates the risk of electric shock to persons. Causes of electrical shocks are often disadvantages of construction and installation of the equipment, its operation is wrong. During drying and transportation of sugar produced by static electricity. To remove the static electricity equipment grounded; also used the increase in humidity; air ionization. To reduce the consumption of fresh industrial water from reservoirs provides for the establishment of the system of working circuits cleaning and maximum reuse of industrial water. Thus, safety and environmental compliance in the grocery

  9. Retail grocery store marketing strategies and obesity: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanz, Karen; Bader, Michael D M; Iyer, Shally

    2012-05-01

    In-store food marketing can influence food-purchasing behaviors and warrants increased attention given the dramatic rise in obesity. Descriptive and experimental studies of key marketing components have been conducted by consumer scientists, marketing researchers, and public health experts. This review synthesizes research and publications from industry and academic sources and provides direction for developing and evaluating promising interventions. Literature sources for the review were English-language articles published from 1995 to 2010, identified from multidisciplinary search indexes, backward searches of cited articles, review articles, industry reports, and online sources. Only articles that focused on physical grocery stores and food products were included. Data collection occurred in 2010 and 2011. Articles were classified in the categories of product, price, placement, and promotion and divided into controlled laboratory experiments, observation, and field experiments; 125 primary peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria. Narrative synthesis methods were used. Key findings were synthesized by category of focus and study design. Evidence synthesis was completed in 2011. Findings suggest several strategies for in-store marketing to promote healthful eating by increasing availability, affordability, prominence, and promotion of healthful foods and/or restricting or de-marketing unhealthy foods. Key results of research in controlled laboratory studies should be adapted and tested in real-world in-store settings. Industry methods for assessing consumer behavior, such as electronic sales data and individually linked sales information from loyalty card holders, can help public health researchers increase the scientific rigor of field studies. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development and outlook of online grocery retail in the Czech Republic and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Biznár, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to provide a comprehensive understanding of successful strategies in retail trade, overview of the Czech online grocery retail market and provide recommendations how to succeed in this market. This diploma thesis is intended to help established big grocery retailers, start-ups venturing into the online grocery retail and prospective investors into such start-ups understand the Czech online grocery market. First, we provide a summary of the major developments in the h...

  11. Nurses as Antibiotic Brokers: Institutionalized Praxis in the Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Alex; Broom, Jennifer; Kirby, Emma; Scambler, Graham

    2017-11-01

    We are likely moving rapidly toward a post-antibiotic era, as a result of escalating antimicrobial resistance, rapidly declining antibiotic production and profligate overuse. Hitherto research has almost exclusively focused on doctors' prescribing, with nurses' roles in antibiotic use remaining virtually invisible. Drawing on interviews with 30 nurses, we focus on nurses as brokers of doctors' antibiotic decisions, nursing capacity to challenge doctors' decisions, and, "back stage" strategies for circumnavigating organizational constraints. We argue that nurses occupy an essential and conscious position as brokers within the hospital; a subject position that is not neutral, facilitates (short-term) cohesion, and involves the pursuit of particular (preferred) nursing outcomes. Illustrating how authority can be diffuse, mediated by institutionalized praxis, and how professionals evade attempts to govern their practice, we challenge the reification of physician prescribing power, arguing that it may work against the utilization of nurses as important stakeholders in the future of antibiotics.

  12. Prevalence of phosphorus containing food additives in grocery stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeen B. Leon

    2012-06-01

    In conclusion, phosphorus additives are commonly present in groceries and contribute significantly to the phosphorus content of foods. Moreover, phosphorus additive foods are less costly than additive-free foods. As a result, phosphorus additives may be an important contributor to hyperphosphatemia among persons with chronic kidney disease

  13. Effective Factors in Environmental Health Status of Grocery Stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Asadi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims of the Study: This study was carried out to determine the effective factors in environmental health status of grocery stores in the city of Qom (located in the center of Iran. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 283 grocery stores from 3 different regions were selected randomly using stratified sampling. Data were gathered through observation, interview, and questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of two sections: section 1 dealt with some shop managers’ features including the age, educational level, job satisfaction, passing “food and occupational hygiene training courses”, store ownership, duration of employment, and features of stores including their location (Region and environmental health condition. And section 2 dealt with the important aspects of regulations of Article 13. The data analyzed using statistical procedures such as Spearman Rank Correlation and Multivariate Regression Analysis. P-values less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results: Among the investigated factors, the manager’s educational level had a greater impact on the environmental health conditions of grocery stores. The ownership status of grocery stores, Job satisfaction and passing “food and occupational hygiene training courses” were next in the ranking, respectively (p <0.001 for all measures, except for shop ownership, for which p-value was <0.02. Conclusions: Planning and implementation of effective operational and strategic programs addressing the above mentioned issues seems to be necessary. Such programs will improve the health status of the stores over time.

  14. Gains and losses of exclusivity in grocery retailing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielens, K.J.P.; Gijsbrechts, E.; Dekimpe, M.G.

    Conventional wisdom dictates that convenience goods should be distributed as intensively as possible. Still, exclusivity arrangements are rapidly gaining way in grocery retailing. We discuss the possible performance outcomes of exclusivity deals, and propose a unified framework (i) to quantify the

  15. What information do consumers consider, and how do they look for it, when shopping for groceries online?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Yael; Webb, Thomas L; Chang, Betty P I; Reidy, John

    2015-06-01

    Previous research investigating what information shoppers seek when purchasing groceries has used either lab-experiments or observed shoppers in supermarkets. The present research investigates this question in a relatively naturalistic online-grocery environment. Forty participants completed their weekly shopping online while their eye-movements were recorded. Ten of the participants were subsequently interviewed to gain insight into their information seeking behaviour. We found that, when looking for products, 95% of participants navigated through the 'virtual departments', 80% used the 'search' facility, and 68% browsed the special offer pages. Once on the product pages, participants tended to look at the pictures of products, rather than examine detailed product information. To explain these findings, we suggest that online grocery sites simulate familiar supermarket environments, which may explain why consumers prefer to browse categories of products rather than use search terms. We also suggest that additional strategies are needed if consumers are to be encouraged to view detailed product information. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. What information do consumers consider, and how do they look for it, when shopping for groceries online?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Yael; Webb, Thomas L.; Chang, Betty P.I.; Reidy, John

    2015-01-01

    Previous research investigating what information shoppers seek when purchasing groceries has used either lab-experiments or observed shoppers in supermarkets. The present research investigates this question in a relatively naturalistic online-grocery environment. Forty participants completed their weekly shopping online while their eye-movements were recorded. Ten of the participants were subsequently interviewed to gain insight into their information seeking behaviour. We found that, when looking for products, 95% of participants navigated through the ‘virtual departments’, 80% used the ‘search’ facility, and 68% browsed the special offer pages. Once on the product pages, participants tended to look at the pictures of products, rather than examine detailed product information. To explain these findings, we suggest that online grocery sites simulate familiar supermarket environments, which may explain why consumers prefer to browse categories of products rather than use search terms. We also suggest that additional strategies are needed if consumers are to be encouraged to view detailed product information. PMID:25660339

  17. Piloting an online grocery store simulation to assess children's food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Amy M; Harris, Jennifer L; Liu, Sai; Schwartz, Marlene B; Li, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Public health interventions must address poor diet among U.S. children, but research is needed to better understand factors influencing children's food choices. Using an online grocery store simulation, this research piloted a novel method to assess children's snack selection in a controlled but naturalistic laboratory setting, evaluate predictors of choice, and experimentally test whether promotions on food packages altered choices. Children (7-12 years, N = 61) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: promotions on healthy products; promotions on unhealthy products; and no promotions (control). They selected from a variety of healthy and unhealthy foods and beverages and rated all products on healthfulness and taste. Promotions on food packaging did not affect snack selection in this study, but findings supported our other hypothesis that perceived taste would be the strongest predictor of food choice. Children accurately rated product healthfulness, but these ratings did not predict healthy snack choices or taste ratings for healthy or unhealthy snacks. These results suggest that interventions to improve children's food choices should focus on increasing availability of healthy options and identifying opportunities to enhance children's liking of healthy options. However, nutrition education alone is unlikely to improve children's diets. Further testing is required, but the simulated online grocery store method shows potential for measuring children's food choices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gazetteer Brokering through Semantic Mediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobona, G.; Bermudez, L. E.; Brackin, R.

    2013-12-01

    A gazetteer is a geographical directory containing some information regarding places. It provides names, location and other attributes for places which may include points of interest (e.g. buildings, oilfields and boreholes), and other features. These features can be published via web services conforming to the Gazetteer Application Profile of the Web Feature Service (WFS) standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). Against the backdrop of advances in geophysical surveys, there has been a significant increase in the amount of data referenced to locations. Gazetteers services have played a significant role in facilitating access to such data, including through provision of specialized queries such as text, spatial and fuzzy search. Recent developments in the OGC have led to advances in gazetteers such as support for multilingualism, diacritics, and querying via advanced spatial constraints (e.g. search by radial search and nearest neighbor). A challenge remaining however, is that gazetteers produced by different organizations have typically been modeled differently. Inconsistencies from gazetteers produced by different organizations may include naming the same feature in a different way, naming the attributes differently, locating the feature in a different location, and providing fewer or more attributes than the other services. The Gazetteer application profile of the WFS is a starting point to address such inconsistencies by providing a standardized interface based on rules specified in ISO 19112, the international standard for spatial referencing by geographic identifiers. The profile, however, does not provide rules to deal with semantic inconsistencies. The USGS and NGA commissioned research into the potential for a Single Point of Entry Global Gazetteer (SPEGG). The research was conducted by the Cross Community Interoperability thread of the OGC testbed, referenced OWS-9. The testbed prototyped approaches for brokering gazetteers through use of semantic

  19. [Organization and technology in the grocery store sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambetti, Edy

    2014-01-01

    In Italy, grocery stores develop an annual turnover of 92 billion of , (data referred to 2013) and have 28.232 stores spread over a commercial area of 17.224.000 m2. The business involved are 252, linked with 30 important distribution leader companies. The total workforce is about 280.000 people. The grocery stores structure is composed by suppliers and producers warehouses and different kinds of stores (hypermarkets, supermarkets, shops and discounts). In the stores, the technological progress concerns fundamentally back-office operations; the improvement of information and computer science is the main renewal source. Other tasks as receiving goods and stocking shelves are still executed without specific inovations. In terms of organization, we observed a strong increase of part-time workers, the development of atypical contract and thie inclination to contract the easiest jobs (for example, stocking shelves). Also the warehouses often use to sub-contract the picking tasks. The increase of on-line shopping, also concerning the groceries, represents the most relevant evolution in tire near future.

  20. BCube: Building a Geoscience Brokering Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodha Khalsa, Siri; Nativi, Stefano; Duerr, Ruth; Pearlman, Jay

    2014-05-01

    BCube is addressing the need for effective and efficient multi-disciplinary collaboration and interoperability through the advancement of brokering technologies. As a prototype "building block" for NSF's EarthCube cyberinfrastructure initiative, BCube is demonstrating how a broker can serve as an intermediary between information systems that implement well-defined interfaces, thereby providing a bridge between communities that employ different specifications. Building on the GEOSS Discover and Access Broker (DAB), BCube will develop new modules and services including: • Expanded semantic brokering capabilities • Business Model support for work flows • Automated metadata generation • Automated linking to services discovered via web crawling • Credential passing for seamless access to data • Ranking of search results from brokered catalogs Because facilitating cross-discipline research involves cultural and well as technical challenges, BCube is also addressing the sociological and educational components of infrastructure development. We are working, initially, with four geoscience disciplines: hydrology, oceans, polar and weather, with an emphasis on connecting existing domain infrastructure elements to facilitate cross-domain communications.

  1. Effect of a grocery store intervention on sales of nutritious foods to youth and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Ashley S; Estabrooks, Paul A; Davis, George C; Serrano, Elena L

    2012-06-01

    Grocery stores represent a unique opportunity to initiate nutrition interventions. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a 12-week, child-focused intervention at one grocery store. An observational uninterrupted time-series design was implemented from May to September 2009. The Healthy Kids campaign consisted of a point-of-purchase kiosk featuring fruits, vegetables, and healthy snacks as well as a sampling pod comprised of food items from the kiosk. Data collection included changes in sales for featured products; observations of customers at the kiosk/intervention; and brief questionnaires for customers who engaged with the kiosk. Descriptive statistics were computed for questionnaire responses and observational data. Correlational analyses were conducted to identify potential predictors of engagement. Sales data were analyzed using analysis of variance. Results showed an overall increase in the proportion of sales of the featured items to total store sales during the intervention period (Pincreased sales during the intervention period included whole-wheat bagels, bananas, radishes, honey, sunflower seeds, baked tortilla chips, and almond butter (P<0.05). Almost two thirds (61.7%) of the patrons interviewed noticed the Healthy Kids kiosk, with about one quarter (28.7%) indicating that they purchased at least one item. Fifty-eight percent reported that the kiosk encouraged them to buy healthier foods. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Market Concentration and Profitability of the Grocery Retailers in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindřich Špička

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article was to internationally compare the market concentration of grocery retailers in the six countries of Central Europe – Austria, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia. The market concentration was measured by CR4 ratio, Herfindahl-Hirschman Index and the GRS index. Data covered the period 2010 – 2015. The secondary data came from the Euromonitor International and Bureau van Dijk databases. The results showed that the market structure of the Central European grocery retailers has mostly a character of asymmetric oligopoly. The pairwise correlation did not reveal any strong relationship between the market power and profitability of the grocery retailers. The Central European grocery market is controlled by strong national retail chains and multinational companies which operate modern grocery retail formats. However, traditional grocery retailers are still popular in Hungary while traditional individual grocers in other countries are disappearing or gradually joining the networking system based on franchising.

  3. 17 CFR 155.4 - Trading standards for introducing brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trading standards for introducing brokers. 155.4 Section 155.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION TRADING STANDARDS § 155.4 Trading standards for introducing brokers. (a) Each introducing broker...

  4. 77 FR 74201 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee...: General notice. SUMMARY: This document provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that... of the 2013 Customs Broker User Fee is due February 15, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Craig...

  5. 76 FR 65741 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for.... SUMMARY: This document provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for... 2012 in accordance with the Tax Reform Act of 1986. DATES: Payment of the 2012 Customs Broker User Fee...

  6. Insurance brokers market dynamics in Poland before deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Krajewski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focus on insurance broker profession in connection with second part of professions deregulations. It briefly presents modifications in polish law in this domain. Next part concerns the insurance brokers market dynamics analysis. The results shows permanent increase in brokers quantity in spite of existing regulations. Presented paper makes start point to following analysis.

  7. 78 FR 48460 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of revocation of a customs broker license. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a customs broker...

  8. 78 FR 48456 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Customs broker license cancellations. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the customs broker...

  9. 78 FR 48458 - Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Reinstatement of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Reinstatement of customs broker license. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a customs broker's license has...

  10. 12 CFR 221.125 - Credit to brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Credit to brokers and dealers. 221.125 Section... SYSTEM CREDIT BY BANKS AND PERSONS OTHER THAN BROKERS OR DEALERS FOR THE PURPOSE OF PURCHASING OR CARRYING MARGIN STOCK (REGULATION U) Interpretations § 221.125 Credit to brokers and dealers. (a) The...

  11. 76 FR 1626 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee... notice. SUMMARY: This document provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by a broker, whether it may be an individual, partnership, association, or...

  12. 12 CFR 221.103 - Loans to brokers or dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loans to brokers or dealers. 221.103 Section... SYSTEM CREDIT BY BANKS AND PERSONS OTHER THAN BROKERS OR DEALERS FOR THE PURPOSE OF PURCHASING OR CARRYING MARGIN STOCK (REGULATION U) Interpretations § 221.103 Loans to brokers or dealers. Questions have...

  13. 78 FR 77140 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee...: General notice. SUMMARY: This document provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by a broker, whether it may be an individual, partnership...

  14. 12 CFR 220.132 - Credit to brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Credit to brokers and dealers. 220.132 Section 220.132 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) Interpretations § 220.132 Credit to brokers and...

  15. Developing a new Internet grocery retail shop concept for the Indian customers

    OpenAIRE

    Belkud, Ravikiran

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of the thesis is to develop a new Internet grocery retail shop concept for Indian customers in the capital region of Finland. The aim is to understand the various factors to be considered when setting up an Internet grocery retail shop. The thesis report consists of an introduction, and chapters describing the theoretical framework, benchmarking, collection and analysis of empirical data and implementation details of the Internet grocery retail shop. The theoretical frame...

  16. Differentiation strategy : how to create a competitive advantage in online groceries

    OpenAIRE

    Lok, Ka Heng

    2017-01-01

    Since the beginning of e-commerce, digital selling of commodities is becoming more common and accessible to every consumer. It is possible to order any grocery item on the Internet. A successful company in online groceries requires a strategy that could make it stand out from its competitors. That is the aim of the thesis; to create a competitive advantage in online groceries by using a differentiation strategy. The study focuses on analysing the external factors: the macro environment, ...

  17. Factors affecting Purchase behavior of Women grocery consumer- An Insight

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra, Dr. Anu Nagpal

    2014-01-01

    Women are most powerful consumers in the world as they control almost 80 percent of the household spending. And no longer can the womens spending powers and influence be neglected. The role of women in the society and their effects has changed. Most of the marketers know that women are different, but we actually need a deep rooted understanding of how and why they are different. Studying women could be interesting as Family grocery shopping is the accepted domain of women; however, modern so...

  18. Border Brokers: Teachers and Undocumented Mexican Students in Search of "Acompañamiento"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Enrique, III

    2018-01-01

    This article examines the deployment of border conocimiento and the subsequent cultural production of third spaces for transnational Mexican youth by Chicano educators who I call "border brokers" at a northern California high school. It examines the micro-level insurgent actions on the part of a small group of educators at Bosque High to…

  19. 31 CFR 560.416 - Brokering services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brokering services. 560.416 Section 560.416 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF... provision of goods, services or technology, from whatever source, to or from Iran or the Government of Iran...

  20. 12 CFR 337.6 - Brokered deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... government sponsored minority or women-owned depository institution deposit program. (iii) Notwithstanding... any brokered deposit without restriction by this section. (2)(i) An adequately capitalized insured... restriction on the payment of interest contained in paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of the section. After such 90-day...

  1. Geospatial Brokering - Challenges and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    An important feature of many brokers is to facilitate straightforward human access to scientific data while maintaining programmatic access to it for system solutions. Standards-based protocols are critical for this, and there are a number of protocols to choose from. In this discussion, we will present a web application solution that leverages certain protocols - e.g., OGC CSW, REST, and OpenSearch - to provide programmatic as well as human access to geospatial resources. We will also discuss managing resources to reduce duplication yet increase discoverability, federated search solutions, and architectures that combine human-friendly interfaces with powerful underlying data management. The changing requirements witnessed in brokering solutions over time, our recent experience participating in the EarthCube brokering hack-a-thon, and evolving interoperability standards provide insight to future technological and philosophical directions planned for geospatial broker solutions. There has been much change over the past decade, but with the unprecedented data collaboration of recent years, in many ways the challenges and opportunities are just beginning.

  2. Qualities of Knowledge Brokers: Reflections from Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, David; Morton, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Employing knowledge brokers is one way that universities and research centres have responded to the increasing emphasis on the wider usefulness and uptake of research beyond the academy. While there is an increase in the numbers of such professionals, there has been little focus on their roles, skills and development. In this paper, two knowledge…

  3. FOOD SAFETY SYSTEMS’ FUNCTIONING IN POLISH NETWORKS OF GROCERY STORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł NOWICKI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the way how the food safety systems are functioning in Polish networks of grocery stores. The study was conducted in the fourth quarter of 2012 in the south‐eastern Poland. There were chosen three organizations that meet certain conditions: medium size Polish grocery network without participation of foreign capital and up to 30 retail locations within the group. Studies based on a case study model. The research found that regular and unannounced inspections carried out to each store's, impact on increasing safety of food offered and the verification of GHP requirements on the headquarters level has a significant impact on the safety of food offered as well as on the knowledge and behavior of employees. In addition it was found that the verification and analysis of food safety management system is an effective tool for improving food safety. It was also shown that in most cases there is no formal crisis management system for the food protection in the surveyed companies and employees are only informed of what to do in case of an emergency.

  4. Loyalty Programmes of Selective Grocery Retailers in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Solarová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with long term loyalty programmes of selective grocery retailers who operate in the market within the Czech Republic. Only those loyalty programmes designed for the end customers are taken into account, so this study is concerned with the B2C area. A long term loyalty programmes last at least for one year, i.e. twelve months (this time determination is valid for purposes of this paper. The main aim of this paper is to identify the single elements and principles occurring in long term loyalty programmes and then to develop an illustrative model. The presented output is a model of long term loyalty programmes that captures the three following phases: the establishment, development (or building and termination of the relationship. In addition, from the empirical research, an interesting fact has emerged: two of the analysed long term loyalty programmes were launched at a similar time. This could be explained through the tendency for companies to copy the successful activities insigated by their competitors. Furthermore, the next remarkable phenomenon is that one grocery chain runs two long term loyalty programmes at the same time and the target groups of these programmes overlap. A possible explanation could be that the chain is making efforts to interest as many as possible of its different customers.

  5. Evaluation of Traditional and Technology-Based Grocery Store Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jennifer; Litchfield, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background: A literature gap exists for grocery interventions with realistic resource expectations; few technology-based publications exist, and none document traditional comparison. Purpose: Compare grocery store traditional aisle demonstrations (AD) and technology-based (TB) nutrition education treatments. Methods: A quasi-experimental 4-month…

  6. Multi-outlet/multi-format grocery retailing : Some issues and insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haans, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Several trends and shifts in consumer behavior (e.g., desire for convenience) have resulted in grocery retailers opening more stores and new formats (e.g., AH ToGo and AH XL) next to their existing ones (regular supermarket). By using this strategy grocery retailers try to attract new customers

  7. Save or (over-)spend? : The impact of hard-discounter shopping on consumers' grocery outlay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbrechts, Els; Campo, K.; Vroegrijk, M.J.J.

    An increasing number of consumers have come to patronize a hard discounter (HD) to save on their grocery budget. Given the HDs' rock-bottom prices, a complete switch from the traditional supermarket (TS) to the HD format would, indeed, substantially reduce grocery spending. However, consumers

  8. 49 CFR 375.409 - May household goods brokers provide estimates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May household goods brokers provide estimates? 375... Estimating Charges § 375.409 May household goods brokers provide estimates? A household goods broker must not... there is a written agreement between the broker and you, the carrier, adopting the broker's estimate as...

  9. Features in Grocery Stores that Motivate Shoppers to Buy Healthier Foods, ConsumerStyles 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Latetia V; Pinard, Courtney A; Yaroch, Amy L

    2016-08-01

    We examined nine features in grocery stores shoppers reported motivated them to purchase more healthful foods in the past month. Features were compiled from common supermarket practices for each of the 4 Ps of marketing: pricing, placement, promotion, and product. We examined percentages of the features overall and by shopping frequency using Chi square tests from a 2014 cross sectional web-based health attitudes and behaviors survey, ConsumerStyles. The survey was fielded from June to July in 2014. Participants were part of a market research consumer panel that were randomly recruited by probability-based sampling using address-based sampling methods to achieve a sample representative of the U.S. Data from 4242 adults ages 18 and older were analyzed. About 44 % of respondents indicated at least one feature motivated them to purchase more healthful foods. Top choices included in-store coupons or specials (20.1 %), availability of convenient, ready-to-eat more healthful foods (18.8 %), product labels or advertising on packages (15.2 %), and labels or signs on shelves that highlighted more healthful options (14.6 %). Frequent shoppers reported being motivated to purchase more healthful foods by in-store tastings/recipe demonstrations and coupons/specials more often than infrequent shoppers. Enhancing the visibility and appeal of more healthful food items in grocery stores may help improve dietary choices in some populations but additional research is needed to identify the most effective strategies for interventions.

  10. Factors Influencing Consumers Intention for Online Grocery Shopping - A Proposed Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzi, SFF; Thoo, AC; Tan, LC; Muharam, FM; Talib, NA

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, Internet is one of the most popular platforms for people to do online shopping including grocery items. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the determinants of customer intentions for online grocery shopping. Till now, there is no consensus on what are the factors that actually influencing people to shop grocery items through Internet. This paper aims to explore the factors such as social influences, facilitating conditions, hedonic motivations, perceived risk and perceived trust that influence the consumer intention to purchase grocery online. Questionnaires will be the main instrument of the study and they will be distributed to target respondents using Internet survey. Respondents of the study will be selected using convenience sampling. After data collection, Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) will be employed for data analysis. Overall, the result of the study is important to retailers to identify the important factors in increasing their customers’ intention to purchase grocery online.

  11. MEASURING GROCERY STORES SERVICE QUALITY IN INDONESIA: A RETAIL SERVICE QUALITY SCALE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonnard Leonnard

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The growing number of modern grocery stores in Indonesia is a challenge for each grocery store to maintain and increase their number of consumers. The success of maintaining and improving service quality will affect long-term profitability and business sustainability. Therefore, in this study, we examined consumer perceptions of service quality in one of modern grocery stores in Indonesia. Data were collected from 387 consumers of grocery stores in Jakarta, Bogor, Depok, Bekasi, Cibubur, and Subang. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM through Maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation was employed to analyze the data. The finding indicated that the five indicators of the retail service quality scale consisting of physical aspects, reliability, personal interactions, problem solving and policies provided  valid multi-item instruments in measuring consumer perceptions of service quality in grocery stores.

  12. An integrative conceptual framework for analyzing customer satisfaction with shopping trip experiences in grocery retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Grocery retailers aim to satisfy customers, and because grocery shopping trips are frequently recurring, they must do socontinuously. Surprisingly, little research has addressed satisfaction with individual grocery shopping trips. This article therefore develops a conceptual framework for analyzing...... customer satisfaction with individual grocery shopping trip experiences within a overall ‘disconfirmation of expectations model’ of customer satisfaction. The contribution of the framework is twofold. First, by focusing on satisfaction with individual grocery shopping trips, previous research...... on satisfaction in the retailing literature. Second, the framework synthesizes and integrates multiple central concepts from different research streams into a common framework for analyzing shopping trip satisfaction. Propositions are derived regarding the relationships among the different concepts...

  13. Proposição de um modelo para a gestão da demanda: um estudo entre os elos atacadista e fornecedores de produtos de mercearia básica A proposed framework for demand management: a study involving wholesalers and suppliers of grocery products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela de Castro Melo

    2012-12-01

    diversity of products. The objective of this study was to develop a framework for demand management in the supply chain of grocery products considering the dyadic relationship between the supplier and wholesaler. Therefore, a case study was conducted in the wholesale company Martins and nine of its suppliers. The research revealed that the demand management implementation process can be divided into three phases: 1 joint alignment of strategic policies, 2 formulation of business plan, and 3 implementation and monitoring of the business plan. Moreover, this process consists of three elements: top management involvement, inter and intra-firm interactions, and benefits of demand management. The benefits include profitability increase by improving efficiency and effectiveness, as well as knowledge sharing and learning.

  14. Consumers' multifaceted deal knowledge in a grocery retail setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2017-01-01

    of deal price status, typical deal price knowledge, and deal-spotting ability. Results show reasonably stable knowledge of typical deal prices, while knowledge of deal price status and deal-spotting ability improves significantly during grocery shopping. Surprisingly, consumers’ deal knowledge...... typical deal price knowledge. Furthermore, the findings suggest that consumers store internal reference deal prices. Retailers are therefore well advised to consider mixed depth and creative discount patterns to prevent ‘perfect’ perceptions of typical deal prices.......Despite its relevance to retailers, studies of consumers’ deal knowledge have been few. This study explores consumers’ deal knowledge before, during, and after the store visit applying a between-subjects field-study design with 1204 respondents. In particular, the authors investigate perception...

  15. The stressful (and not so stressful) nature of language brokering: identifying when brokering functions as a cultural stressor for Latino immigrant children in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Jennifer A; Lazarevic, Vanja

    2014-12-01

    Language brokering remains prevalent among immigrant families, but it is widely assumed that brokering functions as a cultural stressor, resulting in adverse health outcomes for immigrant youth. Few studies, however, have tested this assumption, particularly while using longitudinal data and capturing multiple dimensions of brokering. Thus, this study examined how depressive symptoms and family-based acculturation stress mediated the relationships between various aspects of brokering (i.e., frequency of brokering, positive and negative feelings about brokering, brokering norms, and brokering efficacy) and alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use and other risky behaviors. Using longitudinal survey data from 234 Latino early adolescents in 6th-8th grades (M age  = 12.4 years; Females = 46.2 %), brokering for parents indirectly affected alcohol and marijuana use through family-based acculturation stress; however, these significant indirect effects became non-significant when taking into account negative brokering feelings and brokering as a burden on one's time. Feeling positively or efficacious about brokering or having pro-brokering norms did not directly predict any adverse mental and behavioral health outcomes. Moderation analyses, however, revealed that brokering for parents did not seem to function as a stressor when Latino early adolescents were high in brokering efficacy (e.g., feeling confident in one's ability to broker) or descriptive brokering norms (e.g., perceiving one's peers as brokering often). By contrast, when Latino early adolescents perceived brokering as a burden, brokering for parents functioned as a stressor, placing Latino early adolescents at risk for family-based acculturation stress, and in turn, alcohol and marijuana use. Such findings point to the complexity of brokering.

  16. Staying in the Light: Evaluating Sustainability Models for Brokering Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, L. A.; Benedict, K. K.; Best, M.; Fyfe, S.; Jacobs, C. A.; Michener, W. K.; Pearlman, J.; Turner, A.; Nativi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Business Models Team of the Research Data Alliance Brokering Governance Working Group examined several support models proposed to promote the long-term sustainability of brokering middleware. The business model analysis includes examination of funding source, implementation frameworks and obstacles, and policy and legal considerations. The issue of sustainability is not unique to brokering software and these models may be relevant to many applications. Results of this comprehensive analysis highlight advantages and disadvantages of the various models in respect to the specific requirements for brokering services. We offer recommendations based on the outcomes of this analysis while recognizing that all software is part of an evolutionary process and has a lifespan.

  17. A Brokering Solution for Business Process Execution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, M.; Bigagli, L.; Roncella, R.; Mazzetti, P.; Nativi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Predicting the climate change impact on biodiversity and ecosystems, advancing our knowledge of environmental phenomena interconnection, assessing the validity of simulations and other key challenges of Earth Sciences require intensive use of environmental modeling. The complexity of Earth system requires the use of more than one model (often from different disciplines) to represent complex processes. The identification of appropriate mechanisms for reuse, chaining and composition of environmental models is considered a key enabler for an effective uptake of a global Earth Observation infrastructure, currently pursued by the international geospatial research community. The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) Model Web initiative aims to increase present accessibility and interoperability of environmental models, allowing their flexible composition into complex Business Processes (BPs). A few, basic principles are at the base of the Model Web concept (Nativi, et al.): 1. Open access 2. Minimal entry-barriers 3. Service-driven approach 4. Scalability In this work we propose an architectural solution aiming to contribute to the Model Web vision. This solution applies the Brokering approach for facilitiating complex multidisciplinary interoperability. The Brokering approach is currently adopted in the new GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) as was presented at the last GEO Plenary meeting in Istanbul, November 2011. According to the Brokering principles, the designed system is flexible enough to support the use of multiple BP design (visual) tools, heterogeneous Web interfaces for model execution (e.g. OGC WPS, WSDL, etc.), and different Workflow engines. We designed and prototyped a component called BP Broker that is able to: (i) read an abstract BP, (ii) "compile" the abstract BP into an executable one (eBP) - in this phase the BP Broker might also provide recommendations for incomplete BPs and parameter mismatch resolution - and (iii) finally execute the eBP using a

  18. Integrate Data into Scientific Workflows for Terrestrial Biosphere Model Evaluation through Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Cook, R. B.; Du, F.; Dasgupta, A.; Poco, J.; Huntzinger, D. N.; Schwalm, C. R.; Boldrini, E.; Santoro, M.; Pearlman, J.; Pearlman, F.; Nativi, S.; Khalsa, S.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become integral tools for extrapolating local observations and process-level understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. Model-model and model-observation intercomparisons are critical to understand the uncertainties within model outputs, to improve model skill, and to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange. The DataONE Exploration, Visualization, and Analysis (EVA) working group is evaluating TBMs using scientific workflows in UV-CDAT/VisTrails. This workflow-based approach promotes collaboration and improved tracking of evaluation provenance. But challenges still remain. The multi-scale and multi-discipline nature of TBMs makes it necessary to include diverse and distributed data resources in model evaluation. These include, among others, remote sensing data from NASA, flux tower observations from various organizations including DOE, and inventory data from US Forest Service. A key challenge is to make heterogeneous data from different organizations and disciplines discoverable and readily integrated for use in scientific workflows. This presentation introduces the brokering approach taken by the DataONE EVA to fill the gap between TBMs' evaluation scientific workflows and cross-organization and cross-discipline data resources. The DataONE EVA started the development of an Integrated Model Intercomparison Framework (IMIF) that leverages standards-based discovery and access brokers to dynamically discover, access, and transform (e.g. subset and resampling) diverse data products from DataONE, Earth System Grid (ESG), and other data repositories into a format that can be readily used by scientific workflows in UV-CDAT/VisTrails. The discovery and access brokers serve as an independent middleware that bridge existing data repositories and TBMs evaluation scientific workflows but introduce little overhead to either component. In the initial work, an OpenSearch-based discovery broker

  19. Brokered dialogue: A new research method for controversial health and social issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Janet A; Lavery, James V

    2012-07-02

    Dialogue is a foundational feature of social life and an important way in which we come to understand one another. In situations of controversy dialogue is often absent because of a range of social barriers. We have developed a new film-based qualitative research method for studying controversial issues in healthcare and social policy. We call this method Brokered Dialogue. Theoretically informed by the traditions in narrative inquiry and visual anthropology, the method is premised on the idea that dialogue possesses features making it unique as a generator of new knowledge and opportunities for social intervention. Film is not only an extraordinarily rich data source, but an excellent medium for knowledge transfer and dissemination. The paper introduces the Brokered Dialogue method. We outline its critical steps, including the procedures for sampling, data collection and data analysis of both textual and visual data. Participants in a Brokered Dialogue engage in filmed interviews that capture their perspectives on a given topic; they then share their perspectives with, and pose questions of, one another through the medium of film. Using a participatory editing process, only footage that participants feel comfortable showing to others is incorporated. This technique offers participants a 'safe' space for respectful interaction. The editing process itself is analytic, and the final assembly of footage approximates a dialogue on the topic at hand. A link to a film produced from a project piloting the method is provided to demonstrate its real world application. Brokered Dialogue is a method for promoting respectful interactions among those with seemingly divergent views on a controversial topic and for discovering critical points of divergence that may represent pathways for improvement. While the end product is a 'film', the goal is to have these films used as catalysts for ongoing respectful dialogue and problem-solving concerning the topic at hand informing

  20. Mother-Child Communication Quality during Language Brokering: Validation of Four Measures of Brokering Interaction Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntzviller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    One hundred dyads of low-income, Spanish-speaking mothers and their bilingual children (age = 12-18; M = 14.12, SD = 1.89) who have language brokered for the mother (i.e., culturally or linguistically mediated between the mother and English speakers) were surveyed. Multiple goals theory posits that mothers and children who do not recognize and…

  1. Are introverts better at partnership brokering? Exploring brokering skills across the introvert-extrovert continuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    This article raises the question of whether it matters if a partnership broker is introverted or extroverted[1], [2]. A recent public discussion about Susan Cain’s book ‘Quiet: The power of introverts in a world that can’t stop talking’ has highlighted the importance of recognising one’s temperament

  2. Shopper marketing nutrition interventions: Social norms on grocery carts increase produce spending without increasing shopper budgets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin R. Payne

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Descriptive and provincial social norm messages (i.e., on grocery cart placards may be an overlooked tool to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability and increasing shopper budgets.

  3. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores--50% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of grocery store buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

  4. Efficient Consumer Response (ECR: a survey of the Australian grocery industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Swatman

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficient consumer response (ECR is a U.S. supply chain management strategy which attempts to address the inefficiencies which have led to excessive inventory and unnecessary costs at all levels within the grocery industry supply chain. This paper discusses the traditional grocery store format, the supermarket, and the ways in which inefficient business practices developed in the U.S. grocery supply chain; and discusses the major business activities needed for successful implementation of ECR. The paper then presents a brief summary of the results of a survey of ECR knowledge and usage within the Australian grocery industry, which is the initial phase of a long term research project whose main purpose is to evaluate ECR as it applies to that industry.

  5. Video-Based Grocery Shopping Intervention Effect on Purchasing Behaviors Among Latina Shoppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Dharma E.; Garcia, Samantha; Duan, Lei; Black, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To compare changes in food-purchasing knowledge, self-efficacy, and behavior after viewing nutrition education videos among Los Angeles, California Latinas responsible for household grocery shopping. Methods. From February to May 2015, a convenience sample of 113 Latinas watched 1 video (El Carrito Saludable) featuring MyPlate guidelines applied to grocery shopping (1-video intervention) and another convenience sample of 105 Latinas watched 2 videos (El Carrito Saludable and Ser Consciente), the latter featuring mindfulness to support attention and overcome distractions while grocery shopping (2-video intervention). We administered questionnaires before and after intervention. A preselected sample in each intervention condition (n = 72) completed questionnaires at 2-months after intervention and provided grocery receipts (before and 2-months after intervention). Results. Knowledge improved in both intervention groups (P behavior and mindfulness show promise for improving the quality of foods that Latinas bring into the home. PMID:28323473

  6. Collaborative Planning, Forecasting, and Replenishment in the Grocery Industry and Defense Commissary Agency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    ... possible cost to authorized patrons (2002: 2). This project looks at DeCA's current business processes as well as the relatively new business process of CPFR used by some of the major supermarket chains in the commercial grocery industry...

  7. Video-Based Grocery Shopping Intervention Effect on Purchasing Behaviors Among Latina Shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Hortensia; Cortés, Dharma E; Garcia, Samantha; Duan, Lei; Black, David S

    2017-05-01

    To compare changes in food-purchasing knowledge, self-efficacy, and behavior after viewing nutrition education videos among Los Angeles, California Latinas responsible for household grocery shopping. From February to May 2015, a convenience sample of 113 Latinas watched 1 video (El Carrito Saludable) featuring MyPlate guidelines applied to grocery shopping (1-video intervention) and another convenience sample of 105 Latinas watched 2 videos (El Carrito Saludable and Ser Consciente), the latter featuring mindfulness to support attention and overcome distractions while grocery shopping (2-video intervention). We administered questionnaires before and after intervention. A preselected sample in each intervention condition (n = 72) completed questionnaires at 2-months after intervention and provided grocery receipts (before and 2-months after intervention). Knowledge improved in both intervention groups (P shopping list (both P behavior and mindfulness show promise for improving the quality of foods that Latinas bring into the home.

  8. 42 CFR 422.2274 - Broker and agent requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... compensation structure initiated in the year the enrollment occurred. (iv) If the MA organization contracts... Advantage organization markets through independent (i.e., non-employee) brokers or agents, the following requirements must be met: (a) Agents and brokers must be compensated as follows: (1) An MA organization (or...

  9. 78 FR 14848 - Duties of Brokers, Dealers, and Investment Advisers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... of 1940 (``Advisers Act'') is largely principles-based. In contrast, a broker-dealer is not uniformly... interest\\21\\ and disclosure practices of investment advisers and broker-dealers, as well as the economics... Parts III and IV below, we request data and other information relating to the economics and...

  10. 17 CFR 155.2 - Trading standards for floor brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trading standards for floor brokers. 155.2 Section 155.2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION TRADING STANDARDS § 155.2 Trading standards for floor brokers. Each contract market shall adopt and submit...

  11. 7 CFR 46.28 - Duties of brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... itemized accounting to the principal promptly on receipt of payment, showing the true gross selling price... broker who agrees to collect funds from the buyer for his principal shall render an itemized accounting... Act. While the broker is not obliged to furnish his principal information regarding the financial...

  12. 78 FR 48457 - Correction of Document Revoking Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Correction of Document Revoking Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Correction of document revoking certain customs broker licenses. SUMMARY: In a notice published...

  13. 76 FR 71591 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Bureau of Customs and Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Customs broker license revocations for the failure to file the 2006 triennial status...

  14. 76 FR 65742 - Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Revocation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General... U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51(b)), the following Customs broker...

  15. 77 FR 74022 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION...) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51), the following Customs broker...

  16. Adolescent Healthcare Brokering: Prevalence, Experience, Impact, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Jennifer R.; Wallis, Lisa C.; Ball, James W.; Gershon, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Limited health literacy disproportionately affects those with limited English proficiency (LEP). Parents with LEP might rely on their adolescent children to interpret health information. We call this "adolescent healthcare brokering." This study uncovers the prevalence of brokering, kinds of tasks, emotional and academic…

  17. Establishing the electric pipeline: The role of energy brokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, R.

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of energy brokers. As transmission services become more open, the energy broker will arrange transmission paths between supplier and customer, assume inventory risk, solve reliability and/or contract integration problems, balance the financial needs of the buyer and the seller, and know where the supply and the load are to be found

  18. Mapping of Grocery Stores in Slovak Countryside in Context of Food Deserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristína Bilková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on mapping grocery stores in the Slovak countryside with an emphasis on identifying potential food deserts in rural areas. Grocery stores are analyzed in the time period 2001–2011. Food deserts in rural areas are identified by two accessibility measures. The results show the development of food retailing in the Slovak countryside and in potentially threatened localities which can be defined as food deserts.

  19. 49 CFR 371.3 - Records to be kept by brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Records to be kept by brokers. 371.3 Section 371.3... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS BROKERS OF PROPERTY § 371.3 Records to be kept by brokers. (a) A broker shall keep a record of each transaction. For purposes of this...

  20. 17 CFR 240.15g-4 - Disclosure of compensation to brokers or dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... brokers or dealers. 240.15g-4 Section 240.15g-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... § 240.15g-4 Disclosure of compensation to brokers or dealers. Preliminary Note: Brokers and dealers may..., and dominated and controlled markets. (a) Disclosure requirement. It shall be unlawful for any broker...

  1. 48 CFR 204.7206 - Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... identify agents and brokers. 204.7206 Section 204.7206 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... 204.7206 Using CAGE codes to identify agents and brokers. Authorized agents and brokers are entities... code will be assigned to the agent/broker establishment in addition to any codes assigned to the...

  2. 17 CFR 1.57 - Operations and activities of introducing brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... introducing brokers. 1.57 Section 1.57 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION... introducing brokers. (a) Each introducing broker must: (1) Open and carry each customer's and option customer..., That an introducing broker which has entered into a guarantee agreement with a futures commission...

  3. Consumer Poultry Handling Behavior in the Grocery Store and In-Home Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Amy K; Chambers, Delores H; Chambers, Edgar; Godwin, Sandria L; Cates, Sheryl C

    2016-04-01

    Considerable work on consumers' food safety habits has highlighted issues associated with home food preparation. However, consumer handling of foods, such as poultry, during shopping and storage has not been noted. The objective of this study was to determine consumer behaviors during purchasing and initial storage of raw poultry to determine potential cross-contamination issues. A shop-along observational study was conducted to determine actual shopping, transportation, and storage behavior of consumers who purchase raw poultry products. Neither hand sanitizer nor wipes were observed in 71% of grocery store meat sections of stores visited. Plastic bags could be found in the meat section 85% of the time, but only 25% of shoppers used the bag for their raw poultry purchases. During checkout, the poultry was bagged separately from other products 71% of the time. A majority of shoppers stored raw poultry in the original package without an additional container or overwrap. Overall, there needs to be an increase in food safety education on the handling of poultry during purchasing, transportation, and storage.

  4. 17 CFR 240.17a-4 - Records to be preserved by certain exchange members, brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... readable projection or production of micrographic media or electronic storage media images and for... are subject to rules of a self-regulatory organization of which the member, broker or dealer is a... may be immediately produced or reproduced on “micrographic media” (as defined in this section) or by...

  5. Facilitators and Inhibitors of Supply Chain Innovation-prospects for Supply Chain Managment in the Irish Grocery Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Keegan, Joan; O'Callaghan, Edmund; Wilcox, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Supply chain management is one of the most significant strategic challenges currently facing the Irish grocery sector. The UK grocery market with its emphasis on composite deliveries via regional distribution centres is extremely sophisticated; the Irish grocery sector, however, is in the embryonic stage of implementing central distribution. The potential to develop innovative supply chain systems is mediated by both national logistic-related variables and company characteristics. In additio...

  6. BCube: A Broker Framework for Next Generation Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, S. S.; Pearlman, J.; Nativi, S.

    2013-12-01

    EarthCube is an NSF initiative that aims to transform the conduct of research through the creation of community-guided cyberinfrastructure enabling the integration information and data across the geosciences. Following an initial phase of concept and community development activities, NSF has made awards for the development of cyberinfrastructure 'building blocks.' In this talk we describe the goals and methods for one of these projects - BCube, for Brokering Building Blocks. BCube addresses the need for effective and efficient multi-disciplinary collaboration and interoperability through the introduction of brokering technologies. Brokers, as information systems middleware, have existed for many years and are found in diverse domains and industries such as financial systems, business-to-business interfaces, medicine and the automotive industry, to name a few. However, the emergence of brokers in science is relatively new and is now being piloted with great promise in cyberinfrastructure and science communities in the U.S., Europe, and elsewhere. Brokers act as intermediaries between information systems that implement well-defined interfaces, providing a bridge between communities using different specifications. The BCube project is helping to build a truly cross-disciplinary, global platform for data providers, cyberinfrastructure developers, and data users to make data more available and interoperable through a brokering framework. Building on the GEOSS Discover and Access Broker (DAB), BCube will develop new modules and services including * Expanded semantic brokering * Business Model support for work flows * Automated metadata generation * Automated linking to services discovered via web crawling * Plug and play for most community service buses * Credential passing for seamless access to data * Ranking of search results from brokered catalogs Because facilitating cross-discipline research involves cultural and well as technical challenges, BCube is also

  7. Do Latino and non-Latino grocery stores differ in the availability and affordability of healthy food items in a low-income, metropolitan region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emond, Jennifer A; Madanat, Hala N; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2012-02-01

    To compare non-ethnically based supermarkets and Latino grocery stores (tiendas) in a lower-income region with regard to the availability, quality and cost of several healthy v. unhealthy food items. A cross-sectional study conducted by three independent observers to audit twenty-five grocery stores identified as the main source of groceries for 80 % of Latino families enrolled in a childhood obesity study. Stores were classified as supermarkets and tiendas on the basis of key characteristics. South San Diego County. Ten tiendas and fifteen supermarkets. Tiendas were smaller than supermarkets (five v. twelve aisles, P = 0·003). Availability of fresh produce did not differ by store type; quality differed for one fruit item. Price per unit (pound or piece) was lower in tiendas for most fresh produce. The cost of meeting the US Department of Agriculture's recommended weekly servings of produce based on an 8368 kJ (2000 kcal)/d diet was $US 3·00 lower in tiendas compared with supermarkets (P income communities. However, efforts are needed to increase the access and affordability of healthy dairy and meat products.

  8. Knowledge brokers in a knowledge network: the case of Seniors Health Research Transfer Network knowledge brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, James; Lusk, Elizabeth; Harris, Megan; Stolee, Paul

    2013-01-09

    The purpose of this paper is to describe and reflect on the role of knowledge brokers (KBs) in the Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN). The paper reviews the relevant literature on knowledge brokering, and then describes the evolving role of knowledge brokering in this knowledge network. The description of knowledge brokering provided here is based on a developmental evaluation program and on the experiences of the authors. Data were gathered through qualitative and quantitative methods, analyzed by the evaluators, and interpreted by network members who participated in sensemaking forums. The results were fed back to the network each year in the form of formal written reports that were widely distributed to network members, as well as through presentations to the network's members. The SHRTN evaluation and our experiences as evaluators and KBs suggest that a SHRTN KB facilitates processes of learning whereby people are connected with tacit or explicit knowledge sources that will help them to resolve work-related challenges. To make this happen, KBs engage in a set of relational, technical, and analytical activities that help communities of practice (CoPs) to develop and operate, facilitate exchanges among people with similar concerns and interests, and help groups and individuals to create, explore, and apply knowledge in their practice. We also suggest that the role is difficult to define, emergent, abstract, episodic, and not fully understood. The KB role within this knowledge network has developed and matured over time. The KB adapts to the social and technical affordances of each situation, and fashions a unique and relevant process to create relationships and promote learning and change. The ability to work with teams and to develop relevant models and feasible approaches are critical KB skills. The KB is a leader who wields influence rather than power, and who is prepared to adopt whatever roles and approaches are needed to bring about a valuable

  9. Brokers in participatory urban governance: Assembling formal and informal politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.

    2016-01-01

    Participatory urban governance, with its focus on citizen representation and the equitable distribution of resources, has been implemented globally to deepen democracy. Some individuals position themselves as voluntary representatives, or brokers, between the state and their fellow citizens. In this

  10. African Logistics Agents and Middlemen as Cultural Brokers in Guangzhou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Mathews

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article begins by asking how African traders learn to adjust to the foreign world of Guangzhou, China, and suggests that African logistics agents and middlemen serve as cultural brokers for these traders. After defining “cultural broker” and discussing why these brokers are not usually Chinese, it explores this role as played by ten logistics agents/middlemen from Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. As logistics agents, these people help their customers in practically adjusting to Chinese life, and as middlemen they serve to grease the wheels of commerce between African customers and Chinese suppliers. This is despite their own ambivalent views of China as a place to live. They play an essential role in enabling harmonious relations between Africans and Chinese in Guangzhou, even though they see themselves not as cultural brokers but simply as businessmen.

  11. 77 FR 16249 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... Dependable International Services 12574 New Orleans. and Transport, Inc.. Professional Customs Brokers, Inc.... Horizon Logistics, LLC 28432 Dallas. Sandra L. Smith 15266 Dallas. Barry E. Booth 09627 San Francisco...

  12. Knowledge brokering in public health: a tale of two studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, R; DeCorby, K; Dobbins, M

    2014-06-01

    A Knowledge Broker is one approach for facilitating the integration of evidence-informed decision making in public health practice. In this paper, the findings from two studies investigating a Knowledge Broker intervention as a means of enhancing capacity for evidence-informed decision making are presented. Contextual factors that facilitate this strategy are also identified. This paper describes work done through a single mixed-methods study (randomized controlled trial with a qualitative component) and a case study. The Health Evidence team conducted two studies examining Knowledge Broker impact in Canadian public health departments. The effectiveness of knowledge translation strategies of varying intensities for promoting the use of research evidence in decisions related to child obesity prevention were explored via a randomized controlled trial with a fundamental descriptive component (2003-2007). In a case study (2010-2013), the authors partnered with three health departments to develop and implement tailored strategies targeted at the organization. Knowledge Brokers worked with designated staff in these studies via one-on-one consultations, small group meetings, and/or workshops and presentations. The Knowledge Broker role was assessed by analysing data from close-ended surveys, interviews, organizational documents, and reflective journals. In this paper, the authors focus on findings from the qualitative analysis of implementing the Knowledge Broker role in both studies and explore several contextual factors that impacted study outcomes. Knowledge Brokers were shown to enhance individual capacity by improving knowledge and skill in searching for, critically appraising, and applying research evidence to practice-based issues. Organizational capacity was also enhanced with strong management support and policies. Effective Knowledge Broker attributes included both expertise in research methodology and public health, as well as intangible traits such as

  13. Innovation and Virtual Environments: Towards Virtual Knowledge Brokers

    OpenAIRE

    VERONA G; PRANDELLI E.; SAWHNEY M.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examine the implications of virtual customer environments for supporting the innovation process. By building on the literature of knowledge brokers, they introduce the concept of virtual knowledge brokers — actors who leverage the internet to support third parties’ innovation activities. These actors enable firms to extend their reach in engaging with customers and they also allow firms to have a richer dialogue with customers because of their perceived neutrality. Consequently...

  14. Average opportunity-based accessibility of public transit systems to grocery stores in small urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimish Dharmadhikari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research studies the accessibility of grocery stores to university students using the public transportation system, drawing from a case study of Fargo, North Dakota. Taking into consideration the combined travel time components of walking, riding, and waiting, this study measures two types of accessibilities: accessibility to reach a particular place and accessibility to reach the bus stop to ride the public transit system. These two accessibilities are interdependent and cannot perform without each other. A new method to calculate the average accessibility measure for the transit routes is proposed. A step-wise case study analysis indicates that one route provides accessibility to a grocery store in eight minutes. This also suggests that the North Dakota State University area has moderate accessibility to grocery stores.

  15. The ‘dark side’ of knowledge brokering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Paul; Boaden, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Deploying knowledge brokers to bridge the ‘gap’ between researchers and practitioners continues to be seen as an unquestionable enabler of evidence-based practice and is often endorsed uncritically. We explore the ‘dark side’ of knowledge brokering, reflecting on its inherent challenges which we categorize as: (1) tensions between different aspects of brokering; (2) tensions between different types and sources of knowledge; and (3) tensions resulting from the ‘in-between’ position of brokers. As a result of these tensions, individual brokers may struggle to maintain their fragile and ambiguous intermediary position, and some of the knowledge may be lost in the ‘in-between world’, whereby research evidence is transferred to research users without being mobilized in their day-to-day practice. To be effective, brokering requires an amalgamation of several types of knowledge and a multidimensional skill set that needs to be sustained over time. If we want to maximize the impact of research on policy and practice, we should move from deploying individual ‘brokers’ to embracing the collective process of ‘brokering’ supported at the organizational and policy levels. PMID:28429974

  16. What Do We Know about Knowledge Brokers in Paediatric Rehabilitation? A Systematic Search and Narrative Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifer Taylor, Jacqueline; Verrier, Molly C; Landry, Michel D

    2014-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the literature related to the use of knowledge brokers within paediatric rehabilitation, and specifically to determine (1) how knowledge brokers are defined and used in paediatric rehabilitation and (2) whether knowledge brokers in paediatric rehabilitation have demonstrably improved the performance of health care providers or organizations. The MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and AMED databases were systematically searched to identify studies relating to knowledge brokers or knowledge brokering within paediatric rehabilitation, with no restriction on the study design or primary aim. Following review of titles and abstracts, those studies identified as potentially relevant were assessed based on the inclusion criteria that they: (1) examined some aspect of knowledge brokers/brokering in paediatric rehabilitation; (2) included sufficient descriptive detail on how knowledge brokers/brokering were used; and(3) were peer-reviewed and published in English. Of 1513 articles retrieved, 4 met the inclusion criteria, 3 of which referenced the same knowledge broker initiative. Two papers used mixed methods, one qualitative methodology, and one case presentation. Because of the different methods used in the included studies, the findings are presented in a narrative summary. This study provides an overview of the limited understanding of knowledge brokers within paediatric rehabilitation. Knowledge broker initiatives introduced within paediatric rehabilitation have been anchored in different theoretical frameworks, and no conclusions can be drawn as to the optimum combination of knowledge brokering activities and methods, nor about optimal duration, for sustained results.

  17. Brokered dialogue: A new research method for controversial health and social issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Janet A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dialogue is a foundational feature of social life and an important way in which we come to understand one another. In situations of controversy dialogue is often absent because of a range of social barriers. We have developed a new film-based qualitative research method for studying controversial issues in healthcare and social policy. We call this method Brokered Dialogue. Theoretically informed by the traditions in narrative inquiry and visual anthropology, the method is premised on the idea that dialogue possesses features making it unique as a generator of new knowledge and opportunities for social intervention. Film is not only an extraordinarily rich data source, but an excellent medium for knowledge transfer and dissemination. Discussion The paper introduces the Brokered Dialogue method. We outline its critical steps, including the procedures for sampling, data collection and data analysis of both textual and visual data. Participants in a Brokered Dialogue engage in filmed interviews that capture their perspectives on a given topic; they then share their perspectives with, and pose questions of, one another through the medium of film. Using a participatory editing process, only footage that participants feel comfortable showing to others is incorporated. This technique offers participants a ‘safe’ space for respectful interaction. The editing process itself is analytic, and the final assembly of footage approximates a dialogue on the topic at hand. A link to a film produced from a project piloting the method is provided to demonstrate its real world application. Summary Brokered Dialogue is a method for promoting respectful interactions among those with seemingly divergent views on a controversial topic and for discovering critical points of divergence that may represent pathways for improvement. While the end product is a ‘film’, the goal is to have these films used as catalysts for ongoing respectful

  18. The broker function of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The market for enriched uranium has recently begun to look like that foreseen when the Agency was established: few but big suppliers of enriched uranium and many competing purchasers. This development is the result of two strong forces that in recent years have influenced the market for nuclear power plants. The first is the continued advances in nuclear power technology which have made nuclear power plants a practical and commercially acceptable source of electric energy. Allied to this is the fact that nuclear power plants using slightly enriched uranium have increased in number over those using natural uranium; in the latter case there would have been a far wider range of suppliers. The second is the steep rise in recent years in oil prices followed by upward movement in other fossil fuel prices, not to mention the present energy crises. This development in the market for enriched uranium has renewed the interest of Member States in the Agency's function as a broker or intermediary between its Member States, because this function applies particularly to the supply of enriched uranium, Plutonium and reactors. It was a function of serious concern to the founders of the Agency

  19. Trying Harder and Doing Worse : How Grocery Shoppers Track In-Store Spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ittersum, Koert; Pennings, Joost M. E.; Wansink, Brian

    Although almost one in three U.S. households shops on a budget, it remains unclear whether and how shoppers track their in-store spending to stay within those budgets. A field study and two laboratory studies offer four key generalizations about budget shoppers in grocery stores: (1) They

  20. Trying Harder and Doing Worse: How Grocery Shoppers Track In-Store Spending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ittersum, van K.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Wansink, B.

    2010-01-01

    Although almost one in three U.S. households shops on a budget, it remains unclear whether and how shoppers track their in-store spending to stay within those budgets. A field study and two laboratory studies offer four key generalizations about budget shoppers in grocery stores: (1) They

  1. Dietetics and Nutrition Students Response to Grocery Store Tour Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Elizabeth D.; Brunt, Ardith; Froelich, Christa; Borr, Mari

    2018-01-01

    Retail dietetics is a growing field, however, there is very little research available on effective teaching strategies for preparing students to enter this part of the profession. This paper is the second paper to report on the results of produce-focused grocery store tour training program. This paper focuses on the trained students' perception of…

  2. Promoting Literacy with Self-Created Grocery Lists on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Karen H.; Uphold, Nicole M.; Steffen, Shannon; Kroesch, Allison M.

    2018-01-01

    Four middle school students with a developmental disability participated in a multiple probe design across students and replicated across conditions study to evaluate the effectiveness of constant time delay to teach them to create a grocery list on an iPad or iPod touch. The classroom teacher collected data on the percentage of items…

  3. Drivers and barriers of reverse logistics practices: A study of large grocery retailers in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Meyer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reverse logistics (RL practices have previously been viewed as a cost drain, but have received greater attention from practitioners because of increasing competition and dwindling margins. Purpose: The purpose of this generic qualitative study was to uncover the main internal and external drivers and barriers of RL within major South African grocery retailers. Method: Eleven face-to-face, semi-structured interviews and one telephonic interview were conducted with participants from four large grocery retailers. Findings: Optimising profitability and cost reduction goals are the identified internal drivers, whereas the main external driver was to reduce the organisations’ environmental impact. A lack of information systems – such as enterprise resource planning systems or warehouse management system software – and infrastructure were revealed as the main internal barriers for organisations’ RL practices, whereas supplier non-compliance and transportation inefficiencies were the main external barriers exposed. Managerial implications: In order to optimise the efficiency of the reverse flow, managers are recommended to devote more capital to RL infrastructure, develop policies to manage supplier behaviour, focus on RL as a revenue generating stream as well as implement information systems to manage the entire reverse flow. Conclusion: All participating grocery retailers follow similar RL processes. Growth in RL practices as well as infrastructure to perform those practices is a future priority for all the reviewed grocery retailers. RL is no longer only a key cost driver, but also provides organisations with many additional opportunities.

  4. Understanding Customer Attrition at an Individual Level: a New Model in Grocery Retail Context

    OpenAIRE

    Gautrais , Clément; Cellier , Peggy; Guyet , Thomas; Quiniou , René; Termier , Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a new model to detect and explain customer defection in a grocery retail context. This new model analyzes the evolution of each customer basket content. It therefore provides actionable knowledge for the retailer at an individual scale. In addition, this model is able to identify customers that are likely to defect in the future months.

  5. Kształcenie brokerów informacji w Polsce / Education information brokers in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Kustra

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We współczesnym świecie, w dobie Internetu, to informacja jest najważniejsza, ale żeby ocenić czy jest wiarygodna potrzebni są specjaliści – brokerzy informacji. W Polsce ten zawód jest jeszcze młody, a jego przedstawiciele nie mając własnego stowarzyszenia, stosują się do zasad kodeksu etyki infobrokerskiej stworzonego przez Association of Independent Information Professionals. Oferta kształcenia infobrokerów w Polsce jest coraz szersza i przyszli brokerzy informacji mogą się przygotowywać do zawodu na studiach I i II stopnia, studiach podyplomowych oraz na szkoleniach i kursach. English abstractIn the modern world, the age of the Internet, the information is important, but to assess whether there is credible experts are needed – information brokers. In Poland, the profession is still young, and it’s representatives don’t have their own associations, follow the rules of the Code of Ethical Business Practiced created by the Association of Independent Information Professionals. Offer infobrokerów education in Poland is getting wider and future information brokers can prepare for the profession at the undergraduate and secondary education, post-graduate studies and training courses.

  6. Designing and implementing a Quality Broker: the GeoViQua experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papeschi, Fabrizio; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Masò, Joan; Nativi, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    concerns the association between the user feedbacks and the affected products that are target of the report. This association is usually achieved by means of a Product Identifier (PID), but actually just a few products are annotated with their PID; recent studies show that on a total of more than 100000 Clearinghouse products, only some tens have the Product Identifier. Furthermore the association should be persistent within the GeoViQua scope. This work is focused on the typical use case in which the GeoViQua Broker performs data discovery from different data providers, and then integrates in the Quality Information Model the producer quality report with the feedback given by users. In particular, this work highlights the problems faced by the GeoViQua Broker and the techniques adopted to ensure consistency and persistency also for quality reports whose target products are not annotated with a PID.

  7. Survey on supply and demand of medicinal plants in Lorestan province groceries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fatemeh Naderi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of activities related to medicinal plant industry lead to maintenance and progress (improvement of society health. Attention to situation of medicinal plants in groceries, diagnosis different species, Value of consumption and supplier regions as most important factors in medicinal plants forum can be used for programming and politics in medicinal industry in our country. So via proper scientific programming we can achieve to better culture of medicinal plants consumption and we can improve health parameters in lorestan province. Materials and methods The research was accomplished with Cross-Sectional study and questionary technique was used for data collection. The questionnaire consist of 3 parts were included questions related to socioeconomic trait, number of medicinal plant and medicinal properties. All of the groceries in the lorestan province were studied as statistical society. Sampling method was availability sample and samples size was 69 groceries. Results Results showed that the numbers of medicinal plants in groceries were about 336 species, mean of sold weight Was 128.48 kg. 94.5% and 5.5% of medicinal plants were supplied from out of Lorestan and Lorestan province respectively. Conclusion Existence of special plains and mountains plentiful running water, high storage of under round water and different Climate in the lorestan province cause a considerable diversity in this province. Whereas the results of this study showed that the most important suppliers of medicinal plants were located out of this province therefore programming in the case of these valuable sources of medicinal plants will be because higher preoccupation and existence of these crops in the groceries of lorestan province, even can export these to other countries.

  8. Shopper marketing nutrition interventions: Social norms on grocery carts increase produce spending without increasing shopper budgets☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Collin R.; Niculescu, Mihai; Just, David R.; Kelly, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We assessed the efficacy of an easy-to-implement shopper marketing nutrition intervention in a pilot and two additional studies to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability or increasing shopper budgets. Methods We created grocery cart placards that detailed the number of produce items purchased (i.e., descriptive norm) at particular stores (i.e., provincial norm). The effect of these placards on produce spending was assessed across 971,706 individual person grocery store transactions aggregated by day. The pilot study designated a baseline period (in both control and intervention store) followed by installation of grocery cart placards (in the intervention store) for two weeks. The pilot study was conducted in Texas in 2012. In two additional stores, we designated baseline periods followed by 28 days of the same grocery cart placard intervention as in the pilot. Additional interventions were conducted in New Mexico in 2013. Results The pilot study resulted in a significant difference between average produce spending per day per person across treatment periods (i.e., intervention versus same time period in control) (16%) and the difference between average produce spending per day per person across stores in the control periods (4%); Furthermore, the same intervention in two additional stores resulted in significant produce spending increases of 12.4% and 7.5% per day per person respectively. In all stores, total spending did not change. Conclusions Descriptive and provincial social norm messages (i.e., on grocery cart placards) may be an overlooked tool to increase produce demand without decreasing store profitability and increasing shopper budgets. PMID:26844084

  9. 17 CFR 270.10b-1 - Definition of regular broker or dealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.10b-1 Definition of regular broker or dealer. The term regular broker or dealer of an investment company shall mean: (a) One... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of regular broker...

  10. 76 FR 163 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... broker exam would complete CBP Form 3124E, ``Application for Customs Broker License Exam''; or to apply... U.S.C. 1641. CBP Forms 3124 and 3124E may be found at http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/forms/ . Further information about the customs broker exam and how to apply for it may be found at http://www.cbp...

  11. 77 FR 17367 - Permissible Sharing of Client Records by Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ...-0038] RIN 1651-AA80 Permissible Sharing of Client Records by Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and... would allow brokers, upon the client's consent in a written authorization, to share client information... services to the broker's clients. Although the proposed rule was prepared in response to a request from a...

  12. 75 FR 66050 - Permissible Sharing of Client Records by Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    .... USCBP-2010-0038] RIN 1651-AA80 Permissible Sharing of Client Records by Customs Brokers AGENCIES... the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) pertaining to the obligations of customs brokers to keep clients' information confidential. The proposed amendment would allow brokers, upon the client's consent in a written...

  13. 77 FR 74546 - Posting of Pamphlet Provided for in the International Marriage Broker Regulation Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... Marriage Broker Regulation Act ACTION: Notice of posting of pamphlet provided for in section 833(a) of the International Marriage Broker Regulation Act, Title D of Public Law 109-162. SUMMARY: Section 833(a) of the International Marriage Broker Regulation Act, Title D of Public Law 109-162, provided that the Secretary of...

  14. 29 CFR 453.21 - Interests held in agents, brokers, and surety companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interests held in agents, brokers, and surety companies... LABOR-MANAGEMENT REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Qualified Agents, Brokers, and Surety Companies for the Placing of Bonds § 453.21 Interests held in agents, brokers, and surety companies. (a) Section...

  15. 17 CFR 250.4 - Exemption of certain brokers, dealers and underwriters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption of certain brokers... and General Exemptions § 250.4 Exemption of certain brokers, dealers and underwriters. (a) General exemption. Subject to the provision of § 250.6, any broker, dealer or underwriter, as defined in paragraph...

  16. 17 CFR 240.15b2-2 - Inspection of newly registered brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... brokers and dealers. 240.15b2-2 Section 240.15b2-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Regulations Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Registration of Brokers and Dealers § 240.15b2-2 Inspection of newly registered brokers and dealers. (a) Definition. For the purpose of this section the term...

  17. 17 CFR 405.3 - Notification provisions for certain registered government securities brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... certain registered government securities brokers and dealers. 405.3 Section 405.3 Commodity and Securities... REPORTS AND AUDIT § 405.3 Notification provisions for certain registered government securities brokers and dealers. (a) Every registered government securities broker or dealer, other than a government securities...

  18. 75 FR 67094 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... collection requirement concerning the: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers (19 CFR Part 111). This... Pertaining to Customs Brokers (19 CFR Part 111). OMB Number: 1651-0034. Form Numbers: CBP Forms 3124 and...

  19. 17 CFR 300.304 - Retained rights of brokers or dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retained rights of brokers or... Completion of Open Contractual Commitments § 300.304 Retained rights of brokers or dealers. (a) Nothing stated in these rules shall be construed to prejudice the right of a broker or dealer to any claim...

  20. 12 CFR 220.101 - Transactions of customers who are brokers or dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transactions of customers who are brokers or... OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) Interpretations § 220.101 Transactions of customers who are brokers or dealers. The Board has recently considered certain questions...

  1. 17 CFR 240.17h-2T - Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for brokers and dealers. 240.17h-2T Section 240.17h-2T Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Organizations § 240.17h-2T Risk assessment reporting requirements for brokers and dealers. (a) Reporting requirements of risk assessment information required to be maintained by section 240.17h-1T. (1) Every broker...

  2. 29 CFR 2580.412-22 - Interests held in agents, brokers and surety companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interests held in agents, brokers and surety companies... SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Qualified Agents, Brokers and Surety Companies for the Placing of Bonds § 2580.412-22 Interests held in agents, brokers and surety companies. Section 13(c...

  3. 17 CFR 230.139a - Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Publications by brokers or... Publications by brokers or dealers distributing asset-backed securities. The publication or distribution by a broker or dealer of information, an opinion or a recommendation with respect to asset-backed securities...

  4. 17 CFR 240.17a-7 - Records of non-resident brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... brokers and dealers. 240.17a-7 Section 240.17a-7 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-7 Records of non-resident brokers and dealers. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, each non-resident broker or dealer registered or applying for...

  5. 17 CFR 403.1 - Application of part to registered brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... registered brokers and dealers. 403.1 Section 403.1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges DEPARTMENT OF THE... SECURITIES AND BALANCES § 403.1 Application of part to registered brokers and dealers. With respect to their activities in government securities, compliance by registered brokers or dealers with § 240.8c-1 of this...

  6. 7 CFR 3565.108 - Responsibility for actions of agents and mortgage brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... brokers. 3565.108 Section 3565.108 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... Requirements § 3565.108 Responsibility for actions of agents and mortgage brokers. An approved lender is responsible for the actions of its agents and mortgage brokers. ...

  7. 17 CFR 404.5 - Securities counts by registered government securities brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... registered government securities brokers and dealers. 404.5 Section 404.5 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... AND PRESERVATION OF RECORDS § 404.5 Securities counts by registered government securities brokers and dealers. (a) Securities counts. Every registered government securities broker or dealer shall comply with...

  8. 13 CFR 120.956 - Suspension or revocation of brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... brokers and dealers. 120.956 Section 120.956 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... Suspension or revocation of brokers and dealers. The appropriate Office of Capital Access official in accordance with Delegations of Authority may suspend or revoke the privilege of any broker or dealer to...

  9. 29 CFR 2580.412-35 - Disqualification of agents, brokers and sureties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disqualification of agents, brokers and sureties. 2580.412...-35 Disqualification of agents, brokers and sureties. Since 13(c) is to be construed as disqualifying any agent, broker, surety or other company from having a bond placed through or with it, if the plan...

  10. 17 CFR 404.1 - Application of part to registered brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... registered brokers and dealers. 404.1 Section 404.1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges DEPARTMENT OF THE... PRESERVATION OF RECORDS § 404.1 Application of part to registered brokers and dealers. Compliance by a registered broker or dealer with § 240.17a-3 of this title (pertaining to records to be made), § 240.17a-4 of...

  11. 75 FR 3666 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock; Correction AGENCY: Internal... on Thursday, December 17, 2009, relating to reporting sales of securities by brokers and determining... 3, in the preamble, under paragraph heading ``a. Form and Manner of New Broker Reporting...

  12. 17 CFR 240.17a-11 - Notification provisions for brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... brokers and dealers. 240.17a-11 Section 240.17a-11 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-11 Notification provisions for brokers and dealers. (a) This section shall apply to every broker or dealer registered with the Commission pursuant to section 15 of the Act. (b)(1...

  13. 12 CFR 221.5 - Special purpose loans to brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special purpose loans to brokers and dealers... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM CREDIT BY BANKS AND PERSONS OTHER THAN BROKERS OR DEALERS FOR THE PURPOSE OF PURCHASING OR CARRYING MARGIN STOCK (REGULATION U) § 221.5 Special purpose loans to brokers and dealers. (a...

  14. 31 CFR 103.19 - Reports by brokers or dealers in securities of suspicious transactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reports by brokers or dealers in... Reports Required To Be Made § 103.19 Reports by brokers or dealers in securities of suspicious transactions. (a) General. (1) Every broker or dealer in securities within the United States (for purposes of...

  15. 17 CFR 240.15b1-1 - Application for registration of brokers or dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of brokers or dealers. 240.15b1-1 Section 240.15b1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... Rules and Regulations Under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Registration of Brokers and Dealers § 240.15b1-1 Application for registration of brokers or dealers. (a) An application for registration of...

  16. Interconnecting Multidiscilinary Data Infrastructures: From Federation to Brokering Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Standardization and federation activities have been played an essential role to push interoperability at the disciplinary and cross-disciplinary level. However, they demonstrated not to be sufficient to resolve important interoperability challenges, including: disciplinary heterogeneity, cross-organizations diversities, cultural differences. Significant international initiatives like GEOSS, IODE, and CEOS demonstrated that a federation system dealing with global and multi-disciplinary domain turns out to be rater complex, raising more the already high entry level barriers for both Providers and Users. In particular, GEOSS demonstrated that standardization and federation actions must be accompanied and complemented by a brokering approach. Brokering architecture and its implementing technologies are able to implement an effective interoperability level among multi-disciplinary systems, lowering the entry level barriers for both data providers and users. This presentation will discuss the brokering philosophy as a complementary approach for standardization and federation to interconnect existing and heterogeneous infrastructures and systems. The GEOSS experience will be analyzed, specially.

  17. Data analysis in an Object Request Broker environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malon, D.M.; May, E.N.; Grossman, R.L.; Day, C.T.; Quarrie, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Computing for the Next Millenium will require software interoperability in heterogeneous, increasingly object-oriented environments. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) is a software industry effort, under the aegis of the Object Management Group (OMG), to standardize mechanisms for software interaction among disparate applications written in a variety of languages and running on a variety of distributed platforms. In this paper, we describe some of the design and performance implications for software that must function in such a brokered environment in a standards-compliant way. We illustrate these implications with a physics data analysis example as a case study

  18. Data analysis in an object request broker environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malon, David M.; May, Edward N.; Grossman, Robert L.; Day, Christopher T.; Quarrie, David R.

    1996-01-01

    Computing for the Next Millennium will require software interoperability in heterogeneous, increasingly object-oriented environments. The Common Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) is a software industry effort, under the aegis of the Object Management Group (OMG), to standardize mechanism for software interaction among disparate applications written in a variety of languages and running on a variety of distributed platforms. In this paper, we describe some of the design and performance implications for software that must function is such a brokered environment in a standards-compliant way. We illustrate these implications with a physics data analysis example as a case study. (author)

  19. Building a High Performance Metadata Broker using Clojure, NoSQL and Message Queues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truslove, I.; Reed, S.

    2013-12-01

    In practice, Earth and Space Science Informatics often relies on getting more done with less: fewer hardware resources, less IT staff, fewer lines of code. As a capacity-building exercise focused on rapid development of high-performance geoinformatics software, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) built a prototype metadata brokering system using a new JVM language, modern database engines and virtualized or cloud computing resources. The metadata brokering system was developed with the overarching goals of (i) demonstrating a technically viable product with as little development effort as possible, (ii) using very new yet very popular tools and technologies in order to get the most value from the least legacy-encumbered code bases, and (iii) being a high-performance system by using scalable subcomponents, and implementation patterns typically used in web architectures. We implemented the system using the Clojure programming language (an interactive, dynamic, Lisp-like JVM language), Redis (a fast in-memory key-value store) as both the data store for original XML metadata content and as the provider for the message queueing service, and ElasticSearch for its search and indexing capabilities to generate search results. On evaluating the results of the prototyping process, we believe that the technical choices did in fact allow us to do more for less, due to the expressive nature of the Clojure programming language and its easy interoperability with Java libraries, and the successful reuse or re-application of high performance products or designs. This presentation will describe the architecture of the metadata brokering system, cover the tools and techniques used, and describe lessons learned, conclusions, and potential next steps.

  20. 17 CFR 240.17a-23 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements relating to broker-dealer trading systems. 240.17a-23 Section 240.17a-23 Commodity and Securities... relating to broker-dealer trading systems. (a) Scope of section. This section shall apply to any registered broker or dealer that acts as the sponsor of a broker-dealer trading system. (b) Definitions. For...

  1. 17 CFR 201.520 - Suspension of registration of brokers, dealers, or other Exchange Act-registered entities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... brokers, dealers, or other Exchange Act-registered entities: Application. 201.520 Section 201.520... Rules Relating to Temporary Orders and Suspensions § 201.520 Suspension of registration of brokers... of a registered broker, dealer, municipal securities dealer, government securities broker, government...

  2. 7 CFR 4290.1630 - Regulation of Brokers and Dealers and disclosure to purchasers of Leverage or Trust Certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulation of Brokers and Dealers and disclosure to... Brokers and Dealers and disclosure to purchasers of Leverage or Trust Certificates. (a) Brokers and Dealers. Each broker, dealer, and Pool or Trust assembler approved by the Secretary pursuant to these...

  3. School Business Community Partnership Brokers. Program Guidelines, 2010-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, 2009

    2009-01-01

    These guidelines for 2010-2013 relate specifically to the Partnership Brokers program. This program is part of the Australian Government's contribution to the Youth Attainment and Transitions National Partnership and will commence on 1 January 2010. These Guidelines set out the requirements for the provision of services by organisations contracted…

  4. Designing a Robot for Cultural Brokering in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yanghee

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of English language learning children in U.S. classrooms and the need for effective programs that support these children present a great challenge to the current educational paradigm. The challenge may be met, at least in part, by an innovative humanoid robot serving as a cultural broker that mediates collaborative…

  5. As Endowment Values Plummet, Some Institutions Consider Suing Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that as many as five colleges or charitable foundations whose endowments have suffered significant investment losses or were unable to access money in their accounts in recent months are considering legal action against their brokers or investment managers, alleging misrepresentation of risk or mismanagement. Jacob H.…

  6. Between Indian and White Worlds: The Cultural Broker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Margaret Connell, Ed.

    During the five centuries of contact between Native and non-Native peoples of the Americas, thousands of intermediaries have moved across the continents' cultural frontiers. These cultural brokers have included traders, missionaries, persons of mixed race, diplomats, Indian schoolchildren attending missionary or government boarding schools, White…

  7. An Education Broker Toolset for Web Course Customization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbach, Christian; Bodendorf, Freimut

    Within an electronic education market, an electronic education mall is defined as a virtual service center to support various transaction processes by providing a technological platform with appropriate value-added services and interfaces for suppliers and customers. In this context, an education broker service is of central importance, because…

  8. 12 CFR 703.8 - Broker-dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Broker-dealers. 703.8 Section 703.8 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT... commitments, as evidenced by capital strength, liquidity, and operating results. The Federal credit union...

  9. Knowledge Sharing in Construction Partnering - Redundancy, Boundary Objects and Brokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Thuesen, Christian Langhoff

    2013-01-01

    common assignment of meaning, brokers (e.g. design managers), boundary objects (e.g. drawings) and arenas (e.g. meetings). The paper presents an ethnographic case study of a project partnership between engineers, architects and contractors in construction using the partnering concept. The focus is on two...

  10. Evaluating Sustainability Models for Interoperability through Brokering Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Jay; Benedict, Karl; Best, Mairi; Fyfe, Sue; Jacobs, Cliff; Michener, William; Nativi, Stefano; Powers, Lindsay; Turner, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Sustainability of software and research support systems is an element of innovation that is not often discussed. Yet, sustainment is essential if we expect research communities to make the time investment to learn and adopt new technologies. As the Research Data Alliance (RDA) is developing new approaches to interoperability, the question of uptake and sustainability is important. Brokering software sustainability is one of the areas that is being addressed in RDA. The Business Models Team of the Research Data Alliance Brokering Governance Working Group examined several support models proposed to promote the long-term sustainability of brokering middleware. The business model analysis includes examination of funding source, implementation frameworks and challenges, and policy and legal considerations. Results of this comprehensive analysis highlight advantages and disadvantages of the various models with respect to the specific requirements for brokering services. We offer recommendations based on the outcomes of this analysis that suggest that hybrid funding models present the most likely avenue to long term sustainability.

  11. 12 CFR 303.243 - Brokered deposit waivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and use of brokered deposits; (7) A recent consolidated financial statement with balance sheet and income statements; and (8) The reasons the institution believes its acceptance, renewal or rollover of...) The time period for which the waiver is requested; (2) A statement of the policy governing the use of...

  12. 75 FR 11898 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security... 1641), and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51(b)), the following Customs...

  13. 76 FR 22912 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1641), and the U.S. Customs and...

  14. 77 FR 5819 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security... 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51), the following Customs...

  15. 75 FR 5618 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security... 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51(b)), the following Customs...

  16. 76 FR 22912 - Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs And Border Protection Notice of Revocation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS. ACTION: General Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 U.S.C. 1641) and the U.S. Customs and...

  17. 76 FR 7873 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ACTION...), and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51(b)), the following Customs...

  18. 77 FR 43609 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.... 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.53), the following Customs...

  19. 76 FR 44032 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.... 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51), the following Customs...

  20. 75 FR 52456 - Customs Broker License Examination Individual Eligibility Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection 19 CFR Part 111 [USCBP-2008-0059; CBP Dec. 10-28] RIN 1651-AA74 Customs Broker License Examination Individual Eligibility Requirements AGENCY: Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Final rule...

  1. 75 FR 47825 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.... 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51(b)), the following Customs...

  2. 75 FR 76998 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.... 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51), the following Customs...

  3. 76 FR 2918 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.... 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51), the following Customs...

  4. 75 FR 11899 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.... 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51), the following Customs...

  5. 76 FR 13205 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.... 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.45), the following Customs...

  6. 75 FR 75691 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker License AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.... 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.45), the following Customs...

  7. 75 FR 47825 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security... 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51), the following Customs...

  8. Information Brokers/Free-Lance Librarians: An Alternative Reference Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Matthew

    This paper examines the profession of information brokerage through a look at types of services provided, and through a discussion of major issues, including that of fee for service. The types of information broker and free-lance librarian services are identified: (1) non-profit reference and research services administered by public libraries and…

  9. 77 FR 45647 - Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Ferrara International Logistics 11930 New York. J.B. Fong & Co., Inc 06461 San Francisco. Air 7 Seas Transport Logistics, Inc 23081 San Francisco. Liberty Port Broker, Inc 20911 New York. Sky Sea Forwarding Corp 13261 New York. Contact Customs Clearance, Inc 13467 New York. Legacy Worldwide Logistics, Inc...

  10. Comparison of Grocery Purchase Patterns of Diet Soda Buyers to Those of Regular Soda Buyers

    OpenAIRE

    James, Binkley; Golub, Alla A.

    2007-01-01

    The ultimate effect of regular and diet carbonated soft drinks on energy intakes depends on possible relations with other dietary components. With this motivation, this study compared grocery purchase patterns of regular and diet soft drink consumers using a large sample of US single person households. We tested for differences in food spending shares allocated to 43 food categories chosen mainly for their desirable/undesirable nutritional properties. We also investigated whether differences ...

  11. Multiple and Symbol Operators: the Battle for Market Leadership in the Irish Grocery Market

    OpenAIRE

    O'Callaghan, Edmund; Wilcox, Mary

    2002-01-01

    The Irish grocery retailing market, one of the most competitive in Europe, has undergone a metamorphosis in recent years. The demise of many small grocers, an increased concentration of multiples and the galvanization of the independent sector through symbol group participation has intensified competitive rivalry. The two largest multiples ie. Tesco Ireland and Dunnes Stores continually vie for number one position nationally. In recent years, Musgrave have galvanised the independent sector an...

  12. Who Is Hurt by E-Commerce? Crowding out and Business Stealing in Online Grocery

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Pozzi

    2011-01-01

    I study the impact of e-commerce on competition in retail markets. Using scanner data from a large chain that markets grocery online and through traditional stores, I illustrate that selling online reduces the barrier of geographic differentiation and allows stealing business from competitors. Between 60% and 70% of the sales made online by the chain are stolen from other grocers, the rest coming from self cannibalization. I show that small stores are suffering the largest losses from this re...

  13. Supply chain risk management processes for resilience: A study of South African grocery manufacturers

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Simba; Wesley Niemann; Theuns Kotzé; Assilah Agigi

    2017-01-01

    Background: The supply chain risk management (SCRM) process is aimed at the implementation of strategies that assist in managing both daily and exceptional risks facing the supply chain through continuous risk assessment to reduce vulnerability and ensure continuity. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine whether the SCRM process enables supply chain resilience among grocery manufacturers in South Africa. The fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG)-manufacturing industry faces incre...

  14. Psychological Prices and Price Rigidity in Grocery Retailing: Analysis of German Scanner Data

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Roland; Moeser, Anke

    2005-01-01

    A substantial degree of price rigidity has been reported for branded foods in various studies with scanner data. One possible explanation for price rigidity is the existence of psychological pricing points. We analyze to which extent psychological pricing plays a role in grocery retailing and whether it contributes to price rigidity of branded foods in Germany. Psychological pricing defined here as just-below-the-round-figure-pricing is empirically analyzed with scanner data of weekly prices ...

  15. Semantic Web-based Vocabulary Broker for Open Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, B.; Neher, G.; Iyemori, T.; Murayama, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Koyama, Y.; King, T. A.; Galkin, I. A.; Fung, S. F.; Wharton, S.; Cecconi, B.

    2016-12-01

    Keyword vocabularies are used to tag and to identify data of science data repositories. Such vocabularies consist of controlled terms and the appropriate concepts, such as GCMD1 keywords or the ESPAS2 keyword ontology. The Semantic Web-based mash-up of domain-specific, cross- or even trans-domain vocabularies provides unique capabilities in the network of appropriate data resources. Based on a collaboration between GFZ3, the FHP4, the WDC for Geomagnetism5 and the NICT6 we developed the concept of a vocabulary broker for inter- and trans-disciplinary data detection and integration. Our prototype of the Semantic Web-based vocabulary broker uses OSF7 for the mash-up of geo and space research vocabularies, such as GCMD keywords, ESPAS keyword ontology and SPASE8 keyword vocabulary. The vocabulary broker starts the search with "free" keywords or terms of a specific vocabulary scheme. The vocabulary broker almost automatically connects the different science data repositories which are tagged by terms of the aforementioned vocabularies. Therefore the mash-up of the SKOS9 based vocabularies with appropriate metadata from different domains can be realized by addressing LOD10 resources or virtual SPARQL11 endpoints which maps relational structures into the RDF format12. In order to demonstrate such a mash-up approach in real life, we installed and use a D2RQ13 server for the integration of IUGONET14 data which are managed by a relational database. The OSF based vocabulary broker and the D2RQ platform are installed at virtual LINUX machines at the Kyoto University. The vocabulary broker meets the standard of a main component of the WDS15 knowledge network. The Web address of the vocabulary broker is http://wdcosf.kugi.kyoto-u.ac.jp 1 Global Change Master Directory2 Near earth space data infrastructure for e-science3 German Research Centre for Geosciences4 University of Applied Sciences Potsdam5 World Data Center for Geomagnetism Kyoto6 National Institute of Information and

  16. The Grocery Store Food Environment in Northern Greenland and Its Implications for the Health of Reproductive Age Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Zoe A; Shanks, Carmen Byker; Miles, Mary P; Rink, Elizabeth

    2018-02-01

    The population of Greenland is diminishing and environmental and social shifts implicate food availability and the health of reproductive age women. There is little knowledge of the grocery store food environment in Greenland. To address this gap and provide baseline information the present study measured food availability in five grocery stores in northern Greenland. As well, 15 interviews were conducted with reproductive age women, three grocery store managers were interviewed and one interview was conducted with a food distribution manager. Results show few fresh fruits and vegetables are available in grocery stores and in some stores no fresh foods are available. In Kullorsuaq, the primary location for this study, the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey in Stores score in spring 2016 was (3/30) and the Freedman Grocery Store Survey Score was (11/49). Interview results highlight a need to increase communication within the food system and to tailor food distribution policies to the Arctic context with longer term planning protocols for food distribution. These findings can be used to inform future food store environment research in Greenland and for informing policies that improve healthful food availability in grocery stores in northern Greenland.

  17. Reported Influences on Restaurant-Type Food Selection Decision Making in a Grocery Store Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Jessica Lynne; Arigo, Danielle

    2018-06-01

    To examine food decision-making priorities for restaurant-type foods at grocery stores and determine whether adding calorie information, as required by federal menu labeling laws, affected decision-making priorities. Natural experiment: intervention and control groups with baseline and follow-up. Regional grocery store chain with 9 locations. Participants (n = 393; mean age, 54.8 ± 15.1 years) were primarily women (71%) and Caucasian (95%). Data were collected before and after calorie information was added to restaurant-type foods at 4 intervention locations. Primary influencers of food selection decision making for restaurant-type foods and frequency of use of nutrition information. Quantitative analysis examined the top 3 influencers of food selections and chi-square goodness of fit test determined whether the calorie labeling intervention changed food decision-making priorities. Qualitative data were used to describe responses. Taste, cost, and convenience were the most frequently reported influencers of restaurant-type food selections; 20% of participants rated calories as influential. Calorie labeling did not affect food selection decision making; 16% of participants in intervention stores noticed calorie labels. Qualitative explanations confirmed these findings. Menu labeling laws increase access to calorie information; however, use of this information is limited. Additional interventions are needed to encourage healthier restaurant-type food selections in grocery stores. Copyright © 2018 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Relationships among grocery nutrition label users and consumers' attitudes and behavior toward restaurant menu labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, Mary G; Mathe-Soulek, Kimberly; Higgins, Joseph A

    2013-12-01

    In the United States (US), based on the 2010 Affordable Care Act, restaurant chains and similar retail food establishments with 20 or more locations are required to begin implementing calorie information on their menus. As enacting of the law begins, it is important to understand its potential for improving consumers' healthful behaviors. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore relationships among users of grocery nutrition labels and attitudes toward restaurant menu labeling, along with the caloric content of their restaurant menu selection. Study participants were surveyed and then provided identical mock restaurant menus with or without calories. Results found that participants who used grocery nutrition labels and believed they would make healthy menu selections with nutrition labels on restaurant menus made healthier menu selections, regardless of whether the menu displayed calories or not. Consumers' nutrition knowledge and behaviors gained from using grocery nutrition labels and consumers' desire for restaurants to provide nutrition menu labels have a positive effect on their choosing healthful restaurant menu items. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Role of Knowledge Brokers in International Ocean Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannix, H.

    2013-12-01

    The concept of the 'boundary' between science and policy has been used as a tool to separate and protect the credibility of both parties - the scientist and the policy maker. While this separation is important, it also results in frustration by both sides, a reduction in efficiency and ultimately establishes policy that has the potential to be more effective. Many now agree that the process of knowledge generation and transmission to decision makers, and eventually into effective policy, should not be a one-way, linear push of information, but a multi-party dialogue in which decision makers, scientists and intermediaries work together to increase the effectiveness of the scientific information for the policy process. These intermediaries, or knowledge brokers, are described as persons or organizations that actively facilitate the creation, sharing, and use of knowledge. This work discusses the reasons for the boundary between science and policy and the inherent challenges in bridging the boundary. It examines the role and activities of knowledge brokers and illuminates the process by which scientific and technical knowledge is translated from knowledge generators (i.e. scientists) to knowledge users (i.e. policy makers) in international environmental governance. The study then considers the role of knowledge brokers in practice, through a case study of the ongoing effort to establish marine protected areas in the high seas. Specifically, this study examines who the knowledge brokers are working on this topic, their activities, and what lessons their experiences hold for the effective translation of scientific information to policy makers in other international issues. The study concludes that 1) knowledge brokers and boundary organizations are an essential part of the effective translation of scientific knowledge to policy makers in international environmental governance and 2) both knowledge generators and knowledge users would benefit by recognizing the role of

  20. Induction of the mar operon by miscellaneous groceries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, A H; Lindsay, S; Lockwood, G B; Gilbert, P

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the potential of non-antibacterial consumer products to act as inducers of the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) operon of Escherichia coli SPC105. Wells were cut into chemically defined agar medium (CDM) contained within Petri dishes. Molten agar slurries were prepared by mixing known quantities of 35 consumer products with molten CDM and these were pipetted into each well. Plates were overlaid with molten CDM (5 ml), containing 40 microg ml(-1) X-gal and approx. 1000 CFU ml(-1) of an overnight culture of E. coli SPC105 containing a chromosomal marOII::lacZ fusion. After incubation (37 degrees C, 24 h), plates were examined for zones of growth inhibition and the presence of a blue coloration, indicative of mar (marOII::lacZ) induction. Of the 35 products tested (nine herbs and spices, 19 food and drinks and seven household products), 24 (69%) of the items produced inhibitory zones and 22 (63%) of the items induced mar expression. Apple puree was inhibitory but did not induce marOII::lacZ. Mustard, chilli and garlic were shown to be powerful inducers of marOII::lacZ. Overall six products were shown to be powerful marOII::lacZ inducers. None of these made hygiene claims. In addition to induction by specific biocides and antibiotics, mar is induced by the exposure of bacteria to natural substances, many of which are common to a domiciliary setting. Concern that the overuse of antibacterials within consumer products might select for mar-mediated resistance is shortsighted and fails to recognize the ubiquity of inducers in our environment.

  1. A Broker-based approach for GEOSS authentication/authorization services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Mattia; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) is a voluntary partnership of governments and international organizations coordinating efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). GEOSS aims to achieve societal benefits through voluntary contribution and sharing of resources to better understand the relationships between the society and the environment where we live. The GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) implements a digital infrastructure (e-infrastructure) that coordinates access to these systems, interconnecting and harmonizing their data, applications, models, and products. The GCI component implementing the needed interoperability arrangements to interconnect the data systems contributing to GEOSS is the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker). This provides a unique entry point to which client applications (i.e. the portals and apps) can connect for exploiting (search, discover, and access) resources available through GCI. The GEO DAB implements the brokering approach (Nativi et al., 2013) to build a flexible and scalable System of Systems. GEOSS data providers ask for information about who accessed their resources and, in some cases, want to limit the data download. GEOSS users ask for a profiled interaction with the system based on their needs and expertise level. This raised the need for an enrichment of GEO DAB functionalities, i.e. user authentication/authorization. Besides, authentication and authorization is necessary for GEOSS to provide moderated social services - e.g. feedback messages, data "fit for use" comments, etc. In the development of this new functionality, the need to support existing and well-used users' credentials (e.g. Google, Twitter, etc.) stems from GEOSS principles to build on existing systems and lower entry-barriers for users. To cope with these requirements and face the heterogeneity of technologies used by the different data systems and client applications, a broker-based approach for the authentication

  2. Strategic pricing possibilities of grocery retailers : an empirical study

    OpenAIRE

    Länsiluoto, Aapo; Back, Barbro; Vanharanta, Hannu

    2007-01-01

    The right pricing of products is one of the most important issues concerning the development of companies’ financial performance. Prices should be low enough to attract customers and at the same time high enough to cover all the emerged costs and expected profits. This research illustrates how self-organizing maps (SOM) can be used for pricing purposes. We show how changes in a company’s pricing policies would affect the company’s pricing position. The study illustrates clearly that companies...

  3. What Happens When Parents and Children Go Grocery Shopping? An Observational Study of Latino Dyads in Southern California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Joanna; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Elder, John P; Belch, George E; Castro, Iana A; Weibel, Nadir; Pickrel, Julie

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to observe parent-child interactions in tiendas, limited assortment food stores catering to Latinos in the United States, and to examine the extent to which child involvement influenced these interactions and their purchase outcomes. Two confederates, one posing as a tienda employee and one posing as a customer, observed the entire shopping trip of 100 Latino parent-child (mean age = 8 years) dyads and coded the following: number and type of parent- and child-initiated request interactions, types of purchase influence attempts used by children and how parents responded, and whether the product was purchased. Level of child involvement was examined as a potential influencing factor on purchasing. The observations were relatively short (mean duration of 10 minutes), reflecting the "quick trip" nature of the observed shopping trips. From the 100 parent-child dyads, 144 request interactions were observed, and among dyads with at least 1 request interaction during the shopping trip, the average number of request interactions per dyad was 2. Children initiated most of the request interactions by asking for a product or simply placing it in the basket; parents initiated 24% of the request interactions. Child involvement in shopping and checkout were associated with spending and purchase outcomes. These results indicate that children and parents influence each other during grocery shopping, and children who are more involved have greater influence over purchases. Furthermore, this study identified a number of targets for future family/parent and consumer food environment interventions.

  4. From Kisiizi to Baltimore: cultivating knowledge brokers to support global innovation for community engagement in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Chidinma A; Basu, Lopa; Gooden, Rachel; Syed, Shamsuzzoha B; Dadwal, Viva; Bone, Lee R; Ephraim, Patti L; Weston, Christine M; Wu, Albert W

    2018-02-09

    Reverse Innovation has been endorsed as a vehicle for promoting bidirectional learning and information flow between low- and middle-income countries and high-income countries, with the aim of tackling common unmet needs. One such need, which traverses international boundaries, is the development of strategies to initiate and sustain community engagement in health care delivery systems. In this commentary, we discuss the Baltimore "Community-based Organizations Neighborhood Network: Enhancing Capacity Together" Study. This randomized controlled trial evaluated whether or not a community engagement strategy, developed to address patient safety in low- and middle-income countries throughout sub-Saharan Africa, could be successfully applied to create and implement strategies that would link community-based organizations to a local health care system in Baltimore, a city in the United States. Specifically, we explore the trial's activation of community knowledge brokers as the conduit through which community engagement, and innovation production, was achieved. Cultivating community knowledge brokers holds promise as a vehicle for advancing global innovation in the context of health care delivery systems. As such, further efforts to discern the ways in which they may promote the development and dissemination of innovations in health care systems is warranted. Trial Registration Number: NCT02222909 . Trial Register Name: Reverse Innovation and Patient Engagement to Improve Quality of Care and Patient Outcomes (CONNECT). Date of Trial's Registration: August 22, 2014.

  5. Extending the GI Brokering Suite to Support New Interoperability Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, E.; Papeschi, F.; Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The GI brokering suite provides the discovery, access, and semantic Brokers (i.e. GI-cat, GI-axe, GI-sem) that empower a Brokering framework for multi-disciplinary and multi-organizational interoperability. GI suite has been successfully deployed in the framework of several programmes and initiatives, such as European Union funded projects, NSF BCube, and the intergovernmental coordinated effort Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Each GI suite Broker facilitates interoperability for a particular functionality (i.e. discovery, access, semantic extension) among a set of brokered resources published by autonomous providers (e.g. data repositories, web services, semantic assets) and a set of heterogeneous consumers (e.g. client applications, portals, apps). A wide set of data models, encoding formats, and service protocols are already supported by the GI suite, such as the ones defined by international standardizing organizations like OGC and ISO (e.g. WxS, CSW, SWE, GML, netCDF) and by Community specifications (e.g. THREDDS, OpenSearch, OPeNDAP, ESRI APIs). Using GI suite, resources published by a particular Community or organization through their specific technology (e.g. OPeNDAP/netCDF) can be transparently discovered, accessed, and used by different Communities utilizing their preferred tools (e.g. a GIS visualizing WMS layers). Since Information Technology is a moving target, new standards and technologies continuously emerge and are adopted in the Earth Science context too. Therefore, GI Brokering suite was conceived to be flexible and accommodate new interoperability protocols and data models. For example, GI suite has recently added support to well-used specifications, introduced to implement Linked data, Semantic Web and precise community needs. Amongst the others, they included: DCAT: a RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between Web data catalogs. CKAN: a data management system for data distribution, particularly used by

  6. Using an Acculturation-Stress-Resilience Framework to Explore Latent Profiles of Latina/o Language Brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Jennifer A; Marcoulides, Katerina M; Merolla, Andy J

    2017-12-01

    With survey data from 243 Latina/o early adolescent language brokers, latent profile analyses were conducted to identify different types (i.e., profiles) of brokers. Profiles were based on how often Latina/o early adolescents brokered for family members, as well as their levels of family-based acculturation stress, negative brokering beliefs, parentification, and positive brokering beliefs. Three brokering profiles emerged: (1) infrequent-ambivalents, (2) occasional-moderates, and (3) parentified-endorsers. Profile membership was significantly predicted by ethnic identification and brokering in a medical context. Respect, brokering at school, and brokering at home did not significantly predict profile membership. In addition, parentified-endorsers had more frequent perceived ethnic/racial discrimination and depressive symptoms than other profiles. In contrast, infrequent-ambivalents engaged in risky behaviors less frequently than other profiles. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2017 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  7. One-to-one modeling and simulation: a new approach in customer relationship management for grocery retail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydar, Cem M.

    2002-03-01

    The ever-increasing competition in retail industry puts pressure on retailers to deal with their customers more efficiently. Currently most companies use Customer Relationship Management (CRM) systems to maximize the customer satisfaction level by trying to understand more about their behaviors. However, one disadvantage of the current approaches is that they focus on the segmentation of customers into homogenous groups and they disregard examining the one-to-one relationship of each individual's behavior toward each product. Therefore, individual behavior cannot be captured in detail. Modeling individual behavior for each product enables several strategies of pricing by keeping the customer satisfaction at the maximum level. One example is offering a personal discount on a particular item to a customer who is price sensitive to that particular product. Therefore, you can still sell other products at the non-discounted level to this customer by keeping him satisfied. In this paper, individual pricing approach is discussed. The aim of this study is to develop a conceptual framework to analyze the feasibility of individual pricing. Customer behaviors can be modeled individually with respect to each product for a grocery store. Several factors can be used to determine these behaviors such as customer's need, brand loyalty and price sensitivity. Each customer can be modeled as an adaptive agent using qualitative descriptions of behaviors (i.e., highly price sensitive). Then, the overall shopping behavior can be simulated using a multi-agent Monte-Carlo simulation. It is expected that with this approach, retailers will be able to determine better strategies to obtain more profits, better sales and better customer satisfaction.

  8. Supporting people with disabilities in managing individual budgets: the role of support brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Emma D; O'Connor, Darlene Dee; McGaffigan, Erin

    2010-01-01

    Nationwide people with disabilities are self-directing their long-term care supports through individual budgets. Because these individuals may rely on a "support broker" to assist them in making and executing decisions regarding their budgets, the interactions between the participant and the support broker can influence participant autonomy. Massachusetts piloted a program for 14 participants to receive individual budgets for home and community-based services. Central to this pilot were the participant-designated support brokers, including home care case managers and peer advocates. Analysis of data on participants and support brokers indicated that the support brokers struggled with when, how, and how much to assist participants to self-direct. Case managers or other providers assuming the support broker's role will need proper training if they are to respond skillfully to challenging situations self-direction may bring.

  9. A Review on Broker Based Cloud Service Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Rajganesh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing emerged as a utility oriented computing that facilitates resource sharing under pay-as-you-go model. Nowadays, cloud offerings are not limited to range of services and anything can be shared as a service through the Internet. In this work, a detailed literature survey with respect to cloud service discovery and composition has been accounted. A proposed architecture with the inclusion of cloud broker is presented in our work. It focuses the importance of suitable service selection and its ranking towards fulfilling the customer’s service requirements. The proposed cloud broker advocates techniques such as reasoning and decision making capabilities for the improved cloud service selection and composition.

  10. Developing brokered community transportation for seniors and people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Jerry; Davis, Christie; Miftari, Caitlin; Salamone, Anne; Weise, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Communities are exploring ways to increase transportation coordination to improve access for seniors. One such effort is a brokered transportation system in which one agency serves as the central point of contact for ride information or actually arranging transportation for clients of multiple programs by use of a combination of transportation services. A team of social work faculty and students from the University of New Hampshire (UNH) Social Work Outreach Center, a center that provides service learning opportunities to students, collaborated with a local coalition to investigate the specific transportation needs of the region's senior citizens. A total of 641 people participated in the survey. Results indicate that the study population experiences problems reliably meeting daily living needs due to inconsistent or unavailable private and public transportation options. Study findings also indicate the promising potential of brokered transportation systems, particularly for isolated seniors in rural and suburban areas with relatively limited public and private transportation options.

  11. Towards a Brokering Framework for Business Process Execution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Mattia; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Roncella, Roberto; Mazzetti, Paolo; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Advancing our knowledge of environmental phenomena and their interconnections requires an intensive use of environmental models. Due to the complexity of Earth system, the representation of complex environmental processes often requires the use of more than one model (often from different disciplines). The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) launched the Model Web initiative to increase present accessibility and interoperability of environmental models, allowing their flexible composition into complex Business Processes (BPs). A few, basic principles are at the base of the Model Web concept (Nativi, et al.): (i) Open access, (ii) Minimal entry-barriers, (iii) Service-driven approach, and (iv) Scalability. This work proposes an architectural solution, based on the Brokering approach for multidisciplinary interoperability, aiming to contribute to the Model Web vision. The Brokering approach is currently adopted in the new GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) as was presented at the last GEO Plenary meeting in Istanbul, November 2011. We designed and prototyped a component called BP Broker. The high-level functionalities provided by the BP Broker are: • Discover the needed model implementations in an open, distributed and heterogeneous environment; • Check I/O consistency of BPs and provide suggestions for mismatches resolving: • Publish the EBP as a standard model resource for re-use. • Submit the compiled BP (EBP) to a WF-engine for execution. A BP Broker has the following features: • Support multiple abstract BP specifications; • Support encoding in multiple WF-engine languages. According to the Brokering principles, the designed system is flexible enough to support the use of multiple BP design (visual) tools, heterogeneous Web interfaces for model execution (e.g. OGC WPS, WSDL, etc.), and different Workflow engines. The present implementation makes use of BPMN 2.0 notation for BP design and jBPM workflow engine for eBP execution; however, the strong

  12. Reported attitudes and beliefs toward soy food consumption of soy consumers versus nonconsumers in natural foods or mainstream grocery stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyver, Tamara; Smith, Chery

    2005-01-01

    To examine the attitudes and beliefs of soy foods consumers (SCs) versus nonconsumers (NCs). Seven focus groups were conducted. Mainstream or natural foods grocery stores. Fifty-three participants, ages 18 to 91 years. Focus groups included discussions on lifestyle practices, beliefs about soy, conversion to soy consumption, and suggestions on how to increase soy consumption. Common themes were identified, coded, and compared using NVivo computer software. Barriers to soy consumption included soy's image, a lack of familiarity with how to prepare soy foods, and a perception that soy foods were an inadequate flavor substitute for animal-based products. SCs' conversion to regular consumption was initiated by food intolerances, an increased interest in health, or an adoption of a vegetarian or natural foods lifestyle and was sustained because they enjoyed the flavor. Many participants did not know why soy was considered healthful, whereas others identified it as "heart healthy," a source of protein, and good for women's health. Some SCs had become concerned regarding the controversy surrounding breast cancer and soy consumption. Improving soy's image and educating consumers on its preparation could increase soy consumption.

  13. Country-of-origin labeling prior to and at the point of purchase: an exploration of the information environment in Baltimore City grocery stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagasse, Lisa P; Love, David C; Smith, Katherine Clegg

    2014-01-01

    The country-of-origin labeling (COOL) law requires United States grocers to indicate the origin and procurement method (farm-raised or wild-caught) for seafood. This study explored the presentation of COOL on fresh, frozen, packaged, and unpackaged seafood in Baltimore City grocery stores. Eight stores were visited bi-monthly to photograph seafood labels, and circulars were collected weekly from fourteen stores over three months. Ninety-six percent of products were labeled correctly. Forty-eight percent of advertisements included COOL. While in-store labels did not highlight COOL, advertising featured references to domestic and wild-caught seafood, signaling to customers that these are high-value product qualities.

  14. Grocery store beverage choices by participants in federal food assistance and nutrition programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyeva, Tatiana; Luedicke, Joerg; Henderson, Kathryn E; Tripp, Amanda S

    2012-10-01

    Sugar-sweetened beverages are a target for reduction in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Concerns have been raised about sugar-sweetened beverages purchased with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. This paper describes purchases of non-alcoholic refreshment beverages among participants in the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and SNAP. Grocery store scanner data from a regional supermarket chain were used to assess refreshment beverage purchases of 39,172 households in January-June 2011. The sample consisted of families with a history of WIC participation in 2009-2011; about half also participated in SNAP. Beverage spending and volume purchased were compared for WIC sampled households either using SNAP benefits (SNAP) or not (WIC-only). Analyses were completed in 2012. Refreshment beverages were a significant contributor to expenditure on groceries by SNAP and WIC households. Sugar-sweetened beverages accounted for 58% of refreshment beverage purchases made by SNAP households and 48% of purchases by WIC-only households. Soft drinks were purchased most by all households. Fruit-based beverages were mainly 100% juice for WIC-only households and sugary fruit drinks for SNAP households. SNAP benefits paid for 72% of the sugar-sweetened beverage purchases made by SNAP households. Nationwide, SNAP was estimated to pay at least $1.7 to $2.1 billion annually for sugar-sweetened beverages purchased in grocery stores. Considerable amounts of sugar-sweetened beverages are purchased by households participating in WIC and SNAP. The SNAP program pays for most of the sugar-sweetened beverage purchases among SNAP households. The upcoming SNAP reauthorization could be a good time to reconsider the program priorities to align public funds with public health. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Determinants and consequences of child culture brokering in families from the former Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Curtis J; Trickett, Edison J; Birman, Dina

    2012-09-01

    Child culture brokering occurs when immigrant children help their families navigate the new culture and language. The present study develops a model of the child culture broker role that situates it within the family and community economic and acculturative contexts of 328 families from the former Soviet Union. Path analysis was utilized to explore the relationships of community and family economic and cultural contexts with child culture brokering, child emotional distress, and family disagreements. All children reported some culture brokering for their parents. Less English proficient parents with lower status jobs, and living in areas with more Russian speaking families tended to utilize their children as brokers more often. Further, community economic conditions also predicted brokering indirectly, mediated by parent job social status. Brokering was related to child emotional distress and family disagreements. Further, culture brokering was a mediator of the impact of parent job social status on both child emotional distress and family disagreements. These results add to our understanding of the culture broker role and emphasize the utility of approaching research on it from an ecological perspective.

  16. Taikongs and Calos: the role of middlemen and brokers in Javanese international migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaan, E

    1994-01-01

    "This article discusses international migration from Java in the past and present and the role brokers have played in stimulating this movement. It describes legal and clandestine labor migration to Singapore, Malaysia, and Saudi Arabia, the influence of employment brokers on the process, and the organization of the recruitment networks. The involvement of brokers is crucial but not always beneficial for the migrants. Migrants are dependent on the brokers and risk exploitation. In the case of movement to Saudi Arabia, there is a linkage with religious institutions and the Islamic pilgrimage." excerpt

  17. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Grocery Stores (Revised) (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, B.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders successfully plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited in these guides. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. Grocery stores were selected as one of the highest priority sectors, because they represent one of the most energy-intensive market segments.

  18. Brokering technologies to realize the hydrology scenario in NSF BCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, Enrico; Easton, Zachary; Fuka, Daniel; Pearlman, Jay; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In the National Science Foundation (NSF) BCube project an international team composed of cyber infrastructure experts, geoscientists, social scientists and educators are working together to explore the use of brokering technologies, initially focusing on four domains: hydrology, oceans, polar, and weather. In the hydrology domain, environmental models are fundamental to understand the behaviour of hydrological systems. A specific model usually requires datasets coming from different disciplines for its initialization (e.g. elevation models from Earth observation, weather data from Atmospheric sciences, etc.). Scientific datasets are usually available on heterogeneous publishing services, such as inventory and access services (e.g. OGC Web Coverage Service, THREDDS Data Server, etc.). Indeed, datasets are published according to different protocols, moreover they usually come in different formats, resolutions, Coordinate Reference Systems (CRSs): in short different grid environments depending on the original data and the publishing service processing capabilities. Scientists can thus be impeded by the burden of discovery, access and normalize the desired datasets to the grid environment required by the model. These technological tasks of course divert scientists from their main, scientific goals. The use of GI-axe brokering framework has been experimented in a hydrology scenario where scientists needed to compare a particular hydrological model with two different input datasets (digital elevation models): - the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) dataset, v.2. - the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset, v.3. These datasets were published by means of Hyrax Server technology, which can provide NetCDF files at their original resolution and CRS. Scientists had their model running on ArcGIS, so the main goal was to import the datasets using the available ArcPy library and have EPSG:4326 with the same resolution grid as the

  19. Ensuring consistency and persistence to the Quality Information Model - The role of the GeoViQua Broker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, Lorenzo; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Nativi, Stefano; Bastin, Lucy; Masó, Joan

    2013-04-01

    a few products are annotated with their PID; recent studies show that on a total of about 100000 Clearinghouse products, only 37 have the Product Identifier. Furthermore the association should be persistent within the GeoViQua scope. GeoViQua architecture is built on the brokering approach successfully experimented within the EuroGEOSS project and realized by the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker). Part of the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI), the GEO DAB allows for harmonization and distribution in a transparent way for both users and data providers. This way, GeoViQua can effectively complement and extend the GEO DAB obtaining a Quality-augmentation broker (GeoViQua Broker) which plays a central role in ensuring the consistency of the Producer and User quality models. This work is focused on the typical use case in which the GeoViQua Broker performs data discovery from different data providers, and then integrates in the Quality Information Model the producer quality report with the feedback given by users. In particular, this work highlights the problems faced by the GeoViQua Broker and the techniques adopted to ensure consistency and persistency also for quality reports whose target products are not annotated with a PID. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement n° 265178.

  20. Semantic Mediation via Access Broker: the OWS-9 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Mattia; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Craglia, Massimo; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Even with the use of common data models standards to publish and share geospatial data, users may still face semantic inconsistencies when they use Spatial Data Infrastructures - especially in multidisciplinary contexts. Several semantic mediation solutions exist to address this issue; they span from simple XSLT documents to transform from one data model schema to another, to more complex services based on the use of ontologies. This work presents the activity done in the context of the OGC Web Services Phase 9 (OWS-9) Cross Community Interoperability to develop a semantic mediation solution by enhancing the GEOSS Discovery and Access Broker (DAB). This is a middleware component that provides harmonized access to geospatial datasets according to client applications preferred service interface (Nativi et al. 2012, Vaccari et al. 2012). Given a set of remote feature data encoded in different feature schemas, the objective of the activity was to use the DAB to enable client applications to transparently access the feature data according to one single schema. Due to the flexible architecture of the Access Broker, it was possible to introduce a new transformation type in the configured chain of transformations. In fact, the Access Broker already provided the following transformations: Coordinate Reference System (CRS), spatial resolution, spatial extent (e.g., a subset of a data set), and data encoding format. A new software module was developed to invoke the needed external semantic mediation service and harmonize the accessed features. In OWS-9 the Access Broker invokes a SPARQL WPS to retrieve mapping rules for the OWS-9 schemas: USGS, and NGA schema. The solution implemented to address this problem shows the flexibility and extensibility of the brokering framework underpinning the GEO DAB: new services can be added to augment the number of supported schemas without the need to modify other components and/or software modules. Moreover, all other transformations (CRS

  1. The economic impact of reduced value added tax rates for groceries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomíra Martinková

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The value added tax represents one of the most important sources of state budget revenues of EU Member States. The basic value added tax rate is in the EU currently between 15% in Luxembourg to 27% applied in Hungary. The revenues from this tax represent an average of 17.5% of all tax revenues of EU countries and create an average GDP of 7.0% (year 2016, EU 28. As revenues from value added tax represent a stable income of state budget, the legislative changes in the system of value added tax, mainly its reductions as well as its imposition on groceries, can significantly influence further macroeconomic development. In the last year, the government of the Slovak Republic implemented changes in universal indirect taxing in such way that in addition to the standard value added tax rate of 20%, the Act No. 268/2015 on Value added tax adopted in 2016 a decreased value added tax rate of 10% on selected groceries, in order to support domestic producers and reduce the tax burden of low-income and middle-income groups. According to the European Commission (2007, the reduced rate of value added tax in selected cases has its justification and importance in the country's economy. The aim of this paper is to analyse the economic impact of the applied reduced value added tax on food in the Slovak Republic in the context of household expenditures and revenues of the state budget.

  2. A framework for understanding grocery purchasing in a low-income urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, Drew A; Palmer, Anne M; Beckham, Sarah W; Surkan, Pamela J

    2013-05-01

    Research demonstrates that food desert environments limit low-income shoppers' ability to purchase healthy foods, thereby increasing their likelihood of diet-related illnesses. We sought to understand how individuals in an urban American food desert make grocery-purchasing decisions, and specifically why unhealthy purchases arise. Analysis is based on ethnographic data from participant observation, 37 in-depth interviews, and three focus groups with low-income, primarily African American shoppers with children. We found participants had detailed knowledge of and preference for healthy foods, but the obligation to consistently provide food for their families required them to apply specific decision criteria which, combined with structural qualities of the supermarket environment, increased unhealthy purchases and decreased healthy purchases. Applying situated cognition theory, we constructed an emic model explaining this widely shared grocery-purchasing decision process and its implications. This context-specific understanding of behavior suggests that multifaceted, system-level approaches to intervention are needed to increase healthy purchasing in food deserts.

  3. Food safety issues and training methods for ready-to-eat foods in the grocery industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Margaret; Ghiselli, Richard

    2005-10-01

    As Americans have become more pressed for time, the use of convenient, simplified meals become a way of life. One aspect of this trend, known as Home Meal Replacement (IIMR), has increased in sales since its inception. Between 1999 and 2001, the average annual expenditure per consumer rose 5.6 pereent, and $958 per person per year was spent in 2002. Along with this growth, food safety risks may have increased. The study reported here examined efforts being undertaken by grocery and convenience stores to control the wholesomeness of INR food items. After a convenience sample of 500 grocery store executives was identified, a 32-item questionnaire was developed and mailed to the executives. The results indicate that the industry has taken food safety seriously with only 10 pereent reporting that they have no food safety training. The executives cited employee turnover as a major concern in food safety today, along with lack of food safety knowledge of the consumer and improper holding temperatures.

  4. Grocery store podcast about omega-3 fatty acids influences shopping behaviors: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangia, Deepika; Palmer-Keenan, Debra M

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether listening to a podcast about omega-3 fatty acids (n-3s) while grocery shopping increased shoppers' awareness about and purchases of seafood and other foods rich in n-3s. Repeated-measures design with a convenience sample (n = 56) of grocery shoppers who listened to the podcast while shopping. Pre- and postintervention semistructured interviews were conducted. The Theory of Reasoned Action was the study's framework. Shoppers were primarily females (mean age, 41 ± 15.3 years). Their perceived ability to buy [t(55) = 6.27, P buying [t(55) = 3.38, P future purchases. Podcasts may effectively communicate nutrition information. More research with a larger sample size is needed to evaluate the effects of the podcast on long-term changes in shopping behavior. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating the Impact of Business Intelligence Tools on Organizational Performance in Food and Groceries Retail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailaja Venuturumilli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While retailers are spending a significant portion of its information technology (IT budgets on BI and related technology in order to handle the ever increasing volumes of data, the actual benefits derived from these tools needs to be explored. The study focuses on the organized food and groceries retail, and explores benefits of business intelligence (BI and hypothesis‟s a structural causal relationship among its intrinsic attributes, and impact on organizational performance. A focus group of selected senior marketing employees was used to develop and validate the research model. Based on findings from the literature survey and focus group, a survey instrument was developed to empirically validate the research model. Data collected from senior marketing executives and managers from six organized food and groceries retail was analyzed using exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation modeling. Five major categories of BI were identified: (1 access to data quality, (2 improved managerial effectiveness, (3 improved operational effectiveness, (4 improved customer orientation and (5 improved organizational efficiency. From the structural causal relationship analysis, a significant relationship was found between intrinsic attributes and benefits of BI and data quality. The structural equation model also suggests a significant relationship between BI and data quality on organizational performance.

  6. The correlation between cherry picking and the distance that consumers travel to do grocery shopping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Van Scheers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Retailers often use price promotions to discriminate between consumers who can shift purchases over time and those who cannot. Retailers consistently tend to charge lower prices than necessary, pricing defensively to prevent loyal customers from cherry picking, or shifting to competitors. Knowledge about cherry picking behaviour will enable retailers to obtain a higher share of disposable income from even price-sensitive shoppers, while at the same time charging higher prices. Recent studies indicate that effective cherry picking entails saving costs through price searching over time, price searching across stores, or both. This study examines the relationship between cherry picking and the distance that consumers travel to do grocery shopping. Interviews were conducted at ten different retail outlets over three days, and the results show that there is a highly significant correlation between cherry picking and the distance that consumers travel to do grocery shopping.These results should help retailers to benefit from cherry picking by taking a proactive approach to store switching and store location, two of the main influences on cherry picking behaviour.

  7. Evaluation of a Cooperative Extension Service Curriculum on Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Grocery Shop, Prepare Food, and Eat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Janice R.; Johnston, Jan H.; Brosi, Whitney A.; Jaco, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The Empowering Older Adults with Assistive Technology to Shop, Cook and Eat curriculum was designed to provide education about concepts of empowerment and assistive technology for grocery shopping, preparing food, and eating. The curriculum included examples and hands-on demonstrations of assistive technology devices for grocery shopping, food…

  8. Knowledge sharing in construction partnering projects - redundancy, boundary objects and brokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Thuesen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    is on two dialogue excerpts, one on process, and one on product knowledge exchanges. The diversity and disjunctive feature of the practices form a condition of possibility for knowledge handling and synthesis into the built construct. Relation-based interaction is necessary with boundary objects and brokers......This article adopts practice-based theory for understanding inter-organisational knowledge work and extends it with a discussion of the role of redundancy. In this view, a constellation of firms is a multiple configuration of communities of practices, characterised by overlapping practises......, multiple memberships and different levels of participation, and accompanied by a governance frame. The paper discusses central mechanisms for coordinating knowledge in such a complex construction project. The knowledge relations are conceptualised through focusing on redundancy, understood as negotiated...

  9. Language Brokering, Acculturation, and Empowerment: Evidence from South Asian Canadian Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cila, Jorida; Lalonde, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the practice of language brokering (LB) among South Asian Canadian college-age adults and how such practice relates to acculturation to mainstream and heritage cultures, as well as personal empowerment. One hundred and twenty-four young adults reported on three different indices of LB (brokering frequency, diversity of…

  10. Teacher-as-Knowledge-Broker in a Futures-Oriented Health and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Doune

    2015-01-01

    The concept of brokering is usually aligned with a business model of an intermediary helping the customer/client with their decisions/choices. As knowledge becomes increasingly accessible, and of varied origins, quality and veracity, the number of professionals engaged in knowledge brokering is simultaneously increasing. This paper considers if…

  11. 75 FR 69791 - Risk Management Controls for Brokers or Dealers With Market Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... relationship with the ultimate customer, can more effectively implement them. In addition, a broker or dealer... specific risk management controls and supervisory procedures to a customer that is a registered broker... such customer, based on its position in the transaction and relationship with the ultimate customer...

  12. 75 FR 71723 - Policies and Procedures Pertaining to Changes in Listing Brokers Participating in the Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... estate brokers may participate as Listing or Selling brokers under FHA's Management and Marketing III (M... disposition of its REO inventory to private sector contractors under the Management and Marketing (M&M..., program support, management and marketing services throughout the United States, the Caribbean, Guam and...

  13. 78 FR 23116 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Debt Instruments and Options...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... in the burden on Form 1099-B, ``Proceeds from Broker and Barter Exchange Transactions,'' when revised... not provide them sufficient time to build and test the systems required to implement the reporting... to allow brokers to test and refine their reporting systems. In response to these comments, as was...

  14. 78 FR 48458 - Notice of Reinstatement of Revoked Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Reinstatement of Revoked Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Reinstatement of customs broker licenses that were erroneously revoked. SUMMARY: CBP...

  15. 77 FR 25729 - Notice of Correction of Revoked Customs Broker Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Correction of Revoked Customs Broker Licenses AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security... Customs broker licenses were inadvertently revoked without prejudice on November 18, 2011. See Notice of...

  16. 76 FR 78182 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Debt Instruments and Options...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 [REG-102988-11] RIN 1545-BK05 Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Debt Instruments and Options..., November 25, 2011 (76 FR 72652) relating to reporting by brokers for transactions related to debt...

  17. Health Brokers: How Can They Help Deal with the Wickedness of Public Health Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rinsum, Celeste E; Gerards, Sanne M P L; Rutten, Geert M; van de Goor, Ien A M; Kremers, Stef P J

    2017-01-01

    The role of health broker is a relatively new one in public health. Health brokers aim to create support for efforts to optimise health promotion in complex or even "wicked" public health contexts by facilitating intersectoral collaborations and by exchanging knowledge with different stakeholders. The current study aimed to explore the role of health brokers, by examining the motivational, contextual, and behaviour-related factors they have to deal with. Fifteen professionals from various backgrounds and from various policy and practice organisations were recruited for a semistructured interview. To structure the interviews, we developed the "Health Broker Wheel" (HBW), a framework we then specified with more details derived from the interviews. We identified seven primary types of behaviour that health brokers need to engage in: recognizing opportunities, agenda setting, implementing, network formation, intersectoral collaboration, adaptive managing, and leadership. Determinants of health brokers' behaviours were identified and categorised as capability, opportunities, motivation, and local or national contextual factors. The health brokers' role can be seen as an operational approach and is visualised in the HBW. This framework can assist further research to monitor and evaluate this role, and health promotion practitioners can use it as a tool to implement the health brokers' role and to facilitate intersectoral collaboration.

  18. Living in/between Two Worlds: Narratives of Latina Cultural Brokers in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lando, Jennifer Rose

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this narrative study was to explore how Latina cultural brokers understand their role in translating and interpreting complex, adult situations for their families, called cultural brokering, and how that background shapes their collegiate experiences. While much of the higher education literature in recent years has focused on the…

  19. 26 CFR 1.6045-1T - Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Returns of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary). 1.6045-1T Section 1.6045-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... of information of brokers and barter exchanges (temporary). (a)-(k) [Reserved] For further guidance...

  20. Health brokers : How can they help deal with the wickedness of public health problems?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rinsum, C.E.; Gerards, S.M.P.L.; Rutten, G.J.M.; Van De Goor, L.A.M.; Kremers, S.P.J.

    Background The role of health broker is a relatively new one in public health. Health brokers aim to create support for efforts to optimise health promotion in complex or even “wicked” public health contexts by facilitating intersectoral collaborations and by exchanging knowledge with different

  1. 13 CFR 107.1640 - SBA access to records of the CRA, Brokers, Dealers and Pool or Trust assemblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false SBA access to records of the CRA, Brokers, Dealers and Pool or Trust assemblers. 107.1640 Section 107.1640 Business Credit and Assistance... records of the CRA, Brokers, Dealers and Pool or Trust assemblers. The CRA and any broker, dealer and Pool...

  2. 7 CFR 4290.1640 - Secretary's access to records of the CRA, Brokers, Dealers and Pool or Trust assemblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Secretary's access to records of the CRA, Brokers, Dealers and Pool or Trust assemblers. 4290.1640 Section 4290.1640 Agriculture Regulations of the... to records of the CRA, Brokers, Dealers and Pool or Trust assemblers. The CRA and any broker, dealer...

  3. 17 CFR 240.10b-3 - Employment of manipulative and deceptive devices by brokers or dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... deceptive devices by brokers or dealers. 240.10b-3 Section 240.10b-3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Contrivances § 240.10b-3 Employment of manipulative and deceptive devices by brokers or dealers. (a) It shall be unlawful for any broker or dealer, directly or indirectly, by the use of any means or...

  4. 49 CFR 385.14 - Motor carriers, brokers, and freight forwarders delinquent in paying civil penalties: prohibition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor carriers, brokers, and freight forwarders....14 Motor carriers, brokers, and freight forwarders delinquent in paying civil penalties: prohibition... commerce under 49 CFR 386.83. (b) A broker, freight forwarder, or for-hire motor carrier that has failed to...

  5. 17 CFR 240.15c1-3 - Misrepresentation by brokers, dealers and municipal securities dealers as to registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Misrepresentation by brokers...-The-Counter Markets § 240.15c1-3 Misrepresentation by brokers, dealers and municipal securities..., as used in section 15(c)(1) of the Act, is hereby defined to include any representation by a broker...

  6. 31 CFR 103.17 - Reports by futures commission merchants and introducing brokers in commodities of suspicious...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... merchants and introducing brokers in commodities of suspicious transactions. 103.17 Section 103.17 Money and... merchants and introducing brokers in commodities of suspicious transactions. (a) General—(1) Every futures commission merchant (“FCM”) and introducing broker in commodities (“IB-C”) within the United States shall...

  7. Toward an Intelligent Event Broker: Automated Transient Classificaiton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, P.

    In order to succeed, the massive time-domain surveys of the future must automatically identify actionable information from the torrent of imaging data, classify emerging events, and optimize the follow-up strategy. To address this challenge, we are developing a fully autonomous, distributed event broker that will integrate cutting edge machine learning algorithms with high performance computing infrastructure. The talk will give an overview of this work and recent progress on image level variability detection and spectral classification using low resolution spectra.

  8. GEOSS authentication/authorization services: a Broker-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.

    2014-12-01

    The vision of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is the achievement of societal benefits through voluntary contribution and sharing of resources to better understand the relationships between the society and the environment where we live. The GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) allows users to search, access, and use the resources contributed by the GEOSS members. The GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker) is the GCI component in charge of interconnecting the heterogeneous data systems contributing to GEOSS. Client applications (i.e. the portals and apps) can connect to GEO DAB as a unique entry point to discover and access resources available through GCI, with no need to implement the many service protocols and models applied by the GEOSS data providers. The GEO DAB implements the brokering approach (Nativi et al., 2013) to build a flexible and scalable System of Systems. User authentication/authorization functionality is becoming more and more important for GEOSS data providers and users. The Providers ask for information about who accessed their resources and, in some cases, want to limit the data download. The Users ask for a profiled interaction with the system based on their needs and expertise level. Besides, authentication and authorization is necessary for GEOSS to provide moderated social services - e.g. feedback messages, data "fit for use" comments, etc. In keeping with the GEOSS principles of building on existing systems and lowering entry-barriers for users, an objective of the authentication/authorization development was to support existing and well-used users' credentials (e.g. Google, Twitter, etc.). Due to the heterogeneity of technologies used by the different providers and applications, a broker-based approach for the authentication/authorization was introduced as a new functionality of GEO DAB. This new capability will be demonstrated at the next GEO XI Plenary (November 2014). This work will be presented and discussed

  9. Environmental risk assessors as honest brokers or stealth advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calow, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Risk assessment ought to provide a solid, evidence base to risk management in the development of environmental policy and decisions, where the risk assessors act without advocacy as honest brokers of science advice. But there are concerns that the values of the risk assessors might undermine the objectivity of the process. For similar reasons, there is suspicion that more interaction between risk assessors and risk managers might contaminate the science. On the contrary, here the argument is that making risk assessment more management- and value-relevant, through more effective dialogue, provides a better foundation for objective science advice.

  10. The feasibility and utility of grocery receipt analyses for dietary assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Yan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To establish the feasibility and utility of a simple data collection methodology for dietary assessment. Design Using a cross-sectional design, trained data collectors approached adults (~20 – 40 years of age at local grocery stores and asked whether they would volunteer their grocery receipts and answer a few questions for a small stipend ($1. Methods The grocery data were divided into 3 categories: "fats, oils, and sweets," "processed foods," and "low-fat/low-calorie substitutions" as a percentage of the total food purchase price. The questions assessed the shopper's general eating habits (eg, fast-food consumption and a few demographic characteristics and health aspects (eg, perception of body size. Statistical Analyses Performed. Descriptive and analytic analyses using non-parametric tests were conducted in SAS. Results Forty-eight receipts and questionnaires were collected. Nearly every respondent reported eating fast food at least once per month; 27% ate out once or twice a day. Frequency of fast-food consumption was positively related to perceived body size of the respondent (p = 0.02. Overall, 30% of the food purchase price was for fats, oils, sweets, 10% was for processed foods, and almost 6% was for low-fat/low-calorie substitutions. Households where no one was perceived to be overweight spent a smaller proportion of their food budget on fats, oils, and sweets than did households where at least one person was perceived to be overweight (p = 0.10; household where the spouse was not perceived to be overweight spent less on fats, oils, and sweets (p = 0.02 and more on low-fat/low-calorie substitutions (p = 0.09 than did households where the spouse was perceived to be overweight; and, respondents who perceived themselves to be overweight spent more on processed foods than did respondents who did not perceive themselves to be overweight (p = 0.06. Conclusion This simple dietary assessment method, although global in

  11. "Hello Jumbo!” The spatio-temporal rollout and traffic to a new grocery chain after acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lin, Arjen; Gijsbrechts, Els

    Grocery retailers increasingly use acquisitions to expand their presence. Such acquisitions are risky, especially when retailers decide to subsume the acquired stores under their own banner, which can take years and demands careful planning. We show how the dynamics of consumer valuations of the old

  12. Making working in retailing interesting: A study of human resource management practices in Danish grocery retail chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.; Buck, Nuka

    In this paper we investigate the human resource management practices of five Danish grocery retail chains from the perspective of both retailers and employees. We present an analytical framework for analysing the social and institutional context of Danish retailing and interpret our case study...

  13. Grocery Store (or Supermarket) Tours as an Effective Nutrition Education Medium: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaus, Cassandra J; Muzaffar, Henna; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate evidence regarding grocery store tours as an effective nutrition education medium for improving nutrition knowledge and food-related behaviors. A systematic literature review of studies published from 1984 to 2015 concerning grocery store (or supermarket) tours and impact on nutrition knowledge and behaviors. Three investigators independently reviewed articles, extracted details, and assessed the quality of each study. Of 307 citations identified, 8 were reviewed and 6 were of neutral quality. Increases in nutrition knowledge were reported in 4 studies, as evaluated by investigator-designed quizzes, with short intervals between tours and assessments. Six programs assessed behavior change using subjective reports or objective purchasing behavior measures; 2 studies did not perform statistical analyses. The 6 studies that reported positive health-related outcomes had varying topics, tour lengths, and target audiences. Grocery store tours are increasingly used as an avenue for nutrition education to improve knowledge and/or alter food selection behaviors and may result in positive outcomes, but it is unknown whether these outcomes persist for longer than 3 months after the tour and whether there are common attributes of effective grocery store tours. More rigorous studies with uniform methodology in study design and outcome measures are needed to confirm the effectiveness of supermarket tours. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Grocery store baking soda. A source of sodium bicarbonate in the management of chronic metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, B E; Gates, J; Morris, R C

    1984-02-01

    Oral sodium bicarbonate is used to treat metabolic acidosis in patients with renal tubular acidosis. Since infants and young children are unable to swallow tablets, those affected must ingest sodium bicarbonate in a powder or liquid form. Pharmacy-weighed sodium bicarbonate is expensive and inconvenient to obtain; some pharmacists are reluctant to provide it. We determined that the sodium bicarbonate contained in 8-oz boxes of Arm and Hammer Baking Soda was sufficiently constant in weight that, dissolved in water to a given volume, it yielded a quantitatively acceptable therapeutic solution of sodium bicarbonate at a cost of approximately 3 percent of that of pharmacy-weighed sodium bicarbonate. Grocery store baking soda can be a safe, economical, and convenient source of sodium bicarbonate for the treatment of chronic metabolic acidosis in infants and young children.

  15. A novel application of point-of-sales grocery transaction data to enhance community nutrition monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiya, Hiroshi; Moodie, Erica E M; Buckeridge, David L

    2017-01-01

    Unhealthy eating is the most important preventable cause of global death and disability. Effective development and evaluation of preventive initiatives and the identification of disparities in dietary patterns require surveillance of nutrition at a community level. However, nutrition monitoring currently relies on dietary surveys, which cannot efficiently assess food selection at high spatial resolution. However, marketing companies continuously collect and centralize digital grocery transaction data from a geographically representative sample of chain retail food outlets through scanner technologies. We used these data to develop a model to predict store-level sales of carbonated soft drinks, which was applied to all chain food outlets in Montreal, Canada. The resulting map of purchase patterns provides a foundation for developing novel, high-resolution nutrition indicators that reflect dietary preferences at a community level. These detailed nutrition portraits will allow health agencies to tailor healthy eating interventions and promotion programs precisely to meet specific community needs.

  16. Knowledge Brokers in the Making: Opportunities to Connect Researchers and Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, K. G.; Pennell, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental science and engineering graduate students often lack training on how to communicate with policy decision makers who are grappling with questions to which research is responding. They communicate directly with mutual experts, but are many times unable to engage with non-experts about their research, thereby limiting the reach and impact of their findings. This presentation highlights opportunities within environmental science and engineering research to create opportunities for researchers to hone skills as knowledge brokers, so they learn ways to meaningfully engage with a range of stakeholders. A knowledge broker is an individual who connects scientific experts and relevant stakeholders with meaningful and useable information. Recognizing that information must flow in multiple directions, the knowledge broker must quickly and effectively translate needs and questions using established relationships. It is these relationships, as well as the synthesis of scientific knowledge into useable information, on which the success of the knowledge broker lies. Using lessons learned, as well as communication science theory related to knowledge brokering, this presentation highlights training opportunities for knowledge brokers who are primarily educated in science and engineering fields, yet seek to engage with societally relevant stakeholders. We present case study examples of knowledge brokering within two large multi-disciplinary research centers. These centers provide unique experiences for researchers to build relationships with stakeholders, so that the scientific experts not only create novel research within their specific discipline, but also inform policy decision makers, community members and regulatory officials.

  17. Establishing the role of honest broker: bridging the gap between protecting personal health data and clinical research efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Joung Choi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this study is to propose the four conditions for the roles of honest brokers through a review of literature published by ten institutions that are successfully utilizing honest brokers. Furthermore, the study aims to examine whether the Asan Medical Center’s (AMC honest brokers satisfy the four conditions, and examine the need to enhance their roles.Methods. We analyzed the roles, tasks, and types of honest brokers at 10 organizations by reviewing the literature. We also established a Task Force (TF in our institution for setting the roles and processes of the honest broker system and the honest brokers. The findings of the literature search were compared with the existing systems at AMC—which introduced the honest broker system for the first time in Korea.Results. Only one organization employed an honest broker for validating anonymized clinical data and monitoring the anonymity verifications of the honest broker system. Six organizations complied with HIPAA privacy regulations, while four organizations did not disclose compliance. By comparing functions with those of the AMC, the following four main characteristics of honest brokers were determined: (1 de-identification of clinical data; (2 independence; (3 checking that the data are used only for purposes approved by the IRB; and (4 provision of de-identified data to researchers. These roles were then compared with those of honest brokers at the AMC.Discussion. First, guidelines that regulate the definitions, purposes, roles, and requirements for honest brokers are needed, since there are no currently existing regulations. Second, Korean clinical research institutions and national regulatory departments need to reach a consensus on a Korean version of Limited Data Sets (LDS, since there are no lists that describe the use of personal identification information. Lastly, satisfaction surveys on honest brokers by researchers are necessary to improve the quality of

  18. Brokers and brokerage in the process of trading in commodity futures markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremić Milan B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly deals with the analysis of a very complex process of brokerage in commodity futures markets. Unlike a classical commodity market in which brokers are not a necessity, sales and purchases in commodity futures markets cannot be carried out without brokers. Brokers who act as agents of buyers and sellers of futures are a necessary condition for trading in organized markets, such as commodity futures markets. The structure of brokers in futures trading is multilayer and involves participants in futures trading from floor brokers, immediate futures traders and the members of clearing and the clearing house itself, on the one hand, to numerous other necessary actors whose activities out of the stock exchange and the clearing house contribute to the efficient functioning of futures market. The fact that transactions between buyers and sellers in futures markets are not carried out directly but through brokers means that the obligations of buyers and sellers are formally conveyed to brokers, providing at the same time the guarantee by the broker that the actual buyer and the actual seller will fulfill their contractual obligations. At the very beginning of futures trading, the relationship between the seller and the buyer is transformed into a relationship between two brokers. Since that moment on, the original relationship is conveyed to higher levels of brokerage reaching the level of the clearing house. In the process of transformation of the buyer-seller relationship and transmitting obligations and guaranteeing their fulfillment, the clearing house itself becomes the buyer relative to all sellers and the seller relative to all buyers. In this way, it guarantees that obligations regarding all transactions in futures market will be fulfilled. The whole process is carried out in accordance with the prescribed procedures conducted on the floor of commodity exchange, in its administrative departments and in the clearing house itself.

  19. The patient as experience broker in clinical learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhausen, Lynette J

    2009-05-01

    A review of the literature reveals deficit information on patient's involvement in student's learning. The study presented in this paper investigates how the educationally unprepared patient engages with students and experienced clinicians to become involved in learning and teaching encounters. As a qualitative study 14 adult patients were interviewed to determine how they perceived experienced clinicians and students engage in learning and teaching moments and how the patient contributes to students learning to care. Revealed is a new and exciting dimension in learning and teaching in the clinical environment. Patients as experience brokers are positioned in a unique learning triad as they mediate and observe teaching and learning to care between students and experienced clinicians whilst also becoming participants in teaching to care. Further investigation is warranted to determine the multi-dimensional aspects of patients' involvement in student learning in various clinical environments. Future studies have the potential to represent a new educational perspective (andragogy).

  20. The Positions of Virtual Knowledge Brokers in the Core Process of Open Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hacievliyagil, N.K.; Maisonneuve, Y.E.; Auger, J.F.; Hartmann, L.

    2007-01-01

    Several companies are implementing the strategy of open innovation in their research and development operations. They become more dependent, therefore, on their capabilities to exchange knowledge and technology with external parties. To facilitate these exchanges, virtual knowledge brokers use

  1. 75 FR 72987 - Brokers of Household Goods Transportation by Motor Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... hyperlink ``Search for Moving Companies and View Complaint History'' which will lead to http://ai.volpe.dot... freight brokers in the future. Finally, FMCSA acknowledges Pro Movers Network's comment about high costs...

  2. 17 CFR 401.9 - Exemption for certain foreign government securities brokers or dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... legally necessary, its customers (with respect to customer information) to permit the foreign broker or..., delivering, and safeguarding funds and securities in connection with the transactions on behalf of the U.S...

  3. Should Nurses Be Knowledge Brokers? Competencies and Organizational Resources to Support the Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catallo, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    Registered nurses with graduate preparation are in a unique position to act as knowledge brokers owing to their extensive clinical experience and ability to be seen as a credible and respected resource by their peers. Nurse knowledge brokers can bridge the gap between research producers and those that need evidence for decision-making and support capacity development for evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM). Knowledge broker competencies include graduate-level education with exposure to research methods; experience with the EIDM process; and established networking skills to bring researchers, decision-makers, stakeholders and policymakers together. For the knowledge broker to be successful, the nurse leader can cultivate an organizational culture supportive of evidence use with advocacy for mandates that require evidence for decisions, structures in place for each stage of the EIDM process, and physical resources such as library services for evidence retrieval. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  4. 77 FR 33964 - Customs Broker Recordkeeping Requirements Regarding Location and Method of Record Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... agency's ability to monitor and enforce recordkeeping compliance. DATES: Effective July 9, 2012. FOR... brokers to manage their recordkeeping responsibilities in a systemic manner which parallels their day-to...

  5. Towards Corporate Shared Value in Retail Sector: A Comparative Study over Grocery and Banking Between Italy and the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Candelo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The research investigates the extent to which Banking and Grocery retailers use Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in accordance to evolving consumers’ expectations and build a strategic model of Corporate Shared Value (CSV to strive for economic and social returns simultaneously. The paper adopts a qualitative approach, based on the comparative case study methodology by investigating a sample of twelve Banking and Grocery retailers in Italy and the UK. Differences and similarities in CSR as new strategic model among countries and retail sectors emerge, with UK companies from both the sectors showing the most formalized integration of CSR within their business strategy. The chance for both Italian and UK retail companies is to adopt the best practices emerging from the case studies to turn their CSR programs into a strategic business model of CSV that will allow a stronger retailer-consumer relationship based on social improvements and a reinforcement of their brand image.

  6. 17 CFR 405.2 - Reports to be made by registered government securities brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... government securities broker or dealer shall file Part I of Form BD-Y2K (§ 249.618 of this title) prepared as..., shall file Part II of Form BD-Y2K (§ 249.618 of this title). Part II of Form BD-Y2K shall address each... registered government securities broker or dealer that was not required to file Part II of Form BD-Y2K under...

  7. Hidden Markov Model Application to Transfer The Trader Online Forex Brokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Suharleni

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hidden Markov Model is elaboration of Markov chain, which is applicable to cases that can’t directly observe. In this research, Hidden Markov Model is used to know trader’s transition to broker forex online. In Hidden Markov Model, observed state is observable part and hidden state is hidden part. Hidden Markov Model allows modeling system that contains interrelated observed state and hidden state. As observed state in trader’s transition to broker forex online is category 1, category 2, category 3, category 4, category 5 by condition of every broker forex online, whereas as hidden state is broker forex online Marketiva, Masterforex, Instaforex, FBS and Others. First step on application of Hidden Markov Model in this research is making construction model by making a probability of transition matrix (A from every broker forex online. Next step is making a probability of observation matrix (B by making conditional probability of five categories, that is category 1, category 2, category 3, category 4, category 5 by condition of every broker forex online and also need to determine an initial state probability (π from every broker forex online. The last step is using Viterbi algorithm to find hidden state sequences that is broker forex online sequences which is the most possible based on model and observed state that is the five categories. Application of Hidden Markov Model is done by making program with Viterbi algorithm using Delphi 7.0 software with observed state based on simulation data. Example: By the number of observation T = 5 and observed state sequences O = (2,4,3,5,1 is found hidden state sequences which the most possible with observed state O as following : where X1 = FBS, X2 = Masterforex, X3 = Marketiva, X4 = Others, and X5 = Instaforex.

  8. Grocery chains opt for green refrigeration. Renaissance of natural refrigerants; Lebensmittelketten entscheiden sich fuer gruene Kaeltetechnik. Renaissance der natuerlichen Kaeltemittel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Wolfgang

    2011-01-15

    Faster than expected the large German grocery chains focus on energy efficiency and sustainability. Due to the continuous growth in demand for 'Greens coldness' the component manufacturers expanded their portfolios especially for applications within the range of natural refrigerants. The general tendency on the Chillventa 2010 (Nuernberg, Federal Republic of Germany): More system engineering and a continuous growth in offer at trade-spanning all-in-one conceptions.

  9. A Review on Methods for Assessing Risk Factors of the Upper Limb Disorders among Cashiers in Grocery Retail Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Zuhaidi Muhammad Fareez; Abdol Rahman Mohd Nasrull

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the various methods that have been developed for the assessment of risk factors for upper limb disorders among cashiers in grocery retail industries. This paper is essential as upper limb disorders have been known as one of the prime cause of work-related disability in various countries. The methods used for the assessment were the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, the Assessment of Repetitive Tasks (ART), the Job Strain Index ...

  10. Fast-food outlets and grocery stores near school and adolescents' eating habits and overweight in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimäki, Hanne; Ervasti, Jenni; Oksanen, Tuula; Pentti, Jaana; Kouvonen, Anne; Halonen, Jaana I; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2015-08-01

    Environmental factors may affect adolescents' eating habits and thereby body weight. However, the contribution of school neighbourhood environment is poorly understood. This study examined the association between proximity of a fast-food outlet or grocery store to school and adolescents' eating habits and overweight. Participants were 23 182 adolescents (mean age 15 years) who responded to a classroom survey in 181 lower secondary schools in Finland (2008-09). School location was linked to data on distance from school to the nearest fast-food outlet or grocery store (≤100 m, 101-500 m, >500 m) using global positioning system-coordinate databases. Outcomes were irregular eating habits (skipping breakfast, skipping free school lunch, skipping free school-provided snacks and not having family dinners), the accumulation of these habits and overweight, including obesity (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2)). Thirteen percentage of the participants were overweight. Having a fast-food outlet or grocery store near school was associated with skipping often breakfast and free school lunch, and the accumulation of irregular eating habits. The proximity of a fast-food outlet or grocery store was associated with a 1.25-fold (95% confidence interval 1.03-1.52) risk of overweight among adolescent with a low socioeconomic status but not among those with higher socioeconomic status. This association was partly (12%) explained by the accumulation of irregular eating habits. Among adolescents from low socioeconomic background, the presence of fast-food retailers near schools is associated with accumulation of irregular eating habits and greater overweight. These findings suggest that obesogenic school neighbourhoods may contribute to social inequalities in overweight. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  11. Can't read my broker face: Learning about trustworthiness with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Eileen C; Gutchess, Angela

    2018-02-05

    We assessed how age impacted learning who to trust, and the extent to which this type of learning relied on explicit memory. In contrast to prior studies, target faces were neutral without prior reputational information. Younger and older adults made investment decisions for 36 brokers, who yielded a good, neutral, or bad outcome. Brokers were encountered three times to measure adaptive learning. After the investment task, participants completed a surprise explicit source memory test for brokers. Although younger and older adults learned to distinguish good and bad brokers from neutral ones, older adults did not learn the brokers' behavior as well as younger adults. In addition, explicit source memory was highly correlated with investment decisions, although less so for good brokers for older than younger adults. Findings extend prior work by establishing that older adults' impairments in learning who to trust extend to neutral faces, and highlighting the role of explicit memory in investment performance. Future work should vary the task demands to explore the contribution of explicit and implicit processes. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Structured P2P overlay of mobile brokers for realizing publish/subscribe communication in VANET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Tulika; Garg, Deepak; Gore, Manoj Madhava

    2014-01-01

    Publish/subscribe communication paradigm provides asynchrony and decoupling, making it an elegant alternative for designing applications in distributed and dynamic environment such as vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). In this paradigm, the broker is the most important component that decouples other two components, namely, publisher and subscriber. Previous research efforts have either utilized the deployment of distributed brokers on stationary road side info-stations or have assigned the role of broker to any moving vehicle on ad hoc basis. In one approach, lots of preinstalled infrastructures are needed whereas, in another, the quality of service is not guaranteed due to unpredictable moving and stopping patterns of vehicles. In this paper, we present the architecture of distributed mobile brokers which are dynamically reconfigurable in the form of structured P2P overlay and act as rendezvous points for matching publications and subscriptions. We have taken city buses in urban settings to act as mobile brokers whereas other vehicles are considered to be in role of publishers and subscribers. These mobile brokers also assist in locating a vehicle for successful and timely transfer of notifications. We have performed an extensive simulation study to compare our approach with previously proposed approaches. Simulation results establish the applicability of our approach.

  13. Structured P2P Overlay of Mobile Brokers for Realizing Publish/Subscribe Communication in VANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Publish/subscribe communication paradigm provides asynchrony and decoupling, making it an elegant alternative for designing applications in distributed and dynamic environment such as vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs. In this paradigm, the broker is the most important component that decouples other two components, namely, publisher and subscriber. Previous research efforts have either utilized the deployment of distributed brokers on stationary road side info-stations or have assigned the role of broker to any moving vehicle on ad hoc basis. In one approach, lots of preinstalled infrastructures are needed whereas, in another, the quality of service is not guaranteed due to unpredictable moving and stopping patterns of vehicles. In this paper, we present the architecture of distributed mobile brokers which are dynamically reconfigurable in the form of structured P2P overlay and act as rendezvous points for matching publications and subscriptions. We have taken city buses in urban settings to act as mobile brokers whereas other vehicles are considered to be in role of publishers and subscribers. These mobile brokers also assist in locating a vehicle for successful and timely transfer of notifications. We have performed an extensive simulation study to compare our approach with previously proposed approaches. Simulation results establish the applicability of our approach.

  14. Musculoskeletal symptoms and ergonomic hazards among material handlers in grocery retail industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd; Zuhaidi, Muhammad Fareez Ahmad

    2017-08-01

    Grocery retail work can be physically demanding as material handler’s tasks involve manual lifting, lowering, carrying, pushing and pulling loads. The nature of this work puts them at a risk for serious low back pain, shoulder pain and other musculoskeletal injuries. This study was conducted by using two different types of tools which were Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) as a survey and Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA) Checklist as a direct observation method. Among 46 males and 14 females material handlers were involved throughout this study. For NMQ, the highest body part trouble in the last 12 months was low back pain (88.3%), followed by upper back (68.3%), neck (55.3%) and shoulder (36.7%). While for WISHA Checklist, most of them experienced hazard level involving awkward posture and high hand force. From the research conducted, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and ergonomic risk factors (ERFs) do related as it showed that musculoskeletal disorders may arise if the workers ignored the safety in ergonomic hazards.

  15. Effects of Working Memory Capacity and Domain Knowledge on Recall for Grocery Prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, Douglas; Gardner, Michael K; Woltz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Hambrick and Engle (2002) proposed 3 models of how domain knowledge and working memory capacity may work together to influence episodic memory: a "rich-get-richer" model, a "building blocks" model, and a "compensatory" model. Their results supported the rich-get-richer model, although later work by Hambrick and Oswald (2005) found support for a building blocks model. We investigated the effects of domain knowledge and working memory on recall of studied grocery prices. Working memory was measured with 3 simple span tasks. A contrast of realistic versus fictitious foods in the episodic memory task served as our manipulation of domain knowledge, because participants could not have domain knowledge of fictitious food prices. There was a strong effect for domain knowledge (realistic food-price pairs were easier to remember) and a moderate effect for working memory capacity (higher working memory capacity produced better recall). Furthermore, the interaction between domain knowledge and working memory produced a small but significant interaction in 1 measure of price recall. This supported the compensatory model and stands in contrast to previous research.

  16. Adoption of automatic identification systems by grocery retailersin the Johannesburg area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Darlington

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Retailers not only need the right data capture technology to meet the requirements of their applications, they must also decide on what the optimum technology is from the different symbologies that have been developed over the years. Automatic identification systems (AIS are a priority to decision makers as they attempt to obtain the best blend of equipment to ensure greater loss prevention and higher reliability in data capture. However there is a risk of having too simplistic a view of adopting AIS, since no one solution is applicable across an industry or business model. This problem is addressed through an exploratory, descriptive study, where the nature and value of AIS adoption by grocery retailers in the Johannesburg area is interrogated. Mixed empirical results indicate that, as retailers adopt AIS in order to improve their supply chain management systems, different types of applications are associated with various constraints and opportunities. Overall this study is in line with previous research that supports the notion that supply chain decisions are of a strategic nature even though efficient management of information is a day-to-day business operational decision.

  17. Minimizing predatory lending: Designing a long-term compensation structure to minimize the actions of opportunistic mortgage brokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Payne

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the inadequacies in the current compensation structure for mortgage brokers, and asserts that the resulting opportunistic behavior by brokers played a major role in the 2008 collapse of the mortgage market. We utilize agency theory as an underpinning to suggest that increased regulation will have only a limited impact on self-serving behavior due to the complex information asymmetries possessed by brokers. We posit that a restructured long-term compensation package would be effective in aligning the interests of borrowers and brokers, ultimately reducing the level of mortgage defaults and foreclosures.

  18. Food system access, shopping behavior, and influences on purchasing groceries in adult Hmong living in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Lisa; Smith, Chery

    2010-01-01

    To investigate influences on shopping and eating behavior of Hmong adults living in St. Paul/Minneapolis, Minnesota. Conducted a mapping project, food surveys, food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), and focus groups (n = 11). Subjects were assigned to three groups. The B-TL(1) group was made up of subjects who were born in Thailand/Laos and had lived in the US 5 years (n = 20). The B-US group was made up of subjects who were born and/or raised in the US (n = 30). Using Geographical Informational Systems software, 15 grocery stores were mapped and surveyed. Food prices were compared with the consumer price index (CPI). The FFQ assessed food consumption patterns. Focus group transcripts were evaluated for themes and coded. Degree of acculturation was assessed by adapting a previously developed instrument. The population is concentrated in St. Paul, coinciding with store density. Limited foods had CPIs and some CPIs were outdated. B-US had significantly higher levels of dietary acculturation than B-TL(2) and B-TL(1), with B-TL(2) also having a higher dietary acculturation level compared with B-TL(1). Acculturation of the Hmong into the American food system, determinants of store type, and Hmong food's having a mainstream factor were identified themes. B-US and B-TL(2) shopped at American stores more than did B-TL(1) because of convenience, one-stop shopping, and increased English fluency. Hmong foods have entered the American food system and are sold at Asian and American stores.

  19. Emolabeling increases healthy food choices among grade school children in a structured grocery aisle setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privitera, Gregory J; Phillips, Taylor E; Zuraikat, Faris M; Paque, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Health literacy, the ability to acquire health-related knowledge and make appropriate health-related decisions, is regarded as a key barrier to meaningfully convey health information to children and can impact food choice. Emolabeling is an image-based labeling strategy aimed at addressing this problem by conveying health information using emotional correlates of health using emoticons (happy = healthy; sad = not healthy). To test the utility of such a method to promote healthy food choices among children, 64 children (59% girls, foods in each of 2 aisles structured to mimic a grocery aisle - there were 12 identical foods placed in the same location in each aisle with half being low calorie and half high calorie snacks. Foods were emolabeled in one aisle; no emolabels were used in the other aisle; the order that children were brought in each aisle was counterbalanced. Results showed that adding emolabels increased the number (M ± SD) of healthy foods chosen (3.6 ± 0.7 with vs. 2.3 ± 1.1 without emolabels present [95% CI 1.0, 1.5], R(2) = .67) and reduced the total calories (M ± SD) of foods chosen (193.5 ± 88.5 Cal with vs. 374.3 ± 152.6 Cal without emolabels present [95% CI -212.6, -149.0], R(2) = .70). Hence, adding emolabels was associated with healthier food choices among children, thereby demonstrating one possible strategy to effectively overcome health literacy barriers at these ages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Experiences in Broker-Facilitated Participatory Cross-Cultural Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie P. Kowal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Health researchers are increasingly using community-based participatory research approaches because of the benefits accrued through ongoing community engagement. The documentation of our research partnership highlights key ethical and analytical challenges researchers face in participatory research, particularly in projects partnering with service providers or cultural brokers in cross-cultural settings. In this article, we describe how choices made to accommodate a participatory research approach in the examination of vaccination behavior impacted the process and outcomes of our qualitative inquiries. First, we found that employing multiple interviewers influenced the breadth of discussion topics, thus reducing the ability to achieve saturation in small study populations. This was mitigated by (a having two people at each interview and (b using convergent interviewing, a technique in which multiple interviewers discuss and include concepts raised in interviews in subsequent interviews to test the validity of interview topics. Second, participants were less engaged during the informed consent process if they knew the interviewer before the interview commenced. Finally, exposing identity traits, such as age or immigration status, before the interview affected knowledge cocreation, as the focus of the conversation then mirrored those traits. For future research, we provide recommendations to reduce ethical and analytical concerns that arise with qualitative interview methods in participatory research. Specifically, we provide guidance to ensure ethical informed consent processes and rigorous interview techniques.

  1. Political Broker and Budget Mafia in Indonesian Parliament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Ilham A. Hamudy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Budget mafia practices and brokerage phenomenon in ministries/agencies and the parliament in the country's financial dredge is very alarming. Not counted how much money is successfully robbed. The modus is varying, so it is not easy to dismantle. Because expert move, the law enforcers had trouble catching them. This article tried to describe the mode of action and often they do. The method is done by tracing the various reports in newspapers. From tracking and in-depth analysis, it could be concluded that in order to minimize the action of brokers and budget mafia practices there are some necessary steps. First, fixing the finances system of political parties, reducing the dominance of parliament in budget management and election of public officials, and encourage law enforcement. Second, transparency debates the state budget in the parliament to be a key budget reforms. Third, the involvement of the community is also important to increase the transparency of the state budget discussions.

  2. Health Brokers: How Can They Help Deal with the Wickedness of Public Health Problems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste E. van Rinsum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The role of health broker is a relatively new one in public health. Health brokers aim to create support for efforts to optimise health promotion in complex or even “wicked” public health contexts by facilitating intersectoral collaborations and by exchanging knowledge with different stakeholders. The current study aimed to explore the role of health brokers, by examining the motivational, contextual, and behaviour-related factors they have to deal with. Methods. Fifteen professionals from various backgrounds and from various policy and practice organisations were recruited for a semistructured interview. To structure the interviews, we developed the “Health Broker Wheel” (HBW, a framework we then specified with more details derived from the interviews. Results. We identified seven primary types of behaviour that health brokers need to engage in: recognizing opportunities, agenda setting, implementing, network formation, intersectoral collaboration, adaptive managing, and leadership. Determinants of health brokers’ behaviours were identified and categorised as capability, opportunities, motivation, and local or national contextual factors. Conclusion. The health brokers’ role can be seen as an operational approach and is visualised in the HBW. This framework can assist further research to monitor and evaluate this role, and health promotion practitioners can use it as a tool to implement the health brokers’ role and to facilitate intersectoral collaboration.

  3. Brokers, consumers and the internet: how North American consumers navigate their infertility journeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speier, Amy R

    2011-11-01

    North Americans who suffer infertility often reach an end to treatment options at home, whether it is due to a lack of egg donors in Canada or the high cost of treatment in the USA. Patients navigate their way onto the internet, seeking support and other options. As women and couples 'do the research' online, they conduct endless Google searches, come across IVF brokers, join support groups, read blogs and meet others on the road of infertility. This paper considers the journeys that North American patients make to clinics in Moravia, Czech Republic. Along these travels, patients engage with support groups, other patients, IVF brokers and clinic co-ordinators. Since the distance travelled between North America and Europe is extensive, reproductive travels may be arranged by clinical staff, travel brokers and patients. Acting as consumers, North Americans make different 'choices' along their journeys – the use of a broker, if and when they should join online communities, which clinic to visit and where to stay. This study focuses on the question of how patient choices often determine the success of brokers and clinics, thus influencing the structure of cross-border reproductive care in the Czech Republic. Copyright © 2011 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. What role do local grocery stores play in urban food environments? A case study of Hartford-Connecticut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie S Martin

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Research on urban food environments emphasizes limited access to healthy food, with fewer large supermarkets and higher food prices. Many residents of Hartford, Connecticut, which is often considered a food desert, buy most of their food from small and medium-sized grocery stores. We examined the food environment in greater Hartford, comparing stores in Hartford to those in the surrounding suburbs, and by store size (small, medium, and large. METHODS: We surveyed all small (over 1,000 ft2, medium, and large-sized supermarkets within a 2-mile radius of Hartford (36 total stores. We measured the distance to stores, availability, price and quality of a market basket of 25 items, and rated each store on internal and external appearance. Geographic Information System (GIS was used for mapping distance to the stores and variation of food availability, quality, and appearance. RESULTS: Contrary to common literature, no significant differences were found in food availability and price between Hartford and suburban stores. However, produce quality, internal, and external store appearance were significantly lower in Hartford compared to suburban stores (all p<0.05. Medium-sized stores had significantly lower prices than small or large supermarkets (p<0.05. Large stores had better scores for internal (p<0.05, external, and produce quality (p<0.01. Most Hartford residents live within 0.5 to 1 mile distance to a grocery store. DISCUSSION: Classifying urban areas with few large supermarkets as 'food deserts' may overlook the availability of healthy foods and low prices that exist within small and medium-sized groceries common in inner cities. Improving produce quality and store appearance can potentially impact the food purchasing decisions of low-income residents in Hartford.

  5. Home grocery delivery improves the household food environments of behavioral weight loss participants: results of an 8-week pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Amy A; Raynor, Hollie A; Niemeier, Heather M; Wing, Rena R

    2007-11-14

    Household food availability is consistently linked to dietary intake; yet behavioral weight control treatment includes only minimal instruction on how to change the home environment to support dietary goals. This pilot study examined whether it is feasible to change the household food environments of behavioral weight loss participants through the use of a commercially available grocery home delivery service. Overweight participants (N = 28; BMI = 31.7 +/- 3.6 kg/m2; 89.3% women, 47.9 +/- 9.5 years) were randomly assigned to 8-weeks of standard behavioral weight loss (SBT) or to SBT plus home food delivery (SBT+Home). SBT+Home participants were instructed to do their household grocery shopping via an online service affiliated with a regional supermarket chain and were reimbursed for delivery charges. Compared to SBT, SBT+Home produced significantly greater reductions in the total number of foods in the home (p = .01) and number of foods that were high in fat (p = .002). While the groups did not differ in 8-week weight losses, within SBT+Home there was a trend for the number of home deliveries to be associated with weight loss (p = .08). Participants reported that the home delivery service was easy to use and that it helped decrease impulse purchases and lead to healthier choices; however, few planned to continue using the service after the study. Encouraging weight loss participants to use a commercially available online grocery ordering and home delivery service reduces the overall number of food items in the home and decreases access to high-fat food choices. More research is needed to determine whether this is a viable strategy to strengthen stimulus control and improve weight loss outcomes.

  6. Home grocery delivery improves the household food environments of behavioral weight loss participants: Results of an 8-week pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemeier Heather M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Household food availability is consistently linked to dietary intake; yet behavioral weight control treatment includes only minimal instruction on how to change the home environment to support dietary goals. This pilot study examined whether it is feasible to change the household food environments of behavioral weight loss participants through the use of a commercially available grocery home delivery service. Methods Overweight participants (N = 28; BMI = 31.7 ± 3.6 kg/m2; 89.3% women, 47.9 ± 9.5 years were randomly assigned to 8-weeks of standard behavioral weight loss (SBT or to SBT plus home food delivery (SBT+Home. SBT+Home participants were instructed to do their household grocery shopping via an online service affiliated with a regional supermarket chain and were reimbursed for delivery charges. Results Compared to SBT, SBT+Home produced significantly greater reductions in the total number of foods in the home (p = .01 and number of foods that were high in fat (p = .002. While the groups did not differ in 8-week weight losses, within SBT+Home there was a trend for the number of home deliveries to be associated with weight loss (p = .08. Participants reported that the home delivery service was easy to use and that it helped decrease impulse purchases and lead to healthier choices; however, few planned to continue using the service after the study. Conclusion Encouraging weight loss participants to use a commercially available online grocery ordering and home delivery service reduces the overall number of food items in the home and decreases access to high-fat food choices. More research is needed to determine whether this is a viable strategy to strengthen stimulus control and improve weight loss outcomes.

  7. What is the effectiveness of obesity related interventions at retail grocery stores and supermarkets? - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Abdulfatah; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

    2016-01-01

    interventions have been carried out in retail grocery/supermarket settings as part of an effort to understand and influence consumption of healthful foods. The review’s key outcome variable is sale/purchase of healthy foods as a result of the interventions. This systematic review sheds light...... fulfilling search criteria were identified and critically appraised. Studies included in this review report health interventions at physical food stores including supermarkets and corner stores, and with outcome variable of adopting healthier food purchasing/consumption behavior. The methodological quality...

  8. 17 CFR 404.2 - Records to be made and kept current by registered government securities brokers and dealers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... on a consolidated basis, by the highest level holding company that is a Material Associated Person..., as of quarter-end for the registered government securities broker or dealer and its highest level... registered government securities broker or dealer and its highest level holding company that is a Material...

  9. 17 CFR 240.15Ca2-3 - Registration of successor to registered government securities broker or government securities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... business of a government securities broker or government securities dealer registered pursuant to section... the registration of the successor if the successor, within 30 days after such succession, files an... securities broker or government securities dealer succeeds to and continues the business of a predecessor...

  10. 17 CFR 240.15b1-3 - Registration of successor to registered broker or dealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... continues the business of a registered predecessor broker or dealer, and the succession is based solely on a... and continues the business of a broker or dealer registered pursuant to section 15(b) of the Act, the... successor, within 30 days after such succession, files an application for registration on Form BD, and the...

  11. 17 CFR 401.7 - Temporary exemption for certain government securities brokers and dealers terminating business on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary exemption for certain government securities brokers and dealers terminating business on or before October 31, 1987. 401... government securities brokers and dealers terminating business on or before October 31, 1987. During the...

  12. 13 CFR 108.1640 - SBA access to records of the CRA, Brokers, Dealers and Pool or Trust assemblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false SBA access to records of the CRA, Brokers, Dealers and Pool or Trust assemblers. 108.1640 Section 108.1640 Business Credit and Assistance....1640 SBA access to records of the CRA, Brokers, Dealers and Pool or Trust assemblers. The CRA and any...

  13. 12 CFR 218.700 - Defined terms relating to the networking exception from the definition of “broker.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the average of the minimum and maximum hourly wage established by the bank for the current or prior... exception from the definition of âbroker.â 218.700 Section 218.700 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM EXCEPTIONS FOR BANKS FROM THE DEFINITION OF BROKER IN...

  14. 17 CFR 402.1 - Application of part to registered brokers and dealers and financial institutions; special rules...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... interdealer broker means an entity engaged exclusively in business as a broker that effects, on an initially... business day and offset by government securities failed to deliver of the same issue and quantity. In no... same government securities failed-to-deliver contract for more than one business day. A government...

  15. She Is My Language Broker: How Does Cultural Capital Benefit Asian Immigrant Children in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md-Yunus, Sham'ah

    2011-01-01

    Cultural capital benefits Asian immigrant children when they become language brokers. This skill can also benefit their parents and families in the United States. Language brokering may shape and possibly enhance students' academic performance and can further children's linguistic and academic achievement. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  16. 26 CFR 31.3406(b)(3)-2 - Reportable barter exchanges and gross proceeds of sales of securities or commodities by brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of sales of securities or commodities by brokers. 31.3406(b)(3)-2 Section 31.3406(b)(3)-2 Internal... or commodities by brokers. (a) Transactions subject to backup withholding. A payment of a kind, and to a payee, that any broker (as defined in section 6045(c) and § 1.6045-1(a)(1) of this chapter) or...

  17. Architecture of a Process Broker for Interoperable Geospatial Modeling on the Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Bigagli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of appropriate mechanisms for process sharing and reuse by means of composition is considered a key enabler for the effective uptake of a global Earth Observation infrastructure, currently pursued by the international geospatial research community. Modelers in need of running complex workflows may benefit from outsourcing process composition to a dedicated external service, according to the brokering approach. This work introduces our architecture of a process broker, as a distributed information system for creating, validating, editing, storing, publishing and executing geospatial-modeling workflows. The broker provides a service framework for adaptation, reuse and complementation of existing processing resources (including models and geospatial services in general in the form of interoperable, executable workflows. The described solution has been experimentally applied in several use scenarios in the context of EU-funded projects and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems.

  18. Information broker: a useless overhead or a necessity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitan, Jacek

    1996-01-01

    The richness and diversity of information available over the Internet, its size, convenience of access, and its dynamic growth will create new ways to offer better education opportunities in medicine. The Internet will especially benefit medical training process that is expensive and requires continuous updating. The use of the Internet will lower the delivery cost and make medical information available to all potential users. On the other hand, since medical information must be trusted and new policies must be developed to support these capabilities, technologies alone are not enough. In general, we must deal with issues of liability, remuneration for educational and professional services, and general issues of ethics associated with patient-physician relationship in a complicated environment created by a mix of managed and private care combined with modern information technology. In this paper we will focus only on the need to create, to manage and to operate open system over the Internet, or similar low-cost and easy access networks, for the purpose of medical education process. Finally, using business analysis, we argue why the medical education infrastructure needs an information broker, a third party organization that will help the users to access the information and the publishers to display their titles. The first section outlines recent trends in medical education. In the second section, we discuss transfusion medicine requirements. In the third section we provide a summary of the American Red Cross (ARC) transfusion audit system; we discuss the relevance of the assumptions used in this system to other areas of medicine. In the fourth section we describe the overall system architecture and discuss key components. The fifth section covers business issues associated with medical education systems and with the potential role of ARC in particular. The last section provides a summary of findings.

  19. Health Information Brokers in the General Population: An Analysis of the Health Information National Trends Survey 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrona, Sarah L; Mazor, Kathleen M; Agunwamba, Amenah A; Valluri, Sruthi; Wilson, Patrick M; Sadasivam, Rajani S; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2016-06-03

    Health information exchanged between friends or family members can influence decision making, both for routine health questions and for serious health issues. A health information broker is a person to whom friends and family turn for advice or information on health-related topics. Characteristics and online behaviors of health information brokers have not previously been studied in a national population. The objective of this study was to examine sociodemographic characteristics, health information seeking behaviors, and other online behaviors among health information brokers. Data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (2013-2014; n=3142) were used to compare brokers with nonbrokers. Modified Poisson regression was used to examine the relationship between broker status and sociodemographics and online information seeking. Over half (54.8%) of the respondents were consulted by family or friends for advice or information on health topics (ie, they acted as health information brokers). Brokers represented 54.1% of respondents earning brokers (PR 1.34, 95% CI 1.23-1.47) as were those with education past high school (PR 1.42, CI 1.22-1.65). People aged ≥75 were less likely to be brokers as compared to respondents aged 35-49 (PR 0.81, CI 0.67-0.99). Brokers used the Internet more frequently for a variety of online behaviors such as seeking health information, creating and sharing online content, and downloading health information onto a mobile device; and also reported greater confidence in obtaining health information online. More than 50% of adults who responded to this national survey, including those with low income and those born abroad, were providing health information or advice to friends and family. These individuals may prove to be effective targets for initiatives supporting patient engagement and disease management, and may also be well-positioned within their respective social networks to propagate health messages.

  20. Data and Metadata Brokering – Theory and Practice from the BCube Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siri Jodha Singh Khalsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available EarthCube is a U.S. National Science Foundation initiative that aims to create a cyberinfrastructure (CI for all the geosciences. An initial set of “building blocks” was funded to develop potential components of that CI. The Brokering Building Block (BCube created a brokering framework to demonstrate cross-disciplinary data access based on a set of use cases developed by scientists from the domains of hydrology, oceanography, polar science and climate/weather. While some successes were achieved, considerable challenges were encountered. We present a synopsis of the processes and outcomes of the BCube experiment.

  1. Fuzzy-Neural Controller in Service Requests Distribution Broker for SOA-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fras, Mariusz; Zatwarnicka, Anna; Zatwarnicki, Krzysztof

    The evolution of software architectures led to the rising importance of the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) concept. This architecture paradigm support building flexible distributed service systems. In the paper the architecture of service request distribution broker designed for use in SOA-based systems is proposed. The broker is built with idea of fuzzy control. The functional and non-functional request requirements in conjunction with monitoring of execution and communication links are used to distribute requests. Decisions are made with use of fuzzy-neural network.

  2. Virtual Knowledge Brokering: Describing the Roles and Strategies Used by Knowledge Brokers in a Pediatric Physiotherapy Virtual Community of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtubise, Karen; Rivard, Lisa; Héguy, Léa; Berbari, Jade; Camden, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge transfer in pediatric rehabilitation is challenging and requires active, multifaceted strategies. The use of knowledge brokers (KBs) is one such strategy noted to promote clinician behavior change. The success of using KBs to transfer knowledge relies on their ability to adapt to ever-changing clinical contexts. In addition, with the rapid growth of online platforms as knowledge transfer forums, KBs must become effective in virtual environments. Although the role of KBs has been studied in various clinical contexts, their emerging role in specific online environments designed to support evidence-based behavior change has not yet been described. Our objective is to describe the roles of, and strategies used by, four KBs involved in a virtual community of practice to guide and inform future online KB interventions. A descriptive design guided this study and a thematic content analysis process was used to analyze online KB postings. The Promoting Action on Research in Health Sciences knowledge transfer framework and online andragogical learning theories assisted in the coding. A thematic map was created illustrating the links between KBs' strategies and emerging roles in the virtual environment. We analyzed 95 posts and identified three roles: 1) context architect: promoting a respectful learning environment, 2) knowledge sharing promoter: building capacity, and 3) linkage creator: connecting research-to-practice. Strategies used by KBs reflected invitational, constructivism, and connectivism approaches, with roles and strategies changing over time. This study increases our understanding of the actions of KBs in virtual contexts to foster uptake of research evidence in pediatric physiotherapy. Our results provide valuable information about the knowledge and skills required by individuals to fulfill this role in virtual environments.

  3. A Review on Methods for Assessing Risk Factors of the Upper Limb Disorders among Cashiers in Grocery Retail Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zuhaidi Muhammad Fareez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the various methods that have been developed for the assessment of risk factors for upper limb disorders among cashiers in grocery retail industries. This paper is essential as upper limb disorders have been known as one of the prime cause of work-related disability in various countries. The methods used for the assessment were the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaire, the Assessment of Repetitive Tasks (ART, the Job Strain Index (JSI and the Occupational Repetitive Actions (OCRA Checklist. DASH questionnaire is a structured interview in determining the prevalence of the upper limb disorders, while ART, the JSI and OCRA Checklist act as a direct observation in examining the involvement of risk factors. Basically, these tools dealt with the measurements of symptoms, posture observation, and workplace risk assessment, as they are the most relevant tools for assessing the risk factors faced by the workers in grocery industries. The use of these tools assessed the risk factors and consequently reduces the risk of injuries among the workers.

  4. Differences in healthy food supply and stocking practices between small grocery stores, gas-marts, pharmacies and dollar stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Caitlin Eicher; Pelletier, Jennifer E; Harnack, Lisa; Erickson, Darin J; Laska, Melissa N

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about the practices for stocking and procuring healthy food in non-traditional food retailers (e.g., gas-marts, pharmacies). The present study aimed to: (i) compare availability of healthy food items across small food store types; and (ii) examine owner/manager perceptions and stocking practices for healthy food across store types. Descriptive analyses were conducted among corner/small grocery stores, gas-marts, pharmacies and dollar stores. Data from store inventories were used to examine availability of twelve healthy food types and an overall healthy food supply score. Interviews with managers assessed stocking practices and profitability. Small stores in Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN, USA, not participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. One hundred and nineteen small food retailers and seventy-one store managers. Availability of specific items varied across store type. Only corner/small grocery stores commonly sold fresh vegetables (63% v. 8% of gas-marts, 0% of dollar stores and 23% of pharmacies). More than half of managers stocking produce relied on cash-and-carry practices to stock fresh fruit (53%) and vegetables (55%), instead of direct store delivery. Most healthy foods were perceived by managers to have at least average profitability. Interventions to improve healthy food offerings in small stores should consider the diverse environments, stocking practices and supply mechanisms of small stores, particularly non-traditional food retailers. Improvements may require technical support, customer engagement and innovative distribution practices.

  5. Examining food purchasing patterns from sales data at a full-service grocery store intervention in a former food desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Daniel; Engler-Stringer, Rachel; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2015-01-01

    The Good Food Junction Grocery Store was opened in a former food desert in the inner city of Saskatoon, Canada. The purpose of this research was to examine, using grocery store sales data, healthy and less healthful food purchasing over a one-year period beginning eight months after opening by shoppers' neighborhood of residence. A multilevel cross sectional design was used. The sample consisted of members of the Good Food Junction with a valid address in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. All purchases made by members who reported their postal code of residence from May 15, 2013 to April 30, 2014 were analyzed. The outcome variable was the total amount spent on foods in 11 food groups. Linear random intercept models with three levels were fit to the data. Shoppers who were residents of former food desert neighborhoods spent $0.7 (95% CI: 0.2 to 1.2) more on vegetables, and $1.2 (95% CI: - 1.8 to - 0.6) less on meat, and $1.1 (95% CI: - 2.0 to - 0.3) less on prepared foods than shoppers who did not reside in those neighborhoods. When given geographical access to healthy food, people living in disadvantaged former food desert neighborhoods will take advantage of that access.

  6. The Case for Information Brokering During Major Change: The Experience of the Transition Support Office of the McGill University Health Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klag, Malvina; Richer, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the emergence of an "information brokerage" in the project management office of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) in Montreal. This process evolved during unprecedented transformation linked to a redevelopment project. Information brokering became a core function in the MUHC's context of major change. To develop an information brokering model, the paper draws upon the literature on knowledge brokering, applies Daft and Lengel's (1986) seminal framework on information processing in organizations, and builds on the MUHC experience. The paper proposes that knowledge brokering and information brokering are related, yet distinct in content, purpose and structure.

  7. 49 CFR 387.307 - Property broker surety bond or trust fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Evidence of a trust fund with a financial institution must be filed using the FMCSA's prescribed Form BMC... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Property broker surety bond or trust fund. 387.307... MINIMUM LEVELS OF FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR MOTOR CARRIERS Surety Bonds and Policies of Insurance for...

  8. Cultural and Social Processes of Language Brokering among Arab, Asian, and Latin Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shu-Sha Angie; Nash, Afaf; Orellana, Marjorie Faulstich

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how language and culture brokering (translating and interpreting language and culture for others) influences the acculturative experiences and self-perceptions of young adults from immigrant Arab, Asian, and Latino American backgrounds. Semi-structured interviews with 10 participants suggest that mediating information for…

  9. 17 CFR 3.11 - Registration of floor brokers and floor traders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Registration of floor brokers and floor traders. 3.11 Section 3.11 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... a contract market or registered as a derivatives transaction execution facility by the Commission...

  10. 75 FR 5620 - New Date for April 2010 Customs Brokers License Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... types of infractions. In the case of an applicant for an individual broker's license, section 641... regularly scheduled examination date conflicts with a national holiday, religious observance, or other... (April 5) coincides with the observance of Passover. In consideration of this conflict with Passover, CBP...

  11. Agent-Oriented Privacy-Based Information Brokering Architecture for Healthcare Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmutalib Masaud-Wahaishi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare industry is facing a major reform at all levels—locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. Healthcare services and systems become very complex and comprise of a vast number of components (software systems, doctors, patients, etc. that are characterized by shared, distributed and heterogeneous information sources with varieties of clinical and other settings. The challenge now faced with decision making, and management of care is to operate effectively in order to meet the information needs of healthcare personnel. Currently, researchers, developers, and systems engineers are working toward achieving better efficiency and quality of service in various sectors of healthcare, such as hospital management, patient care, and treatment. This paper presents a novel information brokering architecture that supports privacy-based information gathering in healthcare. Architecturally, the brokering is viewed as a layer of services where a brokering service is modeled as an agent with a specific architecture and interaction protocol that are appropriate to serve various requests. Within the context of brokering, we model privacy in terms of the entities ability to hide or reveal information related to its identities, requests, and/or capabilities. A prototype of the proposed architecture has been implemented to support information-gathering capabilities in healthcare environments using FIPA-complaint platform JADE.

  12. 31 CFR 103.122 - Customer identification programs for broker-dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS Anti-Money Laundering Programs Anti-Money Laundering Programs § 103.122 Customer identification programs for broker-dealers. (a... anti-money laundering compliance program required under 31 U.S.C. 5318(h). (2) Identity verification...

  13. 31 CFR 103.123 - Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TRANSACTIONS Anti-Money Laundering Programs Anti-Money Laundering Programs § 103.123 Customer identification... each futures commission merchant's and introducing broker's anti-money laundering compliance program... money laundering activities, Federal law requires all financial institutions to obtain, verify, and...

  14. 76 FR 75553 - Completion of the Broker Self-Assessment Outreach Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... also disclosed that the broker's assessment of risk factors differed from the risk factors CBP... risk factors. The reliable quantitative measure related to import transactions is the compliance... compliance, professional ethics and professional development of their employees to meet its overall objective...

  15. Amartya Sen's Capability Approach and the Brokering of Learning Provision for Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harreveld, Roberta E.; Singh, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper argues that Amartya Sen's ("Development as freedom," New York: Random House, 1999) concept of "capabilities" provides a useful framework for interpreting the brokering of learning provisions that emerged as a key feature of reforms to education and training in Queensland (Australia) for young people. Sen's capability…

  16. 75 FR 44996 - Study Regarding Obligations of Brokers, Dealers, and Investment Advisers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... the varying scope and terms of retail customer relationships of brokers, dealers, investment advisers..., or overlaps in legal or regulatory standards in the protection of retail customers relating to the... INFORMATION CONTACT: Holly Hunter-Ceci, Division of Investment Management, at (202) 551-6825 or Emily Russell...

  17. Orchestrating innovation networks: The case of innovation brokers in the agri-food sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batterink, M.H.; Wubben, E.F.M.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2010-01-01

    This explorative study of network orchestration processes conducted by innovation brokers addresses new issues in bridging small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and research institutes in innovation networks. The study includes four in-depth case studies in the agri-food sector from different

  18. Connecting the Dots: Understanding the Flow of Research Knowledge within a Research Brokering Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodway, Joelle

    2015-01-01

    Networks are frequently cited as an important knowledge mobilization strategy; however, there is little empirical research that considers how they connect research and practice. Taking a social network perspective, I explore how central office personnel find, understand and share research knowledge within a research brokering network. This mixed…

  19. Factors That Influence the Job Market Decision: The Role of Faculty as a Knowledge Broker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, William A.; Rutherford, Brian; Boles, James; Loe, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of students, recruiters, and faculty regarding the importance of various workplace attributes to students who are entering the job market. Furthermore, this study discusses the important role that faculty can play as a knowledge broker with both students and recruiters. Looking at students' Top 10…

  20. 78 FR 52680 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Registration and Licensing of Brokers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-26

    ... U.S. origin defense articles, defense services, and technical data stemming from brokering... Request: Revision of Currently Approved Collection Originating Office: Bureau of Political-Military...: Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, PM/DDTC Form Number: None...

  1. The Game of Knowledge Brokering: A New Method for Increasing Evaluation Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejniczak, Karol

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge brokering is a promising practice for addressing the challenge of using research evidence, including evaluation findings, in policy implementation. For public policy practitioners, it means playing the role of an intermediary who steers the flow of knowledge between producers (researchers) and users (decision makers). It requires a set…

  2. Book Review: "The Honest Broker: Making Sense of Science in Policy and Politics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Honest Broker is a must-read for any scientist with even a modest interest in environmental policy or politics, and I recommend it especially to scientists unfamiliar with the continuing controversy over how scientists misuse science in environmental policy and politics. The ...

  3. Knowledge that Acts: Evaluating the Outcomes of a Knowledge Brokering Intervention in Western Australia's Ningaloo Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kelly; Boschetti, Fabio; Fulton, Elizabeth; Horwitz, Pierre; Jones, Tod; Scherrer, Pascal; Syme, Geoff

    2017-11-01

    Knowledge exchange involves a suite of strategies used to bridge the divides between research, policy and practice. The literature is increasingly focused on the notion that knowledge generated by research is more useful when there is significant interaction and knowledge sharing between researchers and research recipients (i.e., stakeholders). This is exemplified by increasing calls for the use of knowledge brokers to facilitate interaction and flow of information between scientists and stakeholder groups, and the integration of scientific and local knowledge. However, most of the environmental management literature focuses on explicit forms of knowledge, leaving unmeasured the tacit relational and reflective forms of knowledge that lead people to change their behaviour. In addition, despite the high transaction costs of knowledge brokering and related stakeholder engagement, there is little research on its effectiveness. We apply Park's Manag Learn 30(2), 141-157 (1999); Knowledge and Participatory Research, London: SAGE Publications (2006) tri-partite knowledge typology as a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of knowledge brokering in the context of a large multi-agency research programme in Australia's Ningaloo coastal region, and for testing the assumption that higher levels of interaction between scientists and stakeholders lead to improved knowledge exchange. While the knowledge brokering intervention substantively increased relational networks between scientists and stakeholders, it did not generate anticipated increases in stakeholder knowledge or research application, indicating that more prolonged stakeholder engagement was required, and/or that there was a flaw in the assumptions underpinning our conceptual framework.

  4. 31 CFR 560.533 - Brokering sales of agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... technical data, software, or information) that are subject to license application requirements of another... IRANIAN TRANSACTIONS REGULATIONS Licenses, Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.533 Brokering sales of agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical devices. (a) General license for...

  5. Agent-oriented privacy-based information brokering architecture for healthcare environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaud-Wahaishi, Abdulmutalib; Ghenniwa, Hamada

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare industry is facing a major reform at all levels-locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. Healthcare services and systems become very complex and comprise of a vast number of components (software systems, doctors, patients, etc.) that are characterized by shared, distributed and heterogeneous information sources with varieties of clinical and other settings. The challenge now faced with decision making, and management of care is to operate effectively in order to meet the information needs of healthcare personnel. Currently, researchers, developers, and systems engineers are working toward achieving better efficiency and quality of service in various sectors of healthcare, such as hospital management, patient care, and treatment. This paper presents a novel information brokering architecture that supports privacy-based information gathering in healthcare. Architecturally, the brokering is viewed as a layer of services where a brokering service is modeled as an agent with a specific architecture and interaction protocol that are appropriate to serve various requests. Within the context of brokering, we model privacy in terms of the entities ability to hide or reveal information related to its identities, requests, and/or capabilities. A prototype of the proposed architecture has been implemented to support information-gathering capabilities in healthcare environments using FIPA-complaint platform JADE.

  6. The role of the broker and insurance of oil cargoes in the market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Fevre, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    This article considers Lloyd's insurance brokers and their code of practice which covers their conduct, the need to meet the insurance requirements of clients, and the stipulation that advertisement should not be inaccurate. The Institute Bulk Oil Clauses 1983 and the American SP13C Clauses 1962, categories of clients and insurance markets are discussed. (UK)

  7. Caught in the Middle: Child Language Brokering as a Form of Unrecognised Language Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Rachele

    2016-01-01

    This paper will present the findings of a wide-scale research aimed at studying the phenomenon of Child Language Brokering (henceforth CLB) in Italy. After providing a description of recent immigration patterns and the provision of language services in Italy, and an overview of current research in this field, this study will discuss narrative data…

  8. 78 FR 78472 - Registration and Financial Security Requirements for Brokers of Property and Freight Forwarders...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... shippers from the abuse of market power or that the transaction or service is of limited scope; and Is in... protect shippers from the abuse of market power . . . and . . . is not in the public interest.'' AIPBA... abuse of market power.'' According to AIPBA, ``[t]he unnecessarily high $75,000 broker bond requirement...

  9. 75 FR 4007 - Risk Management Controls for Brokers or Dealers With Market Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... 3235-AK53 Risk Management Controls for Brokers or Dealers With Market Access AGENCY: Securities and... or other persons, to implement risk management controls and supervisory procedures reasonably... access may not utilize any pre-trade risk management controls (i.e., ``unfiltered'' or ``naked'' access...

  10. 76 FR 38293 - Risk Management Controls for Brokers or Dealers With Market Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... 3235-AK53 Risk Management Controls for Brokers or Dealers With Market Access AGENCY: Securities and... of risk management controls and supervisory procedures that, among other things, is reasonably... relevant risk management controls and supervisory procedures required under the Rule. DATES: The effective...

  11. 75 FR 75896 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR 1 [TD 9504] RIN 1545-BI66 Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock Correction In rule document 2010-25504 beginning on page 64072 in the issue of Monday, October 18, 2010, make the following corrections: Sec. 1...

  12. 75 FR 6166 - Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts, 1, 31, and 301 [REG-101896-09] RIN 1545-Bl66 Basis Reporting by Securities Brokers and Basis Determination for Stock Correction In proposed rule document E9-29855 beginning on page 67010 in the issue of Thursday, December 17, 2009, make...

  13. 78 FR 78375 - Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: CBP Regulations Pertaining to Customs Brokers Correction In notice document 2013-30220 appearing on page 76851 of the issue of Thursday, December 19, 2013, make the following correction: In the...

  14. Roadmap for Developing of Brokering as a Component of EarthCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, J.; Khalsa, S. S.; Browdy, S.; Duerr, R. E.; Nativi, S.; Parsons, M. A.; Pearlman, F.; Robinson, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of NSF's EarthCube is to create a sustainable infrastructure that enables the sharing of all geosciences data, information, and knowledge in an open, transparent and inclusive manner. Key to achieving the EarthCube vision is establishing a process that will guide the evolution of the infrastructure through community engagement and appropriate investment so that the infrastructure is embraced and utilized by the entire geosciences community. In this presentation we describe a roadmap, developed through the EarthCube Brokering Concept Award, for an evolutionary process of infrastructure and interoperability development. All geoscience communities already have, to a greater or lesser degree, elements of an information infrastructure in place. These elements include resources such as data archives, catalogs, and portals as well as vocabularies, data models, protocols, best practices and other community conventions. What is necessary now is a process for consolidating these diverse infrastructure elements into an overall infrastructure that provides easy discovery, access and utilization of resources across disciplinary boundaries. This process of consolidation will be achieved by creating "interfaces," what we call "brokers," between systems. Brokers connect disparate systems without imposing new burdens upon those systems, and enable the infrastructure to adjust to new technical developments and scientific requirements as they emerge. Robust cyberinfrastructure will arise only when social, organizational, and cultural issues are resolved in tandem with the creation of technology-based services. This is best done through use-case-driven requirements and agile, iterative development methods. It is important to start by solving real (not hypothetical) information access and use problems via small pilot projects that develop capabilities targeted to specific communities. These pilots can then grow into larger prototypes addressing intercommunity problems working

  15. Brokering Capabilities for EarthCube - supporting Multi-disciplinary Earth Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodha Khalsa, Siri; Pearlman, Jay; Nativi, Stefano; Browdy, Steve; Parsons, Mark; Duerr, Ruth; Pearlman, Francoise

    2013-04-01

    The goal of NSF's EarthCube is to create a sustainable infrastructure that enables the sharing of all geosciences data, information, and knowledge in an open, transparent and inclusive manner. Brokering of data and improvements in discovery and access are a key to data exchange and promotion of collaboration across the geosciences. In this presentation we describe an evolutionary process of infrastructure and interoperability development focused on participation of existing science research infrastructures and augmenting them for improved access. All geosciences communities already have, to a greater or lesser degree, elements of an information infrastructure in place. These elements include resources such as data archives, catalogs, and portals as well as vocabularies, data models, protocols, best practices and other community conventions. What is necessary now is a process for levering these diverse infrastructure elements into an overall infrastructure that provides easy discovery, access and utilization of resources across disciplinary boundaries. Brokers connect disparate systems with only minimal burdens upon those systems, and enable the infrastructure to adjust to new technical developments and scientific requirements as they emerge. Robust cyberinfrastructure will arise only when social, organizational, and cultural issues are resolved in tandem with the creation of technology-based services. This is a governance issue, but is facilitated by infrastructure capabilities that can impact the uptake of new interdisciplinary collaborations and exchange. Thus brokering must address both the cyberinfrastructure and computer technology requirements and also the social issues to allow improved cross-domain collaborations. This is best done through use-case-driven requirements and agile, iterative development methods. It is important to start by solving real (not hypothetical) information access and use problems via small pilot projects that develop capabilities

  16. Bridges, brokers and boundary spanners in collaborative networks: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Janet C; Cunningham, Frances C; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2013-04-30

    Bridges, brokers and boundary spanners facilitate transactions and the flow of information between people or groups who either have no physical or cognitive access to one another, or alternatively, who have no basis on which to trust each other. The health care sector is a context that is rich in isolated clusters, such as silos and professional "tribes," in need of connectivity. It is a key challenge in health service management to understand, analyse and exploit the role of key agents who have the capacity to connect disparate groupings in larger systems. The empirical, peer reviewed, network theory literature on brokerage roles was reviewed for the years 1994 to 2011 following PRISMA guidelines. The 24 articles that made up the final literature set were from a wide range of settings and contexts not just healthcare. Methods of data collection, analysis, and the ways in which brokers were identified varied greatly. We found four main themes addressed in the literature: identifying brokers and brokerage opportunities, generation and integration of innovation, knowledge brokerage, and trust. The benefits as well as the costs of brokerage roles were examined. Collaborative networks by definition, seek to bring disparate groups together so that they can work effectively and synergistically together. Brokers can support the controlled transfer of specialised knowledge between groups, increase cooperation by liaising with people from both sides of the gap, and improve efficiency by introducing "good ideas" from one isolated setting into another.There are significant costs to brokerage. Densely linked networks are more efficient at diffusing information to all their members when compared to sparsely linked groups. This means that while a bridge across a structural hole allows information to reach actors that were previously isolated, it is not the most efficient way to transfer information. Brokers who become the holders of, or the gatekeepers to, specialised knowledge

  17. General and food-selection specific parenting style in relation to the healthfulness of parent-child choices while grocery shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G; Graham, Dan J; Ullrich, Emily; MacPhee, David

    2017-01-01

    Past research has demonstrated that parenting style is related to children's health and eating patterns, and that parenting can vary across time and context. However, there is little evidence about similarities and differences between general, self-reported parenting style and observed parenting during grocery shopping. The goals of this study were to investigate links between general parenting style, parental warmth and limit setting (important dimensions of parenting style) during grocery shopping, and the healthfulness of foods chosen. Participants were 153 parent (88 mothers) - child (6-9 years old) dyads. Dyads were brought to a laboratory set up like a grocery store aisle and asked to choose two items from each of three categories (cookies/crackers, cereals, chips/snacks). Parents were observed in terms of warmth, responsiveness, autonomy granting, and limit setting; children were observed in terms of resistance and negotiation. Parents reported behaviors related to general parenting. Regression analyses were used to test study hypotheses. Observed parental limit setting was related to general parenting style; observed warmth was not. Observed limit setting (but not observed warmth or self-reported parenting style) was related to the healthfulness of food choices. Limit setting appears to be the dimension of parenting style that is expressed during grocery shopping, and that promotes healthier food choices. Implications are discussed regarding consistencies in parenting style across situations as well as contributions of parenting style to the development of children's healthy eating. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. The association between self-reported grocery store access, fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, and obesity in a racially diverse, low-income population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Nichol Gase

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to examine the relationship between self-reported time and distance to the nearest retail grocery store, healthy and unhealthy food consumption, and objectively measured body mass index. We conducted a survey with 1,503 racially diverse, low-income residents at five public health centers in Los Angeles County. Most participants reported shopping at a supermarket (86.7% and driving (59.9% to their usual source for groceries. Over half reported living less than a mile from (58.9% and traveling five minutes or less to reach (50.3% the nearest grocery store. In the multivariable regression models, neither self-reported distance nor time to the nearest grocery store was consistently associated with fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, or body mass index. Results suggest the need to consider access and quality as well as urban planning and transportation, when examining the relationship between the retail food environment and health outcomes.

  19. The Association between Self-Reported Grocery Store Access, Fruit and Vegetable Intake, Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, and Obesity in a Racially Diverse, Low-Income Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren Nichol; DeFosset, Amelia Rose; Smith, Lisa V; Kuo, Tony

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to examine the relationship between self-reported time and distance to the nearest retail grocery store, healthy and unhealthy food consumption, and objectively measured body mass index (BMI). We conducted a survey with 1,503 racially diverse, low-income residents at five public health centers in Los Angeles County. Most participants reported shopping at a supermarket (86.7%) and driving (59.9%) to their usual source for groceries. Over half reported living less than a mile from (58.9%) and traveling 5 min or less to reach (50.3%) the nearest grocery store. In the multivariable regression models, neither self-reported distance nor time to the nearest grocery store was consistently associated with fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, or BMI. Results suggest that the need to consider access and quality as well as urban planning and transportation, when examining the relationship between the retail food environment and health outcomes.

  20. Integrating ArcGIS Online with GEOSS Data Access Broker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchi, Roberto; Hogeweg, Marten

    2014-05-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) seeks to address 9 societal benefit areas for Earth observations to address: disasters, health, energy, climate, agriculture, ecosystems, biodiversity, water, and weather. As governments and their partners continue to monitor the face of the Earth, the collection, storage, analysis, and sharing of these observations remain fragmented, incomplete, or redundant. Major observational gaps also remain (particularly as we seek to look beneath the surface of the land and the water). As such, GEO's credo is that "decision makers need a global, coordinated, comprehensive, and sustained system of observing systems." Not surprisingly, one of the largest block of issues facing GEOSS is in the area of data: the access to data (including the building services to make the data more accessible), inadequate data integration and interoperability, error and uncertainty of observations, spatial and temporal gaps in observations, and the related issues of user involvement and capacity building. This is especially for people who stand to gain the most benefit from the datasets, but don't have the resources or knowledge to use them. Esri has millions of GIS and imagery users in hundreds of thousands of organizations around the world that work in the aforementioned 9 GEO societal benefit areas. Esri is therefore proud to have entered into a partnership with GEOSS, more specifically by way of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Esri and the Earth and Space Science Informatics (ESSI) Laboratory of Prof. Stefano Nativi at the CNR (National Research Council of Italy) Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research. Esri is working with the ESSI Lab to integrate ArcGIS Online by way of the ArcGIS Online API into the GEOSS Data Access Broker (DAB), resulting in the discoverability of all public content from ArcGIS Online through many of the search portals that participate in this network (e.g., DataOne, CEOS, CUAHSI, OneGeology, IOOS

  1. A comparison of mycotoxin contamination of premium and grocery brands of pelleted cat food in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanil D. Singh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Contamination with mycotoxins is of concern to pet owners and veterinary practitioners owing to their ability to cause disease and exacerbate the pathological changes associated with other diseases. Currently, there is a lack of information regarding the mycotoxin content of common premium brand (PB and grocery brand (GB cat feeds. Therefore, we undertook to determine the mycobiota content of feed samples, from both categories (n = 6 each, and measured the levels of aflatoxin (AF, fumonisin (FB, ochratoxin A (OTA and zearalenone (ZEA by high performance liquid chromatographic analysis. There were high concentrations of mycotoxins in both categories of feed, regardless of the notion that PBs are of a higher quality. The concentration of these toxins may contribute to the development of related pathologies in felines.

  2. Supermarket and Grocery Store–Based Interventions to Promote Healthful Food Choices and Eating Practices: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinen, Amy M.; Nitzke, Susan A.; Martinez-Donate, Ana P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Increasingly high rates of obesity have heightened interest among researchers and practitioners in identifying evidence-based interventions to increase access to healthful foods and beverages. Because most food purchasing decisions are made in food stores, such settings are optimal for interventions aimed at influencing these decisions. The objective of this review was to synthesize the evidence on supermarket and grocery store interventions to promote healthful food choices. Methods We searched PubMed through July 2012 to identify original research articles evaluating supermarket and grocery store interventions that promoted healthful food choices. We categorized each intervention by type of intervention strategy and extracted and summarized data on each intervention. We developed a scoring system for evaluating each intervention and assigned points for study design, effectiveness, reach, and availability of evidence. We averaged points for each intervention category and compared the strength of the evidence for each category. Results We identified 58 articles and characterized 33 interventions. We found 7 strategies used alone or in combination. The most frequently used strategy was the combination of point-of-purchase and promotion and advertising (15 interventions); evidence for this category was scored as sufficient. On average, of 3 points possible, the intervention categories scored 2.6 for study design, 1.1 for effectiveness, 0.3 for reach, and 2 for availability of evidence. Three categories showed sufficient evidence; 4 showed insufficient evidence; none showed strong evidence. Conclusion More rigorous testing of interventions aimed at improving food and beverage choices in food stores, including their effect on diet and health outcomes, is needed. PMID:23578398

  3. 12 CFR 220.127 - Independent broker/dealers arranging credit in connection with the sale of insurance premium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... an independent broker/dealer to sell such a program and to arrange for financing in that connection. In reaching such decision, the Board again relied upon the earlier understanding that independent...

  4. Effective Cost Mechanism for Cloudlet Retransmission and Prioritized VM Scheduling Mechanism over Broker Virtual Machine Communication Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Raj, Gaurav; Setia, Sonika

    2012-01-01

    In current scenario cloud computing is most widely increasing platform for task execution. Lot of research is going on to cut down the cost and execution time. In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm to have an effective and fast execution of task assigned by the user. We proposed an effective communication framework between broker and virtual machine for assigning the task and fetching the results in optimum time and cost using Broker Virtual Machine Communication Framework (BVCF). ...

  5. Bilinguals' Plausibility Judgments for Phrases with a Literal vs. Non-literal Meaning: The Influence of Language Brokering Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belem G. López

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that prior experience in language brokering (informal translation may facilitate the processing of meaning within and across language boundaries. The present investigation examined the influence of brokering on bilinguals' processing of two word collocations with either a literal or a figurative meaning in each language. Proficient Spanish-English bilinguals classified as brokers or non-brokers were asked to judge if adjective+noun phrases presented in each language made sense or not. Phrases with a literal meaning (e.g., stinging insect were interspersed with phrases with a figurative meaning (e.g., stinging insult and non-sensical phrases (e.g., stinging picnic. It was hypothesized that plausibility judgments would be facilitated for literal relative to figurative meanings in each language but that experience in language brokering would be associated with a more equivalent pattern of responding across languages. These predictions were confirmed. The findings add to the body of empirical work on individual differences in language processing in bilinguals associated with prior language brokering experience.

  6. A MAS-Based Cloud Service Brokering System to Respond Security Needs of Cloud Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Talbi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is becoming a key factor in computer science and an important technology for many organizations to deliver different types of services. The companies which provide services to customers are called as cloud service providers. The cloud users (CUs increase and require secure, reliable and trustworthy cloud service providers (CSPs from the market. So, it’s a challenge for a new customer to choose the highly secure provider. This paper presents a cloud service brokering system in order to analyze and rank the secured cloud service provider among the available providers list. This model uses an autonomous and flexible agent in multi-agent system (MASs that have an intelligent behavior and suitable tools for helping the brokering system to assess the security risks for the group of cloud providers which make decision of the more secured provider and justify the business needs of users in terms of security and reliability.

  7. Hierarchical Brokering with Feedback Control Framework in Mobile Device-Centric Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Lieh Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a hierarchical brokering architecture (HiBA and Mobile Multicloud Networking (MMCN feedback control framework for mobile device-centric cloud (MDC2 computing. Exploiting the MMCN framework and RESTful web-based interconnection, each tier broker probes resource state of its federation for control and management. Real-time and seamless services were developed. Case studies including intrafederation energy-aware balancing based on fuzzy feedback control and higher tier load balancing are further demonstrated to show how HiBA with MMCN relieves the embedding of algorithms when developing services. Theoretical performance model and real-world experiments both show that an MDC2 based on HiBA features better quality in terms of resource availability and network latency if it federates devices with enough resources distributed in lower tier hierarchy. The proposed HiBA realizes a development platform for MDC2 computing which is a feasible solution to User-Centric Networks (UCNs.

  8. The main new driver of customer experience in Grocery retail - the Fresh opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISMANĂ -ILISAN Camelia -Maria

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main challenge of a modern retailer is how to delight customers in fresh products without risking profitability. To compete effectively, businesses must focus on the customer's shopping experience. To manage a customer's experience, retailers should understand what “customer experience” actually means. Customer experience includes every point of contact at which the customer interacts with the business, product, or service. Customer experience management represents a business strategy designed to manage the customer experience. This paper presents the results of a marketing research study conducted for reviewing perception versus reality of customer experience delivery in fresh products and product availability.

  9. A Broker Framework for Secure and Cost-Effective Business Process Deployment on Multiple Clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Goettelmann , Elio; Dahman , Karim; Gateau , Benjamin; Godart , Claude

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Security risk management on information systems provides security guarantees while controlling costs. But security risk assessments can be very complex, especially in a cloud context where data is dis-tributed over multiple environments. To prevent costs from becoming the only cloud selection factor, while disregarding security, we propose a method for performing multiple cloud security risk assessments. In this paper we present a broker framework for balancing costs a...

  10. Morals, medicine and change: morality brokers, social phobias, and French psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Stephanie

    2008-06-01

    This paper will examine how French neurotics are being transformed into 'social phobics' and how the appearance of this group may be tied to new personal and social ideals. There are many people and factors that contribute to this changing definition of mental illness. Amongst these, I will focus on the role of three groups who are most vocally acting as morality brokers in the creation of these new subjects: psychiatrists, patients' groups and pharmaceutical companies.

  11. Online Broker Investors: Demographic Information, Investment Strategy, Portfolio Positions, and Trading Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, Markus

    2003-01-01

    It is often argued that the internet influences investor behavior. Furthermore, the recent 'bubble' in internet stocks is sometimes ascribed, at least in part, to online trading. However, little is known about how online investors actually behave. This paper contributes to fill this gap. A sample of approximately 3,000 online broker investors is studied over a 51 month period ending in April 2001. The main goal of this paper is to present various descriptive statistics on demographic informat...

  12. Trust Management for Public Key Infrastructures: Implementing the X.509 Trust Broker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Samer Wazan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A Public Key Infrastructure (PKI is considered one of the most important techniques used to propagate trust in authentication over the Internet. This technology is based on a trust model defined by the original X.509 (1988 standard and is composed of three entities: the certification authority (CA, the certificate holder (or subject, and the Relying Party (RP. The CA plays the role of a trusted third party between the certificate holder and the RP. In many use cases, this trust model has worked successfully. However, we argue that the application of this model on the Internet implies that web users need to depend on almost anyone in the world in order to use PKI technology. Thus, we believe that the current TLS system is not fit for purpose and must be revisited as a whole. In response, the latest draft edition of X.509 has proposed a new trust model by adding new entity called the Trust Broker (TB. In this paper, we present an implementation approach that a Trust Broker could follow in order to give RPs trust information about a CA by assessing the quality of its issued certificates. This is related to the quality of the CA’s policies and procedures and its commitment to them. Finally, we present our Trust Broker implementation that demonstrates how RPs can make informed decisions about certificate holders in the context of the global web, without requiring large processing resources themselves.

  13. A Variable Service Broker Routing Policy for data center selection in cloud analyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Manasrah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing depends on sharing distributed computing resources to handle different services such as servers, storage and applications. The applications and infrastructures are provided as pay per use services through data center to the end user. The data centers are located at different geographic locations. However, these data centers can get overloaded with the increase number of client applications being serviced at the same time and location; this will degrade the overall QoS of the distributed services. Since different user applications may require different configuration and requirements, measuring the user applications performance of various resources is challenging. The service provider cannot make decisions for the right level of resources. Therefore, we propose a Variable Service Broker Routing Policy – VSBRP, which is a heuristic-based technique that aims to achieve minimum response time through considering the communication channel bandwidth, latency and the size of the job. The proposed service broker policy will also reduce the overloading of the data centers by redirecting the user requests to the next data center that yields better response and processing time. The simulation shows promising results in terms of response and processing time compared to other known broker policies from the literature.

  14. Machine Learning-based Transient Brokers for Real-time Classification of the LSST Alert Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Gautham; Zaidi, Tayeb; Soraisam, Monika; ANTARES Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The number of transient events discovered by wide-field time-domain surveys already far outstrips the combined followup resources of the astronomical community. This number will only increase as we progress towards the commissioning of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), breaking the community's current followup paradigm. Transient brokers - software to sift through, characterize, annotate and prioritize events for followup - will be a critical tool for managing alert streams in the LSST era. Developing the algorithms that underlie the brokers, and obtaining simulated LSST-like datasets prior to LSST commissioning, to train and test these algorithms are formidable, though not insurmountable challenges. The Arizona-NOAO Temporal Analysis and Response to Events System (ANTARES) is a joint project of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory and the Department of Computer Science at the University of Arizona. We have been developing completely automated methods to characterize and classify variable and transient events from their multiband optical photometry. We describe the hierarchical ensemble machine learning algorithm we are developing, and test its performance on sparse, unevenly sampled, heteroskedastic data from various existing observational campaigns, as well as our progress towards incorporating these into a real-time event broker working on live alert streams from time-domain surveys.

  15. What is the effectiveness of obesity related interventions at retail grocery stores and supermarkets? —a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulfatah Adam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Prevalence of obesity and overweight has been increasing in many countries. Many factors have been identified as contributing to obesity including the food environment, especially the access, availability and affordability of healthy foods in grocery stores and supermarkets. Several interventions have been carried out in retail grocery/supermarket settings as part of an effort to understand and influence consumption of healthful foods. The review’s key outcome variable is sale/purchase of healthy foods as a result of the interventions. This systematic review sheds light on the effectiveness of food store interventions intended to promote the consumption of healthy foods and the methodological quality of studies reporting them. Methods Systematic literature search spanning from 2003 to 2015 (inclusive both years, and confined to papers in the English language was conducted. Studies fulfilling search criteria were identified and critically appraised. Studies included in this review report health interventions at physical food stores including supermarkets and corner stores, and with outcome variable of adopting healthier food purchasing/consumption behavior. The methodological quality of all included articles has been determined using a validated 16-item quality assessment tool (QATSDD. Results The literature search identified 1580 publications, of which 42 met the inclusion criteria. Most interventions used a combination of information (e.g. awareness raising through food labeling, promotions, campaigns, etc. and increasing availability of healthy foods such as fruits and vegetables. Few used price interventions. The average quality score for all papers is 65.0%, or an overall medium methodological quality. Apart from few studies, most studies reported that store interventions were effective in promoting purchase of healthy foods. Conclusion Given the diverse study settings and despite the challenges of methodological

  16. BP-Broker use-cases in the UncertWeb framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncella, Roberto; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Schulz, Michael; Stasch, Christoph; Proß, Benjamin; Jones, Richard; Santoro, Mattia

    2013-04-01

    The UncertWeb framework is a distributed, Web-based Information and Communication Technology (ICT) system to support scientific data modeling in presence of uncertainty. We designed and prototyped a core component of the UncertWeb framework: the Business Process Broker. The BP-Broker implements several functionalities, such as: discovery of available processes/BPs, preprocessing of a BP into its executable form (EBP), publication of EBPs and their execution through a workflow-engine. According to the Composition-as-a-Service (CaaS) approach, the BP-Broker supports discovery and chaining of modeling resources (and processing resources in general), providing the necessary interoperability services for creating, validating, editing, storing, publishing, and executing scientific workflows. The UncertWeb project targeted several scenarios, which were used to evaluate and test the BP-Broker. The scenarios cover the following environmental application domains: biodiversity and habitat change, land use and policy modeling, local air quality forecasting, and individual activity in the environment. This work reports on the study of a number of use-cases, by means of the BP-Broker, namely: - eHabitat use-case: implements a Monte Carlo simulation performed on a deterministic ecological model; an extended use-case supports inter-comparison of model outputs; - FERA use-case: is composed of a set of models for predicting land-use and crop yield response to climatic and economic change; - NILU use-case: is composed of a Probabilistic Air Quality Forecasting model for predicting concentrations of air pollutants; - Albatross use-case: includes two model services for simulating activity-travel patterns of individuals in time and space; - Overlay use-case: integrates the NILU scenario with the Albatross scenario to calculate the exposure to air pollutants of individuals. Our aim was to prove the feasibility of describing composite modeling processes with a high-level, abstract

  17. Supply chain design approaches for supply chain resilience: A qualitative study of South African fast-moving consumer goods grocery manufacturers

    OpenAIRE

    Assilah Agigi; Wesley Niemann; Theuns Kotzé

    2016-01-01

    Orientation: In today’s globalised and complex business environment, firms are ever more vulnerable to supply chain disruptions, originating both internally and externally from the supply chain. Supply chain resilience minimises the impact of a disruption through design approaches, which allows the supply chain to respond appropriately to disruptive events. Research purpose: This article investigated the supply chain risks faced by grocery manufacturers in the South African fast-moving co...

  18. HEAVY METAL CONTENT OF AYURVEDIC HERBAL MEDICINE PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case reports of individuals taking Ayurvedic herbal medicine products (HMPs) suggest that they may contain lead, mercury, and/or arsenic. We analyzed the heavy metal content of Ayurvedic HMPs manufactured in India and Pakistan, available in South Asian grocery stores in the Bost...

  19. Preschoolers' influence on and help with beverage selection at the grocery store is linked to maternal responsiveness and child beverage intake: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Karina R; Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Guzman, Melissa; Wakefield, Dorothy; Sisson, Susan B; Mayeux, Lara

    2016-12-01

    Children's involvement in beverage selection or purchase has seldom been investigated. The responsiveness dimension of parental feeding styles has been related to healthy maternal feeding practices. Assessing mothers' reports of responsiveness and demandingness in grocery stores may shed light on influences on purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and fruit juice (FJ). Study objectives were to explore whether (1) maternal responsiveness and demandingness were associated with preschoolers' a) help with selection of and b) influence on SSB and FJ purchases during grocery shopping and whether (2) preschoolers' a) help with selection of and b) influence on SSB and FJ purchases were associated with child intake of these beverages. Mothers of 3-to-5-year-old children (n=185) who co-shopped with the child completed the Caregiver Feeding Style Questionnaire, reported frequency of child help with selection and influence on beverage purchase via questionnaire, and provided a one-day weekend food recall for the child. In adjusted logistic regressions, responsiveness was associated with child help selecting FJ (OR=6.50, 95% CI[1.04, 40.75], pparenting behaviors associated with grocery shopping should be explored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Brokering Knowledge Mobilization Networks: Policy Reforms, Partnerships, and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng-A-Fook, Nicholas; Kane, Ruth G.; Butler, Jesse K.; Glithero, Lisa; Forte, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Educational researchers and policy-makers are now expected by funding agencies and their institutions to innovate the multi-directional ways in which our production of knowledge can impact the classrooms of teachers (practitioners), while also integrating their experiential knowledge into the landscape of our research. In this article, we draw on…

  1. 17 CFR 249.510 - Form 10-M, consent to service of process by a nonresident general partner of a broker-dealer firm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., consent to service of process by a nonresident general partner of a broker-dealer firm. This form shall be... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form 10-M, consent to service of process by a nonresident general partner of a broker-dealer firm. 249.510 Section 249.510...

  2. 17 CFR 249.508 - Form 8-M, consent to service of process by a corporation which is a nonresident broker-dealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to service of process by a corporation which is a nonresident broker-dealer. This form shall be filed... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form 8-M, consent to service of process by a corporation which is a nonresident broker-dealer. 249.508 Section 249.508 Commodity...

  3. 17 CFR 249.618 - Form BD-Y2K, information required of broker-dealers pursuant to section 17 of the Securities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form BD-Y2K, information... Exchange Members, Brokers, and Dealers § 249.618 Form BD-Y2K, information required of broker-dealers... FR 37674, July 13, 1998] Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form BD-Y2K, see...

  4. Framing medical tourism: an analysis of persuasive appeals, risks and benefits, and new media features of medical tourism broker websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunmin; Wright, Kevin B; O'Connor, Michaela; Wombacher, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the benefits and risks featured in medical tourism broker websites, as well as the types of persuasive appeals that these websites use to attract potential customers, from a framing theory perspective. In addition, it examines relationships among types of appeals and specific types of health-related services offered by medical facilities abroad and the role of new media modalities within medical tourism broker sites. A content analysis of 91 medical tourism broker websites was conducted. The results indicate that the websites highly emphasized benefits while downplaying the risks. Specifically, despite offering consumers complicated and risky medical procedures, the websites failed to report any procedural, postoperative, or legal concerns associated with them. Moreover, the results indicated that the websites relied on heavy use of new media features to enhance the appeal of the medical services that were offered. The implications of these findings, future directions for research, and limitations of the study are discussed.

  5. The efficiency, energy intensity and visual impact of the accent lighting in the retail grocery stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Nagyová

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, topics of displaying, presentation, lighting, energy saving and issues related to the environment while selling the fresh food (fruits, vegetable, bakery products, meat are becoming an important matter among traders. However, just bigger companies with transnational capital have devoted their attention to this issue yet. Generally, the energy costs make up 70% of operating costs in retail stores where the cooling system and lighting are the most energy consuming. Accent lighting in modern retails is largely involved in the overall design and atmosphere in shops and plays a crucial role in presenting the goods as well. Using of accent lighting can draw the customer's attention to a specific part of the sales area and achieve the overall harmonization in the store. With the rational using of combination of energy saving and effective accent lighting retailers can achieve not only attractive presentation of displayed products but also appreciable savings in the operation of their stores. It is the only factor that can be exactly measured and controlled. Using a Colour and Lux Meters we found out the intensity and color temperature of accent lighting used in domestic and foreign retail chains for the different kinds of fresh food products. Based on the obtained values we have compiled graphs, which are showing visual comfort. We also identified different types of accent lighting, which we assigned to their impact on emotional involvement of consumers. The starting points were the tests we conducted in simulated laboratory conditions. While searching of a compromise between effective and energy efficient accent lighting we take into consideration consumers' emotional response as well as the annual electricity consumption of different types of light sources. At the end we recommend options for energy-efficient, effective and spectacular lighting while using the optimal number of light sources and their logical organization

  6. Social workers as transition brokers: facilitating the transition from pediatric to adult medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanske, Susan; Arnold, Janis; Carvalho, Maria; Rein, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Transition from pediatric to adult medical care and the significant psychosocial considerations impacting this developmental process are a primary focus in health care today. Social workers are often the informal brokers of this complex and nuanced process and are uniquely trained to complete biopsychosocial assessments to understand the needs of patients and families and address psychosocial factors. Their extensive knowledge of resources and systems, along with their sophisticated understanding of the relationship issues, family dynamics, cultural implications, and basic person-in-context approach allow for unique collaboration with the health care team, family, and community supports to develop successful transition plans and programs.

  7. Risk communication and informed consent in the medical tourism industry: a thematic content analysis of Canadian broker websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Kali; Snyder, Jeremy; Crooks, Valorie A; Johnston, Rory

    2011-09-26

    Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the risks and benefits of undergoing surgery or other procedures abroad to their clientele. This raises important ethical concerns regarding processes such as informed consent and the liability of brokers in the event that complications arise from procedures. The purpose of this article is to examine the language, information, and online marketing of Canadian medical tourism brokers' websites in light of such ethical concerns. An exhaustive online search using multiple search engines and keywords was performed to compile a comprehensive directory of English-language Canadian medical tourism brokerage websites. These websites were examined using thematic content analysis, which included identifying informational themes, generating frequency counts of these themes, and comparing trends in these counts to the established literature. Seventeen websites were identified for inclusion in this study. It was found that Canadian medical tourism broker websites varied widely in scope, content, professionalism and depth of information. Three themes emerged from the thematic content analysis: training and accreditation, risk communication, and business dimensions. Third party accreditation bodies of debatable regulatory value were regularly mentioned on the reviewed websites, and discussion of surgical risk was absent on 47% of the websites reviewed, with limited discussion of risk on the remaining ones. Terminology describing brokers' roles was somewhat inconsistent across the websites. Finally

  8. Risk communication and informed consent in the medical tourism industry: A thematic content analysis of canadian broker websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the risks and benefits of undergoing surgery or other procedures abroad to their clientele. This raises important ethical concerns regarding processes such as informed consent and the liability of brokers in the event that complications arise from procedures. The purpose of this article is to examine the language, information, and online marketing of Canadian medical tourism brokers' websites in light of such ethical concerns. Methods An exhaustive online search using multiple search engines and keywords was performed to compile a comprehensive directory of English-language Canadian medical tourism brokerage websites. These websites were examined using thematic content analysis, which included identifying informational themes, generating frequency counts of these themes, and comparing trends in these counts to the established literature. Results Seventeen websites were identified for inclusion in this study. It was found that Canadian medical tourism broker websites varied widely in scope, content, professionalism and depth of information. Three themes emerged from the thematic content analysis: training and accreditation, risk communication, and business dimensions. Third party accreditation bodies of debatable regulatory value were regularly mentioned on the reviewed websites, and discussion of surgical risk was absent on 47% of the websites reviewed, with limited discussion of risk on the remaining ones. Terminology describing brokers' roles was somewhat inconsistent across

  9. Risk communication and informed consent in the medical tourism industry: A thematic content analysis of canadian broker websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crooks Valorie A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the risks and benefits of undergoing surgery or other procedures abroad to their clientele. This raises important ethical concerns regarding processes such as informed consent and the liability of brokers in the event that complications arise from procedures. The purpose of this article is to examine the language, information, and online marketing of Canadian medical tourism brokers' websites in light of such ethical concerns. Methods An exhaustive online search using multiple search engines and keywords was performed to compile a comprehensive directory of English-language Canadian medical tourism brokerage websites. These websites were examined using thematic content analysis, which included identifying informational themes, generating frequency counts of these themes, and comparing trends in these counts to the established literature. Results Seventeen websites were identified for inclusion in this study. It was found that Canadian medical tourism broker websites varied widely in scope, content, professionalism and depth of information. Three themes emerged from the thematic content analysis: training and accreditation, risk communication, and business dimensions. Third party accreditation bodies of debatable regulatory value were regularly mentioned on the reviewed websites, and discussion of surgical risk was absent on 47% of the websites reviewed, with limited discussion of risk on the remaining ones. Terminology describing brokers' roles was

  10. Use of a knowledge broker to establish healthy public policies in a city district: a developmental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeveld, Kirsten; Stronks, Karien; Harting, Janneke

    2016-03-15

    Public health is to a large extent determined by non-health-sector policies. One approach to address this apparent paradox is to establish healthy public policies. This requires policy makers in non-health sectors to become more aware of the health impacts of their policies, and more willing to adopt evidence-informed policy measures to improve health. We employed a knowledge broker to set the agenda for health and to specify health-promoting policy alternatives. This study aimed at gaining in-depth understanding of how this knowledge broker approach works. In the context of a long-term partnership between the two universities in Amsterdam and the municipal public health service, we employed a knowledge broker who worked part-time at a university and part-time for an Amsterdam city district. When setting an agenda and specifying evidence-informed policy alternatives, we considered three individual policy portfolios as well as the policy organization of the city district. We evaluated and developed the knowledge broker approach through action research using participant observation. Our knowledge brokering strategy led to the adoption of several policy alternatives in individual policy portfolios, and was especially successful in agenda-setting for health. More specifically, health became an issue on the formal policy agenda as evidenced by its uptake in the city district's mid-term review and the appointment of a policy analyst for health. Our study corroborated the importance of process factors such as building trust, clearly distinguishing the knowledge broker role, and adequate management support. We also saw the benefits of multilevel agenda-setting and specifying policy alternatives at appropriate policy levels. Sector-specific responsibilities hampered the adoption of cross-sectoral policy alternatives, while thematically designed policy documents offered opportunities for including them. Further interpretation revealed three additional themes in knowledge

  11. Online Academic Networks as Knowledge Brokers: The Mediating Role of Organizational Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Mădălina Vătămănescu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Placing online academic networks in the framework of social, cultural and institutional “deterritorialization,” the current paper aims at investigating the functionality of these new forms of transnational and trans-organizational aggregations as knowledge brokers. The emphasis is laid on the influence of human collective intelligence and consistent knowledge flows on research innovation, considering the role of organizational support within higher education systems. In this respect, the research relied on a questionnaire-based survey with 140 academics from European emerging countries, the data collected being processed via a partial least squares structural equation modelling technique. Evidence was brought that, as knowledge brokers, online academic networks are systems aimed to support the access to human collective intelligence and consistent knowledge flows which exert a positive influence on research innovation, both directly and indirectly, by means of formal and informal organizational support. As facilitators of collaborative environments for individuals with specialized knowledge, competence, expertise and experience, online academic networks have set themselves up as an agora for academics worldwide and as an outlet for their acumen and literacy.

  12. Machine-learning-based Brokers for Real-time Classification of the LSST Alert Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Gautham; Zaidi, Tayeb; Soraisam, Monika D.; Wang, Zhe; Lochner, Michelle; Matheson, Thomas; Saha, Abhijit; Yang, Shuo; Zhao, Zhenge; Kececioglu, John; Scheidegger, Carlos; Snodgrass, Richard T.; Axelrod, Tim; Jenness, Tim; Maier, Robert S.; Ridgway, Stephen T.; Seaman, Robert L.; Evans, Eric Michael; Singh, Navdeep; Taylor, Clark; Toeniskoetter, Jackson; Welch, Eric; Zhu, Songzhe; The ANTARES Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    The unprecedented volume and rate of transient events that will be discovered by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) demand that the astronomical community update its follow-up paradigm. Alert-brokers—automated software system to sift through, characterize, annotate, and prioritize events for follow-up—will be critical tools for managing alert streams in the LSST era. The Arizona-NOAO Temporal Analysis and Response to Events System (ANTARES) is one such broker. In this work, we develop a machine learning pipeline to characterize and classify variable and transient sources only using the available multiband optical photometry. We describe three illustrative stages of the pipeline, serving the three goals of early, intermediate, and retrospective classification of alerts. The first takes the form of variable versus transient categorization, the second a multiclass typing of the combined variable and transient data set, and the third a purity-driven subtyping of a transient class. Although several similar algorithms have proven themselves in simulations, we validate their performance on real observations for the first time. We quantitatively evaluate our pipeline on sparse, unevenly sampled, heteroskedastic data from various existing observational campaigns, and demonstrate very competitive classification performance. We describe our progress toward adapting the pipeline developed in this work into a real-time broker working on live alert streams from time-domain surveys.

  13. The implementation of common object request broker architecture (CORBA) for controlling robot arm via web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Mahamad Zuhdi Amin; Mohd Yazid Idris; Wan Mohd Nasir Wan Kadir

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the employment of the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) technology in the implementation of our distributed Arm Robot Controller (ARC). CORBA is an industrial standard architecture based on distributed abstract object model, which is developed by Object Management Group (OMG). The architecture consists of five components i.e. Object Request Broker (ORB), Interface Definition Language (IDL), Dynamic Invocation Interface (DII), Interface Repositories (IR) and Object adapter (OA). CORBA objects are different from typical programming objects in three ways i.e. they can be executed on any platform, located anywhere on the network and written in any language that supports IDL mapping. In the implementation of the system, 5 degree of freedom (DOF) arm robot RCS 6.0 and Java as a programming mapping to the CORBA IDL. By implementing this architecture, the objects in the server machine can be distributed over the network in order to run the controller. the ultimate goal for our ARC system is to demonstrate concurrent execution of multiple arm robots through multiple instantiations of distributed object components. (Author)

  14. The art of grocery shopping on a food stamp budget: factors influencing the food choices of low-income women as they try to make ends meet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiig, Kristen; Smith, Chery

    2009-10-01

    Amidst a hunger-obesity paradox, the purpose of the present study was to examine the grocery shopping behaviour and food stamp usage of low-income women with children to identify factors influencing their food choices on a limited budget. Focus groups, which included questions based on Social Cognitive Theory constructs, examined food choice in the context of personal, behavioural and environmental factors. A quantitative grocery shopping activity required participants to prioritize food purchases from a 177-item list on a budget of $US 50 for a one-week period, an amount chosen based on the average household food stamp allotment in 2005. Ninety-two low-income women, with at least one child aged 9-13 years in their household, residing in the Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA. Participants' mean age was 37 years, and 76% were overweight or obese (BMI> or =25.0 kg/m2). Key findings suggest that their food choices and grocery shopping behaviour were shaped by not only individual and family preferences, but also their economic and environmental situation. Transportation and store accessibility were major determinants of shopping frequency, and they used various strategies to make their food dollars stretch (e.g. shopping based on prices, in-store specials). Generally, meat was the most important food group for purchase and consumption, according to both the qualitative and quantitative data. Efforts to improve food budgeting skills, increase nutrition knowledge, and develop meal preparation strategies involving less meat and more fruits and vegetables, could be valuable in helping low-income families nutritionally make the best use of their food dollars.

  15. What influences Latino grocery shopping behavior? Perspectives on the small food store environment from managers and employees in San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Flack, Jennifer C; Baquero, Barbara; Linnan, Laura A; Gittelsohn, Joel; Pickrel, Julie L; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2016-01-01

    To inform the design of a multilevel in-store intervention, this qualitative study utilized in-depth semistructured interviews with 28 managers and 10 employees of small-to-medium-sized Latino food stores (tiendas) in San Diego, California, to identify factors within the tienda that may influence Latino customers' grocery-shopping experiences and behaviors. Qualitative data analysis, guided by grounded theory, was performed using open coding. Results suggest that future interventions should focus on the physical (i.e., built structures) and social (i.e., economic and sociocultural) dimensions of store environments, including areas where the two dimensions interact, to promote the purchase of healthy food among customers.

  16. 17 CFR 17.00 - Information to be furnished by futures commission merchants, clearing members and foreign brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... merchants, clearing members and foreign brokers. (a) Special accounts—reportable futures and options... quantity of exchanges of futures for commodities or for derivatives positions and the number of delivery... be used to report three types of data: long and short futures and options positions, futures delivery...

  17. Dynamic QoS management in Differentiated Services using bandwidth brokers, RSVP aggregation and load control protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westberg, Lars; Eriksson, Anders; Karagiannis, Georgios; Heijenk, Geert; Rexhepi, Vlora; Partain, David

    2001-01-01

    A method and network subsystem for providing on demand end to end Quality of Service (Qos) in a dynamic manner, use a combination of Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP), load control protocol (and its successors) and Bandwidth Brokers (BBs)(1106) which communicate using a predetermined protocol.

  18. Dynamic QoS management in Differentiated Services using bandwidth brokers, RSVP aggregation and load control protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westberg, Lars; Eriksson, Anders; Karagiannis, Georgios; Heijenk, Geert; Rexhepi, Vlora; Partain, David

    2009-01-01

    A method and network subsystem for providing on demand end to end Quality of Service (Qos) in a dynamic manner, use a combination of Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP), load control protocol (and its successors) and Bandwidth Brokers (BBs)(1106) which communicate using a predetermined protocol.

  19. 24 CFR 100.135 - Unlawful practices in the selling, brokering, or appraising of residential real property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Unlawful practices in the selling, brokering, or appraising of residential real property. 100.135 Section 100.135 Housing and Urban Development... residential real property in connection with the sale, rental, or financing of any dwelling where the person...

  20. Language Brokering and Self-Concept: An Exploratory Study of Latino Students' Experiences in Middle and High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Kate; Kumpiene, Gerda

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the relationships among individual characteristics, language brokering experiences and attitudes, and multiple dimensions of self-concept among a sample of Latino adolescents. The sample was comprised of 66 Latino students in 6th through 11th grades who were proficient in both Spanish and English. Results from…

  1. Public Participation and Scientific Citizenship in the Science Museum in London: Visitors’ Perceptions of the Museum as a Broker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandelli, A.; Konijn, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    Science museums in Europe play an emerging and important role as brokers between the public and policy-making institutions and are becoming platforms that enable scientific citizenship. To do so, museums rely on the participation of their visitors. However, little is known about the relation between

  2. 17 CFR 249.507 - Form 7-M, consent to service of process by an individual nonresident broker-dealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form 7-M, consent to service of process by an individual nonresident broker-dealer. 249.507 Section 249.507 Commodity and... Forms for Statements Made in Connection With Exempt Tender Offers § 249.507 Form 7-M, consent to service...

  3. 17 CFR 249.509 - Form 9-M, consent to service of process by a partnership nonresident broker-dealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form 9-M, consent to service of process by a partnership nonresident broker-dealer. 249.509 Section 249.509 Commodity and... Forms for Statements Made in Connection With Exempt Tender Offers § 249.509 Form 9-M, consent to service...

  4. Policy learning and policy networks in theory and practice: The role of policy brokers in the Indonesian biodiesel policy network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Howlett (Michael); Mukherjee, I. (Ishani); J.F.M. Koppenjan (Joop)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines how learning has been treated, generally, in policy network theories and what questions have been posed, and answered, about this phenomenon to date. We examine to what extent network characteristics and especially the presence of various types of brokers impede or

  5. From Language Learner to Language User in English-Medium Higher Education: Language Development Brokers outside the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaj-Ward, Lia

    2017-01-01

    This article explores, from within the social constructivist paradigm and drawing on data from twenty-one semi-structured interviews with international postgraduate university students approaching the end of a one-year full-time taught Masters degree in the UK, the range of language development brokers that have had an impact on these students'…

  6. 17 CFR 400.6 - Notice of withdrawal from business as a government securities broker or dealer by a financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice of withdrawal from business as a government securities broker or dealer by a financial institution. 400.6 Section 400.6... SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 RULES OF GENERAL APPLICATION § 400.6 Notice of withdrawal from business as a...

  7. 17 CFR 403.5 - Custody of securities held by financial institutions that are government securities brokers or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... institution does not initiate the purchase of the specified securities by the close of the next business day... physical delivery of certificates if the securities are issued in certificated form, or to direct a... business day. (6) A government securities broker or dealer that is a branch or agency of a foreign bank...

  8. 78 FR 62930 - Order Providing Broker-Dealers a Temporary Exemption From the Requirements of Certain New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... accurately document their market, credit, and liquidity risk management controls under new paragraph (a)(23...)(2) to Rule 15c3-3 regarding the treatment of customers' free credit balances. Additionally, broker... incorporates certain requirements from Rule 15c3-2 (customers' free credit balances), including the requirement...

  9. 17 CFR 240.17a-3 - Records to be made by certain exchange members, brokers and dealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; and (C) System order means any order or other communication or indication submitted by any customer... change in the name or address of the customer or owner, the member, broker or dealer furnished a notification of that change to the customer's old address, or to each joint owner, and the associated person...

  10. Language Brokering and Depressive Symptoms in Mexican-american Adolescents: Parent-Child Alienation and Resilience as Moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Yeong; Hou, Yang; Gonzalez, Yolanda

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to untangle the mixed effects of language brokering by examining a contextual factor (i.e., parent-child alienation) and a personal attribute (i.e., resilience) that may relate to adolescents' feelings during translating (i.e., sense of burden and efficacy) and that may moderate the association between such feelings and adolescent…

  11. An exploratory study of knowledge brokering in hospital settings: facilitating knowledge sharing and learning for patient safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Justin; Currie, Graeme; Crompton, Amanda; Bishop, Simon

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study of intra-organisational knowledge brokers working within three large acute hospitals in the English National Health Services. Knowledge brokering is promoted as a strategy for supporting knowledge sharing and learning in healthcare, especially in the diffusion of research evidence into practice. Less attention has been given to brokers who support knowledge sharing and learning within healthcare organisations. With specific reference to the need for learning around patient safety, this paper focuses on the structural position and role of four types of intra-organisational brokers. Through ethnographic research it examines how variations in formal role, location and relationships shape how they share and support the use of knowledge across organisational and occupational boundaries. It suggests those occupying hybrid organisational roles, such as clinical-managers, are often best positioned to support knowledge sharing and learning because of their 'ambassadorial' type position and legitimacy to participate in multiple communities through dual-directed relationships. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 17 CFR 247.700 - Defined terms relating to the networking exception from the definition of “broker.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the average of the minimum and maximum hourly wage established by the bank for the current or prior... networking exception from the definition of âbroker.â 247.700 Section 247.700 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REGULATION R-EXEMPTIONS AND DEFINITIONS RELATED TO...

  13. Information Broker/Free Lance Librarian--New Careers--New Library Services. Miscellaneous Studies No. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Barbara B., Ed.

    Proceedings of a workshop on the information broker--a person or organization that provides information on demand for a fee, usually to make a profit--includes edited transcripts of the following presentations: "Introduction," Maxine Davis; "The Free-Lance Alternative: Turning Traditional Skills New Directions," Susan Klement;…

  14. Microbial Differences of Eggs from Traditional Cage and free Range Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumers have become more aware of the agricultural practices utilized in producing foods. Food producers have, in many instances, made efforts to provide consumers with a variety of social choices in the grocery store. As alternative products arrive in retail, there is need to understand the app...

  15. "I Got to Know Them in a New Way": Rela(y/t)ing Rhizomes and Community-Based Knowledge (Brokers') Transformation of Western and Indigenous Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornssler, Barbara; McKenzie, Holly A; Dell, Colleen Anne; Laliberte, Larry; Hopkins, Carol

    2014-04-01

    Drawing on three culturally specific research projects, this paper examines how community-based knowledge brokers' engagement in brokering knowledge shaped the projects' processes. Informed by Deleuze and Guattari's (1987) conceptualization of the "rhizome," we discuss how community knowledge brokers' engagement in open research-creation practices embrace the relational foundation of Indigenous research paradigms in contrast to mainstream Western research practices that are engaged as linear, objective, and outcome-oriented activities. In turn, we offer propositions for building team environments where open research-creation practices can unfold, informing a periphery of shared space for Indigenous and Western paradigms.

  16. Knowledge brokering for healthy aging: a scoping review of potential approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eerd, Dwayne; Newman, Kristine; DeForge, Ryan; Urquhart, Robin; Cornelissen, Evelyn; Dainty, Katie N

    2016-10-19

    Developing a healthcare delivery system that is more responsive to the future challenges of an aging population is a priority in Canada. The World Health Organization acknowledges the need for knowledge translation frameworks in aging and health. Knowledge brokering (KB) is a specific knowledge translation approach that includes making connections between people to facilitate the use of evidence. Knowledge gaps exist about KB roles, approaches, and guiding frameworks. The objective of the scoping review is to identify and describe KB approaches and the underlying conceptual frameworks (models, theories) used to guide the approaches that could support healthy aging. Literature searches were done in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, EBM reviews (Cochrane Database of systematic reviews), CINAHL, and SCOPUS, as well as Google and Google Scholar using terms related to knowledge brokering. Titles, abstracts, and full reports were reviewed independently by two reviewers who came to consensus on all screening criteria. Documents were included if they described a KB approach and details about the underlying conceptual basis. Data about KB approach, target stakeholders, KB outcomes, and context were extracted independently by two reviewers. Searches identified 248 unique references. Screening for inclusion revealed 19 documents that described 15 accounts of knowledge brokering and details about conceptual guidance and could be applied in healthy aging contexts. Eight KB elements were detected in the approaches though not all approaches incorporated all elements. The underlying conceptual guidance for KB approaches varied. Specific KB frameworks were referenced or developed for nine KB approaches while the remaining six cited more general KT frameworks (or multiple frameworks) as guidance. The KB approaches that we found varied greatly depending on the context and stakeholders involved. Three of the approaches were explicitly employed in the context of health aging. Common elements

  17. The DIAS/CEOS Water Portal, distributed system using brokering architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Satoko; Sekioka, Shinichi; Kuroiwa, Kaori; Kudo, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    The DIAS/CEOS Water Portal is a one of the DIAS (Data Integration and Analysis System, http://www.editoria.u-tokyo.ac.jp/projects/dias/?locale=en_US) systems for data distribution for users including, but not limited to, scientists, decision makers and officers like river administrators. This portal has two main functions; one is to search and access data and the other is to register and share use cases which use datasets provided via this portal. This presentation focuses on the first function, to search and access data. The Portal system is distributed in the sense that, while the portal system is located in Tokyo, the data is located in archive centers which are globally distributed. For example, some in-situ data is archived at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, USA. The NWP station time series and global gridded model output data is archived at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPIM) in cooperation with the World Data Center for Climate in Hamburg, Germany. Part of satellite data is archived at DIAS storage at the University of Tokyo, Japan. This portal itself does not store data. Instead, according to requests made by users on the web page, it retrieves data from distributed data centers on-the-fly and lets them download and see rendered images/plots. Although some data centers have unique meta data format and/or data search protocols, our portal's brokering function enables users to search across various data centers at one time, like one-stop shopping. And this portal is also connected to other data brokering systems, including GEOSS DAB (Discovery and Access Broker). As a result, users can search over thousands of datasets, millions of files at one time. Our system mainly relies on the open source software GI-cat (http://essi-lab.eu/do/view/GIcat), Opensearch protocol and OPeNDAP protocol to enable the above functions. Details on how it works will be introduced during the

  18. EBT Payment for Online Grocery Orders: a Mixed-Methods Study to Understand Its Uptake among SNAP Recipients and the Barriers to and Motivators for Its Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Olivia; Tagliaferro, Barbara; Rodriguez, Noemi; Athens, Jessica; Abrams, Courtney; Elbel, Brian

    2018-04-01

    To examine Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients' use of the first online supermarket accepting Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) payment. In this mixed-methods study, the authors collected EBT purchase data from an online grocer and attempted a randomized controlled trial in the South Bronx, New York City, followed by focus groups with SNAP beneficiaries aged ≥18 years. Participants were randomized to shop at their usual grocery store or an online supermarket for 3 months. Focus groups explored barriers and motivators to online EBT redemption. Few participants made online purchases, even when incentivized in the randomized controlled trial. Qualitative findings highlighted a lack of perceived control over the online food selection process as a key barrier to purchasing food online. Motivators included fast, free shipping and discounts. Electronic Benefit Transfer for online grocery purchases has the potential to increase food access among SNAP beneficiaries, but challenges exist to this new food buying option. Understanding online food shopping barriers and motivators is critical to the success of policies targeting the online expansion of SNAP benefits. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Brokered virtual hubs for facilitating access and use of geospatial Open Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Paolo; Latre, Miguel; Kamali, Nargess; Brumana, Raffaella; Braumann, Stefan; Nativi, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    , beyond a certain extent, heterogeneity is irreducible especially in interdisciplinary contexts. ENERGIC OD Virtual Hubs address heterogeneity adopting a mediation and brokering approach: specific components (brokers) are dedicated to harmonize service interfaces, metadata and data models, enabling seamless discovery and access to heterogeneous infrastructures and datasets. As an innovation project, ENERGIC OD integrates several existing technologies to implement Virtual Hubs as single points of access to geospatial datasets provided by new or existing platforms and infrastructures, including INSPIRE-compliant systems and Copernicus services. A first version of the ENERGIC OD brokers has been implemented based on the GI-Suite Brokering Framework developed by CNR-IIA, and complemented with other tools under integration and development. It already enables mediated discovery and harmonized access to different geospatial Open Data sources. It is accessible by users as Software-as-a-Service through a browser. Moreover, open APIs and a Javascript library are available for application developers. Six ENERGIC OD Virtual Hubs have been currently deployed: one at regional level (Berlin metropolitan area) and five at national-level (in France, Germany, Italy, Poland and Spain). Each Virtual Hub manager decided the deployment strategy (local infrastructure or commercial Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud), and the list of connected Open Data sources. The ENERGIC OD Virtual Hubs are under test and validation through the development of ten different mobile and Web applications.

  20. Middleware Proxy: A Request-Driven Messaging Broker For High Volume Data Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Sliwinski, W; Dworak, A

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, all major infrastructures and data centres (commercial and scientific) make an extensive use of the publish-subscribe messaging paradigm, which helps to decouple the message sender (publisher) from the message receiver (consumer). This paradigm is also heavily used in the CERN Accelerator Control system, in Proxy broker - critical part of the Controls Middleware (CMW) project. Proxy provides the aforementioned publish-subscribe facility and also supports execution of synchronous read and write operations. Moreover, it enables service scalability and dramatically reduces the network resources and overhead (CPU and memory) on publisher machine, required to serve all subscriptions. Proxy was developed in modern C++, using state of the art programming techniques (e.g. Boost) and following recommended software patterns for achieving low-latency and high concurrency. The outstanding performance of the Proxy infrastructure was confirmed during the last 3 years by delivering the high volume of LHC equipment...

  1. Factors Affecting Satisfaction in Online Financial Transactions: a study of Brazilian home brokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Brantes Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluated consumers’ perceptions of Brazilian Home Broker services in the online environment. Based on the model suggested by Balasubramanian, Konana and Menon (2003, the effects of relevant online consumer behavior constructs on customer satisfaction with the service were analyzed. Constructs such as perceived operational competence, willingness to trust and perceived environmental security were employed, in a model fully mediated by trust. A questionnaire with scales previously used in literature was employed to measure the relevant constructs and structural equations applied to analyze the relationships found. Results show a strong relationship between perceived environment security and perceived operational competence, indicating that trust formation precedes satisfaction in online financial services transactions within the Brazilian context.

  2. Adolescent culture brokering and family functioning: a study of families from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickett, Edison J; Jones, Curtis J

    2007-04-01

    In immigrant families, culture brokering (CB) refers to the ways in which children and adolescents serve as mediator between their family and aspects of the new culture. This study focused on the debate in the literature about whether CB implies "role reversal" in the family and "adultification" of the adolescent or whether CB is better understood as simply one of the many ways that immigrant children contribute to family functioning. Results indicated a mixed picture with respect to this debate. Greater amounts of adolescent CB were indeed related to higher adolescent reports of family conflict, but also to greater family adaptability. In addition, the amount of CB was unrelated to family satisfaction and family cohesion. Secondary questions centered on the relationship of CB to adolescent and parent demographic and acculturation variables. Here, CB was related to parent acculturation patterns but not those of adolescents. Implications for future research on the CB role are discussed. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. A SOA broker solution for standard discovery and access services: the GI-cat framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, Enrico

    2010-05-01

    GI-cat ideal users are data providers or service providers within the geoscience community. The former have their data already available through an access service (e.g. an OGC Web Service) and would have it published through a standard catalog service, in a seamless way. The latter would develop a catalog broker and let users query and access different geospatial resources through one or more standard interfaces and Application Profiles (AP) (e.g. OGC CSW ISO AP, CSW ebRIM/EO AP, etc.). GI-cat actually implements a broker components (i.e. a middleware service) which carries out distribution and mediation functionalities among "well-adopted" catalog interfaces and data access protocols. GI-cat also publishes different discovery interfaces: the OGC CSW ISO and ebRIM Application Profiles (the latter coming with support for the EO and CIM extension packages) and two different OpenSearch interfaces developed in order to explore Web 2.0 possibilities. An extended interface is also available to exploit all available GI-cat features, such as interruptible incremental queries and queries feedback. Interoperability tests performed in the context of different projects have also pointed out the importance to enforce compatibility with existing and wide-spread tools of the open source community (e.g. GeoNetwork and Deegree catalogs), which was then achieved. Based on a service-oriented framework of modular components, GI-cat can effectively be customized and tailored to support different deployment scenarios. In addition to the distribution functionality an harvesting approach has been lately experimented, allowing the user to switch between a distributed and a local search giving thus more possibilities to support different deployment scenarios. A configurator tool is available in order to enable an effective high level configuration of the broker service. A specific geobrowser was also naturally developed, for demonstrating the advanced GI-cat functionalities. This client

  4. Understanding customer reactions to brokered ultimatums: applying negotiation and justice theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Stephen E; Ellis, Aleksander P J; Conlon, Donald E; Tinsley, Catherine H

    2004-06-01

    There has been little research examining customer reactions to brokered ultimatum game (BUG) contexts (i.e. exchanges in which 1 party offers an ultimatum price for a resource through an intermediary, and the ultimatum offer is accepted or rejected by the other party). In this study, the authors incorporated rational decision-making theory and justice theory to examine how customers' bids, recommendations, and repatronage behavior are affected by characteristics of BUG contexts (changing from an ultimatum to negotiation transaction, response timeliness, and offer acceptance or rejection). Results indicated that customers attempt to be economically efficient with their bidding behavior. However, negotiation structures, long waits for a response, and rejected bids create injustice perceptions (particularly informational and distributive injustice), negatively influencing customers' recommendations to others and their repatronage. The authors then discuss the practical and theoretical implications of their results. (c) 2004 APA

  5. On the Support of Scientific Workflows over Pub/Sub Brokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Cedeño

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The execution of scientific workflows is gaining importance as more computing resources are available in the form of grid environments. The Publish/Subscribe paradigm offers well-proven solutions for sustaining distributed scenarios while maintaining the high level of task decoupling required by scientific workflows. In this paper, we propose a new model for supporting scientific workflows that improves the dissemination of control events. The proposed solution is based on the mapping of workflow tasks to the underlying Pub/Sub event layer, and the definition of interfaces and procedures for execution on brokers. In this paper we also analyze the strengths and weaknesses of current solutions that are based on existing message exchange models for scientific workflows. Finally, we explain how our model improves the information dissemination, event filtering, task decoupling and the monitoring of scientific workflows.

  6. On the support of scientific workflows over Pub/Sub brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Augusto; Robles, Tomas; Alcarria, Ramon; Cedeño, Edwin

    2013-08-20

    The execution of scientific workflows is gaining importance as more computing resources are available in the form of grid environments. The Publish/Subscribe paradigm offers well-proven solutions for sustaining distributed scenarios while maintaining the high level of task decoupling required by scientific workflows. In this paper, we propose a new model for supporting scientific workflows that improves the dissemination of control events. The proposed solution is based on the mapping of workflow tasks to the underlying Pub/Sub event layer, and the definition of interfaces and procedures for execution on brokers. In this paper we also analyze the strengths and weaknesses of current solutions that are based on existing message exchange models for scientific workflows. Finally, we explain how our model improves the information dissemination, event filtering, task decoupling and the monitoring of scientific workflows.

  7. Integrating GRID tools to build a computing resource broker: activities of DataGrid WP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglano, C.; Barale, S.; Gaido, L.; Guarise, A.; Lusso, S.; Werbrouck, A.

    2001-01-01

    Resources on a computational Grid are geographically distributed, heterogeneous in nature, owned by different individuals or organizations with their own scheduling policies, have different access cost models with dynamically varying loads and availability conditions. This makes traditional approaches to workload management, load balancing and scheduling inappropriate. The first work package (WP1) of the EU-funded DataGrid project is addressing the issue of optimizing the distribution of jobs onto Grid resources based on a knowledge of the status and characteristics of these resources that is necessarily out-of-date (collected in a finite amount of time at a very loosely coupled site). The authors describe the DataGrid approach in integrating existing software components (from Condor, Globus, etc.) to build a Grid Resource Broker, and the early efforts to define a workable scheduling strategy

  8. An 'Honest Broker' mechanism to maintain privacy for patient care and academic medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Andrew D; Hosner, Charlie; Hunscher, Dale A; Athey, Brian D; Clauw, Daniel J; Green, Lee A

    2007-01-01

    From the Hippocratic Oath to the World Medical Association's Declaration of Geneva, physicians have sworn to protect patients' privacy. However, as systems move to more integrated architectures, protecting this medical data becomes more of a challenge. The increase in complexity of IT environments, the aggregation of data, and the desire of other entities to access this data, often 24 h/day x 7 day/week x 365 day/year, is putting serious strains on our ability to maintain its security. This problem cuts across all electronic record sources from patient care records to academic medical research records. In order to address this issue, we are rethinking the way we store, transmit, process, access, and federate patient data from clinical and research applications. Our groups at the University of Michigan are developing a system called the "Honest Broker" to help manage this problem. The Honest Broker will offload the burden of housing identifiable data elements of protected health information (PHI) (e.g., name and address) as well as manage data transfer between clinical and research systems. Lab results and other non-identifiable data will be stored in separate systems with either a research study ID or clinical ID number. This two-component architecture increases the burden on attackers who now need to compromise two systems, one of which is seriously hardened, in order to match health data with a patient's actual identity. While no security system is truly intrusion-proof, this architecture provides a high security choke point reducing the likelihood of a breach. By redesigning the method of integrating clinical care and research, we have enabled projects that would be cost prohibitive to conduct otherwise. The scalability of this mechanism is dependant on nature of the heterogenous nature of the clinical systems serving patients.

  9. Knowledge brokers, companions, and navigators: a qualitative examination of informal caregivers' roles in medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Victoria; Crooks, Valorie A; Snyder, Jeremy; Turner, Leigh

    2013-12-01

    Many studies examining the phenomena of medical tourism have identified health equity issues associated with this global health services practice. However, there is a notable lack of attention in this existing research to the informal care provided by the friends and family members who typically accompany medical tourists abroad. To date, researchers have not examined the care roles filled by informal caregivers travelling with medical tourists. In this article, we fill this gap by examining these informal caregivers and the roles they take on towards supporting medical tourists' health and wellbeing. We conducted 21 interviews with International Patient Coordinators (IPCs) working at medical tourism hospitals across ten countries. IPCs work closely with informal caregivers as providers of non-medical personal assistance, and can therefore offer broad insight on caregiver roles. The interviews were coded and analyzed thematically. Three roles emerged: knowledge broker, companion, and navigator. As knowledge brokers, caregivers facilitate the transfer of information between the medical tourist and formal health care providers as well as other staff members at medical tourism facilities. The companion role involves providing medical tourists with physical and emotional care. Meanwhile, responsibilities associated with handling documents and coordinating often complex journeys are part of the navigation role. This is the first study to examine informal caregiving roles in medical tourism. Many of the roles identified are similar to those of conventional informal caregivers while others are specific to the transnational context. We conclude that these roles make informal caregivers an integral part of the larger phenomenon of medical tourism. We further contend that examining the roles taken on by a heretofore-unconsidered medical tourism stakeholder group sheds valuable insight into how this industry operates and that such knowledge is necessary in order to respond to

  10. Transforming community members into diabetes cultural health brokers: the Neighborhood Health Talker project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadzow, Renee B; Craig, Mary; Rowe, Jimmy; Kahn, Linda S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a community-based diabetes education pilot project. The Neighborhood Health Talker project aimed to train and implement cultural health brokers primarily targeting communities of color to improve community members' diabetes knowledge and diabetes self-management skills. A secondary aim was to establish diabetes resource libraries accessible to communities that normally experience barriers to these resources. Recruited community members completed 1 week of formal training developed by a multidisciplinary team in Buffalo, NY. The effect of training was evaluated through the use of baseline surveys, a pretest/posttest covering all training content, and daily quizzes evaluating knowledge relevant to each of the five training modules. Trained NHTs then held at least five community conversations in various locations and administered anonymous postconversation surveys to participants. Descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis techniques were used to summarize test, quiz, and survey results. Twelve women and 1 man completed the training program. Working alone as well as in pairs, each held at least five community conversations reaching over 700 community members of all ages over 3 months and established 8 diabetes resource libraries in the community. All trainees increased their diabetes knowledge and confidence as well as their abilities to perform the tasks of a cultural health broker. Trainees also indicated that the goals they set at training initiation were met. The training was successful in increasing trainee knowledge and confidence about diabetes prevention and self-management. Participants not only developed proficiency in discussing diabetes, they also made important lifestyle changes that demonstrated their commitment to the cause and the project. Low-cost initiatives like this are easily reproducible in other communities of color and could be modified to meet the needs of other communities as well.

  11. 17 CFR 240.15c3-1e - Deductions for market and credit risk for certain brokers or dealers (Appendix E to 17 CFR 240...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... credit risk for certain brokers or dealers (Appendix E to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1). 240.15c3-1e Section 240....15c3-1(c)(2)(vi) and (c)(2)(vii) and to compute deductions for credit risk pursuant to this Appendix E... the broker or dealer will use to calculate deductions for market and credit risk on those categories...

  12. Supply chain design approaches for supply chain resilience: A qualitative study of South African fast-moving consumer goods grocery manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assilah Agigi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: In today’s globalised and complex business environment, firms are ever more vulnerable to supply chain disruptions, originating both internally and externally from the supply chain. Supply chain resilience minimises the impact of a disruption through design approaches, which allows the supply chain to respond appropriately to disruptive events. Research purpose: This article investigated the supply chain risks faced by grocery manufacturers in the South African fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG industry and explored supply chain design approaches that enable supply chain resilience. Motivation for the study: South African grocery manufacturers are faced with distinct risks. Whilst supply chain risk management studies have provided firms with certain guidelines to mitigate risk, supply chains are still vulnerable to unanticipated risks. Literature on supply chain resilience in the South African context is scant. The concept of supply chain resilience provides firms with strategies that are built into the supply chain that allow firms to react and recover swiftly from disruptions. Furthermore, supply chain resilience strategies assist firms in becoming less vulnerable to possible disruptions. Research design approach and method: This study was conducted by using a descriptive qualitative research design. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with senior supply chain practitioners specifically within the South African FMCG grocery manufacturing industry. Main findings: The study found that labour unrest is the most common risk faced by the industry. Furthermore, strategic stock and supply chain mapping are of the most useful design approaches to enhance supply chain resilience. Practical/managerial implications: The study provides managers with new insights in guiding supply chain design decisions for resilient supply chains. Through the identification of risks and appropriate solutions linked to the various risks

  13. Open-refrigerated retail display case temperature profile and its impact on product quality and microbiota of stored baby spinach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Open-refrigerated display cabinets are widely used in supermarkets and grocery chains around the globe. However, the temperature conditions in these display cases are variable which may impact product quality and safety. Therefore, we investigated the quality and microbiological populations of bagge...

  14. Human trafficking, labor brokering, and mining in southern Africa: responding to a decentralized and hidden public health disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Many southern African economies are dependent on the extractive industries. These industries rely on low-cost labor, often supplied by migrants, typically acquired through labor brokers. Very little attention has so far been paid to trafficking of men into extractive industries or its connection with trafficked women in the region's mining hubs. Recent reports suggest that labor-brokering practices foster human trafficking, both by exposing migrant men to lack of pay and exploitative conditions and by creating male migratory patterns that generate demand for sex workers and associated trafficking of women and girls. While trafficking in persons violates human rights, and thus remains a priority issue globally, there is little or no evidence of an effective political response to mine-related trafficking in southern Africa. This article concludes with recommendations for legal and policy interventions, as well as an enhanced public health response, which if implemented would help reduce human trafficking toward mining sites.

  15. Language Brokering and Depressive Symptoms in Mexican American Adolescents: Parent-Child Alienation and Resilience as Moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Yeong; Hou, Yang; Gonzalez, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to untangle the mixed effects of language brokering by examining a contextual factor (i.e., parent-child alienation) and a personal attribute (i.e., resilience) that may relate to adolescents’ feelings during translating (i.e., sense of burden and efficacy) and that may moderate the association between such feelings and adolescent depressive symptoms. Participants included 557 adolescent language brokers (Mage = 12.96) in Mexican-American families. Results showed that adolescents with a strong sense of alienation from parents or low resilience a) experienced more burden or less efficacy in translating, and b) were more susceptible to the detrimental effects of feeling a sense of burden and the beneficial effects of experiencing a sense of efficacy, as measured by depressive symptoms. PMID:27637380

  16. A 'health broker' role as a catalyst of change to promote health: an experiment in deprived Dutch neighbourhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, Janneke; Kunst, Anton E; Kwan, Albert; Stronks, Karien

    2011-03-01

    Urban social entrepreneurs have been suggested to play an essential part in the success of local health promotion initiatives. Up to now, roles like these have only been identified in retrospect. This prospective collaborative study explored the possibilities of institutionalizing a comparable role for a 'health broker' in four Dutch municipalities as an additional investment to promote health in deprived neighbourhoods. The theoretical notions of public and policy entrepreneurs as well as of boundary spanners were adopted as a reference framework. Documents produced by the collaborative project served as input for a qualitative analysis of the developments. We succeeded in implementing a 'health broker' role comparable to that of a bureaucratic public entrepreneur holding a formal non-leadership position. The role was empowered by sharing it among multiple professionals. Although positioned within one sector, the occupants of the new role felt more entitled to cross sectoral borders and to connect to local residents, compared to other within-sector functions. The 'health broker' role had the potential to operate as an 'anchoring point' for the municipal health sector (policy), public health services (practice) and/or the local residents (public). It was also possible to specify potential 'broking points', i.e. opportunities for health promotion agenda setting and opportunities to improve cross-sectoral collaboration, citizen participation and political and administrative support for health promotion efforts. The 'health broker' role we developed and implemented reflects the notion of systematic rather than individual entrepreneurship. Such a collective entrepreneurship may create additional opportunities to gradually strengthen local health promotion efforts.

  17. What influences Latino grocery shopping behavior? Perspectives on the small food store environment from managers and employees in San Diego, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Flack, Jennifer C.; Baquero, Barbara; Linnan, Laura A.; Gittelsohn, Joel; Pickrel, Julie L.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.

    2016-01-01

    To inform the design of a multilevel in-store intervention, this qualitative study utilized in-depth semistructured interviews with 28 managers and 10 employees of small-to-medium-sized Latino food stores (tiendas) in San Diego, California, to identify factors within the tienda that may influence Latino customers’ grocery-shopping experiences and behaviors. Qualitative data analysis, guided by grounded theory, was performed using open coding. Results suggest that future interventions should focus on the physical (i.e., built structures) and social (i.e., economic and socio-cultural) dimensions of store environments, including areas where the two dimensions interact, to promote the purchase of healthy food among customers. PMID:26800243

  18. A Point-of-Purchase Intervention Using Grocery Store Tour Podcasts About Omega-3s Increases Long-Term Purchases of Omega-3-Rich Food Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangia, Deepika; Shaffner, Donald W; Palmer-Keenan, Debra M

    2017-06-01

    To assess the impacts associated with a grocery store tour point-of-purchase intervention using podcasts about omega-3 fatty acid (n-3)-rich food items. A repeated-measures secondary data analysis of food purchase records obtained from a convenience sample of shoppers' loyalty cards. Shoppers (n = 251) who had listened to podcasts regarding n-3-rich foods while shopping. The number of omega-3-rich food purchases made according to food or food category by participants determined via spreadsheets obtained from grocery store chain. Descriptive statistics were performed on demographic characteristics. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to assess whether food purchases increased from 6 months before to 6 months after intervention. Correlations assessed the relationship between intentions to purchase n-3-rich foods expressed on the intervention day with actual long-term n-3-rich food purchases. Nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis ANOVAs and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to analyze differences between changes made and demographic variables (ie, participants' gender, race, and education levels). Most shoppers (59%) increased n-3-rich food purchases, with significant mean purchase changes (t[172] = -6.9; P < .001; pre = 0.2 ± 0.7; post = 3.6 ± 5.1). Podcasts are promising nutrition education tools. Longer studies could assess whether lasting change results from podcast use. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Study design for a clinical trial to examine food price elasticity among participants in federal food assistance programs: A laboratory-based grocery store study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Conrad

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a protocol for a study investigating the effect of food price changes on purchasing decisions among individuals participating in federal food assistance programs and among those not participating in these programs. We use a laboratory-based grocery store design, which provides greater control over factors influencing food purchasing than in situ experiments in actual grocery stores. We focus primarily, but not exclusively, on eggs because they are highly nutritious, easy to prepare, can be included in many different dishes, and are a part of a wide range of cultural food menus. The primary aim of this study is to compare the own-and cross-price elasticity of eggs between individuals participating in federal food assistance programs and those not participating in these programs. Our secondary aims are to 1 compare the own- and cross-price elasticity of eggs between overweight/obese individuals and non-overweight/obese individuals, 2 examine whether delay discounting moderates the effect of income on own- and cross-price elasticity, 3 examine whether subjective social status moderates the effect of participation in federal food assistance programs on the purchase of high nutrient-dense foods, and 4 examine whether usual psychological stress level moderates the effect of subjective social status on the purchase of high-nutrient dense foods. The results of this study will provide information about the drivers of food demand among low-income adults. A better understanding of these drivers is needed to develop effective nutrition interventions for this large population. Keywords: Price elasticity, Food assistance, Egg, Obesity, Social status, Stress

  20. Prevalence and genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in free-range chickens from grocery stores and farms in Maryland, Ohio and Massachusetts, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yuqing; Verma, Shiv K; Kwok, Oliver C H; Alibana, Fatima; Mcleod, Rima; Su, Chunlei; Dubey, Jitender P; Pradhan, Abani K

    2017-05-01

    Chickens are considered important in the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii. Chicken hearts (n = 1185) obtained from grocery stores were tested for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were assayed in fluid removed from the heart cavity using the modified agglutination test (MAT) at 1:5, 1:25, and 1:100 dilutions. MAT antibodies were detected in 222 hearts at 1:5 dilution and 8 hearts at 1:25 dilution, but none were positive at 1:100 dilution. Seropositive (n = 230, 19.4%) chicken hearts were bioassayed in mice and seronegative (n = 157) chickens were bioassayed in cats. Viable T. gondii was not isolated from any hearts by bioassays in mice. The 2 cats fed 60 and 97 hearts did not excrete T. gondii oocysts. The results indicate a low prevalence of viable T. gondii in chickens from grocery stores. Molecular typing of 23 archived T. gondii strains isolated from free-range chickens from Ohio and Massachusetts using the 10 PCR-RFLP markers including SAG1, SAG2 (5'-3'SAG2 and altSAG2), SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico revealed that seven were ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #1, 11 were genotype #2, one was genotype #3, three were genotype #170, and one was mixed genotype. These results indicate that the clonal genotypes #1 (type II), #2 (type III), and #3 (type II variant) are common in free-range chickens.

  1. Do knowledge brokers facilitate implementation of the stroke guideline in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Mia; Schröder, Carin; Post, Marcel; van der Weijden, Trudy; Visser-Meily, Anne

    2013-10-23

    The implementation of clinical practice guidelines in rehabilitation practice is often troublesome and incomplete. An intervention to enhance the implementation of guidelines is the knowledge transfer program built around the activities of a knowledge broker (KB).This study investigates the use of KBs to implement guideline recommendations for intensive therapy and physical activity for patients post-stroke in 22 stroke units in hospitals and rehabilitation centers in The Netherlands. This study includes a quantitative evaluation with a non controlled pre-post intervention design and a mixed methods process evaluation. From each stroke unit, enterprising nurses and therapists will be recruited and trained as KB. The KB will work for one year on the implementation of the guideline recommendations in their team. To evaluate the effectiveness of the KB, a questionnaire will be administered to patients, health professionals and KBs at baseline (T0) and after one year (T1). Furthermore, semi structured interviews with 5 KBs will be performed at T1.The primary outcome of this implementation project will be the support health professionals give patients to exercise and be physically active, as reported by patients and health professionals themselves. The support immediately after the intervention is compared with the support at the start of the intervention.Additionally we will explore the influence of socio-demographic characteristics of health professionals and determinants identified in the Theory of Planned Behavior (intention, attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control) on the change of supportive behavior of health professionals. Finally, KBs will complete a questionnaire on their own psychological and social demographic characteristics and on organizational conditions needed for health-care improvement such as time, workforce, sponsoring and support from management. With this study we will gain insight in when and why knowledge brokers seem to be

  2. Professional identity in clinician-scientists: brokers between care and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluijtmans, Manon; de Haan, Else; Akkerman, Sanne; van Tartwijk, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Despite increasing numbers of publications, science often fails to significantly improve patient care. Clinician-scientists, professionals who combine care and research activities, play an important role in helping to solve this problem. However, despite the ascribed advantages of connecting scientific knowledge and inquiry with health care, clinician-scientists are scarce, especially amongst non-physicians. The education of clinician-scientists can be complex because they must form professional identities at the intersection of care and research. The successful education of clinician-scientists requires insight into how these professionals view their professional identity and how they combine distinct practices. This study sought to investigate how recently trained nurse- and physiotherapist-scientists perceive their professional identities and experience the crossing of boundaries between care and research. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 nurse- and physiotherapist-scientists at 1 year after they had completed MSc research training. Interviews were thematically analysed using insights from the theoretical frameworks of dialogical self theory and boundary crossing. After research training, the initial professional identity, of clinician, remained important for novice clinician-scientists, whereas the scientist identity was experienced as additional and complementary. A meta-identity as broker, referred to as a 'bridge builder', seemed to mediate competing demands or tensions between the two positions. Obtaining and maintaining a dual work position were experienced as logistically demanding; nevertheless, it was considered beneficial for crossing the boundaries between care and research because it led to reflection on the health profession, knowledge integration, inquiry and innovation in care, improved data collection, and research with a focus on clinical applicability. Novice clinician-scientists experience dual professional identities as care

  3. The illogicality of stock-brokers: psychological experiments on the effects of prior knowledge and belief biases on logical reasoning in stock trading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauff, Markus; Budeck, Claudia; Wolf, Ann G; Hamburger, Kai

    2010-10-18

    Explanations for the current worldwide financial crisis are primarily provided by economists and politicians. However, in the present work we focus on the psychological-cognitive factors that most likely affect the thinking of people on the economic stage and thus might also have had an effect on the progression of the crises. One of these factors might be the effect of prior beliefs on reasoning and decision-making. So far, this question has been explored only to a limited extent. We report two experiments on logical reasoning competences of nineteen stock-brokers with long-lasting vocational experiences at the stock market. The premises of reasoning problems concerned stock trading and the experiments varied whether or not their conclusions--a proposition which is reached after considering the premises--agreed with the brokers' prior beliefs. Half of the problems had a conclusion that was highly plausible for stock-brokers while the other half had a highly implausible conclusion. The data show a strong belief bias. Stock-brokers were strongly biased by their prior knowledge. Lowest performance was found for inferences in which the problems caused a conflict between logical validity and the experts' belief. In these cases, the stock-brokers tended to make logically invalid inferences rather than give up their existing beliefs. Our findings support the thesis that cognitive factors have an effect on the decision-making on the financial market. In the present study, stock-brokers were guided more by past experience and existing beliefs than by logical thinking and rational decision-making. They had difficulties to disengage themselves from vastly anchored thinking patterns. However, we believe, that it is wrong to accuse the brokers for their "malfunctions", because such hard-wired cognitive principles are difficult to suppress even if the person is aware of them.

  4. The illogicality of stock-brokers: psychological experiments on the effects of prior knowledge and belief biases on logical reasoning in stock trading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Knauff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explanations for the current worldwide financial crisis are primarily provided by economists and politicians. However, in the present work we focus on the psychological-cognitive factors that most likely affect the thinking of people on the economic stage and thus might also have had an effect on the progression of the crises. One of these factors might be the effect of prior beliefs on reasoning and decision-making. So far, this question has been explored only to a limited extent. METHODS: We report two experiments on logical reasoning competences of nineteen stock-brokers with long-lasting vocational experiences at the stock market. The premises of reasoning problems concerned stock trading and the experiments varied whether or not their conclusions--a proposition which is reached after considering the premises--agreed with the brokers' prior beliefs. Half of the problems had a conclusion that was highly plausible for stock-brokers while the other half had a highly implausible conclusion. RESULTS: The data show a strong belief bias. Stock-brokers were strongly biased by their prior knowledge. Lowest performance was found for inferences in which the problems caused a conflict between logical validity and the experts' belief. In these cases, the stock-brokers tended to make logically invalid inferences rather than give up their existing beliefs. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the thesis that cognitive factors have an effect on the decision-making on the financial market. In the present study, stock-brokers were guided more by past experience and existing beliefs than by logical thinking and rational decision-making. They had difficulties to disengage themselves from vastly anchored thinking patterns. However, we believe, that it is wrong to accuse the brokers for their "malfunctions", because such hard-wired cognitive principles are difficult to suppress even if the person is aware of them.

  5. Promoting the use of measurement tools in practice: a mixed-methods study of the activities and experiences of physical therapist knowledge brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Lisa M; Russell, Dianne J; Roxborough, Lori; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Bartlett, Doreen J; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The use of knowledge brokers (KBs) has been recommended as a mechanism to facilitate the use of research evidence in clinical practice. However, little has been written regarding the practical implementation of the KB role. This article (1) describes the brokering activities of 24 pediatric physical therapist KBs (in Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia, Canada), and (2) reports KBs' perceptions of the utility of their role and their experiences with the brokering process. A mixed-methods research design was used in this investigation, which was part of a larger knowledge translation (KT) study that demonstrated the effectiveness of using KBs to implement a group of evidence-based measurement tools into practice. The KBs completed weekly activity logs, which were summarized and described. Semi-structured telephone interviews with KBs were analyzed qualitatively to provide insight into their perceptions of their role and the brokering process. Major interview themes were identified and verified through member checking. Brokering activities varied considerably as KBs adapted to meet the needs of their colleagues. The KBs indicated that they highly valued the connection to the research community and spoke of the enthusiastic engagement of their physical therapist colleagues (and others in their organization) in the brokering process. They discussed the importance of understanding the practice context and organizational factors that could affect knowledge transfer. The KBs spoke of the need to dedicate time for the role and had a strong sense of the supports needed to implement a KB role in future. Considerable variation in brokering activities was demonstrated across KB participants. The KBs perceived their role as useful and indicated that organizational commitment is crucial to the success of this KT strategy.

  6. Child welfare caseworkers as service brokers for youth in foster care: findings from project focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Shannon; Kerns, Suzanne E U; Trupin, Eric W; Conover, Kate L; Berliner, Lucy

    2012-02-01

    Youth in the foster care system have substantially higher rates of mental health needs compared to the general population, yet they rarely receive targeted, evidence-based practices (EBPs). Increasingly emerging in the literature on mental health services is the importance of "brokers" or "gateway providers" of services. For youth in foster care, child welfare caseworkers often play this role. This study examines caseworker-level outcomes of Project Focus, a caseworker training and consultation model designed to improve emotional and behavioral outcomes for youth in foster care through increased linkages with EBPs. Project Focus was tested through a small, randomized trial involving four child welfare offices. Caseworkers in the Project Focus intervention group demonstrated an increased awareness of EBPs and a trend toward increased ability to identify appropriate EBP referrals for particular mental health problems but did not have significantly different rates of actual referral to EBPs. Dose of consultation was associated with general awareness of EBPs. Implications for practice and outcomes for youth are discussed.

  7. Opportunites for Integrated Landscape Planning – the Broker, the Arena, the Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Carlsson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As an integrated social and ecological system, the forest landscape includes multiple values. The need for a landscape pproach in land use planning is being increasingly advocated in research, policy and practice. This paper explores how institutional conditions in the forest policy and management sector can be developed to meet demands for a multifunctional landscape perspective. Departing from obstacles recognised in collaborative planning literature, we build an analytical framework which is operationalised in a Swedish context at municipal level. Our case illustrating this is Vilhelmina Model Forest, where actual barriers and opportunities for a multiple-value landscape approach are identified through 32 semi-structured interviews displaying stakeholders’ views on forest values,ownership rights and willingness to consider multiple values, forest policy and management premises, and collaboration. As an opportunity to overcome the barriers, we suggest and discuss three key components by which an integrated landscape planning approach could be realized in forest management planning: the need for a landscape coordinator (broker, the need for a collaborative forum (arena, and the development of the existing forest management plan into an advanced multifunctional landscape plan (tool.

  8. Geopan AT@S: a Brokering Based Gateway to Georeferenced Historical Maps for Risk Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previtali, M.

    2017-08-01

    Importance of ancient and historical maps is nowadays recognized in many applications (e.g., urban planning, landscape valorisation and preservation, land changes identification, etc.). In the last years a great effort has been done by different institutions, such as Geographical Institutes, Public Administrations, and collaborative communities, for digitizing and publishing online collections of historical maps. In spite of this variety and availability of data, information overload makes difficult their discovery and management: without knowing the specific repository where the data are stored, it is difficult to find the information required. In addition, problems of interconnection between different data sources and their restricted interoperability may arise. This paper describe a new brokering based gateway developed to assure interoperability between data, in particular georeferenced historical maps and geographic data, gathered from different data providers, with various features and referring to different historical periods. The developed approach is exemplified by a new application named GeoPAN Atl@s that is aimed at linking in Northern Italy area land changes with risk analysis (local seismicity amplification and flooding risk) by using multi-temporal data sources and historic maps.

  9. eLearning, knowledge brokering, and nursing: strengthening collaborative practice in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabisky, Brenda; Humbert, Jennie; Stodel, Emma J; MacDonald, Colla J; Chambers, Larry W; Doucette, Suzanne; Dalziel, William B; Conklin, James

    2010-01-01

    Interprofessional collaboration is vital to the delivery of quality care in long-term care settings; however, caregivers in long-term care face barriers to participating in training programs to improve collaborative practices. Consequently, eLearning can be used to create an environment that combines convenient, individual learning with collaborative experiential learning. Findings of this study revealed that learners enjoyed the flexibility of the Working Together learning resource. They acquired new knowledge and skills that they were able to use in their practice setting to achieve higher levels of collaborative practice. Nurses were identified as team leaders because of their pivotal role in the long-term care home and collaboration with all patient care providers. Nurses are ideal as knowledge brokers for the collaborative practice team. Quantitative findings showed no change in learner's attitudes regarding collaborative practice; however, interviews provided examples of positive changes experienced. Face-to-face collaboration was found to be a challenge, and changes to organizations, systems, and technology need to be made to facilitate this process. The Working Together learning resource is an important first step toward strengthening collaboration in long-term care, and the pilot implementation provides insights that further our understanding of both interprofessional collaboration and effective eLearning.

  10. Boundary crossing and brokering between disciplines in pre-service mathematics teacher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goos, Merrilyn; Bennison, Anne

    2017-12-01

    In many countries, pre-service teacher education programs are structured so that mathematics content is taught in the university's mathematics department and mathematics pedagogy in the education department. Such program structures make it difficult to authentically interweave content with pedagogy in ways that acknowledge the roles of both mathematicians and mathematics educators in preparing future teachers. This article reports on a project that deliberately fostered collaboration between mathematicians and mathematics educators in six Australian universities in order to investigate the potential for learning at the boundaries between the two disciplinary communities. Data sources included two rounds of interviews with mathematicians and mathematics educators and annual reports prepared by each participating university over the three years of the project. The study identified interdisciplinary boundary practices that led to integration of content and pedagogy through new courses co-developed and co-taught by mathematicians and mathematics educators, and new approaches to building communities of pre-service teachers. It also developed an evidence-based classification of conditions that enable or hinder sustained collaboration across disciplinary boundaries, together with an empirical grounding for Akkerman and Bakker's conceptualisation of transformation as a mechanism for learning at the boundary between communities. The study additionally highlighted the ambiguous nature of boundaries and implications for brokers who work there to connect disciplinary paradigms.

  11. Beyond Apprenticeship: Knowledge Brokers and Sustainability of Apprentice-Based Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huasheng Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge learning and diffusion have long been discussed in the literature on the dynamics of industrial clusters, but recent literature provides little evidence for how different actors serve as knowledge brokers in the upgrading process of apprentice-based clusters, and does not dynamically consider how to preserve the sustainability of these clusters. This paper uses empirical evidence from an antique furniture manufacturing cluster in Xianyou, Fujian Province, in southeastern China, to examine the growth trajectory of the knowledge learning system of an antique furniture manufacturing cluster. It appears that the apprentice-based learning system is crucial during early stages of the cluster evolution, but later becomes complemented and relatively substituted by the role of both local governments and focal outsiders. This finding addresses the context of economic transformation and provides empirical insights into knowledge acquisition in apprentice-based clusters to question the rationality based on European and North American cases, and to provide a broader perspective for policy makers to trigger and sustain the development of apprentice-based clusters.

  12. The Italian Cloud-based brokering Infrastructure to sustain Interoperability for Operative Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, E.; Pecora, S.; Bussettini, M.; Bordini, F.; Nativi, S.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents the informatics platform carried out to implement the National Hydrological Operative Information System of Italy. In particular, the presentation will focus on the governing aspects of the cloud infrastructure and brokering software that make possible to sustain the hydrology data flow between heterogeneous user clients and data providers.The Institute for Environmental Protection and Research, ISPRA (Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale) in collaboration with the Regional Agency for Environmental Protection in the Emilia-Romagna region, ARPA-ER (Agenzia Regionale per la Prevenzione e l´Ambiente dell´Emilia-Romagna) and CNR-IIA (National Research Council of Italy) designed and developed an innovative platform for the discovery and access of hydrological data coming from 19 Italian administrative regions and 2 Italian autonomous provinces, in near real time. ISPRA has deployed and governs such a system. The presentation will introduce and discuss the technological barriers for interoperability as well as social and policy ones. The adopted solutions will be described outlining the sustainability challenges and benefits.

  13. Message Brokering Evaluation for Live Spacecraft Telemetry Monitoring, Recorded Playback, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daren; Pomerantz, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Live monitoring and post-flight analysis of telemetry data play a vital role in the development, diagnosis, and deployment of components of a space flight mission. Requirements for such a system include low end-to-end latency between data producers and visualizers, preserved ordering of messages, data stream archiving with random access playback, and real-time creation of derived data streams. We evaluate the RabbitMQ and Kafka message brokering systems, on how well they can enable a real-time, scalable, and robust telemetry framework that delivers telemetry data to multiple clients across heterogeneous platforms and flight projects. In our experiments using an actively developed robotic arm testbed, Kafka yielded a much higher message throughput rate and a consistent publishing rate across the number of topics and consumers. Consumer message rates were consistent across the number of topics but can exhibit bursty behavior with an increase in the contention for a single topic partition with increasing number of consumers.

  14. Child welfare caseworkers as brokers of mental health services: a pilot evaluation of Project Focus Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Monica M; Torres, Marcela M; Shipman, Kimberly; Gorrono, Jessica; Kerns, Suzanne E U; Dorsey, Shannon

    2015-02-01

    Youth in the child welfare system (CWS) have substantially higher rates of mental health needs compared to the general population, yet they rarely receive targeted, evidence-based practices (EBPs). Caseworkers play the critically important role of "service broker" for CWS youth and families. This study examines preliminary caseworker-level outcomes of Project Focus Colorado (PF-C), a training and consultation program designed to improve access to EBPs for CWS youth. PF-C evaluation occurred in four child welfare offices (two intervention [n = 16 caseworkers] vs. two practice-as-usual, wait-list control [WLC; n = 12 caseworkers]). Receipt of PF-C was associated with significantly increased caseworker knowledge of (a) EBPs, (b) child mental health problems, (c) evidence-based treatment components targeting mental health problem areas, and (d) mental health screening instruments, compared to WLC. Dose of training and consultation was associated with greater ability to correctly classify mental health problems and match them to EBPs. These preliminary results suggest that targeted training and consultation help to improve caseworker knowledge of children's mental health needs, EBPs for mental health, and mental health screening instruments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Professional culture brokers: Nursing faculty perceptions of nursing culture and their role in student formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Susan M; Nickerson, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Socialization, or formation of students to the professional nurse role, is an expectation of nursing education. This process is complex and challenging for students, who continue to experience culture shock moving from academe to practice settings. Viewing formation as enculturation is one way to address culture shock. Nursing faculty are key figures in this process, yet their views are not known. This focused ethnography study explored nursing faculty's perceptions about the culture of nursing and how they bring students into that culture. Data collected at two accredited, undergraduate pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed using Leininger's four phases of data analysis. Four themes emerged: 1. The culture of nursing is multifaceted, multivalent and at times contradictory 2. Many factors interact and have influence on the culture of nursing 3. Navigating the subcultures (academia, service and organizational culture) is challenging for faculty, and 4. Nursing faculty believe that the right conditions facilitate the enculturation of students. Nursing faculty believe nursing has a professional culture and they bring students into that culture. Viewing the faculty role in enculturation to professional nursing as a culture broker can facilitate the process for students and mitigate the culture shock new graduate nurses experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Egg donation brokers: an analysis of agency versus in vitro fertilization clinic websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwell, Eve; Keehn, Jason; Leu, Cheng-shiun; Sauer, Mark V; Klitzman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    To compare websites of agencies that broker the services of women who provide human eggs for in vitro fertilization versus clinics that recruit egg providers. We examined 207 websites, of which 128 were egg provider agency 40%) or clinic (60%) websites that recruited providers online. We compared them regarding several variables related to adherence to American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) guidelines. According to their respective websites, agencies were more likely than clinics to mention ASRM guidelines, be located in the West/Pacific, indicate compensation, offer a fee range, set their minimum > $5,000, specify preferable traits, cap provider age at 31, require an education minimum, allow both parties to meet, discuss short-term risks, and not acknowledge a possible cancer risk. Only 25.5% of agencies and 19.5% of clinics mention psychological/emotional risks, and 11.8% and 5.2%, respectively, mention risk to future fertility. This research, the first to systematically compare several key aspects of egg provider agencies versus clinics, suggests it significant differences in adherence to guidelines, raising several concerns and suggesting needs for consideration of improved monitoring and regulation by ASRM or others.

  17. Grocery Stores, LAGIC is consulting with local parish GIS departments to create spatially accurate point and polygons data sets including the locations and building footprints of schools, churches, government buildings, law enforcement and emergency response offices, pha, Published in 2011, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, LSU Louisiana Geographic Information Center (LAGIC).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Grocery Stores dataset current as of 2011. LAGIC is consulting with local parish GIS departments to create spatially accurate point and polygons data sets including...

  18. The Path to Convergence: Design, Coordination and Social Issues in the Implementation of a Middleware Data Broker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slota, S.; Khalsa, S. J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Infrastructures are the result of systems, networks, and inter-networks that accrete, overlay and segment one another over time. As a result, working infrastructures represent a broad heterogeneity of elements - data types, computational resources, material substrates (computing hardware, physical infrastructure, labs, physical information resources, etc.) as well as organizational and social functions which result in divergent outputs and goals. Cyber infrastructure's engineering often defaults to a separation of the social from the technical that results in the engineering succeeding in limited ways, or the exposure of unanticipated points of failure within the system. Studying the development of middleware intended to mediate interactions among systems within an earth systems science infrastructure exposes organizational, technical and standards-focused negotiations endemic to a fundamental trait of infrastructure: its characteristic invisibility in use. Intended to perform a core function within the EarthCube cyberinfrastructure, the development, governance and maintenance of an automated brokering system is a microcosm of large-scale infrastructural efforts. Points of potential system failure, regardless of the extent to which they are more social or more technical in nature, can be considered in terms of the reverse salient: a point of social and material configuration that momentarily lags behind the progress of an emerging or maturing infrastructure. The implementation of the BCube data broker has exposed reverse salients in regards to the overall EarthCube infrastructure (and the role of middleware brokering) in the form of organizational factors such as infrastructural alignment, maintenance and resilience; differing and incompatible practices of data discovery and evaluation among users and stakeholders; and a preponderance of local variations in the implementation of standards and authentication in data access. These issues are characterized by their

  19. Knowledge brokering between researchers and policymakers in Fiji to develop policies to reduce obesity: a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqa, Gade; Mavoa, Helen; Snowdon, Wendy; Moodie, Marj; Schultz, Jimaima; McCabe, Marita; Kremer, Peter; Swinburn, Boyd

    2013-07-01

    The importance of using research evidence in decisionmaking at the policy level has been increasingly recognized. However, knowledge brokering to engage researchers and policymakers in government and non-government organizations is challenging. This paper describes and evaluates the knowledge exchange processes employed by the Translational Research on Obesity Prevention in Communities (TROPIC) project that was conducted from July 2009 to April 2012 in Fiji. TROPIC aimed to enhance: the evidence-informed decisionmaking skills of policy developers; and awareness and utilization of local and other obesity-related evidence to develop policies that could potentially improve the nation's food and physical activity environments. The specific research question was: Can a knowledge brokering approach advance evidence-informed policy development to improve eating and physical activity environments in Fiji. The intervention comprised: recruiting organizations and individuals; mapping policy environments; analyzing organizational capacity and support for evidence-informed policymaking (EIPM); developing EIPM skills; and facilitating development of evidence-informed policy briefs. Flexible timetabling of activities was essential to accommodate multiple competing priorities at both individual and organizational levels. Process diaries captured the duration, frequency and type of each interaction and/or activity between the knowledge brokering team and participants or their organizations. Partnerships were formalized with high-level officers in each of the six participating organization. Participants (n = 49) developed EIPM skills (acquire, assess, adapt and apply evidence) through a series of four workshops and applied this knowledge to formulate briefs with ongoing one-to-one support from TROPIC team members. A total of 55% of participants completed the 12 to18 month intervention, and 63% produced one or more briefs (total = 20) that were presented to higher

  20. Mothers' self-reported grocery shopping behaviours with their 2- to 7-year-old children: relationship between feeding practices and mothers' willingness to purchase child-requested nutrient-poor, marketed foods, and fruits and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lively, Kathryn; Babawale, Oluborode; Thompson, David M; Morris, Amanda S; Harris, Jennifer L; Sisson, Susan B; Cheney, Marshall K; Lora, Karina R

    2017-12-01

    To assess relationships between mothers' feeding practices (food as a reward, food for emotion regulation, modelling of healthy eating) and mothers' willingness to purchase child-marketed foods and fruits/vegetables (F&V) requested by their children during grocery co-shopping. Cross-sectional. Mothers completed an online survey that included questions about feeding practices and willingness (i.e. intentions) to purchase child-requested foods during grocery co-shopping. Feeding practices scores were dichotomized at the median. Foods were grouped as nutrient-poor or nutrient-dense (F&V) based on national nutrition guidelines. Regression models compared mothers with above-the-median v. at-or-below-the-median feeding practices scores on their willingness to purchase child-requested food groupings, adjusting for demographic covariates. Participants completed an online survey generated at a public university in the USA. Mothers (n 318) of 2- to 7-year-old children. Mothers who scored above-the-median on using food as a reward were more willing to purchase nutrient-poor foods (β=0·60, Ppurchase nutrient-poor foods (β=0·29, Ppurchase nutrient-dense foods (β=0·22, Ppurchase child-requested, nutrient-poor foods. Parental feeding practices may facilitate or limit children's foods requested in grocery stores. Parent-child food consumer behaviours should be investigated as a route that may contribute to children's eating patterns.

  1. qDIET: toward an automated, self-sustaining knowledge base to facilitate linking point-of-sale grocery items to nutritional content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Valliammai; Brewster, Philip J; Jordan, Kristine C; Hurdle, John F

    2013-01-01

    The United States, indeed the world, struggles with a serious obesity epidemic. The costs of this epidemic in terms of healthcare dollar expenditures and human morbidity/mortality are staggering. Surprisingly, clinicians are ill-equipped in general to advise patients on effective, longitudinal weight loss strategies. We argue that one factor hindering clinicians and patients in effective shared decision-making about weight loss is the absence of a metric that can be reasoned about and monitored over time, as clinicians do routinely with, say, serum lipid levels or HgA1C. We propose that a dietary quality measure championed by the USDA and NCI, the HEI-2005/2010, is an ideal metric for this purpose. We describe a new tool, the quality Dietary Information Extraction Tool (qDIET), which is a step toward an automated, self-sustaining process that can link retail grocery purchase data to the appropriate USDA databases to permit the calculation of the HEI-2005/2010.

  2. Classifying neighbourhoods by level of access to stores selling fresh fruit and vegetables and groceries: identifying problematic areas in the city of Gatineau, Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Adrian C; Apparicio, Philippe; Cloutier, Marie-Soleil

    2012-11-06

    Physical access to stores selling groceries, fresh fruit and vegetables (FV) is essential for urban dwellers. In Canadian cities where low-density development practices are common, social and material deprivation may be compounded by poor geographic access to healthy food. This case study examines access to food stores selling fresh FV in Gatineau, Quebec, to identify areas where poor access is coincident with high deprivation. Food retailers were identified using two secondary sources and each store was visited to establish the total surface area devoted to the sale of fresh FV. Four population-weighted accessibility measures were then calculated for each dissemination area (DA) using road network distances. A deprivation index was created using variables from the 2006 Statistics Canada census, also at the scale of the DA. Finally, six classes of accessibility to a healthy diet were constructed using a k-means classification procedure. These were mapped and superimposed over high deprivation areas. Overall, deprivation is positively correlated with better accessibility. However, more than 18,000 residents (7.5% of the population) live in high deprivation areas characterized by large distances to the nearest retail food store (means of 1.4 km or greater) and virtually no access to fresh FV within walking distance (radius of 1 km). In this research, we identified areas where poor geographic access may introduce an additional constraint for residents already dealing with the challenges of limited financial and social resources. Our results may help guide local food security policies and initiatives.

  3. "The Virtual Grocery Store: A Proposal to Improve the Quality of Life for Retail Customers through a Virtual Environment"

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Katrina Jones

    2004-01-01

    With the prevalence and integration of the Internet in our lives, online shopping has become a popular and convenient method of obtaining goods. However, there is an important experience that occurs between the customer and the product as well as the customer and the space in the actual, physical store which does not yet occur in the virtual store (Raijas, 2002). Customersâ increased use of new technology and the Internet illustrates that an incredible growth potential exists in the elect...

  4. Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spring, Martin; Johnes, Geraint; Hald, Kim Sundtoft

    Productivity is increasingly critical for developed economies. It has always been important: as Paul Krugman puts it, “Productivity isn’t everything, but in the long run it is almost everything. A country’s ability to improve its standard of living over time depends almost entirely on its ability...... to raise its output per worker”(Krugman, 1994). Analyses of productivity have, by and large, been the preserve of economists. Operations Management (OM) is rooted in a similar concern for the efficient use of scarce resources; Management Accounting (MA) is concerned with the institutionalised measurement...... and management of productivity. Yet the three perspectives are rarely connected. This paper is a sketch of a literature review seeking to identify, contrast and reconcile these three perspectives. In so doing, it aims to strengthen the connections between policy and managerial analyses of productivity....

  5. The evolution of green food products and retailers’ eco-strategizing and green competitiveness in the Danish and Brazilian grocery sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzero, Marcelo Fernando

    2017-01-01

    investigates the role of retail groups in the development of the green food market in Denmark and Brazil. Accordingly, it investigates the rate and direction of the greening of this process in those markets as well as their sectoral convergence of retailers’ eco-strategizing. Using the dynamic capabilities...... business case. Finally, changes in their business models have become a central competitive driver to retailers in both countries, which enabled them to sustain competitive advantage on the greening of their food markets.......Grounded on the evolutionary approach, this thesis adds an understanding about the dynamics of the greening of the economy, particularly highlighting the neglected demand side aspect of the greening of markets. Since the emergence of green food markets in the 1980s and 1990s, this study...

  6. Laboratory Determined Sugar Content and Composition of Commercial Infant Formulas, Baby Foods and Common Grocery Items Targeted to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ryan W.; Goran, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Excess added sugar consumption is tied to poor health outcomes in children. The sugar content of beverages and foods children are exposed to is mostly unknown, yet this information is imperative for understanding potential risks from overconsumption of sugars in early life. We determined actual sugar content by conducting a blinded laboratory analysis in infant formulas, breakfast cereals, packaged baked goods and yogurts. One hundred samples were sent to an independent laboratory for analysis via gas chromatography. Sugar content and composition was determined and total sugar was compared against nutrition labels. Of the 100 samples analyzed, 74% contained ≥20% of total calories per serving from added sugars. Nutrient label data underestimated or overestimated actual sugars and ~25% of all samples had actual total sugar values that were either 10% of labeled total sugar. Many products that are frequently marketed to and consumed by infants and young children contain sugars in amounts that differ from nutrition labels and often in excess of recommended daily levels. These findings provide further support for adding more comprehensive sugar labeling to food and beverage products, specifically those marketed to, or commonly consumed by, children. PMID:26193309

  7. Shopping for fruits and vegetables. Food and retail qualities of importance to low-income households at the grocery store.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Caroline B; Sobal, Jeffery; Dollahite, Jamie S

    2010-04-01

    Purchasing fruits and vegetables is an integral part of managing food consumption and dietary quality. This study examined how low-income adults who had primary responsibility for household food purchases considered retail produce decisions. We used a qualitative research approach based on grounded theory and an ecological conceptual framework. Twenty-eight low-income rural, village, and inner city heads of households in upstate New York, USA, were selected by purposive and theoretical sampling and interviewed about fruit and vegetable shopping habits, attitudes toward local food stores, and where and how they would prefer to buy produce. Analyses revealed their concerns were organized around five themes: store venue; internal store environment; product quality; product price; relationships with the stores. An unanticipated finding was the differing social relations that appear to exist between participant consumers, store employees and management, and the store itself as a representation of the larger retail food system. Attitudes toward retail food stores in this study are described as passive or fatalistic indifference, supportive, opportunistic, and confrontational (change agents). These attitudes are related to how shoppers considered retail fruit and vegetable choice, access, and availability. These findings suggest ways to individualize nutrition education and consumer education messages. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 17 CFR 240.15b1-5 - Consent to service of process to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consent to service of process... § 240.15b1-5 Consent to service of process to be furnished by nonresident brokers or dealers and by...) stipulates and agrees that any such civil suit or action may be commended by the service of process upon the...

  9. First-Time Knowledge Brokers in Health Care: The Experiences of Nurses and Allied Health Professionals of Bridging the Research-Practice Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the experiences of nurses and allied health professionals as first-time knowledge brokers, attempting to bridge the research-practice gap within health care. A qualitative study using in-depth interviews and documentary analysis was conducted. The data was analysed using a thematic analysis strategy. Participants were 17…

  10. 17 CFR 240.15g-3 - Broker or dealer disclosure of quotations and other information relating to the penny stock market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... quotations and other information relating to the penny stock market. 240.15g-3 Section 240.15g-3 Commodity... Certain Issuers from Section 15(d) of the Act § 240.15g-3 Broker or dealer disclosure of quotations and... paragraph (b) of this section, the following information: (1) The inside bid quotation and the inside offer...

  11. The Role of Knowledge Brokers: Lessons from a Community Based Research Study of Cultural Safety in Relation to People Who Use Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Jane; Mollison, Ashley; Browne, Annette; Parker, Joanne; Pauly, Bernie

    2017-01-01

    The study explored cultural safety as a strategy to address the stigma of substance use in acute care settings. Two research team members took on the role of knowledge brokers (KBs) in order to liaise between the research team and two distinct research advisory groups: one with people who use drugs and the other nurses. The KBs were instrumental…

  12. Contextual Marketing Based on Customer Buying Pattern in Grocery E-Commerce: The Case of Bigbasket.com (India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesya Vanessa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research are to identify customer purchase behavior, obtain the number of customer clusters, and form customer profile in order to find situation-based customer purchase be- havior pattern. From the given data, the RFM method and K-Means clustering are used to identify the customer purchase behavior and profiles. The result of this research showed that the customer clusters are formed differently in every product category based on the RFM value and K-Means clustering. There are also differences in peak hour for each customer cluster. The best time to deliver notifica- tions and personal messages is near the peak hour. Indeed, this matter is useful to create contextual marketing and targeted advertising that is designed based on customer cluster and purchase behavior.

  13. A Study of the Role of Small Ethnic Retail Grocery Stores in Urban Renewal in a Social Housing Project, Toronto, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komakech, Morris D C; Jackson, Suzanne F

    2016-06-01

    Urban renewal often drives away the original residents, replacing them with higher income residents who can afford the new spaces, leading to gentrification. Urban renewal that takes place over many years can create uncertainties for retailers and residents, exacerbating the gentrification process. This qualitative study explored how the urban renewal process in a multi-cultural social housing neighborhood in Toronto (Regent Park) affected the small ethnic retail grocery stores (SERGS) that supplied ethnic foods and items to the ethnic populations living there. Interviews were conducted with ten SERGS store owners/managers and 16 ethnic residents who lived in Regent Park before renewal and were displaced, or who were displaced and returned. The SERGS stated that they provided culturally familiar items and offered a social credit scheme that recognized existing social relationships and allowed low-income residents to afford food and other amenities in a dignified manner and pay later, without penalty or interest. At the same time, the SERGS were unsupported during the renewal, were excluded from the civic planning processes, could not compete for space in the new buildings, and experienced declining sales and loss of business. The residents stated that the SERGS were trusted, provided a valued cultural social spaces for ethnic identity formation, and ethnic food security but they faced many uncertainties about the role of SERGS in a renewed neighborhood. Based on this study, it is recommended that ethnic retailers be recognized for the role they play in formulating ethnic identities and food security in mixed-use mixed-income communities and that they be included in planning processes during urban renewal. Such recognition may enable more former residents to return and lessen the gentrification.

  14. Museums as brokers of participation: how visitors view the emerging role of European science centres and museums in policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bandelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Science centres and museums in Europe traditionally offer opportunities for public participation, such as dialogues, debates and workshops. In recent years, starting with the support of grants from the European Commission, the purpose of these initiatives is increasingly more connected with the policy making processes where science centres play a role as brokers between the public and other stakeholders. This article begins an investigation on how these two levels of participation – the participation of museums in policy, and the participation of visitors in museums – are related in seven European science centres and museums. The results suggest that science centres and museums are regarded by their visitors as potential platforms to facilitate public participation in policy, especially in countries where the general infrastructure for public participation in science is weak.

  15. Bridging the science–policy interface: A new era for South African research and the role of knowledge brokering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki Funke

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Government departments and agencies are faced with issues of increasing socio-ecological complexities around environmental sustainability and global change, which require them to make decisions that have the potential to impact greatly on society and economies. As a result, they are under increasing pressure to develop policies that consider a wide spectrum of scientific and indigenous knowledge. It is acknowledged that in South Africa, as elsewhere, a gap typically exists between the scientific or research community and the policymaking community, due to a number of underlying reasons at both ends. This gap often results in a unidirectional ‘push of evidence’ by researchers to policymakers, with a hope that policymakers will take up these findings and use them in policy identification, formulation or implementation. To support the uptake of evidence in policy, it is also important to stimulate an environment of ‘evidence pull’ by the policy community from the research community, as well as increasing the dialogue between these communities. A model of knowledge brokering is proposed in this paper as a means to bridge this gap between science and policy and, thereby, ensure the uptake of evidence in policy development and implementation. This model looks at the need for institutional mechanisms, such as knowledge-brokering offices, both within research organisations and government departments. It also highlights the importance of researchers involving policymakers from the onset of their research process, with a continuous dialogue between the two parties, both during and after the research, as a means of increasing the likelihood of research uptake.

  16. The older I got, it wasn ’ t a problem for me anymore ” : Language brokering as a managed activity and a narrated experience among young Vietnamese immigrants in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homoláč, Jiří; Sherman, Tamah

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-29 ISSN 0167-8507 Keywords : anguage brokering * language biography interview * language management * management summaries * Vietnamese in the Czech Republic Impact factor: 0.685, year: 2016

  17. A study of the relationship between UK consumers purchase intention and store brand food products -- Take Nottingham city consumers for example

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Kaochun

    2008-01-01

    Recently, store brands play an important role in retail grocery strategy. More and more retailers put their effort to develop and market new store brands because consumers have been accepting store brands. Therefore, store brands have gradually influenced consumers purchase behaviours in order to provide an in-depth investigation of consumers purchase intention in store brands, the study choose food products among many product categories because when consumers hear the store brand, they mus...

  18. Price knowledge during grocery shopping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Grunert, Klaus G

    2014-01-01

    applying a multi-point, multi-measure approach, consumers appear to know more aboutprices than suggested by past research. Determinants of price knowledge are also examined and the results indicate that price knowledge buildsup not only because of active search but also due to accidental exposure to prices......Past research on consumer price knowledge has varied considerably partly due to differences in how and when price knowledge is measured.This paper applies a multi-point, multi-measure approach to reconcile differences in past price knowledge research by examining systematicrelationships between...... time of measurement and type of measures applied. Examination of consumer price knowledge before, during, and afterstore visit sheds light on what is measured at the individual points in time: episodic price knowledge and/or reference prices? With a between-subjects design interviewing 1...

  19. Reflections on: Online grocery shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is included in the First Monday Special Issue #6: Commercial applications of the Internet, published in July 2006. Special Issue editor Mark A. Fox asked authors to submit additional comments regarding their articles.

  20. Design and implementation of a secure and user-friendly broker platform supporting the end-to-end provisioning of e-homecare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoecke, Sofie; Steurbaut, Kristof; Taveirne, Kristof; De Turck, Filip; Dhoedt, Bart

    2010-01-01

    We designed a broker platform for e-homecare services using web service technology. The broker allows efficient data communication and guarantees quality requirements such as security, availability and cost-efficiency by dynamic selection of services, minimizing user interactions and simplifying authentication through a single user sign-on. A prototype was implemented, with several e-homecare services (alarm, telemonitoring, audio diary and video-chat). It was evaluated by patients with diabetes and multiple sclerosis. The patients found that the start-up time and overhead imposed by the platform was satisfactory. Having all e-homecare services integrated into a single application, which required only one login, resulted in a high quality of experience for the patients.