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Sample records for grn controlling retinal

  1. Emergent adaptive behaviour of GRN-controlled simulated robots in a changing environment

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    Yao Yao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We developed a bio-inspired robot controller combining an artificial genome with an agent-based control system. The genome encodes a gene regulatory network (GRN that is switched on by environmental cues and, following the rules of transcriptional regulation, provides output signals to actuators. Whereas the genome represents the full encoding of the transcriptional network, the agent-based system mimics the active regulatory network and signal transduction system also present in naturally occurring biological systems. Using such a design that separates the static from the conditionally active part of the gene regulatory network contributes to a better general adaptive behaviour. Here, we have explored the potential of our platform with respect to the evolution of adaptive behaviour, such as preying when food becomes scarce, in a complex and changing environment and show through simulations of swarm robots in an A-life environment that evolution of collective behaviour likely can be attributed to bio-inspired evolutionary processes acting at different levels, from the gene and the genome to the individual robot and robot population.

  2. New regulatory circuit controlling spatial and temporal gene expression in the sea urchin embryo oral ectoderm GRN.

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    Li, Enhu; Materna, Stefan C; Davidson, Eric H

    2013-10-01

    The sea urchin oral ectoderm gene regulatory network (GRN) model has increased in complexity as additional genes are added to it, revealing its multiple spatial regulatory state domains. The formation of the oral ectoderm begins with an oral-aboral redox gradient, which is interpreted by the cis-regulatory system of the nodal gene to cause its expression on the oral side of the embryo. Nodal signaling drives cohorts of regulatory genes within the oral ectoderm and its derived subdomains. Activation of these genes occurs sequentially, spanning the entire blastula stage. During this process the stomodeal subdomain emerges inside of the oral ectoderm, and bilateral subdomains defining the lateral portions of the future ciliary band emerge adjacent to the central oral ectoderm. Here we examine two regulatory genes encoding repressors, sip1 and ets4, which selectively prevent transcription of oral ectoderm genes until their expression is cleared from the oral ectoderm as an indirect consequence of Nodal signaling. We show that the timing of transcriptional de-repression of sip1 and ets4 targets which occurs upon their clearance explains the dynamics of oral ectoderm gene expression. In addition two other repressors, the direct Nodal target not, and the feed forward Nodal target goosecoid, repress expression of regulatory genes in the central animal oral ectoderm thereby confining their expression to the lateral domains of the animal ectoderm. These results have permitted construction of an enhanced animal ectoderm GRN model highlighting the repressive interactions providing precise temporal and spatial control of regulatory gene expression. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards real time speckle controlled retinal photocoagulation

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    Bliedtner, Katharina; Seifert, Eric; Stockmann, Leoni; Effe, Lisa; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Photocoagulation is a laser treatment widely used for the therapy of several retinal diseases. Intra- and inter-individual variations of the ocular transmission, light scattering and the retinal absorption makes it impossible to achieve a uniform effective exposure and hence a uniform damage throughout the therapy. A real-time monitoring and control of the induced damage is highly requested. Here, an approach to realize a real time optical feedback using dynamic speckle analysis is presented. A 532 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser is used for coagulation. During coagulation, speckle dynamics are monitored by a coherent object illumination using a 633nm HeNe laser and analyzed by a CMOS camera with a frame rate up to 1 kHz. It is obvious that a control system needs to determine whether the desired damage is achieved to shut down the system in a fraction of the exposure time. Here we use a fast and simple adaption of the generalized difference algorithm to analyze the speckle movements. This algorithm runs on a FPGA and is able to calculate a feedback value which is correlated to the thermal and coagulation induced tissue motion and thus the achieved damage. For different spot sizes (50-200 μm) and different exposure times (50-500 ms) the algorithm shows the ability to discriminate between different categories of retinal pigment epithelial damage ex-vivo in enucleated porcine eyes. Furthermore in-vivo experiments in rabbits show the ability of the system to determine tissue changes in living tissue during coagulation.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Two Lytic Bacteriophages, φSt2 and φGrn1; Phage Therapy Application for Biological Control of Vibrio alginolyticus in Aquaculture Live Feeds.

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    Panos G Kalatzis

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are a serious problem in aquaculture since they can result in massive mortalities in farmed fish and invertebrates. Vibriosis is one of the most common diseases in marine aquaculture hatcheries and its causative agents are bacteria of the genus Vibrio mostly entering larval rearing water through live feeds, such as Artemia and rotifers. The pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus strain V1, isolated during a vibriosis outbreak in cultured seabream, Sparus aurata, was used as host to isolate and characterize the two novel bacteriophages φSt2 and φGrn1 for phage therapy application. In vitro cell lysis experiments were performed against the bacterial host V. alginolyticus strain V1 but also against 12 presumptive Vibrio strains originating from live prey Artemia salina cultures indicating the strong lytic efficacy of the 2 phages. In vivo administration of the phage cocktail, φSt2 and φGrn1, at MOI = 100 directly on live prey A. salina cultures, led to a 93% decrease of presumptive Vibrio population after 4 h of treatment. Current study suggests that administration of φSt2 and φGrn1 to live preys could selectively reduce Vibrio load in fish hatcheries. Innovative and environmental friendly solutions against bacterial diseases are more than necessary and phage therapy is one of them.

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Two Lytic Bacteriophages, φSt2 and φGrn1; Phage Therapy Application for Biological Control of Vibrio alginolyticus in Aquaculture Live Feeds.

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    Kalatzis, Panos G; Bastías, Roberto; Kokkari, Constantina; Katharios, Pantelis

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a serious problem in aquaculture since they can result in massive mortalities in farmed fish and invertebrates. Vibriosis is one of the most common diseases in marine aquaculture hatcheries and its causative agents are bacteria of the genus Vibrio mostly entering larval rearing water through live feeds, such as Artemia and rotifers. The pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus strain V1, isolated during a vibriosis outbreak in cultured seabream, Sparus aurata, was used as host to isolate and characterize the two novel bacteriophages φSt2 and φGrn1 for phage therapy application. In vitro cell lysis experiments were performed against the bacterial host V. alginolyticus strain V1 but also against 12 presumptive Vibrio strains originating from live prey Artemia salina cultures indicating the strong lytic efficacy of the 2 phages. In vivo administration of the phage cocktail, φSt2 and φGrn1, at MOI = 100 directly on live prey A. salina cultures, led to a 93% decrease of presumptive Vibrio population after 4 h of treatment. Current study suggests that administration of φSt2 and φGrn1 to live preys could selectively reduce Vibrio load in fish hatcheries. Innovative and environmental friendly solutions against bacterial diseases are more than necessary and phage therapy is one of them.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Two Lytic Bacteriophages, φSt2 and φGrn1; Phage Therapy Application for Biological Control of Vibrio alginolyticus in Aquaculture Live Feeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalatzis, Panos G.; Bastías, Roberto; Kokkari, Constantina; Katharios, Pantelis

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a serious problem in aquaculture since they can result in massive mortalities in farmed fish and invertebrates. Vibriosis is one of the most common diseases in marine aquaculture hatcheries and its causative agents are bacteria of the genus Vibrio mostly entering larval rearing water through live feeds, such as Artemia and rotifers. The pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus strain V1, isolated during a vibriosis outbreak in cultured seabream, Sparus aurata, was used as host to isolate and characterize the two novel bacteriophages φSt2 and φGrn1 for phage therapy application. In vitro cell lysis experiments were performed against the bacterial host V. alginolyticus strain V1 but also against 12 presumptive Vibrio strains originating from live prey Artemia salina cultures indicating the strong lytic efficacy of the 2 phages. In vivo administration of the phage cocktail, φSt2 and φGrn1, at MOI = 100 directly on live prey A. salina cultures, led to a 93% decrease of presumptive Vibrio population after 4 h of treatment. Current study suggests that administration of φSt2 and φGrn1 to live preys could selectively reduce Vibrio load in fish hatcheries. Innovative and environmental friendly solutions against bacterial diseases are more than necessary and phage therapy is one of them. PMID:26950336

  7. Effects of Retinal Eccentricity on Human Manual Control

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    Popovici, Alexandru; Zaal, Peter M. T.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of viewing a primary flight display at different retinal eccentricities on human manual control behavior and performance. Ten participants performed a pitch tracking task while looking at a simplified primary flight display at different horizontal and vertical retinal eccentricities, and with two different controlled dynamics. Tracking performance declined at higher eccentricity angles and participants behaved more nonlinearly. The visual error rate gain increased with eccentricity for single-integrator-like controlled dynamics, but decreased for double-integrator-like dynamics. Participants' visual time delay was up to 100 ms higher at the highest horizontal eccentricity compared to foveal viewing. Overall, vertical eccentricity had a larger impact than horizontal eccentricity on most of the human manual control parameters and performance. Results might be useful in the design of displays and procedures for critical flight conditions such as in an aerodynamic stall.

  8. Lesion strength control by automatic temperature guided retinal photocoagulation

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    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Baade, Alexander; Birngruber, Reginald; Roider, Johann; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Laser photocoagulation is an established treatment for a variety of retinal diseases. However, when using the same irradiation parameter, the size and strength of the lesions are unpredictable due to unknown inter- and intraindividual optical properties of the fundus layers. The aim of this work is to investigate a feedback system to generate desired lesions of preselectable strengths by automatically controlling the irradiation time. Optoacoustics were used for retinal temperature monitoring. A 532-nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser was used for photocoagulation. A 75-ns/523-nm Q-switched Nd:YLF laser simultaneously excited temperature-dependent pressure transients, which were detected at the cornea by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens. The temperature data were analyzed during the irradiation by a LabVIEW routine. The treatment laser was switched off automatically when the required lesion strength was achieved. Five different feedback control algorithms for different lesion sizes were developed and tested on rabbits in vivo. With a laser spot diameter of 133 μm, five different lesion types with ophthalmoscopically visible diameters ranging mostly between 100 and 200 μm, and different appearances were achieved by automatic exposure time control. The automatically controlled lesions were widely independent of the treatment laser power and the retinal pigmentation.

  9. Vitreous inflammatory factors and serous retinal detachment in central retinal vein occlusion: a case control series

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    Noma Hidetaka

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigated whether the vitreous fluid levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (sVEGFR-2, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1 were associated with the occurrence of serous retinal detachment (SRD in patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO. Methods We recruited 33 patients with CRVO and macular edema, as well as 18 controls with nonischemic ocular diseases. Eighteen of the 33 patients with CRVO showed SRD on optical coherence tomography of the macula (defined as subretinal accumulation of fluid with low reflectivity, while the other 15 patients only had cystoid macular edema (CME, defined as hyporeflective intraretinal cavities. Retinal ischemia was evaluated by measuring the area of capillary non-perfusion using fluorescein angiography and the public domain Scion Image program, while central macular thickness (CMT was examined by optical coherence tomography. Vitreous fluid samples were obtained during pars plana vitrectomy and levels of the target molecules were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Ischemia was significantly more common in the SRD group (17/18 patients than in the CME group (5/15 patients (P ptrendptrend = 0.019. On the other hand, the vitreous fluid level of PEDF showed a significant decrease across the three groups (56.4 ± 40.0 ng/ml, 24.3 ± 17.3 ng/ml, and 16.4 ± 12.6 ng/ml, respectively, ptrend Conclusions Higher levels of inflammatory factors (sICAM-1 and sVEGFR-2 and lower levels of anti-inflammatory PEDF were observed in macular edema patients with SRD, suggesting that inflammation plays a key role in determining the severity of CRVO.

  10. Probing how initial retinal configuration controls photochemical dynamics in retinal proteins

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    Sheves M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the initial retinal configuration and the active isomerization coordinate on the photochemistry of retinal proteins (RPs are assessed by comparing photochemical dynamics of two stable retinal ground state configurations (all-trans,15-anti vs. 13-cis,15-syn, within two RPs: Bacteriorhodopsin (BR and Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin (ASR. Hyperspectral pump-probe spectroscopy shows that photochemistry starting from 13-cis retinal in both proteins is 3-10 times faster than when started in the all-trans state, suggesting that the hastening is ubiquitous to microbial RPs, regardless of their different biological functions and origin. This may also relate to the known disparity of photochemical rates between microbial RPs and visual pigments. Importance and possible underlying mechanisms are discussed as well.

  11. Genomic Control of Retinal Cell Number: Challenges, Protocol, and Results.

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    Keeley, Patrick W; Whitney, Irene E; Reese, Benjamin E

    2017-01-01

    This chapter considers some of the challenges in obtaining accurate and consistent estimates of neuronal population size in the mouse retina, in order to identify the genetic control of cell number through QTL mapping and candidate gene analysis. We first discuss a variety of best practices for analyzing large numbers of recombinant inbred strains of mice over the course of a year in order to amass a satisfactory dataset for QTL mapping. We then consider the relative merits of using average cell density versus estimated total cell number as the target trait to be assessed, and why estimates of heritability may differ for these two traits when studying the retina in whole-mount preparations. Using our dataset on cell number for 12 different retinal cell types across the AXB/BXA recombinant inbred strain set as an example, we briefly review the QTL identified and their relationship to one another. Finally, we discuss our strategies for parsing QTL in order to identify prospective candidate genes, and how those candidates may in turn be dissected to identify causal regulatory or coding variants. By identifying the genetic determinants of nerve cell number in this fashion, we can then explore their roles in modulating developmental processes that underlie the formation of the retinal architecture.

  12. Profiling of Ubiquitination Pathway Genes in Peripheral Cells from Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia due to C9ORF72 and GRN Mutations

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    Maria Serpente

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analysed the expression levels of 84 key genes involved in the regulated degradation of cellular protein by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in peripheral cells from patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD due to C9ORF72 and GRN mutations, as compared with sporadic FTD and age-matched controls. A SABiosciences PCR array was used to investigate the transcription profile in a discovery population consisting of six patients each in C9ORF72, GRN, sporadic FTD and age-matched control groups. A generalized down-regulation of gene expression compared with controls was observed in C9ORF72 expansion carriers and sporadic FTD patients. In particular, in both groups, four genes, UBE2I, UBE2Q1, UBE2E1 and UBE2N, were down-regulated at a statistically significant (p < 0.05 level. All of them encode for members of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme family. In GRN mutation carriers, no statistically significant deregulation of ubiquitination pathway genes was observed, except for the UBE2Z gene, which displays E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme activity, and was found to be statistically significant up-regulated (p = 0.006. These preliminary results suggest that the proteasomal degradation pathway plays a role in the pathogenesis of FTD associated with TDP-43 pathology, although different proteins are altered in carriers of GRN mutations as compared with carriers of the C9ORF72 expansion.

  13. Imetelstat (GRN163L)--telomerase-based cancer therapy.

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    Röth, Alexander; Harley, Calvin B; Baerlocher, Gabriela M

    2010-01-01

    Telomeres and telomerase play essential roles in the regulation of the lifespan of human cells. While normal human somatic cells do not or only transiently express telomerase and therefore shorten their telomeres with each cell division, most human cancer cells typically express high levels of telomerase and show unlimited cell proliferation. High telomerase expression allows cells to proliferate and expand long-term and therefore supports tumor growth. Owing to the high expression and its role, telomerase has become an attractive diagnostic and therapeutic cancer target. Imetelstat (GRN163L) is a potent and specific telomerase inhibitor and so far the only drug of its class in clinical trials. Here, we report on the structure and the mechanism of action of imetelstat as well as about the preclinical and clinical data and future prospects using imetelstat in cancer therapy.

  14. Controllable single photon stimulation of retinal rod cells

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    Phan, Nam Mai; Bessarab, Dmitri A; Krivitsky, Leonid A

    2013-01-01

    Retinal rod cells are commonly assumed to be sensitive to single photons [1, 2, 3]. Light sources used in prior experiments exhibit unavoidable fluctuations in the number of emitted photons [4]. This leaves doubt about the exact number of photons used to stimulate the rod cell. In this letter, we interface rod cells of Xenopus laevis with a light source based on Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion (SPDC) [5], which provides one photon at a time. Precise control of generation of single photons and directional delivery enables us to provide unambiguous proof of single photon sensitivity of rod cells without relying on the statistical assumptions. Quantum correlations between single photons in the SPDC enable us to determine quantum efficiency of the rod cell without pre-calibrated reference detectors [6, 7, 8]. These results provide the path for exploiting resources offered by quantum optics in generation and manipulation of light in visual studies. From a more general perspective, this method offers the ult...

  15. Inhibitory masking controls the threshold sensitivity of retinal ganglion cells.

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    Pan, Feng; Toychiev, Abduqodir; Zhang, Yi; Atlasz, Tamas; Ramakrishnan, Hariharasubramanian; Roy, Kaushambi; Völgyi, Béla; Akopian, Abram; Bloomfield, Stewart A

    2016-11-15

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in dark-adapted retinas show a range of threshold sensitivities spanning ∼3 log units of illuminance. Here, we show that the different threshold sensitivities of RGCs reflect an inhibitory mechanism that masks inputs from certain rod pathways. The masking inhibition is subserved by GABAC receptors, probably on bipolar cell axon terminals. The GABAergic masking inhibition appears independent of dopaminergic circuitry that has been shown also to affect RGC sensitivity. The results indicate a novel mechanism whereby inhibition controls the sensitivity of different cohorts of RGCs. This can limit and thereby ensure that appropriate signals are carried centrally in scotopic conditions when sensitivity rather than acuity is crucial. The responses of rod photoreceptors, which subserve dim light vision, are carried through the retina by three independent pathways. These pathways carry signals with largely different sensitivities. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the output neurons of the retina, show a wide range of sensitivities in the same dark-adapted conditions, suggesting a divergence of the rod pathways. However, this organization is not supported by the known synaptic morphology of the retina. Here, we tested an alternative idea that the rod pathways converge onto single RGCs, but inhibitory circuits selectively mask signals so that one pathway predominates. Indeed, we found that application of GABA receptor blockers increased the sensitivity of most RGCs by unmasking rod signals, which were suppressed. Our results indicate that inhibition controls the threshold responses of RGCs under dim ambient light. This mechanism can ensure that appropriate signals cross the bottleneck of the optic nerve in changing stimulus conditions. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  16. Quality control for retinal OCT in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schippling, S; Balk, Lj; Costello, F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) permits quantification of retinal layer atrophy relevant to assessment of neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). Measurement artefacts may limit the use of OCT to MS research. OBJECTIVE: An expert task force convened with the aim to pr...

  17. Defining the association of TMEM106B variants among frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients with GRN mutations and C9orf72 repeat expansions.

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    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Galimberti, Daniela; Serpente, Maria; Rivaud-Péchoux, Sophie; Camuzat, Agnès; Clot, Fabienne; Fenoglio, Chiara; Scarpini, Elio; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2014-11-01

    TMEM106B was identified as a risk factor for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTD) with TAR DNA-binding protein 43 kDa inclusions. It has been reported that variants in this gene are genetic modifiers of the disease and that this association is stronger in patients carrying a GRN mutation or a pathogenic expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene. Here, we investigated the contribution of TMEM106B polymorphisms in cohorts of FTD and FTD with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients from France and Italy. Patients carrying the C9orf72 expansion (n = 145) and patients with GRN mutations (n = 76) were compared with a group of FTD patients (n = 384) negative for mutations and to a group of healthy controls (n = 552). In our cohorts, the presence of the C9orf72 expansion did not correlate with TMEM106B genotypes but the association was very strong in individuals with pathogenic GRN mutations (p = 9.54 × 10(-6)). Our data suggest that TMEM106B genotypes differ in FTD patient cohorts and strengthen the protective role of TMEM106B in GRN carriers. Further studies are needed to determine whether TMEM106B polymorphisms are associated with other genetic causes for FTD, including C9orf72 repeat expansions.

  18. Progressive retinal degeneration and accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigments in Progranulin deficient mice.

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    Hafler, Brian P; Klein, Zoe A; Jimmy Zhou, Z; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2014-11-07

    Prior investigations have shown that patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) develop neurodegeneration characterized by vision loss, motor dysfunction, seizures, and often early death. Neuropathological analysis of patients with NCL shows accumulation of intracellular autofluorescent storage material, lipopigment, throughout neurons in the central nervous system including in the retina. A recent study of a sibling pair with adult onset NCL and retinal degeneration showed linkage to the region of the progranulin (GRN) locus and a homozygous mutation was demonstrated in GRN. In particular, the sibling pair with a mutation in GRN developed retinal degeneration and optic atrophy. This locus for this form of adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis was designated neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-11 (CLN11). Based on these clinical observations, we wished to determine whether Grn-null mice develop accumulation of autofluorescent particles and retinal degeneration. Retinas of both wild-type and Progranulin deficient mice were examined by immunostaining and autofluorescence. Accumulation of autofluorescent material was present in Progranulin deficient mice at 12 months. Degeneration of multiple classes of neurons including photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells was noted in mice at 12 and 18 months. Our data shows that Grn(-/-) mice develop degenerative pathology similar to features of human CLN11.

  19. Controlled exosome release from the retinal pigment epithelium in situ.

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    Locke, Christina J; Congrove, Nicole R; Dismuke, W Michael; Bowen, Trent J; Stamer, W Daniel; McKay, Brian S

    2014-12-01

    Retinal Pigment Epithelial cells (RPE) express both GPR143 and myocilin, which interact in a signal transduction-dependent manner. In heterologous systems, activation of GPR143 with ligand causes transient recruitment of myocilin to internalized receptors, which appears to be the entry point of myocilin to the endocytic pathway. In some but not all cells, myocilin also traffics through the multivesicular body (MVB) and is released on the surface of exosomes in a signal transduction-dependent fashion. Little is known regarding the role of exosomes in RPE, but they likely serve as a mode of communication between the RPE and the outer retina. In this study, we used posterior poles with retina removed from fresh human donor eyes as a model to test the relationship between GPR143, myocilin, and exosomes in an endogenous system. We isolated exosomes released by RPE using differential centrifugation of media conditioned by the RPE for 25 min, and then characterized the exosomes using nanoparticle tracking to determine the number and size of the exosomes. Next, we tested whether ligand stimulation of GPR143 using l-DOPA altered RPE exosome release. Finally, we investigated whether myocilin was present on the exosomes released by RPE and whether l-DOPA stimulation of GPR143 caused recruitment of myocilin to the endocytic pathway, as we have previously observed using cultured cells. Activation of GPR143 halted RPE exosome release, while simultaneously recruiting myocilin to the endocytic compartment. Together, our results indicate that GPR143 and myocilin function in a signal transduction system that can control exosome release from RPE.

  20. MATH5 controls the acquisition of multiple retinal cell fates

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    Feng Liang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Math5-null mutation results in the loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and in a concurrent increase of amacrine and cone cells. However, it remains unclear whether there is a cell fate switch of Math5-lineage cells in the absence of Math5 and whether MATH5 cell-autonomously regulates the differentiation of the above retinal neurons. Here, we performed a lineage analysis of Math5-expressing cells in developing mouse retinas using a conditional GFP reporter (Z/EG activated by a Math5-Cre knock-in allele. We show that during normal retinogenesis, Math5-lineage cells mostly develop into RGCs, horizontal cells, cone photoreceptors, rod photoreceptors, and amacrine cells. Interestingly, amacrine cells of Math5-lineage cells are predominately of GABAergic, cholinergic, and A2 subtypes, indicating that Math5 plays a role in amacrine subtype specification. In the absence of Math5, more Math5-lineage cells undergo cell fate conversion from RGCs to the above retinal cell subtypes, and occasionally to cone-bipolar cells and Müller cells. This change in cell fate choices is accompanied by an up-regulation of NEUROD1, RXRγ and BHLHB5, the transcription factors essential for the differentiation of retinal cells other than RGCs. Additionally, loss of Math5 causes the failure of early progenitors to exit cell cycle and leads to a significant increase of Math5-lineage cells remaining in cell cycle. Collectively, these data suggest that Math5 regulates the generation of multiple retinal cell types via different mechanisms during retinogenesis.

  1. Ancestral state reconstruction by comparative analysis of a GRN kernel operating in echinoderms.

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    Erkenbrack, Eric M; Ako-Asare, Kayla; Miller, Emily; Tekelenburg, Saira; Thompson, Jeffrey R; Romano, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Diverse sampling of organisms across the five major classes in the phylum Echinodermata is beginning to reveal much about the structure and function of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) in development and evolution. Sea urchins are the most studied clade within this phylum, and recent work suggests there has been dramatic rewiring at the top of the skeletogenic GRN along the lineage leading to extant members of the euechinoid sea urchins. Such rewiring likely accounts for some of the observed developmental differences between the two major subclasses of sea urchins-cidaroids and euechinoids. To address effects of topmost rewiring on downstream GRN events, we cloned four downstream regulatory genes within the skeletogenic GRN and surveyed their spatiotemporal expression patterns in the cidaroid Eucidaris tribuloides. We performed phylogenetic analyses with homologs from other non-vertebrate deuterostomes and characterized their spatiotemporal expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WMISH). Our data suggest the erg-hex-tgif subcircuit, a putative GRN kernel, exhibits a mesoderm-specific expression pattern early in Eucidaris development that is directly downstream of the initial mesodermal GRN circuitry. Comparative analysis of the expression of this subcircuit in four echinoderm taxa allowed robust ancestral state reconstruction, supporting hypotheses that its ancestral function was to stabilize the mesodermal regulatory state and that it has been co-opted and deployed as a unit in mesodermal subdomains in distantly diverged echinoderms. Importantly, our study supports the notion that GRN kernels exhibit structural and functional modularity, locking down and stabilizing clade-specific, embryonic regulatory states.

  2. Telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat (GRN163L limits the lifespan of human pancreatic cancer cells.

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    Katrina M Burchett

    Full Text Available Telomerase is required for the unlimited lifespan of cancer cells. The vast majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas overexpress telomerase activity and blocking telomerase could limit their lifespan. GRN163L (Imetelstat is a lipid-conjugated N3'→P5' thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide that blocks the template region of telomerase. The aim of this study was to define the effects of long-term GRN163L exposure on the maintenance of telomeres and lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells. Telomere size, telomerase activity, and telomerase inhibition response to GRN163L were measured in a panel of 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines. The cell lines exhibited large differences in levels of telomerase activity (46-fold variation, but most lines had very short telomeres (2-3 kb in size. GRN163L inhibited telomerase in all 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines, with IC50 ranging from 50 nM to 200 nM. Continuous GRN163L exposure of CAPAN1 (IC50 = 75 nM and CD18 cells (IC50 = 204 nM resulted in an initial rapid shortening of the telomeres followed by the maintenance of extremely short but stable telomeres. Continuous exposure to the drug eventually led to crisis and to a complete loss of viability after 47 (CAPAN1 and 69 (CD18 doublings. Crisis In these cells was accompanied by activation of a DNA damage response (γ-H2AX and evidence of both senescence (SA-β-galactosidase activity and apoptosis (sub-G1 DNA content, PARP cleavage. Removal of the drug after long-term GRN163L exposure led to a reactivation of telomerase and re-elongation of telomeres in the third week of cultivation without GRN163L. These findings show that the lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells can be limited by continuous telomerase inhibition. These results should facilitate the design of future clinical trials of GRN163L in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  3. Telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat (GRN163L) limits the lifespan of human pancreatic cancer cells.

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    Burchett, Katrina M; Yan, Ying; Ouellette, Michel M

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase is required for the unlimited lifespan of cancer cells. The vast majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas overexpress telomerase activity and blocking telomerase could limit their lifespan. GRN163L (Imetelstat) is a lipid-conjugated N3'→P5' thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide that blocks the template region of telomerase. The aim of this study was to define the effects of long-term GRN163L exposure on the maintenance of telomeres and lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells. Telomere size, telomerase activity, and telomerase inhibition response to GRN163L were measured in a panel of 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines. The cell lines exhibited large differences in levels of telomerase activity (46-fold variation), but most lines had very short telomeres (2-3 kb in size). GRN163L inhibited telomerase in all 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines, with IC50 ranging from 50 nM to 200 nM. Continuous GRN163L exposure of CAPAN1 (IC50 = 75 nM) and CD18 cells (IC50 = 204 nM) resulted in an initial rapid shortening of the telomeres followed by the maintenance of extremely short but stable telomeres. Continuous exposure to the drug eventually led to crisis and to a complete loss of viability after 47 (CAPAN1) and 69 (CD18) doublings. Crisis In these cells was accompanied by activation of a DNA damage response (γ-H2AX) and evidence of both senescence (SA-β-galactosidase activity) and apoptosis (sub-G1 DNA content, PARP cleavage). Removal of the drug after long-term GRN163L exposure led to a reactivation of telomerase and re-elongation of telomeres in the third week of cultivation without GRN163L. These findings show that the lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells can be limited by continuous telomerase inhibition. These results should facilitate the design of future clinical trials of GRN163L in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  4. Progress in Telomerase Inhibitor GRN163L in the Treatment for Cancer%端粒酶抑制剂GRN163L在肿瘤治疗中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻嫦娥; 余忠华

    2013-01-01

    GRN163L是一种针对hTR (端粒酶RNA)的反义核苷酸药物,它能够抑制端粒酶的活性,引起肿瘤染色体末端端粒长度的不断缩短,诱导肿瘤细胞停止分裂.作为针对hTR基因靶向治疗的前沿药物,GRN163L逐渐成为临床研究的热点.全文拟从端粒及端粒酶、GRN 163L的理化性质、生物学功能及肿瘤治疗的相关研究进展作一综述.%GRN163L (Geron Presentations on Imetelstat) is an antisense nueleotide drugs arm-ming at hTR (telomerase RNA),which can inhibit the activity of telomerase, cause telomere length of tumor chromosome ends constantly shortened and induce tumor cells to stop splitting. As a therapy forefront drug targetting the hTR gene,GRN163L gradually become the focus of clinical research. This paper will expound telomeres and telomerase,phy scal and chemical properties of GRN163L,biological function of GRN163L and research progre is of tumor therapy.

  5. Suppression of Ov-grn-1 encoding granulin of Opisthorchis viverrini inhibits proliferation of biliary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatpremsiri, Atiroch; Smout, Michael J; Loukas, Alex; Brindley, Paul J; Sripa, Banchob; Laha, Thewarach

    2015-01-01

    Multistep processes likely underlie cholangiocarcinogenesis induced by chronic infection with the fish-borne liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. One process appears to be cellular proliferation of the host bile duct epithelia driven by excretory-secretory (ES) products of this pathogen. Specifically, the secreted growth factor Ov-GRN-1, a liver fluke granulin, is a prominent component of ES and a known driver of hyper-proliferation of cultured human and mouse cells in vitro. We show potent hyper-proliferation of human cholangiocytes induced by low nanomolar levels of recombinant Ov-GRN-1 and similar growth produced by low microgram concentrations of ES products and soluble lysates of the adult worm. To further explore the influence of Ov-GRN-1 on the flukes and the host cells, expression of Ov-grn-1 was repressed using RNA interference. Expression of Ov-grn-1 was suppressed by 95% by day 3 and by ~100% by day 7. Co-culture of Ov-grn-1 suppressed flukes with human cholangiocyte (H-69) or human cholangiocarcinoma (KKU-M214) cell lines retarded cell hyper-proliferation by 25% and 92%, respectively. Intriguingly, flukes in which expression of Ov-grn-1 was repressed were less viable in culture, suggesting that Ov-GRN-1 is an essential growth factor for survival of the adult stage of O. viverrini, at least in vitro. To summarize, specific knock down of Ov-grn-1 reduced in vitro survival and capacity of ES products to drive host cell proliferation. These findings may help to contribute to a deeper understanding of liver fluke induced cholangiocarcinogenesis.

  6. Acute retinal ischemia caused by controlled low ocular perfusion pressure in a porcine model. Electrophysiological and histological characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhn, Maria Voss; Warfvinge, Karin; Scherfig, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish, and characterize a porcine model of acute, controlled retinal ischemia. The controlled retinal ischemia was produced by clamping the ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in the left eye to 5 mm Hg for 2 h. The OPP was defined as mean arterial blood pressure...... (MAP) minus the intraocular pressure (IOP). It was clamped to 0-30 mm Hg by continuous monitoring of MAP and adjustment of the IOP, which was controlled by cannulation of the anterior chamber. Inner retinal function was assessed by induced multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) with comparisons...

  7. Investigating the role of rare coding variability in Mendelian dementia genes (APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT, and PRNP) in late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Celeste; Guerreiro, Rita; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K.; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Niblock, Michael; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Adnan, Jihad; Killick, Richard; Brown, Kristelle S.; Medway, Christopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Bras, Jose; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F.; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2014-01-01

    The overlapping clinical and neuropathologic features between late-onset apparently sporadic Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), and other neurodegenerative dementias (frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) raise the question of whether shared genetic risk factors may explain the similar phenotype among these disparate disorders. To investigate this intriguing hypothesis, we analyzed rare coding variability in 6 Mendelian dementia genes (APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT, and PRNP), in 141 LOAD patients and 179 elderly controls, neuropathologically proven, from the UK. In our cohort, 14 LOAD cases (10%) and 11 controls (6%) carry at least 1 rare variant in the genes studied. We report a novel variant in PSEN1 (p.I168T) and a rare variant in PSEN2 (p.A237V), absent in controls and both likely pathogenic. Our findings support previous studies, suggesting that (1) rare coding variability in PSEN1 and PSEN2 may influence the susceptibility for LOAD and (2) GRN, MAPT, and PRNP are not major contributors to LOAD. Thus, genetic screening is pivotal for the clinical differential diagnosis of these neurodegenerative dementias. PMID:25104557

  8. An investigation of the potential association between retinal detachment and oral fluoroquinolones: a self-controlled case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Celine S L; Man, Kenneth K C; Cheng, Ching-Lan; Chan, Esther W; Lau, Wallis C Y; Cheng, Vincent C C; Wong, David S H; Yang Kao, Yea-Huei; Wong, Ian C K

    2014-09-01

    A study reported a significant association between oral fluoroquinolones and the development of retinal detachment among current users of oral fluoroquinolones (Etminan M, Forooghian F, Brophy JM et al. JAMA 2012; 307: 1414-9). However, other published studies have discordant results. This study aimed to investigate this association and to estimate the absolute risk of developing retinal detachment in patients exposed to oral fluoroquinolones. A self-controlled case series study was conducted with data retrieved from the Hong Kong Clinical Data Analysis and Reporting System database and the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Hong Kong and Taiwanese patients who had prescriptions for oral fluoroquinolones and a procedure for retinal detachment between 2001 and 2012 and between 2000 and 2010, respectively, were defined as cases and included in the analysis. A total of 9 events were found during the fluoroquinolone-exposed period and 1407 events were found during the non-exposed period. The adjusted incidence rate ratio in the combined model was 1.26 (0.65-2.47). The crude absolute risk of experiencing retinal detachment whilst on oral fluoroquinolones was ∼1.3 per 200 000 prescriptions. Our study does not support the association between the use of fluoroquinolones and the development of retinal detachment and our findings are strikingly similar to that of the study conducted in Denmark. Doubt is cast on the association between the use of fluoroquinolones and the development of retinal detachment. Therefore, the use of fluoroquinolones should not be precluded based on the current evidence on the risk of retinal detachment. The impact of different ethnicities on the response to fluoroquinolones should also be investigated. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Hippo pathway controls a switch between retinal progenitor cell proliferation and photoreceptor cell differentiation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaoka, Yoichi; Hata, Shoji; Namae, Misako; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of numbers and types of neurons through control of cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation is an essential aspect of neurogenesis. The Hippo signaling pathway has recently been identified as playing a crucial role in promoting cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation in multiple types of stem cells, including in retinal progenitor cells. When Hippo signaling is activated, the core Mst1/2 kinases activate the Lats1/2 kinases, which in turn phosphorylate and inhibit the transcriptional cofactor Yap. During mouse retinogenesis, overexpression of Yap prolongs progenitor cell proliferation, whereas inhibition of Yap decreases this proliferation and promotes retinal cell differentiation. However, to date, it remains unknown how the Hippo pathway affects the differentiation of distinct neuronal cell types such as photoreceptor cells. In this study, we investigated whether Hippo signaling regulates retinogenesis during early zebrafish development. Knockdown of zebrafish mst2 induced early embryonic defects, including altered retinal pigmentation and morphogenesis. Similar abnormal retinal phenotypes were observed in zebrafish embryos injected with a constitutively active form of yap [(yap (5SA)]. Loss of Yap's TEAD-binding domain, two WW domains, or transcription activation domain attenuated the retinal abnormalities induced by yap (5SA), indicating that all of these domains contribute to normal retinal development. Remarkably, yap (5SA)-expressing zebrafish embryos displayed decreased expression of transcription factors such as otx5 and crx, which orchestrate photoreceptor cell differentiation by activating the expression of rhodopsin and other photoreceptor cell genes. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Rx1 is a novel interacting partner of Yap that regulates photoreceptor cell differentiation. Our results suggest that Yap suppresses the differentiation of photoreceptor cells from retinal progenitor cells by repressing Rx1

  10. The Hippo pathway controls a switch between retinal progenitor cell proliferation and photoreceptor cell differentiation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Asaoka

    Full Text Available The precise regulation of numbers and types of neurons through control of cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation is an essential aspect of neurogenesis. The Hippo signaling pathway has recently been identified as playing a crucial role in promoting cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation in multiple types of stem cells, including in retinal progenitor cells. When Hippo signaling is activated, the core Mst1/2 kinases activate the Lats1/2 kinases, which in turn phosphorylate and inhibit the transcriptional cofactor Yap. During mouse retinogenesis, overexpression of Yap prolongs progenitor cell proliferation, whereas inhibition of Yap decreases this proliferation and promotes retinal cell differentiation. However, to date, it remains unknown how the Hippo pathway affects the differentiation of distinct neuronal cell types such as photoreceptor cells. In this study, we investigated whether Hippo signaling regulates retinogenesis during early zebrafish development. Knockdown of zebrafish mst2 induced early embryonic defects, including altered retinal pigmentation and morphogenesis. Similar abnormal retinal phenotypes were observed in zebrafish embryos injected with a constitutively active form of yap [(yap (5SA]. Loss of Yap's TEAD-binding domain, two WW domains, or transcription activation domain attenuated the retinal abnormalities induced by yap (5SA, indicating that all of these domains contribute to normal retinal development. Remarkably, yap (5SA-expressing zebrafish embryos displayed decreased expression of transcription factors such as otx5 and crx, which orchestrate photoreceptor cell differentiation by activating the expression of rhodopsin and other photoreceptor cell genes. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Rx1 is a novel interacting partner of Yap that regulates photoreceptor cell differentiation. Our results suggest that Yap suppresses the differentiation of photoreceptor cells from retinal progenitor cells by

  11. Quality control for retinal OCT in multiple sclerosis: validation of the OSCAR-IB criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippling, S; Balk, L J; Costello, F; Albrecht, P; Balcer, L; Calabresi, P A; Frederiksen, J L; Frohman, E; Green, A J; Klistorner, A; Outteryck, O; Paul, F; Plant, G T; Traber, G; Vermersch, P; Villoslada, P; Wolf, S; Petzold, A

    2015-02-01

    Retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) permits quantification of retinal layer atrophy relevant to assessment of neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). Measurement artefacts may limit the use of OCT to MS research. An expert task force convened with the aim to provide guidance on the use of validated quality control (QC) criteria for the use of OCT in MS research and clinical trials. A prospective multi-centre (n = 13) study. Peripapillary ring scan QC rating of an OCT training set (n = 50) was followed by a test set (n = 50). Inter-rater agreement was calculated using kappa statistics. Results were discussed at a round table after the assessment had taken place. The inter-rater QC agreement was substantial (kappa = 0.7). Disagreement was found highest for judging signal strength (kappa = 0.40). Future steps to resolve these issues were discussed. Substantial agreement for QC assessment was achieved with aid of the OSCAR-IB criteria. The task force has developed a website for free online training and QC certification. The criteria may prove useful for future research and trials in MS using OCT as a secondary outcome measure in a multi-centre setting. © The Author(s), 2014.

  12. YAP controls retinal stem cell DNA replication timing and genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabochette, Pauline; Vega-Lopez, Guillermo; Bitard, Juliette; Parain, Karine; Chemouny, Romain; Masson, Christel; Borday, Caroline; Hedderich, Marie; Henningfeld, Kristine A; Locker, Morgane; Bronchain, Odile; Perron, Muriel

    2015-09-22

    The adult frog retina retains a reservoir of active neural stem cells that contribute to continuous eye growth throughout life. We found that Yap, a downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, is specifically expressed in these stem cells. Yap knock-down leads to an accelerated S-phase and an abnormal progression of DNA replication, a phenotype likely mediated by upregulation of c-Myc. This is associated with an increased occurrence of DNA damage and eventually p53-p21 pathway-mediated cell death. Finally, we identified PKNOX1, a transcription factor involved in the maintenance of genomic stability, as a functional and physical interactant of YAP. Altogether, we propose that YAP is required in adult retinal stem cells to regulate the temporal firing of replication origins and quality control of replicated DNA. Our data reinforce the view that specific mechanisms dedicated to S-phase control are at work in stem cells to protect them from genomic instability.

  13. "Antelope": a hybrid-logic model checker for branching-time Boolean GRN analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arellano Gustavo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Thomas' formalism for modeling gene regulatory networks (GRNs, branching time, where a state can have more than one possible future, plays a prominent role. By representing a certain degree of unpredictability, branching time can model several important phenomena, such as (a asynchrony, (b incompletely specified behavior, and (c interaction with the environment. Introducing more than one possible future for a state, however, creates a difficulty for ordinary simulators, because infinitely many paths may appear, limiting ordinary simulators to statistical conclusions. Model checkers for branching time, by contrast, are able to prove properties in the presence of infinitely many paths. Results We have developed Antelope ("Analysis of Networks through TEmporal-LOgic sPEcifications", http://turing.iimas.unam.mx:8080/AntelopeWEB/, a model checker for analyzing and constructing Boolean GRNs. Currently, software systems for Boolean GRNs use branching time almost exclusively for asynchrony. Antelope, by contrast, also uses branching time for incompletely specified behavior and environment interaction. We show the usefulness of modeling these two phenomena in the development of a Boolean GRN of the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche. There are two obstacles to a direct approach when applying model checking to Boolean GRN analysis. First, ordinary model checkers normally only verify whether or not a given set of model states has a given property. In comparison, a model checker for Boolean GRNs is preferable if it reports the set of states having a desired property. Second, for efficiency, the expressiveness of many model checkers is limited, resulting in the inability to express some interesting properties of Boolean GRNs. Antelope tries to overcome these two drawbacks: Apart from reporting the set of all states having a given property, our model checker can express, at the expense of efficiency, some properties that ordinary

  14. Cloning and Expression of Human Grn Gene%重组人Grn的克隆与表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谌思; 粟艳林; 李悦; 彭小宁

    2015-01-01

    目的:构建人Grn基因原核表达载体并观察其表达。方法:从人单核细胞系THP-1细胞cDNA中扩增出Grn片段,通过酶切与连接,将Grn片段构建到pGEX-4T-2质粒载体上,再转化入感受态细胞TOP10,菌落PCR鉴定阳性克隆并测序分析,测序正确的重组质粒再转化入感受态细胞DE3中表达蛋白,用Western blot鉴定结果。结果:构建的pGEX-4T-2表达载体作PCR和双酶切鉴定,证实其中有目的片段完整插入,插入片段测序结果与Grn序列设计完全一致,将其转化入DE3中,Western blot结果表明在细菌裂解上清有分子质量为91KD的融合蛋白。结论:重组人Grn的克隆与表达成功,为进一步研究Grn的功能奠定了基础。%ObjectsTo construct a prokaryotic expression vector containing human Grn gene and observe its expression. MethodsThe gene Grn was amplifified by PCR from THP-1 cDNA. The cloned gene was digested by restrictive endonucle-ase and subcloned into eulcaryotic experssion vecter pGEX-4T-2. Grn had been cloned into pGEX-4T-2, and the recom-bined plasmid was transduced into TOP10. The positive cloning was identified by PCR and sequencing. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into competent cell of DE3. The expression of GRN was analyzed by Western blot.ResultsIt was verified by PCR and nucleotide sequencing that the constructed Grn eukaryotic vector was correct. After pGEX-4T-2 was transfected into DE3, a GST fusion protein molecule of91KD was found in supernatant of lysis of bactoria by Western blot. ConclusionA prokaryotic expression plasmid containing human grn gene is successfully constructed, and it can express out objectiveprotein, which has laid a concrete fundation for future study on grn.

  15. Retinal function in relation to improved glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, S K; Nørgaard, K; Jackson, George

    2011-01-01

    To study long-term changes in retinal function in response to sustained glycaemia reduction in participants with type 1 diabetes.......To study long-term changes in retinal function in response to sustained glycaemia reduction in participants with type 1 diabetes....

  16. Vitamin D Deficiency in Patients with Central Retinal Vein Occlusion: A Case Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, David; Kvanta, Anders; Lindqvist, Pelle G

    2017-03-01

    Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) has been shown to occur more often in winter/spring season. We aimed to evaluate if patients with CRVO have more vitamin D deficiency compared to matched controls. Prospective match controlled study of 72 patients with CRVO and 144 matched controls. All new CRVO cases presenting at St. Erik Eye Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden during the study period were approached to participate. Statistics Sweden provided randomly selected controls matched for age, gender, and season. The first 18 cases of CRVO and 36 controls for each of the four seasons were included and blood was drawn for 25-OH vitamin D analysis (25(OH)D). About half of the patients (51.4%) in the CRVO group had vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D D were 55.3 nmol/l (95% CI 48.4-62.2) in the study group and 59.8 nmol/l (95% CI 55.4-64.2) in the control group (p = 0.28). In stratified analysis, the CRVO patients under 75 years had significantly lower 25(OH)D levels than the matched controls (47.8 nmol/l vs. 59.0 nmol/l, p = 0.02). Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with CRVO. No significant differences in vitamin deficiency or 25(OH)D levels were found in comparison to the control group. However, the CRVO patients under 75 years had significantly lower 25(OH)D levels as compared to the control group.

  17. Phosphatase control of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation state is central for glycolytic regulation of retinal protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Thomas W; Abcouwer, Steven F; Losiewicz, Mandy K; Fort, Patrice E

    2015-09-15

    Control of protein synthesis in insulin-responsive tissues has been well characterized, but relatively little is known about how this process is regulated in nervous tissues. The retina exhibits a relatively high protein synthesis rate, coinciding with high basal Akt and metabolic activities, with the majority of retinal ATP being derived from aerobic glycolysis. We examined the dependency of retinal protein synthesis on the Akt-mTOR signaling and glycolysis using ex vivo rat retinas. Akt inhibitors significantly reduced retinal protein synthesis but did not affect glycolytic lactate production. Surprisingly, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) markedly inhibited Akt1 and Akt3 activities, as well as protein synthesis. The effects of 2-DG, and 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (2-FDG) on retinal protein synthesis correlated with inhibition of lactate production and diminished ATP content, with all these effects reversed by provision of d-mannose. 2-DG treatment was not associated with increased AMPK, eEF2, or eIF2α phosphorylation; instead, it caused rapid dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1. 2-DG reduced total mTOR activity by 25%, but surprisingly, it did not reduce mTORC1 activity, as indicated by unaltered raptor-associated mTOR autophosphorylation and ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation. Dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 was largely prevented by inhibition of PP1/PP2A phosphatases with okadaic acid and calyculin A, and inhibition of PPM1 phosphatases with cadmium. Thus, inhibition of retinal glycolysis diminished Akt and protein synthesis coinciding with accelerated dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 independently of mTORC1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism regulating protein synthesis in the retina involving an mTORC1-independent and phosphatase-dependent regulation of 4E-BP1.

  18. myGRN: a database and visualisation system for the storage and analysis of developmental genetic regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacha Jamil

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological processes are regulated by complex interactions between transcription factors and signalling molecules, collectively described as Genetic Regulatory Networks (GRNs. The characterisation of these networks to reveal regulatory mechanisms is a long-term goal of many laboratories. However compiling, visualising and interacting with such networks is non-trivial. Current tools and databases typically focus on GRNs within simple, single celled organisms. However, data is available within the literature describing regulatory interactions in multi-cellular organisms, although not in any systematic form. This is particularly true within the field of developmental biology, where regulatory interactions should also be tagged with information about the time and anatomical location of development in which they occur. Description We have developed myGRN (http://www.myGRN.org, a web application for storing and interrogating interaction data, with an emphasis on developmental processes. Users can submit interaction and gene expression data, either curated from published sources or derived from their own unpublished data. All interactions associated with publications are publicly visible, and unpublished interactions can only be shared between collaborating labs prior to publication. Users can group interactions into discrete networks based on specific biological processes. Various filters allow dynamic production of network diagrams based on a range of information including tissue location, developmental stage or basic topology. Individual networks can be viewed using myGRV, a tool focused on displaying developmental networks, or exported in a range of formats compatible with third party tools. Networks can also be analysed for the presence of common network motifs. We demonstrate the capabilities of myGRN using a network of zebrafish interactions integrated with expression data from the zebrafish database, ZFIN. Conclusion Here we

  19. Variability of the clinical phenotype in an Italian family with dementia associated with an intronic deletion in the GRN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Gabriella; Rossi, Giacomina; Giaccone, Giorgio; Giovagnoli, Anna Rita; Piccoli, Elena; Zanini, Sergio; Geatti, Onelio; Toso, Vito; Grisoli, Marina; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the progranulin gene (GRN) were recently identified as an important cause of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD). More than 60 pathogenic mutations have been reported up to now and prominent phenotypic variability within and among affected kindreds has been described. We have studied an Italian family with clinical evidence of dementia, and here we report detailed clinical records, imaging, sequential neurological examinations, cognitive assessments, and genetic analysis of three affected members of the same generation. Genetic analysis revealed the presence of the null mutation IVS6 + 5_8delGTGA in GRN, leading to haploinsufficiency, as documented by mRNA analysis. The mutation is associated with wide variation of the clinical phenotype, ranging from FTD to Alzheimer's disease and to a rapidly-progressive dementia. In summary, the patients of this kindred showed highly variable clinical features that do not have a close correspondence with the pattern of the cerebral atrophy. Our data extend the phenotypic spectrum and the complexity of neurodegenerative diseases linked to GRN mutations.

  20. Retinal locus for scanning text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, George T; Sharma, Manoj K; Grose, Susan A; Maino, Joseph H

    2006-01-01

    A method of mapping the retinal location of text during reading is described in which text position is plotted cumulatively on scanning laser ophthalmoscope retinal images. Retinal locations that contain text most often are the brightest in the cumulative plot, and locations that contain text least often are the darkest. In this way, the retinal area that most often contains text is determined. Text maps were plotted for eight control subjects without vision loss and eight subjects with central scotomas from macular degeneration. Control subjects' text maps showed that the fovea contained text most often. Text maps of five of the subjects with scotomas showed that they used the same peripheral retinal area to scan text and fixate. Text maps of the other three subjects with scotomas showed that they used separate areas to scan text and fixate. Retinal text maps may help evaluate rehabilitative strategies for training individuals with central scotomas to use a particular retinal area to scan text.

  1. TGF-β Controls miR-181/ERK Regulatory Network during Retinal Axon Specification and Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Carrella

    Full Text Available Retinal axon specification and growth are critically sensitive to the dosage of numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors. Subtle variations in the expression levels of key molecules may result in a variety of axonal growth anomalies. miR-181a and miR-181b are two eye-enriched microRNAs whose inactivation in medaka fish leads to alterations of the proper establishment of connectivity and function in the visual system. miR-181a/b are fundamental regulators of MAPK signaling and their role in retinal axon growth and specification is just beginning to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that miR-181a/b are key nodes in the interplay between TGF-β and MAPK/ERK within the functional pathways that control retinal axon specification and growth. Using a variety of in vivo and in vitro approaches in medaka fish, we demonstrate that TGF-β signaling controls the miR-181/ERK regulatory network, which in turn strengthens the TGF-β-mediated regulation of RhoA degradation. Significantly, these data uncover the role of TGF-β signaling in vivo, for the first time, in defining the correct wiring and assembly of functional retina neural circuits and further highlight miR-181a/b as key factors in axon specification and growth.

  2. Hes4 controls proliferative properties of neural stem cells during retinal ontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yakoubi, Warif; Borday, Caroline; Hamdache, Johanna; Parain, Karine; Tran, Hong Thi; Vleminckx, Kris; Perron, Muriel; Locker, Morgane

    2012-12-01

    The retina of fish and amphibian contains genuine neural stem cells located at the most peripheral edge of the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ). However, their cell-of-origin as well as the mechanisms that sustain their maintenance during development are presently unknown. We identified Hes4 (previously named XHairy2), a gene encoding a bHLH-O transcriptional repressor, as a stem cell-specific marker of the Xenopus CMZ that is positively regulated by the canonical Wnt pathway and negatively by Hedgehog signaling. We found that during retinogenesis, Hes4 labels a small territory, located first at the pigmented epithelium (RPE)/neural retina (NR) border and later in the retinal margin, that likely gives rise to adult retinal stem cells. We next addressed whether Hes4 might impart this cell subpopulation with retinal stem cell features: inhibited RPE or NR differentiation programs, continuous proliferation, and slow cell cycle speed. We could indeed show that Hes4 overexpression cell autonomously prevents retinal precursor cells from commitment toward retinal fates and maintains them in a proliferative state. Besides, our data highlight for the first time that Hes4 may also constitute a crucial regulator of cell cycle kinetics. Hes4 gain of function indeed significantly slows down cell division, mainly through the lengthening of G1 phase. As a whole, we propose that Hes4 maintains particular stemness features in a cellular cohort dedicated to constitute the adult retinal stem cell pool, by keeping it in an undifferentiated and slowly proliferative state along embryonic retinogenesis.

  3. Norrin, Frizzled4, and Lrp5 signaling in endothelial cells controls a genetic program for retinal vascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Wang, Yanshu; Cahill, Hugh; Yu, Minzhong; Badea, Tudor C.; Smallwood, Philip M.; Peachey, Neal S.; Nathans, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Disorders of vascular structure and function play a central role in a wide variety of CNS diseases. Mutations in the Frizzled4 (Fz4) receptor, Lrp5 co-receptor, or Norrin ligand cause retinal hypovascularization, but the role of Norrin/Fz4/Lrp signaling in vascular development has not been defined. Using mouse genetic and cell culture models, we show that loss of Fz4 signaling in endothelial cells causes defective vascular growth, which leads to chronic but reversible silencing of retinal neurons. Loss of Fz4 in all endothelial cells disrupts the blood brain barrier in the cerebellum, while excessive Fz4 signaling disrupts embryonic angiogenesis. Sox17, a transcription factor that is up-regulated by Norrin/Fz4/Lrp signaling, plays a central role in inducing the angiogenic program controlled by Norrin/Fz4/Lrp. These experiments establish a cellular basis for retinal hypovascularization diseases due to insufficient Frizzled signaling, and they suggest a broader role for Frizzled signaling in vascular growth, remodeling, maintenance, and disease. PMID:19837032

  4. Highly cooperative feedback control of retinal rod guanylate cyclase by calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, K W; Stryer, L

    1988-07-07

    Visual excitation in retinal rod cells is mediated by a cascade that leads to the amplified hydrolysis of cyclic GMP (cGMP) and the consequent closure of cGMP-activated cation-specific channels in the plasma membrane. Recovery of the dark state requires the resynthesis of cGMP, which is catalysed by guanylate cyclase, an axoneme-associated enzyme. The lowering of the cytosolic calcium concentration (Cai) following illumination is thought to be important in stimulating cyclase activity. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that the cGMP content of rod outer segments increases several-fold when Cai is lowered to less than 10 nM. It is evident that cGMP and Cai levels are reciprocally controlled by negative feedback. Guanylate cyclase from toad ROS is strongly stimulated when the calcium level is lowered from 10 microM to 10 nM, but only if they are excited by light. We show here that the guanylate cyclase activity of unilluminated bovine rod outer segments increases markedly (5 to 20-fold) when the calcium level is lowered from 200 nM to 50 nM. This steep dependence of guanylate cyclase activity on the calcium level in the physiological range has a Hill coefficient of 3.9. Stimulation at low calcium levels is mediated by a protein that can be released from the outer segment membranes by washing with a low salt buffer. Calcium sensitivity is partially restored by adding the soluble extract back to the washed membranes. The highly cooperative activation of guanylate cyclase by the light-induced lowering of Cai is likely to be a key event in restoring the dark current after excitation.

  5. Retinal Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, James T.; Sibley, Cailin H.; Lin, Phoebe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Ophthalmologists and rheumatologists frequently miscommunicate in consulting on patients with retinal vasculitis. This report seeks to establish a common understanding of the term, retinal vasculitis, and to review recent papers on this diagnosis. Recent findings 1) The genetic basis of some rare forms of retinal vascular disease have recently been described. Identified genes include CAPN5, TREX1, and TNFAIP3; 2) Behçet’s disease is a systemic illness that is very commonly associated with occlusive retinal vasculitis; 3) retinal imaging including fluorescein angiography and other newer imaging modalities has proven crucial to the identification and characterization of retinal vasculitis and its complications; 4) although monoclonal antibodies to IL-17A or IL-1 beta failed in trials for Behçet’s disease, antibodies to TNF alpha, either infliximab or adalimumab, have demonstrated consistent benefit in managing this disease. Interferon treatment and B cell depletion therapy via rituximab may be beneficial in certain types of retinal vasculitis. Summary Retinal vasculitis is an important entity for rheumatologists to understand. Retinal vasculitis associated with Behçet’s disease responds to monoclonal antibodies that neutralize TNF, but the many other forms of non-infectious retinal vasculitis may require alternate therapeutic management. PMID:26945335

  6. Protection of retinal function by sulforaphane following retinal ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrecht, Lindsay A; Perlman, Jay I; McDonnell, James F; Zhai, Yougang; Qiao, Liang; Bu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Sulforaphane, a precursor of glucosinolate in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower, has been shown to protect brain ischemic injury. In this study, we examined the effect of systemic administration of sulforaphane on retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Intraocular pressure was elevated in two groups of C57BL/6 mice (n = 8 per group) for 45 min to induce retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Following retinal ischemic reperfusion injury, vehicle (1% DMSO saline) or sulforaphane (25 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally daily for 5 days. Scotopic electroretinography (ERG) was used to quantify retinal function prior to and one-week after retinal ischemic insult. Retinal morphology was examined one week after ischemic insult. Following ischemic reperfusion injury, ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in the control mice. Sulforaphane treatment significantly attenuated ischemic-induced loss of retinal function as compared to vehicle treated mice. In vehicle treated mice, ischemic reperfusion injury produced marked thinning of the inner retinal layers, but the thinning of the inner retinal layers appeared significantly less with sulforaphane treatment. Thus, sulforaphane may be beneficial in the treatment of retinal disorders with ischemic reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Communication: Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms: Controlling the photoisomerization yield of retinal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, R. D.; Arango, C. A.; Reyes, A.

    2016-07-01

    We recently proposed a Quantum Optimal Control (QOC) method constrained to build pulses from analytical pulse shapes [R. D. Guerrero et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143(12), 124108 (2015)]. This approach was applied to control the dissociation channel yields of the diatomic molecule KH, considering three potential energy curves and one degree of freedom. In this work, we utilized this methodology to study the strong field control of the cis-trans photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal. This more complex system was modeled with a Hamiltonian comprising two potential energy surfaces and two degrees of freedom. The resulting optimal pulse, made of 6 linearly chirped pulses, was capable of controlling the population of the trans isomer on the ground electronic surface for nearly 200 fs. The simplicity of the pulse generated with our QOC approach offers two clear advantages: a direct analysis of the sequence of events occurring during the driven dynamics, and its reproducibility in the laboratory with current laser technologies.

  8. Titration kinetics of Asp-85 in bacteriorhodopsin: exclusion of the retinal pocket as the color-controlling cation binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X; Bressler, S; Ottolenghi, M; Eliash, T; Friedman, N; Sheves, M

    1997-10-20

    The spectrum (the purple blue transition) and function of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin are determined by the state of protonation of the Asp-85 residue located in the vicinity of the retinal chromophore. The titration of Asp-85 is controlled by the binding/unbinding of one or two divalent metal cations (Ca2+ or Mg2+). The location of such metal binding site(s) is approached by studying the kinetics of the cation-induced titration of Asp-85 using metal ions and large molecular cations, such as quaternary ammonium ions, R4N+ (R = Et, Pr, a divalent 'bolaform ion' [Et3N+-(CH2)4-N+Et3] and the 1:3 molecular complex formed between Fe2+ and 1,10-phenanthroline (OP). The basic multi-component kinetic features of the titration, extending from 10(-2) to 10(4) s, are unaffected by the charge and size of the cation. This indicates that cation binding to bR triggers the blue --> purple titration in a fast step, which is not rate-determining. In view of the size of the cations involved, these observations indicate that the cation binding site is in an exposed location on, or close to, the membrane surface. This excludes previous models, which placed the color-controlling Ca2+ ion in the retinal binding pocket.

  9. Retinal Thickening and Photoreceptor Loss in HIV Eyes without Retinitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A Arcinue

    Full Text Available To determine the presence of structural changes in HIV retinae (i.e., photoreceptor density and retinal thickness in the macula compared with age-matched HIV-negative controls.Cohort of patients with known HIV under CART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy treatment were examined with a flood-illuminated retinal AO camera to assess the cone photoreceptor mosaic and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT to assess retinal layers and retinal thickness.Twenty-four eyes of 12 patients (n = 6 HIV-positive and 6 HIV-negative were imaged with the adaptive optics camera. In each of the regions of interest studied (nasal, temporal, superior, inferior, the HIV group had significantly less mean cone photoreceptor density compared with age-matched controls (difference range, 4,308-6,872 cones/mm2. A different subset of forty eyes of 20 patients (n = 10 HIV-positive and 10 HIV-negative was included in the retinal thickness measurements and retinal layer segmentation with the SD-OCT. We observed significant thickening in HIV positive eyes in the total retinal thickness at the foveal center, and in each of the three horizontal B-scans (through the macular center, superior, and inferior to the fovea. We also noted that the inner retina (combined thickness from ILM through RNFL to GCL layer was also significantly thickened in all the different locations scanned compared with HIV-negative controls.Our present study shows that the cone photoreceptor density is significantly reduced in HIV retinae compared with age-matched controls. HIV retinae also have increased macular retinal thickness that may be caused by inner retinal edema secondary to retinovascular disease in HIV. The interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE, as well as possible low-grade ocular inflammation causing diffuse inner retinal edema, may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients without overt retinitis.

  10. Controlling the pKa of the bacteriorhodopsin Schiff base by use of artificial retinal analogues.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Artificial bacteriorhodopsin pigments based on synthetic retinal analogues carrying an electron-withdrawing CF3 substituent group were prepared. The effects of CF3 on the spectra, photocycles, and Schiff base pKa values of the pigments were analyzed. A reduction of 5 units in the pKa of the Schiff base is observed when the CF3 substituent is located at the C-13 polyene position, in the vicinity of the protonated Schiff base nitrogen. The results lead to the unambiguous characterization of the...

  11. Rationale and design of the AdRem study : Evaluating the effects of blood pressure lowering and intensive glucose control on vascular retinal disorders in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Ronald P.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Cruickshank, J. Kennedy; Hughes, Alun D.; Stanton, Alice; Lu Juming, [No Value; Patel, Anushka; Thom, Simon A. McG.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Lu, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The ADVANCE Retinal Measurements (AdRem) Study is a large intervention study evaluating the effects of target driven intensive glucose control and placebo controlled blood pressure lowering on retinal vascular changes. AdRem is a sub-study of the ADVANCE Study (Action in Diabetes and Vascular diseas

  12. Pneumatic retinopexy. A multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial comparing pneumatic retinopexy with scleral buckling. The Retinal Detachment Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornambe, P E; Hilton, G F

    1989-06-01

    Pneumatic retinopexy was compared with scleral buckling in a multicenter (7 centers), randomized, controlled, clinical trial with 198 patients. Admission criteria included detachments with retinal break(s) no greater than 1 clock hour in size, within the superior two thirds of the fundus, without significant proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). All patients were followed for at least 6 months. Scleral buckling was compared with pneumatic retinopexy with regard to single-operation reattachment (82 versus 73%), reattachment with one operation and postoperative laser/cryotherapy (84 versus 81%), overall reattachment with reoperations (98 versus 99%), final visual acuity of 20/50 or better in eye with preoperative detachment of the macula for 2 weeks or less (56 versus 80%), PVR (5 versus 3%), and new retinal breaks (13 versus 23%). Complications, including reoperations, as measured by the "score" system, were similar. The anatomic results of the two operations were not significantly different (P greater than 0.05), but pneumatic retinopexy had less morbidity and better postoperative visual acuity (P = 0.01). Pneumatic retinopexy is recommended for cases meeting the admission criteria.

  13. Single-cell and coupled GRN models of cell patterning in the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Buylla Elena R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental work has uncovered some of the genetic components required to maintain the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche (SCN and its structure. Two main pathways are involved. One pathway depends on the genes SHORTROOT and SCARECROW and the other depends on the PLETHORA genes, which have been proposed to constitute the auxin readouts. Recent evidence suggests that a regulatory circuit, composed of WOX5 and CLE40, also contributes to the SCN maintenance. Yet, we still do not understand how the niche is dynamically maintained and patterned or if the uncovered molecular components are sufficient to recover the observed gene expression configurations that characterize the cell types within the root SCN. Mathematical and computational tools have proven useful in understanding the dynamics of cell differentiation. Hence, to further explore root SCN patterning, we integrated available experimental data into dynamic Gene Regulatory Network (GRN models and addressed if these are sufficient to attain observed gene expression configurations in the root SCN in a robust and autonomous manner. Results We found that an SCN GRN model based only on experimental data did not reproduce the configurations observed within the root SCN. We developed several alternative GRN models that recover these expected stable gene configurations. Such models incorporate a few additional components and interactions in addition to those that have been uncovered. The recovered configurations are stable to perturbations, and the models are able to recover the observed gene expression profiles of almost all the mutants described so far. However, the robustness of the postulated GRNs is not as high as that of other previously studied networks. Conclusions These models are the first published approximations for a dynamic mechanism of the A. thaliana root SCN cellular pattering. Our model is useful to formally show that the data now available are not

  14. Increase of aqueous inflammatory factors in macular edema with branch retinal vein occlusion: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noma Hidetaka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigated whether soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1 has a role in the pathogenesis of macular edema associated with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO together with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Methods A retrospective case control study was performed in 22 patients with BRVO and macular edema, as well as 10 patients with nonischemic ocular diseases as the control group. Retinal ischemia was evaluated by measuring the area of capillary non-perfusion with Scion Image software, while the severity of macular edema was examined by optical coherence tomography. Aqueous humor samples were obtained during the performance of combined vitrectomy and cataract surgery. sICAM-1 and VEGF levels in aqueous humor and plasma specimens were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Aqueous humor levels of sICAM-1 (median: 6.90 ng/ml and VEGF (median: 169 pg/ml were significantly elevated in BRVO patients compared with the control group (median: 3.30 pg/ml and 15.6 pg/ml, respectively (P = 0.005 and P P = 0.025. In addition, aqueous levels of both sICAM-1 and VEGF were correlated with the size of the non-perfused area of the retina in BRVO patients (P = 0.021 and P P = 0.020 and P = 0.005, respectively. Conclusions Both sICAM-1 and VEGF may be involved in the pathogenesis of macular edema associated with BRVO. Measurement of aqueous humor sICAM-1 levels may be useful for assessment of BRVO patients with macular edema, in addition to measurement of VEGF.

  15. Expression, refolding and purification of Ov-GRN-1, a granulin-like growth factor from the carcinogenic liver fluke, that causes proliferation of mammalian host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smout, Michael J; Mulvenna, Jason P; Jones, Malcolm K; Loukas, Alex

    2011-10-01

    Granulins (GRNs) are potent growth factors that are upregulated in many aggressive cancers from a wide range of organs. GRNs form tight, disulphide bonded, beta hairpin stacks, making them difficult to express in recombinant form. We recently described Ov-GRN-1, a GRN family member secreted by the carcinogenic liver fluke of humans, Opisthorchis viverrini, and showed that recombinant Ov-GRN-1 expressed and refolded from Escherichia coli caused proliferation of mammalian cell lines at nanomolar concentrations. We now report on an optimized method to express and purify monomeric Ov-GRN-1 in E. coli using a straightforward and scalable purification and refolding process. Purified monomeric protein caused proliferation at nanomolar concentrations of cancerous and non-cancerous cell lines derived from human bile duct tissue. The expression and purification method we describe herein will serve as a backbone upon which to develop expression and purification processes for recombinant GRNs from other organisms, accelerating research on this intriguing family of proteins.

  16. Variation at GRN3′-UTR rs5848 is not associated with a risk of frontotemporal lobar degenerationin Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Simón-Sánchez (Javier); H. Seelaar (Harro); Z. Bochdanovits (Zoltan); D.J.H. Deeg (Dorly); J.C. van Swieten (John); P. Heutink (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A single nucleotide polymorphism (rs5848) located in the 3′- untranslated region of GRN has recently been associated with a risk of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) in North American population particularly in pathologically confirmed cases with neural inclusions

  17. A regulatory loop involving PAX6, MITF, and WNT signaling controls retinal pigment epithelium development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Bharti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The separation of the optic neuroepithelium into future retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is a critical event in early eye development in vertebrates. Here we show in mice that the transcription factor PAX6, well-known for its retina-promoting activity, also plays a crucial role in early pigment epithelium development. This role is seen, however, only in a background genetically sensitized by mutations in the pigment cell transcription factor MITF. In fact, a reduction in Pax6 gene dose exacerbates the RPE-to-retina transdifferentiation seen in embryos homozygous for an Mitf null allele, and it induces such a transdifferentiation in embryos that are either heterozygous for the Mitf null allele or homozygous for an RPE-specific hypomorphic Mitf allele generated by targeted mutation. Conversely, an increase in Pax6 gene dose interferes with transdifferentiation even in homozygous Mitf null embryos. Gene expression analyses show that, together with MITF or its paralog TFEC, PAX6 suppresses the expression of Fgf15 and Dkk3. Explant culture experiments indicate that a combination of FGF and DKK3 promote retina formation by inhibiting canonical WNT signaling and stimulating the expression of retinogenic genes, including Six6 and Vsx2. Our results demonstrate that in conjunction with Mitf/Tfec Pax6 acts as an anti-retinogenic factor, whereas in conjunction with retinogenic genes it acts as a pro-retinogenic factor. The results suggest that careful manipulation of the Pax6 regulatory circuit may facilitate the generation of retinal and pigment epithelium cells from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells.

  18. Retinal Detachment in Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prado Renata Silva do

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is an obstetric disease of unknown cause that affects approximately 5% of pregnant women. The visual system may be affected with variable intensity, being the retinal detachment a rare complication. The retinal detachment in preeclampsia is usually bilateral and serous, and its pathogenesis is related to the choroidal ischemia secondary to an intense arteriolar vasospasm. The majority of patients have complete recovery of vision with clinical management, and surgery is unnecessary. This is a case report of a 27 year old patient who developed the severe form of preeclampsia on her first pregnancy. She had progressive blurred vision, until she could see only shadows. Ophthalmic examination diagnosed spread and bilateral retinal detachment. With blood pressure control at postpartum, the patient had her retina reattached, and recovery of vision.

  19. Retinal vein occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decrease the risk of retinal vein occlusion. These measures include: Eating a low-fat diet Getting regular exercise Maintaining an ideal weight Not smoking Aspirin or other blood thinners may help prevent blockages in the other eye. Controlling diabetes may ...

  20. The short-term effect of flavonoid-rich dark chocolate on retinal vessel diameter in glaucoma patients and age-matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Naim; Gedenk, Alexandra; Spoerl, Eberhard; Pillunat, Lutz E; Stodtmeister, Richard

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of flavonoid-rich dark chocolate and non-flavonoid-rich white chocolate on retinal vessel diameter in glaucoma patients and age-matched controls. Thirty glaucoma patients and 30 age-matched subjects were assigned to dark or white chocolate by randomization with forced equal distribution. The number in each of the four groups was 15. Measured parameters included systemic blood pressure (BP), blood glucose levels, static retinal vessel analysis, as measured by central retinal artery equivalent (CRAE) (which relates to the diameter of the central retinal artery), central retinal vein equivalent (CRVE) (which relates to the diameter of central retinal vein) and the arterio-venous ratio (AVR), which represents the CRAE/CRVE ratio, dynamic retinal vessel analysis as measured by the change in vessel diameter in response to flicker light stimulation. Three recording cycles from each were averaged. Blood pressure parameters (systolic BP, diastolic BP and pulse), IOP and blood glucose levels did not differ significantly between both groups before and after consumption of white or dark chocolate. Static vessel analysis did not show any significant changes in CRAE, CRVE or AVR before and after dark or white chocolate in both groups (p > 0.05). Mean dilatation of the venules in the control group was 3.2 ± 0.9 % before dark chocolate and 4.2 ± 1.4 % after dark chocolate intake, which was statistically significantly different (p = 0.01). Mean dilatation of the arterioles in the control group was 2.8 ± 1.8 % before dark chocolate and 3.5 ± 1.8 % after dark chocolate intake with a trend to statistical significance (p = 0.14), but not reaching the significance level. Mean diameter changes in the glaucoma group did not show any significant differences after dark chocolate consumption. The present study showed a significant improvement of venous vasodilatation 2 hr after dark chocolate intake in the control group, but not in the glaucoma group. This

  1. Lack of evidence for phase-only control of retinal photoisomerization in the strict one-photon limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebel, M.; Kukura, P.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of shaping electric fields to steer light-induced processes coherently has fascinated scientists for decades. Despite early theoretical considerations that ruled out one-photon coherent control (CC), several experimental studies reported that molecular responses are sensitive to the shape of the excitation field in the weak-field limit. These observations were largely attributed to the presence of rapid-decay channels, but experimental verification is lacking. Here, we test this hypothesis by investigating the degree of achievable control over the photoisomerization of the retinal protonated Schiff-base in bacteriorhodopsin, isorhodopsin and rhodopsin, all of which exhibit similar chromophores but different isomerization yields and excited-state lifetimes. Irrespective of the system studied, we find no evidence for dissipation-dependent behaviour, nor for any CC in the strict one-photon limit. Our results question the extent to which a photochemical process at ambient conditions can be controlled at the amplitude level, and how the underlying molecular potential-energy surfaces and dynamics may influence this controllability.

  2. Reciprocal control of retinal rod cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase by its gamma subunit and transducin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensel, T G; Stryer, L

    1986-09-01

    The switching on of the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) in retinal rod outer segments by activated transducin (T alpha-GTP) is a key step in visual excitation. The finding that trypsin activates PDE (alpha beta gamma) by degrading its gamma subunit and the reversal of this activation by gamma led to the proposal that T alpha-GTP activates PDE by relieving an inhibitory constraint imposed by gamma (Hurley and Stryer: J. Biol. Chem. 257:11094-11099, 1982). We report here studies showing that the addition of gamma subunit also reverses the activation of PDE by T alpha-GTP-gamma S. A procedure for preparing gamma in high yield (50-80%) is presented. Analyses of SDS polyacrylamide gel slices confirmed that inhibitory activity resides in the gamma subunit. Nanomolar gamma blocks the activation of PDE by micromolar T alpha-GTP gamma S. The degree of activation of PDE depends reciprocally on the concentrations of gamma and T alpha-GTP gamma S. gamma remains bound to the disk membrane during the activation of PDE by transducin. The binding of gamma to the alpha beta subunits of native PDE is very tight; the dissociation constant is less than 10 pM, indicating that fewer than 1 in 1,700 PDE molecules in rod outer segments are activated in the absence of T alpha-GTP.

  3. Antagonistic cross-regulation between Wnt and Hedgehog signalling pathways controls post-embryonic retinal proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borday, Caroline; Cabochette, Pauline; Parain, Karine; Mazurier, Nicolas; Janssens, Sylvie; Tran, Hong Thi; Sekkali, Belaïd; Bronchain, Odile; Vleminckx, Kris; Locker, Morgane; Perron, Muriel

    2012-10-01

    Continuous neurogenesis in the adult nervous system requires a delicate balance between proliferation and differentiation. Although Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog signalling pathways are thought to share a mitogenic function in adult neural stem/progenitor cells, it remains unclear how they interact in this process. Adult amphibians produce retinal neurons from a pool of neural stem cells localised in the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ). Surprisingly, we found that perturbations of the Wnt and Hedgehog pathways result in opposite proliferative outcomes of neural stem/progenitor cells in the CMZ. Additionally, our study revealed that Wnt and Hedgehog morphogens are produced in mutually exclusive territories of the post-embryonic retina. Using genetic and pharmacological tools, we found that the Wnt and Hedgehog pathways exhibit reciprocal inhibition. Our data suggest that Sfrp-1 and Gli3 contribute to this negative cross-regulation. Altogether, our results reveal an unexpected antagonistic interplay of Wnt and Hedgehog signals that may tightly regulate the extent of neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the Xenopus retina.

  4. Antagonism between Gdf6a and retinoic acid pathways controls timing of retinal neurogenesis and growth of the eye in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Leonardo E.; Lamb, Dayna B.; Horner, Wilson; Wierzbicki, Claudia; Tafessu, Amanuel; Williams, Audrey M.; Gestri, Gaia; Krasnow, Anna M.; Vleeshouwer-Neumann, Terra S.; Givens, McKenzie; Young, Rodrigo M.; Lawrence, Lisa M.; Stickney, Heather L.; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Schwarz, Quenten P.; Cavodeassi, Florencia; Wilson, Stephen W.; Cerveny, Kara L.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining neurogenesis in growing tissues requires a tight balance between progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. In the zebrafish retina, neuronal differentiation proceeds in two stages with embryonic retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) of the central retina accounting for the first rounds of differentiation, and stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) being responsible for late neurogenesis and growth of the eye. In this study, we analyse two mutants with small eyes that display defects during both early and late phases of retinal neurogenesis. These mutants carry lesions in gdf6a, a gene encoding a BMP family member previously implicated in dorsoventral patterning of the eye. We show that gdf6a mutant eyes exhibit expanded retinoic acid (RA) signalling and demonstrate that exogenous activation of this pathway in wild-type eyes inhibits retinal growth, generating small eyes with a reduced CMZ and fewer proliferating progenitors, similar to gdf6a mutants. We provide evidence that RA regulates the timing of RPC differentiation by promoting cell cycle exit. Furthermore, reducing RA signalling in gdf6a mutants re-establishes appropriate timing of embryonic retinal neurogenesis and restores putative stem and progenitor cell populations in the CMZ. Together, our results support a model in which dorsally expressed gdf6a limits RA pathway activity to control the transition from proliferation to differentiation in the growing eye. PMID:26893342

  5. Antagonism between Gdf6a and retinoic acid pathways controls timing of retinal neurogenesis and growth of the eye in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Leonardo E; Lamb, Dayna B; Horner, Wilson; Wierzbicki, Claudia; Tafessu, Amanuel; Williams, Audrey M; Gestri, Gaia; Krasnow, Anna M; Vleeshouwer-Neumann, Terra S; Givens, McKenzie; Young, Rodrigo M; Lawrence, Lisa M; Stickney, Heather L; Hawkins, Thomas A; Schwarz, Quenten P; Cavodeassi, Florencia; Wilson, Stephen W; Cerveny, Kara L

    2016-04-01

    Maintaining neurogenesis in growing tissues requires a tight balance between progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. In the zebrafish retina, neuronal differentiation proceeds in two stages with embryonic retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) of the central retina accounting for the first rounds of differentiation, and stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) being responsible for late neurogenesis and growth of the eye. In this study, we analyse two mutants with small eyes that display defects during both early and late phases of retinal neurogenesis. These mutants carry lesions in gdf6a, a gene encoding a BMP family member previously implicated in dorsoventral patterning of the eye. We show that gdf6a mutant eyes exhibit expanded retinoic acid (RA) signalling and demonstrate that exogenous activation of this pathway in wild-type eyes inhibits retinal growth, generating small eyes with a reduced CMZ and fewer proliferating progenitors, similar to gdf6a mutants. We provide evidence that RA regulates the timing of RPC differentiation by promoting cell cycle exit. Furthermore, reducing RA signalling in gdf6a mutants re-establishes appropriate timing of embryonic retinal neurogenesis and restores putative stem and progenitor cell populations in the CMZ. Together, our results support a model in which dorsally expressed gdf6a limits RA pathway activity to control the transition from proliferation to differentiation in the growing eye.

  6. Retinitis pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartong, Dyonne T.; Berson, Eliot L.; Dryja, Thaddeus P.

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary degenerations of the human retina are genetically heterogeneous, with well over 100 genes implicated so far. This Seminar focuses on the subset of diseases called retinitis pigmentosa, in which patients typically lose night vision in adolescence, side vision in young adulthood, and centra

  7. Retinal characteristics during 1 year of insulin pump therapy in type 1 diabetes: a prospective, controlled, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klefter, Oliver Niels; Hommel, Eva; Munch, Inger Christine; Nørgaard, Kirsten; Madsbad, Sten; Larsen, Michael

    2016-09-01

    To investigate changes in retinal metabolism, function, structure and morphology in relation to initiation of insulin pump therapy (continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, CSII). Visual acuity, retinopathy level, dark adaptation kinetics, retinal and subfoveal choroidal thickness, macular perfusion velocities, retinal vessel diameters and blood oxygen saturations were measured at baseline and after 1, 4, 16, 32 and 52 weeks in 31 patients with type 1 diabetes who started CSII and 20 patients who continued multiple daily insulin injections (MDI). One year of CSII reduced haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ) by 1.6% (17.8 mmol/mol) compared with 0.3% (3.1 mmol/mol) in the MDI group (p < 0.0001). Central retinal thickness increased by 1.5% in the CSII group (within-group p = 0.0098; between-group p = 0.063) without producing macular oedema. No detectable change was found in any other primary outcome measure. The proportion of patients with retinopathy worsening did not differ between groups. At baseline, longer disease duration was associated with higher retinal artery oxygen saturation (p = 0.014) and lower macular venous perfusion velocity (p = 0.045). One year of CSII led to an HbA1c reduction relative to continued MDI and a small increase in retinal thickness but not to early retinopathy worsening or to changes in retinal vascular, structural or functional characteristics. Longer duration of type 1 diabetes appears to be associated with lower macular venous perfusion velocity and higher retinal artery oxygen saturation. The latter could potentially reflect cumulative glycaemia. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Mutation Frequency of the Major Frontotemporal Dementia Genes, MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 in a Turkish Cohort of Dementia Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Gamze; Lohmann, Ebba; Bras, Jose; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Gurvit, Hakan; Bilgic, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Rizzu, Patrizia; Heutink, Peter; Emre, Murat; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Just, Walter; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Guerreiro, Rita

    2016-01-01

    ‘Microtubule-associated protein tau’ (MAPT), ‘granulin’ (GRN) and ‘chromosome 9 open reading frame72’ (C9ORF72) gene mutations are the major known genetic causes of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent studies suggest that mutations in these genes may also be associated with other forms of dementia. Therefore we investigated whether MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 gene mutations are major contributors to dementia in a random, unselected Turkish cohort of dementia patients. A combination of whole-exome sequencing, Sanger sequencing and fragment analysis/Southern blot was performed in order to identify pathogenic mutations and novel variants in these genes as well as other FTD-related genes such as the ‘charged multivesicular body protein 2B’ (CHMP2B), the ‘FUS RNA binding protein’ (FUS), the ‘TAR DNA binding protein’ (TARDBP), the ‘sequestosome1’ (SQSTM1), and the ‘valosin containing protein’ (VCP). We determined one pathogenic MAPT mutation (c.1906C>T, p.P636L) and one novel missense variant (c.38A>G, p.D13G). In GRN we identified a probably pathogenic TGAG deletion in the splice donor site of exon 6. Three patients were found to carry the GGGGCC expansions in the non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene. In summary, a complete screening for mutations in MAPT, GRN and C9ORF72 genes revealed a frequency of 5.4% of pathogenic mutations in a random cohort of 93 Turkish index patients with dementia. PMID:27632209

  9. Retinitis pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms. Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema, and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis.

  10. Vitreous advanced glycation endproducts and α-dicarbonyls in retinal detachment patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-diabetic controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Douwe J.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Scheijen, Jean L.; Smit, Andries J.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and their precursors α-dicarbonyls are implicated in the progression of diabetic retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess AGEs and α-dicarbonyls in the vitreous of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with early stages or absence of diabetic retinopathy. Methods We examined vitreous samples obtained during vitrectomy from 31 T2DM patients presenting themselves with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and compared these to 62 non-diabetic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment patients, matched on age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, smoking, intra-ocular lens implantation, and proliferative vitreoretinopathy. AGEs (pentosidine, Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine, Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine, and 5-hydro-5-methylimidazolone) and α-dicarbonyls (3-deoxyglucosone, methylglyoxal, and glyoxal) were measured by ultra performance liquid chromatography or high performance liquid chromatography. Skin autofluorescence was measured by the AGE Reader. Results Mean age was 64 ± 7.6 years for T2DM patients and 63 ± 8.1 years for controls. For T2DM patients, median diabetes duration was 2.2 (0.3–7.4) years. Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy was present in 1 patient and classified as absent or background retinopathy in 30 patients. Vitreous levels of pentosidine (2.20 vs. 1.59 μmol/mol lysine, p = 0.012) and 3-deoxyglucosone (809 vs. 615 nmol/L, p = 0.001) were significantly elevated in T2DM patients compared to controls. Other AGEs and α-dicarbonyls in the vitreous were not significantly different. There was a trend for increased skin autofluorescence in T2DM patients as compared to controls (p = 0.07). Conclusions Pentosidine and 3-deoxyglucosone concentrations were increased in the vitreous of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment patients with a relatively short duration of diabetes compared to non-diabetic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment patients. PMID:28264049

  11. The homologous putative GTPases Grn1p from fission yeast and the human GNL3L are required for growth and play a role in processing of nucleolar pre-rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xianming; Rao, Malireddi R K Subba; Chen, Xue Qin; Wu, Wei; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy; Balasundaram, David

    2006-01-01

    Grn1p from fission yeast and GNL3L from human cells, two putative GTPases from the novel HSR1_MMR1 GTP-binding protein subfamily with circularly permuted G-motifs play a critical role in maintaining normal cell growth. Deletion of Grn1 resulted in a severe growth defect, a marked reduction in mature rRNA species with a concomitant accumulation of the 35S pre-rRNA transcript, and failure to export the ribosomal protein Rpl25a from the nucleolus. Deleting any of the Grn1p G-domain motifs resulted in a null phenotype and nuclear/nucleolar localization consistent with the lack of nucleolar export of preribosomes accompanied by a distortion of nucleolar structure. Heterologous expression of GNL3L in a Deltagrn1 mutant restored processing of 35S pre-rRNA, nuclear export of Rpl25a and cell growth to wild-type levels. Genetic complementation in yeast and siRNA knockdown in HeLa cells confirmed the homologous proteins Grn1p and GNL3L are required for growth. Failure of two similar HSR1_MMR1 putative nucleolar GTPases, Nucleostemin (NS), or the dose-dependent response of breast tumor autoantigen NGP-1, to rescue deltagrn1 implied the highly specific roles of Grn1p or GNL3L in nucleolar events. Our analysis uncovers an important role for Grn1p/GNL3L within this unique group of nucleolar GTPases.

  12. Avoiding pitfalls of internal controls: validation of reference genes for analysis by qRT-PCR and Western blot throughout rat retinal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Martins, Maurício; Njaine, Brian; Silveira, Mariana S

    2012-01-01

    Housekeeping genes have been commonly used as reference to normalize gene expression and protein content data because of its presumed constitutive expression. In this paper, we challenge the consensual idea that housekeeping genes are reliable controls for expression studies in the retina through the investigation of a panel of reference genes potentially suitable for analysis of different stages of retinal development. We applied statistical tools on combinations of retinal developmental stages to assess the most stable internal controls for quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The stability of expression of seven putative reference genes (Actb, B2m, Gapdh, Hprt1, Mapk1, Ppia and Rn18s) was analyzed using geNorm, BestKeeper and Normfinder software. In addition, several housekeeping genes were tested as loading controls for Western blot in the same sample panel, using Image J. Overall, for qRT-PCR the combination of Gapdh and Mapk1 showed the highest stability for most experimental sets. Actb was downregulated in more mature stages, while Rn18s and Hprt1 showed the highest variability. We normalized the expression of cyclin D1 using various reference genes and demonstrated that spurious results may result from blind selection of internal controls. For Western blot significant variation could be seen among four putative internal controls (β-actin, cyclophilin b, α-tubulin and lamin A/C), while MAPK1 was stably expressed. Putative housekeeping genes exhibit significant variation in both mRNA and protein content during retinal development. Our results showed that distinct combinations of internal controls fit for each experimental set in the case of qRT-PCR and that MAPK1 is a reliable loading control for Western blot. The results indicate that biased study outcomes may follow the use of reference genes without prior validation for qRT-PCR and Western blot.

  13. Filling in the retinal image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, James; Piantanida, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The optics of the eye form an image on a surface at the back of the eyeball called the retina. The retina contains the photoreceptors that sample the image and convert it into a neural signal. The spacing of the photoreceptors in the retina is not uniform and varies with retinal locus. The central retinal field, called the macula, is densely packed with photoreceptors. The packing density falls off rapidly as a function of retinal eccentricity with respect to the macular region and there are regions in which there are no photoreceptors at all. The retinal regions without photoreceptors are called blind spots or scotomas. The neural transformations which convert retinal image signals into percepts fills in the gaps and regularizes the inhomogeneities of the retinal photoreceptor sampling mosaic. The filling-in mechamism plays an important role in understanding visual performance. The filling-in mechanism is not well understood. A systematic collaborative research program at the Ames Research Center and SRI in Menlo Park, California, was designed to explore this mechanism. It was shown that the perceived fields which are in fact different from the image on the retina due to filling-in, control some aspects of performance and not others. Researchers have linked these mechanisms to putative mechanisms of color coding and color constancy.

  14. Retinal optical coherence tomography at 1 μm with dynamic focus control and axial motion tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cua, Michelle; Lee, Sujin; Miao, Dongkai; Ju, Myeong Jin; Mackenzie, Paul J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-02-01

    High-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal imaging is important to noninvasively visualize the various retinal structures to aid in better understanding of the pathogenesis of vision-robbing diseases. However, conventional OCT systems have a trade-off between lateral resolution and depth-of-focus. In this report, we present the development of a focus-stacking OCT system with automatic focus optimization for high-resolution, extended-focal-range clinical retinal imaging by incorporating a variable-focus liquid lens into the sample arm optics. Retinal layer tracking and selection was performed using a graphics processing unit accelerated processing platform for focus optimization, providing real-time layer-specific en face visualization. After optimization, multiple volumes focused at different depths were acquired, registered, and stitched together to yield a single, high-resolution focus-stacked dataset. Using this system, we show high-resolution images of the retina and optic nerve head, from which we extracted clinically relevant parameters such as the nerve fiber layer thickness and lamina cribrosa microarchitecture.

  15. Retinal rod GTPase turnover rate increases with concentration: a key to the control of visual excitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dratz, E A; Lewis, J W; Schaechter, L E; Parker, K R; Kliger, D S

    1987-07-31

    Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding proteins mediate cellular responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, growth factors and light. Activated GTP binding proteins are shut off by GTPase mediated hydrolysis of GTP. Photoreceptor GTPase rates are reported to be 10-50 times too slow to account for electrophysiological recovery time after light stimulus. Recovery rates of other parts of the system, however, appear fast enough. We present evidence that the GTPase rate increases markedly with photoreceptor membrane concentration implying the existence of a diffusible factor controlling the GTPase. When extrapolated to physiological concentrations, the GTPase turnover rate is fast enough (0.25-1.5 sec) to account for the recovery rate of the light stimulated signal of the photoreceptor cells.

  16. A model for open-close control of cation channels in the plasma membrane of retinal rod outer segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, K

    1989-06-01

    A model for open-close control of cation channels in the plasma membrane of retinal rod outer segments is presented. A channel is assumed to open when 3 cGMP molecules bind to it and close as soon as one of the 3 cGMP molecules is released from it. The calcium ion (divalent cation) is a modulator of the channel conductance. The channel conductance is low when Ca2+ binds to it, while it is high when it is free from Ca2+. From the above assumptions, the reaction scheme of channels with cGMP and Ca2+ is created and the fraction of channels in the open and closed states was calculated using equations for this scheme. The kinetic constants used in the model are estimated from the experimental results of many studies and from the theories. From this estimation, it was found that at the physiological concentrations of intracellular and extracellular Ca2+, almost all channels are bound with Ca2+ and are in the low conductance state. The present model accounts for the reported dose(cGMP)-response(membrane current or conductance) relationship, where the Hill coefficient decreases as the cGMP concentration increases. The dark-level cGMP concentration of 8.13 microM is estimated from the model. This is in good agreement with the reported values. Moreover, the model predicts the invariance of current noise at relatively low Ca2+ concentrations when the cGMP concentration is raised from the dark level to a saturation level. The dynamic properties (opening and closing actions) of the channels in the present model are also in good agreement with the reported observations. The burst mode opening and closing of a channel is predicted by the present model, and it was found that the number of openings in a burst is controlled by the forward and backward rate constants between a channel protein and cGMP molecules. The simulated waveform of a single channel is similar to the reported observations.

  17. Does soccer ball heading cause retinal bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, William F; Feldman, Kenneth W; Weiss, Avery H; Tencer, Alan F

    2002-04-01

    To define forces of youth soccer ball heading (headers) and determine whether heading causes retinal hemorrhage. Regional Children's Hospital, youth soccer camp. Male and female soccer players, 13 to 16 years old, who regularly head soccer balls. Dilated retinal examination, after 2-week header diary, and accelerometer measurement of heading a lofted soccer ball. Twenty-one youth soccer players, averaging 79 headers in the prior 2 weeks, and 3 players who did not submit header diaries lacked retinal hemorrhage. Thirty control subjects also lacked retinal hemorrhage. Seven subjects heading the ball experienced linear cranial accelerations of 3.7 +/- 1.3g. Rotational accelerations were negligible. Headers, not associated with globe impact, are unlikely to cause retinal hemorrhage. Correctly executed headers did not cause significant rotational acceleration of the head, but incorrectly executed headers might.

  18. Prediction of Cis-Regulatory Elements Controlling Genes Differentially Expressed by Retinal and Choroidal Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dongseok; Appukuttan, Binoy; Binek, Sierra J; Planck, Stephen R; Stout, J Timothy; Rosenbaum, James T; Smith, Justine R

    2008-01-01

    Cultured endothelial cells of the human retina and choroid demonstrate distinct patterns of gene expression. We hypothesized that differential gene expression reflected differences in the interactions of transcription factors and respective cis-regulatory motifs(s) in these two emdothelial cell subpopulations, recognizing that motifs often exist as modules. We tested this hypothesis in silico by using TRANSFAC Professional and CisModule to identify cis-regulatory motifs and modules in genes that were differentially expressed by human retinal versus choroidal endothelial cells, as identified by analysis of a microarray data set. Motifs corresponding to eight transcription factors were significantly (p < 0.05) differentially abundant in genes that were relatively highly expressed in retinal (i.e., GCCR, HMGIY, HSF1, p53, VDR) or choroidal (i.e., E2F, YY1, ZF5) endothelial cells. Predicted cis-regulatory modules were quite different for these two groups of genes. Our findings raise the possibility of exploiting specific cis-regulatory motifs to target therapy at the ocular endothelial cells subtypes responsible for neovascular age-related macular degeneration or proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Retrospective, controlled observational case study of patients with central retinal vein occlusion and initially low visual acuity treated with an intravitreal dexamethasone implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhalter, Sibylle; Vom Brocke, Gerrit Alexander; Pilger, Daniel; Eckert, Annabelle; Schlomberg, Juliane; Rübsam, Anne; Klamann, Matthias Karl; Gundlach, Enken; Dietrich-Ntoukas, Tina; Joussen, Antonia Maria

    2016-10-27

    Patients with initially low visual acuity were excluded from the therapy approval studies for retinal vein occlusion. But up to 28 % of patients presenting with central retinal vein occlusion have a baseline BCVA of less than 34 ETDRS letters (0.1). The purpose of our study was to assess visual acuity and central retinal thickness in patients suffering from central retinal vein occlusion and low visual acuity (central retinal vein occlusion, which were treated with a dexamethasone implantation. Visual acuity, central retinal thickness and intraocular pressure were measured monthly. Analyses were performed separately for eyes with visual acuity central retinal thickness, however, was reduced in both groups, falling from 694 to 344 μm (1 month; p = 0.003,) to 361 μm (2 months; p = 0,002) and to 415 μm (3 months; p = 0,004) in the low visual acuity group and from 634 to 315 μm (1 month; p central retinal vein occlusion and initially low visual acuity, a dexamethasone implantation can lead to an important reduction of central retinal thickness but may be of limited use to increase visual acuity.

  20. Printed educational messages aimed at family practitioners fail to increase retinal screening among their patients with diabetes: a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN72772651].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwarenstein, Merrick; Shiller, Susan K; Croxford, Ruth; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Kelsall, Diane; Paterson, J Michael; Laupacis, Andreas; Austin, Peter C; Tu, Karen; Yun, Lingsong; Hux, Janet E

    2014-08-06

    Evidence of the effectiveness of printed educational messages in narrowing the gap between guideline recommendations and practice is contradictory. Failure to screen for retinopathy exposes primary care patients with diabetes to risk of eye complications. Screening is initiated by referral from family practitioners but adherence to guidelines is suboptimal. We aimed to evaluate the ability of printed educational messages aimed at family doctors to increase retinal screening of primary care patients with diabetes. Design: Pragmatic 2×3 factorial cluster trial randomized by physician practice, involving 5,048 general practitioners (with 179,833 patients with diabetes). Setting: Ontario family practitioners. Interventions: Reminders (that retinal screening helps prevent diabetes-related vision loss and is covered by provincial health insurance for patients with diabetes) with prompts to encourage screening were mailed to each physician in conjunction with a widely-read professional newsletter. Alternative printed materials formats were an 'outsert' (short, directive message stapled to the outside of the newsletter), and/or a two-page, evidence-based article ('insert') and a pre-printed sticky note reminder for patients. Main Outcome Measure: A successful outcome was an eye examination (which includes retinal screening) provided to a patient with diabetes, not screened in the previous 12 months, within 90 days after visiting a family practitioner. Analysis accounted for clustering of doctors within practice groups. No intervention effect was detected (eye exam rates were 31.6% for patients of control physicians, 31.3% for the insert, 32.8% for the outsert, 32.3% for those who received both, and 31.2% for those who received both plus the patient reminder with the largest 95% confidence interval around any effect extending from -1.3% to 1.1%). This large trial conclusively failed to demonstrate any impact of printed educational messages on screening uptake. Despite

  1. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies.

  2. Retinal blood flow velocity in patients with active uveitis using the retinal function imager

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xing; Kedhar Sanjay; Bhoomibunchoo Chavakij

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest a link between macular edema and retinal blood flow velocity (RBFV).The effects of inflammation in the retinal blood vessels are not clearly understood.We want to evaluate the differences in retinal blood flow velocities of patients with active uveitis and healthy controls using the retinal function imager (RFI)and determine the correlation between retinal blood flow veiocity and central macular thickness in uveitis patients.Methods Twenty-eight eyes of 24 patients with active anterior uveitis and 51 eyes of 51 normal control subjects were enrolled.Retinal blood flow velocities evaluated by RFI and central macular thickness evaluated by optical coherence tomography (SLO-OCT) were obtained.Differences among the groups were assessed using Stata statistical software.Results Ten eyes had uveitic cystoid macular edema (CME).Median (first quartile,third quartile) venous velocity for uveitic eyes with CME,uveitic eyes without CME,and controls were 2.09 (1.92,2.44),2.64 (2.32,2.86),and 2.82 (2.39,3.53) mm/s respectively.Median (first and quartile) arterial velocity for uveitic eyes with CME,uveitic eyes without CME,and controls were 3.79 (3.61,4.09),3.46 (2.86,4.12),and 3.93 (3.35,4.65) mm/s.Uveitic eyes with CME had significantly lower venous velocity than controls (P=0.044).There was a strong linear relationship between venous velocity and central retinal thickness (P=-0.007).Conclusions Retinal venous velocities were significantly decreased in eyes with uveitic CME relative to controls.Decreased venous velocity was correlated with increased central retinal thickness in uveitic eyes.

  3. Optimal management of cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients with AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Stewart

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Michael W StewartDepartment of Ophthalmology, Mayo School of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USAAbstract: Cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis is the most common cause of vision loss in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. CMV retinitis afflicted 25% to 42% of AIDS patients in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART era, with most vision loss due to macula-involving retinitis or retinal detachment. The introduction of HAART significantly decreased the incidence and severity of CMV retinitis. Optimal treatment of CMV retinitis requires a thorough evaluation of the patient’s immune status and an accurate classification of the retinal lesions. When retinitis is diagnosed, HAART therapy should be started or improved, and anti-CMV therapy with oral valganciclovir, intravenous ganciclovir, foscarnet, or cidofovir should be administered. Selected patients, especially those with zone 1 retinitis, may receive intravitreal drug injections or surgical implantation of a sustained-release ganciclovir reservoir. Effective anti-CMV therapy coupled with HAART significantly decreases the incidence of vision loss and improves patient survival. Immune recovery uveitis and retinal detachments are important causes of moderate to severe loss of vision. Compared with the early years of the AIDS epidemic, the treatment emphasis in the post-HAART era has changed from short-term control of retinitis to long-term preservation of vision. Developing countries face shortages of health care professionals and inadequate supplies of anti-CMV and anti-HIV medications. Intravitreal ganciclovir injections may be the most cost effective strategy to treat CMV retinitis in these areas.Keywords: cytomegalovirus, AIDS, retinitis, immune recovery uveitis, retinal detachment, treatment

  4. Dorzolamide increases retinal oxygen tension after branch retinal vein occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Michael Hove; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Scherfig, Erik;

    2008-01-01

    To study the effect of dorzolamide on the preretinal oxygen tension (RPO(2)) in retinal areas affected by experimental branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs.......To study the effect of dorzolamide on the preretinal oxygen tension (RPO(2)) in retinal areas affected by experimental branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs....

  5. Enhanced generation of retinal progenitor cells from human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by amniotic fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanie-Jahromi Fatemeh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal progenitor cells are a convenient source of cell replacement therapy in retinal degenerative disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of the homeobox genes PAX6 and CHX10 (retinal progenitor markers during treatment of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells with amniotic fluid (AF, RPE cells harvested from neonatal cadaver globes were cultured in a mixture of DMEM and Ham's F12 supplemented with 10% FBS. At different passages, cells were trypsinized and co-cultured with 30% AF obtained from normal fetuses of 1416 weeks gestational age. Results Compared to FBS-treated controls, AF-treated cultures exhibited special morphological changes in culture, including appearance of spheroid colonies, improved initial cell adhesion and ordered cell alignment. Cell proliferation assays indicated a remarkable increase in the proliferation rate of RPE cells cultivated in 30% AF-supplemented medium, compared with those grown in the absence of AF. Immunocytochemical analyses exhibited nuclear localization of retinal progenitor markers at a ratio of 33% and 27% for CHX10 and PAX6, respectively. This indicated a 3-fold increase in retinal progenitor markers in AF-treated cultures compared to FBS-treated controls. Real-time PCR data of retinal progenitor genes (PAX6, CHX10 and VSX-1 confirmed these results and demonstrated AF's capacity for promoting retinal progenitor cell generation. Conclusion Taken together, the results suggest that AF significantly promotes the rate of retinal progenitor cell generation, indicating that AF can be used as an enriched supplement for serum-free media used for the in vitro propagation of human progenitor cells.

  6. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping-Jung; Liu, Zongbin; Zhang, Kai; Han, Xin; Saito, Yuki; Xia, Xiaojun; Yokoi, Kenji; Shen, Haifa; Qin, Lidong

    2015-08-28

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demonstrated by administration of glycinergic factors. In addition, an image-based analytical method was used to quantify the synaptic connections and to assess the kinetics of synaptic regeneration. The rate of RSR decreased significantly below 100 μM of inhibitor glycine and then approached to a relatively constant level at higher concentrations. Furthermore, RSR was enhanced by chemical stimulation with potassium chloride. Collectively, the microfluidic synaptic regeneration chip provides a novel tool for high-throughput investigation of RSR at the cellular level and may be useful in quality control of retinal precursor cell transplantation.

  7. Relationship between target organ damage and blood pressure, retinal vessel calibre, oxidative stress and polymorphisms in VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes in patients with hypertension: a case–control study protocol (LOD-Hipertensión)

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel A Gomez-Marcos; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; José I Recio-Rodríguez; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Perretta-Tejedor, Nuria; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-01-01

    [Introduction]: Target organ damage (TOD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The study objectives were to analyse the relationship of TOD to blood pressure, size of retinal arteries and veins, oxidative stress and different polymorphisms in the VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes in participants with hypertension. [Methods and analysis]: A case-control study to analyse the relationship between clinical, biochemical and genetic parameters and presence of cardiac, vascular and renal TOD in 486...

  8. Use of an Ophthalmic Viscosurgical Device for Experimental Retinal Detachment in Rabbit Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Okinami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the temporary tamponade effects of an ophthalmic viscosurgical device (OVD for experimental retinal tears, we performed vitrectomy in four rabbit eyes and created a posterior vitreous detachment and artificial retinal tear to produce retinal detachment. The retina was flattened with liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC, the area peripheral to the tear was photocoagulated, an OVD was applied to the retinal tear surface below the PFC and the PFC was removed by aspiration. In the control group, PFC was removed without application of OVD. At one, three and seven days postoperatively, funduscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT were performed to examine the sealing process of the retinal tear. In OVD-treated eyes, the OVD remained on the retinal surface, and the retinal tear was patched for ≥ 3 days postoperatively. By seven days postoperatively, the OVD on the retinal surface had disappeared, and the retina was reattached. In control eyes, the edge of the retinal tear was rolled, and retinal detachment persisted. In OVD-treated eyes, the border of the retinal tear was indistinct, and the defect area was significantly decreased. These results show that application of an OVD effectively seals retinal tears and eliminates retinal detachments.

  9. Effects of vitamin D on retinal nerve fiber layer in vitamin D deficient patients with optic neuritis: Preliminary findings of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Salari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is accumulating evidence for a possible protective role of vitamin D in the development and disease course of multiple sclerosis. Whether vitamin D is also effective in treating patients with optic neuritis (ON is not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral vitamin D on the thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL in vitamin D deficient patients with ON by optical coherence tomography. Materials and Methods: A Phase II placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial conducted between July 2011 and November 2012 included 52 patients with confirmed unilateral ON aged 15-38 years and low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. The main outcome measures were changes in thickness of RNFL and macula 6 months after treatment. Patients were randomly allocated to receive 6 months of treatment with adding either 50,000 IU/week vitamin D or placebo. Results: In the 27 patients treated with vitamin D, the mean (standard deviation [SD] thickness of RNFL decreased from 111.3 (18.9 μm at baseline to 91.4 (13.3 at the end of study period (P 0.05. Average thickness of RNFL at the end of trial did not differ between groups. Conclusion: Adding vitamin D to routine disease therapy had no significant effect on the thickness of RNFL or macula in patients with ON. This trial is registered on www.clinicaltrials.gov (ID NCT01465893.

  10. Functional analysis of retinal microglia and their effects on progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Debra A; Balasubramaniam, Balini; Dick, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    The identification of stem/progenitor cells within the retinal neural environment has opened up the possibility of therapy via cellular replacement and/or reprogramming of resident cell populations. Within the neuro-retinal niche, following injury or in disease states (including inflammation and degeneration), cellular responses affect tissue homeostasis, reduce cell density, disrupt tissue architecture, and produce scar formation. Microglia (resident retinal immune cell tissue macrophage) are key to the maintenance of retinal homeostasis and are implicated in responses that may influence the control and behavior of retinal progenitors. Factors to consider in the generation of a transplantable cell resource with good migratory and integrative capacity include their yield, purity, and functional viability. Utilizing human postmortem retina, we have created a research platform to isolate, culture, and characterize adult retinal microglia as well as analyze their effect on retinal progenitors. Here, we describe techniques using magnetic labeled bead cell separation to isolate pure populations of retinal CD133(+) precursor cells and CD11b(+) microglia from primary adult retinal cell suspensions (RCSs), enabling flow cytometric cell phenotypic and qPCR genotypic analysis, as well as functional analysis by real-time ratiometric calcium imaging.

  11. Microvascular Abnormality in Schizophrenia as Shown by Retinal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Madeline H.; Shalev, Idan; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Kapur, Shitij; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Wong, Tien; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie

    2013-01-01

    Objective Retinal and cerebral microvessels are structurally and functionally homologous, but, unlike cerebral microvessels, retinal microvessels can be noninvasively measured in vivo via retinal imaging. Here we test the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality and evaluate the utility of retinal imaging as a tool for future schizophrenia research. Methods Participants were members of the Dunedin Study, a population-representative cohort followed from birth with 95% retention. Study members underwent retinal imaging at age 38 years. We assessed retinal arteriolar and venular caliber for all members of the cohort, including individuals who developed schizophrenia. Results Study members who developed schizophrenia were distinguished by wider retinal venules, suggesting microvascular abnormality reflective of insufficient brain oxygen supply. Analyses that controlled for confounding health conditions suggested that wider retinal venules are not simply an artifact of co-occurring health problems in schizophrenia patients. Wider venules were also associated with a dimensional measure of adult psychosis symptoms and with psychosis symptoms reported in childhood. Conclusions Findings provide initial support for the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality. Moreover, results suggest that the same vascular mechanisms underlie subthreshold symptoms and clinical disorder and that these associations may begin early in life. These findings highlight the promise of retinal imaging as a tool for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:24030514

  12. Ocular hemodynamics in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Zavgorodnya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. In case of retinal detachment atrophic processes lead to irreversible loss of functions within 4–6 days, it happens on underlying low ocular blood flow. In order to evaluate the degree of violation of regional hemodynamics in patients with retinal detachment two groups of patients were examined: the main group (52 patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and the control group (24 myopic patients with lattice form of peripheral chorioretinal dystrophy. Methods and results. Doppler and reography results had been compared, significant decrease of blood flow in patients with retinal detachment was found. No differences between affected and fellow eye in these patients, close negative correlation between the level of ocular blood flow and the degree of myopia in the control group. Conclusion. This demonstrates the feasibility of actions to improve regional blood flow in patients operated on for retinal detachment.

  13. Progressive outer retinal necrosis-like retinitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Rohan; Tripathy, Koushik; Gogia, Varun; Venkatesh, Pradeep

    2016-08-10

    We describe two young immunocompetent women presenting with bilateral retinitis with outer retinal necrosis involving posterior pole with centrifugal spread and multifocal lesions simulating progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) like retinitis. Serology was negative for HIV and CD4 counts were normal; however, both women were on oral steroids at presentation for suspected autoimmune chorioretinitis. The retinitis in both eyes responded well to oral valaciclovir therapy. However, the eye with the more fulminant involvement developed retinal detachment with a loss of vision. Retinal atrophy was seen in the less involved eye with preservation of vision. Through these cases, we aim to describe a unique evolution of PORN-like retinitis in immunocompetent women, which was probably aggravated by a short-term immunosuppression secondary to oral steroids.

  14. Time-Domain and Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in MS Patients and Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex P. Lange

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT between spectral-domain (SD- and time-domain optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT in MS patients and healthy controls (HC. Furthermore, RNFLT between MS eyes with and without optic neuritis (ON and HC should be explored. Finally, the relationship between RNFLT, disease duration, EDSS, and disease modifying therapy (DMT should be established. Design. Prospective, cross-sectional study. Participants. 28 MS patients and 35 HC. Methods. Both groups underwent TD- and SD-OCT measurements. RFNLT was correlated between the two machines and between MS eyes with and without ON and HC. Furthermore, RNFLT was correlated to disease duration, EDSS and DMT. Results. A strong correlation (Pearson’s r=0.921, P<0.001, but a statistically significant difference of 2 μm (P<0.001, was found between the two devices. RNFLT was significantly different between MS eyes with history of ON (mean RFNLT (SD 72.21 μm (15.83 μm, MS eyes without history of ON 93.03 μm (14.25 μm, and HC 99.07 μm (7.23 μm (P<0.001. Conclusions. The measurements between different generation of OCT machines are not interchangeable, which should be taken into account if comparing results between different machines and switching OCT machine in longitudinal studies.

  15. Retinal haemorrhages in vacuum extraction deliveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahgat Mostafa

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and thirty eight newly born infants were subjected to fundus examination in the first 5 hours of labour then daily till discharge from the hospital then weekly till complete absorption of retinal haemorrhages The 238 infants were 23 delivered by caesarean section, 90 with spontaneous vaginal delivery,45 babies (over3.5 kgm delivered vaginallyand80 delivered by vacuum extraction. It was found that 37.39% of the newborns had retinal haemorrhages. The incidence, type and severity of retinal haemorrhages were related to the extent of obstetric trauma during birth. They were least with caesarean section. (4.35%, more in babies with spontaneous vaginal delivery (20%, more higher in infants over 3.5 kgm birth weight (33.33% and maximum in vacuum extraction deliveries (68.75%. A good correlation was made between the site and duration of cup application, level and rate of increase of negative pressure, the presence and size of cephalhematoma and the incidence and severity of retinal haemorrhages A good choice of cases as well as good control of the technique of vacuum extraction will minimize the incidence and severity of retinal haemorrhages in the new born.

  16. Integrated computer-aided retinal photocoagulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Oberg, Erik D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Cain, Clarence P.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1996-05-01

    Successful retinal tracking subsystem testing results in vivo on rhesus monkeys using an argon continuous wave laser and an ultra-short pulse laser are presented. Progress on developing an integrated robotic retinal laser surgery system is also presented. Several interesting areas of study have developed: (1) 'doughnut' shaped lesions that occur under certain combinations of laser power, spot size, and irradiation time complicating measurements of central lesion reflectance, (2) the optimal retinal field of view to achieve simultaneous tracking and lesion parameter control, and (3) a fully digital versus a hybrid analog/digital tracker using confocal reflectometry integrated system implementation. These areas are investigated in detail in this paper. The hybrid system warrants a separate presentation and appears in another paper at this conference.

  17. Spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy detection in retinal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartczak, Piotr; Fält, Pauli; Penttinen, Niko; Ylitepsa, Pasi; Laaksonen, Lauri; Lensu, Lasse; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Uusitalo, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Retinal photography is a standard method for recording retinal diseases for subsequent analysis and diagnosis. However, the currently used white light or red-free retinal imaging does not necessarily provide the best possible visibility of different types of retinal lesions, important when developing diagnostic tools for handheld devices, such as smartphones. Using specifically designed illumination, the visibility and contrast of retinal lesions could be improved. In this study, spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy lesion visualization are implemented using a spectrally tunable light source based on digital micromirror device. The applicability of this method was tested in vivo by taking retinal monochrome images from the eyes of five diabetic volunteers and two non-diabetic control subjects. For comparison to existing methods, we evaluated the contrast of retinal images taken with our method and red-free illumination. The preliminary results show that the use of optimal illuminations improved the contrast of diabetic lesions in retinal images by 30-70%, compared to the traditional red-free illumination imaging.

  18. Quantitative and qualitative retinal microvascular characteristics and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Carol Y; Tay, Wan T; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie J; Hsu, Wynne; Lee, Mong L; Lau, Qiangfeng P; Zhu, Ai L; Klein, Ronald; Saw, Seang M; Wong, Tien Y

    2011-07-01

    The present study examined the effects of blood pressure on a spectrum of quantitative and qualitative retinal microvascular signs. Retinal photographs from the Singapore Malay Eye Study, a population-based cross-sectional study of 3280 (78.7% response) persons aged 40-80 years, were analyzed. Quantitative changes in the retinal vasculature (branching angle, vascular tortuosity, fractal dimension, and vascular caliber) were measured using a semi-automated computer-based program. Qualitative signs, including focal arteriolar narrowing (FAN), arteriovenous nicking (AVN), opacification of the arteriolar wall (OAW), and retinopathy (e.g., microaneurysms, retinal hemorrhages), were assessed from photographs by trained technicians. After excluding persons with diabetes and ungradable photographs, 1913 persons provided data for this analysis. In multivariable linear regression models controlling for age, sex, BMI, use of antihypertensive medication, and other factors, retinal arteriolar branching asymmetry ratio, arteriolar tortuosity, venular tortuosity, fractal dimension, arteriolar caliber, venular caliber, FAN, AVN, and retinopathy were independently associated with mean arterial blood pressure. In contrast, arteriolar/venular branching angle, venular branching asymmetry ratio and OAW were not related to blood pressure. Retinal arteriolar caliber (sβ = -0.277) and FAN (sβ = 0.170) had the strongest associations with mean arterial blood pressure, and higher blood pressure levels were associated with increasing number of both quantitative and qualitative retinal vascular signs (P trend qualitative retinal vascular signs, with the number of signs increasing with higher blood pressure levels.

  19. Effect of combination antiretroviral therapy on cytomegalovirus retinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banker Alay

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the various changes in the course of cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis following combination antiretroviral treatment. Methods: Combination antiretroviral treatment was given to 12 patients with active CMV retinitis following which all anti-CMV medications were discontinued once the CD4 cell counts were> 100/mm3 for 3 months. Results: The median CD4 cell count increased from 36.5/mm3 (range, 3-74/mm3 at baseline to 175.5/mm3 (range, 97-410/mm3 at 3 months. No patient had reactivation of CMV retinitis or developed extraocular CMV infection during median follow-up of 16.7 months. In one patient with peripheral active CMV retinitis, the retinitis resolved completely and remained so throughout the follow-up period without specific anti-CMV treatment. Five (41.7% patients had immune recovery vitritis. Conclusion: Patients receiving combination antiretroviral treatment following treatment for CMV retinitis have better control of CMV retinitis but immune recovery vitritis is a common sequelae. Reactivation of CMV retinitis is common in patients who discontinue combination antiretroviral treatment

  20. Subclinical primary retinal pathology in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Hye; Kim, Ho Jin; Kim, Nam-Hee; Jeong, Kyoung Sook; Park, Choul Yong

    2016-07-01

    Foveal thickness may be a more sensitive indicator of primary retinal pathology than retinal nerve fiber layer thickness since the fovea contains no or sparse retinal nerve fiber layer, which coalesces into axons of the optic nerve. To our knowledge, few quantitative in vivo studies have investigated foveal thickness. By using optical coherence tomography, we measured foveal thickness to evaluate intrinsic retinal pathology. Seventy-two neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients (99 eyes with optic neuritis and 45 eyes without optic neuritis) and 34 age-matched controls were included. Foveal thinning was observed both in eyes with non-optic neuritis (185.1 µm, p neuritis (185.0 µm, p neuritis did not have peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thinning, but showed foveal thinning (p optica spectrum disorder, foveal thickness correlated with 2.5 % low contrast visual acuity, while retinal nerve fiber layer thickness correlated with high or low contrast visual acuity, extended disability status scale, and disease duration. In this study, we observed foveal thinning irrespective of optic neuritis; thus, we believe that subclinical primary retinal pathology, prior to retinal nerve fiber layer thinning, may exist in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

  1. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  2. Bioelectronic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D.

    2016-05-01

    Retinal prosthesis have been translated to clinical use over the past two decades. Currently, two devices have regulatory approval for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and one device is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. These devices provide partial sight restoration and patients use this improved vision in their everyday lives to navigate and to detect large objects. However, significant vision restoration will require both better technology and improved understanding of the interaction between electrical stimulation and the retina. In particular, current retinal prostheses do not provide peripheral visions due to technical and surgical limitations, thus limiting the effectiveness of the treatment. This paper reviews recent results from human implant patients and presents technical approaches for peripheral vision.

  3. Retinal flow cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, C; Veilleux, I; Lee, H; Pitsillides, C M; Côté, D; Lin, C P

    2007-12-01

    The in vivo flow cytometer is an instrument capable of continuous, real-time monitoring of fluorescently labeled cells in the circulation without the need to draw blood samples. However, the original system probes a single vessel in the mouse ear; the small sample volume limits the sensitivity of the technique. We describe an in vivo retinal flow cytometer that simultaneously probes five artery-vein pairs in the mouse eye by circularly scanning a small laser spot rapidly around the optic nerve head. We demonstrate that the retinal flow cytometer detects about five times more cells per minute than the original in vivo flow cytometer does in the ear.

  4. [Retinal pneumopexy in the treatment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levai, L; Gavriş, Monica; Gábor, Radó; Bagosi, P

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of retinal pneumopexy in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. This clinical prospective study unrolled between november 2010-june 2012 in the Ophthalmology Department of the Military Hospital in Cluj-Napoca and Satu Mare Emergency Hospital included 20 patients (20 eyes) with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Patients were treated with retinal pneumopexy followed by laser photocoagulation. Anatomical and functional results were evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12 and 19 months after treatment. In 17 eyes out of 20, we achieved retinal reattachment and visual recovery. Three cases yelded no success, these being further treated with posterior vitrectomy. Retinal pneumopexy is a minimally invasive treatment method of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with very good results in well selected cases.

  5. Inner retinal change in a novel rd1-FTL mouse model of retinal degeneration

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    Ursula eGreferath

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While photoreceptor loss is the most devastating result of inherited retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa, inner retinal neurons also undergo significant alteration. Detailing these changes has become important as many vision restorative therapies target the remaining neurons. In this study, the rd1-Fos-Tau-LacZ (rd1-FTL mouse model was used to explore inner retinal change at a late stage of retinal degeneration, after the loss of photoreceptor nuclei. The rd1-FTL model carries a mutation in the phosphodiesterase gene, Pde6b, and an axonally targeted transgenic beta galactosidase reporter system under the control of the c-fos promoter. Retinae of transgenic rd1-FTL mice and control FTL animals aged 2 to 12 months were processed for indirect fluorescence immunocytochemistry. At 2 months of age, a time when the majority of photoreceptor nuclei are lost, there was negligible c-fos reporter (FTL expression, however, from 4 months, reporter expression was observed to increase within subpopulations of amacrine and ganglion cells within the central retina. These areas of inner retinal FTL expression coincided with regions that contained aberrant Müller cells. Specifically, these cells exhibited reduced glutamine synthetase and Kir4.1 immunolabelling, whilst showing evidence of proliferative gliosis (increased cyclinD1 and GFAP expression. These changes were limited to distinct regions where cone photoreceptor terminals were absent. Overall, these results highlight that distinct areas of the rd1-FTL central retina undergo significant glial alterations after cone photoreceptor loss. These areas coincide with up-regulation of the c-fos reporter in the inner retina, which may represent a change in neuronal function/plasticity. The rd1-FTL mouse is a useful model system to probe changes that occur in the inner retina at later stages of retinal degeneration.

  6. Learning about Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that detect light). Photoreceptor cells capture and process light helping us to see. As these cells breakdown and die, patients experience progressive vision loss. The most common feature of all forms of RP is a ... cells that detect dim light) and cones (retinal cells that detect light and ...

  7. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  8. Retinal imaging with smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademola-Popoola, D S; Olatunji, V A

    2017-03-01

    The use of smartphones for various purposes among health professionals is increasing, especially with the availability of different applications. On account of cost, fundus cameras are not readily available in ophthalmic practice in developing countries. Since smartphones are readily available, easy to use and portable, they may present a cheap alternative in a resource-limited economy. to explore the use of smartphone (Blackberry Z-10) for retinal imaging in a resource-limited economy. A smartphone (Blackberry Z-10) was used to acquire retinal images with the use of +20D lens in patients with dilated pupils by activating the video mode of the camera. Clear retinal images were obtained in different clinical conditions in adults and children including branch retinal vein occlusion with fibrovascular proliferation, chorioretinal scarring from laser photocoagulation, presumed ocular toxoplasmosis, diabetic retinopathy, retinoblastoma, ocular albinism with fundus hypopigmentation. The ability to have low cost fundus imaging from readily available smartphones in an eye clinic in Nigeria presents a major boost to patient care and also offers an innovative role in research, education, and information sharing.

  9. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  10. Retinal Imaging with Smartphone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-06

    Mar 6, 2017 ... Aim and Objectives: to explore the use of smartphone (Blackberry. Z-10) for retinal imaging in ... Samsung phones with additional apps/software such as the Filmic pro to ... in Nigeria also compared the iPhone with the Android.

  11. Oral fluoroquinolones and the incidence of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and symptomatic retinal breaks: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Kapil G.; Hodge, David O.; St Sauver, Jennifer L.; Barkmeier, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine whether oral fluoroquinolone antibiotics are associated with an increase in subsequent rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and symptomatic retinal breaks in a large, population-based cohort. Design Population-based cohort study Participants and Controls Adult residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota who were prescribed oral fluoroquinolone medications from 1/01/03 – 6/30/11. Comparison cohorts consisted of patients prescribed oral macrolide and β-lactam antibiotics during the study period. Methods Procedure codes were used to identify retinal detachment repair and prophylaxis procedures occurring within 1 year of prescription dates. Travel clinic, pro re nata, and self-treatment prescriptions were excluded. Patients with tractional retinal detachment, previous retinal detachment repair, endophthalmitis, and necrotizing retinitis were excluded, as were those with intraocular surgery or severe head/eye trauma ≤ 90 days prior to the procedure. Main Outcome Measures Rates of retinal detachment repair and prophylaxis procedures within 7, 30, 90, and 365 days of the first prescription were calculated and compared between antibiotic prescription cohorts using Chi-square tests. Retinal detachment repair rates were also compared to the expected Olmsted County, Minnesota rates using the one-sample log rank test. Results Oral fluoroquinolones were prescribed for 38,046 patients (macrolide n=48,074, β-lactam n=69,079) during the study period. Retinal detachment repair procedures were performed within 365 days of the first prescription in 0.03% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.01–0.06%) of the fluoroquinolone, 0.02% (95% CI 0.01–0.03%) of the macrolide, and 0.03% (95% CI 0.02–0.05%) of the β-lactam cohorts (p>0.05). Retinal detachment prophylaxis procedures for symptomatic retinal breaks were performed within 365 days of the first prescription in 0.01% (95% CI 0.00–0.03%) of the fluoroquinolone, 0.02% (95% CI 0.01–0.04%) of the macrolide, and 0

  12. Duration of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment predicts recovery of retinal sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Rose

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The decision to treat a disease is often based on the presence or absence of symptoms, one prototype case being rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Detachment of the neural retina from the pigment epithelium is a major cause of anatomical and functional dysfunction of the retina, where retinal recovery is inversely related to duration of detachment. The purpose of retinal reattachment is to effect recovery of the photoreceptors and pigment epithelium from degeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the critical duration of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment resulting in optimal retinal recovery after reattachment. A prospective study was conducted at a private hospital in Yogyakarta. Thirty five eyes were involved in this study. Three months after reattachment, central retinal recovery was measured by means of a Goldmann manual kinetic perimeter. The results showed that retinal recovery developed three months after surgery if the onset of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment was less than 28 days before surgery. The results were not significant if the onset of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment was more than 35 days. Although the Goldmann manual kinetic perimeter can efficiently detect central retinal sensitivity, it should be supported by more sensitive tools to evaluate the anatomy and function of the retina.

  13. Progressive retinal nonperfusion in ischemic central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykoff, Charles C; Brown, David M; Croft, Daniel E; Major, James C; Wong, Tien P

    2015-01-01

    Serial wide-field fluorescein angiography was performed on eyes with preproliferative (ischemic) central retinal vein occlusion to evaluate retinal perfusion. Serial wide-field fluorescein angiography was performed on 12 preproliferative central retinal vein occlusion eyes in the 3-year Rubeosis Anti-VEGF (RAVE) trial using the Staurenghi lens (Ocular Staurenghi 230SLO Retina Lens) with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (Heidelberg HRA Spectralis). "Disk area" was defined anatomically for each eye. Mean total field of gradable retina was 290 disk areas (range, 178-452). All eyes demonstrated extensive areas of retinal nonperfusion; at baseline, mean area of retinal perfusion was 106 disk areas (range, 37-129), correlating with a mean of 46.5% perfused retinal area (range, 19.1-56.4%). The area of retinal nonperfusion increased in all eyes with a mean loss of approximately 8.1% of perfused retinal area per year (range, 4.3-12.4%), which corresponded to a mean 15-disk areas (range, 12-35) of retina evolving from perfused to nonperfused annually. The extent of baseline and final nonperfusion was not significantly different between eyes that developed neovascularization and eyes that did not. In this population of severe central retinal vein occlusion eyes, profound retinal nonperfusion was observed with wide-field fluorescein angiography at baseline and the extent of nonperfusion progressed while undergoing anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy.

  14. Role of Bax in death of uninfected retinal cells during murine cytomegalovirus retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Juan; Marshall, Brendan; Covar, Jason; Zhang, Nancy Y; Smith, Sylvia B; Atherton, Sally S; Zhang, Ming

    2014-10-08

    Extensive death of uninfected bystander neuronal cells is an important component of the pathogenesis of cytomegalovirus retinitis. Our previous results have shown that caspase 3-dependent and -independent pathways are involved in death of uninfected bystander cells during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) retinitis and also that Bcl-2, an important inhibitor of apoptosis via the Bax-mediated mitochondrial pathway, is downregulated during this process. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Bax-mediated mitochondrial damage has a significant role in the death of uninfected retinal cells. BALB/c mice, Bax(-/-) mice, or Bax(+/+) mice were immunosuppressed with methylprednisolone and infected with 5 × 10(3) plaque-forming units (PFU) of the K181 strain of MCMV via the supraciliary route. Injected eyes were analyzed by plaque assay, electron microscopy, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, TUNEL assay, Western blot (for caspase 3, caspase 12, Bax, receptor interacting protein-1 [RIP1] and receptor interacting protein-3 [RIP3]), as well as immunohistochemical staining for MCMV early antigen and cleaved caspase 3. Significantly more Bax was detected in mitochondrial fractions of MCMV-infected eyes than in mitochondrial fractions of mock-infected control eyes. Furthermore, the level of cleaved caspase 3 was significantly lower in MCMV-infected Bax(-/-) eyes than in MCMV-infected Bax(+/+) eyes. However, more caspase 3-independent cell death of uninfected bystander retinal cells and more cleaved RIP1 were observed in Bax(-/-) than in Bax(+/+) eyes. During MCMV retinitis, Bax is activated and has an important role in death of uninfected bystander retinal cells by caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. Although the exact mechanism remains to be deciphered, active Bax might also prevent death of some types of uninfected retinal cells by a caspase 3-independent pathway. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  15. Prevention of retinal detachment in Stickler syndrome: the Cambridge prophylactic cryotherapy protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincham, Gregory S; Pasea, Laura; Carroll, Christopher; McNinch, Annie M; Poulson, Arabella V; Richards, Allan J; Scott, John D; Snead, Martin P

    2014-08-01

    The Stickler syndromes are the most common causes of inherited and childhood retinal detachment; however, no consensus exists regarding the effectiveness of prophylactic intervention. We evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of the Cambridge prophylactic cryotherapy protocol, a standardized retinal prophylactic treatment developed to prevent retinal detachment arising from giant retinal tears in type 1 Stickler syndrome. Retrospective comparative case series. Four hundred eighty seven patients with type 1 Stickler syndrome. Time to retinal detachment was compared between patients who received bilateral prophylaxis and untreated controls, with and without individual patient matching. Patients receiving unilateral prophylaxis (after fellow eye retinal detachment) were similarly compared with an appropriate control subgroup. Individual patient matching ensured equal age and follow-up between groups and that an appropriate control (who had not suffered a retinal detachment before the age at which their individually matched treatment patient underwent prophylactic treatment) was selected. Matching was blinded to outcome events. Individual patient matching protocols purposely weighted bias against the effectiveness of treatment. All treatment side effects are reported. Time to retinal detachment and side effects occurring after prophylactic treatment. The bilateral control group (n = 194) had a 7.4-fold increased risk of retinal detachment compared to the bilateral prophylaxis group (n = 229) (hazard ratio [HR], 7.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.53-12.08; PCambridge prophylactic cryotherapy protocol is safe and markedly reduces the risk of retinal detachment. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Endoscope-Assisted and Controlled Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis Implantation in Late-Stage Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özmert, Emin; Demirel, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    Several different approaches for restoring sight in subjects who are blind due to outer retinal degeneration are currently under investigation, including stem cell therapy, gene therapy, and visual prostheses. Although many different types of visual prostheses have shown promise, to date, the Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis System, developed in a clinical setting over the course of 10 years, is the world's first and only retinal prosthesis that has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and has been given the CE-Mark for sale within the European Economic Area (EEA). The incidence of serious adverse events from Argus II implantation decreased over time after minor changes in the implant design and improvements in the surgical steps used for the procedure had been made. In order to further decrease the scleral incision-related complications and enhance the assessment of the tack position and the contact between the array and the inner macular surface, we used an ophthalmic endoscope during the regular course of Argus II implantation surgery in 2 patients with late-stage retinitis pigmentosa in an attempt to improve the anatomical and functional outcomes.

  17. Endoscope-Assisted and Controlled Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis Implantation in Late-Stage Retinitis Pigmentosa: A Report of 2 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Özmert

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Several different approaches for restoring sight in subjects who are blind due to outer retinal degeneration are currently under investigation, including stem cell therapy, gene therapy, and visual prostheses. Although many different types of visual prostheses have shown promise, to date, the Argus II Epiretinal Prosthesis System, developed in a clinical setting over the course of 10 years, is the world’s first and only retinal prosthesis that has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA and has been given the CE-Mark for sale within the European Economic Area (EEA. The incidence of serious adverse events from Argus II implantation decreased over time after minor changes in the implant design and improvements in the surgical steps used for the procedure had been made. In order to further decrease the scleral incision-related complications and enhance the assessment of the tack position and the contact between the array and the inner macular surface, we used an ophthalmic endoscope during the regular course of Argus II implantation surgery in 2 patients with late-stage retinitis pigmentosa in an attempt to improve the anatomical and functional outcomes.

  18. Peripapillary retinal thermal coagulation following electrical injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjari Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have presented the case report of a 20 year old boy who suffered an electric injury shock, following which he showed peripapillary retinal opacification and increased retinal thickening that subsequently progressed to retinal atrophy. The fluorescein angiogram revealed normal retinal circulation, thus indicating thermal damage to retina without any compromise to retinal circulation.

  19. A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase10 (ADAM10 Regulates NOTCH Signaling during Early Retinal Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Toonen

    Full Text Available ADAM10 and ADAM17 are two closely related members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease family of membrane-bound sheddases, which proteolytically cleave surface membrane proteins. Both ADAM10 and ADAM17 have been implicated in the proteolytic cleavage of NOTCH receptors and as such regulators of NOTCH signaling. During retinal development, NOTCH signaling facilitates retinal neurogenesis by maintaining progenitor cells in a proliferative state and by mediating retinal cell fates. However, the roles of ADAM10 and ADAM17 in the retina are not well defined. In this study, we set out to clarify the roles of ADAM10 and ADAM17 during early retinal development. The retinal phenotype of conditionally abated Adam17 retinae (Adam17 CKO did not differ from the controls whereas conditionally ablated Adam10 retinae (Adam10 CKO exhibited abnormal morphogenesis characterized by the formation of rosettes and a loss of retinal laminae phenotypically similar to morphological abnormalities identified in mice with retinal NOTCH signaling deficiency. Additionally, Adam10 CKO retinae exhibited abnormal neurogenesis characterized by fewer proliferating progenitor cells and greater differentiation of early photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, constitutive activation of the NOTCH1-intracellular domain (N1-ICD rescued Adam10 CKO abnormal neurogenesis, as well as abnormal retinal morphology by maintaining retinal cells in the progenitor state. Collectively these findings provide in vivo genetic evidence that ADAM10, and not ADAM17, is indispensable for proper retinal development as a regulator of NOTCH signaling.

  20. A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase10 (ADAM10) Regulates NOTCH Signaling during Early Retinal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Joseph A; Ronchetti, Adam; Sidjanin, D J

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 and ADAM17 are two closely related members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of membrane-bound sheddases, which proteolytically cleave surface membrane proteins. Both ADAM10 and ADAM17 have been implicated in the proteolytic cleavage of NOTCH receptors and as such regulators of NOTCH signaling. During retinal development, NOTCH signaling facilitates retinal neurogenesis by maintaining progenitor cells in a proliferative state and by mediating retinal cell fates. However, the roles of ADAM10 and ADAM17 in the retina are not well defined. In this study, we set out to clarify the roles of ADAM10 and ADAM17 during early retinal development. The retinal phenotype of conditionally abated Adam17 retinae (Adam17 CKO) did not differ from the controls whereas conditionally ablated Adam10 retinae (Adam10 CKO) exhibited abnormal morphogenesis characterized by the formation of rosettes and a loss of retinal laminae phenotypically similar to morphological abnormalities identified in mice with retinal NOTCH signaling deficiency. Additionally, Adam10 CKO retinae exhibited abnormal neurogenesis characterized by fewer proliferating progenitor cells and greater differentiation of early photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, constitutive activation of the NOTCH1-intracellular domain (N1-ICD) rescued Adam10 CKO abnormal neurogenesis, as well as abnormal retinal morphology by maintaining retinal cells in the progenitor state. Collectively these findings provide in vivo genetic evidence that ADAM10, and not ADAM17, is indispensable for proper retinal development as a regulator of NOTCH signaling.

  1. No evidence for thrombophilia in patients with retinal venous occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Heegaard, Steffen; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Retinal venous occlusion represents a common retinal disorder that untreated often leads to severely reduced vision. While general risk factors for vascular disease are known to increase the risk of an event, the role of thrombophilia is controversial. The purpose of this systematic review...... was to evaluate the evidence for thrombophilia investigation in patients presenting with retinal venous occlusion. Eligible studies were identified by a MESH-based search in PubMed 11–13 of March 2015. The level of evidence was stated according to the guidelines published by the GRADE working group using three...... synthesis. The majority of studies were small case–control studies, and only one large cohort study was identified. No randomized controlled trials were retrieved. All the studies were categorized as low quality of evidence. Systematic thrombophilia screening in patients presenting with retinal venous...

  2. Red blood cells in retinal vascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Sherwood, Joseph; Chhablani, Jay; Ricchariya, Ashutosh; Kim, Sangho; Jones, Philip H; Balabani, Stavroula; Shima, David

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular circulation plays a vital role in regulating physiological functions, such as vascular resistance, and maintaining organ health. Pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, or hematologic diseases affect the microcirculation posing a significant risk to human health. The retinal vasculature provides a unique window for non-invasive visualisation of the human circulation in vivo and retinal vascular image analysis has been established to predict the development of both clinical and subclinical cardiovascular, metabolic, renal and retinal disease in epidemiologic studies. Blood viscosity which was otherwise thought to play a negligible role in determining blood flow based on Poiseuille's law up to the 1970s has now been shown to play an equally if not a more important role in controlling microcirculation and quantifying blood flow. Understanding the hemodynamics/rheology of the microcirculation and its changes in diseased states remains a challenging task; this is due to the particulate nature of blood, the mechanical properties of the cells (such as deformability and aggregability) and the complex architecture of the microvasculature. In our review, we have tried to postulate a possible role of red blood cell (RBC) biomechanical properties and laid down future framework for research related to hemorrheological aspects of blood in patients with retinal vascular disorders.

  3. Curative effect of minimally invasive sclera buckling on single retinal detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Huan Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the curative effect of minimally invasive sclera buckling on single retinal detachment. METHODS:Totally, 100 cases of patients with retinal detachment(106 eyesenrolled in our hospital were randomly divided into observation group and control group, 53 eyes in each group. Patients in observation group were treated with minimally invasive sclera buckling, while patients in control group received traditional limbal conjunctival incision. After surgery, patients were all followed up for 6~18mo, during which the retinal recurrence situation, degree of vision enhancement and compliance occurrence rate was recorded. RESULTS: The retinal reattachment rate once of observation group(96.22%was significantly higher than that of control group(88.68%, there was statistically significance(PPPCONCLUSION: The improved minimally invasive sclera buckling can significantly enhance the curative effect for retinal detachment, decrease the compliance occurrence rate, improve vision function, and is a scientific, practical and rigorous tool for retinal detachment treatment.

  4. The close interrelationship between increased vascular retinal permeability and blood pressure level. Evidence from retinal fluorangiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpelli, P T; Brancato, R; Menchini, U; Santoro, P; Lamanna, S

    1977-01-01

    A long-term study was done by means of interative fluorangiography on microvascular retinal permeability versus the blood pressure control carried out in 11 patients with a diastolic blood pressure of greater than or equal to 130 mm Hg and with retinal exudates, haemorrhages and oedema. No matter what the original disease was (i.e., essential, renovascular, endocrine hypertension or chronic nephropathy with terminal renal failure) the increased permeability appeared to be critically connected with the blood pressure level. Our results confirm that hypertension per se might be the cause of vascular permeability changes.

  5. Astrocytes and Müller cells changes during retinal degeneration in a transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eFernández-Sánchez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa includes a group of progressive retinal degenerative diseases that affect the structure and function of photoreceptors. Secondarily to the loss of photoreceptors, there is a reduction in retinal vascularization, which seems to influence the cellular degenerative process. Retinal macroglial cells, astrocytes and Müller cells provide support for retinal neurons and are fundamental for maintaining normal retinal function. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of macroglial changes during retinal degeneration in P23H rats. Methods: Homozygous P23H line-3 rats aged from P18 to 18 months were used to study the evolution of the disease, and SD rats were used as controls. Immunolabeling with antibodies against GFAP, vimentin, and transducin were used to visualize macroglial cells and cone photoreceptors. Results: In P23H rats, increased GFAP labeling in Müller cells was observed as an early indicator of retinal gliosis. At 4 and 12 months of age, the apical processes of Müller cells in P23H rats clustered in firework-like structures, which were associated with ring-like shaped areas of cone degeneration in the outer nuclear layer. These structures were not observed at 16 months of age. The number of astrocytes was higher in P23H rats than in the SD matched controls at 4 and 12 months of age, supporting the idea of astrocyte proliferation. As the disease progressed, astrocytes exhibited a deteriorated morphology and marked hypertrophy. The increase in the complexity of the astrocytic processes correlated with greater connexin 43 expression and higher density of connexin 43 immunoreactive puncta within the ganglion cell layer of P23H versus SD rat retinas. Conclusions: In the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa, the loss of photoreceptors triggers major changes in the number and morphology of glial cells affecting the inner retina.

  6. Retinal flow cytometer

    OpenAIRE

    Alt, C.; Veilleux, I.; H. Lee; Pitsillides, C. M.; Côté, D.; Lin, C.P.

    2007-01-01

    The in vivo flow cytometer is an instrument capable of continuous, real-time monitoring of fluorescently labeled cells in the circulation without the need to draw blood samples. However, the original system probes a single vessel in the mouse ear; the small sample volume limits the sensitivity of the technique. We describe an in vivo retinal flow cytometer that simultaneously probes five artery–vein pairs in the mouse eye by circularly scanning a small laser spot rapidly around the optic nerv...

  7. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  8. Retinal amyloid pathology and proof-of-concept imaging trial in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronyo, Yosef; Biggs, David; Barron, Ernesto; Boyer, David S; Pearlman, Joel A; Au, William J; Kile, Shawn J; Blanco, Austin; Fuchs, Dieu-Trang; Ashfaq, Adeel; Frautschy, Sally; Cole, Gregory M; Miller, Carol A; Hinton, David R; Verdooner, Steven R; Black, Keith L; Koronyo-Hamaoui, Maya

    2017-08-17

    Noninvasive detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with high specificity and sensitivity can greatly facilitate identification of at-risk populations for earlier, more effective intervention. AD patients exhibit a myriad of retinal pathologies, including hallmark amyloid β-protein (Aβ) deposits. Burden, distribution, cellular layer, and structure of retinal Aβ plaques were analyzed in flat mounts and cross sections of definite AD patients and controls (n = 37). In a proof-of-concept retinal imaging trial (n = 16), amyloid probe curcumin formulation was determined and protocol was established for retinal amyloid imaging in live patients. Histological examination uncovered classical and neuritic-like Aβ deposits with increased retinal Aβ42 plaques (4.7-fold; P = 0.0063) and neuronal loss (P = 0.0023) in AD patients versus matched controls. Retinal Aβ plaque mirrored brain pathology, especially in the primary visual cortex (P = 0.0097 to P = 0.0018; Pearson's r = 0.84-0.91). Retinal deposits often associated with blood vessels and occurred in hot spot peripheral regions of the superior quadrant and innermost retinal layers. Transmission electron microscopy revealed retinal Aβ assembled into protofibrils and fibrils. Moreover, the ability to image retinal amyloid deposits with solid-lipid curcumin and a modified scanning laser ophthalmoscope was demonstrated in live patients. A fully automated calculation of the retinal amyloid index (RAI), a quantitative measure of increased curcumin fluorescence, was constructed. Analysis of RAI scores showed a 2.1-fold increase in AD patients versus controls (P = 0.0031). The geometric distribution and increased burden of retinal amyloid pathology in AD, together with the feasibility to noninvasively detect discrete retinal amyloid deposits in living patients, may lead to a practical approach for large-scale AD diagnosis and monitoring. National Institute on Aging award (AG044897) and The Saban and The Marciano Family

  9. Elevated albumin excretion and retinal changes in children with type 1 diabetes are related to long-term poor blood glucose control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K; Storm, Birgit Kjærside; Graae, M

    1989-01-01

    patients were proteinuric (greater than 300 mg 24 h-1) (2%). Retinal morphology was evaluated by colour fundus photography. Background retinopathy was more frequent in the group with elevated albumin excretion (71%) than in a matched normoalbuminuric group (20%, 2p less than 0.001). Long-term blood glucose......All diabetic children (n = 113) under 19 years old and with more than 2 years of diabetes attending the Steno Memorial Hospital in 1987 were studied. Normal urinary albumin excretion (less than 30 mg 24 h-1) was found in 96 patients (85%), 15 had microalbuminuria (30-300 mg 24 h-1) (13%), and 2...

  10. Laminins and retinal vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Malia M; Lefebvre, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling vascular development, both normal and pathological, are not yet fully understood. Many diseases, including cancer and diabetic retinopathy, involve abnormal blood vessel formation. Therefore, increasing knowledge of these mechanisms may help develop novel therapeutic targets. The identification of novel proteins or cells involved in this process would be particularly useful. The retina is an ideal model for studying vascular development because it is easy to access, particularly in rodents where this process occurs post-natally. Recent studies have suggested potential roles for laminin chains in vascular development of the retina. This review will provide an overview of these studies, demonstrating the importance of further research into the involvement of laminins in retinal blood vessel formation.

  11. Automated retinal robotic laser system instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Jerath, Maya R.; Lewis, R. Stephen, II; Dillard, Bryan C.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1995-05-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Biomedical Engineering Laser Laboratory investigating the medical applications of lasers have worked toward the development of a retinal robotic laser system. The ultimate goal of this ongoing project is to precisely place and control the depth of laser lesions for the treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. Researchers at the USAF Academy's Department of Electrical Engineering have also become involved with this research due to similar interests. Separate low speed prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth using lesion reflectance feedback parameters and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Work is ongoing to build a prototype system to simultaneously control lesion depth and placement. The instrumentation aspects of the prototype subsystems were presented at SPIE Conference 1877 in January 1993. Since then our efforts have concentrated on combining the lesion depth control subsystem and the lesion placement subsystem into a single prototype capable of simultaneously controlling both parameters. We have designed this combined system CALOSOS for Computer Aided Laser Optics System for Ophthalmic Surgery. An initial CALOSOS prototype design is provided. We have also investigated methods to improve system response time. The use of high speed non-standard frame rate CCD cameras and high speed local bus frame grabbers hosted on personal computers are being investigated. A review of system testing in vivo to date is provided in SPIE Conference proceedings 2374-49 (Novel Applications of Lasers and Pulsed Power, Dual-Use Applications of Lasers: Medical session).

  12. [Application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Retinal oximeter is a new machine which has been used in the diagnose, treatment and research of several ophthalmic diseases for recent years. It allows ophthalmologists to gain retinal oxygen saturation directly. Therefore, retinal oximeter might be useful for ophthalmologists to understand ophthalmic diseases more deeper and clarify the impact of ischemia on retinal function. It has been reported in the literatures that retinal oximeter has potentially useful diagnostic and therapeutic indications in various eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, central retinal vein and artery occlusion, retinitis pigmentosa, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, et al. In this thesis, the application of retinal oximeter in ophthalmology is reviewed.

  13. Retinal oximetry in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rilvén, Sandra; Torp, Thomas Lee; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    increased retinal arterial oxygen saturation (raSatO2 ) in patients with DR. In patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), all studies found that rvSatO2 was reduced, but raSatO2 remained unchanged. Branch retinal vein occlusion was not associated with changes in retinal oxygen saturation......, but this was based on a single study. In conclusion, DR is associated with increased rvSatO2 and might also be related to increased raSatO2 . Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is correlated with increased rvSatO2 but unrelated to raSatO2 . Prospective studies are needed to expand these findings. These would tell...... retinopathy (DR) and four about retinal vein occlusion. No studies about retinal artery occlusion were included. In diabetes, all studies found that increases in retinal venous oxygen saturation (rvSatO2 ) were associated with present as well as increasing levels of DR. Four of six studies also found...

  14. Steric interaction between the 9-methyl group of the retinal and tryptophan 182 controls 13-cis to all-trans reisomerization and proton uptake in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidlich, O.; Schalt, B.; Siebert, F. [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg (Germany)] [and others

    1996-08-20

    The hypothesis was tested whether in bacteriorhodopsin (BR) the reduction of the steric interaction between the 9-methyl group of the chromophore all-trans-retinal and the tryptophan at position 182 causes the same changes as observed in the photocycle of 9-demethyl-BR. For this, the photocycle of the mutant W182F was investigated by time-resolved UV-vis and pH measurements and by static and time-resolved FT-IR difference spectroscopy. We found that the second half of the photocycle was similarly distorted in the two modified systems: based on the amide-I band, the protonation state of D96, and the kinetics of proton uptake, four N intermediates could be identified, the last one having a lifetime of several seconds; no O intermediate could be detected; the proton uptake showed a pronounced biphasic time course; and the pK{sub a} of group(s) on the cytoplasmic side in N was reduced from 11 in wild type BR to around 7.5. In contrast to 9-demethyl-BR, in the W182F mutant the first part of the photocycle does not drastically deviate from that of wild type BR. The results demonstrate the importance of the steric interaction between W182 and the 9-methyl group of the retinal in providing tight coupling between chromophore isomerization and the late proton transfer steps. 51 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Internal limiting membrane peeling in vitreo-retinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Ehab; Lois, Noemi

    2008-01-01

    Peeling the internal limiting membrane of the retina has become a very common procedure performed by vitreo-retinal surgeons. The combination of new microsurgical instrumentation with the availability of different dyes to stain this thin and transparent membrane has facilitated the performance of internal limiting membrane peeling, reducing the time and trauma associated with this maneuver. Internal limiting membrane peeling has been used to treat a variety of retinal pathologies, including full-thickness macular hole, epiretinal membrane, macular edema, vitreomacular traction syndrome, and Terson syndrome, among others. Although it appears that peeling the internal limiting membrane in these retinal conditions may be associated with better anatomical and visual outcomes following surgery, further evidence through randomized controlled clinical trials is still needed to guide the vitreo-retinal surgeon on the appropriate use of this surgical maneuver.

  16. Cell-Based Therapy for Degenerative Retinal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbin, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptors (PRs) have restored vision in preclinical models of human retinal degenerative disease. This review discusses characteristics of stem cell therapy in the eye and the challenges to clinical implementation that are being confronted today. Based on encouraging results from Phase I/II trials, the first Phase II clinical trials of stem cell-derived RPE transplantation are underway. PR transplant experiments have demonstrated restoration of visual function in preclinical models of retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration, but also indicate that no single approach is likely to succeed in overcoming PR loss in all cases. A greater understanding of the mechanisms controlling synapse formation as well as the immunoreactivity of transplanted retinal cells is urgently needed.

  17. Specific inhibition of TRPV4 enhances retinal ganglion cell survival in adult porcine retinal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Linnéa; Arnér, Karin; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Signaling through the polymodal cation channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) has been implicated in retinal neuronal degeneration. To further outline the involvement of this channel in this process, we here explore modulation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) activity on neuronal health and glial activation in an in vitro model of retinal degeneration. For this purpose, adult porcine retinal explants were cultured using a previously established standard protocol for up to 5 days with specific TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A (GSK), or specific antagonist RN-1734, or culture medium only. Glial and neuronal cell health were evaluated by a battery of immunohistochemical markers, as well as morphological staining. Specific inhibition of TRPV4 by RN-1734 significantly enhanced ganglion cell survival, improved the maintenance of the retinal laminar architecture, reduced apoptotic cell death and attenuated the gliotic response as well as preserved the expression of TRPV4 in the plexiform layers and ganglion cells. In contrast, culture controls, as well as specimens treated with GSK, displayed rapid remodeling and neurodegeneration as well as a downregulation of TRPV4 and the Müller cell homeostatic mediator glutamine synthetase. Our results indicate that TRPV4 signaling is an important contributor to the retinal degeneration in this model, affecting neuronal cell health and glial homeostasis. The finding that pharmacological inhibition of the receptor significantly attenuates neuronal degeneration and gliosis in vitro, suggests that TRPV4 signaling may be an interesting pharmaceutical target to explore for treatment of retinal degenerative disease.

  18. Retinal vascular lesions in patients of Caucasian and Asian origin with type 2 diabetes - Baseline results from the ADVANCE Retinal Measurements (AdRem) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Ronald P.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Cruickshank, J. Kennedy; Hughes, Alun D.; Stanton, Alice; Lu, Juming; Patel, Anushka; Thom, Simon A. McG.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Vingerling, Johannes R.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - The objective of this study was to describe prevalent vascular retinal lesions among patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in the ADVANCE Retinal Measurements (AdRem) study, a substudy of the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron MR Controlled Evaluation (ADVAN

  19. Retinal vascular lesions in patients of Caucasian and Asian origin with type 2 diabetes - Baseline results from the ADVANCE Retinal Measurements (AdRem) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Ronald P.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Cruickshank, J. Kennedy; Hughes, Alun D.; Stanton, Alice; Lu, Juming; Patel, Anushka; Thom, Simon A. McG.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Vingerling, Johannes R.

    OBJECTIVE - The objective of this study was to describe prevalent vascular retinal lesions among patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in the ADVANCE Retinal Measurements (AdRem) study, a substudy of the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron MR Controlled Evaluation

  20. Proteomic Analysis of the Vitreous following Experimental Retinal Detachment in Rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandal, Nakul; Lewis, Geoffrey P; Fisher, Steven K

    2015-01-01

    of the vitreous following experimental retinal detachment using a comparative proteomic based approach. Materials and Methods. Retinal detachment was created in the right eyes of six New Zealand red pigmented rabbits. Sham surgery was undertaken in five other rabbits that were used as controls. After seven days......, and α-1-antiproteinase F. Conclusions. Proteomic investigation of the rabbit vitreous has identified a set of proteins that help further our understanding of the pathogenesis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and its complications....

  1. The circadian response of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Zele

    Full Text Available Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC signal environmental light level to the central circadian clock and contribute to the pupil light reflex. It is unknown if ipRGC activity is subject to extrinsic (central or intrinsic (retinal network-mediated circadian modulation during light entrainment and phase shifting. Eleven younger persons (18-30 years with no ophthalmological, medical or sleep disorders participated. The activity of the inner (ipRGC and outer retina (cone photoreceptors was assessed hourly using the pupil light reflex during a 24 h period of constant environmental illumination (10 lux. Exogenous circadian cues of activity, sleep, posture, caffeine, ambient temperature, caloric intake and ambient illumination were controlled. Dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO was determined from salivary melatonin assay at hourly intervals, and participant melatonin onset values were set to 14 h to adjust clock time to circadian time. Here we demonstrate in humans that the ipRGC controlled post-illumination pupil response has a circadian rhythm independent of external light cues. This circadian variation precedes melatonin onset and the minimum ipRGC driven pupil response occurs post melatonin onset. Outer retinal photoreceptor contributions to the inner retinal ipRGC driven post-illumination pupil response also show circadian variation whereas direct outer retinal cone inputs to the pupil light reflex do not, indicating that intrinsically photosensitive (melanopsin retinal ganglion cells mediate this circadian variation.

  2. Retinal thinning correlates with clinical severity in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeeyun; Lee, Jee-Young; Kim, Tae Wan

    2016-10-01

    To analyze retinal thickness changes in multiple system atrophy (MSA) and correlate changes with disease severity and subtypes of MSA. A total of 36 MSA (27 MSA-P and 9 MSA-C) patients and 71 healthy control subjects underwent general ophthalmologic examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and perifoveal retinal thickness were analyzed separately. The generalized estimating equation model was used with age as a covariate to adjust for within-patient inter-eye correlations and the effect of age on retinal or RNFL thickness. Correlation analysis between RNFL, perifoveal thickness, and clinical parameters, the Unified MSA Rating Scale (UMSARS) and Global Disability Score (GDS), was also done. MSA patients showed significantly decreased peripapillary RNFL thickness in the inferior (P = 0.047) and inferotemporal (P = 0.017) sectors and significant perifoveal thinning in the superior outer sector (P = 0.042) compared to healthy controls. Both RNFL and perifoveal thinning were more marked and widespread in MSA-P than MSA-C patients. The UMSARS and GDS showed significant negative correlation with center and total macular perifoveal thickness and also the inferior and nasal outer sectors. Peripapillary RNFL and perifoveal retinal thinning were observed in MSA patients and retinal thinning correlated with the clinical severity of MSA. Structural changes in the retina may reflect the degree and pattern of neurodegeneration occurring in MSA.

  3. LONG-TERM OUTCOMES OF RETINAL DEGENERATIVE DISORDER TREATMENT WITH PEPTIDE BIOREGULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Razumovskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze long-term outcomes and efficacy of retinal degeneration treatment with Retinalamin.Patients and methods. Group I included 20 patients (40 eyes with pigmentary retinal dystrophy (15 patients, 30 eyes and retinal abiotrophy (5 patients, 10 eyes who received treatment with Retinalamin for 5‑7 years. Group II included 11 patients (22 eyes with pigmentary retinal dystrophy (9 patients, 18 eyes and retinal abiotrophy (2 patients, 4 eyes who received treatment with Retinalamin for 23‑25 years. Group III (controls included 15 patients (30 eyes with pigmentary retinal dystrophy (11 patients, 22 eyes and retinal abiotrophy (4 patients, 8 eyes who received traditional treatment (vasodilators, angioprotectors, antisclerotic agents, vitamins for 25 years. Standard ophthalmological examination, i.e., visual acuity measurement, visual field test, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, was performed.Results. First course of treatment with Retinalamin improved vision in 58.1 % of retinal degeneration patients. Visual fields improved in 64.5 % of cases. Repeated treatment courses (1‑2 times a year for 23‑25 years preserved residual vision in 55.6 % of patients and object vision in 11.1 % of cases. In retinal abiotrophy patients, residual vision preserved in 100 % of cases.Conclusions. In retinal degenerations, Retinalamin improves vision and visual fields and decreases total area of absolute scotomas even after the first treatment course as well as preserves vision in prolonged use. 

  4. Neuroprotective Effects of Low-Dose Statins in the Retinal Ultrastructure of Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Navarro, Judith; Aldea, Pilar; de Hoz, Rosa; Salazar, Juan J; Ramírez, Ana I; Rojas, Blanca; Gallego, Beatriz I; Triviño, Alberto; Tejerina, Teresa; Ramírez, José M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the pleiotropic effects to statins, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative retinal changes in hypercholesterolemic rabbits after a low-dosage statin treatment. For this purpose, New Zealand rabbits were split into three groups: control (G0; n = 10), fed a standard diet; hypercholesterolemic (G1; n = 8), fed a 0.5% cholesterol-enriched diet for 8 months; and statins (G2; n = 8), fed a 0.5% cholesterol-enriched diet for 8 months, together with the administration of statin (pravastatin or fluvastatin sodium) at a dose of 2 mg / kg / day each diet. The retinas were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry (glial fibrillary acidic protein). The retinal thickness of nuclear and plexiform layers were quantified in semi-thin sections. The results revealed that the low-statin-treated rabbits in comparison with the hypercholesterolemic group showed: i) a more preserved structure in all retinal layers; ii) a significant reduction in retinal thickness; iii) a decrease in cell death in the nuclear-and ganglion-cell layers; iv) a reduction of hydropic degeneration in the plexiform and nerve-fiber layers; v) a preservation of astrocytes and of the retinal area occupied by them; and vi) a better-preserved retinal vascular structure. Our findings indicate that low doses of statins can prevent retinal degeneration, acting on retinal macroglia, neurons and retinal vessels, despite that hypercholesterolemia remained unchanged. Thus, the pleiotropic effects of the statins may help safeguard the retinal ultrastructure.

  5. Retinal detachment surgery without cryotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Chignell, A H; Markham, R H

    1981-01-01

    A series of cases of retinal detachment treated without the application of cryotherapy at the time of surgery has been studied. The omission of cryotherapy while not interfering with retinal reattachment, carries the risk of redetachment at a later date. Macular pucker may still occur in spite of the absence of cryotherapy.

  6. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  7. Spectrophotometric retinal oximetry in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traustason, Sindri; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Karlsson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the validity of spectrophotometric retinal oximetry, by comparison to blood gas analysis and intra-vitreal measurements of partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). METHODS: Female domestic pigs were used for all experiments (n=8). Oxygen fraction in inspired air was changed using...... a mixture of room air, pure oxygen and pure nitrogen, ranging from 5% to 100% oxygen. Femoral arterial blood gas analysis and retinal oximetry was performed at each level of inspiratory oxygen fraction. Retinal oximetry was performed using a commercial instrument, the Oxymap Retinal Oximeter T1 (Oxymap ehf......, Reykjavik, Iceland). The device simultaneously acquires images at two wavelengths (570 nm and 600 nm) and specialized software automatically detects retinal blood vessels. In three pigs, invasive pO2-measurements were performed after the initial non-invasive measurements. RESULTS: Comparison of femoral...

  8. Bilateral retinitis following typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhushanker, M; Topiwalla, Tasneem T; Ganesan, Geetha; Appandaraj, Sripal

    2017-01-01

    Post typhoid fever immune related reactions affecting the eye is a rare finding which can have various presentations in which typhoid retinopathy is not a well recognized sequelae. Here we present a case of 59 year old male who presented with right eye sudden painless loss of vision 4 weeks after typhoid fever which was diagnosed and treated successfully. His BCVA was 2/60 in right eye and 6/6 in left eye. Fundus examination showed retinitis along with macular serous detachment in right eye and retinitis in left eye. Significant improvement in BCVA in right eye was observed after treatment with oral steroid with resolving retinitis lesions. Diagnosis of post typhoid immune mediated retinitis was made with good resolution following treatment. Immune mediated retinitis is a rare sequelae to typhoid infection which can be successfully treated with systemic steroids with good resolution of the lesions.

  9. Retinal research using the perfused mammalian eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, G

    2001-05-01

    The effort to isolate and maintain alive in vitro an intact mammalian eye is rewarded by the full control provided over the arterial input and exclusion of systemic regulatory or compensatory mechanisms. Electrical recording of typical light-evoked field potentials from retina and optic nerve can be complemented by single-cell recording. Thus, light-induced electrical activity reflects the function of the retinal pigment epithelium, of the layers of the retina and of the ganglion cells or their axons. Retinal function in vitro is documented by electrophysiological and morphological methods revealing subtle features of retinal information processing as well as optic nerve signals that approach-at threshold stimulus intensity-the human psychophysical threshold. Such sensitivity of third-order retinal neurons is described for the first time. This well controlled in vitro preparation has been used successfully for biophysical, metabolic and pharmacological studies. Examples are provided that demonstrate the marked sensibility of the rod system to changes in glucose supply. Moreover, histochemical identification of glycogen stores revealed labeling of the second- and third-order neurons subserving the rod system, in addition to labeling of Müller (glial) cells in the cat retina. The glycogen content of the cat retina is augmented by prolonged anesthesia, largely depleted by ischemia after enucleation and enhanced by insulin. Pharmacological experiments using agonists and antagonists of putative retinal neurotransmitters are summarized and outlined using the muscarinic cholinergic agonist QNB as an example. Actions and uptake of the neuromodulator adenosine are presented in detail, including inhibitory effects on physiologically characterized ganglion cells. Neuronal effects of adenosine are distinguished from those resulting from vasodilatation and from glycogenolysis induced by the neuromodulator. To open the blood-retina barrier, a hyperosmotic challenge can be

  10. Pericytes derived from adipose-derived stem cells protect against retinal vasculopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Mendel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinal vasculopathies, including diabetic retinopathy (DR, threaten the vision of over 100 million people. Retinal pericytes are critical for microvascular control, supporting retinal endothelial cells via direct contact and paracrine mechanisms. With pericyte death or loss, endothelial dysfunction ensues, resulting in hypoxic insult, pathologic angiogenesis, and ultimately blindness. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs differentiate into pericytes, suggesting they may be useful as a protective and regenerative cellular therapy for retinal vascular disease. In this study, we examine the ability of ASCs to differentiate into pericytes that can stabilize retinal vessels in multiple pre-clinical models of retinal vasculopathy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that ASCs express pericyte-specific markers in vitro. When injected intravitreally into the murine eye subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR, ASCs were capable of migrating to and integrating with the retinal vasculature. Integrated ASCs maintained marker expression and pericyte-like morphology in vivo for at least 2 months. ASCs injected after OIR vessel destabilization and ablation enhanced vessel regrowth (16% reduction in avascular area. ASCs injected intravitreally before OIR vessel destabilization prevented retinal capillary dropout (53% reduction. Treatment of ASCs with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1 enhanced hASC pericyte function, in a manner similar to native retinal pericytes, with increased marker expression of smooth muscle actin, cellular contractility, endothelial stabilization, and microvascular protection in OIR. Finally, injected ASCs prevented capillary loss in the diabetic retinopathic Akimba mouse (79% reduction 2 months after injection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ASC-derived pericytes can integrate with retinal vasculature, adopting both pericyte morphology and marker expression, and provide functional vascular protection in multiple

  11. Ratiometric analysis of in vivo retinal layer thicknesses in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Motl, Robert W.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-09-01

    We performed ratiometric analysis of retinal optical coherence tomography images for the first time in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The ratiometric analysis identified differences in several retinal layer thickness ratios in the cohort of MS subjects without a history of optic neuritis (ON) compared to healthy control (HC) subjects, and there was no difference in standard retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT). The difference in such ratios between HC subjects and those with mild MS-disability, without a difference in RNFLT, further suggests the possibility of using layer ratiometric analysis for detecting early retinal changes in MS. Ratiometric analysis may be useful and potentially more sensitive for detecting disease changes in MS.

  12. Retinal vessel diameter changes induced by transient high perfusion pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Ying; Zhao; Ping-Jun; Chang; Fang; Yu; Yun-E; Zhao

    2014-01-01

    ·AIM: To investigate the effects of transient high perfusion pressure on the retinal vessel diameter and retinal ganglion cells.·METHODS: The animals were divided into four groups according to different infusion pressure and infusion time(60 mm Hg-3min, 60 mm Hg-5min, 100 mm Hg-3min, 100 mm Hg-5min). Each group consisted of six rabbits. The left eye was used as the experimental eye and the right as a control. Retinal vascular diameters were evaluated before, during infusion, immediately after infusion, 5min, 10 min and 30 min after infusion based on the fundus photographs. Blood pressure was monitored during infusion. The eyes were removed after 24 h.Damage to retinal ganglion cell(RGC) was analyzed by histology.·RESULTS: Retina became whiten and papilla optic was pale during perfusion. Measurements showed significant decrease in retinal artery and vein diameter during perfusion in all of the four groups at the proximal of the edge of the optic disc. The changes were significant in the 100 mm Hg-3min group and 100 mm Hg-5min group compared with 60 mm Hg-3min group(P 1=0.025, P 2=0.000).The diameters in all the groups recovered completely after 30 min of reperfusion. The number of RGC)showed no significant changes at the IOP in 100 mm Hg with5 min compared with contralateral untreated eye(P >0.05).·CONCLUSION: Transient fluctuations during infusion lead to temporal changes of retinal vessels, which could affect the retinal blood circulation. The RGCs were not affected by this transient fluctuation. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the effect of pressure during realtime phacoemusification on retinal blood circulation.

  13. Lack of Acid Sphingomyelinase Induces Age-Related Retinal Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill X Wu

    Full Text Available Mutations of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase cause Niemann-Pick diseases type A and B, which are fatal inherited lipid lysosomal storage diseases, characterized with visceral organ abnormalities and neurodegeneration. However, the effects of suppressing retinal ASMase expression are not understood. The goal of this study was to determine if the disruption of ASMase expression impacts the retinal structure and function in the mouse, and begin to investigate the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities.Acid sphingomyelinase knockout (ASMase KO mice were utilized to study the roles of this sphingolipid metabolizing enzyme in the retina. Electroretinogram and morphometric analysis were used to assess the retinal function and structure at various ages. Sphingolipid profile was determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Western blots evaluated the level of the autophagy marker LC3-II.When compared to control animals, ASMase KO mice exhibited significant age-dependent reduction in ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes. Associated with these functional deficits, morphometric analysis revealed progressive thinning of retinal layers; however, the most prominent degeneration was observed in the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layer. Additional analyses of ASMase KO mice revealed early reduction in ERG c-wave amplitudes and increased lipofuscin accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Sphingolipid analyses showed abnormal accumulation of sphingomyelin and sphingosine in ASMase KO retinas. Western blot analyses showed a higher level of the autophagosome marker LC3-II.These studies demonstrate that ASMase is necessary for the maintenance of normal retinal structure and function. The early outer retinal dysfunction, outer segment degeneration, accumulation of lipofuscin and autophagosome markers provide evidence that disruption of lysosomal function contributes to the age-dependent retinal degeneration exhibited by ASMase KO mice.

  14. Acute retinal necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Hernán Ocampo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clinical features in a case of acute retinal necrosis are described as well as its diagnostic approach and response to early treatment. Methods: This is a descriptive and retrospective study case report of a 26 year old male patient who arrived to the emergency room with a three day history of sudden visual loss in the right eye (RE. At initial evaluation a visual acuity of hand movements in the RE, 20/15 in the left eye (LE and a right relative afferent pupillary defect were found. Fundoscopy revealed profuse soft exudates and hemorrhages involving posterior pole, inferior hemiretina and superotemporal periphery. Infectious workup and fluoresceinic angiography were made and positive serologies for herpes virus types 1 and 2, without HIV, were found. A diagnosis of acute retinal necrosis was made and treatment with intravenous valgancyclovir for two weeks and intra-vitreous triamcinolone for severe vasculitis, was given. Then a 3 months treatment with oral antiviral agents was prescribed. Results: Patient’s evolution showed improvement with treatment and at two and a half months of follow up, visual acuity was 20/50 in the right eye, normal slit lamp examination, tonometry of 12 mm Hg and fundoscopy improved when compared to initial pictures.Conclusions: A high index of suspicion is needed for diagnosing ARN taking into account clinical findings. Prompt intravenous and intra-vitreous treatments are needed to achieve good clinical and functional outcomes and to avoid central nervous system complications.

  15. Relationship between target organ damage and blood pressure, retinal vessel calibre, oxidative stress and polymorphisms in VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes in patients with hypertension: a case-control study protocol (LOD-Hipertension).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A; Gonzalez-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Recio-Rodríguez, José I; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Perretta-Tejedor, Nuria; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-04-03

    Target organ damage (TOD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The study objectives were to analyse the relationship of TOD to blood pressure, size of retinal arteries and veins, oxidative stress and different polymorphisms in the VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes in participants with hypertension. A case-control study to analyse the relationship between clinical, biochemical and genetic parameters and presence of cardiac, vascular and renal TOD in 486 patients with hypertension. Participants with TOD will be considered as cases, and those without TOD will be enrolled as controls. This will be a collaborative study conducted by the groups of Primary Care, Cardiovascular and Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases of the Instituto de Investigación Biomédica of Salamanca (IBSAL). Assessment of cardiac, renal and vascular TOD. Measurement of peripheral and central blood pressure, size of eye fundus arteries and veins, and oxidative stress, and polymorphisms in the VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes. The study will be conducted after approval is obtained from the Ethics Committee of Hospital Clínico Universitario of Salamanca. All study participants will sign an informed consent to agree to participate in the study, and another consent to agree on the genetic study, in compliance with the Declaration of Helsinki and the WHO standards for observational studies. The results of this study will allow for an understanding of the relationship of the different TODs with blood pressure, retinal artery and vein diameters, oxidative stress and polymorphisms in VAV-2 and VAV-3 genes. Clinical Trials. gov Identifier: NCT02022618.

  16. Mortality in Patients with Central Retinal Vein Occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Linneberg, Allan; Christoffersen, Nynne

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess mortality in patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). DESIGN: Registry-based cohort study. PARTICIPANTS AND CONTROLS: Four hundred thirty-nine photographically verified CRVO patients and a control cohort of 2195 unexposed subjects matched by age and gender and alive.......03-1.56) and in women 60 to 69 years of age (SMR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.22-3.08). CONCLUSIONS: Central retinal vein occlusion was associated with an overall increase in mortality compared with controls that was attributed statistically to cardiovascular disorders and diabetes. We recommend treatment of hypertension...

  17. Treatment of Laser-Induced Retinal Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-29

    Distribution List (enclosed) bI’TF rruIoN STATEMEN A Approved for publi reljaso Disatbunon Unlimited TREATMENT OF LASER-INDUCED RETINAL INJURIES FINAL...suprathreshold retinal laser lesions II. Subthreshold retinal laser lesions III. Effect of steroid treatment on laser-induced retinal injury Discussion and...In the present study we investigated the effect of corticosteroid treatment of argon laser-induced retinal injury on vitreal accumulation of both

  18. Retinal thickness measured with optical coherence tomography and risk of disability worsening in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Arnow, Sam; Wilson, James A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most patients with multiple sclerosis without previous optic neuritis have thinner retinal layers than healthy controls. We assessed the role of peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (pRNFL) thickness and macular volume in eyes with no history of optic neuritis as a biomarker of dis...

  19. Axial length as a risk factor to branch retinal vein occlusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, EA; deLavalette, VWR; vandenBrom, HJB

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether axial length is a factor in branch retinal vein occlusion. Methods: Axial length measurements in a group of 24 patients with a unilateral branch retinal Vein occlusion were compared with the axial length measurements in a control group. axial length measurements were ta

  20. Primary Vitrectomy for Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment Associated with Choroidal Detachment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui Zhao; Yiqiao Xing; Ying Chen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role and the anatomic and visual results of primary pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) in treating cases with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment associated with choroidal detachment.Methods: All patients were divided into 2 groups. Each group included 23 consecutive eyes with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and choroidal detachment with proliferative vitreoretinopathy less than grade C. In the study group, controlled removal of vitreous traction was achieved by primary vitrectomy and augmented by scleral buckling if needed. The breaks were treated by focused endolaser coagulation.Postoperative tamponade was done by SF6 or C3F8 gas. In the control group, all patients underwent regular scleral buckling procedure. The cases were followed up for 6 to 12 months.Results: In the study group, retinal reattachment could be achieved in 21 cases (91.30%) after the first operation and in all cases after the second procedure. No occurrence of choroidal detachment occurred after the first procedure. Retinal reattachment rate and visual results tended to be better compared with conventional surgical techniques in the control group.Conclusion: Primary vitrectomy represents a safe, effective method in the management of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment associated with choroidal detachment.

  1. [Optogenetics and prosthetic treatment of retinal degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichnikov, M P; Ostrovskiy, M A

    2015-01-01

    This is a review of the current state of optogenetics-based research in the field of ophthalmology and physiology of vision. Optogenetics employs an interdisciplinary approach that amalgamates gene engineering, optics, and physiology. It involves exogenous expression of a light-activated protein in a very particular retinal cell enabling regulation (stimulation vs. inhibition) of its physiological activity. The experience with gene therapy came in very useful for optogenetics. However, unlike gene therapy, which is aimed at repairing damaged genes or replacing them with healthy ones, optogenetics is focused on protein genes delivery for further molecular control of the cell. In retina, the loss of photoreceptors is not necessarily followed by neuronal loss (at least ganglion cells remain intact), which determines the practicability of prosthetic treatment. Clinical trials can now be considered, owing to the first successful conversion of ganglion cells of mouse degenerative retinas into artificial photoreceptive cells with ON and OFF receptive fields, which is crucial for spatial vision. The following issues are reviewed here in detail: 1. Choice of cell targets within the degenerative retina. 2. Strategy of utilizing the existing light-sensitive agents and development of new optogenetic tools. 3. Gene delivery and expression in retinal cells. 4. Methods of evaluating the treatment success. 5. Selection criteria for optogenetic prosthetics. The conclusion discusses currently unsolved problems and prospects for optogenetic approaches to retinal prosthetics.

  2. Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Associated with Congenital Retinal Macrovessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Shinji; Endoh, Katsuhisa; Tampo, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report a case of retinal microvascular abnormalities in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) associated with congenital retinal macrovessels. An abnormal retinal macrovessel, crossing the macula horizontally, was detected in the right eye. Additionally, retinal microvascular abnormalities were detected. Eight years after the initial visit, the retinal microvascular abnormalities were noted to have changed substantially. We speculate that retinal microvascular abnormalities in NF1 may change dynamically over the years. PMID:23781366

  3. Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Associated with Congenital Retinal Macrovessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Makino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a case of retinal microvascular abnormalities in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 associated with congenital retinal macrovessels. An abnormal retinal macrovessel, crossing the macula horizontally, was detected in the right eye. Additionally, retinal microvascular abnormalities were detected. Eight years after the initial visit, the retinal microvascular abnormalities were noted to have changed substantially. We speculate that retinal microvascular abnormalities in NF1 may change dynamically over the years.

  4. Bilateral patching in retinal detachment: fluid mechanics and retinal "settling".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William J

    2011-07-20

    When a patient suffers a retinal detachment and surgery is delayed, it is known clinically that bilaterally patching the patient may allow the retina to partially reattach or "settle." Although this procedure has been performed since the 1860s, there is still debate as to how such a maneuver facilitates the reattachment of the retina. Finite element calculations using commercially available analysis software are used to elucidate the influence of reduction in eye movement caused by bilateral patching on the flow of subretinal fluid in a physical model of retinal detachment. It was found that by coupling fluid mechanics with structural mechanics, a physically consistent explanation of increased retinal detachment with eye movements can be found in the case of traction on the retinal hole. Large eye movements increase vitreous traction and detachment forces on the edge of the retinal hole, creating a subretinal vacuum and facilitating increased subretinal fluid. Alternative models, in which intraocular fluid flow is redirected into the subretinal space, are not consistent with these simulations. The results of these simulations explain the physical principles behind bilateral patching and provide insight that can be used clinically. In particular, as is known clinically, bilateral patching may facilitate a decrease in the height of a retinal detachment. The results described here provide a description of a physical mechanism underlying this technique. The findings of this study may aid in deciding whether to bilaterally patch patients and in counseling patients on pre- and postoperative care.

  5. Taurine Provides Neuroprotection against Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23115615

  6. Taurine provides neuroprotection against retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Froger

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cell (RGC degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats. After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%, whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases.

  7. Taurine provides neuroprotection against retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases.

  8. Effect of retinal ischemia on the non-image forming visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Fleitas, María Florencia; Bordone, Melina; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Dorfman, Damián

    2015-03-01

    Retinal ischemic injury is an important cause of visual impairment. The loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is a key sign of retinal ischemic damage. A subset of RGCs expressing the photopigment melanopsin (mRGCs) regulates non-image-forming visual functions such as the pupillary light reflex (PLR), and circadian rhythms. We studied the effect of retinal ischemia on mRGCs and the non-image-forming visual system function. For this purpose, transient ischemia was induced by raising intraocular pressure to 120 mm Hg for 40 min followed by retinal reperfusion by restoring normal pressure. At 4 weeks post-treatment, animals were subjected to electroretinography and histological analysis. Ischemia induced a significant retinal dysfunction and histological alterations. At this time point, a significant decrease in the number of Brn3a(+) RGCs and in the anterograde transport from the retina to the superior colliculus and lateral geniculate nucleus was observed, whereas no differences in the number of mRGCs, melanopsin levels, and retinal projections to the suprachiasmatic nuclei and the olivary pretectal nucleus were detected. At low light intensity, a decrease in pupil constriction was observed in intact eyes contralateral to ischemic eyes, whereas at high light intensity, retinal ischemia did not affect the consensual PLR. Animals with ischemia in both eyes showed a conserved locomotor activity rhythm and a photoentrainment rate which did not differ from control animals. These results suggest that the non-image forming visual system was protected against retinal ischemic damage.

  9. AUTOMATIC RETINAL VESSEL TORTUOSITY MEASUREMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhal Khdhair El Abbadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vascular vessels have the role to indicate the retinal diseases and for systematic diseases when there are any abnormalities in retinal vascular pattern. A characteristic of the vascular pattern that is appreciated by clinicians is vascular tortuosity, i.e., how curved or kinked a blood vessel, either vein or artery, appears along its course. In this study we suggest a novel mask filter to track the blood vessel along its course and measuring the blood vessels tortuosity over the entire human retinal vessel network in fundus eye image, by using the arc to chord ratio. The suggested algorithm tested with straight and curve hand drawing lines and gives high accurate results.

  10. [Retinal vasculitis in lupic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, P; Laroche, L; Krulik, M; Prier, A M; Saraux, H; Canuel, C; Debray, J

    1985-01-01

    Three cases of retinal vasculitis in SLE-type diseases are reported. The first was central retinal vein occlusion occurring during clinical remission of SLE in a 55 year old black female. Prednisone maintenance therapy was unchanged and visual loss rapidly regressed with heparin therapy. The second case was a 33 year old black female in whom SLE was discovered following relapsing bilateral optic neuritis. A progressive visual improvement was obtained with high dose of prednisone (1 mg/kg/day). The third cas was a 17 year old white girl with retinal vasculitis. She had an unclassified connective tissue disease inaugurated by optic neuritis at the age of 10. High dose prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) was effective on the visual loss. Retinal vasculitis lesions in SLE and their therapy are reviewed.

  11. Notch signaling induces retinal stem-like properties in perinatal neural retina progenitors and promotes symmetric divisions in adult retinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balenci, Laurent; van der Kooy, Derek

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating retinal stem cell (RSC) activity is fundamental for future stem cell-based therapeutic purposes. By combining gain and loss of function approaches, we addressed whether Notch signaling may play a selective role in retinal stem versus retinal progenitor cells in both developing and adult eyes. Inhibition of either Notch or fibroblast growth factor signaling reduced proliferation of retinal stem and retinal progenitor cells, and inhibited RSC self-renewal. Conversely, exogenous Delta-like 3 and direct intrinsic Notch activation stimulated expansionary symmetric divisions in adult RSCs with the concomitant upregulation of Hes5. Knocking down Hes5 expression specifically decreased the numbers, but not the diameters, of adult RSC primary spheres, indicating that HES5 is the downstream effector of Notch receptor in controlling adult RSC proliferation. In addition, constitutive Notch activation induced retinal stem-like asymmetric self-renewal properties, with no expansion (no symmetrical division) in perinatal neural retina progenitor cells. These findings highlight central roles of Notch signaling activity in regulating the modes of division of retinal stem and retinal progenitor cells.

  12. Vsx2 controls eye organogenesis and retinal progenitor identity via homeodomain and non-homeodomain residues required for high affinity DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Zou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The homeodomain and adjacent CVC domain in the visual system homeobox (VSX proteins are conserved from nematodes to humans. Humans with missense mutations in these regions of VSX2 have microphthalmia, suggesting both regions are critical for function. To assess this, we generated the corresponding mutations in mouse Vsx2. The homeodomain mutant protein lacked DNA binding activity and the knock-in mutant phenocopied the null mutant, ocular retardation J. The CVC mutant protein exhibited weakened DNA binding; and, although the corresponding knock-in allele was recessive, it unexpectedly caused the strongest phenotype, as indicated by severe microphthalmia and hyperpigmentation of the neural retina. This occurred through a cryptic transcriptional feedback loop involving the transcription factors Mitf and Otx1 and the Cdk inhibitor p27(Kip1. Our data suggest that the phenotypic severity of the CVC mutant depends on the weakened DNA binding activity elicited by the CVC mutation and a previously unknown protein interaction between Vsx2 and its regulatory target Mitf. Our data also suggest that an essential function of the CVC domain is to assist the homeodomain in high-affinity DNA binding, which is required for eye organogenesis and unhindered execution of the retinal progenitor program in mammals. Finally, the genetic and phenotypic behaviors of the CVC mutation suggest it has the characteristics of a recessive neomorph, a rare type of genetic allele.

  13. Retinal prosthesis for the blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Eyal; Maia, Mauricio; Weiland, James D; Greenberg, Robert J; Fujii, Gildo Y; Torres, Gustavo; Piyathaisere, Duke V; O'Hearn, Thomas M; Liu, Wentai; Lazzi, Gianluca; Dagnelie, Gislin; Scribner, Dean A; de Juan, Eugene; Humayun, Mark S

    2002-01-01

    Most of current concepts for a visual prosthesis are based on neuronal electrical stimulation at different locations along the visual pathways within the central nervous system. The different designs of visual prostheses are named according to their locations (i.e., cortical, optic nerve, subretinal, and epiretinal). Visual loss caused by outer retinal degeneration in diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration can be reversed by electrical stimulation of the retina or the optic nerve (retinal or optic nerve prostheses, respectively). On the other hand, visual loss caused by inner or whole thickness retinal diseases, eye loss, optic nerve diseases (tumors, ischemia, inflammatory processes etc.), or diseases of the central nervous system (not including diseases of the primary and secondary visual cortices) can be reversed by a cortical visual prosthesis. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of current and future concepts of retinal and optic nerve prostheses. This article will begin with general considerations that are related to all or most of visual prostheses and then concentrate on the retinal and optic nerve designs. The authors believe that the field has grown beyond the scope of a single article so cortical prostheses will be described only because of their direct effect on the concept and technical development of the other prostheses, and this will be done in a more general and historic perspective.

  14. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability.

  15. The mechanics of retinal detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tom; Siegel, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We present a model of the mechanical and fluid forces associated with exudative retinal detachments where the retinal photoreceptor cells separate typically from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By computing the total fluid volume flow arising from transretinal, vascular, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pump currents, we determine the conditions under which the subretinal fluid pressure exceeds the maximum yield stress holding the retina and RPE together, giving rise to an irreversible, extended retinal delamination. We also investigate localized, blister-like retinal detachments by balancing mechanical tension in the retina with both the retina-RPE adhesion energy and the hydraulic pressure jump across the retina. For detachments induced by traction forces, we find a critical radius beyond which the blister is unstable to growth. Growth of a detached blister can also be driven by inflamed tissue within which e.g., the hydraulic conductivities of the retina or choroid increase, the RPE pumps fail, or the adhesion properties change. We determine the parameter regimes in which the blister either becomes unstable to growth, remains stable and finite-sized, or shrinks, allowing possible healing. This work supported by the Army Research Office through grant 58386MA

  16. Heritability of Retinal Vascular Fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Broe, Rebecca; Kessel, Line

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the genetic contribution to the pattern of retinal vascular branching expressed by its fractal dimension. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 50 monozygotic and 49 dizygotic, same-sex twin pairs aged 20 to 46 years. In 50°, disc-centered fundus photographs, the reti......Purpose: To determine the genetic contribution to the pattern of retinal vascular branching expressed by its fractal dimension. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 50 monozygotic and 49 dizygotic, same-sex twin pairs aged 20 to 46 years. In 50°, disc-centered fundus photographs......, the retinal vascular fractal dimension was measured using the box-counting method and compared within monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs using Pearson correlation coefficients. Falconer's formula and quantitative genetic models were used to determine the genetic component of variation. Results: The mean......, the branching pattern of the retinal vessels demonstrated a higher structural similarity in monozygotic than in dizygotic twin pairs. The retinal vascular fractal dimension was mainly determined by genetic factors, which accounted for 54% of the variation. The genetically predetermination of the retinal...

  17. Insulin analogues may accelerate progression of diabetic retinopathy after impairment of inner blood-retinal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Abdullah; Kar, Taner; Aksoy, Yakup; Özalper, Veysel; Başbuğ, Barbaros

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy regresses after spontaneous infarction or surgical ablation of pituitary gland. Growth hormone deficiency seems to be a protective factor for development of diabetic retinopathy in dwarfs. Despite the same glycemic control, development of diabetic retinopathy is significantly higher in pubertal subjects than pre-pubertal subjects. These evidences indicate a strong relationship between growth hormone and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is the most important mediator of effects of growth hormone (GH). It stimulates IGF-1 receptor. Insulin analogues also stimulate IGF-1 receptor. Therefore insulin analogues may show similar effects like growth hormone and deteriorate diabetic retinopathy. However we suggest that impairment degree of inner blood-retinal barrier should be considered for this claim. We hypothesize that insulin analogues have dual effects (beneficial and worsening) depending on stage of impairment of inner blood-retinal barrier. Insulin analogues protect pericytes and blood-retinal barrier by decreasing blood glucose level. Analogues may pass into the retinal tissue in very low amounts when inner blood-retinal barrier is intact. Therefore, insulin analogues may not deteriorate diabetic retinopathy but also have beneficial effect by protecting blood-retinal barrier at this stage. However, they may pass into the retinal tissue in much more amounts when inner blood-retinal barrier impairs. Analogues may deteriorate cellular composition of retina through stimulation of IGF-1 receptors. A number of different cell types, including glia, retinal pigment epithelial cells and fibroblast-like cells have been identified in diabetic epiretinal tissues. Insulin analogues may cause proliferation in these cells. A type of glial cell named Non-astrocytic Inner Retinal Glia-like (NIRG) cell was identified to be stimulated and proliferate by IGF-1. IGF has been reported to generate traction force in retinal

  18. Identification of retinal transformation hot spots in developing Drosophila epithelia.

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    Claire L Salzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The retinal determination (RD network is an evolutionarily conserved regulatory circuit that governs early events in the development of eyes throughout the animal kingdom. Ectopic expression of many members of this network leads to the transformation of non-retinal epithelia into eye tissue. An often-overlooked observation is that only particular cell-populations within a handful of tissues are capable of having their primary developmental instructions superseded and overruled. METHODOLOGY/PRELIMINARY FINDINGS: Here we confirm that indeed, only a discrete number of cell populations within the imaginal discs that give rise to the head, antenna, legs, wings and halteres have the cellular plasticity to have their developmental fates altered. In contrast to previous reports, we find that all transformable cell populations do not lie within the TGFbeta or Hedgehog signaling domains. Additionally neither signaling cascade alone is sufficient for non-retinal cell types to be converted into retinal tissue. The transformation "hot spots" that we have identified appear to coincide with several previously defined transdetermination "weak spots", suggesting that ectopic eye formation is less the result of one network overriding the orders of another, as previously thought, but rather is the physical manifestation of redirecting cell populations of enormous cellular plasticity. We also demonstrate that the initiation of eye formation in non-retinal tissues occurs asynchronously compared to that of the normal eye suggesting that retinal development is not under the control of a global developmental clock. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the subregions of non-retinal tissues that are capable of supporting eye formation represent specialized cell-populations that have a different level of plasticity than other cells within these tissues and may be the founder cells of each tissue.

  19. Neuropilin 1 Involvement in Choroidal and Retinal Neovascularisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Robredo, Patricia; Sim, Dawn A.; Fruttiger, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Inhibiting VEGF is the gold standard treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It is also effective in preventing retinal oedema and neovascularisation (NV) in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinal vein occlusions (RVO). Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) is a co-receptor for VEGF and many other growth factors, and therefore a possible alternative drug target in intra ocular neovascular disease. Here we assessed choroidal and retinal NV in an inducible, endothelial specific knock out model for Nrp1. Methods Crossing Nrp1 floxed mice with Pdgfb-CreERT2 mice produced tamoxifen-inducible, endothelial specific Nrp1 knock out mice (Nrp1ΔEC) and Cre-negative, control littermates. Cre-recombinase activity was confirmed in the Ai3(RCL-EYFP) reporter strain. Animals were subjected to laser-induced CNV (532 nm) and spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was performed immediately after laser and at day 7. Fluorescein angiography (FA) evaluated leakage and postmortem lectin staining in flat mounted RPE/choroid complexes was also used to measure CNV. Furthermore, retinal neovascularisation in the oxygen induced retinopathy (OIR) model was assessed by immunohistochemistry in retinal flatmounts. Results In vivo FA, OCT and post-mortem lectin staining showed a statistically significant reduction in leakage (p<0.05), CNV volume (p<0.05) and CNV area (p<0.05) in the Nrp1ΔEC mice compared to their Cre-negative littermates. Also the OIR model showed reduced retinal NV in the mutant animals compared to wild types (p<0.001). Conclusion We have demonstrated reduced choroidal and retinal NV in animals that lack endothelial Nrp1, confirming a role of Nrp1 in those processes. Therefore, Nrp1 may be a promising drug target for neovascular diseases in the eye. PMID:28107458

  20. Determination of retinal surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagra, Manbir; Gilmartin, Bernard; Thai, Ngoc Jade; Logan, Nicola S

    2017-09-01

    Previous attempts at determining retinal surface area and surface area of the whole eye have been based upon mathematical calculations derived from retinal photographs, schematic eyes and retinal biopsies of donor eyes. 3-dimensional (3-D) ocular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a more direct measurement, it can be used to image the eye in vivo, and there is no risk of tissue shrinkage. The primary purpose of this study is to compare, using T2-weighted 3D MRI, retinal surface areas for superior-temporal (ST), inferior-temporal (IT), superior-nasal (SN) and inferior-nasal (IN) retinal quadrants. An ancillary aim is to examine whether inter-quadrant variations in area are concordant with reported inter-quadrant patterns of susceptibility to retinal breaks associated with posterior vitreous detachment (PVD). Seventy-three adult participants presenting without retinal pathology (mean age 26.25 ± 6.06 years) were scanned using a Siemens 3-Tesla MRI scanner to provide T2-weighted MR images that demarcate fluid-filled internal structures for the whole eye and provide high-contrast delineation of the vitreous-retina interface. Integrated MRI software generated total internal ocular surface area (TSA). The second nodal point was used to demarcate the origin of the peripheral retina in order to calculate total retinal surface area (RSA) and quadrant retinal surface areas (QRSA) for ST, IT, SN, and IN quadrants. Mean spherical error (MSE) was -2.50 ± 4.03D and mean axial length (AL) 24.51 ± 1.57 mm. Mean TSA and RSA for the RE were 2058 ± 189 and 1363 ± 160 mm(2) , respectively. Repeated measures anova for QRSA data indicated a significant difference within-quadrants (P area/mm increase in AL. Although the differences between QRSAs are relatively small, there was evidence of concordance with reported inter-quadrant patterns of susceptibility to retinal breaks associated with PVD. The data allow AL to be converted to QRSAs, which will assist further

  1. ACUTE RETINAL ARTERIAL OCCLUSIVE DISORDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The initial section deals with basic sciences; among the various topics briefly discussed are the anatomical features of ophthalmic, central retinal and cilioretinal arteries which may play a role in acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Crucial information required in the management of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is the length of time the retina can survive following that. An experimental study shows that CRAO for 97 minutes produces no detectable permanent retinal damage but there is a progressive ischemic damage thereafter, and by 4 hours the retina has suffered irreversible damage. In the clinical section, I discuss at length various controversies on acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders. Classification of acute retinal arterial ischemic disorders These are of 4 types: CRAO, branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), cotton wools spots and amaurosis fugax. Both CRAO and BRAO further comprise multiple clinical entities. Contrary to the universal belief, pathogenetically, clinically and for management, CRAO is not one clinical entity but 4 distinct clinical entities – non-arteritic CRAO, non-arteritic CRAO with cilioretinal artery sparing, arteritic CRAO associated with giant cell arteritis (GCA) and transient non-arteritic CRAO. Similarly, BRAO comprises permanent BRAO, transient BRAO and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO), and the latter further consists of 3 distinct clinical entities - non-arteritic CLRAO alone, non-arteritic CLRAO associated with central retinal vein occlusion and arteritic CLRAO associated with GCA. Understanding these classifications is essential to comprehend fully various aspects of these disorders. Central retinal artery occlusion The pathogeneses, clinical features and management of the various types of CRAO are discussed in detail. Contrary to the prevalent belief, spontaneous improvement in both visual acuity and visual fields does occur, mainly during the first 7 days. The incidence of spontaneous visual

  2. Physiological variation of segmented OCT retinal layer thicknesses is short-lasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Lisanne; Mayer, Markus; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Petzold, Axel

    2013-12-01

    The application of spectral domain optical coherence tomography as a surrogate for neurodegeneration in a range of neurological disorders demands better understanding of the physiological variation of retinal layer thicknesses, which may mask any value of this emerging outcome measure. A prospective study compared retinal layer thicknesses between control subjects (n = 15) and runners (n = 27) participating in a 10-km charity run. Three scans were performed using an eye-tracking function (EBF) and automated scan registration for optimal precision at (1) baseline, (2) directly after the run, and (3) following a rehydration period. Retinal layer segmentation was performed with suppression of axial retinal vessel signal artifacts. Following the run, there was an increase in the relative retinal nerve fibre layer (p = 0.018), the combined inner plexiform/ganglion cell layer (p = 0.038), and the outer nuclear layer (p = 0.018) in runners compared to controls. The initial increase of thickness in the outer nuclear layer of runners (p < 0.0001) was likely related to (noncompliant) rehydration during exercise. Following a period of rest and rehydration, the difference in thickness change for all retinal layers, except the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) (p < 0.05), disappeared between the two groups. There is a quantifiable change in the axial thickness of retinal layersthat which can be explained by an increase in the cellular volume. This effect may potentially be caused by H2O volume shifts.

  3. Influence of cataract surgery and blood pressure changes caused by sodium restriction on retinal vascular diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takatoshi Tano

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Takatoshi Tano1, Yoshimune Hiratsuka2, Koichi Ono1, Akira Murakami11Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo; 2National Institute of Public Health, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: To investigate the impact of cataract surgery and blood pressure changes induced by one week of sodium restriction on retinal vascular diameter.Methods: Fundus photographs of 200 patients were obtained before and one week after cataract surgery. For one week after admission, 100 patients received sodium restriction and 100 patients (ie, the control group did not receive sodium restriction. The diameter of the retinal vessels and blood pressure were compared between the sodium restriction group and the control group. The vascular diameter was measured using an objective computer-based method.Results: Neither group had a significant change in the diameter of the retinal vessels after cataract surgery. Although there was no significant change in retinal arterial and venular diameter in the sodium restriction group, one-week sodium restriction significantly reduced mean blood pressure. However, multiple linear regression analyses indicated that an increase in retinal arteriolar diameter was significantly associated with diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and alcohol intake.Conclusion: Cataract surgery and blood pressure reduction induced by one week of sodium restriction resulted in no significant change in retinal arteriolar diameter.Keywords: cataract surgery, hypertension, retinal blood vessel diameter, retinal fundus camera, sodium restriction.

  4. Investigation of Retinal Spatial Interaction Using mfERG Stimulation

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    Patrick H. W. Chu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adaptation is one of the key characteristic of our vision which can maximize the visual function. It applies to both spatial and temporal characteristics. The fast flickering stimulation characteristics of the multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG can be applied to analyze retinal interactions between flashes and to investigate retinal temporal processing mechanism. Besides, its localized stimulus pattern can also be used as a tool for investigation of retinal spatial interaction. Methods: The mfERG recordings were obtained from 13 eyes of 9, normal, six-week-old Yorkshire pigs. The control mfERG was measured using the pattern consisting of 103 nonscaled hexagons, where each hexagon will follow a pre-set m-sequence. Nine isolated hexagons from the 103 nonscaled pattern were chosen in the masking mfERG stimulation, where the remaining hexagons were kept at constant luminance. First-order and the second-order kernel responses were analyzed, which represent the outer and inner retinal responses, respectively. Results: The second-order kernel response amplitude from the visual streak region showed a significant enhancement under the masking stimulation. Conclusions: The enhancement found under the masking condition indicates that the retinal signal will be suppressed under surrounding flicker stimulation, and this spatial inhibitory mechanism may originate from the inner retina.

  5. Central retinal vessel blood flow after surgical treatment for central retinal vein occlusion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crama, N.; Gualino, V.; Restori, M.; Charteris, D.G.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of radial optic neurotomy and retinal endovascular surgery on retinal blood flow velocity in patients with central retinal vein occlusion. METHODS: A prospective interventional case series. RESULTS: Six patients with a central retinal

  6. Specific interaction of Gαi3 with the Oa1 G-protein coupled receptor controls the size and density of melanosomes in retinal pigment epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Young

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ocular albinism type 1, an X-linked disease characterized by the presence of enlarged melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and abnormal crossing of axons at the optic chiasm, is caused by mutations in the OA1 gene. The protein product of this gene is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR localized in RPE melanosomes. The Oa1-/- mouse model of ocular albinism reproduces the human disease. Oa1 has been shown to immunoprecipitate with the Gαi subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins from human skin melanocytes. However, the Gαi subfamily has three highly homologous members, Gαi1, Gαi2 and Gαi3 and it is possible that one or more of them partners with Oa1. We had previously shown by in-vivo studies that Gαi3-/- and Oa1-/- mice have similar RPE phenotype and decussation patterns. In this paper we analyze the specificity of the Oa1-Gαi interaction. METHODOLOGY: By using the genetic mouse models Gαi1-/-, Gαi2-/-, Gαi3-/- and the double knockout Gαi1-/-, Gαi3-/- that lack functional Gαi1, Gαi2, Gαi3, or both Gαi1 and Gαi3 proteins, respectively, we show that Gαi3 is critical for the maintenance of a normal melanosomal phenotype and that its absence is associated with changes in melanosomal size and density. GST-pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays conclusively demonstrate that Gαi3 is the only Gαi that binds to Oa1. Western blots show that Gαi3 expression is barely detectable in the Oa1-/- RPE, strongly supporting a previously unsuspected role for Gαi3 in melanosomal biogenesis. CONCLUSION: Our results identify the Oa1 transducer Gαi3 as the first downstream component in the Oa1 signaling pathway.

  7. From retinal waves to activity-dependent retinogeniculate map development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Markowitz

    Full Text Available A neural model is described of how spontaneous retinal waves are formed in infant mammals, and how these waves organize activity-dependent development of a topographic map in the lateral geniculate nucleus, with connections from each eye segregated into separate anatomical layers. The model simulates the spontaneous behavior of starburst amacrine cells and retinal ganglion cells during the production of retinal waves during the first few weeks of mammalian postnatal development. It proposes how excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms within individual cells, such as Ca(2+-activated K(+ channels, and cAMP currents and signaling cascades, can modulate the spatiotemporal dynamics of waves, notably by controlling the after-hyperpolarization currents of starburst amacrine cells. Given the critical role of the geniculate map in the development of visual cortex, these results provide a foundation for analyzing the temporal dynamics whereby the visual cortex itself develops.

  8. [Congenital retinal folds in different clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, M

    2005-01-01

    We present 12 clinical cases of congenital retinal folds with different etiologies: posterior primitive vitreous persistency and hyperplasia (7 cases),retinocytoma (1 case). retinopathy of prematurity (1 case), astrocytoma of the retina (1 case), retinal vasculitis (1 case), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (1 case). Etiopathogenic and nosological aspects are discussed; the congenital retinal folds are interpreted as a symptom in a context of a congenital or acquired vitreo-retinal pathology.

  9. Beta-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation of retinal blood vessels is reduced in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Sato, Ayumi; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of epinephrine and dopamine on retinal blood vessels in streptozotocin (STZ, 80 mg/kg, i.p.)-treated rats and age-matched control rats to determine whether diabetes mellitus alters the retinal vascular responses to circulating catecholamines. Experiments were performed 6-8 weeks after treatment with STZ or the vehicle. The fundus images were captured with the digital fundus camera system for small animals we developed and diameters of retinal blood vessels contained in the digital images were measured. Epinephrine increased the diameters of retinal blood vessels, but the vasodilator responses were reduced in diabetic rats. Dopamine produced a biphasic retinal vascular response with an initial vasoconstriction followed by a vasodilation. The vasoconstrictor effects of dopamine on retinal arterioles were enhanced in diabetic rats, whereas the difference between the two groups was abolished by treatment with propranolol. The vasodilator effect of isoproterenol, but not of the activator of adenylyl cyclase colforsin, on retinal blood vessels was reduced in diabetic rats. No difference in vasoconstriction of retinal blood vessels to phenylephrine between non-diabetic and diabetic rats was observed. The vasodilator responses of retinal blood vessels to 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium, a ganglionic nicotinic receptor agonist, were also attenuated in diabetic rats. These results suggest that diabetes mellitus alters the retinal vascular responses to circulating catecholamines and the impairment of vasodilator responses mediated by beta-adrenoceptors contributes to the alteration.

  10. Range of retinal diseases potentially treatable by AAV-vectored gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, William W; Li, Quihong; Raisler, Brian; Timmers, Adrian M; Berns, Kenneth I; Flannery, John G; LaVail, Matthew M; Lewin, Alfred S

    2004-01-01

    Viable strategies for retinal gene therapy must be designed to cope with the genetic nature of the disease and/or the primary pathologic process responsible for retinal malfunction. For dominant gene defects the aim must be to destroy the presumably toxic gene product, for recessive gene defects the direct approach aims to provide a wild-type copy of the gene to the affected retinal cell type, and for diseases of either complex or unknown genetic origin, more general cell survival strategies that deal with preserving affected retinal cells are often the best and only option. Hence examples of each type of therapy will be briefly discussed in several animal models, including ribozyme therapy for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in the transgenic P23H opsin rat, beta-PDE gene augmentation therapy for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in the rd mouse, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene therapy for autosomal dominant RP in the transgenic S334ter opsin rat and pigment epithelial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (PEDF) gene therapy for neovascular retinal disease in rodents. Each employs a recombinant AAV vectored passenger gene controlled by one of several promoters supporting either photoreceptor-specific expression or more general retinal cell expression depending on the therapeutic requirements.

  11. In-vivo imaging of the photoreceptor mosaic in retinal dystrophies and correlations with visual function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S; Doble, N; Hardy, J; Jones, S; Keltner, J; Olivier, S; Werner, J S

    2005-10-26

    To relate in-vivo microscopic retinal changes to visual function assessed with clinical tests in patients with various forms of retinal dystrophies. The UC Davis Adaptive Optics (AO) Fundus Camera was used to acquire in-vivo retinal images at the cellular level. Visual function tests, consisting of visual field analysis, multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), contrast sensitivity and color vision measures, were performed on all subjects. Five patients with different forms of retinal dystrophies and three control subjects were recruited. Cone densities were quantified for all retinal images. In all images of diseased retinas, there were extensive areas of dark space between groups of photoreceptors, where no cone photoreceptors were evident. These irregular features were not seen in healthy retinas, but were characteristic features in fundi with retinal dystrophies. There was a correlation between functional vision loss and the extent to which the irregularities occurred in retinal images. Cone densities were found to decrease with an associated decrease in retinal function. AO fundus photography is a reliable technique for assessing and quantifying the changes in the photoreceptor layer as disease progresses. Furthermore, this technique can be useful in cases where visual function tests give borderline or ambiguous results, as it allows visualization of individual photoreceptors.

  12. Distribution, markers and functions of retinal microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, L.; Yang, P.Z.; Kijlstra, A.

    2002-01-01

    Retinal microglia originate from hemopoietic cells and invade the retina from the retinal margin and the optic disc, most likely via the blood vessels of the ciliary body and iris, and the retinal vasculature, respectively. The microglial precursors that appear in the retina prior to vascularization

  13. Choroidal melanoma clinically simulating a retinal angioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, J.A.; Joffe, L.; Guibor, P.

    1978-01-01

    An amelanotic fundus lesion in a 35-year-old man was associated with a dilated retinal vessel, thus suggesting the diagnosis of retinal angioma. Fluorescein angiography and B-scan ultrasonography were not diagnostic, but a radioactive phosphorus uptake test suggested the lesion was malignant. The enucleated globe showed a malignant choroidal melanoma drained by a large retinal vein.

  14. Choroidal melanoma clinically simulating a retinal angioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, J A; Joffe, L; Guibor, P

    1978-01-01

    An amelanotic fundus lesion in a 35-year-old man was associated with a dilated retinal vessel, thus suggesting the diagnosis of retinal angioma. Fluorescein angiography and B-scan ultrasonography were not diagnostic, but a radioactive phosphorus uptake test suggested the lesion was malignant. The enucleated globe showed a malignant choroidal melanoma drained by a large retinal vein.

  15. Noninvasive Retinal Markers in Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Torp, Thomas Lee; Lundberg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The retinal vascular system is the only part of the human body available for direct, in vivo inspection. Noninvasive retinal markers are important to identity patients in risk of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Studies have correlated structural features like retinal vascular caliber and ...

  16. Exploring the retinal connectome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Shaw, Margaret V.; Yang, Jia-Hui; DeMill, David; Lauritzen, James S.; Lin, Yanhua; Rapp, Kevin D.; Mastronarde, David; Koshevoy, Pavel; Grimm, Bradley; Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A connectome is a comprehensive description of synaptic connectivity for a neural domain. Our goal was to produce a connectome data set for the inner plexiform layer of the mammalian retina. This paper describes our first retinal connectome, validates the method, and provides key initial findings. Methods We acquired and assembled a 16.5 terabyte connectome data set RC1 for the rabbit retina at ≈2 nm resolution using automated transmission electron microscope imaging, automated mosaicking, and automated volume registration. RC1 represents a column of tissue 0.25 mm in diameter, spanning the inner nuclear, inner plexiform, and ganglion cell layers. To enhance ultrastructural tracing, we included molecular markers for 4-aminobutyrate (GABA), glutamate, glycine, taurine, glutamine, and the in vivo activity marker, 1-amino-4-guanidobutane. This enabled us to distinguish GABAergic and glycinergic amacrine cells; to identify ON bipolar cells coupled to glycinergic cells; and to discriminate different kinds of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells based on their molecular signatures and activity. The data set was explored and annotated with Viking, our multiuser navigation tool. Annotations were exported to additional applications to render cells, visualize network graphs, and query the database. Results Exploration of RC1 showed that the 2 nm resolution readily recapitulated well known connections and revealed several new features of retinal organization: (1) The well known AII amacrine cell pathway displayed more complexity than previously reported, with no less than 17 distinct signaling modes, including ribbon synapse inputs from OFF bipolar cells, wide-field ON cone bipolar cells and rod bipolar cells, and extensive input from cone-pathway amacrine cells. (2) The axons of most cone bipolar cells formed a distinct signal integration compartment, with ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses targeting diverse cell types. Both ON and OFF bipolar cells receive

  17. Retinal layer location of increased retinal thickness in eyes with subclinical and clinical macular edema in diabetes type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandello, Francesco; Tejerina, Amparo Navea; Vujosevic, Stela

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify the retinal layer predominantly affected in eyes with subclinical and clinical macular edema in diabetes type 2. METHODS: A cohort of 194 type 2 diabetic eyes/patients with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (ETDRS levels 20/35) were examined with Cirrus spectral......-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) at the baseline visit (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01145599). Automated segmentation of the retinal layers of the eyes with subclinical and clinical macular edema was compared with a sample of 31 eyes from diabetic patients with normal OCT and an age......-matched control group of 58 healthy eyes. RESULTS: From the 194 eyes in the study, 62 had subclinical macular edema and 12 had clinical macular edema. The highest increases in retinal thickness (RT) were found in the inner nuclear layer (INL; 33.6% in subclinical macular edema and 81.8% in clinical macular edema...

  18. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  19. Retinal vessel diameters and their correlation with retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with pseudoexfoliation syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet; Cuneyt; Ozmen; Zeynep; Aktas; Burcin; Kepez; Yildiz; Murat; Hasanreisoglu; Berati; Hasanreisoglu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare retinal artery-vein diameters(RAVDs)of patients with pseudoexfoliation(PSX) syndrome with healthy controls and investigate the correlations between retinal nerve fiber layer(RNFL) thickness parameters and RAVDs.METHODS: Seventeen eyes with PSX and 17 eyes of age-matched controls were included in the study. All participants underwent routine ophthalmological examination, Humphrey visual field and RNFL examination by using Stratus OCT. Retinal images were obtained by using a retinal camera(Topcon 501X).RAVDs were measured from inferior nasal, inferior temporal, superior nasal and superior temporal arcuates by using IMAGEnet software. Superior, inferior, nasal,temporal and average RNFL thicknesses were recorded.RAVDs and RNFL parameters in groups and correlations were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U and Spearmann correlation tests.RESULTS: Only inferior quadrant and average RNFL thickness were detected thinner in the PSX group compared with control group(P =0.009, P =0.038,respectively). No statistically significant difference regarding RAVDs was found between two groups.CONCLUSION: RAVDs seems to be comparable in the PSX and control group. RNFL is thinner in the inferior quadrant in the PSX group. RNFL thickness and RAVDs show significant correlations in both groups. This correlation doesn’t seem to be specific to PSX.

  20. [Study on preferred retinal locus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bing-Fa; Hu, Jian-Min; Xu, Duan-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Preferred retinal locus (PRL) is always found in the age-related macular degeneration and other macular damages in patients with low vision, and it is a very important anatomic position in patients with central vision impairment to achieve the rehabilitation. In recent years, the training of preferred retinal locus (PRL) has become a research hotspot of low vision rehabilitation, it can clearly improve functional vision and quality of life. The authors reviewed relevant literatures, and summarized the definition, position, characteristics, training and clinical implications of the PRL.

  1. Angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis and retinal-choroidal anastomosis after treatments in eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Masaaki Saito,1 Tomohiro Iida,1,2 Mariko Kano,1 Kanako Itagaki11Department of Ophthalmology, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Women's Medical University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the angiographic results of retinal-retinal anastomosis (RRA and retinal-choroidal anastomosis (RCA for eyes with retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP after treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab injections as monotherapy or intravitreal bevacizumab combined with photodynamic therapy.Methods: In this interventional, consecutive case series, we retrospectively reviewed five naïve eyes from four patients (mean age 80 years treated with three consecutive monthly intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 mL injections as initial treatment, and followed up for at least 3 months. In cases with over 3 months of follow-up and having recurrence of RAP or leakage by fluorescein angiography, retreatment was performed with a single intravitreal bevacizumab injection and photodynamic therapy.Results: Indocyanine green angiography showed RRA in three eyes with subretinal neovascularization and RCA in two eyes with choroidal neovascularization at baseline. At 3 months after baseline (month 3, neither the RRA nor RCA was occluded in any eye on indocyanine green angiography. Retreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab plus photodynamic therapy was performed in three eyes at months 3 (persistent leakage on fluorescein angiography, 6, and 7 (recurrence of RAP lesion, which achieved obvious occlusion of the RRA and RCA. Mean best-corrected visual acuity improved from 0.13 to 0.21 at month 3 (P = 0.066. No complications or systemic adverse events were noted.Conclusion: Although intravitreal bevacizumab for RAP was effective in improving visual acuity during short-term follow-up, intravitreal bevacizumab could not achieve complete occlusion of RRA and RCA, which could

  2. Retinal detachment after open globe injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewski, Tomasz P; Andreoli, Christopher M; Eliott, Dean

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the development of retinal detachment (RD) after open globe trauma. Case-control study. A total of 892 patients comprising 893 open globe injuries (OGIs), of whom 255 were ultimately diagnosed with RD, with the remaining eyes serving as controls. Retrospective chart review of patients with OGIs presenting to the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary between 1999 and 2011. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the time to detachment, and multivariable logistic regression was used to define the clinical factors associated with RD after OGI. Demographic and clinical characteristics at the time of presentation after OGI, date of RD diagnosis, and last date of follow-up. Primary repair of the open globe was typically undertaken within hours of presentation. A total of 255 eyes were ultimately diagnosed with RD after open globe trauma, yielding an incidence of 29% (95% confidence interval, 26-32). For eyes that developed RD, 27% (69/255) detached within 24 hours of primary open globe repair, 47% (119/255) detached within 1 week, and 72% (183/255) detached within 1 month. Multivariable regression analysis revealed the presence of vitreous hemorrhage (odds ratio [OR], 7.29; P Globe Injury score. Retinal detachment is common after open globe trauma, although often not appearing until days to weeks after the initial traumatic event. Several clinical variables at the time of initial presentation can predict the future risk of detachment. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Automated detection of retinal whitening in malarial retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, V.; Agurto, C.; Barriga, S.; Nemeth, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Lewallen, S.; Harding, S.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe neurological complication associated with malarial infection. Malaria affects approximately 200 million people worldwide, and claims 600,000 lives annually, 75% of whom are African children under five years of age. Because most of these mortalities are caused by the high incidence of CM misdiagnosis, there is a need for an accurate diagnostic to confirm the presence of CM. The retinal lesions associated with malarial retinopathy (MR) such as retinal whitening, vessel discoloration, and hemorrhages, are highly specific to CM, and their detection can improve the accuracy of CM diagnosis. This paper will focus on development of an automated method for the detection of retinal whitening which is a unique sign of MR that manifests due to retinal ischemia resulting from CM. We propose to detect the whitening region in retinal color images based on multiple color and textural features. First, we preprocess the image using color and textural features of the CMYK and CIE-XYZ color spaces to minimize camera reflex. Next, we utilize color features of the HSL, CMYK, and CIE-XYZ channels, along with the structural features of difference of Gaussians. A watershed segmentation algorithm is used to assign each image region a probability of being inside the whitening, based on extracted features. The algorithm was applied to a dataset of 54 images (40 with whitening and 14 controls) that resulted in an image-based (binary) classification with an AUC of 0.80. This provides 88% sensitivity at a specificity of 65%. For a clinical application that requires a high specificity setting, the algorithm can be tuned to a specificity of 89% at a sensitivity of 82%. This is the first published method for retinal whitening detection and combining it with the detection methods for vessel discoloration and hemorrhages can further improve the detection accuracy for malarial retinopathy.

  4. [Progress of research in retinal image registration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lun; Wei, Lifang; Pan, Lin

    2011-10-01

    The retinal image registration has important applications in the processes of auxiliary diagnosis and treatment for a variety of diseases. The retinal image registration can be used to measure the disease process and the therapeutic effect. A variety of retinal image registration techniques have been studied extensively in recent years. However, there are still many problems existing and there are numerous research possibilities. Based on extensive investigation of existing literatures, the present paper analyzes the feature of retinal image and current challenges of retinal image registration, and reviews the transformation models of the retinal image registration technology and the main research algorithms in current retinal image registration, and analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of various types of algorithms. Some research challenges and future developing trends are also discussed.

  5. Interruption of Wnt signaling in Muller cells ameliorates ischemia-induced retinal neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelu Kevin Zhou

    Full Text Available Retinal Müller cells are major producers of inflammatory and angiogenic cytokines which contribute to diabetic retinopathy (DR. Over-activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway has been shown to play an important pathogenic role in DR. However, the roles of Müller cell-derived Wnt/β-catenin signaling in retinal neovascularization (NV and DR remain undefined. In the present study, mice with conditional β-catenin knockout (KO in Müller cells were generated and subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR and streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes. Wnt signaling was evaluated by measuring levels of β-catenin and expression of its target genes using immunoblotting. Retinal vascular permeability was measured using Evans blue as a tracer. Retinal NV was visualized by angiography and quantified by counting pre-retinal nuclei. Retinal pericyte loss was evaluated using retinal trypsin digestion. Electroretinography was performed to examine visual function. No abnormalities were detected in the β-catenin KO mice under normal conditions. In OIR, retinal levels of β-catenin and VEGF were significantly lower in the β-catenin KO mice than in littermate controls. The KO mice also had decreased retinal NV and vascular leakage in the OIR model. In the STZ-induced diabetic model, disruption of β-catenin in Müller cells attenuated over-expression of inflammatory cytokines and ameliorated pericyte dropout in the retina. These findings suggest that Wnt signaling activation in Müller cells contributes to retinal NV, vascular leakage and inflammation and represents a potential therapeutic target for DR.

  6. Retinal imaging and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramoff, M.D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindne

  7. [Surgical managment of retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haritoglou, C; Wolf, A

    2015-05-01

    The detachment of the neurosensory retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium can be related to breaks of the retina allowing vitreous fluid to gain access to the subretinal space, to exudative changes of the choroid such as tumours or inflammatory diseases or to excessive tractional forces exerted by interactions of the collagenous vitreous and the retina. Tractional retinal detachment is usually treated by vitrectomy and exudative detachment can be addressed by treatment of the underlying condition in many cases. In rhegmatogenous retinal detachment two different surgical procedures, vitrectomy and scleral buckling, can be applied for functional and anatomic rehabilitation of our patients. The choice of the surgical procedure is not really standardised and often depends on the experience of the surgeon and other more ocular factors including lens status, the number of retinal breaks, the extent of the detachment and the amount of preexisting PVR. Using both techniques, anatomic success rates of over 90 % can be achieved. Especially in young phakic patients scleral buckling offers the true advantage to prevent the progression of cataract formation requiring cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Therefore, scleral buckling should be considered in selected cases as an alternative surgical option in spite of the very important technical refinements in modern vitrectomy techniques. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Gene Therapy in a Large Animal Model of PDE6A-Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya M. Mowat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite mutations in the rod phosphodiesterase 6-alpha (PDE6A gene being well-recognized as a cause of human retinitis pigmentosa, no definitive treatments have been developed to treat this blinding disease. We performed a trial of retinal gene augmentation in the Pde6a mutant dog using Pde6a delivery by capsid-mutant adeno-associated virus serotype 8, previously shown to have a rapid onset of transgene expression in the canine retina. Subretinal injections were performed in 10 dogs at 29–44 days of age, and electroretinography and vision testing were performed to assess functional outcome. Retinal structure was assessed using color fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and histology. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine transgene expression and expression of other retinal genes. Treatment resulted in improvement in dim light vision and evidence of rod function on electroretinographic examination. Photoreceptor layer thickness in the treated area was preserved compared with the contralateral control vector treated or uninjected eye. Improved rod and cone photoreceptor survival, rhodopsin localization, cyclic GMP levels and bipolar cell dendrite distribution was observed in treated areas. Some adverse effects including foci of retinal separation, foci of retinal degeneration and rosette formation were identified in both AAV-Pde6a and control vector injected regions. This is the first description of successful gene augmentation for Pde6a retinitis pigmentosa in a large animal model. Further studies will be necessary to optimize visual outcomes and minimize complications before translation to human studies.

  9. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and visual hallucinations in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Young; Kim, Jae Min; Ahn, Jeeyun; Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beom S; Kim, Tae Wan

    2014-01-01

    Defective visual information processing from both central and peripheral pathways is one of the suggested mechanisms of visual hallucination in Parkinson's disease (PD). To investigate the role of retinal thinning for visual hallucination in PD, we conducted a case-control study using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. We examined a representative sample of 61 patients with PD and 30 healthy controls who had no history of ophthalmic diseases. General ophthalmologic examinations and optical coherence tomography scans were performed in each participant. Total macular thickness and the thickness of each retinal layer on horizontal scans through the fovea were compared between the groups. In a comparison between patients with PD and healthy controls, there was significant parafoveal inner nuclear layer thinning, whereas other retinal layers, including the retinal nerve fiber layer, as well as total macular thicknesses were not different. In terms of visual hallucinations among the PD subgroups, only retinal nerve fiber layer thickness differed significantly, whereas total macular thickness and the thickness of other retinal layers did not differ. The retinal nerve fiber layer was thinnest in the group that had hallucinations without dementia, followed by the group that had hallucinations with dementia, and the group that had no hallucinations and no dementia. General ophthalmologic examinations did not reveal any significant correlation with hallucinations. There were no significant correlations between retinal thicknesses and duration or severity of PD and medication dosages. The results indicate that retinal nerve fiber layer thinning may be related to visual hallucination in nondemented patients with PD. Replication studies as well as further studies to elucidate the mechanism of thinning are warranted.

  10. Retinal detachment in a patient with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Muh-Shy; Ho, Tzyy-Chang; Chang, Ching-Chung; Hou, Ping-Kang

    2007-01-01

    We report extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers in a 42-year-old patient with retinal detachment. Fundus examination revealed a horseshoe-shaped tear near the temporal edge. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed and firm vitreo-retinal adhesion was noticed in the area of extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers. Following vitrectomy with silicone oil tamponade, the retina was reattached successfully. In conclusion, retinal detachment may develop in patients with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers. Vitrectomy may be performed to treat this condition.

  11. Clinical trials in branch retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandava Krishnan Panakanti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO is the second most common retinal vascular disorder. The management of macular edema has changed considerably over time. The laser is considered the gold standard treatment for over two decades. However, visual recovery with laser is usually slow and incomplete. The advent of intravitreal agents, specifically anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF have heralded a new era which promises rapid recovery of vision and quality of vision. Randomized clinical trials have reported optimal results with anti-VEGF agents (ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept compared to laser therapy or steroids. However, nearly 50% of the patients require repeat intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy up to 4 years after initiating therapy to sustain the visual gains. The adverse events (systemic and ocular of these agents are minimal. Monotherapy with anti-VEGF agents have been found to provide better results than any combination with laser. This review article summarizes evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment options for the treatment of macular edema secondary to BRVO with a special focus on anti-VEGF therapy.

  12. Clinical Trials in Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panakanti, Tandava Krishnan; Chhablani, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) is the second most common retinal vascular disorder. The management of macular edema has changed considerably over time. The laser is considered the gold standard treatment for over two decades. However, visual recovery with laser is usually slow and incomplete. The advent of intravitreal agents, specifically anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) have heralded a new era which promises rapid recovery of vision and quality of vision. Randomized clinical trials have reported optimal results with anti-VEGF agents (ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept) compared to laser therapy or steroids. However, nearly 50% of the patients require repeat intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy up to 4 years after initiating therapy to sustain the visual gains. The adverse events (systemic and ocular) of these agents are minimal. Monotherapy with anti-VEGF agents have been found to provide better results than any combination with laser. This review article summarizes evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment options for the treatment of macular edema secondary to BRVO with a special focus on anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:26957837

  13. Visual advantage in deaf adults linked to retinal changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Codina

    Full Text Available The altered sensory experience of profound early onset deafness provokes sometimes large scale neural reorganisations. In particular, auditory-visual cross-modal plasticity occurs, wherein redundant auditory cortex becomes recruited to vision. However, the effect of human deafness on neural structures involved in visual processing prior to the visual cortex has never been investigated, either in humans or animals. We investigated neural changes at the retina and optic nerve head in profoundly deaf (N = 14 and hearing (N = 15 adults using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT, an in-vivo light interference method of quantifying retinal micro-structure. We compared retinal changes with behavioural results from the same deaf and hearing adults, measuring sensitivity in the peripheral visual field using Goldmann perimetry. Deaf adults had significantly larger neural rim areas, within the optic nerve head in comparison to hearing controls suggesting greater retinal ganglion cell number. Deaf adults also demonstrated significantly larger visual field areas (indicating greater peripheral sensitivity than controls. Furthermore, neural rim area was significantly correlated with visual field area in both deaf and hearing adults. Deaf adults also showed a significantly different pattern of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL distribution compared to controls. Significant correlations between the depth of the RNFL at the inferior-nasal peripapillary retina and the corresponding far temporal and superior temporal visual field areas (sensitivity were found. Our results show that cross-modal plasticity after early onset deafness may not be limited to the sensory cortices, noting specific retinal adaptations in early onset deaf adults which are significantly correlated with peripheral vision sensitivity.

  14. Quantitative retinal blood flow mapping from fluorescein videoangiography using tracer kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M; Guthrie, Micah; Hones, Logan; Sinha, Lagnojita; St Lawrence, Keith; Kang-Mieler, Jennifer J

    2015-05-15

    Abnormal retinal blood flow (RBF) has been associated with numerous retinal pathologies, yet existing methods for measuring RBF predominantly provide only relative measures of blood flow and are unable to quantify volumetric blood flow, which could allow direct patient to patient comparison. This work presents a methodology based on linear systems theory and an image-based arterial input function to quantitatively map volumetric blood flow from standard fluorescein videoangiography data, and is therefore directly translatable to the clinic. Application of the approach to fluorescein retinal videoangiography in rats (4 control, 4 diabetic) demonstrated significantly higher RBF in 4-5 week diabetic rats as expected from the literature.

  15. Effect of lidocaine on retinal aquaporin-4 expression after ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liying He; Li Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have demonstrated that high doses of lidocaine can reduce edema in rats with brain injury by down-regulating aquaporin-4 (AQP4) expression. The hypothesis for the present study is that lidocaine could retinal edema that is associated with AQP4 expression.OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate the interventional effects of lidocaine on retinal AQP4 expression and retinal edema following ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This study, a randomized, controlled, animal experiment, was performed at the Basic Research Institute, Chongqing Medical University from September 2006 to May 2007.MATERIALS: Seventy-five, healthy, adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats were included. A total of 50 rats were used to establish a retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury model using an anterior chamber enhancing perfusion unit. Rabbit anti-rat AQP4 antibody was purchased from Santa Cruz Biotechnology, USA.METHODS: All 75 rats were randomly divided into three groups, with 25 rats in each: control, model, and lidocaine. At each time point (1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after modeling, five rats for each time point), each rat in the lidocaine group was intraperitoneally administered lidocaine with an initial dose of 30 mg/kg, followed by subsequent doses of 15 mg/kg every six hours. The entire treatment process lasted three days for each rat. At each above-mentioned time point, rats in the model group were modeled, but not administered any substances. Rats in the control group received the same treatments as in the lidocaine group except that lidocaine was replaceld by physiological saline.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Following hematoxylin-eosin staining, rat retinal tissue was observed to investigate retinal edema degree through the use of an optical microscope and transmission electron microscope. Retinal AQP4 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: At each above-mentioned time point, AQP4 expression was

  16. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RETINAL HEMORRHAGIC PATTERNS AND PERFUSION STATUS IN EYES WITH ACUTE CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ooto, Sotaro; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Ayako; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Hata, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate peripheral retinal hemorrhagic patterns in eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion, and to explore their clinical relevance in differentiating for the retinal perfusion status, through a prospective, and cross-sectional study. Fifty eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion were included. Retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the equator and retinal perfusion status were evaluated by ultra-wide field fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Retinal perfusion was categorized as nonischemic in 29 eyes, ischemic in 18 eyes, and undeterminable in 3 eyes. None of the examined eyes had flame-shaped retinal hemorrhages in the periphery. All hemorrhages were rounded-dot or blot and were variable in size. Particle analysis was performed to quantify hemorrhage size, and showed higher values in eyes having larger blot hemorrhages, and lower values in eyes having dot or smaller blot hemorrhages. Mean size of maximum peripheral dot or blot hemorrhage was larger in eyes classified as ischemic (10,763.0 ± 5,946.3 pixels) than as nonischemic (2,839.9 ± 1,153.6 pixels, P retinal perfusion status, which was 0.963 (P retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the equator in eyes with acute central retinal vein occlusion using particle analysis. The resulting hemorrhage size measurement was considered to be often useful in determining retinal perfusion status. Because they can be noninvasively evaluated with readily available equipment, peripheral hemorrhagic patterns might be good clinical markers of retinal perfusion.

  17. Cytomegalovirus retinitis associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Shuang; YE Jun-jie; ZHAO Jia-liang; LI Tai-sheng; HAN Yang

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is the most severe intraocular complication that results in total retinal destruction and loss of visual acuity in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study aimed to investigate the fundus characteristics, systemic manifestations and therapeutic outcomes of CMV retinitis associated with AIDS.Methods It was a retrospective case series. CMV retinitis was present in 39 eyes (25 patients). Best corrected visual acuities, anterior segment, fundus features, fundus fluorescence angiography (FFA) and CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts of the patients with CMV retinitis associated with AIDS were analyzed. Intravitreal injections of ganciclovir (400 μg) were performed in 4 eyes (2 patients).Results Retinal vasculitis, dense, full-thickness, yellow-white lesions along vascular distribution with irregular granules at the border, and hemorrhage on the retinal surface were present in 28 eyes. The vitreous was clear or mildly opaque.Late stage of the retinopathy was demonstrated in 8 eyes characterized as atrophic retina, sclerotic and attenuated vessels, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy, and optic nerve atrophy. Retinal detachment was found in 3 eyes. The average CD4+ T-lymphocyte count in peripheral blood of the patients with CMV retinitis was (30.6±25.3) ×106/L (range,(0-85) × 106/L). After intravitreal injections of ganciclovir, visual acuity was improved and fundus lesions regressed.Conclusions CMV retinitis is the most severe and the most common intraocular complication in patients with AIDS. For the patients with yellow-white retinal lesions, hemorrhage and retinal vasculitis without clear cause, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serology should be performed. Routine eye examination is also indicated in HIV positive patients.

  18. Choroidal thickness profiles in retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayton, Lauren N; Guymer, Robyn H; Luu, Chi D

    2013-01-01

    Little quantitative information exists regarding the effect that retinitis pigmentosa (RP) has on the choroid. The aim of this study was to determine choroidal thickness profiles in patients with RP. Prospective. Forty-two RP and 22 control subjects participated in the study. RP patients had mild to severe disease, with a visual acuity range of logMAR 0.1 to no light perception. Images of the retina and choroid were obtained using the enhanced depth-imaging method and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Choroidal thickness measures were determined via manual segmentation of the OCT image. The thickness profiles of the normal and RP groups were compared. The associations between choroidal thickness, visual acuity and duration of RP were determined. The choroid was thickest in the control eyes at the subfoveal location (336.60 ± 70.42 μm), and the thickness gradually decreased towards the peripheral retina (temporal 8° = 295.55 ± 60.52 μm; nasal 8° = 251.68 ± 49.93 μm). In RP, the mean thickness was also greater at the fovea (215.60 ± 94.91 μm) than the temporal (191.66 ± 72.42 μm) and nasal (149.91 ± 57.42 μm) retina, but all values were significantly lower than those of the controls (P ≤ 0.001). Subfoveal choroidal thickness was significantly correlated with visual acuity (r = -0.46, P choroid than controls. Patients with poorer visual acuity or longer duration of symptoms tended to have thinner choroids. Knowledge of choroidal thickness profile in RP is important for the field of restorative vision research and the development of suprachoroidal retinal prostheses. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  19. Retinal Inhibition of CCR3 Induces Retinal Cell Death in a Murine Model of Choroidal Neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    Full Text Available Inhibition of chemokine C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3 signaling has been considered as treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, CCR3 is expressed in neural retina from aged human donor eyes. Therefore, broad CCR3 inhibition may be harmful to the retina. We assessed the effects of CCR3 inhibition on retina and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs that develop into choroidal neovascularization (CNV. In adult murine eyes, CCR3 colocalized with glutamine-synthetase labeled Műller cells. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, CCR3 immunolocalized not only to lectin-stained cells in CNV lesions but also to the retina. Compared to non-lasered controls, CCR3 mRNA was significantly increased in laser-treated retina. An intravitreal injection of a CCR3 inhibitor (CCR3i significantly reduced CNV compared to DMSO or PBS controls. Both CCR3i and a neutralizing antibody to CCR3 increased TUNEL+ retinal cells overlying CNV, compared to controls. There was no difference in cleaved caspase-3 in laser-induced CNV lesions or in overlying retina between CCR3i- or control-treated eyes. Following CCR3i, apoptotic inducible factor (AIF was significantly increased and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2 decreased in the retina; there were no differences in retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. In cultured human Műller cells exposed to eotaxin (CCL11 and VEGF, CCR3i significantly increased TUNEL+ cells and AIF but decreased BCL2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, without affecting caspase-3 activity or VEGF. CCR3i significantly decreased AIF in RPE/choroids and immunostaining of phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (p-VEGFR2 in CNV with a trend toward reduced VEGF. In cultured CECs treated with CCL11 and/or VEGF, CCR3i decreased p-VEGFR2 and increased BCL2 without increasing TUNEL+ cells and AIF. These findings suggest that inhibition of retinal CCR3 causes retinal cell death and that targeted inhibition of CCR3 in CECs may be a safer if CCR3

  20. A randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on cognitive and retinal function in cognitively healthy older people: the Older People And n-3 Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (OPAL study protocol [ISRCTN72331636

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letley Louise

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The number of individuals with age-related cognitive impairment is rising dramatically in the UK and globally. There is considerable interest in the general hypothesis that improving the diet of older people may slow the progression of cognitive decline. To date, there has been little attention given to the possible protective role of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPs most commonly found in oily fish, in age-related loss of cognitive function. The main research hypothesis of this study is that an increased dietary intake of n-3 LCPs will have a positive effect on cognitive performance in older people in the UK. To test this hypothesis, a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial will be carried out among adults aged 70–79 years in which the intervention arm will receive daily capsules containing n-3 LCP (0.5 g/day docosahexaenoic acid and 0.2 g/day eicosapentaenoic acid while the placebo arm will receive daily capsules containing olive oil. The main outcome variable assessed at 24 months will be cognitive performance and a second major outcome variable will be retinal function. Retinal function tests are included as the retina is a specifically differentiated neural tissue and therefore represents an accessible window into the functioning of the brain. The overall purpose of this public-health research is to help define a simple and effective dietary intervention aimed at maintaining cognitive and retinal function in later life. This will be the first trial of its kind aiming to slow the decline of cognitive and retinal function in older people by increasing daily dietary intake of n-3 LCPs. The link between cognitive ability, visual function and quality of life among older people suggests that this novel line of research may have considerable public health importance.

  1. [Vitreo-retinal surgery for complicated retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J Z

    1993-07-01

    93 eyes (93 patients) of complicated retinal detachment were treated with vitreo-retinal surgery. Among the series, 75 eyes were rhegmatogenous with PVR C3-D3 in 66 eyes (88.0%), while the remaining 18 eyes were traction induced. None of the cases had giant tears or complicating diabetes. On discharge from the hospital, the operation was effective in 62 cases (66.7%), in whom the retina was totally reattached or only a small amount of subretinal fluid remained. In a group of 40 eyes where the inert gas SF6 was used, the operation was effective in 30 cases (75.0%). 41 cases were followed up postoperatively for over 3 months, averaging 13.7 months, to find the operative results stable in 33 eyes (80.5%), with the visual acuity improved in 22 cases (66.7%), unchanged in 9 cases (27.3%), and decreased in 2 cases (6.0%). The operative procedures, the peeling of pre-retinal membrane, the effect of PVR severity on the operative results, and the promotion of operative efficacy by application of wide encircling buckle and inert gas tamponade were discussed.

  2. Acute hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction in retinal arterioles in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogawa, Kenji; Nagaoka, Taiji; Izumi, Naohiro; Nakabayashi, Seigo; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the effects of acute hyperglycemia on retinal microcirculation and endothelial function in cats and removal of superoxide to prevent retinal endothelial dysfunction from hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia was induced by intravenous injection of 25% glucose to maintain the plasma glucose concentration at 30 mM. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the vessel diameter (D) and blood velocity (V) simultaneously and calculated retinal blood flow (RBF) in second-order retinal arterioles in cats. Intravitreous, endothelial-dependent vasodilator bradykinin (BK) and endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were administered into the vitreous cavity to evaluate endothelial function in the retinal arterioles. To control osmolality, 25% mannitol was administered the same way. Systemic hyperoxia was induced to noninvasively examine endothelial function during hyperglycemia. To determine the effect of the superoxide on the hyperglycemia-induced changes in the retinal circulation, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) was administered in drinking water for 14 days before the experiment. The D, V, and RBF increased with acute hyperglycemia and mannitol compared with baseline. BK-induced increases in D, V, and RBF significantly declined, whereas SNP-induced increases were unattenuated during acute hyperglycemia. Return of the decreased RBF to baseline after cessation of systemic hyperoxia was significantly (P oxidative stress. Systemic hyperoxia can be used to noninvasively evaluate retinal endothelial function during hyperglycemia.

  3. Genomic Loci Modulating the Retinal Transcriptome in Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix R. Vázquez-Chona

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study predicts and tests genetic networks that modulate gene expression during the retinal wound-healing response.Methods: Upstream modulators and target genes were defined using meta-analysis and bioinfor matic approaches. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs for retinal acute phase genes (Vazquez-Chona et al. 2005 were defi ned using QTL analysis of CNS gene expression (Chesler et al. 2005. Candidate modulators were defi ned using computational analysis of gene and motif sequences. The effect of candidate genes on wound healing was tested using animal models of gene expression.Results: A network of early wound-healing genes is modulated by a locus on chromosome 12. The genetic background of the locus altered the wound-healing response of the retina. The C57BL/6 allele conferred enhanced expression of neuronal marker Thy1 and heat-shock-like crystallins, whereas the DBA/2J allele correlated with greater levels of the classic marker of retinal stress, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Id2 and Lpin1 are candidate upstream modula tors as they strongly correlated with the segregation of DBA/2J and C57BL/6 alleles, and their dosage levels correlated with the enhanced expression of survival genes (Thy1 and crystallin genes.Conclusion: We defined a genetic network associated with the retinal acute injury response. Using genetic linkage analysis of natural transcript variation, we identified regulatory loci and candidate modulators that control transcript levels of acute phase genes. Our results support the convergence of gene expression profiling, QTL analysis, and bioinformatics as a rational approach to discover molecular pathways controlling retinal wound healing.

  4. Metabolic Memory Phenomenon and Accumulation of Peroxynitrite in Retinal Capillaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu A. Kowluru

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Diabetic retinopathy resists reversal after good glycemic control (GC is reinitiated, and preexisting damage at the time of intervention is considered as the major factor in determining the outcome of the GC. This study is to investigate the role of peroxynitrite accumulation in the retinal capillaries in the failure of retinopathy to reverse after reestablishment of GC, and to determine the effect of this reversal on the activity of the enzyme responsible for scavenging mitochondrial superoxide, MnSOD. Methods. In streptozotocin-diabetic rats, 6 months of poor glycemic control (PC, glycated hemoglobin, GHb>12.0% was followed by 6 additional months of GC (GHb about 6%. The trypsin-digested retinal microvessels were prepared for immunostaining of nitrotyrosine (a measure of peroxynitrite and for counting the number of acellular capillaries (a measure of histopathology. The retina from the other eye was used to quantify nitrotyrosine concentration, MnSOD activity and the total antioxidant capacity. Results. Reversal of hyperglycemia after 6 months of PC had no significant effect on nitrotyrosine concentration in the retina, on the nitrotyrosine-positive retinal capillary cells and on the number of acellular capillaries; the values were similar in PC-GC and PC groups. In the same rats retinal MnSOD activity remained inhibited and the total antioxidant capacity was subnormal 6 months after cessation of PC. Conclusions. Peroxynitrite accumulation in the retinal microvasculature, the site of histopathology, fails to normalize after reversal of hyperglycemia, and superoxide remains inadequately scavenged. This failure of reversal of peroxynitrite accumulation could be, in part, responsible for the resistance of diabetic retinopathy to reverse after termination of PC.

  5. Maternal enrichment during pregnancy accelerates retinal development of the fetus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sale

    Full Text Available The influence of maternal environment on fetal development is largely unexplored, the available evidence concerns only the deleterious effects elicited by prenatal stress. Here we investigated the influence of prenatal enrichment on the early development of the visual system in the fetus. We studied the anatomical development of the rat retina, by analyzing the migration of neural progenitors and the process of retinal ganglion cell death, which exerts a key role in sculpturing the developing retinal system at perinatal ages. The number of apoptotic cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer was analyzed using two distinct methods: the presence of pyknotic nuclei stained for cresyl violet and the appearance of DNA fragmentation (Tunel method. We report that environmental enrichment of the mother during pregnancy affects the structural maturation of the retina, accelerating the migration of neural progenitors and the dynamics of natural cell death. These effects seem to be under the control of insulin-like growth factor-I: its levels, higher in enriched pregnant rats and in their milk, are increased also in their offspring, its neutralization abolishes the action of maternal enrichment on retinal development and chronic insulin-like growth factor-I injection to standard-reared females mimics the effects of enrichment in the fetuses. Thus, the development of the visual system is sensitive to environmental stimulation during prenatal life. These findings could have a bearing in orienting clinical research in the field of prenatal therapy.

  6. Defective FGF signaling causes coloboma formation and disrupts retinal neurogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuyi Chen; Hua Li; Karin Gaudenz; Ariel Paulson; Fengli Guo; Rhonda Trimble; Allison Peak

    2013-01-01

    The optic fissure (OF) is a transient opening on the ventral side of the developing vertebrate eye that closes before nearly all retinal progenitor cell differentiation has occurred.Failure to close the OF results in coloboma,a congenital disease that is a major cause of childhood blindness.Although human genetic studies and animal models have linked a number of genes to coloboma,the cellular and molecular mechanisms driving the closure of the OF are still largely unclear.In this study,we used Cre-LoxP-mediated conditional removal of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors,Fgfr1 and Fgfr2,from the developing optic cup (OC) to show that FGF signaling regulates the closing of the OF.Our molecular,cellular and transcriptome analyses of Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 double conditional knockout OCs suggest that FGF signaling controls the OF closure through modulation of retinal progenitor cell proliferation,fate specification and morphological changes.Furthermore,Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 double conditional mutant retinal progenitor cells fail to initiate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) genesis.Taken together,our mouse genetic studies reveal that FGF signaling is essential for OF morphogenesis and RGC development.

  7. Pars plana vitrectomy for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen G Schwartz

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Stephen G Schwartz, Harry W Flynn JrDepartment of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USAAbstract: Pars plana vitrectomy (PPV is growing in popularity for the treatment of primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RD. PPV achieves favorable anatomic and visual outcomes in a wide variety of patients, especially in pseudophakic RD. A growing number of clinical series, both retrospective and prospective, have demonstrated generally comparable outcomes comparing PPV and scleral buckling (SB under a variety of circumstances. The Scleral Buckling Versus Primary Vitrectomy in Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment (SPR study is a multicenter, randomized, prospective, controlled clinical trial comparing SB versus PPV. This study should provide useful guidelines in the future. At this time, the choice of SB versus PPV should be based on the characteristics of the RD, the patient as a whole, and the experience and preference of the individual retinal surgeon.Keywords: pars plana vitrectomy, rhegmatogneous retinal detachment, scleral buckling

  8. Timing the generation of distinct retinal cells by homeobox proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Decembrini

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The reason why different types of vertebrate nerve cells are generated in a particular sequence is still poorly understood. In the vertebrate retina, homeobox genes play a crucial role in establishing different cell identities. Here we provide evidence of a cellular clock that sequentially activates distinct homeobox genes in embryonic retinal cells, linking the identity of a retinal cell to its time of generation. By in situ expression analysis, we found that the three Xenopus homeobox genes Xotx5b, Xvsx1, and Xotx2 are initially transcribed but not translated in early retinal progenitors. Their translation requires cell cycle progression and is sequentially activated in photoreceptors (Xotx5b and bipolar cells (Xvsx1 and Xotx2. Furthermore, by in vivo lipofection of "sensors" in which green fluorescent protein translation is under control of the 3' untranslated region (UTR, we found that the 3' UTRs of Xotx5b, Xvsx1, and Xotx2 are sufficient to drive a spatiotemporal pattern of translation matching that of the corresponding proteins and consistent with the time of generation of photoreceptors (Xotx5b and bipolar cells (Xvsx1 and Xotx2. The block of cell cycle progression of single early retinal progenitors impairs their differentiation as photoreceptors and bipolar cells, but is rescued by the lipofection of Xotx5b and Xvsx1 coding sequences, respectively. This is the first evidence to our knowledge that vertebrate homeobox proteins can work as effectors of a cellular clock to establish distinct cell identities.

  9. [Classification signs of end-stage pigmented retinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, S I; Shchuko, A G; Malyshev, V V

    2007-01-01

    Identification of objective criteria for early-stage pigmented retinitis (PR) remains urgent today. Visual system changes reflecting retinal metabolic and structural disturbances (a change in the time and amplitude parameters of ERG, an increase in dark adaptation, changes in the color palette and the thickness of layers of photoreceptors and pigment epithelium of the retina on the OST scans) were detected in 31% of the examined relatives of patients with PR. The authors show the diagnostic value of retinal optic coherent tomography in the diagnosis of PR and the expediency of its use for objective estimation of retinal structural changes along with functional studies. The statistical studies including descriptive, regression, and discriminant analyses have provided evidence that the characteristics of the visual system in patients with end-stage PR differ from those in the controls. Studies that can determine differences in the state of the visual system of the groups under study and significantly discriminate persons with the normally functioning visual system from patients with PR have been identified.

  10. Nuclear Wavepacket Propogation Model for the Retinal Chromophore in Rhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, Brittany; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2009-05-01

    Rhodopsin, consisting of a retinal chromophore and a protein opsin, is responsible for the first steps in the vision process through a cis to trans photoisomerization, which is completed within 200 fs[1]. Efforts to control the ultrafast dynamics of this molecule have been carried out experimentally[2] as well as through quantum mechanical modeling of nuclear wave packet propagation[3]. We propose a two state model in which the ground electronic Potential Energy Surface (PES) is made up of two adjacent harmonic potentials, representing the cis and trans retinal saddle points, as well as an excited PES, characterized by the Morse potential, which meets the ground PES at a conical intersection. We explore the achievement of a high quantum yield of the trans retinal configuration by varying parameters of the external field and choosing the most adequate shape. Another investigation is presented in which we compare the charge distribution of cis and trans retinal in order to reveal a charge transfer mechanism behind the isomerization of rhodopsin. The results of the Lowdin and Natural Population Analyses demonstrate a significant transfer of charge in and around the isomerization region. [1] RW Schoenlein, LA Peteanu, RA Mathies, CV Shank, Science 254, 412 (1991) [2] VI Prokhorenko, AM Nagy, SA Waschuk, LS Brown, RR Birge, RJD Miller, Science 313, 1257 (2006) [3] S Hahn, G Stock, Chem Phys 259, 297-312 (2000)

  11. Advances in Retinal Stem Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Viczian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tremendous progress has been made in recent years to generate retinal cells from pluripotent cell sources. These advances provide hope for those suffering from blindness due to lost retinal cells. Understanding the intrinsic genetic network in model organisms, like fly and frog, has led to a better understanding of the extrinsic signaling pathways necessary for retinal progenitor cell formation in mouse and human cell cultures. This review focuses on the culture methods used by different groups, which has culminated in the generation of laminated retinal tissue from both embryonic and induced pluripotent cells. The review also briefly describes advances made in transplantation studies using donor retinal progenitor and cultured retinal cells.

  12. Automatic Vessel Segmentation on Retinal Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Yuan Yu; Chia-Jen Chang; Yen-Ju Yao; Shyr-Shen Yu

    2014-01-01

    Several features of retinal vessels can be used to monitor the progression of diseases. Changes in vascular structures, for example, vessel caliber, branching angle, and tortuosity, are portents of many diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and arterial hyper-tension. This paper proposes an automatic retinal vessel segmentation method based on morphological closing and multi-scale line detection. First, an illumination correction is performed on the green band retinal image. Next, the morphological closing and subtraction processing are applied to obtain the crude retinal vessel image. Then, the multi-scale line detection is used to fine the vessel image. Finally, the binary vasculature is extracted by the Otsu algorithm. In this paper, for improving the drawbacks of multi-scale line detection, only the line detectors at 4 scales are used. The experimental results show that the accuracy is 0.939 for DRIVE (digital retinal images for vessel extraction) retinal database, which is much better than other methods.

  13. The role of Zic family zinc finger transcription factors in the proliferation and differentiation of retinal progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watabe, Yui [Division of Molecular and Developmental Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Division of Orthoptics, Teikyo University School of Medical Care and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Baba, Yukihiro [Division of Molecular and Developmental Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Nakauchi, Hiromitsu [Division of Stem Cell Therapy, Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Mizota, Atsushi [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Sumiko, E-mail: sumiko@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Molecular and Developmental Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zic transcription factors expressed early retinal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zics sustain proliferation activity of retinal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of Zic in retinal progenitors perturbed rod differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fate determination to rod photoreceptor was not affected. -- Abstract: Members of the Zic family of zinc finger transcription factors play critical roles in a variety of developmental processes. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found that Zics are strongly expressed in SSEA-1-positive early retinal progenitors in the peripheral region of the mouse retina. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction using mRNA from the retina at various developmental stages showed that Zic1 and Zic2 are expressed in the embryonic retina and then gradually disappear during retinal development. Zic3 is also expressed in the embryonic retina; its expression level slightly decreases but it is expressed until adulthood. We overexpressed Zic1, Zic2, or Zic3 in retinal progenitors at embryonic day 17.5 and cultured the retina as explants for 2 weeks. The number of rod photoreceptors was fewer than in the control, but no other cell types showed significant differences between control and Zic overexpressing cells. The proliferation activity of normal retinal progenitors decreased after 5 days in culture, as observed in normal in vivo developmental processes. However, Zic expressing retinal cells continued to proliferate at days 5 and 7, suggesting that Zics sustain the proliferation activities of retinal progenitor cells. Since the effects of Zic1, 2, and 3 are indistinguishable in terms of differentiation and proliferation of retinal progenitors, the redundant function of Zics in retinal development is suggested.

  14. An Unconventional Approach To Reducing Retinal Degeneration After Traumatic Ocular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    abnormal retinal pericyte vasospasms after ocular trauma in mice, and their relationship to: retinal macrophage activity, and oral administration of L...specifically for blast-type ocular injury. Our hypotheses are based upon evidence that the vascular effects contribute to neurodegeneration after...the effects of oral administration of L-Arginine—a nitric oxide (NO) precursor—on ameliorating these vascular contributions. Blood flow control has

  15. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Masayuki Niwa; Hitomi Aoki; Akihiro Hirata; Hiroyuki Tomita; Green, Paul G.; Akira Hara

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced), autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced) and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced). The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insi...

  16. AAV delivery of wild-type rhodopsin preserves retinal function in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Haoyu; James, Thomas; Schwein, Alison; Shabashvili, Arseniy E; Hauswirth, William W; Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Lewin, Alfred S

    2011-05-01

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) is frequently caused by mutations in RHO, the gene for rod photoreceptor opsin. Earlier, a study on mice carrying mutated rhodopsin transgenes on either RHO + / +  or RHO + /- backgrounds suggested that the amount of wild-type rhodopsin affected survival of photoreceptors. Therefore, we treated P23H RHO transgenic mice with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) expressing a cDNA clone of the rhodopsin gene (RHO301) that expressed normal opsin from the mouse opsin promoter. Analysis of the electroretinogram (ERG) demonstrated that increased expression of RHO301 slowed the rate of retinal degeneration in P23H mice: at 6 months, a-wave amplitudes were increased by 100% and b-wave amplitudes by 79%. In contrast, nontransgenic mice injected with AAV5 RHO301 demonstrated a decrease in the ERG, confirming the damaging effect of rhodopsin overproduction in normal photoreceptors. In P23H mice, the increase in the ERG amplitudes was correlated with improvement of retinal structure: the thickness of the outer nuclear layer in RHO301-treated eyes was increased by 80% compared with control eyes. These findings suggest that the wild-type RHO gene can be delivered to rescue retinal degeneration in mice carrying a RHO mutation and that increased production of normal rhodopsin can suppress the effect of the mutated protein. These findings make it possible to treat ADRP caused by different mutations of RHO with the expression of wild-type RHO.

  17. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary; E.PICKARD; Patricia; J.SOLLARS

    2010-01-01

    A new mammalian photoreceptor was recently discovered to reside in the ganglion cell layer of the inner retina.These intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells(ipRGCs) express a photopigment,melanopsin,that confers upon them the ability to respond to light in the absence of all rod and cone photoreceptor input.Although relatively few in number,ipRGCs extend their dendrites across large expanses of the retina making them ideally suited to function as irradiance detectors to assess changes in ambient light levels.Phototransduction in ipRGCs appears to be mediated by transient receptor potential channels more closely resembling the phototransduction cascade of invertebrate rather than vertebrate photoreceptors.ipRGCs convey irradiance information centrally via the optic nerve to influence several functions.ipRGCs are the primary retinal input to the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus(SCN),a circadian oscillator and biological clock,and this input entrains the SCN to the day/night cycle.ipRGCs contribute irradiance signals that regulate pupil size and they also provide signals that interface with the autonomic nervous system to regulate rhythmic gene activity in major organs of the body.ipRGCs also provide excitatory drive to dopaminergic amacrine cells in the retina,providing a novel basis for the restructuring of retinal circuits by light.Here we review the ground-breaking discoveries,current progress and directions for future investigation.

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography Reveals Distinct Patterns of Retinal Damage in Neuromyelitis Optica and Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Schneider

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS are difficult to differentiate solely on clinical grounds. Optical coherence tomography (OCT studies investigating retinal changes in both diseases focused primarily on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL while rare data are available on deeper intra-retinal layers.To detect different patterns of intra-retinal layer alterations in patients with NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD and RRMS with focus on the influence of a previous optic neuritis (ON.We applied spectral-domain OCT in eyes of NMOSD patients and compared them to matched RRMS patients and healthy controls (HC. Semi-automatic intra-retinal layer segmentation was used to quantify intra-retinal layer thicknesses. In a subgroup low contrast visual acuity (LCVA was assessed.NMOSD-, MS- and HC-groups, each comprising 17 subjects, were included in analysis. RNFL thickness was more severely reduced in NMOSD compared to MS following ON. In MS-ON eyes, RNFL thinning showed a clear temporal preponderance, whereas in NMOSD-ON eyes RNFL was more evenly reduced, resulting in a significantly lower ratio of the nasal versus temporal RNFL thickness. In comparison to HC, ganglion cell layer thickness was stronger reduced in NMOSD-ON than in MS-ON, accompanied by a more severe impairment of LCVA. The inner nuclear layer and the outer retinal layers were thicker in NMOSD-ON patients compared to NMOSD without ON and HC eyes while these differences were primarily driven by microcystic macular edema.Our study supports previous findings that ON in NMOSD leads to more pronounced retinal thinning and visual function impairment than in RRMS. The different retinal damage patterns in NMOSD versus RRMS support the current notion of distinct pathomechanisms of both conditions. However, OCT is still insufficient to help with the clinically relevant differentiation of both conditions in an individual patient.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer...... retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks...... of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells....

  20. RETINAL VASCULITIS ASSOCIATED WITH NEUROMYELITIS OPTICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Mikel; Khan, Ayesha

    2017-01-01

    To report a case of retinal vasculitis in a patient with neuromyelitis optica. Clinical case report, imaging was obtained with photographs, fluorescein angiography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The aforementioned patient presented with urinary incontinence and spastic paraparesis. She was found to have a transverse myelitis on magnetic resonance imaging and positive anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4-Ab) testing. She had no associated visual symptoms. Examination revealed a retinal vasculitis. There have been no previous reports of retinal vasculitis associated with neuromyelitis optica or neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Retinal vasculitis can be associated with neuromyelitis optica.

  1. Retinal Macroglial Responses in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa de Hoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their permanent and close proximity to neurons, glial cells perform essential tasks for the normal physiology of the retina. Astrocytes and Müller cells (retinal macroglia provide physical support to neurons and supplement them with several metabolites and growth factors. Macroglia are involved in maintaining the homeostasis of extracellular ions and neurotransmitters, are essential for information processing in neural circuits, participate in retinal glucose metabolism and in removing metabolic waste products, regulate local blood flow, induce the blood-retinal barrier (BRB, play fundamental roles in local immune response, and protect neurons from oxidative damage. In response to polyetiological insults, glia cells react with a process called reactive gliosis, seeking to maintain retinal homeostasis. When malfunctioning, macroglial cells can become primary pathogenic elements. A reactive gliosis has been described in different retinal pathologies, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD, diabetes, glaucoma, retinal detachment, or retinitis pigmentosa. A better understanding of the dual, neuroprotective, or cytotoxic effect of macroglial involvement in retinal pathologies would help in treating the physiopathology of these diseases. The extensive participation of the macroglia in retinal diseases points to these cells as innovative targets for new drug therapies.

  2. Retinal occlusive vasculer disorder and rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Ortak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory disease that affected older women with many ocular manifestations. Also, these systemic diseases can cause retinal vein occlusion and arterial occlusion that lead to serious and permanent visual loss. Rheumatoid arthritis's the most common manifestation is that retinal vasculitis and retinal vascular complications are associated with this complication. In this review, retinal vascular occlusive diseases are presented to associated with rheumatoid arthritis in literature. Rheumatoid arthritis and its complications have been outlined and was made to create a new perspective. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(1.000: 71-73

  3. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cell loss in Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross‐Cisneros, Fred N.; Koronyo, Yosef; Hannibal, Jens; Gallassi, Roberto; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Sambati, Luisa; Pan, Billy X.; Tozer, Kevin R.; Barboni, Piero; Provini, Federica; Avanzini, Pietro; Carbonelli, Michele; Pelosi, Annalisa; Chui, Helena; Liguori, Rocco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Koronyo‐Hamaoui, Maya; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) are photoreceptors driving circadian photoentrainment, and circadian dysfunction characterizes Alzheimer disease (AD). We investigated mRGCs in AD, hypothesizing that they contribute to circadian dysfunction. Methods We assessed retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in 21 mild‐moderate AD patients, and in a subgroup of 16 we evaluated rest–activity circadian rhythm by actigraphy. We studied postmortem mRGCs by immunohistochemistry in retinas, and axons in optic nerve cross‐sections of 14 neuropathologically confirmed AD patients. We coimmunostained for retinal amyloid β (Aβ) deposition and melanopsin to locate mRGCs. All AD cohorts were compared with age‐matched controls. Results We demonstrated an age‐related optic neuropathy in AD by OCT, with a significant reduction of RNFL thickness (p = 0.038), more evident in the superior quadrant (p = 0.006). Axonal loss was confirmed in postmortem AD optic nerves. Abnormal circadian function characterized only a subgroup of AD patients. Sleep efficiency was significantly reduced in AD patients (p = 0.001). We also found a significant loss of mRGCs in postmortem AD retinal specimens (p = 0.003) across all ages and abnormal mRGC dendritic morphology and size (p = 0.003). In flat‐mounted AD retinas, Aβ accumulation was remarkably evident inside and around mRGCs. Interpretation We show variable degrees of rest–activity circadian dysfunction in AD patients. We also demonstrate age‐related loss of optic nerve axons and specifically mRGC loss and pathology in postmortem AD retinal specimens, associated with Aβ deposition. These results all support the concept that mRGC degeneration is a contributor to circadian rhythm dysfunction in AD. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:90–109 PMID:26505992

  4. Retinal regeneration is facilitated by the presence of surviving neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherpa, Tshering; Lankford, Tyler; McGinn, Tim E; Hunter, Samuel S; Frey, Ruth A; Sun, Chi; Ryan, Mariel; Robison, Barrie D; Stenkamp, Deborah L

    2014-09-01

    Teleost fish regenerate their retinas after damage, in contrast to mammals. In zebrafish subjected to an extensive ouabain-induced lesion that destroys all neurons and spares Müller glia, functional recovery and restoration of normal optic nerve head (ONH) diameter take place at 100 days postinjury. Subsequently, regenerated retinas overproduce cells in the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer, and the ONH becomes enlarged. Here, we test the hypothesis that a selective injury, which spares photoreceptors and Müller glia, results in faster functional recovery and fewer long-term histological abnormalities. Following this selective retinal damage, recovery of visual function required 60 days, consistent with this hypothesis. In contrast to extensively damaged retinas, selectively damaged retinas showed fewer histological errors and did not overproduce neurons. Extensively damaged retinas had RGC axons that were delayed in pathfinding to the ONH, and showed misrouted axons within the ONH, suggesting that delayed functional recovery following an extensive lesion is related to defects in RGC axons exiting the eye and/or reaching their central targets. The atoh7, fgf8a, Sonic hedgehog (shha), and netrin-1 genes were differentially expressed, and the distribution of hedgehog protein was disrupted after extensive damage as compared with selective damage. Confirming a role for Shh signaling in supporting rapid regeneration, shha(t4) +/- zebrafish showed delayed functional recovery after selective damage. We suggest that surviving retinal neurons provide structural/molecular information to regenerating neurons, and that this patterning mechanism regulates factors such as Shh. These factors in turn control neuronal number, retinal lamination, and RGC axon pathfinding during retinal regeneration. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Study of retinal vessel oxygen saturation in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lei-Lei; Dong, Yan-Min; Zong, Yao; Zheng, Qi-Shan; Fu, Yue; Yuan, Yong-Guang; Huang, Xia; Qian, Garrett; Gao, Qian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore how oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels is altered in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). METHODS Fifty BRVO eyes were divided into ischemic (n=26) and non-ischemic (n=24) groups, based on fundus fluorescein angiography. Healthy individuals (n=52 and n=48, respectively) were also recruited as controls for the two groups. The mean oxygen saturations of the occluded vessels and central vessels were measured by oximetry in the BRVO and control groups. RESULTS In the ischemic BRVO group, the occluded arterioles oxygen saturation (SaO2-A, 106.0%±14.3%), instead of the occluded venule oxygen saturation (SaO2-V, 60.8%±9.4%), showed increases when compared with those in the same quadrant vessels (SaO2-A, 86.1%±16.5%) in the contralateral eyes (Pcentral vessels showed similar trends with those of the occluded vessels. In the non-ischemic BRVO group, the occluded and central SaO2-V and SaO2-A showed no significant changes. In both the ischemic and non-ischemic BRVOs, the central SaO2-A was significantly increased when compared to healthy individuals. CONCLUSION Obvious changes in the occluded and central SaO2-A were found in the ischemic BRVO group, indicating that disorders of oxygen metabolism in the arterioles may participate in the pathogenesis of ischemic BRVO. PMID:26949618

  6. Are Preexisting Retinal and Central Nervous System-Related Comorbidities Risk Factors for Complications Following Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chalmers

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:To assess whether retinal and central nervous system (CNS comorbidities are risk factors for complications following robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP.Materials and Methods:A retrospective review of our RALP database identified 1868 patients who underwent RALP by a single surgeon between December 10, 2003-March 14, 2014. We hypothesized that patients with preexisting retinal or CNS comorbidities were at a greater risk of suffering retinal and CNS complications following RALP. Perioperative complications and risk of recurrence were graded using the Clavien and D'Amico systems, respectively.Results:40 (2.1% patients had retinal or CNS-related comorbidities, of which 15 had a history of retinal surgery and 24 had a history of cerebrovascular accident, aneurysm and/or neurosurgery. One additional patient had a history of both retinal and CNS events.Patients with retinal or CNS comorbidities were significantly older, had elevated PSA levels and CCI (Charlson Comorbidity Index scores than the control group. Blood loss, length of stay, surgical duration, BMI, diagnostic Gleason score and T-stage were not statistically different between groups.No retinal or CNS complications occurred in either group. The distribution of patients between D'Amico risk categories was not statistically different between the groups. There was also no difference in the incidence of total complications between the groups.Conclusions:RALP-associated retinal and CNS complications are rare. While our RALP database is large, the cohort of patients with retinal or CNS-related comorbidities was relatively small. Our dataset suggests retinal and CNS pathology presents no greater risk of suffering from perioperative complications following RALP.

  7. Synthetic Polymer Scaffolds for Stem Cell Transplantation in Retinal Tissue Engineering

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    Michael J. Young

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa are two leading causes of irreversible blindness characterized by photoreceptor loss. Cell transplantation may be one of the most promising approaches of retinal repair. However, several problems hinder the success of retinal regeneration, including cell delivery and survival, limited cell integration and incomplete cell differentiation. Recent studies show that polymer scaffolds can address these three problems. This article reviews the current literature on synthetic polymer scaffolds used for stem cell transplantation, especially retinal progenitor cells. The advantages and disadvantages of different polymer scaffolds, the role of different surface modifications on cell attachment and differentiation, and controlled drug delivery are discussed. The development of material and surface modification techniques is vital in making cell transplantation a clinical success.

  8. Ultra-high photosensitivity silicon nanophotonics for retinal prosthesis: electrical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraiche, Massoud L; Lo, Yuhwa; Wang, Deli; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Freeman, William; Silva, Gabriel A

    2011-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases such as age related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), lead to the loss of the photoreceptor cells rendering the retina incapable of detecting light. Several engineering approaches have aimed at replacing the function of the photoreceptors by detecting light via an external camera or photodiodes and electrically stimulating the remaining retinal tissue to restore vision. These devices rely heavily on off-device processing to solve the computational challenge of matching the performance of the PRs. In this work, we present a unique ultra-high sensitivity photodetector technology with light sensitivity, signal amplification, light adaptation that shows signal transduction performance approaching those of the rods and cones in the mammalian retina. In addition, the technology offers nanoscale control over photodetectors topography with the potential to reproduce the visual acuity of the natural retina. This technology promises to drastically reduce the foot print, power consumption and computational needs of the current retinal prothesis, while reproducing high resolution vision.

  9. Significance of Retinal Lesions Potentially Caused by Dazzling Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    delivered through blood vessels of the choroid. The sphincter and dilator muscles of the iris control the size of the aperture of the eye (the pupil...with transients that result in significant heating and thermal relaxation into surrounding tissues. Severe retinal damage and secondary effects such...are those with sufficient damage to display the typical whitening associated with modest thermal damage. Healing can be associated with minimal

  10. Reduction in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipponi, Stefano; Scaroni, Niccolò; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Forbice, Eliana; Rao, Renata; Liberini, Paolo; Padovani, Alessandro; Semeraro, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    Migraine is a common disorder and its pathogenesis remains still unclear. Several hypotheses about the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of migraine have been proposed, but the issue is still far from being fully clarified. Neurovascular system remains one of the most important mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of migraine and it could be possible that hypoperfusion might involve other areas besides brain, including the retina. This is, for example, of particular interest in a form of migraine, the retinal migraine, which has been associated with hypoperfusion and vasoconstriction of the retinal vasculature. Although vasoconstriction of cerebral and retinal blood vessels is a transient phenomenon, the chronic nature of the migraine might cause permanent structural abnormalities of the brain and also of the retina. On this basis, a few studies have evaluated whether retina is involved in migraine patients: Tan et al. have not found differences in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness between migraine patients and healthy subjects, while Martinez et al. have shown that RNFL in the temporal retinic quadrant of migraineurs is thinner than in normal people. The aim of our study was to analyze if there are differences in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness between migraine patients and normal subjects by studying 24 consecutive migraine patients who presented at the Headache Center of our Neurological Department. Migraine diagnosis has been made according to the International Classification of Headache disorder (ICHD-II). Patients have been recruited according to strict inclusion criteria; then patients have undergone a complete ophthalmological examination at the Ophthalmological Department. All patients and controls who met the ophthalmological criteria have been examined with ocular coherence tomography spectral domain (OCT-SD) after pupillary dilation. OCT-SD is an optical system designed to acquire the retinal layer images simultaneously with fundus

  11. Retinal vessel tortuosity associated with central retinal vein occlusion: an optical coherence tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Yuki; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Kumagai, Kyoko; Akagi-Kurashige, Yumiko; Ogino, Ken; Murakami, Tomoaki; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-01-07

    We studied morphologic changes of the retinal vasculature in eyes with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) through the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT). Major retinal vessels in 35 eyes from 35 consecutive patients with acute CRVO were examined prospectively and longitudinally with sequential thin sectioning and circumpapillary scanning. Anteroposterior venous tortuosity associated with CRVO was quantified on longitudinal OCT images of a randomly selected major temporal vein. On OCT sections of a given vein, we identified the innermost and outermost points of the vessel wall. The degree of anteroposterior venous tortuosity was defined as the difference between the vertical distances from the retinal pigment epithelium to the center of the venous lumen at these two points. The OCT images revealed that the major retinal veins traveled tortuously through the swollen neurosensory retina from the inner retinal surface to the retinal pigment epithelium. The degree of anteroposterior venous tortuosity was correlated with poor visual acuity (r = 0.457, P = 0.017), increased mean foveal thickness (r = 0.671, P retinal detachment was detected around the optic disc, which correlated with anteroposterior venous tortuosity. In 14 (40%) eyes, elongated major retinal veins disrupted the boundary between retinal vessels and parenchyma, which resulted in juxtavenous splitting of the neurosensory retina. In eyes with CRVO, OCT can be used to visualize anteroposterior venous tortuosity and associated structural changes to the retinal parenchyma.

  12. Admixture Mapping Scans Identify a Locus Affecting Retinal Vascular Caliber in Hypertensive African Americans: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ching-Yu Cheng; David Reich; Wong, Tien Y.; Ronald Klein; Klein, Barbara E K; Nick Patterson; Arti Tandon; Man Li; Eric Boerwinkle; A Richey Sharrett; W H Linda Kao

    2010-01-01

    Retinal vascular caliber provides information about the structure and health of the microvascular system and is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Compared to European Americans, African Americans tend to have wider retinal arteriolar and venular caliber, even after controlling for cardiovascular risk factors. This has suggested the hypothesis that differences in genetic background may contribute to racial/ethnic differences in retinal vascular caliber. Using 1,365 a...

  13. Retinal vascular oximetry during ranibizumab treatment of central retinal vein occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traustason, Sindri; la Cour, Morten; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of intravitreal injections of the vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor ranibizumab on retinal oxygenation in patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). METHODS: Retinal oxygen saturation in patients with CRVO was analysed using the Oxymap Retinal...... in eyes with CRVO than in the fellow eyes (95%±8% and 91%±3%, p=0.04). Mean visual acuity increased from 51±24 letters ETDRS at baseline to 66±24 and 69±20 letters ETRDS, respectively, at 3 months and 6 months treatment (mean±SD, pcentral retinal...... Oximeter P3, before and during 6 months of treatment with intravitreal injections of ranibizumab. RESULTS: At presentation, retinal venous oxygen saturation was lower in eyes with CRVO than in the healthy fellow eyes (32±13% vs 59±10%, respectively, p=0.001) whereas retinal arterial saturation was higher...

  14. Automatic computerized measurement of retinal blood vessels with adaptive tracking algorithm and association with blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Ikica

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To validate an automatic computer-based method for measuring the caliber of retinal blood vessels and use it to determine the effects of arterial hypertension on the calibers of these vessels and on their ratio.Methods: 295 patients with increased blood pressure were analyzed. All arterioles and venules located in the area between one half and one disc diameter from the optic disc margin were measured with the computer based program. These measurements were combined to provide the average diameters of retinal arterioles and venules and the association with blood pressure was analyzed. The arteriole-to-venule ratio (AVR was also calculated.Results: The average arteriolar diameter of patients who had hypertension from 5 to 15 years was 89.311 μm. Patients with hypertension for more than 15 years they had value of 79.276 μm. Average venular diameters were very similar in both groups (103.319 μm vs. 101.392 μm. We noticed differences in average arteriolar diameter between control group and hypertonic patients who had hypertension for more than 15 years (92.083 μm vs. 79.276 μm. Venular differences were minimal. The average of retinal venules in control group was 106.029 μm, in patients with hypertension for more than 15 years it was 101.392 μm.Conclusions: Using a computer-assisted method to measure retinal vessel diameter we found out that the diameter of retinal arterioles narrowed with blood pressure level. Our findings demonstrate a relation between presence and severity of hypertension and retinal diameter. Diameter of retinal venules hardly changed. Such relationship was similar with men and women. Fully automated system for analyzing retinal vessels is simple to use, quick and reliable.

  15. Relationship Between Retinal Vein Occlusion and Axial Length

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    San-Chang Tsai

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether axial length is a local risk factor for central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO and branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO. The study group consisted of 40 patients with unilateral CRVO and 77 patients with unilateral BRVO. The control group included 67 individuals who matched the study group patients in age, systemic hypertension, and diabetes mellitus status. The axial lengths of affected and fellow eyes of patients and controls were measured using A-scan ultrasonography. The axial length of affected eyes was statistically significantly shorter than that of unaffected eyes in the BRVO group (p < 0.05 but not in the CRVO group (p = 0.05. There were also statistically significant differences in axial length between control eyes and affected eyes in both the CRVO group (p < 0.05 and BRVO group (p < 0.05. Thus, shorter axial length could be a risk factor for developing CRVO and BRVO. The axial lengths of affected eyes in retinal vein occlusion patients tend to be shorter than those of unaffected eyes, especially in BRVO patients.

  16. Argus II retinal prosthesis system: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachitskaya, Aleksandra V; Yuan, Alex

    2016-09-01

    This review focuses on a description of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system (Argus II; Second Sight Medical Products, Sylmar, CA) that was approved for humanitarian use by the FDA in 2013 in patients with retinitis pigmentosa with bare or no light perception vision. The article describes the components of Argus II, the studies on the implant, and future directions.

  17. Fundus autofluorescence applications in retinal imaging

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    Andrea Gabai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundus autofluorescence (FAF is a relatively new imaging technique that can be used to study retinal diseases. It provides information on retinal metabolism and health. Several different pathologies can be detected. Peculiar AF alterations can help the clinician to monitor disease progression and to better understand its pathogenesis. In the present article, we review FAF principles and clinical applications.

  18. RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSIONS - A CLINICAL STUDY

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    Ramadevi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vein occlusion is the most common retinal occlusive disorder encountered by opthalmologists and is usually associated with a variable amount of visual loss.The study was conducted over a period of 22 months, we performed a combined analysis of risk factors, clinical presentation, management and complication of these 51 patients

  19. Anatomy of the retinal nerve fiber layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; de Bruin, J

    1981-11-01

    Anatomy of the retinal nerve fiber layer in rabbit eyes is studied by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that retinal striations noted ophthalmoscopically in these eyes represent individual fiber bundles, Axon bundles are compartmentalized within tissue tunnels comprised of elongated processes of glial cell origin.

  20. Retinal ischemia and embolism. Causes and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijman, C.A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The ocular fundus allows direct visualization of the retinal vasculature, blood vessels that are part of the cerebral circulation. Unraveling the causes of retinal ischemia may provide further insight in the pathophysiological processes that underlie cerebral ischemia. The primary aim of the studies

  1. Retinal vein occlusion: pathophysiology and treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Niral Karia

    2010-01-01

    Niral KariaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Southend Hospital, Prittlewell Chase, Westcliff on Sea, Essex, United KingdomAbstract: This paper reviews the current thinking about retinal vein occlusion. It gives an overview of its pathophysiology and discusses the evidence behind the various established and emerging treatment paradigms.Keywords: central, hemispheric, branch, retinal vein occlusion, visual loss

  2. Thrombophilic screening in retinal artery occlusion patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Nagy

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Valeria Nagy1, Lili Takacs1, Zita Steiber1, György Pfliegler2, Andras Berta11Department of Ophthalmology, 2Division of Rare Diseases, University of Debrecen Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen, HungaryBackground: Retinal artery occlusion (RAO is an ischemic vascular damage of the retina, which frequently leads to sudden, mostly irreversible loss of vision. In this study, blood thrombophilic factors as well as cardiovascular risk factors were investigated for their relevance to this pathology. Thrombophilic risk factors so far not evaluated were included in the study.Patients and methods: 28 RAO patients and 81 matched control subjects were examined. From blood samples, protein C, protein S, antithrombinopathy, and factor V (Leiden mutation (FV, factor II gene polymorphism, factor VIII C level, plasminogen activity, lipoprotein(a and fibrinogen levels, hyperhomocysteinemia and presence of anticardiolipin – antiphospholipid antibodies were investigated. Possibly relevant pathologies such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease were also registered. Statistical analysis by logistic regression was performed with 95% confidence intervals.Results: In the group of patients with RAO only the incidence of hypertension (OR: 3.33, 95% CI: 1.30–9.70, p = 0.014 as an average risk factor showed significant difference, but thrombophilic factors such as hyperfibrinogenemia (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.29–6.57, p = 0.010 and the presence of FV (Leiden mutation (OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.43–10.96, p = 0.008 increased the chances of developing this disease.Conclusions: Our results support the assumption that thrombophilia may contribute to the development of RAO besides vascular damage due to the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. Further studies are needed, however, to justify the possible use of secondary prophylaxis in form of anticoagulant/antiplatelet therapy.Keywords: retinal arterial occlusion, risk factors, thrombophilia

  3. Retinal oximetry measures systemic hypoxia in central nervous system vessels in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasdottir, Thorunn Scheving; Bragason, David; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon; Vacchiano, Charles; Gislason, Thorarinn; Kristjansdottir, Jona Valgerdur; Kristjansdottir, Gudrun; Stefánsson, Einar

    2017-01-01

    Determination of the blood oxyhemoglobin saturation in the retinal vessels of the eye can be achieved through spectrophotometric retinal oximetry which provides access to the state of oxyhemoglobin saturation in the central nervous system circulation. The purpose of this study was to test the capability of the Oxymap T1 oximeter to detect systemic hypoxemia and the effect of supplemental oxygen on retinal vessel oxyhemoglobin saturation. Oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in retinal arterioles and venules was measured in 11 subjects with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on long term oxygen therapy. Measurements were made with and without their daily supplemental oxygen. Eleven healthy age and gender matched subjects were measured during ambient air breathing for comparison of oxyhemoglobin saturation in retinal arterioles and venules. Retinal arteriolar oxyhemoglobin saturation in COPD subjects inspiring ambient air was compared with finger pulse oximetry and blood samples from radial artery. COPD subjects had significantly lower oxyhemoglobin saturation during ambient air breathing than healthy controls in both retinal arterioles (87.2%±4.9% vs. 93.4%±4.3%, p = 0.02; n = 11) and venules (45.0%±10.3% vs. 55.2%±5.5%, p = 0.01). Administration of their prescribed supplemental oxygen increased oxyhemoglobin saturation in retinal arterioles (87.2%±4.9% to 89.5%±6.0%, p = 0.02) but not in venules (45.0%±10.3% to 46.7%±12.8%, p = 0.3). Retinal oximetry values were slightly lower than radial artery blood values (mean percentage points difference = -5.0±5.4, 95% CI: -15.68 to 5.67) and finger pulse oximetry values (-3.1±5.5, 95% CI: -14.05 to 7.84). The noninvasive Oxymap T1 retinal oximetry detects hypoxemia in central nervous system vessels in patients with severe COPD compared with healthy controls. The instrument is sensitive to changes in oxygen breathing but displays slightly lower measures than finger pulse oximetry or radial artery

  4. Imaging of long-term retinal damage after resolved cotton wool spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Maria Laura; Mojana, Francesca; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Freeman, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) patients develop non-infectious retinopathy characterized by retinal cotton wool spots (CWS) and micro vascular abnormalities. Ophthalmoscopically CWS fade with time. We hypothesized that structural changes should be permanent and possibly visible well after ophthalmoscopic resolution. We used simultaneous spectral domain optical coherence tomography/ scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SD-OCT/SLO) to allow co-localization of the lesions and determine the extent and location of residual damage after ophthalmoscopic resolution of the lesions. Design Retrospective, non-interventional case series. Participants Eight eyes of seven human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with nineteen resolved retinal cotton wool spots. Methods Nineteen retinal cotton wool spots were imaged between 2 and 16 (median 7.84) years after the acute lesions using simultaneous SD-OCT and scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) examinations. The areas of the previous CWS were scanned by overlaying the color retinal image over the SLO image and scanning at high resolution in the horizontal plane thru the resolved lesion. Each CWS lesion had a control area taken from the same eye within 2 disc diameters of the lesion. The thickness of each of the retinal layers was compared between lesions and control areas using a paired t-test using multi-test correction. Main Outcome Measures Thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL), ganglion cell layer (GCL), inner plexiform layer (IPL), inner nuclear layer (INL), outer plexiform layer (OPL) and outer nuclear (ONL) layers. Results The largest loss of thickness was seen in the retinal GCL with a 43% reduction in thickness. There was a statistically significant thinning of the retinal NFL, GCL, IPL, INL and OPL. The median thickness differences ranged from 5 to 7 microns. This difference was highly statistically significant. Another striking finding was the displacement of the ONL towards the retinal surface

  5. Selenium Protects Retinal Cells from Cisplatin-Induced Alterations in Carbohydrate Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akşit, Dilek; Yazıcı, Alper; Akşit, Hasan; Sarı, Esin S.; Yay, Arzu; Yıldız, Onur; Kılıç, Adil; Ermiş, Sıtkı S.; Seyrek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investigate alterations in the expression and localization of carbohydrate units in rat retinal cells exposed to cisplatin toxicity. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate putative protective effects of selenium on retinal cells subjected to cisplatin. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Eighteen healthy Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups: 1. Control, 2. Cisplatin and 3. Cisplatin+selenium groups. After anesthesia, the right eye of each rat was enucleated. Results: Histochemically, retinal cells of control groups reacted with α-2,3-bound sialic acid-specific Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA) strongly, while cisplatin reduced the staining intensity for MAA. However, selenium administration alleviated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for MAA in retinal cells. The staining intensity for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc residues) specific Griffonia simplicifolia-1 (GSL–1) was relatively slight in control animals and cisplatin reduced this slight staining for GSL-1 further. Selenium administration mitigated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for GSL-1. A diffuse staining for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) specific wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was observed throughout the retina of the control animals. In particular, cells localized in the inner plexiform and photoreceptor layers are reacted strongly with WGA. Compared to the control animals, binding sites for WGA in the retina of rats given cisplatin were remarkably decreased. However, the retinal cells of rats given selenium reacted strongly with WGA. Conclusion: Cisplatin reduces α-2,3-bound sialic acid, GlcNAc and GalNAc residues in certain retinal cells. However, selenium alleviates the reducing effect of cisplatin on carbohydrate residues in retinal cells. PMID:27606141

  6. Retinal Morphology and Sensitivity Are Primarily Impaired in Eyes with Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder (NMOSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Ryutaro; Yokouchi, Hirotaka; Mori, Masahiro; Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Baba, Takayuki; Sawai, Setsu; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) showed that the outer nuclear layer (ONL) in eyes without a history of optic neuritis (ON) was thinner than that of healthy controls. It remains unclear whether the ONL thinning is caused by a direct attack on the retina by an autoantibody or a retrograde degeneration. Objective To determine the mechanisms involved in the retinal damage in eyes with NMOSD without ON. Methods SD-OCT was used to determine the thicknesses of the different retinal layers of 21 eyes of 12 NMOSD patients without prior ON and 19 eyes of 10 healthy controls. Eyes with peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning were excluded to eliminate the confounding effects of retrograde degeneration. Microperimetry was used to determine the central retinal sensitivity. The data of the two groups were compared using generalized estimated equation models to account for inter-eye dependencies. Results The ganglion cell plus inner plexiform layer and the inner nuclear layer plus outer plexiform layer thicknesses of the NMOSD eyes were not significantly different from that of the control eyes (P = 0.28, P = 0.78). However, the ONL and average macular thickness (AMT) in the NMOSD eyes were significantly thinner than that of the control eyes (P = 0.022, P = 0.036). The retinal sensitivity in the central 10°, 10° to 2°, and 2° sectors were significantly lower in the NMOSD eyes than in the control eyes (P = 0.013, P = 0.022, P = 0.002). Conclusions The ONL thinning, AMT thinning, and reduced retinal sensitivity in eyes with NMOSD without significant peripapillary RNFL thinning are most likely due to direct retinal pathology. PMID:27936154

  7. Retinal artery occlusions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmasena, Aruna; Wallis, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present a case of RAO in a 13 year old girl with a preceding history of hyperextension of the neck at her hairdressers for a long duration and use of her mobile phone handset resting it against the side of her neck presumably exerting some pressure on carotids during the same time. Materials and methods of this study was reported as case report and review of literature. A 13 year-old girl presented with the left supero-nasal scotoma due to an inferior temporal branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO). She underwent extensive investigations and no underlying cause was discovered. She gave a history of cervical extension over a long period of time while having the hair coloured twice in the preceding week. She also mentioned that she was using her mobile phone more or less continuously during both these occasions keeping it against her neck. Given the above history it is possible that the pressure on the ipsilateral carotid arteries or the prolong neck extension may have been responsible for the formation of a platelet embolus resulting in the BRAO. In conclusion, although cerebro-vascular accidents due to 'beauty parlor stroke syndrome' (JAMA 269:2085-2086, 1993) have been reported previously it has not been reported in children to our knowledge. On the other hand, 'beauty parlor stroke syndrome' occurs due to a dissection of the vertebral arteries or due to mechanical compression of the vertebral arteries during the prolonged hyperextension of the neck. The central retinal artery originates from the internal carotid circulation and it is highly unlikely for an embolus to enter the retinal circulation from the vertebral arteries. Therefore, the authors favour the possibility that the compulsive use of a mobile phone exerting pressure on the carotid arteries for a long time may have led to the formation of an embolus and subsequent RAO in this case.

  8. The cell stress machinery and retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Aguilà, Monica; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Novoselov, Sergey S; Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2013-06-27

    Retinal degenerations are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterised by progressive loss of vision due to neurodegeneration. The retina is a highly specialised tissue with a unique architecture and maintaining homeostasis in all the different retinal cell types is crucial for healthy vision. The retina can be exposed to a variety of environmental insults and stress, including light-induced damage, oxidative stress and inherited mutations that can lead to protein misfolding. Within retinal cells there are different mechanisms to cope with disturbances in proteostasis, such as the heat shock response, the unfolded protein response and autophagy. In this review, we discuss the multiple responses of the retina to different types of stress involved in retinal degenerations, such as retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Understanding the mechanisms that maintain and re-establish proteostasis in the retina is important for developing new therapeutic approaches to fight blindness.

  9. Prevalence of generalized retinal dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Jensen, Hanne; Bregnhøj, Jesper F;

    2014-01-01

    of this study was to examine the prevalence and diagnostic spectrum of generalized retinal dystrophy in the Danish population. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study with data from the Danish Retinitis Pigmentosa Registry that comprises all patients in Denmark with generalized retinal....... RESULTS: Of the 5,602,628 Danish citizens on January 1, 2013, 1622 patients were registered as having a generalized retinal dystrophy and were alive and living in Denmark, corresponding to a prevalence of 1:3,454. In 28% of cases the eye condition was part of a syndrome, while the remaining 72% had eye...... disease only. Aside from simplex cases (45%), the most common hereditary pattern was autosomal recessive (23%). CONCLUSION: This epidemiological survey demonstrates that the prevalence of generalized retinal dystrophy in the Danish population is 1:3454. Many of the dystrophies are the subjects of clinical...

  10. Retinal ganglion cell adaptation to small luminance fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel K; Graña, Gilberto; Passaglia, Christopher L

    2010-08-01

    To accommodate the wide input range over which the visual system operates within the narrow output range of spiking neurons, the retina adjusts its sensitivity to the mean light level so that retinal ganglion cells can faithfully signal contrast, or relative deviations from the mean luminance. Given the large operating range of the visual system, the majority of work on luminance adaptation has involved logarithmic changes in light level. We report that luminance gain controls are recruited for remarkably small fluctuations in luminance as well. Using spike recordings from the rat optic tract, we show that ganglion cell responses to a brief flash of light are modulated in amplitude by local background fluctuations as little as 15% contrast. The time scale of the gain control is rapid (retinal locus of adaptation precedes the ganglion cell spike generator because response gain changes of on cells were uncorrelated with firing rate. The mechanism seems to reside within the inner retinal network and not in the photoreceptors, because the adaptation profiles of on and off cells differed markedly. The response gain changes follow Weber's law, suggesting that network mechanisms of luminance adaptation described in previous work modulates retinal ganglion cell sensitivity, not just when we move between different lighting environments, but also as our eyes scan a visual scene. Finally, we show that response amplitude is uniformly reduced for flashes on a modulated background that has spatial contrast, indicating that another gain control that integrates luminance signals nonlinearly over space operates within the receptive field center of rat ganglion cells.

  11. Bilateral retinitis following typhoid fever

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhushanker, M.; Topiwalla, Tasneem T.; Ganesan, Geetha; Appandaraj, Sripal

    2017-01-01

    Background Post typhoid fever immune related reactions affecting the eye is a rare finding which can have various presentations in which typhoid retinopathy is not a well recognized sequelae. Case presentation Here we present a case of 59?year old male who presented with right eye sudden painless loss of vision 4?weeks after typhoid fever which was diagnosed and treated successfully. His BCVA was 2/60 in right eye and 6/6 in left eye. Fundus examination showed retinitis along with macular ser...

  12. Regenerative Therapy for Retinal Disorders

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    Narsis Daftarian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in various disciplines of basic sciences including embryology, molecular and cell biology, genetics, and nanotechnology, as well as stem cell biology have opened new horizons for regenerative therapy. The unique characteristics of stem cells prompt a sound understanding for their use in modern regenerative therapies. This review article discusses stem cells, developmental stages of the eye field, eye field transcriptional factors, and endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. Recent studies and challenges in the application of stem cells for retinal pigment epithelial degeneration models will be summarized followed by obstacles facing regenerative therapy.

  13. Bilateral Progressive Obliterative Retinal Vasculitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, 10 cases of a special type of retinal vasculitis are reported, which was characterized by progressive obliteration of vessels in both eyes, developed from the periphery to the posterior ploe, and was complicated by vitreous hemorrhage (5 eyes) and neovascular glaucoma (5 eyes) in later stage. The visual acuity was 0. 05 in 10 eyes (50%). Argon laser pho-tocoagulation seemed to be able to retard the natural course of the disease. Fundus changes, differential diagnosis and treatment etc are...

  14. Retinitis Pigmentosa with EYS Mutations Is the Most Prevalent Inherited Retinal Dystrophy in Japanese Populations

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    Yuuki Arai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to gain information about disease prevalence and to identify the responsible genes for inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD in Japanese populations. Clinical and molecular evaluations were performed on 349 patients with IRD. For segregation analyses, 63 of their family members were employed. Bioinformatics data from 1,208 Japanese individuals were used as controls. Molecular diagnosis was obtained by direct sequencing in a stepwise fashion utilizing one or two panels of 15 and 27 genes for retinitis pigmentosa patients. If a specific clinical diagnosis was suspected, direct sequencing of disease-specific genes, that is, ABCA4 for Stargardt disease, was conducted. Limited availability of intrafamily information and decreasing family size hampered identifying inherited patterns. Differential disease profiles with lower prevalence of Stargardt disease from European and North American populations were obtained. We found 205 sequence variants in 159 of 349 probands with an identification rate of 45.6%. This study found 43 novel sequence variants. In silico analysis suggests that 20 of 25 novel missense variants are pathogenic. EYS mutations had the highest prevalence at 23.5%. c.4957_4958insA and c.8868C>A were the two major EYS mutations identified in this cohort. EYS mutations are the most prevalent among Japanese patients with IRD.

  15. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, S; Shorer, R; Wollman, J; Dotan, G; Paran, D

    2017-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is frequent in systemic lupus erythematosus. Atrophy of the corpus callosum and hippocampus have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown impaired white matter integrity, suggesting that white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus may underlie the cognitive impairment as well as other neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as assessed by optical coherence tomography, has been suggested as a biomarker for white matter damage in neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning may occur early, even in patients with mild clinical symptoms. Aim The objective of this study was to assess the association of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as a biomarker of white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, including cognitive impairment. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus underwent neuropsychological testing using a validated computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test. All 21 patients, as well as 11 healthy, age matched controls, underwent optical coherence tomography testing to assess retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Correlations between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and results in eight cognitive domains assessed by the computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test were assessed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, with and without neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus, and compared to retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in healthy controls. Results No statistically significant correlation was found between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus as compared to healthy

  16. [Glaucoma and retinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M; Geerling, G; Zierhut, M; Klink, T

    2010-05-01

    In the therapeutic approach to complex glaucomas different initial situations were considered: pre-existing glaucoma, induction of glaucoma after vitreoretinal surgery and antiglaucomatous procedures. In pre-existing glaucoma and after filtering surgery maintenance of the filtering bleb requires a vitreoretinal approach for conjunctiva preservation with techniques such as pneumatic retinopexy or small gauge vitrectomy. After vitreoretinal surgery an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) is common. Secondary glaucoma may occur after scleral buckling and after vitrectomy with or without gas or silicone oil tamponade as well as after application of steroids. Angle closure glaucoma after scleral buckling develops because of congestion and anterior rotation of the ciliary body. Vitreous tamponades with expansive or saturated gases may cause angle-closure glaucoma with or without pupillary blockage and may critically shorten ocular perfusion. Postoperative checks, immediate action and a ban on boarding aircraft over the period of intraocular gas tamponade prevent permanent damage to the eye. The majority of secondary glaucomas can effectively be controlled by topical medication and adequate postoperative posture of the patient. Besides the temporary use of systemic antiglaucomatous medication or laser therapy, very rarely in cases of massive swelling or overfill, a direct intervention, such as partial gas or silicone oil removal is required. A prophylactic inferior peripheral iridectomy prevents pupillary blockage in aphakic eyes with intraocular tamponade. In cases of heavy silicone oil use, the peripheral iridectomy is placed in the superior position. Nd:YAG laser application will regulate IOP in cases of occlusion. Secondary glaucoma due to silicone oil emulsification overload is treated by trabecular meshwork aspiration and lavage. In refractory glaucoma repetitive cyclophotocoagulation and drainage implants represent an approved method for long-term IOP regulation

  17. Association of aqueous humor cytokines with the development of retinal ischemia and recurrent macular edema in retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kyung-A; Sohn, Sea Woon; Yang, Sung Jae

    2014-04-09

    We evaluated the association of angiogenic and inflammatory cytokine levels in the aqueous humor with development of retinal ischemia and recurrent macular edema in retinal vein occlusion (RVO) patients. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study, and patients with RVO (n = 41) and age-matched control subjects (n = 25) were included. The concentrations of angiogenic and inflammatory cytokines, including VEGF, PDGF-AA, IL-1a, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TNF-α, and IP-10, in the aqueous humor were measured before intravitreal injection of bevacizumab using suspension array technology. After retinal hemorrhage disappeared, fluorescein angiography (FA) images were obtained. Based on FA data, RVO patients were divided into a nonischemic group and an ischemic group. We investigated the presence of recurrent macular edema using optical coherent tomography (OCT) during the follow-up period. We compared the levels of cytokines between RVO patients and control subjects, between nonischemic and ischemic groups, and between patients with and without recurrent macular edema. The levels of VEGF, PDGF-AA, IL-1a, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TNF-α, and IP-10 in the aqueous humor were higher in the RVO group than in the control group. The levels of IL-8, PDFGF-AA, TNF-α, and VEGF in the aqueous humor were significantly higher in the ischemic RVO group than in the nonischemic RVO group. We did not observe any association between cytokine levels and recurrent macular edema. Angiogenic and inflammatory cytokines were overexpressed in RVO patients. Additionally, increased levels of IL-8, PDFGF-AA, TNF-α, and VEGF in the aqueous humor at the onset of RVO were associated with the development of future retinal ischemia in RVO patients.

  18. SIRT6 is required for normal retinal function.

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    Dafne M Silberman

    Full Text Available The retina is one of the major energy consuming tissues within the body. In this context, synaptic transmission between light-excited rod and cone photoreceptors and downstream ON-bipolar neurons is a highly demanding energy consuming process. Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6, a NAD-dependent deacylase, plays a key role in regulating glucose metabolism. In this study, we demonstrate that SIRT6 is highly expressed in the retina, controlling levels of histone H3K9 and H3K56 acetylation. Notably, despite apparent normal histology, SIRT6 deficiency caused major retinal transmission defects concomitant to changes in expression of glycolytic genes and glutamate receptors, as well as elevated levels of apoptosis in inner retina cells. Our results identify SIRT6 as a critical modulator of retinal function, likely through its effects on chromatin.

  19. SIRT6 is required for normal retinal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Dafne M; Ross, Kenneth; Sande, Pablo H; Kubota, Shunsuke; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Apte, Rajendra S; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2014-01-01

    The retina is one of the major energy consuming tissues within the body. In this context, synaptic transmission between light-excited rod and cone photoreceptors and downstream ON-bipolar neurons is a highly demanding energy consuming process. Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), a NAD-dependent deacylase, plays a key role in regulating glucose metabolism. In this study, we demonstrate that SIRT6 is highly expressed in the retina, controlling levels of histone H3K9 and H3K56 acetylation. Notably, despite apparent normal histology, SIRT6 deficiency caused major retinal transmission defects concomitant to changes in expression of glycolytic genes and glutamate receptors, as well as elevated levels of apoptosis in inner retina cells. Our results identify SIRT6 as a critical modulator of retinal function, likely through its effects on chromatin.

  20. Protective Effects of Radix Pseudostellariae Extract Against Retinal Laser Injury

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    Guo Rui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to analyze the protective effects of a saponin extract from Radix Pseudostellariae (RP on retinal laser injury based on a retinal photocoagulation model. Methods: Fifty-eight rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: Group A (saponin extract orally, Group B (physiological saline, and Group C (control. The animals were sacrificed 1 day, 7 days, 14 days, and 30 days after photocoagulation and lesions were evaluated with fundus photography, light microscopy, and electron microscopy. Superoxide dismutase (SOD and malondialdehyde (MDA levels were measured, and expression levels of c-fos and Bax genes were also determined. Results: The lesion sizes in Group A were smaller than in Group B. The levels of SOD in Group B were significantly lower than in groups A and C (PConclusion: The saponin extract of RP can inhibit oxidative stress, downregulate the levels of c-fos and Bax gene expression, and inhibit apoptosis in the retina after photocoagulation.

  1. Cell Therapy Applications for Retinal Vascular Diseases: Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S

    2016-04-01

    Retinal vascular conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, remain leading causes of vision loss. No therapy exists to restore vision loss resulting from retinal ischemia and associated retinal degeneration. Tissue regeneration is possible with cell therapy. The goal would be to restore or replace the damaged retinal vasculature and the retinal neurons that are damaged and/or degenerating from the hypoxic insult. Currently, various adult cell therapies have been explored as potential treatment. They include mesenchymal stem cells, vascular precursor cells (i.e., CD34+ cells, hematopoietic cells or endothelial progenitor cells), and adipose stromal cells. Preclinical studies show that all these cells have a paracrine trophic effect on damaged ischemic tissue, leading to tissue preservation. Endothelial progenitor cells and adipose stromal cells integrate into the damaged retinal vascular wall in preclinical models of diabetic retinopathy and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Mesenchymal stem cells do not integrate as readily but appear to have a primary paracrine trophic effect. Early phase clinical trials have been initiated and ongoing using mesenchymal stem cells or autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells injected intravitreally as potential therapy for diabetic retinopathy or retinal vein occlusion. Adipose stromal cells or pluripotent stem cells differentiated into endothelial colony-forming cells have been explored in preclinical studies and show promise as possible therapies for retinal vascular disorders. The relative safety or efficacy of these various cell therapies for treating retinal vascular disorders have yet to be determined.

  2. Demarcation laser photocoagulation induced retinal necrosis and rupture resulting in large retinal tear formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Carlos; Pieramici, Dante J; Matsui, Rodrigo; Rabena, Melvin; Graue, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Retinal tears after laser photocoagulation are a rare complication that occurs after intense laser. It is talked about among retina specialist occurring particularly at the end of a surgical case while applying endophotocoagulation; to the best our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature of a large retinal tear induced after attempted in-office demarcation laser photocoagulation (DLP) that simulated a giant retinal tear. DLP has been employed in the management of selected cases of macula sparring rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Even though extension of the retinal detachment through the "laser barrier" is considered a failure of treatment, few complications have been described with the use of this less invasive retinal detachment repair technique. We describe a case of a high myopic woman who initially was treated with demarcation laser photocoagulation for an asymptomatic retinal detachment associated with a single horseshoe tear and a full thickness large retinal tear was created where the laser was placed. Intense laser photocoagulation resulted in abrupt laser induced retinal necrosis and rupture creating this large retinal break. Proper laser technique should reduce the risks associated with this procedure.

  3. Presumed toxoplasmic central retinal artery occlusion and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arai H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Haruka Arai,1 Tsutomu Sakai,1 Kiichiro Okano,1 Ranko Aoyagi,1 Ayano Imai,2 Hiroshi Takase,2 Manabu Mochizuki,2 Hiroshi Tsuneoka11Department of Ophthalmology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing are rare in ocular toxoplasmosis. We report a case of toxoplasmic CRAO and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing. A healthy 83-year-old male developed left panuveitis. Funduscopic examination of the left eye showed a swollen optic disc and sheathing of the retinal artery with a dense vitreous haze and a white retinal lesion. Serum anti-toxoplasma antibodies were positive in a latex agglutination assay. Vitrectomy was performed to improve visualization of the retinal lesions and for examination of causative microorganisms. A postoperative fundus examination revealed CRAO with optic disc involvement and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing. Qualitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction detected the Toxoplasma gondii B1 gene in ocular fluid from both the aqueous and vitreous humor. The presumed diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis was made and treatment was started with prednisone and acetylspiramycin with subsequent improvement. Two months later, the patient developed active retinochoroiditis in the left eye. After 6 weeks of anti-toxoplasma therapy, the disease involuted. Retinal vascular occlusions and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing are rare in toxoplasmosis. This is the first case report of toxoplasmic CRAO and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing. The diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis should be considered in patients with retinal artery occlusions and multifocal retinitis with perivascular sheathing associated with inflammation.Keywords: ocular toxoplasmosis, toxoplasma retinochoroiditis

  4. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between systemic fluoroquinolones and retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Carlos; Penedones, Ana; Mendes, Diogo; Batel Marques, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    Several pharmacoepidemiologic studies have been carried out evaluating the risk of retinal detachment associated with systemic fluoroquinolones. This meta-analysis aims to investigate such association, in the light of the best scientific evidence available. A literature search was conducted to identify relevant studies evaluating the risk for retinal detachment associated with systemic fluoroquinolones. A meta-analysis was performed to pool rate ratios (RRs). Meta-regressions were conducted aiming to evaluate the influence of time interval between fluoroquinolones use and retinal detachment diagnosis or treatment risk estimates. Ten observational studies from seven publications were included. Overall, fluoroquinolones were not associated with an increased risk for retinal detachment [RR 1.47 (95% CI 0.95-2.27): p = 0.09; I(2)  = 92.8%]. When the analysis was stratified according to different study designs, the result was statistically significant for retrospective cohort studies [RR 1.87 (95% CI 1.36-2.58); p fluoroquinolones, based on data from case-control studies [RR 1.07 (95% CI 1.01-1.12); p = 0.01; I(2)  = 0.0%]. According to meta-regressions, the risk for retinal detachment did not vary due to different time intervals between fluoroquinolones prescription and retinal detachment occurrence. No statistically significant results were identified among studies evaluating only rhegmatogenous retinal detachments, as well as among studies that evaluated patients not requiring a prior ophthalmologist visit to be included. In light of the current available evidence, systemic fluoroquinolones do not seem to be associated with retinal detachment. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis with an intraocular sustained-release ganciclovir implant

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    Muccioli C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the efficacy and complications of the use of an intraocular sustained-release ganciclovir implant for the treatment of active cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis in AIDS patients. Thirty-nine eyes of 26 patients were submitted to ocular surgery. All patients underwent complete ocular examination before and after surgery. The surgical procedure was always done under local anesthesia using the same technique. The mean time for the surgical procedure was 20 min (range, 15 to 30 min. The average follow-up period was 3.7 months. Of all patient, only 4 presented recurrence of retinitis after 8, 8, 9 and 2 months, respectively. Three of them received a successful second implant. All 39 eyes of the 26 patients presented healing of retinitis as shown by clinical improvement evaluated by indirect binocular ophthalmoscopy and retinography. Retinitis healed within a period of 4 to 6 weeks in all patients, with clinical regression signs from the third week on. Six (15.4% eyes developed retinal detachment. None of the patients developed CMV retinitis in the contralateral eye. The intraocular implant proved to be effective in controlling the progression of retinitis for a period of up to 8 months even in patients for whom systemic therapy with either ganciclovir or foscarnet or both had failed. The intraocular sustained-release ganciclovir implant proved to be a safe new procedure for the treatment of CMV retinitis, avoiding the systemic side effects caused by the intravenous medications and improving the quality of life of the patients.

  6. Influence of microglia on retinal progenitor cell turnover and cell replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, A D

    2009-10-01

    Microglia within the retina are continually replaced from the bone marrow and are the resident myeloid-derived cells within the retina. Throughout life, microglial function is conditioned by the microenvironment affording immunomodulation to control inflammation as well as functioning to enable normal development and, during adulthood, maintain normal retinal function. In adulthood, recent evidence supports the concept that the retina continues to replace cells to maintain optimal function. Although in some cases after injury, degeneration, or inflammation there remains an inextricable decline in visual function inferring a deficit in cell replacement, the deficit could be explained by microglial cell activation influencing the ability of either retinal progenitor cells or recruited progenitor cells to integrate and differentiate appropriately. Myeloid cell response differs depending on insult: it is evident that during inflammation microglia and the infiltrating myeloid cell function are conditioned by the cytokine environment. Indeed, modulating myeloid cell function therapeutically suppresses disease in experimental models of autoimmunity, whereas in non-inflammatory models microglia have little or no effect on the course of degeneration. The extent of myeloid activation can help determine retinal progenitor cell turnover. Retinal progenitor cells may be isolated from adult human retina, which, albeit limited, display mitotic activity and can differentiate. Microglial activation secreting IL-6 limits progenitor cell turnover and the extent to which differentiation to post-mitotic retinal cells occurs. Such experimental data illustrate the need to develop methods to replenish normal retinal myeloid cell function facilitating integration, either by cell transplantation or by encouraging retinal progenitor cells to recover retinal function.

  7. Analysis of related factors of macular retinal thickness in high myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Ping Lü

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the relationship between the macular retinal thickness and diopter, dominant eye, axial length. METHODS: Totally 128 patients with high myopia group 180 eyes were selected, including the dominant eye in 79 eyes, the non dominant eye in 101 eyes. OCT was applied to measure macular and peripheral retinal thickness and A-mode ultrasonic diagnostic equipment to axial length. Another 112 patients with emmetropia group in 180 eyes, including the dominant eye in 106 eyes and the non dominant eye in 74 eyes served as control. Obtained data were statistically analyzed.RESULTS: The average length of ocular axis in patients with high myopia(29.57±1.57mm were significantly prolonged, compared with the mean axial length in normal group(24.13±0.90mm(P1, below(I1, temporal(T1and foveal outer ring area(from the foveal region of 3-6mmabove(S2, below(I2, nasal(N2, temporal(T2existed correlation, while there was no correlation with macular central and nasal foveal inner ring area(N1retinal thickness. The retinal thickness of macular central area and each partition in high myopia group were obviously thinner than emmetropia group(PP>0.05between dominant and non dominant eye macular retinal thickness in high myopia.CONCLUSION: The detected values of high myopia macular retinal thickness by OCT are lower than emmetropia group. There is a negative correlation between the ocular axial length and macular retinal thickness above(S1, below(I1, temporal(T1, above(S2, below(I2, nasal(N2, temporal(T2with high myopia. Ocular dominance and non dominant eye macular retinal thickness with high myopia have no obviously difference.

  8. Management of acute central retinal artery occlusion: Intravenous thrombolysis is feasible and safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Préterre, Cécile; Godeneche, Gaelle; Vandamme, Xavier; Ronzière, Thomas; Lamy, Matthias; Breuilly, Christophe; Urbanczyk, Cédric; Wolff, Valérie; Lebranchu, Pierre; Sevin-Allouet, Mathieu; Guillon, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    Background Although acute central retinal artery occlusion is as a stroke in the carotid territory (retinal artery), its management remains controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of intravenous thrombolysis delivered within 6 h of central retinal artery occlusion in French stroke units. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of patients treated with intravenous alteplase (recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator), based on stroke units thrombolysis registers from June 2005 to June 2015, and we selected those who had acute central retinal artery occlusion. The feasibility was assessed by the ratio of patients that had received intravenous alteplase within 6 h after central retinal artery occlusion onset among those who had been admitted to the same hospital for acute central retinal artery occlusion. All adverse events were documented. Results Thirty patients were included. Visual acuity before treatment was limited to "hand motion", or worse, in 90% of the cases. The mean onset-to-needle time was 273 min. The individuals treated with intravenous alteplase for central retinal artery occlusion represented 10.2% of all of the patients hospitalized for central retinal artery occlusion in 2013 and 2014. We observed one occurrence of major bleeding, a symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. Conclusion When applied early on, intravenous thrombolysis appears to be feasible and safe, provided that contraindications are given due consideration. Whether intravenous thrombolysis is more effective than conservative therapy remains to be determined. In order to conduct a well-designed prospective randomized control trial, an organized network should be in place.

  9. Retinal vascular caliber is associated with cardiovascular biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation: the POLA study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Daien

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Retinal vascular caliber has been linked with increased cardiovascular risk and is predictive of cardiovascular pathology, including stroke and coronary heart disease. Oxidative stress, as well as inflammatory mechanisms, plays a major role in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis, plaque rupture and vascular thrombotic propensity. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between retinal vascular calibers and biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation, in subjects free of cardiovascular pathology. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis from a community-dwelling cohort comprising 1224 individuals aged 60 years and over, without a history of coronary or peripheral artery disease or stroke. Retinal vascular caliber was measured from fundus photographs using semi-automated standardized imaging software. Oxidative stress was evaluated using plasma superoxide dismutase 2 and glutathione peroxidase (GPx-3 activities, and inflammatory state was assessed using plasma high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP and orosomucoid. RESULTS: In a multivariate model controlling for cardiovascular risk factors, larger retinal arteriolar caliber was independently related to higher level of GPx-3 activity (p = 0.003 whereas larger venular caliber was associated with higher levels of hsCRP (p = 0.0001 and orosomucoid (p = 0.01. CONCLUSION: In the present study, biomarkers of oxidative stress regulation and inflammation were independently associated with retinal vascular calibers. This suggests that an assessment of retinal vessels may offer early and non-invasive detection of subclinical vascular pathology.

  10. Concomitant multiple myeloma spectrum diagnosis in a central retinal vein occlusion: a case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgman, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Multiple myeloma is a neoplastic plasma-cell disorder resulting from malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. It can cause a hyperviscosity syndrome secondary to the paraproteinaemia associated with the disease. The increased hyperviscosity can lead to retinal vein occlusions and other ocular problems that may challenge clinicians. In patients with multiple myeloma and hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus, retinal changes appear similar and changes due to one disease or the other may be difficult to determine. A 48-year-old white female presented to the clinic with a complaint of blurry vision in her left eye. A full comprehensive ocular examination revealed a central retinal vein occlusion presumably from the patient's history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolaemia. Further bloodwork revealed monoclonal protein in the patient's serum and an increased percentage of plasma cells in the bone marrow. She was diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, part of the multiple myeloma disease spectrum. She was referred to a retinal specialist for initiation of intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. Multiple myeloma has been implicated in younger patients as an underlying cause of retinal vein occlusions. Multiple myeloma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in young patients with retinal vein occlusions, even if other risk factors for venous occlusion like hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolaemia are present. Timely referral to the patient's primary care physician and haematologist is important for appropriate treatment and control of underlying systemic conditions. © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  11. Retinal Mueller glial cells trigger the hallmark inflammatory process in autoimmune uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Stefanie M; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Amann, Barbara; Stangassinger, Manfred; Gerhards, Hartmut; Ueffing, Marius; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2007-06-01

    Spontaneous equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is an incurable autoimmune disease affecting the eye. Although retinal-autoantigen specific T-helper 1 cells have been demonstrated to trigger disease progression and relapses, the molecular processes leading to retinal degeneration and consequent blindness remain unknown. To elucidate such processes, we studied changes in the total retinal proteome of ERU-diseased horses compared to healthy controls. Severe changes in the retinal proteome were found for several markers for blood-retinal barrier breakdown and whose emergence depended upon disease severity. Additionally, uveitic changes in the retina were accompanied by upregulation of aldose 1-epimerase, selenium-binding protein 1, alpha crystallin A chain, phosphatase 2A inhibitor (SET), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the latter indicating an involvement of retinal Mueller glial cells (RMG) in disease process. To confirm this, we screened for additional RMG-specific markers and could demonstrate that, in uveitic retinas, RMG concomitantly upregulate vimentin and GFAP and downregulate glutamine synthetase. These expression patterns suggest for an activated state of RMG, which further downregulate the expression of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and begin expressing interferon-gamma, a pro-inflammatory cytokine typical for T-helper 1 cells. We thus propose that RMG may play a fatal role in uveitic disease progression by directly triggering inflammatory processes through the expression and secretion of interferon-gamma.

  12. mTORC1-independent reduction of retinal protein synthesis in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Patrice E; Losiewicz, Mandy K; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Jefferson, Leonard S; Kimball, Scot R; Abcouwer, Steven F; Gardner, Thomas W

    2014-09-01

    Poorly controlled diabetes has long been known as a catabolic disorder with profound loss of muscle and fat body mass resulting from a simultaneous reduction in protein synthesis and enhanced protein degradation. By contrast, retinal structure is largely maintained during diabetes despite reduced Akt activity and increased rate of cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that retinal protein turnover is regulated differently than in other insulin-sensitive tissues, such as skeletal muscle. Ins2(Akita) diabetic mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats exhibited marked reductions in retinal protein synthesis matched by a concomitant reduction in retinal protein degradation associated with preserved retinal mass and protein content. The reduction in protein synthesis depended on both hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency, but protein degradation was only reversed by normalization of hyperglycemia. The reduction in protein synthesis was associated with diminished protein translation efficiency but, surprisingly, not with reduced activity of the mTORC1/S6K1/4E-BP1 pathway. Instead, diabetes induced a specific reduction of mTORC2 complex activity. These findings reveal distinctive responses of diabetes-induced retinal protein turnover compared with muscle and liver that may provide a new means to ameliorate diabetic retinopathy.

  13. Transsynaptic retinal degeneration in optic neuropathies: optical coherence tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Prema; Graham, Stuart L; Wang, Chenyu; Yiannikas, Con; Garrick, Raymond; Klistorner, Alexander

    2012-03-09

    Recently demonstrated neuronal loss in the inner nuclear layer of the retina in multiple sclerosis (MS) and glaucoma raises the question of a primary (possibly immune-mediated) or secondary (transsynaptic) mechanism of retinal damage in these diseases. In the present study we used optical coherence tomography to investigate retrograde retinal transsynaptic degeneration in patients with long-standing and severe loss of ganglion cells due to optic neuropathy. Fifteen eyes of glaucoma patients with visual field defect limited to upper hemifield and 15 eyes of MS patients with previous episode of optic neuritis (ON) and extensive loss of ganglion cells were imaged using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and compared with two groups of age-matched controls. Combined retinal ganglion cell layer/inner plexiform layer (GCL/IPL) thickness and inner nuclear layer (INL) thickness were analyzed. In the glaucoma group there was a significant (P = 0.0005) reduction of GCL/IPL thickness in the lower (affected) retina compared with normal controls; however INL thickness was not statistically reduced (P = 0.49). In the MS group reduction of GCL/IPL thickness in both hemifields of ON eyes was also significant (P = 0.0001 and P < 0.0001 for inferior and superior retina respectively). However, similar to the glaucomatous eyes, there was no significant reduction of INL thickness in both hemifields (P = 0.25 and P = 0.45). This study demonstrates no significant loss of INL thickness in parts of the retina with long-standing and severe loss of retinal ganglion cells.

  14. Degeneration modulates retinal response to transient exogenous oxidative injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lederman

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Oxidative injury is involved in retinal and macular degeneration. We aim to assess if retinal degeneration associated with genetic defect modulates the retinal threshold for encountering additional oxidative challenges. METHODS: Retinal oxidative injury was induced in degenerating retinas (rd10 and in control mice (WT by intravitreal injections of paraquat (PQ. Retinal function and structure was evaluated by electroretinogram (ERG and histology, respectively. Oxidative injury was assessed by immunohistochemistry for 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE, and by Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS and protein carbonyl content (PCC assays. Anti-oxidant mechanism was assessed by quantitative real time PCR (QPCR for mRNA of antioxidant genes and genes related to iron metabolism, and by catalase activity assay. RESULTS: Three days following PQ injections (1 µl of 0.25, 0.75, and 2 mM the average ERG amplitudes decreased more in the WT mice compared with the rd10 mice. For example, following 2 mM PQ injection, ERG amplitudes reduced 1.84-fold more in WT compared with rd10 mice (p = 0.02. Injection of 4 mM PQ resulted in retinal destruction. Altered retina morphology associated with PQ was substantially more severe in WT eyes compared with rd10 eyes. Oxidative injury according to HNE staining and TBARS assay increased 1.3-fold and 2.1-fold more, respectively, in WT compared with rd10 mice. At baseline, prior to PQ injection, mRNA levels of antioxidant genes (Superoxide Dismutase1, Glutathione Peroxidase1, Catalase and of Transferrin measured by quantitative PCR were 2.1-7.8-fold higher in rd10 compared with WT mice (p<0.01 each, and catalase activity was 1.7-fold higher in rd10 (p = 0.0006. CONCLUSIONS: This data suggests that degenerating rd10 retinas encounter a relatively lower degree of damage in response to oxidative injury compared with normal retinas. Constitutive up-regulation of the oxidative defense mechanism in degenerating retinas

  15. Optical coherence tomography angiography in retinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K V Chalam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD, retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA. Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases.

  16. Genomic analysis of mouse retinal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Blackshaw

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate retina is comprised of seven major cell types that are generated in overlapping but well-defined intervals. To identify genes that might regulate retinal development, gene expression in the developing retina was profiled at multiple time points using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE. The expression patterns of 1,051 genes that showed developmentally dynamic expression by SAGE were investigated using in situ hybridization. A molecular atlas of gene expression in the developing and mature retina was thereby constructed, along with a taxonomic classification of developmental gene expression patterns. Genes were identified that label both temporal and spatial subsets of mitotic progenitor cells. For each developing and mature major retinal cell type, genes selectively expressed in that cell type were identified. The gene expression profiles of retinal Müller glia and mitotic progenitor cells were found to be highly similar, suggesting that Müller glia might serve to produce multiple retinal cell types under the right conditions. In addition, multiple transcripts that were evolutionarily conserved that did not appear to encode open reading frames of more than 100 amino acids in length ("noncoding RNAs" were found to be dynamically and specifically expressed in developing and mature retinal cell types. Finally, many photoreceptor-enriched genes that mapped to chromosomal intervals containing retinal disease genes were identified. These data serve as a starting point for functional investigations of the roles of these genes in retinal development and physiology.

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalam, K V; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases.

  18. Bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsura T

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Keisho Hirota1,2, Masayuki Akimoto1,3, Toshiaki Katsura21Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Medical Center, National Hospital Organization, 2Internal Medicine, Kyoto Medical Center, 3Clinical Research Center, Kyoto Medical Center, Kyoto, JapanPurpose: The report of a case of bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis.Case report: A 47-year-old man was admitted with the chief complaint of persistent high fever and transient loss of consciousness. Although his general condition improved after intravenous acyclovir administration, the patient presented with visual loss in both eyes 4 days after admission. Visual acuity in his right eye was 20/200 and his left eye had light perception alone. Both eyes showed panretinal arteritis diagnosed as acute retinal necrosis. Panretinal photocoagulation was performed for both eyes. Progression of retinal detachment was prevented in both eyes; however, visual acuity of the left eye was totally lost because of neovascular glaucoma. Visual acuity of the right eye recovered to 20/20.Conclusion: Although cases of bilateral acute retinal necrosis have been reported after herpetic encephalitis, this condition is rare after herpetic meningitis. Prophylactic acyclovir therapy and early panretinal photocoagulation may prevent retinal detachment and improve the prognosis. Neurologists and ophthalmologists should be aware that not only herpetic encephalitis but also herpetic meningitis can lead to acute retinal necrosis within a very short interval.Keywords: acute retinal necrosis, herpetic meningitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster virus

  19. Fundus changes in central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh; Zimmerman, M Bridget

    2015-01-01

    To investigate systematically the retinal and optic disk changes in central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and their natural history. This study comprised 562 consecutive patients with CRVO (492 nonischemic [NI-CRVO] and 89 ischemic CRVO [I-CRVO] eyes) seen within 3 months of onset. Ophthalmic evaluation at initial and follow-up visits included recording visual acuity, visual fields, and detailed anterior segment and fundus examinations and fluorescein fundus angiography. Retinal and subinternal limiting membrane hemorrhages and optic disk edema in I-CRVO were initially more marked (P retinal epithelial pigment degeneration, serous macular detachment, and retinal perivenous sheathing developed at a higher rate in I-CRVO than that in NI-CRVO (P retinal venous engorgement than NI-CRVO (P = 0.003). Fluorescein fundus angiography showed significantly more fluorescein leakage, retinal capillary dilatation, capillary obliteration, and broken capillary foveal arcade (P < 0.0001) in I-CRVO than NI-CRVO. Resolution time of CRVO was longer for I-CRVO than NI-CRVO (P < 0.0001). Characteristics and natural history of fundus findings in the two types of CRVO are different.

  20. Automatic diagnosis of retinal diseases from color retinal images

    CERN Document Server

    Jayanthi, D; SwarnaParvathi, S

    2010-01-01

    Teleophthalmology holds a great potential to improve the quality, access, and affordability in health care. For patients, it can reduce the need for travel and provide the access to a superspecialist. Ophthalmology lends itself easily to telemedicine as it is a largely image based diagnosis. The main goal of the proposed system is to diagnose the type of disease in the retina and to automatically detect and segment retinal diseases without human supervision or interaction. The proposed system will diagnose the disease present in the retina using a neural network based classifier.The extent of the disease spread in the retina can be identified by extracting the textural features of the retina. This system will diagnose the following type of diseases: Diabetic Retinopathy and Drusen.

  1. Roller coaster-associated retinal detachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Saad

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report two cases of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment noted immediately after roller coaster riding in an at-risk population. In separate incidents, a 35-year-old woman and a 45-year-old woman, both significantly myopic, presented with visual symptoms after riding roller coasters. Both patients were found to have acute rhegmatogenous retinal detachments associated with myopic degenerative changes. The pathology supported an acute, traumatic etiology for the detachments. Roller coaster riding should be considered an adjunct risk factor for retinal detachment in predisposed patients.

  2. Photostress Testing Device for Diagnosing Retinal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Swan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Retinal diseases such as Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD affect nearly one in three elderly patients. ARMD damages the central vision photoreceptors in the fovea. The Photostress Test is a simple technique for testing for the early effects of ARMD. Here, the illumination sources in a novel self-administered Photostress Testing device were modeled for safety and distribution in illumination software. After satisfying the design constraints in the model, a prototype of the illumination system was fabricated and tested to confirm the modeling results. The resultant prototype can be used to aid in the diagnosis of retinal disease and is well within retinal safety levels.

  3. Fluid vitreous substitutes in vitreo retinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, S; Gopal, L

    1996-12-01

    Advances in the surgical instrumentation and vitreoretinal techniques have allowed intraoperative reapproximation of retina to a more normal position. The use of intravitreally injected liquid materials (viscoelastic liquids, liquid perfluorocarbons and silicone oil), as adjunctive agents to vitreo-retinal surgery play an important role in facilitating retinal reattachment. These materials are used as intraoperative instruments to re-establish intraocular volume, assist in separating membranes adherent to the retina, manipulate retinal detachments and mechanically flatten detached retina. Over the longer term, silicone oil maintains intraocular tamponade. One should be cognizant of the potential uses, benefits and risks of each of these vitreous substitutes.

  4. Fluid vitreous substitutes in vitreo retinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena Sandeep

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the surgical instrumentation and vitreoretinal techniques have allowed intraoperative reapproximation of retina to a more normal position. The use of intravitreally injected liquid materials (viscoelastic liquids, liquid perfluorocarbons and silicone oil, as adjunctive agents to vitreo-retinal surgery play an important role in facilitating retinal reattachment. These materials are used as intraoperative instruments to re-establish intraocular volume, assist in separating membranes adherent to the retina, manipulate retinal detachments and mechanically flatten detached retina. Over the longer term, silicone oil maintains intraocular tamponade. One should be cognizant of the potential uses, benefits and risks of each of these vitreous substitutes.

  5. [New drug therapy for retinal degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohguro, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal degeneration characterized by nyctalopia, ring scotoma, and bone-spicule pigmentation of the retina. So far, no effective therapy has been found for RP. As a possible molecular etiology of RP, retina-specific gene deficits are most likely involved, but little has been identified in terms of intracellular mechanisms leading to retinal photoreceptor cell death at post-translational levels. In order to find an effective therapy for RP, we must look for underlying common mechanisms that are responsible for the development of RP, instead of designing a specific therapy for each of the RP types with different causes. Therefore, in the present study, several animal models with different causes of RP were studied, including (1)Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats with a deficit of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) function caused by rhodopsin mutation; (2) P23H rats, (3) S334ter rats, (4) photo stress rats, (5) retinal degeneration (rd) mice with a deficit of phosphodiesterase(PDE) function; and (6) cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) model rats with a deficit of recoverin-dependent photoreceptor adaptation function. In each of these models, the following assessments were made in order to elucidate common pathological mechanisms among the models: (1) retinal function assessed by electroretinogram (ERG), (2) retinal morphology, (3) retinoid analysis, (4) rhodopsin regeneration, (5) rhodopsin phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, and (6) cytosolic cGMP levels. We found that unregulated photoreceptor adaptation processes caused by an imbalance of rhodopsin phosphorylation and dephosphorylation caused retinal dysfunction leading to photoreceptor cell death. As possible candidate drugs for normalizing these retinal dysfunctions and stopping further retinal degeneration, nilvadipine, a Ca channel blocker, retinoid derivatives, and anthocyanine were chosen and tested to determine their effect on the above animal models with

  6. The cost-effectiveness of the Argus II retinal prosthesis in Retinitis Pigmentosa patients

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a hereditary genetic disease causing bilateral retinal degeneration. RP is a leading cause of blindness resulting in incurable visual impairment and drastic reduction in the Quality of life of the patients. Second Sight Medical Products Inc. developed Argus II, a retinal prosthesis system for treating RP. Argus II is the world’s first ever-commercial implant intended to restore some vision in the blind patients. The objective of this study was to assess...

  7. Long-term outcomes in patients undergoing vitrectomy for retinal detachment due to viral retinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida DRP

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available David RP Almeida,1 Eric K Chin,1 Ryan M Tarantola,1 Elizabeth O Tegins,1 Christopher A Lopez,1 Herbert Culver Boldt,1 Karen M Gehrs,1 Elliott H Sohn,1 Stephen R Russell,1 James C Folk,1 Vinit B Mahajan1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, 2Omics Laboratory, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA Purpose: To determine the outcomes in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD secondary to viral retinitis. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective, consecutive, noncomparative, interventional case series of 12 eyes in ten patients with RRD secondary to viral retinitis. Results of vitreous or aqueous biopsy, effect of antiviral therapeutics, time to retinal detachment, course of visual acuity, and anatomic and surgical outcomes were investigated. Results: There were 1,259 cases of RRD during the study period, with 12 cases of RRD secondary to viral retinitis (prevalence of 0.95%. Follow-up was available for a mean period of 4.4 years. Varicella zoster virus was detected in six eyes, herpes simplex virus in two eyes, and cytomegalovirus in two eyes. Eight patients were treated with oral valacyclovir and two patients with intravenous acyclovir. Lack of optic nerve involvement correlated with improved final visual acuity of 20/100 or greater. Pars plana vitrectomy (n=12, silicone-oil tamponade (n=11, and scleral buckling (n=10 provided successful anatomic retinal reattachment in all cases, with no recurrent retinal detachment and no cases of hypotony during the follow-up period. Conclusion: Varicella zoster virus was the most frequent cause of viral retinitis, and lack of optic nerve involvement was predictive of a favorable visual acuity prognosis. Vitrectomy with silicone-oil tamponade and scleral buckle placement provided stable anatomical outcomes. Keywords: viral retinitis, acute retinal necrosis, herpetic retinitis, vitrectomy, retinal detachment 

  8. Concurrent central retinal artery occlusion and branch retinal vein occlusion in giant cell arteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Edward R.; Chen, Celia S

    2010-01-01

    Edward R Chu, Celia S ChenDepartment of Ophthalmology, Flinders Medical Centre and Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA, AustraliaAbstract: Ophthalmic involvement in giant cell arteritis can manifest in a number of ways. Central retinal artery occlusion is one of the common causes of visual loss in giant cell arteritis. On the contrary, branch retinal vein occlusion is rarely associated with the latter. We report an 89-year-old lady with acute left central retinal artery occlusion on a backg...

  9. Retinal vascular lesions in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of Caucasian and Asian origin - baseline results from the AdRem study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, R.P.; van Schooneveld, M.J.; Cruickshank, J.K.; Hughes, A.D.; Stanton, A.; Lu, J.; Patel, A.; Thom, S.A.; Grobbee, D.E.; Vingerling, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe prevalent vascular retinal lesions among patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in the ADVANCE Retinal measurement study (AdRem), a sub-study of the Action in Diabetes and Vascular disease - Preterax and Diamicron Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) trial. Research Design and Meth

  10. Retinal vascular lesions in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus of Caucasian and Asian origin - baseline results from the AdRem study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, R.P.; van Schooneveld, M.J.; Cruickshank, J.K.; Hughes, A.D.; Stanton, A.; Lu, J.; Patel, A.; Thom, S.A.; Grobbee, D.E.; Vingerling, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe prevalent vascular retinal lesions among patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in the ADVANCE Retinal measurement study (AdRem), a sub-study of the Action in Diabetes and Vascular disease - Preterax and Diamicron Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) trial. Research Design and

  11. Towards high-resolution retinal prostheses with direct optical addressing and inductive telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sohmyung; Khraiche, Massoud L.; Akinin, Abraham; Jing, Yi; Damle, Samir; Kuang, Yanjin; Bauchner, Sue; Lo, Yu-Hwa; Freeman, William R.; Silva, Gabriel A.; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Despite considerable advances in retinal prostheses over the last two decades, the resolution of restored vision has remained severely limited, well below the 20/200 acuity threshold of blindness. Towards drastic improvements in spatial resolution, we present a scalable architecture for retinal prostheses in which each stimulation electrode is directly activated by incident light and powered by a common voltage pulse transferred over a single wireless inductive link. Approach. The hybrid optical addressability and electronic powering scheme provides separate spatial and temporal control over stimulation, and further provides optoelectronic gain for substantially lower light intensity thresholds than other optically addressed retinal prostheses using passive microphotodiode arrays. The architecture permits the use of high-density electrode arrays with ultra-high photosensitive silicon nanowires, obviating the need for excessive wiring and high-throughput data telemetry. Instead, the single inductive link drives the entire array of electrodes through two wires and provides external control over waveform parameters for common voltage stimulation. Main results. A complete system comprising inductive telemetry link, stimulation pulse demodulator, charge-balancing series capacitor, and nanowire-based electrode device is integrated and validated ex vivo on rat retina tissue. Significance. Measurements demonstrate control over retinal neural activity both by light and electrical bias, validating the feasibility of the proposed architecture and its system components as an important first step towards a high-resolution optically addressed retinal prosthesis.

  12. Clinical research of retinal laser photocoagulation and Ranibizumab on the treatment of neovascular glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Peng Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the improvement of visual function and the adverse reactions of retinal laser photocoagulation combined with ranibizumab for the treatment of neovascular glaucoma(NVG, to provide the basis for clinical treatment.METHODS: One hundred patients with 129 eyes in our hospital from January 2012 to June 2014 were selected. They were randomly divided into the observation group and the control group, 50 cases in each one. Patients in the control group(67 eyeswere treated with retinal laser photocoagulation, and those in the observation group(62 eyeswere given retinal laser photocoagulation combined with ranibizumab treatment. After the treatment, the degeneration of iris neovascularization, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, ocular fundus and the adverse reactions were evaluated. Optical coherence tomography(OCTwas used to detect retinal nerve fiber layer(RNFLthickness and visual field defect. RESULTS: The degeneration rate of the iris neovascularization in the observation group was 95.2%(59/62, higher than that of the control group 83.6%(56/67(PPPPPP>0.05.CONCLUSION: The treatment of NVG with laser photocoagulation combined with ranibizumab has good clinical efficacy, and can significantly improve the vision and retinal structure and function of the patients, and is safer.

  13. CORRELATION OF MICROVASCULAR STRUCTURES ON OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY WITH VISUAL ACUITY IN RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joon-Won; Yoo, Romi; Jo, Youn Hye; Kim, Hyung Chan

    2017-09-01

    To analyze the correlation of superficial and deep capillary plexuses using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography with visual acuity in eyes with retinal vein occlusion (RVO). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 33 patients with retinal vein occlusion (RVO; branch retinal vein occlusion in 21 patients, central retinal vein occlusion in 12 patients) and included 33 healthy subjects as a control group, who were evaluated by OCT angiography. The OCT angiography was performed on a 3 mm × 3-mm region centered on the fovea and parafoveal area. The foveal avascular zone (FAZ), and foveal and parafoveal vascular density (VD) in superficial and deep vascular plexuses were analyzed using OCT angiography. The area of superficial and deep FAZ in eyes with RVO were larger than those in fellow eyes and control eyes (P = 0.034, P = 0.018). The superficial and deep parafoveal VDs in eyes with RVO were significantly lower than those in fellow eyes and control eyes (P = 0.001, Pretinal vein occlusion (85.7%) showed a high concordance rate with respect to the location of branch retinal vein occlusion and the lowest parafoveal VD area. The multivariate analysis showed that the deep parafoveal VD was associated with best-corrected visual acuity. The OCT angiography allows to detect FAZ enlargement, increased parafoveal capillary nonperfusion, and decreased parafoveal VD in eyes with RVO. The area of superficial FAZ and the parafoveal VD are correlated with best-corrected visual acuity in eyes with RVO.

  14. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-02-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics.

  15. Abnormal retinal development associated with FRMD7 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mervyn G; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Kumar, Anil; Araki, Masasuke; Leroy, Bart P; McLean, Rebecca J; Sheth, Viral; Maconachie, Gail; Thomas, Shery; Moore, Anthony T; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, often associated with FRMD7 mutations. As the appearance of the retina is reported to be normal based on conventional fundus photography, IIN is postulated to arise from abnormal cortical development. To determine whether the afferent visual system is involved in FRMD7 mutations, we performed in situ hybridization studies in human embryonic and fetal stages (35 days post-ovulation to 9 weeks post-conception). We show a dynamic retinal expression pattern of FRMD7 during development. We observe expression within the outer neuroblastic layer, then in the inner neuroblastic layer and at 9 weeks post-conception a bilaminar expression pattern. Expression was also noted within the developing optic stalk and optic disk. We identified a large cohort of IIN patients (n = 100), and performed sequence analysis which revealed 45 patients with FRMD7 mutations. Patients with FRMD7 mutations underwent detailed retinal imaging studies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography. The tomograms were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). The foveal pit was significantly shallower in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). The optic nerve head morphology was abnormal with significantly decreased optic disk area, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, cup area and cup depth in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). This study shows for the first time that abnormal afferent system development is associated with FRMD7 mutations and could be an important etiological factor in the development of nystagmus.

  16. Angiogenic gene therapy does not cause retinal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokosch, Verena; Stupp, Tobias; Spaniol, Kristina; Pham, Emmanuel; Nikol, Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    The potential negative influence of angiogenic gene therapy on the development or progression of retinal pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy (DR) or age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has led to the systematic exclusion of affected patients from trials. We investigated the role of nonviral fibroblast factor 1 (NV1FGF) in two phase II, multinational, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, gene therapy trials (TALISMAN 201 and 211). One hundred and fifty-two subjects with critical limb ischemia or claudication were randomized to receive eight intramuscular injections of 2.5 ml of NV1FGF at 0.2 mg/ml or 0.4 mg/dl or placebo. One hundred and fifty-two patients received a plasmid dose of NV1FGF of up to 32 mg or placebo. All patients underwent a systematic ophthalmologic examination at baseline and at 3, 6 or 12 months following gene therapy. Twenty-six of these patients (Münster subgroup) received a retinal fluorescence angiography at baseline and at final examination. Among those 26 patients, four of nine patients with diabetes suffered from nonproliferative DR. Three patients showed non-exsudative AMD. No change of retinal morphology or function was observed in Münster subgroup of both TALISMAN trials independent of the intramuscular NV1FGF dosage applied. Angiogenic gene therapy using NV1FGF is safe even in diabetics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Retinal vascular oximetry during ranibizumab treatment of central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traustason, Sindri; la Cour, Morten; Larsen, Michael

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effect of intravitreal injections of the vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor ranibizumab on retinal oxygenation in patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). Retinal oxygen saturation in patients with CRVO was analysed using the Oxymap Retinal Oximeter P3, before and during 6 months of treatment with intravitreal injections of ranibizumab. At presentation, retinal venous oxygen saturation was lower in eyes with CRVO than in the healthy fellow eyes (32±13% vs 59±10%, respectively, p=0.001) whereas retinal arterial saturation was higher in eyes with CRVO than in the fellow eyes (95%±8% and 91%±3%, p=0.04). Mean visual acuity increased from 51±24 letters ETDRS at baseline to 66±24 and 69±20 letters ETRDS, respectively, at 3 months and 6 months treatment (mean±SD, pcentral retinal thickness was reduced from 697±139 µm to 368±113 µm and 340±96 µm, respectively, from baseline to 3 months and 6 months treatment (pRetinal venous oxygen saturation was markedly reduced in untreated CRVO and was roughly halfway normalised during intravitreal ranibizumab treatment. Retinal artery oxygen saturation was not reduced in CRVO. NCT01360385. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Cytotoxic effects of curcumin in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrit Hollborn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Curcumin from turmeric is an ingredient in curry powders. Due to its antiinflammatory, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effects, curcumin is a promising drug for the treatment of cancer and retinal diseases. We investigated whether curcumin alters the viability and physiological properties of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cellular proliferation was investigated with a bromodeoxy-uridine immunoassay, and chemotaxis was investigated with a Boyden chamber assay. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion. Apoptosis and necrosis rates were determined with a DNA fragmentation ELISA. Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR, and secretion of VEGF and bFGF was examined with ELISA. The phosphorylation level of proteins was revealed by Western blotting. The proliferation of RPE cells was slightly increased by curcumin at 10 µM and strongly reduced by curcumin above 50 µM. Curcumin at 50 µM increased slightly the chemotaxis of the cells. Curcumin reduced the expression and secretion of VEGF under control conditions and abolished the VEGF secretion induced by PDGF and chemical hypoxia. Whereas low concentrations of curcumin stimulated the expression of bFGF and HGF, high concentrations caused downregulation of both factors. Curcumin decreased dose-dependently the viability of RPE cells via induction of early necrosis (above 10 µM and delayed apoptosis (above 1 µM. The cytotoxic effect of curcumin involved activation of caspase-3 and calpain, intracellular calcium signaling, mitochondrial permeability, oxidative stress, increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and decreased phosphorylation of Akt protein. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that curcumin at concentrations described to be effective in the treatment of tumor cells and in inhibiting death of retinal neurons (∼10 µM has adverse effects on RPE cells. It is suggested that, during the intake of curcumin as

  19. Cytotoxic Effects of Curcumin in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollborn, Margrit; Chen, Rui; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas; Kohen, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Backround Curcumin from turmeric is an ingredient in curry powders. Due to its antiinflammatory, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effects, curcumin is a promising drug for the treatment of cancer and retinal diseases. We investigated whether curcumin alters the viability and physiological properties of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings Cellular proliferation was investigated with a bromodeoxy-uridine immunoassay, and chemotaxis was investigated with a Boyden chamber assay. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion. Apoptosis and necrosis rates were determined with a DNA fragmentation ELISA. Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR, and secretion of VEGF and bFGF was examined with ELISA. The phosphorylation level of proteins was revealed by Western blotting. The proliferation of RPE cells was slightly increased by curcumin at 10 µM and strongly reduced by curcumin above 50 µM. Curcumin at 50 µM increased slightly the chemotaxis of the cells. Curcumin reduced the expression and secretion of VEGF under control conditions and abolished the VEGF secretion induced by PDGF and chemical hypoxia. Whereas low concentrations of curcumin stimulated the expression of bFGF and HGF, high concentrations caused downregulation of both factors. Curcumin decreased dose-dependently the viability of RPE cells via induction of early necrosis (above 10 µM) and delayed apoptosis (above 1 µM). The cytotoxic effect of curcumin involved activation of caspase-3 and calpain, intracellular calcium signaling, mitochondrial permeability, oxidative stress, increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and decreased phosphorylation of Akt protein. Conclusion It is concluded that curcumin at concentrations described to be effective in the treatment of tumor cells and in inhibiting death of retinal neurons (∼10 µM) has adverse effects on RPE cells. It is suggested that, during the intake of curcumin as concomitant therapy of

  20. Idiopathic pediatric retinal artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manayath George

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO in a healthy young girl. An eight-year-old girl presented with sudden loss of vision in her left eye. She had a pale retina with macular edema consistent with extensive BRAO. A thorough workup was performed to determine any etiologic factor. All test results were within normal limits. Her visual acuity improved from finger counting to 20/40 over two weeks, on immediate treatment with intravenous steroids (methyl prednisolone. This case suggests that BRAO can occur in healthy children without any detectable systemic or ocular disorders and a dramatic improvement may be achieved with prompt treatment with intravenous steroids.

  1. Nanoparticles for retinal gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2010-09-01

    Ocular gene therapy is becoming a well-established field. Viral gene therapies for the treatment of Leber's congentinal amaurosis (LCA) are in clinical trials, and many other gene therapy approaches are being rapidly developed for application to diverse ophthalmic pathologies. Of late, development of non-viral gene therapies has been an area of intense focus and one technology, polymer-compacted DNA nanoparticles, is especially promising. However, development of pharmaceutically and clinically viable therapeutics depends not only on having an effective and safe vector but also on a practical treatment strategy. Inherited retinal pathologies are caused by mutations in over 220 genes, some of which contain over 200 individual disease-causing mutations, which are individually very rare. This review will focus on both the progress and future of nanoparticles and also on what will be required to make them relevant ocular pharmaceutics. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Integration of retinal image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballerini, Lucia

    1998-10-01

    In this paper a method for noise reduction in ocular fundus image sequences is described. The eye is the only part of the human body where the capillary network can be observed along with the arterial and venous circulation using a non invasive technique. The study of the retinal vessels is very important both for the study of the local pathology (retinal disease) and for the large amount of information it offers on systematic haemodynamics, such as hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and diabetes. In this paper a method for image integration of ocular fundus image sequences is described. The procedure can be divided in two step: registration and fusion. First we describe an automatic alignment algorithm for registration of ocular fundus images. In order to enhance vessel structures, we used a spatially oriented bank of filters designed to match the properties of the objects of interest. To evaluate interframe misalignment we adopted a fast cross-correlation algorithm. The performances of the alignment method have been estimated by simulating shifts between image pairs and by using a cross-validation approach. Then we propose a temporal integration technique of image sequences so as to compute enhanced pictures of the overall capillary network. Image registration is combined with image enhancement by fusing subsequent frames of a same region. To evaluate the attainable results, the signal-to-noise ratio was estimated before and after integration. Experimental results on synthetic images of vessel-like structures with different kind of Gaussian additive noise as well as on real fundus images are reported.

  3. Photodiode circuits for retinal prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudin, J D; Cogan, S F; Mathieson, K; Sher, A; Palanker, D V

    2011-10-01

    Photodiode circuits show promise for the development of high-resolution retinal prostheses. While several of these systems have been constructed and some even implanted in humans, existing descriptions of the complex optoelectronic interaction between light, photodiode, and the electrode/electrolyte load are limited. This study examines this interaction in depth with theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. Actively biased photoconductive and passive photovoltaic circuits are investigated, with the photovoltaic circuits consisting of one or more diodes connected in series, and the photoconductive circuits consisting of a single diode in series with a pulsed bias voltage. Circuit behavior and charge injection levels were markedly different for platinum and sputtered iridium-oxide film (SIROF) electrodes. Photovoltaic circuits were able to deliver 0.038 mC/cm(2) (0.75 nC/phase) per photodiode with 50- μm platinum electrodes, and 0.54-mC/cm(2) (11 nC/phase) per photodiode with 50-μ m SIROF electrodes driven with 0.5-ms pulses of light at 25 Hz. The same pulses applied to photoconductive circuits with the same electrodes were able to deliver charge injections as high as 0.38 and 7.6 mC/cm(2) (7.5 and 150 nC/phase), respectively. We demonstrate photovoltaic stimulation of rabbit retina in-vitro, with 0.5-ms pulses of 905-nm light using peak irradiance of 1 mW/mm(2). Based on the experimental data, we derive electrochemical and optical safety limits for pixel density and charge injection in various circuits. While photoconductive circuits offer smaller pixels, photovoltaic systems do not require an external bias voltage. Both classes of circuits show promise for the development of high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prostheses.

  4. Suppressed retinal degeneration in aged wild type and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice by bone marrow transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yang

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-related condition characterized by accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid β peptides (Aβ in brain and retina. Because bone marrow transplantation (BMT results in decreased cerebral Aβ in experimental AD, we hypothesized that BMT would mitigate retinal neurotoxicity through decreased retinal Aβ. To test this, we performed BMT in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic mice using green fluorescent protein expressing wild type (wt mice as marrow donors. We first examined retinas from control, non-transplanted, aged AD mice and found a two-fold increase in microglia compared with wt mice, prominent inner retinal Aβ and paired helical filament-tau, and decreased retinal ganglion cell layer neurons. BMT resulted in near complete replacement of host retinal microglia with BMT-derived cells and normalized total AD retinal microglia to non-transplanted wt levels. Aβ and paired helical filament-tau were reduced (61.0% and 44.1% respectively in BMT-recipient AD mice, which had 20.8% more retinal ganglion cell layer neurons than non-transplanted AD controls. Interestingly, aged wt BMT recipients also had significantly more neurons (25.4% compared with non-transplanted aged wt controls. Quantitation of retinal ganglion cell layer neurons in young mice confirmed age-related retinal degeneration was mitigated by BMT. We found increased MHC class II expression in BMT-derived microglia and decreased oxidative damage in retinal ganglion cell layer neurons. Thus, BMT is neuroprotective in age-related as well as AD-related retinal degeneration, and may be a result of alterations in innate immune function and oxidative stress in BMT recipient mice.

  5. Study of retinal vessel oxygen saturation in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei-Lei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore how oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels is altered in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO. METHODS: Fifty BRVO eyes were divided into ischemic (n=26 and non-ischemic (n=24 groups, based on fundus fluorescein angiography. Healthy individuals (n=52 and n=48, respectively were also recruited as controls for the two groups. The mean oxygen saturations of the occluded vessels and central vessels were measured by oximetry in the BRVO and control groups. RESULTS: In the ischemic BRVO group, the occluded arterioles oxygen saturation (SaO2-A, 106.0%±14.3%, instead of the occluded venule oxygen saturation (SaO2-V, 60.8%±9.4%, showed increases when compared with those in the same quadrant vessels (SaO2-A, 86.1%±16.5% in the contralateral eyes (P<0.05. The oxygen saturations of the central vessels showed similar trends with those of the occluded vessels. In the non-ischemic BRVO group, the occluded and central SaO2-V and SaO2-A showed no significant changes. In both the ischemic and non-ischemic BRVOs, the central SaO2-A was significantly increased when compared to healthy individuals. CONCLUSION: Obvious changes in the occluded and central SaO2-A were found in the ischemic BRVO group, indicating that disorders of oxygen metabolism in the arterioles may participate in the pathogenesis of ischemic BRVO.

  6. [Intraocular hypertension after retinal detachment surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muşat, O; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R

    2012-01-01

    This papers presents a case of a patient with retinal detachment, 3 days ago operated (posterior vitrectomy, internal tamponament with silicon oil 1000) who developed increased ocular pressure following silicon oil output in the anterior chamber.

  7. [Retinal vein occlusion in a young patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Mihail; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Sarbu, Laura; Avram, Corina; Camburu, Raluca; Stamate, Alina

    2013-01-01

    We present a case report of a 27 years old pacient with central retinal vein occlussion and macular edema. The pacient has a significant reduction of the macular aedema with complete recovery of vision after the treatment.

  8. The treatment of bullous rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D; Chignell, A H; Inglesby, D V; Little, B C; Franks, W

    1992-01-01

    We describe the results of a consecutive series of 97 cases of bullous superior retinal detachment treated by conventional surgery. The retinal detachments were characterized by either a single retinal break or multiple retinal breaks confined within 1 clock hour and no proliferative vitreoretinopathy. The surgery involved sequential drainage of subretinal fluid, injection of air, cryotherapy and the application of local explant. All cases would otherwise be suitable for pneumatic retinopexy. The anatomical success rate was 85.5% with a single operation and 97% with further procedures. We report on the complications encountered and appraise the advantages and disadvantages of this operation. Forty-five of the 97 cases had detachment of the macula for less than 2 weeks, and 35 of the 45 (80%) achieved a visual acuity of 6/18 or better. These visual results challenge the assertion that better visual outcome might be attained with pneumatic retinopexy.

  9. [Ocular hypertension after surgery for retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muşat, O; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R

    2012-01-01

    This papers presents a case of a patient with retinal detachement, 3 days ago operated (posterior vitrectomy internal tamponament with silicon oil 1000) who develop increased ocular pressure following silicon oil output in the anterior chamber.

  10. Imaging retinal mosaics in the living eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, E A; Chung, M; Dubra, A; Hunter, J J; Merigan, W H; Williams, D R

    2011-03-01

    Adaptive optics imaging of cone photoreceptors has provided unique insight into the structure and function of the human visual system and has become an important tool for both basic scientists and clinicians. Recent advances in adaptive optics retinal imaging instrumentation and methodology have allowed us to expand beyond cone imaging. Multi-wavelength and fluorescence imaging methods with adaptive optics have allowed multiple retinal cell types to be imaged simultaneously. These new methods have recently revealed rod photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, and the smallest retinal blood vessels. Fluorescence imaging coupled with adaptive optics has been used to examine ganglion cells in living primates. Two-photon imaging combined with adaptive optics can evaluate photoreceptor function non-invasively in the living primate retina.

  11. Regulatory and Economic Considerations of Retinal Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankoor R; Williams, George A

    2016-01-01

    The advent of anti-VEGF therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration and macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion and diabetes mellitus has prevented blindness in tens of thousands of people. However, the costs of these drugs are without precedent in ophthalmic drug therapeutics. An analysis of the financial implications of retinal drugs and the impact of the Food and Drug Administration on treatment of retinal disease must include not only an evaluation of the direct costs of the drugs and the costs associated with their administration, but also the cost savings which accrue from their clinical benefit. This chapter will discuss the financial and regulatory issues associated with retinal drugs.

  12. Caffeine administration prevents retinal neuroinflammation and loss of retinal ganglion cells in an animal model of glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Maria H.; Ortin-Martinez, Arturo; Nadal-Nícolas, Francisco; Ambrósio, António F.; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide, being characterized by progressive optic nerve damage and loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), accompanied by increased inflammatory response involving retinal microglial cells. The etiology of glaucoma is still unknown, and despite elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) being a major risk factor, the exact mechanisms responsible for RGC degeneration remain unknown. Caffeine, which is an antagonist of adenosine receptors, is the most widely consumed psychoactive drug in the world. Several evidences suggest that caffeine can attenuate the neuroinflammatory responses and afford protection upon central nervous system (CNS) injury. We took advantage of a well characterized animal model of glaucoma to investigate whether caffeine administration controls neuroinflammation and elicits neuroprotection. Caffeine or water were administered ad libitum and ocular hypertension (OHT) was induced by laser photocoagulation of the limbal veins in Sprague Dawley rats. Herein, we show that caffeine is able to partially decrease the IOP in ocular hypertensive animals. More importantly, we found that drinking caffeine prevented retinal microglia-mediated neuroinflammatory response and attenuated the loss of RGCs in animals with ocular hypertension (OHT). This study opens the possibility that caffeine or adenosine receptor antagonists might be a therapeutic option to manage RGC loss in glaucoma. PMID:27270337

  13. Retinal and post-retinal contributions to the quantum efficiency of the human eye revealed by electrical neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasseh, Gibran; de Balthasar, Chloe; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Pomarico, Enrico; Gisin, Nicolas; de Peralta, Rolando Grave; Andino, Sara L Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    The retina is one of the best known quantum detectors with rods able to reliably respond to single photons. However, estimates on the number of photons eliciting conscious perception, based on signal detection theory, are systematically above these values after discounting by retinal losses. One possibility is that there is a trade-off between the limited motor resources available to living systems and the excellent reliability of the visual photoreceptors. On this view, the limits to sensory thresholds are not set by the individual reliability of the receptors within each sensory modality (as often assumed) but rather by the limited central processing and motor resources available to process the constant inflow of sensory information. To investigate this issue, we reproduced the classical experiment from Hetch aimed to determine the sensory threshold in human vision. We combined a careful physical control of the stimulus parameters with high temporal/spatial resolution recordings of EEG signals and behavioral variables over a relatively large sample of subjects (12). Contrarily to the idea that the limits to visual sensitivity are fully set by the statistical fluctuations in photon absorption on retinal photoreceptors we observed that the state of ongoing neural oscillations before any photon impinges the retina helps to determine if the responses of photoreceptors have access to central conscious processing. Our results suggest that motivational and attentional off-retinal mechanisms play a major role in reducing the QE efficiency of the human visual system when compared to the efficiency of isolated retinal photoreceptors. Yet, this mechanism might subserve adaptive behavior by enhancing the overall multisensory efficiency of the whole system composed by diverse reliable sensory modalities.

  14. Retinal and post-retinal contributions to the Quantum efficiency of the human eye revealed by electrical neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibran eManasseh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The retina is one of the best known quantum detectors with rods able to reliably respond to single photons. However, estimates on the number of photons eliciting conscious perception, based on signal detection theory, are systematically above these values after discounting by retinal losses. One possibility is that there is a trade-off between the limited motor resources available to living systems and the excellent reliability of the visual photoreceptors. On this view, the limits to sensory thresholds are not set by the individual reliability of the receptors within each sensory modality (as often assumed but rather by the limited central processing and motor resources available to process the constant inflow of sensory information. To investigate this issue, we reproduced the classical experiment from Hetch aimed to determine the sensory threshold in human vision. We combined a careful physical control of the stimulus parameters with high temporal/spatial resolution recordings of EEG signals and behavioral variables over a relatively large sample of subjects (12. Contrarily to the idea that the limits to visual sensitivity are fully set by the statistical fluctuations in photon absorption on retinal photoreceptors we observed that the state of ongoing neural oscillations before any photon impinges the retina helps to determine if the responses of photoreceptors have access to central conscious processing. Our results suggest that motivational and attentional off-retinal mechanisms play a major role in reducing the QE efficiency of the human visual system when compared to the efficiency of isolated retinal photoreceptors. Yet, this mechanism might subserve adaptive behavior by enhancing the overall multisensory efficiency of the whole system composed by diverse reliable sensory modalities.

  15. Strategies to improve stimulation efficiency for retinal prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davuluri, Navya S; Nimmagadda, Kiran; Petrossians, Artin; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D

    2016-08-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disease of the retina that leads to vision loss. Retinal prostheses are being developed in order to restore functional vision in patients suffering from RP. We conducted in-vivo experiments in order to identify strategies to efficiently stimulate the retina. We electrically stimulated the retina and measured electrically evoked potentials (EERs) from the superior colliculus of rats. We compared the strength of EERs when voltage-controlled and current-controlled pulses of varying pulse width and charge levels were applied to the retina. In addition to comparing EER strength, we evaluated improvement in power efficiency afforded by a high surface area platinum-iridium material. Voltage-controlled pulses were more efficient than current-controlled pulses when the pulses have a short duration (<; 1 ms) and current-controlled pulses were more efficient than voltage-controlled pulses when the pulse width was greater than 1 ms. The high surface area platinum-iridium stimulation electrode consumed power significantly lower than a standard platinum-iridium electrode.

  16. [Treatment of retinal detachment with macular hole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikulski, Z; Nawrocki, J; Dziegielewski, K

    1993-01-01

    The methods and results of surgery in 6 cases of retinal detachment with macular hole are presented. In all 6 cases pars plana vitrectomy was performed, in 4 with subsequent SF6 and in 2 with silicone oil tamponade. Retinal attachment was achieved in 4 eyes. Visual acuity 1/50-2/50 was found after surgery in 5 cases. The follow-up ranged from 6 to 9 months.

  17. Complete Blood Count and Retinal Vessel Calibers

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald Liew; Jie Jin Wang; Elena Rochtchina; Tien Yin Wong; Paul Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The influence of hematological indices such as complete blood count on microcirculation is poorly understood. Retinal microvasculature can be directly visualized and vessel calibers are associated with a range of ocular and systemic diseases. We examined the association of complete blood count with retinal vessel calibers. METHODS: Cross-sectional population-based Blue Mountains Eye Study, n = 3009, aged 49+ years. Complete blood count was measured from fasting blood samples taken ...

  18. Branch retinal artery occlusion in Susac's syndrome

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    Ricardo Evangelista Marrocos de Aragão

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Susac's syndrome is a rare disease attribuited to a microangiopathy involving the arterioles of the cochlea, retina and brain. Encefalopathy, hearing loss, and visual deficits are the hallmarks of the disease. Visual loss is due to multiple, recurrent branch arterial retinal occlusions. We report a case of a 20-year-old women with Susac syndrome presented with peripheral vestibular syndrome, hearing loss, ataxia, vertigo, and vision loss due occlusion of the retinal branch artery.

  19. Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    this grant, we sought to investigate the mechanisms that regulate the earliest events in cone photoreceptor development and to exploit this knowledge...the mRNA for three transcription factors promoted cone photoreceptor formation in retinal stem cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. These...reverse vision loss. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cone photoreceptor, retina, retinal stem cell, Otx2, Onecut1, Blimp1, RNA-seq., transcription factors, and

  20. Current surgery of retinal detachment recurrence. Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Zakharov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available this review presents a detailed analysis and an experience of surgical treatment of retinal detachment recurrence associated with light silicone oil tamponade of vitreous cavity. Approaches and variants of treatment were described in the historical aspect and till now. there are considered general and particular issues in case of retinal detachment recurrence appearance, expediency and volume of intraoperative manipulations, time of operation and choice of temporary substitute of vitreous body for a purpose of postoperative tamponade of vitreous cavity.

  1. Current surgery of retinal detachment recurrence. Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Zakharov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available this review presents a detailed analysis and an experience of surgical treatment of retinal detachment recurrence associated with light silicone oil tamponade of vitreous cavity. Approaches and variants of treatment were described in the historical aspect and till now. there are considered general and particular issues in case of retinal detachment recurrence appearance, expediency and volume of intraoperative manipulations, time of operation and choice of temporary substitute of vitreous body for a purpose of postoperative tamponade of vitreous cavity.

  2. Fluid vitreous substitutes in vitreo retinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena Sandeep; Gopal Lingam

    1996-01-01

    Advances in the surgical instrumentation and vitreoretinal techniques have allowed intraoperative reapproximation of retina to a more normal position. The use of intravitreally injected liquid materials (viscoelastic liquids, liquid perfluorocarbons and silicone oil), as adjunctive agents to vitreo-retinal surgery play an important role in facilitating retinal reattachment. These materials are used as intraoperative instruments to re-establish intraocular volume, assist in separating membrane...

  3. Safety of iPhone retinal photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sheng Chiong; Wynn-Williams, Giles; Wilson, Graham

    2017-04-01

    With the advancement in mobile technology, smartphone retinal photography is becoming a popular practice. However, there is limited information about the safety of the latest smartphones used for retinal photography. This study aims to determine the photobiological risk of iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus when used in conjunction with a 20Diopter condensing lens for retinal photography. iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus (Apple, Cupertino, CA) were used in this study. The geometrical setup of the study was similar to the indirect ophthalmoscopy technique. The phone was set up at one end of the bench with its flash turned on at maximal brightness; a 20 Dioptre lens was placed 15 cm away from the phone. The light that passes through the lens was measured with a spectroradiometer and an illuminance probe at the other end to determine the spectral profile, spatial irradiance, radiant power emitted by the phone's flash. Trigonometric and lens formula were applied to determine the field of view and retinal surface in order to determine the weighted retinal irradiance and weighted retinal radiant exposure. Taking ocular transmission and the distribution of the beam's spatial irradiance into account, the weighted retinal irradiance is 1.40 mW/cm(2) and the weighted retinal radiant exposure is 56.25 mJ/cm(2). The peak weighted foveal irradiance is 1.61 mW/cm(2). Our study concluded that the photobiological risk posed by iPhone 6 indirect ophthalmoscopy was at least 1 order of magnitude below the safety limits set by the ISO15004-2.2.

  4. Temporal retinal nerve fiber loss in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Stricker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is an adult onset progressive disorder with well characterized neurodegeneration in the cerebellum and brainstem. Beyond brain atrophy, few data exist concerning retinal and optic nerve involvement. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate retinal changes in SCA1 patients compared to age and gender matched healthy controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nine patients with SCA1 were prospectively recruited from the ataxia clinic and were compared to nine age and gender matched healthy controls. Both cohorts received assessment of visually evoked potentials and eye examination by optical coherence tomography to determine retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and total macular volume. While no differences were found in visually evoked potentials, SCA1 patients showed a significant reduction of mean retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT compared to healthy controls (84±13 µm vs. 97±8 µm, p = 0.004. Temporal areas showed the most prominent RNFLT reduction with high statistical significances (temporal-inferior: p<0.001, temporal: p<0.001, temporal-superior: p = 0.005 whereas RNFLT in nasal areas was in the range of the control group. From six SCA1 patients an additional macular scan was obtained. The comparison to the corresponding healthy control showed a slight but not significant reduction in TMV (8.22±0.68 mm(3 vs. 8.61±0.41 mm(3, p = 0.15. CONCLUSION: In SCA1 patients, we found evidence for degeneration of retinal nerve fibers. The temporal focus of the observed retinal nerve fiber layer reduction suggests an involvement of the papillo-macular bundle which resembles pathology found in toxic or mitochondrial optic nerve disease such as Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON or dominant optic atrophy (DOA.

  5. Postnatal visual deprivation in rats regulates several retinal genes and proteins, including differentiation-associated fibroblast growth factor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokosch-Willing, Verena; Meyer zu Hoerste, Melissa; Mertsch, Sonja; Stupp, Tobias; Thanos, Solon

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the retinal cellular basis of amblyopia, which is a developmental disease characterized by impaired visual acuity. This study examined the retinal transcripts associated with experimentally induced unilateral amblyopia in rats. Surgical tarsorrhaphy of the eyelids on one side was performed in pups prior to eye opening at postnatal day 14, thereby preventing any visual experience. This condition was maintained for over 2 months, after which electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded, the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) arrangement and number were determined using neuroanatomical tracing, the retinal transcripts were studied using microarray analysis, regulated mRNAs were confirmed with quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, and proteins were stained using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. An attenuated ERG was found in eyes that were deprived of visual experience. Retrograde neuroanatomical staining disclosed a larger number of RGCs within the retina on the visually deprived side compared to the non-deprived, control side, and a multilayered distribution of RGCs. At the retinomic level, several transcripts associated with retinal differentiation, such as fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), were either up- or downregulated. Most of the transcripts could be verified at the mRNA level. To unravel the role of a differentiation-associated protein, we tested FGF-2 in dissociated postnatal retinal cell cultures and found that FGF-2 is a potent factor triggering ganglion cell differentiation. The data suggest that visual experience shapes the postnatal retinal differentiation, whereas visual deprivation induces changes at the functional, cellular and molecular levels within the retina.

  6. Diagnostic imaging in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Mitamura-Aizawa, Sayaka; Nagasawa, Toshihiko; Katome, Takashi; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Naito, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive inherited retinal disease, and patients with RP have reduced visual function caused by a degeneration of the photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). At the end stage of RP, the degeneration of the photoreceptors in the fovea reduces central vision, and RP is one of the main causes of acquired blindness in developed countries. Therefore, morphological and functional assessments of the photoreceptors in the macula area can be useful in estimating the residual retinal function in RP patients. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a well-established method of examining the retinal architecture in situ. The photoreceptor inner/outer segment (IS/OS) junction is observed as a distinct, highly reflective line by OCT. The presence of the IS/OS junction in the OCT images is essential for normal visual function. Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) results from the accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE cells and has been used to investigate RPE and retinal function. More than one-half of RP patients have an abnormally high density parafoveal FAF ring (AF ring). The AF ring represents the border between functional and dysfunctional retina. In this review, we shall summarize recent progress on diagnostic imaging in eyes with RP.

  7. Retinal Vascular Fractals and Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ting Ong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Retinal microvascular network changes have been found in patients with age-related brain diseases such as stroke and dementia including Alzheimer's disease. We examine whether retinal microvascular network changes are also present in preclinical stages of dementia. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 300 Chinese participants (age: ≥60 years from the ongoing Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore study who underwent detailed clinical examinations including retinal photography, brain imaging and neuropsychological testing. Retinal vascular parameters were assessed from optic disc-centered photographs using a semiautomated program. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery was administered, and cognitive function was summarized as composite and domain-specific Z-scores. Cognitive impairment no dementia (CIND and dementia were diagnosed according to standard diagnostic criteria. Results: Among 268 eligible nondemented participants, 78 subjects were categorized as CIND-mild and 69 as CIND-moderate. In multivariable adjusted models, reduced retinal arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions were associated with an increased risk of CIND-mild and CIND-moderate. Reduced fractal dimensions were associated with poorer cognitive performance globally and in the specific domains of verbal memory, visuoconstruction and visuomotor speed. Conclusion: A sparser retinal microvascular network, represented by reduced arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions, was associated with cognitive impairment, suggesting that early microvascular damage may be present in preclinical stages of dementia.

  8. Retinal iron homeostasis in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delu eSong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for life, but excess iron can be toxic. As a potent free radical creator, iron generates hydroxyl radicals leading to significant oxidative stress. Since iron is not excreted from the body, it accumulates with age in tissues, including the retina, predisposing to age-related oxidative insult. Both hereditary and acquired retinal diseases are associated with increased iron levels. For example, retinal degenerations have been found in hereditary iron overload disorders, like aceruloplasminemia, Friedreich’s ataxia, and pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. Similarly, mice with targeted mutation of the iron exporter ceruloplasmin and its homolog hephaestin showed age-related retinal iron accumulation and retinal degeneration with features resembling human age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Post mortem AMD eyes have increased levels of iron in retina compared to age-matched healthy donors. Iron accumulation in AMD is likely to result, in part, from inflammation, hypoxia, and oxidative stress, all of which can cause iron dysregulation. Fortunately, it has been demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies that iron in the retinal pigment epithelium and retina is chelatable. Iron chelation protects photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE in a variety of mouse models. This has therapeutic potential for diminishing iron-induced oxidative damage to prevent or treat AMD.

  9. Optical coherence tomography and electrophysiology of retinal and visual pathways in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Litwin, Tomasz; Szulborski, Kamil; Członkowska, Anna

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated correlations between positive findings of changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and selected morphological and electrophysiological parameters of the retinal and visual systems in Wilson's disease. Fifty-eight Wilson's disease symptomatic patients were divided according to whether they displayed brain changes on MRI (positive, n = 39; negative, n = 19). All participants and healthy control group (n = 30), underwent retinal optical coherence tomography to assess the thickness of macula and the total retinal nerve fiber layer. Visual evoked potentials were measured and electroretinography was performed. Macular and retinal nerve fibers were thinner in participants with changes on MRI than in participants without changes. Electrophysiological parameters were markedly different in the MRI positive group compared with the negative group and 30 healthy controls; however, some abnormalities were evident in cases without visible brain pathology. Morphological and electrophysiological changes of retinal and visual pathways are associated with MRI visualized brain injury in Wilson's disease and may be useful for detecting the degree of neurodegeneration.

  10. Effect of Chinese Medicines on the Subretinal Fluid Absorption after Operation for Retinal Detachment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YeziLiu

    1995-01-01

    Purpose:To determine the effects of traditional Chinese medicines on subretinal fluld absorption after Operation for retinal detachment.Mehods:Among100eyes with operations fo retinal detachment without drainage of fluid,there were 50eyes in traditional Chinese medicine treatment group and 50eyes in the control group.and there were no significant difference between the two groups in age,myopia and retinal detachment area.We observed the time for the absorption of subretinal fluid and visual acuity improvement aftr the opera-tions for retinal detachment.Results;he result showed that the average time for the absorption of subretinal fluid was14.5days in the traditional Chinese medicine treatment group,21.7days in the control group and the visual acuity was better in the former than in the latter.Conclusions:The taditional Chinese medicine treatment could increase the ab-sorption of subretional fluid,the mechanisms of which may be that Chinese medicines regulated and impved the general blood circulation and local eye blood criculation and the function of blood-retinal barrier so that they increase the out-ward osmotic suction forces of the pigment epithelium.

  11. Increased vascular density and vitreo-retinal membranes accompany vascularization of the pigment epithelium in the dystrophic rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, R B; Roque, R S; Solomon, S W

    1989-09-01

    Observations of vascularization of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and formation of vitreo-retinal membranes (VRMs) in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats with inherited retinal dystrophy suggest that vascular proliferation occurs in this model. To test this hypothesis, we studied the progression of vascular changes in RCS and age-matched control rats using quantitative light microscope morphometry and electron microscopy. At 2 weeks, prior to photoreceptor degeneration, the dystrophic retina is comparable with the control. By 2 months, extensive degeneration of photoreceptor cells results in significant thinning of the dystrophic retina as compared with the control. Signs of vascular degeneration are evident at the electron microscope level--"ghost" vessels consisting of acellular basal lamina surrounded by amorphous electron-dense material; degenerating endothelial cells and pericytes; and abnormal deposits of extracellular matrix (ECM) material around blood vessels. Vascular degeneration is accompanied by glial changes in the form of necrotic perivascular glial processes and abnormal ECM deposits among the altered Muller cell processes. At 2-4 months in the dystrophic retina, numbers of vessel profiles in dystrophic retinas are decreased as compared with controls. However, vascular degeneration is overshadowed by the formation of numerous capillary tufts within the RPE layer, which together with retinal thinning results in increased vessel density. Between 4-12 months, the retinal thickness diminishes further, vascularization of the RPE increases, vitreo-retinal membranes are formed, and vascular density increases. In summary, following an initial period of vascular degeneration, vascularization of the RPE is accompanied by an increase in retinal vessel density and by the formation of vitreo-retinal membranes.

  12. Bone marrow-derived cells are differentially involved in pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, He [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Otani, Atsushi, E-mail: otan@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Oishi, Akio; Yodoi, Yuko; Kameda, Takanori; Kojima, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2010-01-08

    Purpose: Bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to play roles in angiogenesis. Although these cells have been shown to promote angiogenesis, it is not yet clear whether these cells affect all types of angiogenesis. This study investigated the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in pathological and physiological angiogenesis in the murine retina. Materials and methods: The oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model was used as a retinal angiogenesis model in newborn mice. To block the influence of bone marrow-derived cells, the mice were irradiated with a 4-Gy dose of radiation from a {sup 137}Cs source. Irradiation was performed in four different conditions with radio dense 2-cm thick lead disks; (1) H group, the head were covered with these discs to protect the eyes from radiation; (2) A group, all of the body was covered with these discs; (3) N group, mice were completely unshielded; (4) C group, mice were put in the irradiator but were not irradiated. On P17, the retinal areas showing pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis were measured and compared to the retinas of nonirradiated mice. Results: Although irradiation induced leukocyte depletion, it did not affect the number of other cell types or body weight. Retinal nonperfusion areas were significantly larger in irradiated mice than in control mice (P < 0.05), indicating that physiological angiogenesis was impaired. However, the formation of tuft-like angiogenesis processes was more prominent in the irradiated mice (P < 0.05), indicating that pathological angiogenesis was intact. Conclusions: Bone marrow-derived cells seem to be differentially involved in the formation of physiological and pathological retinal vessels. Pathological angiogenesis in the murine retina does not require functional bone marrow-derived cells, but these cells are important for the formation of physiological vessels. Our results add a new insight into the pathology of retinal angiogenesis and bolster the hypothesis that

  13. Central retinal vessel blood flow after surgical treatment for central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crama, Niels; Gualino, Vincent; Restori, Marie; Charteris, David G

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of radial optic neurotomy and retinal endovascular surgery on retinal blood flow velocity in patients with central retinal vein occlusion. A prospective interventional case series. Six patients with a central retinal vein occlusion of retinal endovascular surgery. Five patients had decreased central venous blood flow velocity compared with the fellow eye, and one patient had similar central venous blood flow in both eyes at baseline. All study eyes had decreased central venous blood flow velocity compared with the fellow eye at 24 weeks after treatment. Two patients had a further decrease in central venous blood flow during the study. Three patients had no minimal change in central venous blood flow, and 1 patient showed a minimal increase from 3 cm/s at baseline to 4 cm/s 24 weeks after surgery. Radial optic neurotomy and retinal endovascular surgery do not alter central retinal blood flow velocity. The place of these therapies in the treatment for central retinal vein occlusion should be questioned.

  14. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress.

  15. Retinal oxygen saturation in relation to retinal thickness in diabetic macular edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Peto, Tunde; Grauslund, Jakob

    to retinal thickness in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). Methods: We included 18 patients with DME that all had central retinal thickness (CRT) >300 µm and were free of active proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Optical coherence tomography (Topcon 3D OCT-2000 spectral domain OCT) was used...... for paracentral edema, the oxygen saturation in the upper and lower temporal arcade branches were compared to the corresponding upper and lower subfield thickness. Spearman’s rank was used to calculate correlation coefficients between CRT and retinal oximetry. Results: Median age and duration of diabetes was 59....... 92.3%, p=0.52). We found no correlation between CRT and retinal oxygen saturation, even when accounting for paracentral edema (p>0.05). Furthermore, there was no difference in retinal oxygen saturation between the macular hemisphere that was more or less affected by DME (p>0.05). Conclusion: Patients...

  16. Tamponade in surgery for retinal detachment associated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Flynn, Harry W; Lee, Wen-Hsiang; Wang, Xue

    2014-01-01

    Background Retinal detachment (RD) with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) often requires surgery to restore normal anatomy and to stabilize or improve vision. PVR usually occurs in association with recurrent RD (that is, after initial retinal re-attachment surgery) but occasionally may be associated with primary RD. Either way, a tamponade agent (gas or silicone oil) is needed during surgery to reduce the rate of postoperative recurrent RD. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the relative safety and effectiveness of various tamponade agents used with surgery for retinal detachment (RD) complicated by proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 5), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 26 June 2013. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of participants undergoing surgery for RD associated with PVR that compared various tamponade agents. Data collection and analysis Two review authors screened the search results independently. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. PMID:24532038

  17. Retinal thinning in tree shrews with induced high myopia: optical coherence tomography and histological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Carla J; Grünert, Ulrike; Pianta, Michael J; McBrien, Neville A

    2011-02-09

    This study determined retinal thinning in a mammalian model of high myopia using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and histological sections from the same retinal tissue. High myopia was induced in three tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) by deprivation of form vision via lid suture of one eye, with the other eye a control. Ocular biometry data was obtained by Ascan ultrasonography, keratometry and retinoscopy. The Zeiss StratusOCT was used to obtain Bscans in vivo across the retina. Subsequently, eyes were enucleated and retinas fixed, dehydrated, embedded and sectioned. Treated eyes developed a high degree of axial myopia (-15.9 ± 2.3D; n = 3). The OCT analysis showed that in myopic eyes the nasal retina thinned more than the temporal retina relative to the disc (p=0.005). Histology showed that the retinas in the myopic eyes comprise all layers but were thinner than the retinas in normal and control eyes. Detailed thickness measurements in corresponding locations of myopic and control eyes in superior nasal retina using longitudinal reflectivity profiles from OCT and semithin vertical histological sections showed the percentage of retinal thinning in the myopic eyes was similar between methods (OCT 15.34 ± 5.69%; histology 17.61 ± 3.02%; p = 0.10). Analysis of retinal layers revealed that the inner plexiform, inner nuclear and outer plexiform layers thin the most. Cell density measurements showed all neuronal cell types are involved in retinal thinning. The results indicate that in vivo OCT measurements can accurately detect retinal thinning in high myopia.

  18. Automated Detection of Ocular Alignment with Binocular Retinal Birefringence Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David G.; Shah, Ankoor S.; Sau, Soma; Nassif, Deborah; Guyton, David L.

    2003-06-01

    We previously developed a retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) device to detect eye fixation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new binocular RBS (BRBS) instrument can detect simultaneous fixation of both eyes. Control (nonmyopic and myopic) and strabismic subjects were studied by use of BRBS at a fixation distance of 45 cm. Binocularity (the percentage of measurements with bilateral fixation) was determined from the BRBS output. All nonstrabismic subjects with good quality signals had binocularity >75%. Binocularity averaged 5% in four subjects with strabismus (range of 0 -20%). BRBS may potentially be used to screen individuals for abnormal eye alignment.

  19. Retinal vascular and structural dynamics during acute hyperglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klefter, Oliver N; Lauritsen, Tina Vilsbøll; Knop, Filip K

    2015-01-01

    oximetry, macular perfusion velocities and optical coherence tomographic measurement of subfoveal choroidal thickness every 30 min during a 3-hr 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Patients paused antidiabetic therapy for 1 week prior to the OGTT. RESULTS: Plasma glucose (PG) and fluctuations in PG......, narrowed retinal veins and increased arteriovenous diameter ratios. No effect of age, gender or diabetes status was observed. Choroidal thickness was transiently reduced in controls and unchanged in patients with diabetes (p = 0.021). Macular perfusion velocities increased after 150 min in patients...

  20. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Avanesova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD is a severe ocular disorder which requires prompt treatment to prevent low vision and blindness. It is also a significant socio-economic problem as 84% of RDD patients are able-bodied. RRD grading systems (including current Machemer grading system, risk factors, and pathogenesis are reviewed. The role of proliferative vitreoretinopathy in RDD pathogenesis and recurrence is described. Macula involvement determines RDD outcome. Optical coherence tomography (OCT provides the study of retina anatomy and the analysis of parameters that affect post-op best corrected visual acuity, i.e., defects of the junction between inner segments and outer segments (IS/OS, the integrity of external (ELM and internal limiting membrane (ILM, outer nuclear layer thickness (ONLT etc. Fluorescent angiography allows to understand the reasons for low vision in anatomically successful RDD surgery. Scleral buckling, balloon buckling, pneumatic retinopexy, vitrectomy, cryopexy, and laser coagulation are important tools in surgical armamentarium. In recent years, vitrectomy is growing in popularity for RDD treatment. Criteria for procedure selection and surgical success rate in phakic and pseudophakic eyes are discussed. The outcomes of vitrectomy with air/gas and silicone oil tamponade are compared. Bimanual vitrectomy benefits are discussed. 

  1. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Avanesova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD is a severe ocular disorder which requires prompt treatment to prevent low vision and blindness. It is also a significant socio-economic problem as 84% of RDD patients are able-bodied. RRD grading systems (including current Machemer grading system, risk factors, and pathogenesis are reviewed. The role of proliferative vitreoretinopathy in RDD pathogenesis and recurrence is described. Macula involvement determines RDD outcome. Optical coherence tomography (OCT provides the study of retina anatomy and the analysis of parameters that affect post-op best corrected visual acuity, i.e., defects of the junction between inner segments and outer segments (IS/OS, the integrity of external (ELM and internal limiting membrane (ILM, outer nuclear layer thickness (ONLT etc. Fluorescent angiography allows to understand the reasons for low vision in anatomically successful RDD surgery. Scleral buckling, balloon buckling, pneumatic retinopexy, vitrectomy, cryopexy, and laser coagulation are important tools in surgical armamentarium. In recent years, vitrectomy is growing in popularity for RDD treatment. Criteria for procedure selection and surgical success rate in phakic and pseudophakic eyes are discussed. The outcomes of vitrectomy with air/gas and silicone oil tamponade are compared. Bimanual vitrectomy benefits are discussed. 

  2. Loss of caveolin-1 causes blood-retinal barrier breakdown, venous enlargement, and mural cell alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaowu; Fliesler, Steven J; Zhao, You-Yang; Stallcup, William B; Cohen, Alex W; Elliott, Michael H

    2014-02-01

    Blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and related vascular changes are implicated in several ocular diseases. The molecules and mechanisms regulating BRB integrity and pathophysiology are not fully elucidated. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) ablation results in loss of caveolae and microvascular pathologies, but the role of Cav-1 in the retina is largely unknown. We examined BRB integrity and vasculature in Cav-1 knockout mice and found a significant increase in BRB permeability, compared with wild-type controls, with branch veins being frequent sites of breakdown. Vascular hyperpermeability occurred without apparent alteration in junctional proteins. Such hyperpermeability was not rescued by inhibiting eNOS activity. Veins of Cav-1 knockout retinas exhibited additional pathological features, including i) eNOS-independent enlargement, ii) altered expression of mural cell markers (eg, down-regulation of NG2 and up-regulation of αSMA), and iii) dramatic alterations in mural cell phenotype near the optic nerve head. We observed a significant NO-dependent increase in retinal artery diameter in Cav-1 knockout mice, suggesting that Cav-1 plays a role in autoregulation of resistance vessels in the retina. These findings implicate Cav-1 in maintaining BRB integrity in retinal vasculature and suggest a previously undefined role in the retinal venous system and associated mural cells. Our results are relevant to clinically significant retinal disorders with vascular pathologies, including diabetic retinopathy, uveoretinitis, and primary open-angle glaucoma.

  3. Persistent inflammatory state after photoreceptor loss in an animal model of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noailles, Agustina; Maneu, Victoria; Campello, Laura; Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2016-09-14

    Microglia act as the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, including the retina. In response to damaging stimuli microglia adopt an activated state, which can progress into a phagocytic phenotype and play a potentially harmful role by eliciting the expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to assess longitudinal changes in microglia during retinal degeneration in the homozygous P23H rat, a model of dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Microglial phenotypes, morphology and density were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and cytokine antibody array. In addition, we performed electroretinograms to evaluate the retinal response. In the P23H retina, sclera, choroid and ciliary body, inflammatory cells increased in number compared with the control at all ages analyzed. As the rats became older, a higher number of amoeboid MHC-II(+) cells were observed in the P23H retina, which correlated with an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that, in the P23H model, retinal neuroinflammation persists throughout the rat's life span even after photoreceptor depletion. Therefore, the inclusion of anti-inflammatory drugs at advanced stages of the neurodegenerative process may provide better retinal fitness so the remaining cells could still be used as targets of cellular or gene therapies.

  4. Does retinal configuration make the head and eyes of foveate birds move?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Bret A.; Tyrrell, Luke P.; Pita, Diana; Bininda-Emonds, Olaf R. P.; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Animals move their heads and eyes to compensate for movements of the body and background, search, fixate, and track objects visually. Avian saccadic head/eye movements have been shown to vary considerably between species. We tested the hypothesis that the configuration of the retina (i.e., changes in retinal ganglion cell density from the retinal periphery to the center of acute vision-fovea) would account for the inter-specific variation in avian head/eye movement behavior. We characterized retinal configuration, head movement rate, and degree of eye movement of 29 bird species with a single fovea, controlling for the effects of phylogenetic relatedness. First, we found the avian fovea is off the retinal center towards the dorso-temporal region of the retina. Second, species with a more pronounced rate of change in ganglion cell density across the retina generally showed a higher degree of eye movement and higher head movement rate likely because a smaller retinal area with relatively high visual acuity leads to greater need to move the head/eye to align this area that contains the fovea with objects of interest. Our findings have implications for anti-predator behavior, as many predator-prey interaction models assume that the sensory system of prey (and hence their behavior) varies little between species. PMID:28079062

  5. Retinal Biocompatibility of Brilliant Blue G with Deuterated Water for Chromovitrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmerson Badaró

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the retinal biocompatibility of Brilliant Blue G with deuterated water (BBG-D2O as a vital dye for chromovitrectomy. Methods: In this animal study, 0.05 mL of 0.25 g/L Brilliant Blue G (BBG associated with 0.13 mL/mL of deuterium oxide (D2O was injected intravitreally in the right eye and the same amount of balanced salt solution (BSS was injected similarly in the left eye of rabbits. Clinical examination and histology with light microscopy were performed after seven days. Retinal cell layers were evaluated for morphologic alterations. Electroretinographic (ERG changes were also assessed at baseline and 7 days after the injections. Results: A total of 6 rabbits were included in the study. The gross histopathologic appearance of the retina, choroid, sclera and optic nerve was within normal limits without any sign of severe retinal necrosis or cystic degeneration. Light microscopy showed that BBG-D2O caused no substantial alterations in retinal layers as compared to control eyes. The injection of BBG-D2O did not induce considerable functional ERG alterations. Conclusion: Intravitreal injection of BBG-D2O 0.25 g/L seems to induce no retinal toxicity as documented by lack of functional and histological changes.

  6. Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using A New Topological Method

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A novel topological segmentation of retinal images represents blood vessels as connected regions in the continuous image plane, having shape-related analytic and geometric properties. This paper presents topological segmentation results from the DRIVE retinal image database.

  7. Retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doubal, F.N.; Hokke, P.E.; Wardlaw, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Lacunar strokes account for 25% of ischaemic strokes, but their precise aetiology is unknown. Similarities between the retinal and cerebral small vessels mean that clarification of the exact relationship between retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke, and particularly with stroke

  8. Neoplasia versus hyperplasia of the retinal pigment epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Steffen; Larsen, J.N.B.; Fledelius, Hans C.

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, retinal pigment epithelium, adenoma, tumor-like hyperplasia, histology, immunohistochemistry, tumor, neoplasm, ultrasonography......ophthalmology, retinal pigment epithelium, adenoma, tumor-like hyperplasia, histology, immunohistochemistry, tumor, neoplasm, ultrasonography...

  9. External Approach Microsurgery of Retinal Dialysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Piqing Hu; Lixin Shun; Xuechun Zhu; Yingwu Yi; Wen Liu

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the effect of external approach microsurgery in retinal dialysis.Methods: Consecutive 30 eyes of 28 patients with retinal dialysis were enrolled for this study. The progresses of the external approach microsurgery were following. Under the surgical microscopy, the preplacement of mattress sutures for buckling and/or encircling following retrobulbar anesthesia and scleral exposure, draining subretinal fluid, the cryotherapy of retinal breaks, checking the position of breaks on scleral buckle and gases injection were performed in turn.Results: After drainage of subretinal fluid, with scleral depression cryotherapy reaction around breaks could be observed clearly under the microscopy. All breaks were located on anterior slope of the buckle. Intraoperative complications were mild subretinal hemorrhage at drainage site and corneal epithelium exfoliation in 3 eyes, respectively.Postoperative complications were mainly secondary glaucoma and retinal redetachment.The one-operation reattachmentl rate was 96.7% (29 eyes), and the final reattachment rate was 100% after one eye had a second external approach microsurgery. The postoperative vision acuity (VA) was significantly better than the preoperative VA (X2=9.529, P< 0.01).Conclusion: External approach microsurgery has favourable effect on the surgery of retinal dialysis.

  10. Stem Cell Therapies in Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Garg

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells, and can model polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases, as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients’ diseases. Since iPSCs are a self-renewing resource, scientists can experiment with an unlimited number of pluripotent cells to perfect the process of targeted differentiation, transplantation, and more, for personalized medicine. Challenges in the use of stem cells are present from the scientific, ethical, and political realms. These include transplant complications leading to anatomically incorrect placement, concern for tumorigenesis, and incomplete targeting of differentiation leading to contamination by different types of cells. Despite these limitations, human ESCs and iPSCs specific to individual patients can revolutionize the study of retinal disease and may be effective therapies for conditions currently considered incurable.

  11. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  12. Photoresponse of the protonated Schiff-base retinal chromophore in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toker, Jonathan; Rahbek, Dennis Bo; Kiefer, H V

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation, initiated by photoexcitation as well as collisionally-induced excitation, of several retinal chromophores was studied in the gas phase. The chromophore in the protonated Schiff-base form (RPSB), essential for mammalian vision, shows a remarkably selective photoresponse. The sel......The fragmentation, initiated by photoexcitation as well as collisionally-induced excitation, of several retinal chromophores was studied in the gas phase. The chromophore in the protonated Schiff-base form (RPSB), essential for mammalian vision, shows a remarkably selective photoresponse...... modifications of the chromophore. We propose that isomerizations play an important role in the photoresponse of gas-phase retinal chromophores and guide internal conversion through conical intersections. The role of protein interactions is then to control the specificity of the photoisomerization in the primary...

  13. Retinal Identification Based on an Improved Circular Gabor Filter and Scale Invariant Feature Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Xi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Retinal identification based on retinal vasculatures in the retina provides the most secure and accurate means of authentication among biometrics and has primarily been used in combination with access control systems at high security facilities. Recently, there has been much interest in retina identification. As digital retina images always suffer from deformations, the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT, which is known for its distinctiveness and invariance for scale and rotation, has been introduced to retinal based identification. However, some shortcomings like the difficulty of feature extraction and mismatching exist in SIFT-based identification. To solve these problems, a novel preprocessing method based on the Improved Circular Gabor Transform (ICGF is proposed. After further processing by the iterated spatial anisotropic smooth method, the number of uninformative SIFT keypoints is decreased dramatically. Tested on the VARIA and eight simulated retina databases combining rotation and scaling, the developed method presents promising results and shows robustness to rotations and scale changes.

  14. MR detection of retinal hemorrhages: correlation with graded ophthalmologic exam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavers, Angela J.; Allbery, Sandra M. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Omaha, NE (United States); Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Omaha, NE (United States); Stagner, Anna M.; Hejkal, Thomas W. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Omaha, NE (United States); Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Omaha, NE (United States); Lyden, Elizabeth R. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Public Health, Omaha, NE (United States); Haney, Suzanne B. [Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Omaha, NE (United States); University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Dilated fundoscopic exam is considered the gold standard for detecting retinal hemorrhage, but expertise in obtaining this exam is not always immediately available. MRI can detect retinal hemorrhages, but correlation of the grade or severity of retinal hemorrhage on dilated fundoscopic exam with retinal hemorrhage visibility on MRI has not been described. To determine the value of standard brain protocol MRI in detecting retinal hemorrhage and to determine whether there is any correlation with MR detection of retinal hemorrhage and the dilated fundoscopic exam grade of hemorrhage. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 77 children <2 years old who were seen for head trauma from April 2007 to July 2013 and had both brain MRI and dilated fundoscopic exam or retinal camera images. A staff pediatric radiologist and radiology resident reviewed the MR images. Retinal hemorrhages were graded by a chief ophthalmology resident on a 12-point scale based on the retinal hemorrhage type, size, location and extent as seen on review of retinal camera images and detailed reports by ophthalmologists. Higher scores indicated increased severity of retinal hemorrhages. There was a statistically significant difference in the median grade of retinal hemorrhage examination between children who had retinal hemorrhage detected on MRI and children who did not have retinal hemorrhage detected on MRI (P = 0.02). When examination grade was categorized as low-grade (1-4), moderate-grade (5-8) or high-grade (>8) hemorrhage, there was a statistically significant association between exam grade and diagnosis based on MRI (P = 0.008). For example, only 14% of children with low-grade retinal hemorrhages were identified on MRI compared to 76% of children with high-grade hemorrhages. MR detection of retinal hemorrhage demonstrated a sensitivity of 61%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 63%. Retinal hemorrhage was best seen on the gradient

  15. "Super p53" mice display retinal astroglial changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J Salazar

    Full Text Available Tumour-suppressor genes, such as the p53 gene, produce proteins that inhibit cell division under adverse conditions, as in the case of DNA damage, radiation, hypoxia, or oxidative stress (OS. The p53 gene can arrest proliferation and trigger death by apoptosis subsequent to several factors. In astrocytes, p53 promotes cell-cycle arrest and is involved in oxidative stress-mediated astrocyte cell death. Increasingly, astrocytic p53 is proving fundamental in orchestrating neurodegenerative disease pathogenesis. In terms of ocular disease, p53 may play a role in hypoxia due to ischaemia and may be involved in the retinal response to oxidative stress (OS. We studied the influence of the p53 gene in the structural and quantitative characteristics of astrocytes in the retina. Adult mice of the C57BL/6 strain (12 months old were distributed into two groups: 1 mice with two extra copies of p53 ("super p53"; n = 6 and 2 wild-type p53 age-matched control, as the control group (WT; n = 6. Retinas from each group were immunohistochemically processed to locate the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. GFAP+ astrocytes were manually counted and the mean area occupied for one astrocyte was quantified. Retinal-astrocyte distribution followed established patterns; however, morphological changes were seen through the retinas in relation to p53 availability. The mean GFAP+ area occupied by one astrocyte in "super p53" eyes was significantly higher (p<0.05; Student's t-test than in the WT. In addition, astroglial density was significantly higher in the "super p53" retinas than in the WT ones, both in the whole-retina (p<0,01 Student's t-test and in the intermediate and peripheral concentric areas of the retina (p<0.05 Student's t-test. This fact might improve the resistance of the retinal cells against OS and its downstream signalling pathways.

  16. Contribution of Microglia-Mediated Neuroinflammation to Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Madeira, Maria H.; Raquel Boia; Santos, Paulo F.; António F. Ambrósio; Santiago, Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are major causes of vision loss and blindness worldwide and are characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. One common feature of retinal degenerative diseases and brain neurodegenerative diseases is chronic neuroinflammation. There is growing evidence that retinal microglia, as in the brain, become activated in the course of retinal degenerative diseases, having a pivotal role in the initiation and propagation of the neurodegenerative process. A bett...

  17. The porcine retinal vasculature accessed using an endovascular approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morén, Håkan; Undrén, Per; Gesslein, Bodil;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether the retinal circulation in the pig can be accessed using interventional neuroradiology and to explore the possibility of creating occlusions that result in experimental retinal ischemia.......The aim of this study was to examine whether the retinal circulation in the pig can be accessed using interventional neuroradiology and to explore the possibility of creating occlusions that result in experimental retinal ischemia....

  18. Direct Measurement of the Isomerization Barrier of the Isolated Retinal Chromophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-03

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 03/11/2015 2. REPORT TYPE...photoisomerization of retinal 24 Acknowledgements Bar-Ilan University: Dr. Yoni Toker Lihi Musbat Funding: NSWC Crane NISE / 219 Indiana University

  19. A Simple Method for Removal of Particles from the Retinal Surface during Vitrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touka Banaee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Removal of particulate materials from the retinal surface is somewhat difficult during small gauge vitrectomy. Simple injection of balanced salt solution into the vitreous cavity in a controlled manner using a connector tubing between the syringe and needle can produce enough turbulence to float the deposited material and remove it.

  20. Retinal vessel caliber, choroidal thickness and ocular pulse amplitude measurements in essential thrombocythemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Pekel

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results indicate that choroidal thickness and pulsatile blood flow are not significantly affected in ET and under high blood platelet counts. Retinal arteriolar and venular calibers are thinner in ET when compared to age.sex matched healthy controls.

  1. Retinal degeneration in progressive supranuclear palsy measured by optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemplewitz, Birthe; Kromer, Robert; Vettorazzi, Eik; Hidding, Ute; Frings, Andreas; Buhmann, Carsten

    2017-07-13

    This cross-sectional study compared the retinal morphology between patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and healthy controls. (The retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) around the optic disc and the retina in the macular area of 22 PSP patients and 151 controls were investigated by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Additionally, the RNFL and the nerve fiber index (NFI) were measured by scanning laser polarimetry (SLP). Results of RNFL measurements with SD-OCT and SLP were compared to assess diagnostic discriminatory power. Applying OCT, PSP patients showed a smaller RNFL thickness in the inferior nasal and inferior temporal areas. The macular volume and the thickness of the majority of macular sectors were reduced compared to controls. SLP data showed a thinner RNFL thickness and an increase in the NFI in PSP patients. Sensitivity and specificity to discriminate PSP patients from controls were higher applying SLP than SD-OCT. Retinal changes did not correlate with disease duration or severity in any OCT or SLP measurement. PSP seems to be associated with reduced thickness and volume of the macula and reduction of the RNFL, independent of disease duration or severity. Retinal imaging with SD-OCT and SLP might become an additional tool in PSP diagnosis.

  2. Baseline haemoglobin A1c influences retinal function after long-term insulin pump therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klefter, Oliver N; Holfort, Stig K; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to characterize the long-term effect of insulin pump therapy (CSII) on electroretinography and dark adaptometry and to examine the influence of baseline glycaemic control on retinal function in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: This prospective...

  3. Functional annotation of the human retinal pigment epithelium transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Booij (Judith); S. van Soest (Simone); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid); A.H.W. Essing (Anke); J.H.M. Verkerk (Annemieke); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); T.G.M.F. Gorgels (Theo); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To determine level, variability and functional annotation of gene expression of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the key tissue involved in retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Macular RPE cells from six selected healthy

  4. Functional annotation of the human retinal pigment epithelium transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, J.C.; van Soest, S.; Swagemakers, S.M.A.; Essing, A.H.W.; Verkerk, A.J.M.H.; van der Spek, P.J.; Gorgels, T.G.M.F.; Bergen, A.A.B.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To determine level, variability and functional annotation of gene expression of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the key tissue involved in retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Macular RPE cells from six selected healthy hu

  5. Effects of intravitreal injection of netrin-1 in retinal neovascularization of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2015-12-01

    -waves (a-wave: 0.1 µg/mL netrin-1 =17.67±3.39 µm, 5 µg/mL netrin-1 =28.50±1.31 µm, phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]-treated =17.67±3.39 µm; b-wave: 0.1 µg/mL netrin-1 =44.67±4.80 µm, 5 µg/mL netrin-1 =97.17±9.63 µm, PBS-treated =44.67±4.80 µm and the expression of VEGF-A (no-treatment rats, 9.29±0.80 pg/mL; PBS-treated rats, 19.64±3.77 pg/mL; 0.1 µg/mL netrin-1 treated rats, 21.37±3.64 pg/mL; 5 µg/mL netrin-1 treated rats, 9.85±0.54 pg/mL, at 6 weeks after induction. By comparing fluoresce in angiography, level of inner blood retinal barrier breakdown (% of control, retinal hematoxylin-eosin staining, and collagen-IV fluorescence assays in the retinas of PBS-treated rats, netrin-1 was found to suppress and reverse retinal neovascularization at a concentration of 5 µg/mL (P<0.05, while 0.1 µg/mL netrin-1 (P<0.05 led to an increase in the number of new retinal blood vessels, after 6 weeks’ injection.Conclusion: Netrin-1 could play a significant role in retinal neovascularization by dual-direction regulating angiogenesis dependent on dosage.Keywords: netrin-1,HUVEC, DR, intravitreal injection, retinal neovas­cularization

  6. [Muscular Dystrophies Involving the Retinal Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägle, H

    2016-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are rare disorders, with an incidence of approx. 20 in 100 000. Some dystrophies also affect retinal or optic nerve function. In such cases, the ophthalmological findings may be critical for differential diagnosis or patient counseling. For example in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where the alteration in retinal function seems to reflect cerebral involvement. Other important forms are mitochondrial and metabolic disorders, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome and the Refsum syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis has become a major tool for differential diagnosis, but may be complex and demanding. This article gives an overview of major muscular dystrophies involving retinal function and their genetic origin, in order to guide differential diagnosis.

  7. Enhancing retinal images by nonlinear registration

    CERN Document Server

    Molodij, Guillaume; Glanc, Marie; Chenegros, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Being able to image the human retina in high resolution opens a new era in many important fields, such as pharmacological research for retinal diseases, researches in human cognition, nervous system, metabolism and blood stream, to name a few. In this paper, we propose to share the knowledge acquired in the fields of optics and imaging in solar astrophysics in order to improve the retinal imaging at very high spatial resolution in the perspective to perform a medical diagnosis. The main purpose would be to assist health care practitioners by enhancing retinal images and detect abnormal features. We apply a nonlinear registration method using local correlation tracking to increase the field of view and follow structure evolutions using correlation techniques borrowed from solar astronomy technique expertise. Another purpose is to define the tracer of movements after analyzing local correlations to follow the proper motions of an image from one moment to another, such as changes in optical flows that would be o...

  8. Marfan Syndrome Presenting with Bilateral Retinal Detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Chakrabarti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder of the connective tissue. Marfan syndrome affects most organs and tissues, especially the skeleton, lungs, eyes, heart, and the large blood vessels. Eye involvement may be in the form of retinal detachment which is a potentially dangerous manifestation for its sight threatening nature .We report a case where a 17 year old male developed sudden blindness due to spontaneous bilateral retinal detachment. Examination revealed features of Marfan syndrome and was stamped as a case of Marfan syndrome by Ghent criteria . The point to stress upon is that a young male developing spontaneous retinal detachment, a diagnosis of underlying Marfan syndrome should be kept in mind if appropriate clinical stigmata are present. [Natl J Med Res 2014; 4(1.000: 104-105

  9. Stem cell therapy for retinal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose Mauricio Garcia,; Luisa Mendon?a; Rodrigo Brant; Murilo Abud; Caio Regatieri; Bruno Diniz

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss about current knowledgeabout stem cell (SC) therapy in the treatment of retinaldegeneration. Both human embryonic stem cell andinduced pluripotent stem cell has been growth inculture for a long time, and started to be explored inthe treatment of blinding conditions. The Food andDrug Administration, recently, has granted clinical trialsusing SC retinal therapy to treat complex disorders, asStargardt's dystrophy, and patients with geographicatrophy, providing good outcomes. This study'sintent is to overview the critical regeneration of thesubretinal anatomy through retinal pigment epitheliumtransplantation, with the goal of reestablish importantpathways from the retina to the occipital cortex of thebrain, as well as the differentiation from pluripotentquiescent SC to adult retina, and its relationshipwith a primary retinal injury, different techniques oftransplantation, management of immune rejection andtumorigenicity, its potential application in improvingpatients' vision, and, finally, approaching future directionsand challenges for the treatment of several conditions.

  10. Prospects for retinal gene replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W; Ali, Robin R

    2009-04-01

    Inherited retinal degeneration, which includes conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), affects approximately 1/3000 of the population in the Western world. It is characterized by loss of vision and results from mutations in any one of >100 different genes. There are currently no effective treatments, but many of the genes have now been identified and their functions elucidated, providing a major impetus to develop gene-based treatments. Preliminary results from three clinical trials indicate that the treatment of a form of LCA by gene therapy can be safe and effective. Here, we discuss the potential for treating other forms of retinal degeneration by gene therapy, focusing on the gene defects that are likely to be the most amenable to treatment.

  11. Central Retinal Artery Occlusion With Subsequent Central Retinal Vein Occlusion in Biopsy-Proven Giant Cell Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Zoë R; Wang, Xiaofei; DiLoreto, David A

    2016-09-01

    Central retinal artery occlusion with subsequent central retinal vein occlusion in the same eye is a rare entity. We present a 72-year-old man with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis who developed bilateral arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and a left central retinal artery occlusion. Subsequently, he developed a left central retinal vein occlusion within 2 weeks of his initial vision loss. His vision did not improve with corticosteroids.

  12. Retinal changes in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash Pankaj Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to determine the prevalence of retinal changes in pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH and any association between the retinal changes and age, parity, blood pressure, proteinuria, and severity of the disease. Settings and Design: Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: All the patients admitted with a diagnosis of PIH were included in this study. Age, gravida, gestation period, blood pressure, and proteinuria were noted from the case records. Fundus examination was done with a direct ophthalmoscope. The findings were noted and were analyzed using SPSS program. Results: A total of 150 patients of PIH were examined. The mean age of patients was 25.1 years. The gestation period ranged from 27 weeks to 42 weeks; 76 (50.67% were the primi gravida. 92 (61.33% patients had gestational hypertension, 49 (32.67% patients had preeclampsia, and 9 (6% had eclampsia. Retinal changes (hypertensive retinopathy were noted in 18 (12% patients - Grade 1 in 12 (8% and Grade 2 in 6 (4%. Hemorrhages or exudates or retinal detachment were not seen in any patient. There was statistically significant positive association of retinal changes and blood pressure (P = 0.037, proteinuria (P = 0.0005, and severity of the PIH (P = 0.004. Conclusions: Retinal changes were seen in 12% of patients with PIH. Occurrence of hypertensive retinopathy in PIH cases has been decreased due to better antenatal care and early detection and treatment of PIH cases. There is a greater chance of developing retinopathy with increase in blood pressure, severity of PIH, and proteinuria in cases of PIH.

  13. Reading visual braille with a retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Thomas Z; Harris, Jordan; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, Jose A; Dorn, Jessy D; McClure, Kelly; Greenberg, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Retinal prostheses, which restore partial vision to patients blinded by outer retinal degeneration, are currently in clinical trial. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system was recently awarded CE approval for commercial use in Europe. While retinal prosthesis users have achieved remarkable visual improvement to the point of reading letters and short sentences, the reading process is still fairly cumbersome. This study investigates the possibility of using an epiretinal prosthesis to stimulate visual braille as a sensory substitution for reading written letters and words. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system, used in this study, includes a 10 × 6 electrode array implanted epiretinally, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses, and a wearable computer that processes the video and determines the stimulation current of each electrode in real time. In the braille reading system, individual letters are created by a subset of dots from a 3 by 2 array of six dots. For the visual braille experiment, a grid of six electrodes was chosen out of the 10 × 6 Argus II array. Groups of these electrodes were then directly stimulated (bypassing the camera) to create visual percepts of individual braille letters. Experiments were performed in a single subject. Single letters were stimulated in an alternative forced choice (AFC) paradigm, and short 2-4-letter words were stimulated (one letter at a time) in an open-choice reading paradigm. The subject correctly identified 89% of single letters, 80% of 2-letter, 60% of 3-letter, and 70% of 4-letter words. This work suggests that text can successfully be stimulated and read as visual braille in retinal prosthesis patients.

  14. Reading visual Braille with a retinal prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Zaccarin Lauritzen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Retinal prostheses, which restore partial vision to patients blinded by outer retinal degeneration, are currently in clinical trial. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system was recently awarded CE approval for commercial use in Europe. While retinal prosthesis users have achieved remarkable visual improvement to the point of reading letters and short sentences, the reading process is still fairly cumbersome. This study investigates the possibility of using an epiretinal prosthesis to stimulate visual Braille as a sensory substitution for reading written letters and words. The Argus II retinal prosthesis system, used in this study, includes a 10 x 6 electrode array implanted epiretinally, a tiny video camera mounted on a pair of glasses, and a wearable computer that processes the video and determines the stimulation current of each electrode in real time. In the Braille reading system, individual letters are created by a subset of dots from a 3 by 2 array of six dots. For the visual Braille experiment, a grid of six electrodes was chosen out of the 10 x 6 Argus II array. Groups of these electrodes were then directly stimulated (bypassing the camera to create visual percepts of individual Braille letters. Experiments were performed in a single subject. Single letters were stimulated in an alternative forced choice (AFC paradigm, and short 2-4-letter words were stimulated (one letter at a time in an open-choice reading paradigm. The subject correctly identified 89% of single letters, 80% of 2-letter, 60% of 3-letter, and 70% of 4-letter words. This work suggests that text can successfully be stimulated and read as visual Braille in retinal prosthesis patients.

  15. Treatment of Laser Induced Retinal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-02

    END 1.0 1.18 Yl(-ROCOPY Ri yjTuION If ’,! (HART !. UIH; iLruud @ N TREATMENT OF LASER INDUCED RETINAL INJURIES (ANNUAL REPORT 00 DTIC Michael Belkin...NO. CCESSION NO _______________________________61102A I102BS1O0 CF 1i. 446 TITLE (Indude S*.curny Claifkaion) TREATMENT OF LASER INDUCED RETINAL... INJURIES PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) M. BELKIN N. NAVEH a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Mont. D y) S. PAGE COUNT FROM Xaj& TO l 2Ann

  16. Cytomegalovirus retinitis after initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ahmadinejad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART, despite a reduced viral load and improved immune responses, may experience clinical deterioration. This so called "immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS" is caused by inflammatory response to both intact subclinical pathogens and residual antigens. Cytomegalovirus retinitis is common in HIV-infected patients on ART with a cluster differentiation 4 (CD4+ counts less than 50 cells/mm3. We reported a patient with blurred vision while receiving ART. She had an unmasking classic CMV retinitis after ART.

  17. Laser speckle analysis of retinal vascular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neganova, Anastasiia Y.; Postnov, Dmitry D.; Jacobsen, Jens Christian B.;

    2016-01-01

    Studies of vascular responses are usually performed on isolated vessels or on single vessels in vivo. This allows for precise measurements of diameter or blood flow. However, dynamical responses of the whole microvascular network are difficult to access experimentally. We suggest to use full......-field laser speckle imaging to evaluate vascular responses of the retinal network. Image segmentation and vessel recognition algorithms together with response mapping allow us to analyze diameter changes and blood flow responses in the intact retinal network upon systemic administration of the vasoconstrictor...

  18. [Binocular vision after treatment of retinal detachment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymowicz, Małgorzata; Raczyńska, Krystyna; Maksymowicz, Jarosław

    2003-01-01

    The study covered 79 patients after treatment of retinal detachment. Double vision, strabismus and disturbances of eyeballs motility were found. Up to 12 months after intervention, the deterioration of binocular vision was observed in 48.28 to 89.66% of patients, depending on the method used. The majority of disturbances were observed during the first 3 months with tendency to gradual subsidence during consecutive 9 months. A patient, after treatment of retinal detachment, can be qualified to return to work where stereopsis is needed under condition that ophthalmologic examination is done every three months during the first year after operation and than once a year.

  19. Retinal image analysis: preprocessing and feature extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrugo, Andres G; Millan, Maria S, E-mail: andres.marrugo@upc.edu [Grup d' Optica Aplicada i Processament d' Imatge, Departament d' Optica i Optometria Univesitat Politecnica de Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    Image processing, analysis and computer vision techniques are found today in all fields of medical science. These techniques are especially relevant to modern ophthalmology, a field heavily dependent on visual data. Retinal images are widely used for diagnostic purposes by ophthalmologists. However, these images often need visual enhancement prior to apply a digital analysis for pathological risk or damage detection. In this work we propose the use of an image enhancement technique for the compensation of non-uniform contrast and luminosity distribution in retinal images. We also explore optic nerve head segmentation by means of color mathematical morphology and the use of active contours.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the neuroretina and retinal blood vessels after retinal ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Gisela; Gesslein, Bodil; Gustafsson, Lotta

    2010-01-01

    Retinal ischemia arises from circulatory failure. As the retinal blood vessels are key organs in circulatory failure, our aim was to study the retinal vasculature separately from the neuroretina to elucidate the role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1α and 1β and vascular endothelial growth factor...

  1. Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Augments Their Protection on Retinal Cells In Vitro and Attenuates Retinal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury In Vivo against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, involving several ocular diseases, seriously threatens human ocular health, mainly treated by attenuating I/R-induced oxidative stress. Currently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs could restore I/R-injured retina through paracrine secretion. Additionally, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 could ameliorate oxidative stress and thus retinal apoptosis, but the expression of HO-1 in MSC is limited. Here, we hypothesized that overexpression of HO-1 in MSC (MSC-HO-1 may significantly improve their retina-protective potentials. The overexpression of HO-1 in MSC was achieved by lentivirus transduction. Then, MSC or MSC-HO-1 was cocultured with retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5 in H2O2-simulated oxidative condition and their protection on RGC-5 was systemically valuated in vitro. Compared with MSC, MSC-HO-1 significantly attenuated H2O2-induced injury of RGC-5, including decrease in cellular ROS level and apoptosis, activation of antiapoptotic proteins p-Akt and Bcl-2, and blockage of proapoptotic proteins cleaved caspase 3 and Bax. In retinal I/R rats model, compared with control MSC, MSC-HO-1-treated retina significantly retrieved its structural thickness, reduced cell apoptosis, markedly attenuated retinal oxidative stress level, and largely regained the activities of typical antioxidant enzymes, SOD and CAT. Therefore, it could be concluded that overexpression of HO-1 provides a promising strategy to enhance the MSC-based therapy for I/R-related retinal injury.

  2. A randomised, double-masked, controlled study of the efficacy and safety of intravitreal bevacizumab versus ranibizumab in the treatment of macular oedema due to branch retinal vein occlusion: MARVEL Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Raja; Panchal, Bhavik; Das, Taraprasad; Chhablani, Jay; Jalali, Subhadra; Ali, M Hasnat

    2015-07-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) compared with ranibizumab (IVR) in the treatment of macular oedema due to branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). In this prospective, randomised, non-inferiority trial, 75 participants with macular oedema due to BRVO received intravitreal injections of ranibizumab or bevacizumab after 1:1 block randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the difference in mean changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at 6 months. Secondary outcome measures included mean change in central retinal thickness (CRT), the proportion of patients improving by >15 letters and the proportion of patients developing neovascularisation. Participants received either IVR (n=37) or IVB (n=38). The mean BCVA at baseline was 52.8±14.4 letters (20/80) and 56.1±10.0 letters (20/80) (p=0.24) in the ranibizumab and bevacizumab groups, respectively. At 6 months, the mean gains in BCVA were +18.1 letters (p<0.0001; 95% CI, +12.8 to +22.6) in the ranibizumab group and +15.6 letters (p<0.0001; 95% CI +12.0 to +20.5) in the bevacizumab group. The difference between the mean visual gains of the treated groups (bevacizumab-ranibizumab) was -2.5 letters (95% CI -8.0 to +5.0; p=0.74). Mean reductions in CRT at 6 months were 177.1±122.3 µm in the ranibizumab group (p<0.0001) and 201.7±166.2 µm in the bevacizumab group (p<0.0001), with no significant difference between the two groups (p=0.48). The mean numbers of ranibizumab and bevacizumab injections were 3.2±1.5 and 3.0±1.4, respectively (p=0.55). Two serious adverse events occurred in the ranibizumab group and one in the bevacizumab group but both were unrelated to intravitreal injections. This study demonstrated significant gain in visual acuity in eyes with BRVO treated with either bevacizumab or ranibizumab. Pro-re-nata strategy was effective in maintaining the visual gain. http://www.ctri.nic.in/ CTRI/2012/01/003120. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  3. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of intravitreal adalimumab administration in rabbit retinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álcio Coutinho de Paula

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of intravitreal adalimumab treatment in an animal experimental model using cytological and molecular techniques. Methods: Eighteen rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: control, adalimumab treatment, and placebo. Cytotoxicity on retinal cells was evaluated using flow cytometry assays to determine the level of apoptosis and necrosis. Genotoxicity was evaluated by comet assays to assess DNA damage, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to evaluate expression of apoptosis-inducing caspases (8 and 3. Results: No cytotoxicity or genotoxicity was observed in any of the two treatment groups (adalimumab and placebo following intravitreal administration compared with the control group. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that more than 90% of the cells were viable, and only a low proportion of retinal cells presented apoptotic (~10% or necrotic (<1% activity across all groups. Molecular damage was also low with a maximum of 6.4% DNA degradation observed in the comet assays. In addition, no increase in gene expression of apoptosis-inducing caspases was observed on retinal cells by qPCR in both the adalimumab and placebo groups compared with the control group. Conclusion: The use of adalimumab resulted in no detectable cytotoxicity or genotoxicity on retinal cells for up to 60 days upon administration. These results therefore indicate that adalimumab may be a safe option for intravitreal application to treat ocular inflammatory diseases in which TNF-α is involved.

  4. Fractal analysis of the retinal vasculature and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sng, Chelvin C A; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Liu, Erica; Lim, Su Chi; Hamzah, Haslina; Lee, Jeannette; Tai, E Shyong; Wong, Tien Y

    2010-07-01

    BACKGROUND. Fractal analysis provides a global index of the geometric complexity and optimality of vascular networks. In this study, we investigated the relationship between fractal measurements of the retinal vasculature and chronic kidney disease (CKD). METHODS. This was a population-based case-control study which included participants from the Singapore Prospective Study Program. We identified 261 participants with CKD, defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate of fractal dimension (D(f)) was quantified from digitized fundus photographs using a computer-based programme. RESULTS. The mean D(f) was 1.43 +/- 0.048 in the participants with CKD and 1.44 +/- 0.042 in controls (P = 0.013). Suboptimal D(f) in the lowest (first) and highest (fifth) quintiles were associated with an increased prevalence of CKD after adjusting for age, systolic blood pressure, diabetes and other risk factors [odds ratio (OR) 2.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15, 3.83 and OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.06, 3.17; compared to the fourth quintile, respectively). This association was present even in participants without diabetes or hypertension. CONCLUSIONS. Our study found that an abnormal retinal vascular network is associated with an increased risk of CKD, supporting the hypothesis that deviations from optimal microvascular architecture may be related to kidney damage.

  5. Glaucoma associated with the management of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangouritsas G

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available George Mangouritsas, Spyridon Mourtzoukos, Dimitra M Portaliou, Vassilios I Georgopoulos, Anastasia Dimopoulou, Elias Feretis Eye Clinic, General Hospital "Hellenic Red Cross", Athens, Greece Abstract: Transient or permanent elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP is a common complication following vitreoretinal surgery. Usually secondary glaucoma, which develops after scleral buckling procedures, or pars plana vitrectomy for repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, is of multifactorial origin. It is essential, for appropriate management, to detect the cause of outflow obstruction. An exacerbation of preexisting open-angle glaucoma or a steroid-induced elevation of IOP should also be considered. Scleral buckling may be complicated by congestion and anterior rotation of the ciliary body resulting in secondary angle closure, which can usually resolve with medical therapy. The use of intravitreal gases may also induce secondary angle-closure with or without pupillary block. Aspiration of a quantity of the intraocular gas may be indicated. Secondary glaucoma can also develop after intravitreal injection of silicone oil due to pupillary block, inflammation, synechial angle closure, or migration of emulsified silicone oil in the anterior chamber and obstruction of the aqueous outflow pathway. In most eyes medical therapy is successful in controlling IOP; however, silicone oil removal with or without concurrent glaucoma surgery may also be required. Diode laser transscleral cyclophotocoagulation and glaucoma drainage devices constitute useful treatment modalities for long-term IOP control. Cooperation between vitreoretinal and glaucoma specialists is necessary to achieve successful management. Keywords: retinal detachment, intraocular pressure elevation, glaucoma, vitrectomy, intravitreal gas, silicone oil

  6. Retinal Capillary Rarefaction in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumar, Agnes; Harazny, Joanna M.; Ott, Christian; Friedrich, Stefanie; Kistner, Iris; Striepe, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In diabetes mellitus type 2, capillary rarefaction plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of end-organ damage. We investigated retinal capillary density in patients with early disease. Methods This cross-sectional study compares retinal capillary rarefaction determined by intercapillary distance (ICD) and capillary area (CapA), measured non-invasively and in vivo by scanning laser Doppler flowmetry, in 73 patients with type 2 diabetes, 55 healthy controls and 134 individuals with hypertension stage 1 or 2. Results In diabetic patients, ICD was greater (23.2±5.5 vs 20.2±4.2, p = 0.013) and CapA smaller (1592±595 vs 1821±652, p = 0.019) than in healthy controls after adjustment for differences in cardiovascular risk factors between the groups. Compared to hypertensive patients, diabetic individuals showed no difference in ICD (23.1±5.8, p = 0.781) and CapA (1556±649, p = 0.768). Conclusion In the early stage of diabetes type 2, patients showed capillary rarefaction compared to healthy individuals. PMID:27935938

  7. Retinal oxygen saturation evaluation by multi-spectral fundus imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoobehi, Bahram; Ning, Jinfeng; Puissegur, Elise; Bordeaux, Kimberly; Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Beach, James

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a multi-spectral method to measure oxygen saturation of the retina in the human eye. Methods: Five Cynomolgus monkeys with normal eyes were anesthetized with intramuscular ketamine/xylazine and intravenous pentobarbital. Multi-spectral fundus imaging was performed in five monkeys with a commercial fundus camera equipped with a liquid crystal tuned filter in the illumination light path and a 16-bit digital camera. Recording parameters were controlled with software written specifically for the application. Seven images at successively longer oxygen-sensing wavelengths were recorded within 4 seconds. Individual images for each wavelength were captured in less than 100 msec of flash illumination. Slightly misaligned images of separate wavelengths due to slight eye motion were registered and corrected by translational and rotational image registration prior to analysis. Numerical values of relative oxygen saturation of retinal arteries and veins and the underlying tissue in between the artery/vein pairs were evaluated by an algorithm previously described, but which is now corrected for blood volume from averaged pixels (n > 1000). Color saturation maps were constructed by applying the algorithm at each image pixel using a Matlab script. Results: Both the numerical values of relative oxygen saturation and the saturation maps correspond to the physiological condition, that is, in a normal retina, the artery is more saturated than the tissue and the tissue is more saturated than the vein. With the multi-spectral fundus camera and proper registration of the multi-wavelength images, we were able to determine oxygen saturation in the primate retinal structures on a tolerable time scale which is applicable to human subjects. Conclusions: Seven wavelength multi-spectral imagery can be used to measure oxygen saturation in retinal artery, vein, and tissue (microcirculation). This technique is safe and can be used to monitor oxygen uptake in humans. This work

  8. The trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cells is mediated by IL-1β and TNF-α

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles von-Held-Ventura, Juliana; Mázala-de-Oliveira, Thalita; Cândida da Rocha Oliveira, Amanda; Granja, Marcelo Gomes [Departamento de Neurobiologia, Programa de Neurociências, Outeiro de São João Batista s/n CEP: 24020-150, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire [Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacodinâmica, Av., no 4365, Manguinhos, 21045-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Giestal-de-Araujo, Elizabeth, E-mail: egiestal@vm.uff.br [Departamento de Neurobiologia, Programa de Neurociências, Outeiro de São João Batista s/n CEP: 24020-150, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-09-09

    Ouabain is a steroid hormone that binds to the enzyme Na{sup +}, K{sup +} – ATPase and stimulates different intracellular pathways controlling growth, proliferation and cell survival. IL-1β and TNF-α are pleiotropic molecules, conventionally regarded as pro-inflammatory cytokines with well-known effects in the immune system. In addition, IL-1β and TNF-α also play important roles in the nervous system including neuroprotective effects. Previous data from our group showed that ouabain treatment is able to induce an increase in retinal ganglion cell survival kept in mixed retinal cell cultures. The aim of this work was to investigate if IL-1β and TNF-α could be mediating the trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cells. Our results show that the trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cell was inhibited by either anti-IL-1β or anti-TNF-α antibodies. In agreement, IL-1β or TNF-α increased the retinal ganglion cells survival in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, ouabain treatment induces a temporal release of TNF-α and IL-1β from retinal cell cultures. Interestingly, TNF-α and IL-1β regulate each other intracellular levels. Our results suggest that ouabain treatment triggers the activation of TNF-α and IL-1β signaling pathways leading to an increase in retinal ganglion cell survival. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines regulates the ouabain effect on RGC survival. • Ouabain treatment modulates the intracellular levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. • Ouabain induces the release of TNF-α and IL-1β in retinal cell cultures.

  9. Lower Hemoglobin Concentration Is Associated with Retinal Ischemia and the Severity of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Traveset

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To assess the association of blood oxygen-transport capacity variables with the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR, retinal ischemia, and macular oedema in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods. Cross-sectional, case-control study (N=312 with T2DM: 153 individuals with DR and 159 individuals with no DR. Participants were classified according to the severity of DR and the presence of retinal ischemia or macular oedema. Hematological variables were collected by standardized methods. Three logistic models were adjusted to ascertain the association between hematologic variables with the severity of DR and the presence of retinal ischemia or macular oedema. Results. Individuals with severe DR showed significantly lower hemoglobin, hematocrit, and erythrocyte levels compared with those with mild disease and in individuals with retinal ischemia and macular oedema compared with those without these disorders. Hemoglobin was the only factor that showed a significant inverse association with the severity of DR [beta-coefficient = −0.52, P value = 0.003] and retinal ischemia [beta-coefficient = −0.49, P value = 0.001]. Lower erythrocyte level showed a marginally significant association with macular oedema [beta-coefficient = −0.86, P value = 0.055]. Conclusions. In patients with DR, low blood oxygen-transport capacity was associated with more severe DR and the presence of retinal ischemia. Low hemoglobin levels may have a key role in the development and progression of DR.

  10. Retinal protective effects of topically administered agmatine on ischemic ocular injury caused by transient occlusion of the ophthalmic artery

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    S. Hong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Agmatine, an endogenous polyamine and putative neuromodulator, is known to have neuroprotective effects on various neurons in the central nervous system. We determined whether or not topically administered agmatine could reduce ischemic retinal injury. Transient ocular ischemia was achieved by intraluminal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery of ddY mice (30-35 g for 2 h, which is known to also induce occlusion of the ophthalmic artery. In the agmatine group (N = 6, a 1.0 mM agmatine-containing ophthalmic solution was administered four times daily for 2 weeks before occlusion. In the control group (N = 6, a 0.1% hyaluronic acid ophthalmic solution was instilled at the same times. At 22 h after reperfusion, the eyeballs were enucleated and the retinal sections were stained by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL. Transient ocular ischemia induced apoptosis of retinal cells in the entire retinal layer, and topically administered agmatine can significantly reduce this ischemic retinal injury. The proportion of apoptotic cells was definitely decreased (P < 0.001; Kruskal-Wallis test. Overall, we determined that topical agmatine application effectively decreases retinal damage in an in vivo ocular ischemic injury model. This implies that agmatine is a good candidate as a direct neuroprotective agent for eyes with ocular ischemic diseases.

  11. Effects of low level laser treatment on the survival of axotomized retinal ganglion cells in adult Hamsters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwok-Fai So; Mason Chin Pang Leung; Qi Cui

    2014-01-01

    Injury to axons close to the neuronal bodies in the mammalian central nervous system causes a large proportion of parenting neurons to degenerate. It is known that optic nerve transection close to the eye in rodents leads to a loss of about half of retinal ganglion cells in 1 week and about 90% in 2 weeks. Using low level laser treatment in the present study, we demonstrated that treatment with helium-neon (660 nm) laser with 15 mW power could delay retinal ganglion cell death after optic nerve axotomy in adult hamsters. The effect was most apparent in the ifrst week with a short period of treatment time (5 minutes) in which 65–66% of retinal ganglion cells survived the optic nerve axotomy whereas 45–47% of retinal ganglion cells did so in optic nerve axotomy controls. We also found that single dose and early commencement of laser irradiation were important in protecting retinal ganglion cells following optic nerve axotomy. These ifndings thus convincingly show that appropriate laser treatment may be neuroprotective to retinal gan-glion cells.

  12. Gene therapy rescues photoreceptor blindness in dogs and paves the way for treating human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, William A; Cideciyan, Artur V; Lewin, Alfred S; Iwabe, Simone; Khanna, Hemant; Sumaroka, Alexander; Chiodo, Vince A; Fajardo, Diego S; Román, Alejandro J; Deng, Wen-Tao; Swider, Malgorzata; Alemán, Tomas S; Boye, Sanford L; Genini, Sem; Swaroop, Anand; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2012-02-07

    Hereditary retinal blindness is caused by mutations in genes expressed in photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium. Gene therapy in mouse and dog models of a primary retinal pigment epithelium disease has already been translated to human clinical trials with encouraging results. Treatment for common primary photoreceptor blindness, however, has not yet moved from proof of concept to the clinic. We evaluated gene augmentation therapy in two blinding canine photoreceptor diseases that model the common X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene, which encodes a photoreceptor ciliary protein, and provide evidence that the therapy is effective. After subretinal injections of adeno-associated virus-2/5-vectored human RPGR with human IRBP or GRK1 promoters, in vivo imaging showed preserved photoreceptor nuclei and inner/outer segments that were limited to treated areas. Both rod and cone photoreceptor function were greater in treated (three of four) than in control eyes. Histopathology indicated normal photoreceptor structure and reversal of opsin mislocalization in treated areas expressing human RPGR protein in rods and cones. Postreceptoral remodeling was also corrected: there was reversal of bipolar cell dendrite retraction evident with bipolar cell markers and preservation of outer plexiform layer thickness. Efficacy of gene therapy in these large animal models of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa provides a path for translation to human treatment.

  13. Lower Hemoglobin Concentration Is Associated with Retinal Ischemia and the Severity of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traveset, Alicia; Rubinat, Esther; Ortega, Emilio; Alcubierre, Nuria; Vazquez, Beatriz; Hernández, Marta; Jurjo, Carmen; Espinet, Ramon; Ezpeleta, Juan Antonio; Mauricio, Didac

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To assess the association of blood oxygen-transport capacity variables with the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR), retinal ischemia, and macular oedema in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. Cross-sectional, case-control study (N = 312) with T2DM: 153 individuals with DR and 159 individuals with no DR. Participants were classified according to the severity of DR and the presence of retinal ischemia or macular oedema. Hematological variables were collected by standardized methods. Three logistic models were adjusted to ascertain the association between hematologic variables with the severity of DR and the presence of retinal ischemia or macular oedema. Results. Individuals with severe DR showed significantly lower hemoglobin, hematocrit, and erythrocyte levels compared with those with mild disease and in individuals with retinal ischemia and macular oedema compared with those without these disorders. Hemoglobin was the only factor that showed a significant inverse association with the severity of DR [beta-coefficient = −0.52, P value = 0.003] and retinal ischemia [beta-coefficient = −0.49, P value = 0.001]. Lower erythrocyte level showed a marginally significant association with macular oedema [beta-coefficient = −0.86, P value = 0.055]. Conclusions. In patients with DR, low blood oxygen-transport capacity was associated with more severe DR and the presence of retinal ischemia. Low hemoglobin levels may have a key role in the development and progression of DR. PMID:27200379

  14. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia Presenting as Bilateral Retinal Haemorrhages with Multiple Retinal Infiltrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Priyanka Ramkrishna; Barot, Rakesh K; Gohel, Devadatta Jayantilal; Bhagat, Nupur

    2016-05-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) causes retinopathy manifesting as venous dilation and tortuosity, perivascular sheathing, retinal haemorrhages, microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots and optic nerve infiltration. Retina is the most commonly involved intraocular structure in CML. However, retinal involvement is a rare form of presentation of CML and few cases have been reported. We report a case of CML presenting as unilateral sudden visual loss. Fundus showed multiple white centered retinal haemorrhages in both eyes with unilateral macular oedema. Blood work-up showed raised WBC count, high platelet count and low Haemoglobin. Cytological analysis of bone marrow biopsy confirmed Philadelphia chromosome. After a course of Imatinib, visual acuity improved and haemorrhages resolved with normalization of macular thickness. In our case, patient presented early, leading to early detection producing better visual prognosis. This highlights the importance of detailed hematological work up in patients with retinal involvement to rule out leukaemic retinopathy.

  15. A CNGB1 frameshift mutation in Papillon and Phalene dogs with progressive retinal atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saija J Ahonen

    Full Text Available Progressive retinal degenerations are the most common causes of complete blindness both in human and in dogs. Canine progressive retinal atrophy (PRA or degeneration resembles human retinitis pigmentosa (RP and is characterized by a progressive loss of rod photoreceptor cells followed by a loss of cone function. The primary clinical signs are detected as vision impairment in a dim light. Although several genes have been associated with PRAs, there are still PRAs of unknown genetic cause in many breeds, including Papillons and Phalènes. We have performed a genome wide association and linkage studies in cohort of 6 affected Papillons and Phalènes and 14 healthy control dogs to map a novel PRA locus on canine chromosome 2, with a 1.9 Mb shared homozygous region in the affected dogs. Parallel exome sequencing of a trio identified an indel mutation, including a 1-bp deletion, followed by a 6-bp insertion in the CNGB1 gene. This mutation causes a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to probable nonsense mediated decay (NMD of the CNGB1 mRNA. The mutation segregated with the disease and was confirmed in a larger cohort of 145 Papillons and Phalènes (PFisher = 1.4×10(-8 with a carrier frequency of 17.2 %. This breed specific mutation was not present in 334 healthy dogs from 10 other breeds or 121 PRA affected dogs from 44 other breeds. CNGB1 is important for the photoreceptor cell function its defects have been previously associated with retinal degeneration in both human and mouse. Our study indicates that a frameshift mutation in CNGB1 is a cause of PRA in Papillons and Phalènes and establishes the breed as a large functional animal model for further characterization of retinal CNGB1 biology and possible retinal gene therapy trials. This study enables also the development of a genetic test for breeding purposes.

  16. Chemical stimulation of rat retinal neurons: feasibility of an epiretinal neurotransmitter-based prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayat, Samsoon; Rountree, Corey M.; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2015-02-01

    Objective. No cure currently exists for photoreceptor degenerative diseases, which cause partial or total blindness in millions of people worldwide. Electrical retinal prostheses have been developed by several groups with the goal of restoring vision lost to these diseases, but electrical stimulation has limitations. It excites both somas and axons, activating retinal pathways nonphysiologically, and limits spatial resolution because of current spread. Chemical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) using the neurotransmitter glutamate has been suggested as an alternative to electrical stimulation with some significant advantages. However, sufficient scientific data to support developing a chemical-based retinal prosthesis is lacking. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a neurotransmitter-based retinal prosthesis and determine therapeutic stimulation parameters. Approach. We injected controlled amounts of glutamate into rat retinas from the epiretinal side ex vivo via micropipettes using a pressure injection system and recorded RGC responses with a multielectrode array. Responsive units were identified using a spike rate threshold of 3 Hz. Main results. We recorded both somal and axonal units and demonstrated successful glutamatergic stimulation across different RGC subtypes. Analyses show that exogenous glutamate acts on RGC synapses similar to endogenous glutamate and, unlike electrical prostheses, stimulates only RGC somata. The spatial spread of glutamate stimulation was ˜ 290 μm from the injection site, comparable to current electrical prostheses. Further, the glutamate injections produced spatially differential responses in OFF, ON, and ON-OFF RGC subtypes, suggesting that differential stimulation of the OFF and ON systems may be possible. A temporal resolution of 3.2 Hz was obtained, which is a rate suitable for spatial vision. Significance. We provide strong support for the feasibility of an epiretinal neurotransmitter

  17. Retinal changes in an ATP-induced model of retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Peter Aplin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In rodents and felines, intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP has been shown to induce photoreceptor death providing a tractable model of retinal degeneration in these species. This study investigated the long term effects of photoreceptor loss in an ATP induced feline model of retinal degeneration. Six normal sighted felines were unilaterally blinded using intravitreal ATP injections and assessed using electroretinography (ERG and optical coherence tomography (OCT. At 30 hours (n = 3 or 12 weeks (n = 3 post-injection, the animals were euthanized and the eyes enucleated. Retinae were sectioned and labelled using immunohistochemistry for markers of cell death, neural remodeling and gliosis. Ongoing cell death and retinal degeneration was observed in the outer retina at both 30 hours and 12 weeks following unilateral ATP injection. Markers of mid to late-stage retinal remodeling such as cell displacement and aberrant neurite growth were observed in the inner retina at 12 weeks post-injection. Ganglion cells appeared to remain intact in ATP injected eyes. Müller cell gliosis was observed throughout the inner and outer retina, in some parts completely enveloping and/or displacing the surviving neural tissue. Our data suggests that the ATP injected feline retina continues to undergo progressive retinal degeneration and exhibits abnormalities consistent with a description of retinal remodeling commonly seen in other models of retinal degeneration. These findings validate the use of intravitreal ATP injection in feline as a large animal model of retinal degeneration which may aid in development of therapies aiming to restore visual function after photoreceptor degeneration.

  18. Cytomegalovirus retinitis after central retinal vein occlusion in a patient on systemic immunosuppression: does venooclusive disease predispose to cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients already at risk?

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    Welling JD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available John D Welling, Ahmad B Tarabishy, John ChristoforidisDepartment of Ophthalmology, Havener Eye Institute, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis remains the most common opportunistic ocular infection in immunocompromised patients. Patients with immunocompromising diseases, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, inherited immunodeficiency states, malignancies, and those on systemic immunosuppressive therapy, are known to be at risk. Recently, it has been suggested that patients undergoing intravitreal injection of immunosuppressive agents may also be predisposed. One previous case report speculated that there may be an additional risk for CMV retinitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients with venoocclusive disease. This case study presents a case of CMV retinitis following central retinal vein occlusion in a patient on systemic immunosuppressants.Keywords: cytomegalovirus retinitis, central retinal vein occlusion, immunosuppression, solid organ transplant, venous stasis, risk factor

  19. Current Concepts in the Treatment of Retinitis Pigmentosa

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    Maria A. Musarella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited retinal degenerations, including retinitis pigmentosa (RP and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, affect 1 in 4000 individuals in the general population. A majority of the genes which are mutated in these conditions are expressed in either photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. There is considerable variation in the clinical severity of these conditions; the most severe being autosomal recessive LCA, a heterogeneous retinal degenerative disease and the commonest cause of congenital blindness in children. Here, we discuss all the potential treatments that are now available for retinal degeneration. A number of therapeutic avenues are being explored based on our knowledge of the pathophysiology of retinal degeneration derived from research on animal models, including: gene therapy, antiapoptosis agents, neurotrophic factors, and dietary supplementation. Technological advances in retinal implant devices continue to provide the promise of vision for patients with end-stage disease.

  20. Endovascular cannulation with a microneedle for central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadonosono, Kazuaki; Yamane, Shin; Arakawa, Akira; Inoue, Maiko; Yamakawa, Tadashi; Uchio, Eiichi; Yanagi, Yasuo; Amano, Shiro

    2013-06-01

    We developed a new surgical treatment in which a microneedle is used for retinal endovascular cannulation to treat eyes with central retinal vein occlusion by flushing thrombus out of the central retinal vein as it passes through the lamina cribrosa. The eyes of 12 consecutive patients (12 eyes) with central retinal vein occlusion were successfully treated using this novel treatment. At 24 weeks after surgery, 9 of 12 eyes had gained more than 15 letters in best-corrected visual acuity, and the mean decrease in central foveal thickness was 271.1 μm. Few complications were observed. The microneedle is stiff and sharp enough to facilitate retinal endovascular cannulation in eyes with central retinal vein occlusion. This new technique is a promising treatment of macular edema due to central retinal vein occlusion.

  1. Protection of retinal ganglion cells and retinal vasculature by Lycium barbarum polysaccharides in a mouse model of acute ocular hypertension.

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    Xue-Song Mi

    Full Text Available Acute ocular hypertension (AOH is a condition found in acute glaucoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the protective effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP and its protective mechanisms in the AOH insult. LBP has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effect in the chronic ocular hypertension (COH experiments. AOH mouse model was induced in unilateral eye for one hour by introducing 90 mmHg ocular pressure. The animal was fed with LBP solution (1 mg/kg or vehicle daily from 7 days before the AOH insult till sacrifice at either day 4 or day 7 post insult. The neuroprotective effects of LBP on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and blood-retinal-barrier (BRB were evaluated. In control AOH retina, loss of RGCs, thinning of IRL thickness, increased IgG leakage, broken tight junctions, and decreased density of retinal blood vessels were observed. However, in LBP-treated AOH retina, there was less loss of RGCs with thinning of IRL thickness, IgG leakage, more continued structure of tight junctions associated with higher level of occludin protein and the recovery of the blood vessel density when compared with vehicle-treated AOH retina. Moreover, we found that LBP provides neuroprotection by down-regulating RAGE, ET-1, Aβ and AGE in the retina, as well as their related signaling pathways, which was related to inhibiting vascular damages and the neuronal degeneration in AOH insults. The present study suggests that LBP could prevent damage to RGCs from AOH-induced ischemic injury; furthermore, through its effects on blood vessel protection, LBP would also be a potential treatment for vascular-related retinopathy.

  2. Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) in AIDS patients: a different appearance of varicella-zoster retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesio, C E; Mitchell, S M; Barton, K; Schwartz, S D; Towler, H M; Lightman, S

    1995-01-01

    Retinal infections caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) have been reported in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. Two cases of a VZV-related retinitis are described with the characteristic features of the recently described progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome. Both patients suffered from the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with greatly reduced peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte counts, and presented with macular retinitis without vitritis. The disease was bilateral in one case and unilateral in the other. The clinical course was rapidly progressive with widespread retinal involvement and the development of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with complete loss of vision in the affected eyes despite intensive intravenous antiviral therapy. VZV DNA was identified in vitreous biopsies, by molecular techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in both patients. At present, the use of very high-dose intravenous acyclovir may be the best therapeutic option in these patients for whom the visual prognosis is poor. Intravitreal antiviral drugs could also contribute to the management of these cases.

  3. Ground-state properties of the retinal molecule: from quantum mechanical to classical mechanical computations of retinal proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhai, Sandor [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg

    2011-01-01

    Retinal proteins are excellent systems for understanding essential physiological processes such as signal transduction and ion pumping. Although the conjugated polyene system of the retinal chromophore is best described with quantum mechanics, simulations of the long-timescale dynamics of a retinal protein in its physiological, flexible, lipid-membrane environment can only be performed at the classical mechanical level. Torsional energy barriers are a critical ingredient of the classical force-field parameters. Here we review briefly current retinal force fields and discuss new quantum mechanical computations to assess how the retinal Schiff base model and the approach used to derive the force-field parameters may influence the torsional potentials.

  4. Nonsurgical management of diplopia after retinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgetts, David J

    2012-01-01

    For those who manage strabismus in adults, the patient with diplopia following retinal surgery presents a challenge. Mechanical and sensory factors may combine to preclude single binocular vision, and neutralizing the patient's strabismus may not be sufficient to permit resolution of their diplopia. This paper reviews the issues involved and discusses some potential solutions.

  5. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Xueling; Jensen, Richard A; Ikram, M Kamran; Cotch, Mary Frances; Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Glazer, Nicole L; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Kuo, Jane Z; Taylor, Kent D; Hewitt, Alex W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L; Mackey, David A; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Doney, Alex S F; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Rotter, Jerome I; Tai, E Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R; Siscovick, David S; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  6. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Keith; Loudin, James; Goetz, Georges; Huie, Philip; Wang, Lele; Kamins, Theodore I.; Galambos, Ludwig; Smith, Richard; Harris, James S.; Sher, Alexander; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases lead to blindness due to loss of the `image capturing' photoreceptors, while neurons in the `image-processing' inner retinal layers are relatively well preserved. Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight by electrically stimulating the surviving neurons. Most implants are powered through inductive coils, requiring complex surgical methods to implant the coil-decoder-cable-array systems that deliver energy to stimulating electrodes via intraocular cables. We present a photovoltaic subretinal prosthesis, in which silicon photodiodes in each pixel receive power and data directly through pulsed near-infrared illumination and electrically stimulate neurons. Stimulation is produced in normal and degenerate rat retinas, with pulse durations of 0.5-4 ms, and threshold peak irradiances of 0.2-10 mW mm-2, two orders of magnitude below the ocular safety limit. Neural responses were elicited by illuminating a single 70 µm bipolar pixel, demonstrating the possibility of a fully integrated photovoltaic retinal prosthesis with high pixel density.

  7. Retinal oscillations carry visual information to cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilian Koepsell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Thalamic relay cells fire action potentials that transmit information from retina to cortex. The amount of information that spike trains encode is usually estimated from the precision of spike timing with respect to the stimulus. Sensory input, however, is only one factor that influences neural activity. For example, intrinsic dynamics, such as oscillations of networks of neurons, also modulate firing pattern. Here, we asked if retinal oscillations might help to convey information to neurons downstream. Specifically, we made whole-cell recordings from relay cells to reveal retinal inputs (EPSPs and thalamic outputs (spikes and then analyzed these events with information theory. Our results show that thalamic spike trains operate as two multiplexed channels. One channel, which occupies a low frequency band (<30 Hz, is encoded by average firing rate with respect to the stimulus and carries information about local changes in the visual field over time. The other operates in the gamma frequency band (40-80 Hz and is encoded by spike timing relative to retinal oscillations. At times, the second channel conveyed even more information than the first. Because retinal oscillations involve extensive networks of ganglion cells, it is likely that the second channel transmits information about global features of the visual scene.

  8. Multimodal Imaging in Hereditary Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pichi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this retrospective study we evaluated the multimodal visualization of retinal genetic diseases to better understand their natural course. Material and Methods. We reviewed the charts of 70 consecutive patients with different genetic retinal pathologies who had previously undergone multimodal imaging analyses. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and genotyped at the known locus for the different diseases. Results. The medical records of 3 families of a 4-generation pedigree affected by North Carolina macular dystrophy were reviewed. A total of 8 patients with Stargardt disease were evaluated for their two main defining clinical characteristics, yellow subretinal flecks and central atrophy. Nine male patients with a previous diagnosis of choroideremia and eleven female carriers were evaluated. Fourteen patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and 6 family members with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy were included. Seven patients with enhanced s-cone syndrome were ascertained. Lastly, we included 3 unrelated patients with fundus albipunctatus. Conclusions. In hereditary retinal diseases, clinical examination is often not sufficient for evaluating the patient’s condition. Retinal imaging then becomes important in making the diagnosis, in monitoring the progression of disease, and as a surrogate outcome measure of the efficacy of an intervention.

  9. Anterior segment complications of retinal photocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, J J

    1975-03-01

    Seven patients had anterior segment complications following xenon arc retinal photocoagulation. Irreversible keratopathy was induced in two cases; all patients showed evidence of iris injury. The absorption of radiation by the iris was considered the main factor in producing overheating of the anterior segment.

  10. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerard, X.; Garanto Iglesias, A.; Rozet, J.M.; Collin, R.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several

  11. [Retinal detachment with retinoschisis--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristescu, R; Muşat, O; Toma, Oana; Coma, Corina; Gabej, Ioana; Burcea, M

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 43 year old patient diagnosed with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and retinoschizis, a rare case of disease association. Surgery is recommended and we practice 23 gauge vitrectomy, laser retinopexy, criopexy in the periphery and internal heavy oil tamponade. Postoperatory evolution was favorable.

  12. Dynamic eye phantom for retinal oximetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2009-11-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy. Recently, we developed a multiaperture camera that uses the division of the retinal image into several wavelength-sensitive subimages to compute retinal oxygen saturation. The calibration of such instruments is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose, we realize an in vitro model of the human eye composed of a lens, the retina vessel, and three layers: the choroid, the retinal pigmented epithelium, and the sclera. The retinal vessel is modeled with a microtube connected to a micropump and a hemoglobin reservoir in a closed circulatory system. Hemoglobin oxygenation in the vessel could be altered using a reversible fuel cell. The sclera is represented by a Spectralon slab. The optical properties of the other layers are mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer, ink as an absorber, and epoxy as a supporting structure. The optical thickness of each layer of the eye phantom is matched to each respective eye layer.

  13. [Pharmacological concepts to treat hereditary retinal degenerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloschek, C M; Jägle, H

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the current pharmacological strategies to treat inherited retinal degeneration. To date there is no causal therapy despite growing knowledge of the particular pathomechanisms. However, treatment is available for complications, such as cystic macular changes and cystoid macular edema. To reduce retinal thickness systemic or topical carboanhydrase inhibitors can be applied and in rare cases combined with steroids when indicated, however reduction of retinal thickness is not always accompanied by improvement of visual acuity. Regular follow-up with optical coherence tomography is required. In some cases, potentially neuroprotective agents (valproic acid, ciliary neurotrophic factor and Ca(2+ ) channel inhibitors) or food supplementation (vitamin A, lutein, synthetic retinoids and decosahexaenoic acid) may have a positive impact on disease progression (e.g. reduction in progression of visual field loss or individual electrophysiological parameters). However, beneficial effects and side effects, e.g. of vitamin A substitution, depend not only on the disease phenotype (such as retinitis pigmentosa) but also on the actual genotype. Furthermore, no data are available regarding the application of pharmaceuticals in the pediatric population.

  14. AUTOMATIC RETINAL VESSEL DETECTION AND TORTUOSITY MEASUREMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temitope Mapayi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As retinopathies continue to be major causes of visual loss and blindness worldwide, early detection and management of these diseases will help achieve significant reduction of blindness cases. However, an efficient automatic retinal vessel segmentation approach remains a challenge. Since efficient vessel network detection is a very important step needed in ophthalmology for reliable retinal vessel characterization, this paper presents study on the combination of difference image and K-means clustering for the segmentation of retinal vessels. Stationary points in the vessel center-lines are used to model the detection of twists in the vessel segments. The combination of arc-chord ratio with stationary points is used to compute tortuosity index. Experimental results show that the proposed K-means combined with difference image achieved a robust segmentation of retinal vessels. A maximum average accuracy of 0.9556 and a maximum average sensitivity of 0.7581 were achieved on DRIVE database while a maximum average accuracy of 0.9509 and a maximum average sensitivity of 0.7666 were achieved on STARE database. When compared with the previously proposed techniques on DRIVE and STARE databases, the proposed technique yields higher mean sensitivity and mean accuracy rates in the same range of very good specificity. In a related development, a non-normalized tortuosity index that combined distance metric and the vessel twist frequency proposed in this paper also achieved a strong correlation of 0.80 with the expert ground truth.

  15. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueling Sim

    Full Text Available Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8. This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12 in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts. In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  16. Connexin43 in retinal injury and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; Zhang, Jie; Acosta, Monica L; Rupenthal, Ilva D; Green, Colin R

    2016-03-01

    Gap junctions are specialized cell-to-cell contacts that allow the direct transfer of small molecules between cells. A single gap junction channel consists of two hemichannels, or connexons, each of which is composed of six connexin protein subunits. Connexin43 is the most ubiquitously expressed isoform of the connexin family and in the retina it is prevalent in astrocytes, Müller cells, microglia, retinal pigment epithelium and endothelial cells. Prior to docking with a neighboring cell, Connexin43 hemichannels have a low open probability as open channels constitute a large, relatively non-specific membrane pore. However, with injury and disease Connexin43 upregulation and hemichannel opening has been implicated in all aspects of secondary damage, especially glial cell activation, edema and loss of vascular integrity, leading to neuronal death. We here review gap junctions and their roles in the retina, and then focus in on Connexin43 gap junction channels in injury and disease. In particular, the effect of pathological opening of gap junction hemichannels is described, and hemichannel mediated loss of vascular integrity explained. This latter phenomenon underlies retinal pigment epithelium loss and is a common feature in several retinal diseases. Finally, Connexin43 channel roles in a number of retinal diseases including macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy are considered, along with results from related animal models. A final section describes gap junction channel modulation and the ocular delivery of potential therapeutic molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Unsupervised Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using Combined Filters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendeson S Oliveira

    Full Text Available Image segmentation of retinal blood vessels is a process that can help to predict and diagnose cardiovascular related diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, which are known to affect the retinal blood vessels' appearance. This work proposes an unsupervised method for the segmentation of retinal vessels images using a combined matched filter, Frangi's filter and Gabor Wavelet filter to enhance the images. The combination of these three filters in order to improve the segmentation is the main motivation of this work. We investigate two approaches to perform the filter combination: weighted mean and median ranking. Segmentation methods are tested after the vessel enhancement. Enhanced images with median ranking are segmented using a simple threshold criterion. Two segmentation procedures are applied when considering enhanced retinal images using the weighted mean approach. The first method is based on deformable models and the second uses fuzzy C-means for the image segmentation. The procedure is evaluated using two public image databases, Drive and Stare. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods perform well for vessel segmentation in comparison with state-of-the-art methods.

  18. Unsupervised Retinal Vessel Segmentation Using Combined Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Wendeson S; Teixeira, Joyce Vitor; Ren, Tsang Ing; Cavalcanti, George D C; Sijbers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Image segmentation of retinal blood vessels is a process that can help to predict and diagnose cardiovascular related diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, which are known to affect the retinal blood vessels' appearance. This work proposes an unsupervised method for the segmentation of retinal vessels images using a combined matched filter, Frangi's filter and Gabor Wavelet filter to enhance the images. The combination of these three filters in order to improve the segmentation is the main motivation of this work. We investigate two approaches to perform the filter combination: weighted mean and median ranking. Segmentation methods are tested after the vessel enhancement. Enhanced images with median ranking are segmented using a simple threshold criterion. Two segmentation procedures are applied when considering enhanced retinal images using the weighted mean approach. The first method is based on deformable models and the second uses fuzzy C-means for the image segmentation. The procedure is evaluated using two public image databases, Drive and Stare. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods perform well for vessel segmentation in comparison with state-of-the-art methods.

  19. Laser photocoagulation for retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vein occlusion (RVO is one of the leading causes of permanent vision loss. In adults, central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO occurs in 1.8% while branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO occurs in 0.2%. Treatment strategy and disease prognosis are determined by RVO type (ischemic/non-ischemic. Despite numerous studies and many current CRVO and BRVO treatment approaches, the management of these patients is still being debated. Intravitreal injections of steroids (triamcinolone acetate, dexamethasone and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibitors (bevacizumab, ranibizumab were shown to be fairly effective. However, it is unclear whether anti-VEGF agents are reasonable in ischemic RVOs. Laser photocoagulation remains the only effective treatment of optic nerve head and/or retinal neovascularization. Laser photocoagulation is also indicated for the treatment of macular edema. Both threshold and sub-threshold photocoagulation may be performed. Photocoagulation performed with argon (514 nm, krypton (647 nm, or diode (810 nm laser for macular edema provides similar results (no significant differences. The treatment may be complex and include medication therapy and/or surgery. Medication therapy includes anti-aggregant agents and antioxidants, i.e., emoxypine which may be used in acute RVO as well as in post-thrombotic retinopathy. 

  20. Melanopsin expressing human retinal ganglion cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Christensen, Anders Tolstrup; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin belong to a heterogenic population of RGCs which regulate the circadian clock, masking behavior, melatonin suppression, the pupillary light reflex and sleep/wake cycles. The different functions seem...

  1. Retinal breaks due to intravitreal ocriplasmin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ruwan A Silva, Darius M Moshfeghi, Theodore Leng Byers Eye Institute at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA Abstract: Ocriplasmin represents a new treatment option for numerous vitreoretinopathies involving an abnormal vitreomacular interface. While the drug may circumvent the traditional risks of surgical treatment, pharmacologic vitreolysis is not devoid of risk itself. This report presents two cases, one of vitreomacular traction syndrome and the other of a full-thickness macular hole, both of which were treated with an intravitreal injection of ocriplasmin. Notably, in both cases, vitreomacular traction of the macula appears to have been alleviated; however, failure to completely relieve vitreoretinal traction from the peripheral retina generated retinal breaks with one patient eventually developing a macula-involving retinal detachment. Thus, even in instances of ‘successful’ pharmacologic treatment of vitreomacular traction, continued follow-up evaluation is essential. Keywords: posterior vitreous detachment, retinal detachment, vitreomacular traction, ocriplasmin, retinal break, macular hole, laser retinopexy

  2. CERKL knockdown causes retinal degeneration in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Riera

    Full Text Available The human CERKL gene is responsible for common and severe forms of retinal dystrophies. Despite intense in vitro studies at the molecular and cellular level and in vivo analyses of the retina of murine knockout models, CERKL function remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to approach the developmental and functional features of cerkl in Danio rerio within an Evo-Devo framework. We show that gene expression increases from early developmental stages until the formation of the retina in the optic cup. Unlike the high mRNA-CERKL isoform multiplicity shown in mammals, the moderate transcriptional complexity in fish facilitates phenotypic studies derived from gene silencing. Moreover, of relevance to pathogenicity, teleost CERKL shares the two main human protein isoforms. Morpholino injection has been used to generate a cerkl knockdown zebrafish model. The morphant phenotype results in abnormal eye development with lamination defects, failure to develop photoreceptor outer segments, increased apoptosis of retinal cells and small eyes. Our data support that zebrafish Cerkl does not interfere with proliferation and neural differentiation during early developmental stages but is relevant for survival and protection of the retinal tissue. Overall, we propose that this zebrafish model is a powerful tool to unveil CERKL contribution to human retinal degeneration.

  3. Prospectives for gene therapy of retinal degenerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumann, Gabriele

    2012-08-01

    Retinal degenerations encompass a large number of diseases in which the retina and associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells progressively degenerate leading to severe visual disorders or blindness. Retinal degenerations can be divided into two groups, a group in which the defect has been linked to a specific gene and a second group that has a complex etiology that includes environmental and genetic influences. The first group encompasses a number of relatively rare diseases with the most prevalent being Retinitis pigmentosa that affects approximately 1 million individuals worldwide. Attempts have been made to correct the defective gene by transfecting the appropriate cells with the wild-type gene and while these attempts have been successful in animal models, human gene therapy for these inherited retinal degenerations has only begun recently and the results are promising. To the second group belong glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). These retinal degenerations have a genetic component since they occur more often in families with affected probands but they are also linked to environmental factors, specifically elevated intraocular pressure, age and high blood sugar levels respectively. The economic and medical impact of these three diseases can be assessed by the number of individuals affected; AMD affects over 30 million, DR over 40 million and glaucoma over 65 million individuals worldwide. The basic defect in these diseases appears to be the relative lack of a neurogenic environment; the neovascularization that often accompanies these diseases has suggested that a decrease in pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), at least in part, may be responsible for the neurodegeneration since PEDF is not only an effective neurogenic and neuroprotective agent but also a potent inhibitor of neovascularization. In the last few years inhibitors of vascularization, especially antibodies against vascular endothelial cell

  4. Dietary n-3 and n-6 PUFA enhance DHA incorporation in retinal phospholipids without affecting PGE(1) and PGE (2) levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnebelen, Coralie; Grégoire, Stéphane; Pasquis, Bruno; Joffre, Corinne; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P; Bron, Alain M; Bretillon, Lionel; Acar, Niyazi

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether dietary n-3 and n-6 PUFA may affect retinal PUFA composition and PGE(1) and PGE(2) production. Male Wistar rats were fed for 3 months with diets containing: (1) 10% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 7% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or (2) 10% gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), or (3) 10% EPA, 7% DHA and 10% GLA, or (4) a balanced diet deprived of EPA, DHA, and GLA. The fatty acid composition of retinal phospholipids was determined by gas chromatography. Prostaglandin production was measured by enzyme immunoassay. When compared to rats fed the control diet, the retinal levels of DHA were increased in rats fed both diets enriched with n-3 PUFA (EPA + DHA and EPA + DHA + GLA diets) and decreased in those supplemented with n-6 PUFA only (GLA diet). The diet enriched with both n-6 and n-3 PUFA resulted in the greatest increase in retinal DHA. The levels of PGE(1) and PGE(2) were significantly increased in retinal homogenates of rats fed with the GLA-rich diet when compared with those of animals fed the control diet. These higher PGE(1) and PGE(2) levels were not observed in animals fed with EPA + DHA + GLA. In summary, GLA added to EPA + DHA resulted in the highest retinal DHA content but without increasing retinal PGE(2) as seen in animals supplemented with GLA only.

  5. Low levels of plasma endothelin-1 in patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ohguro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hiroshi Ohguro1, Yukihiko Mashima2, Mitsuru Nakazawa31Department of Ophthalmology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, JapanPurpose: The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of endothelin-1 (ET-1 in the pathophysiology of retinitis pigmentosa (RP.Methods: Plasma ET-1 levels and ophthalmic features in 50 RP patients were compared with those in 20 healthy-eye control subjects. Plasma ET-1 concentrations were determined using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit.Results: Mean plasma ET-1 levels of RP patients (1.88 ± 0.56 pg/mL were significantly lower than those of control subjects (2.30 ± 0.30 pg/mL, Mann-Whitney’s U test; P < 0.01. However, ET-1 concentrations varied markedly in each patient. Among RP patients, a significant correlation of ET-1 concentrations was not observed in terms of its hereditary forms or other clinical factors.Conclusion: ET-1 may be important in the pathogenesis of RP, and measurement of its plasma concentrations may also contribute to additional insights into the retinal hemodynamics of RP.Keywords: endothelin-1, retinitis pigmentosa, retinal hemodynamics

  6. No evidence for thrombophilia in patients with retinal venous occlusion: a systematic GRADE-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Heegaard, Steffen; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-02-01

    Retinal venous occlusion represents a common retinal disorder that untreated often leads to severely reduced vision. While general risk factors for vascular disease are known to increase the risk of an event, the role of thrombophilia is controversial. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence for thrombophilia investigation in patients presenting with retinal venous occlusion. Eligible studies were identified by a MESH-based search in PubMed 11-13 of March 2015. The level of evidence was stated according to the guidelines published by the GRADE working group using three levels for quality of evidence: high, moderate and low. A total of 118 studies relating to the study question were identified. After excluding case stories, commentaries, cross-sectional studies and reviews/expert opinions, 28 original papers and two meta-analyses were included in the final qualitative synthesis. The majority of studies were small case-control studies, and only one large cohort study was identified. No randomized controlled trials were retrieved. All the studies were categorized as low quality of evidence. Systematic thrombophilia screening in patients presenting with retinal venous occlusion cannot be recommended.

  7. Differential modulation of retinal degeneration by Ccl2 and Cx3cr1 chemokine signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Lange, Clemens A; Robbie, Scott; Munro, Peter M G; Cowing, Jill A; Armer, Hannah E J; Luong, Vy; Carvalho, Livia S; MacLaren, Robert E; Fitzke, Frederick W; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R

    2012-01-01

    Microglia and macrophages are recruited to sites of retinal degeneration where local cytokines and chemokines determine protective or neurotoxic microglia responses. Defining the role of Ccl2-Ccr2 and Cx3cl1-Cx3cr1 signalling for retinal pathology is of particular interest because of its potential role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Ccl2, Ccr2, and Cx3cr1 signalling defects impair macrophage trafficking, but have, in several conflicting studies, been reported to show different degrees of age-related retinal degeneration. Ccl2/Cx3cr1 double knockout (CCDKO) mice show an early onset retinal degeneration and have been suggested as a model for AMD. In order to understand phenotypic discrepancies in different chemokine knockout lines and to study how defects in Ccl2 and/or Cx3cr1 signalling contribute to the described early onset retinal degeneration, we defined primary and secondary pathological events in CCDKO mice. To control for genetic background variability, we compared the original phenotype with that of single Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 double knockout mice obtained from backcrosses of CCDKO with C57Bl/6 mice. We found that the primary pathological event in CCDKO mice develops in the inferior outer nuclear layer independently of light around postnatal day P14. RPE and vascular lesions develop secondarily with increasing penetrance with age and are clinically similar to retinal telangiectasia not to choroidal neovascularisation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that a third autosomal recessive gene causes the degeneration in CCDKO mice and in all affected re-derived lines and subsequently demonstrated co-segregation of the naturally occurring RD8 mutation in the Crb1 gene. By comparing CCDKO mice with re-derived CCl2(-/-)/Crb1(Rd8/RD8), Cx3cr1(-/-)/Crb1(Rd8/RD8) and CCl2(-/-)/Cx3cr1(-/-)/Crb1(Rd8/RD8) mice, we observed a differential modulation of the retinal phenotype by genetic background and both chemokine signalling pathways. These findings

  8. Adenosine A(2A receptor up-regulates retinal wave frequency via starburst amacrine cells in the developing rat retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin-Chien Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Developing retinas display retinal waves, the patterned spontaneous activity essential for circuit refinement. During the first postnatal week in rodents, retinal waves are mediated by synaptic transmission between starburst amacrine cells (SACs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. The neuromodulator adenosine is essential for the generation of retinal waves. However, the cellular basis underlying adenosine's regulation of retinal waves remains elusive. Here, we investigated whether and how the adenosine A(2A receptor (A(2AR regulates retinal waves and whether A(2AR regulation of retinal waves acts via presynaptic SACs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We showed that A(2AR was expressed in the inner plexiform layer and ganglion cell layer of the developing rat retina. Knockdown of A(2AR decreased the frequency of spontaneous Ca²⁺ transients, suggesting that endogenous A(2AR may up-regulate wave frequency. To investigate whether A(2AR acts via presynaptic SACs, we targeted gene expression to SACs by the metabotropic glutamate receptor type II promoter. Ca²⁺ transient frequency was increased by expressing wild-type A(2AR (A2AR-WT in SACs, suggesting that A(2AR may up-regulate retinal waves via presynaptic SACs. Subsequent patch-clamp recordings on RGCs revealed that presynaptic A(2AR-WT increased the frequency of wave-associated postsynaptic currents (PSCs or depolarizations compared to the control, without changing the RGC's excitability, membrane potentials, or PSC charge. These findings suggest that presynaptic A(2AR may not affect the membrane properties of postsynaptic RGCs. In contrast, by expressing the C-terminal truncated A(2AR mutant (A(2AR-ΔC in SACs, the wave frequency was reduced compared to the A(2AR-WT, but was similar to the control, suggesting that the full-length A(2AR in SACs is required for A(2AR up-regulation of retinal waves. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A(2AR up-regulates the frequency of retinal waves via

  9. Early interventions to prevent retinal vasculopathy in diabetes: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison WW

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wendy W Harrison, Vladimir YevseyenkovArizona College of Optometry, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ, USAAbstract: Diabetic eye disease is a public health concern in all areas of the world as a leading cause of blindness in the working aged to elderly populations. Diabetes damages the lining of the microvasculature throughout the body through prolonged exposure to hyperglycemic conditions. The ocular changes are progressive with very little recourse for improvement once damage begins. Current treatments for the eye focus mainly on the late stages of the disease when neovascularization or edema threatens sight. Early interventions for diabetic vasculopathy involve metabolic therapy to improve blood glucose and blood pressure control. Technology improvements have a large part to play in advancing diagnosis of diabetic eye disease. These new technologies offer both structural and functional means for assessment of retinal health. This review focuses on current treatments for diabetic eye disease at all stages with an emphasis on new and early interventions. It also details established and emerging technologies used for earlier detection of diabetic eye disease, which is vital to the development and approval of much needed treatments targeted at earlier stages of diabetic retinopathy. Possible future treatments should be aimed to prevent retinal vasculopathy from progressing. This review will explore current research on this topic and what is needed moving forward.Keywords: diabetes, diabetic retinopathy, vascular disease

  10. Intraocular camera for retinal prostheses: Refractive and diffractive lens systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Michelle Christine

    The focus of this thesis is on the design and analysis of refractive, diffractive, and hybrid refractive/diffractive lens systems for a miniaturized camera that can be surgically implanted in the crystalline lens sac and is designed to work in conjunction with current and future generation retinal prostheses. The development of such an intraocular camera (IOC) would eliminate the need for an external head-mounted or eyeglass-mounted camera. Placing the camera inside the eye would allow subjects to use their natural eye movements for foveation (attention) instead of more cumbersome head tracking, would notably aid in personal navigation and mobility, and would also be significantly more psychologically appealing from the standpoint of personal appearances. The capability for accommodation with no moving parts or feedback control is incorporated by employing camera designs that exhibit nearly infinite depth of field. Such an ultracompact optical imaging system requires a unique combination of refractive and diffractive optical elements and relaxed system constraints derived from human psychophysics. This configuration necessitates an extremely compact, short focal-length lens system with an f-number close to unity. Initially, these constraints appear highly aggressive from an optical design perspective. However, after careful analysis of the unique imaging requirements of a camera intended to work in conjunction with the relatively low pixellation levels of a retinal microstimulator array, it becomes clear that such a design is not only feasible, but could possibly be implemented with a single lens system.

  11. Retinal vessel extraction using Lattice Neural Networks with Dendritic Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Roberto; Sanchez-Ante, Gildardo; Falcon-Morales, Luis E; Sossa, Humberto; Guevara, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Retinal images can be used to detect and follow up several important chronic diseases. The classification of retinal images requires an experienced ophthalmologist. This has been a bottleneck to implement routine screenings performed by general physicians. It has been proposed to create automated systems that can perform such task with little intervention from humans, with partial success. In this work, we report advances in such endeavor, by using a Lattice Neural Network with Dendritic Processing (LNNDP). We report results using several metrics, and compare against well known methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Multilayer Perceptrons (MLP). Our proposal shows better performance than other approaches reported in the literature. An additional advantage is that unlike those other tools, LNNDP requires no parameters, and it automatically constructs its structure to solve a particular problem. The proposed methodology requires four steps: (1) Pre-processing, (2) Feature computation, (3) Classification and (4) Post-processing. The Hotelling T(2) control chart was used to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vector, from 7 that were used before to 5 in this work. The experiments were run on images of DRIVE and STARE databases. The results show that on average, F1-Score is better in LNNDP, compared with SVM and MLP implementations. Same improvement is observed for MCC and the accuracy.

  12. Safety and Efficacy of Human Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Therapy for Retinal Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S N Leow

    Full Text Available To investigate the safety and efficacy of subretinal injection of human Wharton's Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hWJ-MSCs on retinal structure and function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rats.RCS rats were divided into 2 groups: hWJ-MSCs treated group (n = 8 and placebo control group (n = 8. In the treatment group, hWJ-MSCs from healthy donors were injected into the subretinal space in one eye of each rat at day 21. Control group received saline injection of the same volume. Additional 3 animals were injected with nanogold-labelled stem cells for in vivo tracking of cells localisation using a micro-computed tomography (microCT. Retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG 3 days before the injection and repeated at days 15, 30 and 70 after the injection. Eyes were collected at day 70 for histology, cellular and molecular studies.No retinal tumor formation was detected by histology during the study period. MicroCT scans showed that hWJ-MSCs stayed localised in the eye with no systemic migration. Transmission electron microscopy showed that nanogold-labelled cells were located within the subretinal space. Histology showed preservation of the outer nuclear layer (ONL in the treated group but not in the control group. However, there were no significant differences in the ERG responses between the groups. Confocal microscopy showed evidence of hWJ-MSCs expressing markers for photoreceptor, Müller cells and bipolar cells.Subretinal injection of hWJ-MSCs delay the loss of the ONL in RCS rats. hWJ-MSCs appears to be safe and has potential to differentiate into retinal-like cells. The potential of this cell-based therapy for the treatment of retinal dystrophies warrants further studies.

  13. Choroidal thickness and retinal abnormalities by optical coherence tomography in endogenous Cushing’s syndrome

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    Maria Fernanda Abalem

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Cortisol has been suggested as a risk factor for choroidal thickening, which may lead to retinal changes. Objective: To compare choroidal thickness measurements using optical coherence tomography (OCT in patients with endogenous active Cushing’s syndrome and to evaluate the occurrence of retinal abnormalities in the same group of patients. Design: Cross-sectional study.Setting: Outpatient clinic.Patients: Eleven female patients with Cushing’s syndrome in hypercortisolism state as determined by the presence of at least two abnormal measurements from urinary cortisol 24h, no suppression of cortisol with low dose dexamethasone suppression test and nocturnal salivary cortisol levels and 12 healthy controls.Methods: Choroidal and retinal morphology was assessed using OCT. Main outcome measures: Choroidal thickness measurements and the presence of retinal changes. Results: The mean subfoveal choroidal thickness was 372.96 ± 73.14 μm in the patients with Cushing’s syndrome and 255.63 ± 50.70 μm in the control group, (p<0.001. One patient (9.09% presented with central serous chorioretinopathy and one patient (9.09% with pachychoroid pigment epitheliopathy. Conclusions: Choroidal thickness is increased in the eyes of patients with active Cushing’s syndrome compared to healthy and matched control. Also, 18.18% of patients presented with macular changes, possibly secondary to choroidal thickening. While further studies are necessary to confirm our findings excess corticosteroid levels seems to have a significant effect on the choroid and might be associated with secondary retinal diseases.

  14. Association Between Retinal Vascular Calibre and Blindness in Young Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg

    Association Between Retinal Vascular Calibre and Blindness in Young Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Purpose To examine the association between retinal vascular calibre and incident blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy in young patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods A case-control study of 6...... patients (12 eyes) who later went blind and 18 age- and sex-matched controls (36 eyes). They were all identified in a population-based cohort study of 339 patients with type 1 diabetes. Patients and controls all participated in a clinical baseline examination in 1995 and were subsequently followed for 15...... years. Incident blindness was defined for patients who registered between 1995 and 2010 in the Danish Association of the Blind, which is a voluntary organization open for patients with a visual acuity at or below 6/60 (0.1) in the best eye. Each blind patient was matched with 3 controls regarding age...

  15. Clinical observation of hexuemingmu tablet on retinal vein occlusion

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    Jian-Hua Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effect of hexuemingmu tablet on retinal vein occlusion(ROV.METHODS: Totally, 108 patients of 112 eyes were divided into two groups randomly. One group including 55 patients(55 eyeswere treated by hexuemingmu tablet, the other group including 53 patients(57 eyeswere treated by danhong injection. The visual acuity, fundus and FFA were evaluated before and after treatment.RESULTS: The total effective rate in the group treated by hexuemingmu tablet was 98%, and that in control group was 82%. The hemorrhage was absorbed much more quickly than control group. Two group were different from each other in statistics(P0.05.CONCLUSION: Hexuemingmu tablet can accelerate hemorrhage absorbing and improve visual acuity in RVO treatment.

  16. Correlation between senile retinal microvascular disease and acute coronary event in the old:a controlled study of 1 509 cases in communities%老年人眼底微血管病变与急性冠脉事件的相关性研究:基于社区的1743例病例对照分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐扬; 闫中瑞; 孙树印

    2015-01-01

    people. Methods A controlled study for senile people in communities was conducted. Xinglong Zhuang Coal Mine Community in Jining city, Shandong province was chosen to carry out the study, and the residents in that area aged≥60 years were asked to take questionnaire survey, physical and laboratory examinations. There were 139 cases met the diagnostic criteria of ACE being in the observation group, and 1 509 cases without ACE were assigned in the control group. The gender, age, smoking, alcohol intake, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, education, physical exercise, retinal microvascular disease, fasting blood-glucose, high density lipoprotein cholesterin (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterin (LDL-C), triacylglycerol (TG), systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, body mass index (BMI) were collected in the two groups to perform univariate analysis. Multivariate non-conditional logistic regression analysis was used for the factors with statistical significance to screen out the independent risk factors that could affect the occurrence of ACE. Results The univariate analysis showed:the risk factors that might cause the occurrence of ACE included age, gender, smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, LDL-C, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, BMI, and retinal microvascular disease (P<0.05 or P<0.01). In the ACE patients of observation group, the rates of presence of arteriovenous crossing sign [44.6%(62/139) vs. 27.8%(419/1 509)], hard exudates [9.4%(13/139) vs. 4.9%(74/1 509)] and cotton-wool patches [19.4%(27/139) vs. 7.3%(110/1 509)] in retinal microvascular disease were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The logistic regression analysis showed:age [P=0.002, odds ratio (OR)=1.06, 95%confidence interval (95%CI)=1.04-1.09], smoking (P=0.032, OR=2.17, 95%CI=2.04-2.30), retinal microvascular disease (P = 0.010, OR = 2.33, 95%CI = 0.97 - 1.27), hypertension (P < 0.001, OR = 5.21, 95%CI=4.11-6.36), diabetes mellitus (P=0.021, OR=1.03, 95

  17. Continuous retinal vessel diameter measurements: the future in retinal vessel assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmar, Rebekka; Blann, Andrew D; Cubbidge, Robert P; Lip, Gregory Y H; Gherghel, Doina

    2010-11-01

    To establish an alternative method, sequential and diameter response analysis (SDRA), to determine dynamic retinal vessel responses and their time course in serial stimulation compared with the established method of averaged diameter responses and standard static assessment. SDRA focuses on individual time and diameter responses, taking into account the fluctuation in baseline diameter, providing improved insight into reaction patterns when compared with established methods as delivered by retinal vessel analyzer (RVA) software. SDRA patterns were developed with measurements from 78 healthy nonsmokers and subsequently validated in a group of 21 otherwise healthy smokers. Fundus photography and retinal vessel responses were assessed by RVA, intraocular pressure by contact tonometry, and blood pressure by sphygmomanometry. Compared with the RVA software method, SDRA demonstrated a marked difference in retinal vessel responses to flickering light (P SDRA showed a strong relation between baseline retinal vessel diameter and subsequent dilatory response in both healthy subjects and smokers (P = 0.001). The RVA software was unable to detect this difference or to find a difference in retinal vessel arteriovenous ratio between smokers and nonsmokers (P = 0.243). However, SDRA revealed that smokers' vessels showed both an increased level of arterial baseline diameter fluctuation before flicker stimulation (P = 0.005) and an increased stiffness of retinal arterioles (P = 0.035) compared with those in nonsmokers. These differences were unrelated to intraocular pressure or systemic blood pressure. SDRA shows promise as a tool for the assessment of vessel physiology. Further studies are needed to explore its application in patients with vascular diseases.

  18. Novel localization of peripherin 2, the photoreceptor-specific retinal degeneration slow protein, in retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Patrizia B; Amann, Barbara; Hauck, Stefanie M; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2015-01-26

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) builds the outer blood-retinal barrier of the eye. Since one typical feature of the autoimmune disease, equine recurrent uveitis (ERU), is the breakdown of this barrier, we recently performed comparative analysis of healthy and uveitic RPE. We identified for the first time peripherin 2, which is responsible for visual perception and retina development, to be localized in RPE. The purpose of this study was therefore to validate our findings by characterizing the expression patterns of peripherin 2 in RPE and retina. We also investigated whether peripherin 2 expression changes in ERU and if it is expressed by the RPE itself. Via immunohistochemistry, significant downregulation of peripherin 2 in uveitic RPE compared to the control was detectable, but there was no difference in healthy and uveitic retina. A further interesting finding was the clear distinction between peripherin 2 and the phagocytosis marker, rhodopsin, in healthy RPE. In conclusion, changes in the expression pattern of peripherin 2 selectively affect RPE, but not retina, in ERU. Moreover, peripherin 2 is clearly detectable in healthy RPE due to both phagocytosis and the expression by the RPE cells themselves. Our novel findings are very promising for better understanding the molecular mechanisms taking place on RPE in uveitis.

  19. Novel Localization of Peripherin 2, the Photoreceptor-Specific Retinal Degeneration Slow Protein, in Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia B. Uhl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE builds the outer blood-retinal barrier of the eye. Since one typical feature of the autoimmune disease, equine recurrent uveitis (ERU, is the breakdown of this barrier, we recently performed comparative analysis of healthy and uveitic RPE. We identified for the first time peripherin 2, which is responsible for visual perception and retina development, to be localized in RPE. The purpose of this study was therefore to validate our findings by characterizing the expression patterns of peripherin 2 in RPE and retina. We also investigated whether peripherin 2 expression changes in ERU and if it is expressed by the RPE itself. Via immunohistochemistry, significant downregulation of peripherin 2 in uveitic RPE compared to the control was detectable, but there was no difference in healthy and uveitic retina. A further interesting finding was the clear distinction between peripherin 2 and the phagocytosis marker, rhodopsin, in healthy RPE. In conclusion, changes in the expression pattern of peripherin 2 selectively affect RPE, but not retina, in ERU. Moreover, peripherin 2 is clearly detectable in healthy RPE due to both phagocytosis and the expression by the RPE cells themselves. Our novel findings are very promising for better understanding the molecular mechanisms taking place on RPE in uveitis.

  20. Vasoinhibins prevent retinal vasopermeability associated with diabetic retinopathy in rats via protein phosphatase 2A-dependent eNOS inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Celina; Aranda, Jorge; Arnold, Edith; Thébault, Stéphanie; Macotela, Yazmín; López-Casillas, Fernando; Mendoza, Valentín; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Hernández-Montiel, Hebert Luis; Lin, Sue-Hwa; de la Escalera, Gonzalo Martínez; Clapp, Carmen

    2008-06-01

    Increased retinal vasopermeability contributes to diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults. Despite clinical progress, effective therapy remains a major need. Vasoinhibins, a family of peptides derived from the protein hormone prolactin (and inclusive of the 16-kDa fragment of prolactin), antagonize the proangiogenic effects of VEGF, a primary mediator of retinal vasopermeability. Here, we demonstrate what we believe to be a novel function of vasoinhibins as inhibitors of the increased retinal vasopermeability associated with diabetic retinopathy. Vasoinhibins inhibited VEGF-induced vasopermeability in bovine aortic and rat retinal capillary endothelial cells in vitro. In vivo, vasoinhibins blocked retinal vasopermeability in diabetic rats and in response to intravitreous injection of VEGF or of vitreous from patients with diabetic retinopathy. Inhibition by vasoinhibins was similar to that achieved following immunodepletion of VEGF from human diabetic retinopathy vitreous or blockage of NO synthesis, suggesting that vasoinhibins inhibit VEGF-induced NOS activation. We further showed that vasoinhibins activate protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), leading to eNOS dephosphorylation at Ser1179 and, thereby, eNOS inactivation. Moreover, intravitreous injection of okadaic acid, a PP2A inhibitor, blocked the vasoinhibin effect on endothelial cell permeability and retinal vasopermeability. These results suggest that vasoinhibins have the potential to be developed as new therapeutic agents to control the excessive retinal vasopermeability observed in diabetic retinopathy and other vasoproliferative retinopathies.

  1. Vasoinhibins prevent retinal vasopermeability associated with diabetic retinopathy in rats via protein phosphatase 2A–dependent eNOS inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Celina; Aranda, Jorge; Arnold, Edith; Thébault, Stéphanie; Macotela, Yazmín; López-Casillas, Fernando; Mendoza, Valentín; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Hernández-Montiel, Hebert Luis; Lin, Sue-Hwa; de la Escalera, Gonzalo Martínez; Clapp, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Increased retinal vasopermeability contributes to diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults. Despite clinical progress, effective therapy remains a major need. Vasoinhibins, a family of peptides derived from the protein hormone prolactin (and inclusive of the 16-kDa fragment of prolactin), antagonize the proangiogenic effects of VEGF, a primary mediator of retinal vasopermeability. Here, we demonstrate what we believe to be a novel function of vasoinhibins as inhibitors of the increased retinal vasopermeability associated with diabetic retinopathy. Vasoinhibins inhibited VEGF-induced vasopermeability in bovine aortic and rat retinal capillary endothelial cells in vitro. In vivo, vasoinhibins blocked retinal vasopermeability in diabetic rats and in response to intravitreous injection of VEGF or of vitreous from patients with diabetic retinopathy. Inhibition by vasoinhibins was similar to that achieved following immunodepletion of VEGF from human diabetic retinopathy vitreous or blockage of NO synthesis, suggesting that vasoinhibins inhibit VEGF-induced NOS activation. We further showed that vasoinhibins activate protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), leading to eNOS dephosphorylation at Ser1179 and, thereby, eNOS inactivation. Moreover, intravitreous injection of okadaic acid, a PP2A inhibitor, blocked the vasoinhibin effect on endothelial cell permeability and retinal vasopermeability. These results suggest that vasoinhibins have the potential to be developed as new therapeutic agents to control the excessive retinal vasopermeability observed in diabetic retinopathy and other vasoproliferative retinopathies. PMID:18497878

  2. Patterns of retinal damage facilitate differential diagnosis between Susac syndrome and MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander U Brandt

    Full Text Available Susac syndrome, a rare but probably underdiagnosed combination of encephalopathy, hearing loss, and visual deficits due to branch retinal artery occlusion of unknown aetiology has to be considered as differential diagnosis in various conditions. Particularly, differentiation from multiple sclerosis is often challenging since both clinical presentation and diagnostic findings may overlap. Optical coherence tomography is a powerful and easy to perform diagnostic tool to analyse the morphological integrity of retinal structures and is increasingly established to depict characteristic patterns of retinal pathology in multiple sclerosis. Against this background we hypothesised that differential patterns of retinal pathology facilitate a reliable differentiation between Susac syndrome and multiple sclerosis. In this multicenter cross-sectional observational study optical coherence tomography was performed in nine patients with a definite diagnosis of Susac syndrome. Data were compared with age-, sex-, and disease duration-matched relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis patients with and without a history of optic neuritis, and with healthy controls. Using generalised estimating equation models, Susac patients showed a significant reduction in either or both retinal nerve fibre layer thickness and total macular volume in comparison to both healthy controls and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis patients. However, in contrast to the multiple sclerosis patients this reduction was not distributed over the entire scanning area but showed a distinct sectorial loss especially in the macular measurements. We therefore conclude that patients with Susac syndrome show distinct abnormalities in optical coherence tomography in comparison to multiple sclerosis patients. These findings recommend optical coherence tomography as a promising tool for differentiating Susac syndrome from MS.

  3. Bloodstream-To-Eye Infections Are Facilitated by Outer Blood-Retinal Barrier Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Phillip S.; Wiskur, Brandt J.; Miller, Frederick C.; LaGrow, Austin L.; Astley, Roger A.; Elliott, Michael H.; Callegan, Michelle C.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier (BRB) functions to maintain the immune privilege of the eye, which is necessary for normal vision. The outer BRB is formed by tightly-associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells which limit transport within the retinal environment, maintaining retinal function and viability. Retinal microvascular complications and RPE dysfunction resulting from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy cause permeability changes in the BRB that compromise barrier function. Diabetes is the major predisposing condition underlying endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE), a blinding intraocular infection resulting from bacterial invasion of the eye from the bloodstream. However, significant numbers of EBE cases occur in non-diabetics. In this work, we hypothesized that dysfunction of the outer BRB may be associated with EBE development. To disrupt the RPE component of the outer BRB in vivo, sodium iodate (NaIO3) was administered to C57BL/6J mice. NaIO3-treated and untreated mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony forming units (cfu) of Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. At 4 and 6 days postinfection, EBE was observed in NaIO3-treated mice after infection with K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, although the incidence was higher following S. aureus infection. Invasion of the eye was observed in control mice following S. aureus infection, but not in control mice following K. pneumoniae infection. Immunohistochemistry and FITC-dextran conjugate transmigration assays of human RPE barriers after infection with an exoprotein-deficient agr/sar mutant of S. aureus suggested that S. aureus exoproteins may be required for the loss of the tight junction protein, ZO-1, and for permeability of this in vitro barrier. Our results support the clinical findings that for both pathogens, complications which result in BRB permeability increase the likelihood of bacterial transmigration from the bloodstream into the eye. For S. aureus, however, BRB permeability is

  4. Bloodstream-To-Eye Infections Are Facilitated by Outer Blood-Retinal Barrier Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Phillip S; Wiskur, Brandt J; Miller, Frederick C; LaGrow, Austin L; Astley, Roger A; Elliott, Michael H; Callegan, Michelle C

    2016-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier (BRB) functions to maintain the immune privilege of the eye, which is necessary for normal vision. The outer BRB is formed by tightly-associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells which limit transport within the retinal environment, maintaining retinal function and viability. Retinal microvascular complications and RPE dysfunction resulting from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy cause permeability changes in the BRB that compromise barrier function. Diabetes is the major predisposing condition underlying endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE), a blinding intraocular infection resulting from bacterial invasion of the eye from the bloodstream. However, significant numbers of EBE cases occur in non-diabetics. In this work, we hypothesized that dysfunction of the outer BRB may be associated with EBE development. To disrupt the RPE component of the outer BRB in vivo, sodium iodate (NaIO3) was administered to C57BL/6J mice. NaIO3-treated and untreated mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony forming units (cfu) of Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. At 4 and 6 days postinfection, EBE was observed in NaIO3-treated mice after infection with K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, although the incidence was higher following S. aureus infection. Invasion of the eye was observed in control mice following S. aureus infection, but not in control mice following K. pneumoniae infection. Immunohistochemistry and FITC-dextran conjugate transmigration assays of human RPE barriers after infection with an exoprotein-deficient agr/sar mutant of S. aureus suggested that S. aureus exoproteins may be required for the loss of the tight junction protein, ZO-1, and for permeability of this in vitro barrier. Our results support the clinical findings that for both pathogens, complications which result in BRB permeability increase the likelihood of bacterial transmigration from the bloodstream into the eye. For S. aureus, however, BRB permeability is

  5. Variation associated with measurement of retinal vessel diameters at different points in the pulse cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudtson, M D; Klein, B E K; Klein, R; Wong, T Y; Hubbard, L D; Lee, K E; Meuer, S M; Bulla, C P

    2004-01-01

    Background/aims: To assess the variability in retinal vessel measurements at different points in the pulse cycle. Methods: A healthy white male aged 19 years had 30 digitised images taken at three distinct points in the pulse cycle over a one hour period. A pulse synchronised ear clip trigger device was used to capture images at the desired point in the pulse cycle. Two trained graders measured the retinal vessel diameter of one large arteriole, one large venule, one small arteriole, and one small venule 10 times in each of these 30 images. Results: Within an image, variability was similar between graders, pulse point, and vessel type. Across images taken at the same point in the pulse period, the change from the minimum to maximum measurement was between 6% and 17% for arterioles and between 2% and 11% for venules. In addition, measurements of small vessels had greater changes than large vessels and no point in the pulse period was more variable than another. Ignoring pulse cycle increased variability across images in the large venule, but not in the other vessel types. Mixed effect models were fit for each of the vessel types to determine the greatest source of variability. Controlling for pulse point and grader, the largest source of variability for all four vessels measured was across images, accounting for more than 50% of the total variability. Conclusion: Measurements of large retinal venules is generally less variable than measurements of other retinal vessels. After controlling for pulse point and grader, the largest source of variation is across images. Understanding the components of variability in measuring retinal vessels is important as these techniques are applied in epidemiological studies. PMID:14693774

  6. Bloodstream-To-Eye Infections Are Facilitated by Outer Blood-Retinal Barrier Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip S Coburn

    Full Text Available The blood-retinal barrier (BRB functions to maintain the immune privilege of the eye, which is necessary for normal vision. The outer BRB is formed by tightly-associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells which limit transport within the retinal environment, maintaining retinal function and viability. Retinal microvascular complications and RPE dysfunction resulting from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy cause permeability changes in the BRB that compromise barrier function. Diabetes is the major predisposing condition underlying endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE, a blinding intraocular infection resulting from bacterial invasion of the eye from the bloodstream. However, significant numbers of EBE cases occur in non-diabetics. In this work, we hypothesized that dysfunction of the outer BRB may be associated with EBE development. To disrupt the RPE component of the outer BRB in vivo, sodium iodate (NaIO3 was administered to C57BL/6J mice. NaIO3-treated and untreated mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony forming units (cfu of Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. At 4 and 6 days postinfection, EBE was observed in NaIO3-treated mice after infection with K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, although the incidence was higher following S. aureus infection. Invasion of the eye was observed in control mice following S. aureus infection, but not in control mice following K. pneumoniae infection. Immunohistochemistry and FITC-dextran conjugate transmigration assays of human RPE barriers after infection with an exoprotein-deficient agr/sar mutant of S. aureus suggested that S. aureus exoproteins may be required for the loss of the tight junction protein, ZO-1, and for permeability of this in vitro barrier. Our results support the clinical findings that for both pathogens, complications which result in BRB permeability increase the likelihood of bacterial transmigration from the bloodstream into the eye. For S. aureus, however, BRB

  7. The Finnish lapphund retinal atrophy locus maps to the centromeric region of CFA9

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    Sargan David R

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dogs have the second largest number of genetic diseases, after humans. Among the diseases present in dogs, progressive retinal atrophy has been reported in more than a hundred breeds. In some of them, the mutation has been identified and genetic tests have allowed the identification of carriers, thus enabling a drastic reduction in the incidence of the disease. The Finnish lapphund is a dog breed presenting late-onset progressive retinal atrophy for which the disease locus remains unknown. Results In this study we mapped the progressive retinal atrophy locus in the Finnish lapphund using a DNA pooling approach, assuming that all affected dogs within the breed share the same identical-by descent-mutation as the cause of the disease (genetic homogeneity. Autosomal recessive inheritance was also assumed, after ruling out, from pedigree analysis, dominant and X-linked inheritance. DNA from 12 Finnish lapphund cases was mixed in one pool, and DNA from 12 first-degree relatives of these cases was mixed to serve as the control pool. The 2 pools were tested with 133 microsatellite markers, 3 of which showed a shift towards homozygosity in the cases. Individual genotyping with these 3 markers confirmed homozygosity for the GALK1 microsatellite only (chromosome 9. Further individual genotyping with additional samples (4 cases and 59 controls confirmed the association between this marker and the disease locus (p Conclusion The locus for progressive rod-cone degeneration is known to be close to the GALK1 locus, on the telomeric region of chromosome 9, where the retinal atrophy locus of the Finnish lapphund has been mapped. This suggests that the disease in this breed, as well as in the Swedish lapphund, may correspond to progressive rod-cone degeneration. This would increase the number of known dog breeds having this particular form of progressive retinal atrophy.

  8. Epigenetic intervention with a BET inhibitor ameliorates acute retinal ganglion cell death in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Lei; Urabe, Go; Fu, Yingmei

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The bromo and extraterminal (BET) epigenetic “reader” family is becoming an appealing new therapeutic target for several common diseases, yet little is known of its role in retinal neurodegeneration. We explored the potential of BET inhibition in the protection of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Methods To test the therapeutic effect of JQ1, an inhibitor highly selective for the BET family of proteins, we used an acute RGC damage model induced by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) excitotoxicity. Adult C57BL/6 mice received an intravitreal injection of NMDA with (or without) JQ1 in one eye and vehicle control in the contralateral eye; RGC loss was assessed on retinal sections and whole mounts. Gene expression and apoptosis were analyzed by quantitative real time (RT)-PCR and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), respectively. For counting RGCs, immunostaining of the marker protein BRN3A was performed on whole mounts. Results NMDA treatment eliminated RGCs (day 7 and day 14 post injection) and diminished the expression (mRNAs) of RGC-selective genes, including Thy1, Nrn1, Sncg, and Nfl (day 3 and day 7). In contrast, co-injection with JQ1 maintained the number and gene expression of RGCs at ~2 fold of the control (NMDA only, no JQ1), and it decreased NMDA-induced TUNEL-positive cells in the RGC layer by 35%. While NMDA treatment dramatically upregulated mRNAs of inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, MCP-1, RANTES) in retinal homogenates, co-injection with JQ1 suppressed their upregulation by ~50%. Conclusions Intravitreal injection of a BET inhibitor (JQ1) ameliorates NMDA-induced RGC death, revealing the RGC-protective potential of pharmacological blockage of the BET family. This new strategy of epigenetic intervention may be extended to other retinal degenerative conditions. PMID:28356707

  9. Retinal neurodegeneration may precede microvascular changes characteristic of diabetic retinopathy in diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Elliott H.; van Dijk, Hille W.; Jiao, Chunhua; Kok, Pauline H. B.; Jeong, Woojin; Demirkaya, Nazli; Garmager, Allison; Wit, Ferdinand; Kucukevcilioglu, Murat; van Velthoven, Mirjam E. J.; DeVries, J. Hans; Mullins, Robert F.; Kuehn, Markus H.; Schlingemann, Reinier Otto; Sonka, Milan; Verbraak, Frank D.; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) has long been recognized as a microvasculopathy, but retinal diabetic neuropathy (RDN), characterized by inner retinal neurodegeneration, also occurs in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). We report that in 45 people with DM and no to minimal DR there was significant, progressive loss of the nerve fiber layer (NFL) (0.25 μm/y) and the ganglion cell (GC)/inner plexiform layer (0.29 μm/y) on optical coherence tomography analysis (OCT) over a 4-y period, independent of glycated hemoglobin, age, and sex. The NFL was significantly thinner (17.3 μm) in the eyes of six donors with DM than in the eyes of six similarly aged control donors (30.4 μm), although retinal capillary density did not differ in the two groups. We confirmed significant, progressive inner retinal thinning in streptozotocin-induced “type 1” and B6.BKS(D)-Leprdb/J “type 2” diabetic mouse models on OCT; immunohistochemistry in type 1 mice showed GC loss but no difference in pericyte density or acellular capillaries. The results suggest that RDN may precede the established clinical and morphometric vascular changes caused by DM and represent a paradigm shift in our understanding of ocular diabetic complications. PMID:27114552

  10. Genome-wide association and linkage analyses localize a progressive retinal atrophy locus in Persian cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaddad, Hasan; Gandolfi, Barbara; Grahn, Robert A; Rah, Hyung-Chul; Peterson, Carlyn B; Maggs, David J; Good, Kathryn L; Pedersen, Niels C; Lyons, Leslie A

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary eye diseases of animals serve as excellent models of human ocular disorders and assist in the development of gene and drug therapies for inherited forms of blindness. Several primary hereditary eye conditions affecting various ocular tissues and having different rates of progression have been documented in domestic cats. Gene therapy for canine retinopathies has been successful, thus the cat could be a gene therapy candidate for other forms of retinal degenerations. The current study investigates a hereditary, autosomal recessive, retinal degeneration specific to Persian cats. A multi-generational pedigree segregating for this progressive retinal atrophy was genotyped using a 63 K SNP array and analyzed via genome-wide linkage and association methods. A multi-point parametric linkage analysis localized the blindness phenotype to a ~1.75 Mb region with significant LOD scores (Z ≈ 14, θ = 0.00) on cat chromosome E1. Genome-wide TDT, sib-TDT, and case-control analyses also consistently supported significant association within the same region on chromosome E1, which is homologous to human chromosome 17. Using haplotype analysis, a ~1.3 Mb region was identified as highly associated for progressive retinal atrophy in Persian cats. Several candidate genes within the region are reasonable candidates as a potential causative gene and should be considered for molecular analyses.

  11. Role of calcium conductance in firing behavior of retinal ganglion cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Wang; Qingli Qiao; Nan Xie

    2011-01-01

    Fohlmeister-Coleman-Miller model of retinal ganglion cells consists of five ion channels; these are sodium channels, calcium channels, and 3 types of potassium channels. An increasing number of studies have investigated sodium channels, voltage-gated potassium channels, and delayed rectifier potassium channels. However, little is known about calcium channels, and in particular the dynamics and computational models of calcium ions. Retinal prostheses have been designed to assist with sight recovery for the blind, and in the present study, the effects of calcium ions in retinal ganglion cell models were analyzed with regard to calcium channel potential and calcium-activated potassium potential. Using MATLAB software, calcium conductance and calcium current from the Fohlmeister-Coleman-Miller model, under clamped voltages, were numerically computed using backward Euler methods. Subsequently, the Fohlmeister-Coleman-Miller model was simulated with the absence of calcium-current (lc,) or calcium-activated potassium current (IK, ca). The model was also analyzed according to the phase plane method.The relationship curve between peak calcium current and clamped potentials revealed an inverted bell shape, and the calcium-activated potassium current increased the frequency of firing and the peak of membrane potential. Results suggested that calcium ion concentrations play an important role in controlling the peak and the magnitude of peak membrane voltage in retinal ganglion cells.

  12. Retinal neurodegeneration may precede microvascular changes characteristic of diabetic retinopathy in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Elliott H; van Dijk, Hille W; Jiao, Chunhua; Kok, Pauline H B; Jeong, Woojin; Demirkaya, Nazli; Garmager, Allison; Wit, Ferdinand; Kucukevcilioglu, Murat; van Velthoven, Mirjam E J; DeVries, J Hans; Mullins, Robert F; Kuehn, Markus H; Schlingemann, Reinier Otto; Sonka, Milan; Verbraak, Frank D; Abràmoff, Michael David

    2016-05-10

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) has long been recognized as a microvasculopathy, but retinal diabetic neuropathy (RDN), characterized by inner retinal neurodegeneration, also occurs in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). We report that in 45 people with DM and no to minimal DR there was significant, progressive loss of the nerve fiber layer (NFL) (0.25 μm/y) and the ganglion cell (GC)/inner plexiform layer (0.29 μm/y) on optical coherence tomography analysis (OCT) over a 4-y period, independent of glycated hemoglobin, age, and sex. The NFL was significantly thinner (17.3 μm) in the eyes of six donors with DM than in the eyes of six similarly aged control donors (30.4 μm), although retinal capillary density did not differ in the two groups. We confirmed significant, progressive inner retinal thinning in streptozotocin-induced "type 1" and B6.BKS(D)-Lepr(db)/J "type 2" diabetic mouse models on OCT; immunohistochemistry in type 1 mice showed GC loss but no difference in pericyte density or acellular capillaries. The results suggest that RDN may precede the established clinical and morphometric vascular changes caused by DM and represent a paradigm shift in our understanding of ocular diabetic complications.

  13. FEATURES OF THE MACULA AND CENTRAL VISUAL FIELD AND FIXATION PATTERN IN PATIENTS WITH RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayman Muslubas, Isil; Karacorlu, Murat; Arf, Serra; Hocaoglu, Mumin; Ersoz, Mehmet Giray

    2017-02-07

    To evaluate macular features and fixation pattern in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) compared with healthy controls, using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and MP-1 microperimetry. Eighty-one eyes of 81 patients with RP and 90 eyes of 90 healthy subjects were assessed. The central foveal thickness, subfoveal choroidal thickness, ellipsoid zone length, and the mean retinal sensitivities and fixation characteristics were evaluated by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and MP-1 microperimetry. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with central macular thinning had lower best corrected visual acuity, central foveal thickness, ellipsoid zone length, retinal sensitivity, and visual field than patients with cystoid macular edema or no macular change (all P central foveal thickness, ellipsoid zone length, retinal sensitivity, and visual field were statistically significant (all P centralized and stabilized fixation than patients with central foveal thinning and cystoid macular edema. The spectrum of macular features from the nearly normal retina to complete chorioretinal atrophy can be seen in RP patients without associations with age or duration of symptoms. Unlike other macular degenerations, most patients with RP obtained at least a central 2° of visual field, with foveal and stable fixation.

  14. Fasudil, a Clinically Used ROCK Inhibitor, Stabilizes Rod Photoreceptor Synapses after Retinal Detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes-Anderson, Ellen; Wang, Jianfeng; Halász, Éva; Sugino, Ilene; Pitler, Amy; Whitehead, Ian; Zarbin, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Retinal detachment disrupts the rod-bipolar synapse in the outer plexiform layer by retraction of rod axons. We showed that breakage is due to RhoA activation whereas inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK), using Y27632, reduces synaptic damage. We test whether the ROCK inhibitor fasudil, used for other clinical applications, can prevent synaptic injury after detachment. Detachments were made in pigs by subretinal injection of balanced salt solution (BSS) or fasudil (1, 10 mM). In some animals, fasudil was injected intravitreally after BSS-induced detachment. After 2 to 4 hours, retinae were fixed for immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. Axon retraction was quantified by imaging synaptic vesicle label in the outer nuclear layer. Apoptosis was analyzed using propidium iodide staining. For biochemical analysis by Western blotting, retinal explants, detached from retinal pigmented epithelium, were cultured for 2 hours. Subretinal injection of fasudil (10 mM) reduced retraction of rod spherules by 51.3% compared to control detachments (n = 3 pigs, P = 0.002). Intravitreal injection of 10 mM fasudil, a more clinically feasible route of administration, also reduced retraction (28.7%, n = 5, P ROCK, was decreased with 30 μM fasudil (n = 8-10 explants, P ROCK signaling with fasudil reduced photoreceptor degeneration and preserved the rod-bipolar synapse after retinal detachment. These results support the possibility, previously tested with Y27632, that ROCK inhibition may attenuate synaptic damage in iatrogenic detachments.

  15. Simultaneous segmentation of retinal surfaces and microcystic macular edema in SDOCT volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Bhavna J.; Lang, Andrew; Swingle, Emily K.; Al-Louzi, Omar; Carass, Aaron; Solomon, Sharon; Calabresi, Peter A.; Saidha, Shiv; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging modality that has begun to find widespread use in retinal imaging for the detection of a variety of ocular diseases. In addition to structural changes in the form of altered retinal layer thicknesses, pathological conditions may also cause the formation of edema within the retina. In multiple sclerosis, for instance, the nerve fiber and ganglion cell layers are known to thin. Additionally, the formation of pseudocysts called microcystic macular edema (MME) have also been observed in the eyes of about 5% of MS patients, and its presence has been shown to be correlated with disease severity. Previously, we proposed separate algorithms for the segmentation of retinal layers and MME, but since MME mainly occurs within specific regions of the retina, a simultaneous approach is advantageous. In this work, we propose an automated globally optimal graph-theoretic approach that simultaneously segments the retinal layers and the MME in volumetric OCT scans. SD-OCT scans from one eye of 12 MS patients with known MME and 8 healthy controls were acquired and the pseudocysts manually traced. The overall precision and recall of the pseudocyst detection was found to be 86.0% and 79.5%, respectively.

  16. A partial intensity invariant feature descriptor for multimodal retinal image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Tian, Jie; Lee, Noah; Zheng, Jian; Smith, R Theodore; Laine, Andrew F

    2010-07-01

    Detection of vascular bifurcations is a challenging task in multimodal retinal image registration. Existing algorithms based on bifurcations usually fail in correctly aligning poor quality retinal image pairs. To solve this problem, we propose a novel highly distinctive local feature descriptor named partial intensity invariant feature descriptor (PIIFD) and describe a robust automatic retinal image registration framework named Harris-PIIFD. PIIFD is invariant to image rotation, partially invariant to image intensity, affine transformation, and viewpoint/perspective change. Our Harris-PIIFD framework consists of four steps. First, corner points are used as control point candidates instead of bifurcations since corner points are sufficient and uniformly distributed across the image domain. Second, PIIFDs are extracted for all corner points, and a bilateral matching technique is applied to identify corresponding PIIFDs matches between image pairs. Third, incorrect matches are removed and inaccurate matches are refined. Finally, an adaptive transformation is used to register the image pairs. PIIFD is so distinctive that it can be correctly identified even in nonvascular areas. When tested on 168 pairs of multimodal retinal images, the Harris-PIIFD far outperforms existing algorithms in terms of robustness, accuracy, and computational efficiency.

  17. VEGF receptor blockade markedly reduces retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration into laser-induced CNV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    Full Text Available Although blocking VEGF has a positive effect in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the effect of blocking its receptors remains unclear. This was an investigation of the effect of VEGF receptor (VEGFR 1 and/or 2 blockade on retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration in laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV, a model of wet AMD. CNV lesions were isolated by laser capture microdissection at 3, 7, and 14 days after laser and analyzed by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining for mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Neutralizing antibodies for VEGFR1 or R2 and the microglia inhibitor minocycline were injected intraperitoneally (IP. Anti-CD11b, CD45 and Iba1 antibodies were used to confirm the cell identity of retinal microglia/macrophage, in the RPE/choroidal flat mounts or retinal cross sections. CD11b(+, CD45(+ or Iba1(+ cells were counted. mRNA of VEGFR1 and its three ligands, PlGF, VEGF-A (VEGF and VEGF-B, were expressed at all stages, but VEGFR2 were detected only in the late stage. PlGF and VEGF proteins were expressed at 3 and 7 days after laser. Anti-VEGFR1 (MF1 delivered IP 3 days after laser inhibited infiltration of leukocyte populations, largely retinal microglia/macrophage to CNV, while anti-VEGFR2 (DC101 had no effect. At 14 days after laser, both MF1 and DC101 antibodies markedly inhibited retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration into CNV. Therefore, VEGFR1 and R2 play differential roles in the pathogenesis of CNV: VEGFR1 plays a dominant role at 3 days after laser; but both receptors play pivotal roles at 14 days after laser. In vivo imaging demonstrated accumulation of GFP-expressing microglia into CNV in both CX3CR1(gfp/gfp and CX3CR1(gfp/+ mice. Minocycline treatment caused a significant increase in lectin(+ cells in the sub-retinal space anterior to CNV and a decrease in dextran-perfused neovessels compared to controls. Targeting the chemoattractant molecules that regulate trafficking of retinal microglia

  18. Canine and human visual cortex intact and responsive despite early retinal blindness from RPE65 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Geoffrey K; Komáromy, András M; Cideciyan, Artur V; Brainard, David H; Aleman, Tomas S; Roman, Alejandro J; Avants, Brian B; Gee, James C; Korczykowski, Marc; Hauswirth, William W; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2007-06-01

    RPE65 is an essential molecule in the retinoid-visual cycle, and RPE65 gene mutations cause the congenital human blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Somatic gene therapy delivered to the retina of blind dogs with an RPE65 mutation dramatically restores retinal physiology and has sparked international interest in human treatment trials for this incurable disease. An unanswered question is how the visual cortex responds after prolonged sensory deprivation from retinal dysfunction. We therefore studied the cortex of RPE65-mutant dogs before and after retinal gene therapy. The