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Sample records for grisea species complex

  1. Metabolomic analysis reveals a common pattern of metabolic re-programming during invasion of three host plant species by Magnaporthe grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David; Beckmann, Manfred; Zubair, Hassan; Enot, David P; Caracuel-Rios, Zaira; Overy, David P; Snowdon, Stuart; Talbot, Nicholas J; Draper, John

    2009-09-01

    The mechanisms by which biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic fungal pathogens simultaneously subdue plant defences and sequester host nutrients are poorly understood. Using metabolite fingerprinting, we show that Magnaporthe grisea, the causal agent of rice blast disease, dynamically re-programmes host metabolism during plant colonization. Identical patterns of metabolic change occurred during M. grisea infections in barley, rice and Brachypodium distachyon. Targeted metabolite profiling by GC-MS confirmed the modulation of a conserved set of metabolites. In pre-symptomatic tissues, malate and polyamines accumulated, rather than being utilized to generate defensive reactive oxygen species, and the levels of metabolites associated with amelioration of redox stress in various cellular compartments increased dramatically. The activity of NADP-malic enzyme and generation of reactive oxygen species were localized to pathogen penetration sites, and both appeared to be suppressed in compatible interactions. Early diversion of the shikimate pathway to produce quinate was observed, as well as accumulation of non-polymerized lignin precursors. These data are consistent with modulation of defensive phenylpropanoid metabolism by M. grisea and the inability of susceptible hosts to mount a hypersensitive reaction or produce lignified papillae (both involving reactive oxygen species) to restrict pathogen invasion. Rapid proliferation of M. grisea hyphae in plant tissue after 3 days was associated with accelerated nutrient acquisition and utilization by the pathogen. Conversion of photoassimilate into mannitol and glycerol for carbon sequestration and osmolyte production appear to drive hyphal growth. Taken together, our results suggest that fungal pathogens deploy a common metabolic re-programming strategy in diverse host species to suppress plant defence and colonize plant tissue.

  2. Promoter trapping in Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-hong; LU Jian-ping; WANG Jiao-yu; MIN Hang; LIN Fu-cheng

    2006-01-01

    Application of promoter trapping based on transformation in Magnaporthe grisea is reported in this paper. Two promoter-trapping vectors, designated as pCBGFP and pEGFPHPH, were constructed and transformed into protoplasts of M.grisea. A library of 1077 transformants resistant to hygromycin B was generated. Of which, 448 transformants were found to express eGFP gene in different structures ofM. grisea. Three transformants grew slowly, 5 transformants decreased in conidiafion and 7 transformants reduced in pathogenicity greatly among these 448 transformants. Eleven transformants were checked by genomic southern blot randomly, and 9 of which were single-copy insertions. The promoter trapping technique has been applied successfully in M. grisea and can be used as a tool for functional genomic analysis.

  3. Eumicetoma por Madurella grisea: relato de caso

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    Maria do Rosário Rodrigues Silva

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available E relatado um caso de micetoma por Madurella grisea de localização podai em uma mulher do lar. A identificação da amostra foi feita através das características macro e microscópicas do agente em ágar Sabouraud e através da assimilação de açúcares. Este é o quinto caso de micetoma por Madurella grisea relatado no Brasil.One case of mycetoma produced by Madurella grisea localised on the foot of a house wife is reported. The identification of the strain was made through the following features: aspect of the grains, micro e macromorphology in Sabouraud agar and capacity of assimilation of the sugars. This is the fifth case of mycetoma by Madurella grisea reported from Brasil.

  4. Eumycotic mycetoma due to Madurella grisea

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    Walter Belda Júnior

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors reported one case of eumycotic mycetoma due to Madurella grisea (black grains occurred on the right foot of the patient studied. The structure, microscopic morphology and therapeutic evolution are also studied and reported.

  5. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Octacosanol from the Leaves of Sabicea grisea var. grisea in Mice

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    Emiliano Barreto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sabicea species are used in the Amazon for treatment of fever and malaria, which suggests that its chemical constituents may have some effect on pain and inflammation. Phytochemical analysis of the hexane fraction obtained from the crude ethanol extract from Sabicea grisea var. grisea Cham. & Schltdl (Rubiaceae, an endemic plant in Brazil, resulted in the isolation of octacosanol. This study investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the octacosanol in different experimental models. The crude ethanolic extract and hexane fraction obtained from the leaves of S. grisea produced an inhibition of acetic acid-induced pain. Moreover, octacosanol isolated from the hexane fraction produced a significant inhibition of pain response elicited by acetic acid. Pre-treatment with yohimbine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, notably reversed the antinociceptive activity induced by octacosanol in the abdominal constriction test. Furthermore, mice treated with octacosanol did not exhibit any behavioral alteration during the hot plate and rota-rod tests, indicating non-participation of the supraspinal components in the modulation of pain by octacosanol with no motor abnormality. In the formalin test, octacosanol did not inhibit the licking time in first phase (neurogenic pain, but significantly inhibited the licking time in second phase (inflammatory pain of mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of octacosanol was evaluated using carrageenan-induced pleurisy. The octacosanol significantly reduced the total leukocyte count and neutrophils influx, as well as TNF-α levels in the carrageenan-induced pleurisy. This study revealed that the mechanism responsible for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the octacosanol appears to be partly associated with an inhibition of alpha 2-adrenergic transmission and an inhibition of pathways dependent on pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, these results demonstrated that the

  6. HUBUNAGN KEMAMPUAN PERGANTIAN INANG DENGAN PLASTISITAS GENETIKA PADA CENDAWAN BLAS PADI (PYRICULARIA GRISEA)

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Listiyowati; Utut Widyastuti; Gayuh Rahayu; Alex Hartana; Muhammad Jusuf

    2009-01-01

    The Digitaria ciliaris, wild grass grown around rice field, was a host for Pyricularia grisea (Cooke) Sacc., the fungi caused blast disease of rice. This fungi have a specific mechanism to regenerate new genetic variation in its life cycle. The aim of this research is to study the relation between the ability of the fungi to infect different species of host with its genetic plasticity. It was used three SCAR molecular markers Cut1, Pwl 1 and Erg2. P. grisea isolates (Dc4J1) originated from ...

  7. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2017-05-09

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea CeI7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  8. Isolamento e regeneração de protoplastos de Magnaporthe grisea Isolation and regeneration of Magnaporthe grisea protoplasts

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    Carlos Eduardo Marchi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Protoplastos são ferramentas biológicas importantes para pesquisas em fungos filamentosos, sendo empregados intensamente em transformação genética. O isolamento de protoplastos de Magnaporthe grisea foi facilitado com Novozym 234, contudo, este complexo enzimático encontra-se indisponível no mercado. Assim, objetivou-se comparar a eficiência de enzimas líticas disponíveis comercialmente na obtenção de protoplastos de M. grisea. Paralelamente, analisaram-se estabilizadores osmóticos, tempos de digestão e freqüência de regeneração. Maior produção de protoplastos foi obtida com o uso simultâneo de Lysing Enzymes e Cellulase Onozuka R-10. O uso de 10 ou 15 mg de cada complexo enzimático, em 3 mL de estabilizador osmótico, resultou em maior liberação de protoplastos. O melhor estabilizador osmótico foi MgSO4 1,2 M / NaH2PO4 0,01 M, pH 5,8, seguido por MgSO4 0,8 M / NaH2PO4 0,01 M, pH 5,8. O isolamento de protoplastos foi monitorado a cada 60 minutos, atingindo o máximo após incubação por 3 a 6 horas. No entanto, maior freqüência de regeneração (19,4% foi registrada para protoplastos obtidos após 3 horas de hidrólise enzimática.Protoplasts are important biological tools in filamentous fungi research. Fungal protoplasts have been extensively used in experiments with genetic transformation. Protoplastization of Magnaporthe grisea was accomplished with Novozym 234, however, this enzymatic complex is no commercially available for purchase. Thus, the efficiency of several other commercial enzymes in M. grisea protoplasts preparation was investigated. At the same time, osmotic buffer, digestion time and regeneration rate were also analyzed. The highest protoplasts production was obtained with Lysing Enzymes plus Cellulase Onozuka R-10. The use of 10 or 15 mg of each enzymatic complex in 3 mL of osmotic buffer was most effective for the protoplasts yields. The best osmotic buffer was MgSO4 1.2 M / NaH2PO4 0.01 M, pH 5

  9. The Colletotrichum gigasporum species complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, F.; Cai, L.; Crous, P.W.; Damm, U.

    2014-01-01

    In a preliminary analysis, 21 Colletotrichum strains with large conidia preserved in the CBS culture collection clustered with a recently described species, C. gigasporum, forming a clade distinct from other currently known Colletotrichum species complexes. Multi-locus phylogenetic analyses (ITS,

  10. Representative appressorium stage eDNA library of Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jian-ping; LIU Tong-bao; YU Xiao-yun; LIN Fu-cheng

    2005-01-01

    A mature appressorium cDNA library of rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea, was constructed in a ?TriplEx2 vector by SMARTTM cDNA library containing 2.37?106 independent clones about 100% of which harbor foreign cDNA inserts with average size of 660 bp. Of 9 randomly selected clones, 2 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequences did not have homologous EST sequences of M. grisea in GenBank. The appressorium cDNA library is suitable for gene expression analysis and function analysis of the late stages of appressorium formation and the early stages of penetration of M. grisea.

  11. Xiphinema krugi, Species Complex or Complex of Cryptic Species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Claudio M G; Ferraz, Luiz C C B; Neilson, Roy

    2006-12-01

    Fourteen morphologically putative populations of X. krugi were clearly separated into four different profiles by RFLP analysis (Alu I and Hinf I), sequencing of the ITS-1 region, and subsequent Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic analyses. These four profiles were further supported by a principal component analysis of morphometric characters that yielded four taxonomic clusters matching those produced by the molecular data. Sequence homology was greater amongst populations that represented the same RFLP profile than between profiles and similar both between representative populations of the RFLP profiles and putative closely related Xiphinema species. This study suggests that X. krugi is a potential species complex comprised of at least four distinct genotypes.

  12. Eumicetoma de grãos pretos por Madurella grisea: registro de dois casos Eumycotic mycetoma of black grains caused by Madurella grisea: report of two cases

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    Luís Antonio de Paula Machado

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Os Autores registram dois casos de eumicetoma de grãos pretos, com localização podal, procedentes da Bahia, provocados por Madurella grisea Mackinnon et al., 1949. São estudadas a estrutura dos grãos, bem como as características micromorfológicas do fungo em vida saprofítica. Acreditam os Autores que estas observações correspondem ao sétimo e oitavo casos registrados na literatura do país, provocadas por este fungo. Os Autores consideram nomen dubium ou nomina confusa as seguintes espécies de Madurella: M. ramiroi, M. oswaldoi, M. bovoi, M. tozeuri, M. mansonii, M. brumpti, M. reynieri, M. americana, M. lackawanna e M. ikedae, o mesmo ocorrendo com a chamada Rubromadurella mycetomi. As únicas espécies válidas são Madurella mycetomatis McGinnis, 1980 (=Madurella mycetomi Brumpt, 1905 e Madurella grisea Mackinnon et al., 1949. Nos dois casos registrados o tratamento com itraconazol, por um período de 3 meses não fez regredir as lesões, havendo ligeira melhora clínica.Two cases of black grains eumycotic mycetoma, occurring on a foot, are reported. Both proceeded from the State of Bahia (Brazil, and in both the etiologic agent was Madurella grisea Mackinnon et al., 1949. The grains structure as well as the micromorphologic characteristics of the fungus in saprophytic life were studied. It is the Author's belief that these observations correspond to the 7th and 8th cases reported in the Brazilian medical literature. The Authors do consider the following Madurella species as nomen dubium or nomina confusa: M. ramiroi, M. oswaldoi, M. bovoi, M. tozeuri, M. mansonii, M. brumpti, M. reynieri, M. americana, M. lackawanna e M. ikedae and the same for Rubromadurella mycetomi. The only valid species must be Madurella mycetomatis McGinnis, 1980 (=Madurella mycetomi Brumpt, 1905 and Madurella grisea Mackinnon et al., 1949. Treatment with itraconazole in both reported cases, for a 3 month duration, did not produce any regression of the

  13. HUBUNAGN KEMAMPUAN PERGANTIAN INANG DENGAN PLASTISITAS GENETIKA PADA CENDAWAN BLAS PADI (PYRICULARIA GRISEA

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    Sri Listiyowati

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Digitaria ciliaris, wild grass grown around rice field, was a host for Pyricularia grisea (Cooke Sacc., the fungi caused blast disease of rice. This fungi have a specific mechanism to regenerate new genetic variation in its life cycle. The aim of this research is to study the relation between the ability of the fungi to infect different species of host with its genetic plasticity. It was used three SCAR molecular markers Cut1, Pwl 1 and Erg2. P. grisea isolates (Dc4J1 originated from D. ciliaris at Jasinga-Bogor were able to infect rice cultivars Kencana Bali and Cisokan. The original Dc4J1, from D. ciliaris, and the Dc4J1 that were reisolated from the infected rice cultivars (reisolates-1 had the same ability to infect Kencana Bali and Cisokan. Molecular technique showed that there was a different molecular marker genotype between the original Dc4J1, from D. ciliaris, and the Dc4J1 reisolated from infected rice cultivars. The original Dc4J1 owned Cut1 but did not Pwl2 in contrary the reisolates Dc4J1 from rice cultivars (reisolates-1 had Pwl2 but did not Cut1. The Erg2 presented in both the original and the reisolated Dc4J1. These results indicated that there were a change of genotype of P. grisea at the same time with the change of host species. The Dc4J1 isolates originated from Kencana Bali and Cisokan (reisolates-2 that were infected by reisolate-1, had the same genotype with the reisolates-1

  14. Novel Taxa Associated with Human Fungal Black-Grain Mycetomas: Emarellia grisea gen. nov., sp. nov., and Emarellia paragrisea sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Campbell, Colin K.; Bridge, Paul D.; Dannaoui, Eric; Johnson, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Eumycetoma is a debilitating, chronic, fungal infection that is endemic in India, Indonesia, and parts of Africa and South and Central America. It remains a neglected tropical disease in need of international recognition. Infections follow traumatic implantation of saprophytic fungi and frequently require radical surgery or amputation in the absence of appropriate treatment. Several fungal species can cause black-grain mycetomas, including Madurella spp. (Sordariales), Falciformispora spp., Trematosphaeria grisea, Biatriospora mackinnonii, Pseudochaetosphaeronema larense, and Medicopsis romeroi (all Pleosporales). We performed phylogenetic analyses based on five loci on 31 isolates from two international culture collections to establish the taxonomic affiliations of fungi that had been isolated from cases of black-grain mycetoma and historically classified as Madurella grisea. Although most strains were well resolved to species level and corresponded to known agents of eumycetoma, six independent isolates, which failed to produce conidia under any conditions tested, were only distantly related to existing members of the Pleosporales. Five of the six isolates shared >99% identity with each other and are described as Emarellia grisea gen. nov. and sp. nov; the sixth isolate represents a sister species in this novel genus and is described as Emarellia paragrisea. Several E. grisea isolates were present in both United Kingdom and French culture collections and had been isolated independently over 6 decades from cases of imported eumycetoma. Four of the six isolates involved patients that had originated on the Indian subcontinent. All isolates were all susceptible in vitro to the azole antifungals, but had elevated MICs with caspofungin. PMID:27076666

  15. The Candida Pathogenic Species Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Siobhán A.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida species are the most common causes of fungal infection. Approximately 90% of infections are caused by five species: Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei. Three (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis) belong to the CTG clade, in which the CTG codon is translated as serine and not leucine. C. albicans remains the most commonly isolated but is decreasing relative to the other species. The increasing incidence of C. glabrata is related to its reduced susceptibility to azole drugs. Genome analysis suggests that virulence in the CTG clade is associated with expansion of gene families, particularly of cell wall genes. Similar independent processes took place in the C. glabrata species group. Gene loss and expansion in an ancestor of C. glabrata may have resulted in preadaptations that enabled pathogenicity. PMID:25183855

  16. The Gilbertiodendron ogoouense species complex (Leguminosae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, van der X.M.; Mackinder, B.A.; Wieringa, J.J.; Estrella, de la Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The Gilbertiodendron ogoouense species complex consists of 14 tree species. Eight species are here newly described and one is here reinstated: G. bambolense Burgt; G. breteleri Burgt; G. ebo Burgt & Mackinder; G. ecoukense (Pellegr.) Burgt; G. maximum Burgt & Wieringa; G. minkebense Burgt

  17. The Gilbertiodendron ogoouense species complex (Leguminosae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, van der X.M.; Mackinder, B.A.; Wieringa, J.J.; Estrella, de la Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The Gilbertiodendron ogoouense species complex consists of 14 tree species. Eight species are here newly described and one is here reinstated: G. bambolense Burgt; G. breteleri Burgt; G. ebo Burgt & Mackinder; G. ecoukense (Pellegr.) Burgt; G. maximum Burgt & Wieringa; G. minkebense Burgt

  18. Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyros...

  19. Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

  20. Lactobacillus species: taxonomic complexity and controversial susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M

    2015-05-15

    The genus Lactobacillus is a taxonomically complex and is composed of over 170 species that cannot be easily differentiated phenotypically and often require molecular identification. Although they are part of the normal human gastrointestinal and vaginal flora, they can also be occasional human pathogens. They are extensively used in a variety of commercial products including probiotics. Their antimicrobial susceptibilities are poorly defined in part because of their taxonomic complexity and are compounded by the different methods recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute and International Dairy Foundation. Their use as probiotics for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection is prevalent among consumers worldwide but raises the question of will the use of any concurrent antibiotic effect their ability to survive. Lactobacillus species are generally acid resistant and are able to survive ingestion. They are generally resistant to metronidazole, aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin with L. acidophilus being susceptible to penicillin and vancomycin, whereas L. rhamnosus and L. casei are resistant to metronidazole and vancomycin.

  1. Geographic Distribution of Mating Types in Magnaporthe grisea and the Relationship Between Fertile Isolates in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ying; Notteghem Jean Loup.; Milazzo Joёlle.; YUAN Xiao-ping; Adreit Henry; ZHAO Xin-hua; WANG Yan-li; Tharreau Didier.

    2002-01-01

    377 isolates of Magnaporthe grisea were collected from 17 provinces in China and their geographic distribution of mating types and their fertility was tested with four standard isolates, KA3 and TH12 (Mat1.1) and Guy11 and TH16 (Mat1.2) provided by CIRAD. 73 fertile isolates were tested with SCAR markers of 13 pairs of primers. Preliminary results showed that the geographic distribution of M. grisea existed among isolates collected from the same location as well as different locations and the genetic relationship between fertile isolates of the fungus in China. The existence of sexual reproduction of M. grisea was explored in the field as well.

  2. Screening and identification of mutants of Magnaporthe grisea by REMI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Ruyi; LIU Juan; ZHOU Yijun; FAN Yongjian; ZHENG Xiaobo

    2007-01-01

    The plasmid pUCATPH was used to establish a transformation system in wild-type isolate M131 of Magnaporthe grisea.Six hundred and thirty-nine transformants were obtained by restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) with hygromycin B (hyg B) resistance as a tag.Morphological analysis of two of the REMI mutants confirmed that they produced little melanin under black light and continued for three generations.Pathogenicity identification of six mutants screened proved that they made pathogenicity changes on three sets of differential varieties with different resistance genes.Rep-PCR analyses showed that two morphological mutants and two pathogenicity mutants differed from wild-type isolate M131 at the molecular level.RFLP analyses were performed to study the four mutants at the molecular level and the integration sites of the plasmid DNA.The results showed that the plasmid was inserted into all four mutants and that the insertion sites were random.

  3. Eficiência da disseminação aérea em Pyricularia grisea Efficiency of aerial dissemination of Pyricularia grisea

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    Alfredo Seiiti Urashima

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyricularia grisea (teleomorfa Magnaporthe grisea é um patógeno que infecta mais de 80 gramíneas. No Brasil ataca importantes culturas como arroz e trigo, causando a brusone. Mais recentemente foi reportada na triticale, cultura alternativa para os produtores de trigo no sul do estado de São Paulo. Um dos principais meios de disseminação da doença é a dispersão aérea embora pouca informação esteja disponível sobre a distância que esses esporos podem atingir a partir de uma determinada fonte de inóculo. O presente trabalho teve o objetivo de avaliar a capacidade de disseminação de P. grisea a partir de um foco inicial, empregando ferramentas moleculares. A presença de clones do patógeno em campos distantes 4, 30 e 1000 metros a partir de um campo infectado sugere que esporos de um determinado foco podem atingir pelo menos essas distâncias.Pyricularia grisea (teleomorph Magnaporthe grisea infects more than 80 gramineous plants. In Brazil, it attacks important crops like rice and wheat causing blast disease. Recently the disease was reported in triticale, an alternative crop to wheat producers in Southern São Paulo state. Airborne conidia are one of the most important way of dissemination, although little reliable information is available on the distance traveled by spores from an inoculum source. The present work aimed to determine by molecular tools the efficiency of aerial dissemination of P. grisea from a known inoculum source. The presence of pathogen clones in fields distant 4, 30 and 1000 meters from an infected field suggested that spores can travel at least these distances.

  4. Species and speciation in the Hebeloma crustuliniforme complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis deals with species delimitation and speciation in the ectomycorrhizal Hebeloma crustuliniforme complex. The species concept traditionally used in this complex is based on morphology of basidiocarps. However, species delimitation has been controversial. One of the best known names is H. c

  5. Species and speciation in the Hebeloma crustuliniforme complex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis deals with species delimitation and speciation in the ectomycorrhizal Hebeloma crustuliniforme complex. The species concept traditionally used in this complex is based on morphology of basidiocarps. However, species delimitation has been controversial. One

  6. Species recognition and cryptic species in the Tuber indicum complex.

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    Juan Chen

    Full Text Available Morphological delimitation of Asian black truffles, including Tuber himalayense, T. indicum, T. sinense, T. pseudohimalayense, T. formosanum and T. pseudoexcavatum, has remained problematic and even phylogenetic analyses have been controversial. In this study, we combined five years of field investigation in China with morphological study and DNA sequences analyses (ITS, LSU and β-tubulin of 131 Tuber specimens to show that T. pseudohimalayense and T. pseudoexcavatum are the same species. T. formosanum is a separate species based on its host plants and geographic distribution, combined with minor morphological difference from T. indicum. T. sinense should be treated as a synonym of T. indicum. Our results demonstrate that the present T. indicum, a single described morphological species, should include at least two separate phylogenetic species. These findings are of high importance for truffle taxonomy and reveal and preserve the richness of truffle diversity.

  7. Isolamento e regeneração de protoplastos de Magnaporthe grisea

    OpenAIRE

    Marchi,Carlos Eduardo; Brommonschenkel,Sérgio Hermínio; Queiroz,Marisa Vieira de; Mizubuti,Eduardo Seiti Gomide

    2006-01-01

    Protoplastos são ferramentas biológicas importantes para pesquisas em fungos filamentosos, sendo empregados intensamente em transformação genética. O isolamento de protoplastos de Magnaporthe grisea foi facilitado com Novozym 234, contudo, este complexo enzimático encontra-se indisponível no mercado. Assim, objetivou-se comparar a eficiência de enzimas líticas disponíveis comercialmente na obtenção de protoplastos de M. grisea. Paralelamente, analisaram-se estabilizadores osmóticos, tempos de...

  8. Sequence analysis and expression pattern of MGTA1 gene in rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiao-yu; LIU Xiao-hong; LU Jian-ping; LIN Fu-cheng

    2005-01-01

    MGTA1, a putative fungal Zn(Ⅱ)2Cys6 transcriptional activator-encoding gene, was isolated from rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe grisea, which is homologous to CLTA1 from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum with 51% identity at protein level.MGTA1 cassette contains a 2370 bp open reading frame, consisting of 6 exons, coding a 790 amino acid peptide. MGTA1 gene exists as a single copy in genomes of 7 strains of M. grisea, and is expressed in tip hyphae, conidia, and mature appressoria of strain Guy 11.

  9. Sequence analysis and expression pattern of MGTA1 gene in rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe grisea *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao-yu; Liu, Xiao-hong; Lu, Jian-ping; Lin, Fu-cheng

    2005-01-01

    MGTA1, a putative fungal Zn(II)2Cys6 transcriptional activator-encoding gene, was isolated from rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe grisea, which is homologous to CLTA1 from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum with 51% identity at protein level. MGTA1 cassette contains a 2370 bp open reading frame, consisting of 6 exons, coding a 790 amino acid peptide. MGTA1 gene exists as a single copy in genomes of 7 strains of M. grisea, and is expressed in tip hyphae, conidia, and mature appressoria of strain Guy11. PMID:16052717

  10. Morphological evolution and genetic differentiation in Daphnia species complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gießer, S.; Mader, E.; Schwenk, K.

    1999-01-01

    Despite many ecological and evolutionary studies, the history of several species complexes within the freshwater crustacean genus Daphnia (Branchiopoda, Anomopoda) is poorly understood. In particular, the Daphnia longispina group, comprising several large-lake species, is characterized by pronounced

  11. Comparative Genome Analysis of Lolium-Festuca Complex Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czaban, Adrian; Byrne, Stephen; Sharma, Sapna;

    2015-01-01

    The Lolium-Festuca complex incorporates species from the Lolium genera and the broad leaf Fescues. Plants belonging to this complex exhibit significant phenotypic plasticity for agriculturally important traits, such as annuality/perenniality, establishment potential, growth speed, nutritional val...

  12. Diversity of the Cryptococcus neoformans-Cryptococcus gattii species complex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovers, M.; Hagen, F.; Boekhout, T.

    2008-01-01

    More than 110 years of study of the Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii species complex has resulted in an enormous accumulation of fundamental and applied biological and clinical knowledge. Recent developments in our understanding of the diversity within the species complex are

  13. Structure and Expression of Several Putative Cdc42-Interacting Proteins in Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Wu; CHEN Ji-sheng; ZHENG Shi-qin; LU Guo-dong; WANG Zong-hua

    2006-01-01

    MgCdc42 (Cdc42 in Magnaporthe grisea), with high homology to ScCdc42 (Cdc42 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae), has been demonstrated to involve in the morphogenesis and infection process. To further understand the signaling network,the putative MgCdc42-interacting proteins were analyzed. ScCdc42-interacting protein sequences were first used to BLAST against the M. grisea genome database to retrieve their corresponding analogs. Subsequently, conserved domains of these proteins were compared and expression patterns of their encoding genes in different MgCdc42 mutation states were analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. All retrieved analogs of ScCdc42-interacting proteins from the M.grisea database have conserved domains as those in S. cerevisiae. Expression of their encoding genes increased in MgCdc42CA mutant and decreased in MgCdc42KO mutant. However, MgBem1, Chm1, and MgGic1 in MgCdc42DN mutant had the same expression level as that in the wild type, although MgBem4, MgBoi2, MgCdc24, MgGic2, MgRga1,and Mst20 had decreased expression level, as expected. Overall, it is concluded that there may exist a similar Cdc42 signal pathway in M. grisea as in S. cerevisiae and MgCdc42 plays a key role in the pathway.

  14. A Rare Presentation of Concurrent Scedosporium apiospermum and Madurella grisea Eumycetoma in an Immunocompetent Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Gulati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a disfiguring, chronic granulomatous infection which affects the skin and the underlying subcutaneous tissue. We present an atypical case of recurrent mycetoma without ulceration, in a 35-year-old immunocompetent male caused by Scedosporium apiospermum sensu stricto and Madurella grisea, occurring at two separate anatomical sites.

  15. Vegetative Compatibility and Asexual Recombination in Magnaporthe grisea from Jiangsu Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-li; ZHANG Zheng-guang; ZHENG Xiao-bo

    2003-01-01

    Vegetative compatibility among isolates of different races in Magnaporthe grisea collectedfrom Jiangsu Province and asexual recombination among compatible isolates by anastomosis were tested.Twenty isolates involving seven races from diseased rice plants were paired on polished rice rose bengal mediumand incubated at 25℃ in darkness for 18 days. Among 173 pairings tested, solid hyphai fusion lines formed byanastomosis between 124 pairings, indicated that these isolates were vegetative compatible with each other.The result showed that most M. grisea isolates were vegetative compatible. Furthermore, 17 vegetative com-patible pairings between monoconidial isolates with MBCsIPTr marker and isolates with MBCrIPTs markerwere selected to detect the asexual recombination between the compatible isolates of different races. The asexu-al recombinants with MBCrIPTr marker were detected in single hyphal fragment progenies in thirteen of theseventeen pairings. The percentage of recombinants was about 0.6 - 11.3%. Results showed that vegetative com-patibility was prevailing among isolates of M. grisea in Jiangsu Province in vitro. These results also suggested thatasexual recombination may be an important mechanism for M. grisea to maintain genetic diversity in nature.

  16. Complex cellular responses to reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Mark D; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W

    2005-06-01

    Genome-wide analyses of yeast provide insight into cellular responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Many deletion mutants are sensitive to at least one ROS, but no one oxidant is representative of 'oxidative stress' despite the widespread use of a single compound such as H(2)O(2). This has major implications for studies of pathological situations. Cells have a range of mechanisms for maintaining resistance that involves either induction or repression of many genes and extensive remodeling of the transcriptome. Cells have constitutive defense systems that are largely unique to each oxidant, but overlapping, inducible repair systems. The pattern of the transcriptional response to a particular ROS depends on its concentration, and 'classical' antioxidant systems that are induced by high concentrations of ROS can be repressed when cells adapt to low concentrations of ROS.

  17. Biosynthesis of UDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose and UDP-rhamnose in pathogenic fungi Magnaporthe grisea and Botryotinia fuckeliana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinez, Viviana; Ingwers, Miles; Smith, James; Glushka, John; Yang, Ting; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2012-01-01

    .... Nevertheless, little is known about the pathways for the synthesis of these glycans. We show that rhamnose is present in glycans isolated from the rice pathogen Magnaporthe grisea and from the plant pathogen Botryotinia fuckeliana...

  18. Complexation of arsenic species in rabbit erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnomdedieu, M; Basti, M M; Styblo, M; Otvos, J D; Thomas, D J

    1994-01-01

    The binding of arsenite, As(III), and arsenate, As(V), by molecules in the intracellular compartment of rabbit erythrocytes has been studied by 1H- and 31P-NMR spectroscopy, uptake of 73As, and ultrafiltration experiments. For intact erythrocytes to which 0.1-0.4 mM arsenite was added, direct evidence was obtained for entry of 76% within 1/2 h and subsequent binding of As(III) by intracellular glutathione and induced changes in the hemoglobin structure (NMR), likely due to binding of As(III). These results were compared with the effect of addition of As(V) on intact erythrocytes and revealed that a smaller amount of As(V) (approximately 25%) enters the cells; the main fraction of As(V) enters the phosphate pathway, depletes ATP, and increases Pi. In contrast, As(III) did not affect the ATP level. Both 1H- and 31P-NMR data indicated striking differences between As(III) and As(V) behavior when incubated with rabbit erythrocytes. These differences were confirmed by 73As uptake and binding experiments. meso-2,3-Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), a dithiol ligand, released glutathione from its arsenite complexes in erythrocytes.

  19. Mitochondrial genome variability within the Candida parapsilosis species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valach, Matus; Pryszcz, Leszek P; Tomaska, Lubomir; Gacser, Attila; Gabaldón, Toni; Nosek, Jozef

    2012-09-01

    Candida parapsilosis species complex includes three closely related species, namely C. parapsilosis (sensu stricto), C. orthopsilosis, and C. metapsilosis. Unlike most other yeast lineages, members of this species complex possess a linear mitochondrial genome. Yet, its circularized mutant form was identified in strains of C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. To investigate the underlying variability, we performed comparative analyses of the complete mitochondrial DNA sequences in a collection of strains. Our results demonstrate that in contrast to C. parapsilosis and C. metapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis exhibits remarkably high nucleotide diversity whose pattern is consistent with intraspecific genetic exchange.

  20. A differential genome-wide transcriptome analysis: impact of cellular copper on complex biological processes like aging and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Servos

    Full Text Available The regulation of cellular copper homeostasis is crucial in biology. Impairments lead to severe dysfunctions and are known to affect aging and development. Previously, a loss-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the copper-sensing and copper-regulated transcription factor GRISEA of the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina was reported to lead to cellular copper depletion and a pleiotropic phenotype with hypopigmentation of the mycelium and the ascospores, affected fertility and increased lifespan by approximately 60% when compared to the wild type. This phenotype is linked to a switch from a copper-dependent standard to an alternative respiration leading to both a reduced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. We performed a genome-wide comparative transcriptome analysis of a wild-type strain and the copper-depleted grisea mutant. We unambiguously assigned 9,700 sequences of the transcriptome in both strains to the more than 10,600 predicted and annotated open reading frames of the P. anserina genome indicating 90% coverage of the transcriptome. 4,752 of the transcripts differed significantly in abundance with 1,156 transcripts differing at least 3-fold. Selected genes were investigated by qRT-PCR analyses. Apart from this general characterization we analyzed the data with special emphasis on molecular pathways related to the grisea mutation taking advantage of the available complete genomic sequence of P. anserina. This analysis verified but also corrected conclusions from earlier data obtained by single gene analysis, identified new candidates of factors as part of the cellular copper homeostasis system including target genes of transcription factor GRISEA, and provides a rich reference source of quantitative data for further in detail investigations. Overall, the present study demonstrates the importance of systems biology approaches also in cases were mutations in single genes are analyzed to

  1. Variation in virulence in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea in São Paulo State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urashima Alfredo Seiiti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistant varieties have been the preferred means to control Magnaporthe grisea, the causal organism of the rice blast disease. The objective of this study was to examine the degree of diversity of the pathogen in different rice growing regions of São Paulo State, Brazil. Blast samples collected from rice varieties in three different regions (Tremembé, Mococa and José Bonifácio were analyzed for race structure employing the Japanese rice differentials. The highest degree of virulence diversity was observed in Tremembé with 22 different races in three different varieties. Furthermore, no resistance gene in the Japanese differentials was effective to all isolates of M. grisea from São Paulo State.

  2. Recovery and Biological Properties of Nitrate Non-utilizing Mutants of Rice Blast, Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chuan-qing; ZHOU Ming-guo

    2004-01-01

    Eleven nitrate non-utilizing (nit) mutants were recovered from six isolates of Magnaporthe grisea cultured on MM media amended with 60 g/L potassium chlorate, with a frequency of 1.42 %. Some biological properties, such as growth rate, growth biomass, cultural characters, conidial production, sexual reproduction ability, and pathogenicity were compared between nit mutants and their parent isolates. Results showed that all the nit mutants were resistant to chlorate. Some important biological properties such as the growth rate on YPSA, conidial production ability on TPSA, pathogenicity, had no significant differences between nit mutants and their parent isolates. Mating type didn't change, but perithecia production ability of fertile isolates changed significantly as compared with that of their parent isolates. Therefore, the nit can be used as a genetic marker to study the genetics such as pathogenicity, fungicide resistance in Magnaporthe grisea.

  3. Genetic diversity in the Paramecium aurelia species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, Francesco; Wurmser, François; Potekhin, Alexey A; Przybos, Ewa; Lynch, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Current understanding of the population genetics of free-living unicellular eukaryotes is limited, and the amount of genetic variability in these organisms is still a matter of debate. We characterized-reproductively and genetically-worldwide samples of multiple Paramecium species belonging to a cryptic species complex, Paramecium aurelia, whose species have been shown to be reproductively isolated. We found that levels of genetic diversity both in the nucleus and in the mitochondrion are substantial within groups of reproductively compatible P. aurelia strains but drop considerably when strains are partitioned according to their phylogenetic groupings. Our study reveals the existence of discrepancies between the mating behavior of a number of P. aurelia strains and their multilocus genetic profile, a controversial finding that has major consequences for both the current methods of species assignment and the species problem in the P. aurelia complex.

  4. Detection of Sensitivity and Resistance Variation of Magnaporthe grisea to Kitazin P,Carbendazim and Tricyclazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chuan-qing; ZHOU Ming-guo; SHAO Zhen-run; LIANG Gui-mei

    2004-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-nine isolates of Magnaporthe grisea from Guangdong, Guangxi, Anhui and Jiangsu provinces of China were tested for resistance frequency to kitazin P and carbendazim, respectively by the distinctive concentration method.The resistance frequency of the isolates to kitazin P which had not been used in practice for about ten years was as high as 79.1%,and only one carbendazim-resistant isolate was detected in Gaoyao, Guangdong Province (with a frequency of 0.78%). Meanwhile,the minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) of hyphal melanization was adopted to detect the sensitivity of M. grisea to tricyclazole.There existed several different degrees of sensitivity to tricyclazole in the melanin biosynthesis of M. grisea, but no relationship was found between these MIC values completely inhibiting melanization in hyphae and the EC50 values of tricyclazole against rice blast tested in vivo. After the isolates were induced by chemical taming or UV irradiation in laboratory, kitazin P-resistant and carbendazim-resistant mutants were recovered by both the methods, but none of tricyclazole-resistant mutant was obtained.

  5. Sensitivity Detection Technique and Resistance Risk Assessment of Magnaporthe grisea to Tricyclazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In vitro detection method for the sensitivity of Magnaporthe grisea to tricyclazole was studied, and the potential resistance risk of blast disease to tricyclazole was assessed. Both EC50 of hyphal melanization (EC50-H) and minimum inhibitive concentration of melanization in appressorial (MIC-A) by inhibitortricyclazole showed positive correlation to the EC50 of tricyclazole against blast disease tested in vivo, with relative co-efficiency (R2) of 0.8995 and 0.8244, respectively. However, stability and reproducibility of EC50-H were better than those of MIC-A, suggesting that it could be used to detect the sensitivity of M. grisea to tricyclazole in vitro. Tricyclazole sensitivity of the progenies derived from single spores of the most sensitive isolate DY2 and the least sensitive isolate GY6 detected in sensitivity monitoring in 2000 was not stable, with mean EC50 values of 4.4968 μg/mL and 5.4010 μg/mL, respectively, indicating that the difference in EC50 between DY2 and GY6 was not caused probably by resistance variation. EC50 of GY6 did not increase significantly when continuously selected for twenty generations under the selection pressure of tricyclazole in vivo. However, the sensitivity of DY2 was decreased by 10-fold after selected for twenty generations.The results suggested that tricyclazole was still low resistance risk for M. grisea in China.

  6. Phylogeography in Nassarius mud snails: Complex patterns in congeneric species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Chuanliang; Li, Haitao; Zhu, Aijia; Chen, Yiyong; Zhao, Yan; Zhan, Aibin

    2017-01-01

    One major goal for phylogeographical studies is to elucidate respective roles of multiple evolutionary and ecological forces that shape the current distribution patterns. In marine and coastal ecosystems, it has been generated a common realization that species with enormous population size and pelagic larval stages can disperse across broad geographical scales, leading to weak or even no phylogeographical structure across large geographical scales. However, the violation of such realization has been frequently reported, and it remains largely unexplored on mechanisms responsible for various phylogeographical patterns observed in different species at varied geographical scales. Here, we used a species-rich genus Nassarius to assess and compare phylogeographical patterns in congeneric species, and discuss causes and consequences underlying varied phylogeographical patterns. Interestingly, we observed complex phylogeographical patterns both within single species and across multiple species, and multiple analyses showed varied levels of genetic heterogeneity among sites within and across species. Available evidence suggests that related species with similar biological characteristics may not be necessary to result in consistent phylogeographical patterns. Multiple factors, including larval ecology, interactions between dispersal and natural selection, and human activity-mediated dispersal, can partially explain the complex patterns observed in this study. Deep investigations should be performed on these factors, particularly their respective roles in determining evolutionary/ecological processes to form phylogeographical patterns in species with high dispersal capacities in marine and coastal ecosystems.

  7. Viewing the effects of species loss in complex ecological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Huayong; Tian, Wang; Li, Ran; Xu, Xiang

    2017-03-01

    Species loss is becoming a major threat to ecosystems. An urgent task in ecology is to predict the consequence of species loss which requires an extending of our traditional study of the topology of network structure to the population dynamic analyses in complex food webs. Here, via numerical simulations of the model combining structural networks with nonlinear bioenergetic models of population dynamics, we analyzed the secondary effects of species removal on biomass distribution and population stability, as well as the factors influencing these effects. We found that the biomass of target species, the nutrient supply, and the trophic level of target species were the three most significant determiners for the effects of species loss. Species loss had large negative effect on the biomass of the species with small biomass or intermediate trophic levels, especially in infertile environment. The population stability of the species with large biomass or low trophic level is easily to be influenced especially in nutrient-rich environment. Our findings indicate the species which are easily to be affected by species loss in food webs, which may help ecologists to outline a better conservation policy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Drosophila ananassae species complex: Evolutionary relationships among different members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh B.N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about genetic structure and historical demography of natural populations is central to understanding how natural selection changes genomes. Drosophila ananassae is a widespread species occurring in geographically isolated or partially isolated populations and provides a unique opportunity to investigate population structure and molecular variation. D. ananassae and its closely related species serve as a widely used model in population and evolutionary genetics. The ananassae subgroup belongs to the melanogaster species group. This subgroup contains 22 described species distributed mainly throughout Southeast Asia, with some species expanding into northeastern Australia, South Pacific and Indian subcontinent and Africa. Within the ananassae subgroup, three species complexes-ananassae, bipectinata and ercepeae have been recognized based on male genital morphology. D. ananassae and its relatives have many advantages as a model of genetic differentiation and speciation. In this review, distribution, phylogenies, hybridization, sexual isolation among D. ananassae complex have been discussed. The complex of several cryptic island species provides a useful model for evolutionary studies dealing with the mechanisms of speciation.

  9. New species of Moenkhausia Eigenmann, 1903 (Characiformes: Characidae with comments on the Moenkhausia oligolepis species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo C. Benine

    Full Text Available A new species of Moenkhausia is described from tributaries of the rio Paraguay, Brazil. The new species is diagnosed from congeners by characters related to body coloration, the number of lateral line scales, the degree of poring of the lateral line, and number of scales rows above and below the lateral line. Molecular analyses using partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene Cytochrome Oxidase I from specimens of the new species and specimens belonging to morphologically similar species demonstrated that the new species is easily differentiated by their high genetic distance and by their position in the phylogenetic hypothesis obtained through the Maximum Parsimony methodology. The analyses of three samples of M. oligolepis also revealed that they have high genetic distances and belong to different monophyletic groups suggesting that this species corresponds to a species complex rather than a single species.

  10. Pyrosequencing assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boukadida Jalel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms to the species level is important for diagnostic, therapeutic and epidemiologic perspectives. Indeed, isolates are routinely identified as belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex without further discrimination in agreement with the high genomic similarity of the M. tuberculosis complex members and the resulting complex available identification tools. Findings We herein develop a pyrosequencing assay analyzing polymorphisms within glpK, pykA and gyrB genes to identify members of the M. tuberculosis complex at the species level. The assay was evaluated with 22 M. tuberculosis, 21 M. bovis, 3 M. caprae, 3 M. microti, 2 M. bovis BCG, 2 M. pinnipedii, 1 M. canettii and 1 M. africanum type I isolates. The resulted pyrograms were consistent with conventional DNA sequencing data and successfully identified all isolates. Additionally, 127 clinical M. tuberculosis complex isolates were analyzed and were unambiguously identified as M. tuberculosis. Conclusion We proposed a pyrosequencing-based scheme for the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis complex isolates at the species level. The assay is robust, specific, rapid and can be easily introduced in the routine activity.

  11. Comparative Genome Analysis of Lolium-Festuca Complex Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czaban, Adrian; Byrne, Stephen; Sharma, Sapna

    2015-01-01

    The Lolium-Festuca complex incorporates species from the Lolium genera and the broad leaf Fescues. Plants belonging to this complex exhibit significant phenotypic plasticity for agriculturally important traits, such as annuality/perenniality, establishment potential, growth speed, nutritional value......, winter hardiness, drought tolerance and resistance to grazing. In this study we have sequenced and assembled the low copy fraction of the genomes of Lolium westerwoldicum, Lolium multiflorum, Festuca pratensis and Lolium temulentum. We have also generated de-novo transcriptome assemblies for each species......, and these have aided in the annotation of the genomic sequence. Using this data we were able to generate annotated assemblies of the gene rich regions of the four species to complement the already sequenced Lolium perenne genome. Using these gene models we have identified orthologous genes between the species...

  12. Cylindrocarpon root rot: multi-gene analysis reveals novel species within the Ilyonectria radicicola species complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabral, A.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Rego, C.; Oliveira, H.; Crous, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Ilyonectria radicicola and its Cylindrocarpon-like anamorph represent a species complex that is commonly associated with root rot disease symptoms on a range of hosts. During the course of this study, several species could be distinguished from I. radicicola sensu stricto based on morphological and

  13. Cylindrocarpon root rot: multi-gene analysis reveals novel species within the Ilyonectria radicicola species complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabral, A.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Rego, C.; Oliveira, H.; Crous, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Ilyonectria radicicola and its Cylindrocarpon-like anamorph represent a species complex that is commonly associated with root rot disease symptoms on a range of hosts. During the course of this study, several species could be distinguished from I. radicicola sensu stricto based on morphological and

  14. Development of a warning system for wheat blast caused by Pyricularia grisea Desenvolvimento de sistema de previsão de brusome causada por Pyricularia grisea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinara Araújo de Andrade Cardoso

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. blast caused by Pyricularia grisea is a new disease in Brazil and no resistant cultivars are available. The interactions between temperature and wetness durations have been used in many early warning systems. Hence, growth chamber experiments to assess the effect of different temperatures (10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35ºC and the duration of spike-wetness (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 hours on the intensity of blast in cultivar BR23 were carried out. Each temperature formed an experiment and the duration of wetness the treatments. The highest blast intensity was observed at 30°C and increased as the duration of the wetting period increased while the lowest occurred at 25°C and 10 hours of spike wetness. Regardless of the temperature, no symptoms occurred when the wetting period was less than 10 hours but at 25°C and a 40 h wetting period blast intensity exceeded 85%. These variations in blast intensity as a function of temperature are explained by a generalized beta model and as a function of the duration of spike wetness by the Gompertz model. Disease intensity was modeled as a function of both temperature and the durations of spike wetness and the resulting equation provided a precise description of the response of P. grisea to temperatures and the durations of spike wetness. This model was used to construct tables that can be used to predict the intensity of P. grisea wheat blast based on the temperatures and the durations of wheat spike wetness obtained in the field.Em experimentos conduzidos em câmaras de crescimento, com o cultivar suscetível de trigo BR 23 (Triticum aestivum L. foram avaliadas as interações entre temperaturas e durações do período de molhamento contínuo das espigas sobre a intensidade da brusone (Pyricularia grisea. As temperaturas testadas foram de 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 e 35 ºC e os períodos de duração do molhamento das espigas de 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 e 40 horas. Cada

  15. Meiofaunal cryptic species challenge species delimitation: the case of the Monocelis lineata (Platyhelminthes: Proseriata) species complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarpa, F.; Cossu, P.; Lai, T.; Sanna, D.; Curini-Galletti, M.; Casu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Given the pending biodiversity crisis, species delimitation is a critically important task in conservation biology, but its efficacy based on single lines of evidence has been questioned as it may not accurately reflect species limits and relationships. Hence, the use of multiple lines of evidence

  16. Species Delimitation and Lineage Separation History of a Species Complex of Aspens in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Honglei; Fan, Liqiang; Milne, Richard I; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yaling; Mao, Kangshan

    2017-01-01

    Species delimitation in tree species is notoriously challenging due to shared polymorphisms among species. An integrative survey that considers multiple operational criteria is a possible solution, and we aimed to test it in a species complex of aspens in China. Genetic [four chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) fragments and 14 nuclear microsatellite loci (nSSR)] and morphological variations were collected for 76 populations and 53 populations, respectively, covering the major geographic distribution of the Populus davidiana-rotundifolia complex. Bayesian clustering, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), Principle Coordinate Analysis (PCoA), ecological niche modeling (ENM), and gene flow (migrants per generation), were employed to detect and test genetic clustering, morphological and habitat differentiation, and gene flow between/among putative species. The nSSR data and ENM suggested that there are two separately evolving meta-population lineages that correspond to P. davidiana (pd) and P. rotundifolia (pr). Furthermore, several lines of evidence supported a subdivision of P. davidiana into Northeastern (NEC) and Central-North (CNC) groups, yet they are still functioning as one species. CpDNA data revealed that five haplotype clades formed a pattern of [pdNEC, ((pdCNC, pr), (pdCNC, pr))], but most haplotypes are species-specific. Meanwhile, PCA based on morphology suggested a closer relationship between the CNC group (P. davidiana) and P. rontundifolia. Discrepancy of nSSR and ENM vs. cpDNA and morphology could have reflected a complex lineage divergence and convergence history. P. davidiana and P. rotundifolia can be regarded as a recently diverged species pair that experienced parapatric speciation due to ecological differentiation in the face of gene flow. Our findings highlight the importance of integrative surveys at population level, as we have undertaken, is an important approach to detect the boundary of a group of species that have experienced complex evolutionary

  17. EUMYCETOMA BY Madurella grisea: REPORT OF THE FIRST CASE OBSERVED IN THE SOUTHERN BRAZILIAN REGION Eumicetoma por Madurella grisea: Relato do primeiro caso observado na Região Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos SEVERO

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The first case of eumycetoma by Madurella grisea occurred in Southern Brazilian Region is herein related. In addition, Brazilian literature on this subject was reviewed and, the geographic distribution of this eumycetoma is presented.É relatado o primeiro caso de eumicetoma por Madurella grisea ocorrido na Região Sul (Brasil. Além disso, a literatura brasileira correspondente foi revisada e a distribuição geográfica deste tipo de eumicetoma é apresentada.

  18. Allopatric speciation within a cryptic species complex of Australasian octopuses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Amor

    Full Text Available Despite extensive revisions over recent decades, the taxonomy of benthic octopuses (Family Octopodidae remains in a considerable flux. Among groups of unresolved status is a species complex of morphologically similar shallow-water octopods from subtropical Australasia, including: Allopatric populations of Octopus tetricus on the eastern and western coasts of Australia, of which the Western Australian form is speculated to be a distinct or sub-species; and Octopus gibbsi from New Zealand, a proposed synonym of Australian forms. This study employed a combination of molecular and morphological techniques to resolve the taxonomic status of the 'tetricus complex'. Phylogenetic analyses (based on five mitochondrial genes: 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, COI, COIII and Cytb and Generalised Mixed Yule Coalescent (GMYC analysis (based on COI, COIII and Cytb distinguished eastern and Western Australian O. tetricus as distinct species, while O. gibbsi was found to be synonymous with the east Australian form (BS = >97, PP = 1; GMYC p = 0.01. Discrete morphological differences in mature male octopuses (based on sixteen morphological traits provided further evidence of cryptic speciation between east (including New Zealand and west coast populations; although females proved less useful in morphological distinction among members of the tetricus complex. In addition, phylogenetic analyses suggested populations of octopuses currently treated under the name Octopus vulgaris are paraphyletic; providing evidence of cryptic speciation among global populations of O. vulgaris, the most commercially valuable octopus species worldwide.

  19. Pathotype Structure of Magnaporthe grisea in the Fields of Chongyang and Yuan'an in Hubei Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-lin; ZHANG Shu; LU Liang; CHANG Xiang-qian; YUAN Bing; YU Da-zhao

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to explore the pathotype structure of Magnaporthe grisea in Chongyang and Yuan'an in Hubei Province,China.[Method] From the rice-growing fields of Chongyang and Yuan'an in Hubei Province where rice blast occurs frequently,60 isolates which were pathotyped against two sets of host differentials:Chinese host differentials and CO39 NILs,were obtained.Then,20 pathotypes with the six indica host differentials(CO39 NILs) were observed,while 13 pathotypes in four race groups were observed out of the same single spore isolates with Chinese host differentials which consists of three indica cultivars and four japonica cultivars.The diversity of the pathotypes of M.grisea populations tested by CO39 NILs was 2.54 and the pathotype 137.1 occurred at predominantly high frequency(21.67%).The diversity of physiological races of M.grisea populations tested by Chinese host differentials was 1.22 and the race group ZA occurred at predominantly high frequency(73.33%).The diversity of physiological races of M.grisea in Chongyang and Yuan'an were also calculated.Overall,the diversity of pathotypes of M.grisea in Yuan'an was higher than that in Chongyang with the two sets of the host differentials.[Conclusion] This study provided current information on the pathotype spectrum of M.grisea populations in the rice fields of Hubei Province to allow the formulation of viable strategies for blast resistance breeding programs in Hubei Province.

  20. Cloning, sequencing and expression analysis of the NAR promoter activated during hyphal stage of Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The promoter of N4R gene in Magnaporthe grisea was isolated and sequenced. The promoter sequences contained the "TATA" box, the "CAAT" box, and binding sites for fungal regulatory proteins. Programs that predict promoter sequences indicated that promoter sequence lies between locations 430 and 857 of the NAR promoter fragment. GFP expression under the NAR promoter and NAR transcript analysis revealed that this promoter is activated primarily at the mycelial stage in the rice blast fungus and could be used to express native or extrinsic genes in the mycelia of the rice blast fungus.

  1. Preparation of Chitosan nanoparticles and its effect on detached rice leaves infected with Pyricularia grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Appu; Sathiyabama, Muthukrishnan

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare chitosan nanoparticles to evaluate their effect on protection of rice plants from blast fungus. Nanoparticles were prepared using the ionic gelation method by the interaction of Chitosan and sodium tripolyphosphate. The particle size, polydispersity index, zetapotential and structure was confirmed by DLS, FTIR, TEM and XRD. The Chitosan nanoparticle was evaluated for suppression of rice blast fungus (Pyricularia grisea) under the detached leaf condition. It is evident from our results that chitosan nanoparticle have potential in suppressing blast disease of rice which can be used further under field condition to protect rice plants from the devastating fungus.

  2. ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF CHITOSAN AND ONE OF ITS HYDROLYSATES ON Pyricularia grisea, Sacc. FUNGUS

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    La quitosana y sus derivados reducen marcadamente el crecimiento micelial de algunos hongos con un mayor efecto inhibitorio a elevadas concentraciones. El efecto fungistático y fungicida in vitro de la quitosana y el hidrolizado de quitosana fue investigado sobre el hongo Pyricularia grisea. El experimento se realizó en el laboratorio de Microbiología del Departamento de Fisiología y Bioquímica Vegetal del Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Agrícolas (INCA). Se encontró que ambos principios activ...

  3. Resolving cryptic species complexes of major tephritid pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrichs, Jorge; Vera, M. Teresa; De Meyer, Marc; Clarke, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on “Resolution of Cryptic Species Complexes of Tephritid Pests to Overcome Constraints to SIT Application and International Trade” was conducted from 2010 to 2015. As captured in the CRP title, the objective was to undertake targeted research into the systematics and diagnostics of taxonomically challenging fruit fly groups of economic importance. The scientific output was the accurate alignment of biological species with taxonomic names; which led to the applied outcome of assisting FAO and IAEA Member States in overcoming technical constraints to the application of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) against pest fruit flies and the facilitation of international agricultural trade. Close to 50 researchers from over 20 countries participated in the CRP, using coordinated, multidisciplinary research to address, within an integrative taxonomic framework, cryptic species complexes of major tephritid pests. The following progress was made for the four complexes selected and studied: Anastrepha fraterculus complex – Eight morphotypes and their geographic and ecological distributions in Latin America were defined. The morphotypes can be considered as distinct biological species on the basis of differences in karyotype, sexual incompatibility, post-mating isolation, cuticular hydrocarbon, pheromone, and molecular analyses. Discriminative taxonomic tools using linear and geometric morphometrics of both adult and larval morphology were developed for this complex. Bactrocera dorsalis complex – Based on genetic, cytogenetic, pheromonal, morphometric, and behavioural data, which showed no or only minor variation between the Asian/African pest fruit flies Bactrocera dorsalis, Bactrocera papayae, Bactrocera philippinensis and Bactrocera invadens, the latter three species were synonymized with Bactrocera dorsalis. Of the five target pest taxa studied, only Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera carambolae remain as

  4. Transcontinental phylogeography of the Daphnia pulex species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Teresa J; Omilian, Angela R; Costanzo, Katie S; Taylor, Derek J

    2012-01-01

    Daphnia pulex is quickly becoming an attractive model species in the field of ecological genomics due to the recent release of its complete genome sequence, a wide variety of new genomic resources, and a rich history of ecological data. Sequences of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 genes were used to assess the global phylogeography of this species, and to further elucidate its phylogenetic relationship to other members of the Daphnia pulex species complex. Using both newly acquired and previously published data, we analyzed 398 individuals from collections spanning five continents. Eleven strongly supported lineages were found within the D. pulex complex, and one lineage in particular, panarctic D. pulex, has very little phylogeographical structure and a near worldwide distribution. Mismatch distribution, haplotype network, and population genetic analyses are compatible with a North American origin for this lineage and subsequent spatial expansion in the Late Pleistocene. In addition, our analyses suggest that dispersal between North and South America of this and other species in the D. pulex complex has occurred multiple times, and is predominantly from north to south. Our results provide additional support for the evolutionary relationships of the eleven main mitochondrial lineages of the D. pulex complex. We found that the well-studied panarctic D. pulex is present on every continent except Australia and Antarctica. Despite being geographically very widespread, there is a lack of strong regionalism in the mitochondrial genomes of panarctic D. pulex--a pattern that differs from that of most studied cladocerans. Moreover, our analyses suggest recent expansion of the panarctic D. pulex lineage, with some continents sharing haplotypes. The hypothesis that hybrid asexuality has contributed to the recent and unusual geographic success of the panarctic D. pulex lineage warrants further study.

  5. Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) species complex – resurrection of E. W. Baker’s species (Acari: Tenuipalpidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevipalpus phoenicis sensu lato has been identified from countries all over the world and has been associated with many different host plant species. As a taxon, it shows a degree of morphological variation. A combination such as this often indicates that the taxon actually represents a complex o...

  6. Taxonomic confusion of two tramp ant species: Iridomyrmex anceps and Ochetellus glaber are really species complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin D. HOFFMANN; Alan N. ANDERSEN; Xiang ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    Many invasive invertebrates belong to unresolved species complexes,and have a history of misidentification and inappropriate management.Here we detail confusion surrounding the taxonomy and identification of two dolichoderine ant species,Iridomyrmex anceps Roger and Ochetellus glaber Mayr,which are commonly cited in the literature as having been spread widely by human commerce.We provide morphometric data and images strongly suggesting that these two “species” are instead complexes of species that are likely native to many regions where they are purportedly introduced.We take particular interest in the status of species referred to as I.anceps and O.glaber in China,as this is the most northerly distribution of both genera.We conclude by suggesting that many identifications of both species are likely to be unreliable,and we recommend against any management action aimed at controlling these species under the assumption that they are exotic [Current Zoology 57 (5):662-667,2011].

  7. Resistance spectra of six elite breeding lines of upland rice to Pyricularia grisea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Anne Sitarama

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the resistance spectra of six elite breeding lines of rice, developed for improved yield and grain quality, in inoculation tests in the greenhouse and in the field. Forty-six isolates of Pyricularia grisea collected from the cultivar Primavera, 31 from the cultivar Maravilha and 19 from six elite breeding lines, totaling 96 were utilized for inoculations. Out of 11 international and 15 Brazilian pathotypes, IC-1, IB-9, and BD-16, respectively, were identified as most frequent isolates collected from the cultivar Primavera. The isolates retrieved from Maravilha belong to four international and 11 Brazilian pathotypes, the predominant ones being IB-9 and IB-49 and BB-1 and BB-21, respectively. Lines CNAs 8711 and CNAs 8983 showed resistant reaction to all test isolates from Maravilha, while CNAs 8983 was susceptible to three isolates of Primavera pertaining to the pathotype IC-1. A majority of isolates exhibiting compatible reaction to Primavera were incompatible to Maravilha and vice-versa.Field assessment of rice blast utilizing the area under disease progress curve as a criterion for measuring disease severity showed significant differences among the six breeding lines. The isolates of P. grisea exhibiting differential reaction on breeding lines can be utilized in pyramiding resistance genes in new upland rice cultivars.

  8. Physiological Macro-lesions Enhanced Resistance to Blast (Magnaporthe grisea) in Rice Near-isogenic Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shi-wen; LU Ji-ying; LUO Kun; ZHANG Xiu-fu; QIAN Qian

    2005-01-01

    Roll-leaf-1 (rl-1) and spot-leaf-1 (spl-1) were two near-isogenic lines, which were obtained after 3 to 4 backcrosses withearly season indica rice Zhefu 802 as recurrent parent. Henna macro-lesions, referred as physiological or morphological markers,began to appear on leaves at 4.5- to 6.0-leaf stage. The rice seedlings were inoculated at 3.5-, 5.0- and 7.0-leaf stages with highpathogenic races Zhong A1 and Zhong B1 of Magnaporthe grisea, respectively. The resistance of rl-1, spl-1 and Zhefu 802 againstblast was significantly different. The seedlings of Zhefu 802 at 3.5- to 7.0-leaf stage were susceptible to races Zhong A1 and ZhongB1 of M. grisea, whereas those of rl-1 and spl-1 at 3.5-, 5.0- and 7.0-leaf stages were susceptible, moderately resistant andresistant, respectively. These results suggested that the enhanced resistance of ri-1 and spl-1 related to the appearance of theirmorphological marker lesions. The experiment provided a basis for studying lesion mimic and hypersensitive response inassociation with disease resistance.

  9. Single spore isolation and morphological characterization of local Malaysian isolates of rice blast fungus Magnoporthe grisea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ankitta; Ratnam, Wickneswari; Bhuiyan, Md Atiqur Rahman; Ponaya, Ariane; Jena, Khisord K.

    2015-09-01

    Rice blast is a destructive disease, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea. It causes considerable damage to rice and leads to crop loss in rice growing regions worldwide. Although fungicides can be used to control rice blast, they generate additional cost in rice production and contamination of environment and food. Therefore, the use of resistant varieties is thought to be one of the most economically and environmentally efficient ways of crop protection from the disease. Six new local Malaysian isolates of M. grisea were isolated using single spore isolation method. Five isolates were from infected leaf samples collected from Kompleks Latihan MADA, Kedah and one was from Kelantan. These isolates were identified using morphological characteristics and microscopic studies and later confirmed by ITSequences. These isolates were induced to sporulate and used for greenhouse screening on two differential rice varieties: Mahsuri (susceptible) and Pongsu Seribu 2 (resistant). Among the 6 isolates, isolate number 3 was found to be the most virulent showing high sporulation while isolate number 4 was very slow growing, and the least virulent.

  10. Cephalosporium maydis is a distinct species in the Gaeumannomyces-Harpophora species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Amgad A; Leslie, John F

    2004-01-01

    Cephalosporium maydis is an important plant pathogen whose phylogenetic position relative to other fungi has not been established clearly. We compared strains of C. maydis, strains from several other plant-pathogenic Cephalosporium spp. and several possible relatives within the Gaeumannomyces-Harpophora species complex, to which C. maydis has been suggested to belong based on previous preliminary DNA sequence analyses. DNA sequences of the nuclear genes encoding the rDNA ITS region, β-tubulin, histone H3, and MAT-2 support the hypothesis that C. maydis is a distinct taxon within the Gaeumannomyces-Harpophora species complex. Based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) profiles, C. maydis also is distinct from the other tested species of Cephalosporium, Phialophora sensu lato and members of Gaeumannomyces-Harpophora species complex, which supports its classification as Harpophora maydis. Oligonucleotide primers for H. maydis were developed that can be used in a PCR diagnostic protocol to rapidly and reliably detect and identify this pathogen. These diagnostic PCR primers will aid the detection of H. maydis in diseased maize because this fungus can be difficult to detect and isolate, and the movement of authentic cultures may be limited by quarantine restrictions.

  11. Esporulação de Pyricularia grisea em diferentes meios de cultura e regimes de luz Sporulation of Pyricularia grisea on different culture media and light regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Antunes da Cruz

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Diferentes fatores influenciam o crescimento e a esporulação dos fungos, tais como: composição do meio de cultivo, temperatura e luz. O objetivo do trabalho foi determinar o melhor meio de cultivo e regime de luz para a esporulação de Pyricularia grisea. Um isolado deste, obtido da cultivar de trigo 'BRS 194', foi repicado por disco micelial em oito meios de cultivo (farinha integral de arroz, aveia, centeio, cevada, trigo, triticale; BSA e extrato de tomate e submetido a três regimes de luz (escuro, fotoperíodo de 12h e luz contínua. As placas permaneceram por 10 dias, em câmara de crescimento sob temperatura de 23-25°C. Em seguida, o número de conídios foi determinado em câmara de Neubauer. O meio de cultivo à base de farinha integral de trigo propiciou a maior esporulação do fungo em todos os regimes de luz, e a maior esporulação ocorreu em regime de luz contínua para todos os meios de cultivos testados. Os meios de arroz e BSA propiciaram uma menor produção de conídios pelo fungo.A set of conditions is necessary for the growth and sporulation of fungi, particularly the composition of culture media, temperature and light. The objective of this research was to determine the ideal culture medium and light regime for the sporulation of P. grisea. Micelial discs of an isolate, obtained from cultivar 'BRS 194' of wheat, were transferred to eight culture media (rice wholemeal, oat, rye, barley, wheat, triticale, PSA and tomato sauce and kept in the dark, under continuous light and 12h of light. In a growing chamber, for 10 days at 23-25°C. Then, the number of conidia was determined in a Neubauer chamber. The higher sporulation, regardless of light regime, was observed on wheat wholemeal culture medium. The continuous light provided higher sporulation this fungus in all culture medium. The lowest production of conidia was observed on rice wholemeal and PSA culture media.

  12. Systematics and Population Genetics of a Phylogenetic Species Within the Fusarium solani Species Complex Associated with Human Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) is a monophyletic group comprising dozens of phylogenetic and biological species, and represents the most common species complex associated with fusarial infections of mammals, particularly mycotic keratitis. Previous work found that approximately 75% of k...

  13. In vitro photodynamic inactivation of Sporothrix schenckii complex species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Mario, Débora Alves; Denardi, Laura Bedin; Brayer Pereira, Daniela Isabel; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2014-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been applied successfully against cutaneous and subcutaneous mycoses. We applied methylene blue as a photosensitizing agent and light emitting diode (InGaAlP) against Sporothrix schenckii complex species in an in vitro assay. The viability of the conidia was determined by counting colony-forming units. Methylene blue in conjunction with laser irradiation was able to inhibit the growth of all tested samples. The in vitro inhibition of Sporothrix spp. isolates by laser light deserves in vivo experimental and clinical studies since it may be a promising treatment for cutaneous and subcutaneous sporotrichosis.

  14. Exotic plant species around Jeongeup Research Complex and RFT industrial complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Cha, Min Kyoung; Ryu, Tae Ho; Lee, Yun Jong; Kim, Jin Hong [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    In Shinjeong-dong of Jeongeup, there are three government-supported research institutes and an RFT industrial complex which is currently being established. Increased human activities can affect flora and fauna as a man-made pressure onto the region. As a baseline study, status of exotic plants was investigated prior to a full operation of the RFT industrial complex. A total of 54 species and 1 variety of naturalized or introduced plants were found in the study area. Among them, three species (Ambrosia artemisifolia var. elatior, Rumex acetocella and Aster pilosus) belong to 'nuisance species', and four species (Phytolacca americana, Iopomoea hederacea, Ereechtites hieracifolia and Rudbeckia laciniata) to ‘monitor species’ designated by the ministry of Environment. Some of naturalized trees and plants were intentionally introduced in this area, while others naturally immigrated. Physalis angulata seems to immigrate in the study area in the form of mixture with animal feeds as its distribution coincided with the transportation route of the animal feeds. Liquidambar styraciflua is amenable to the ecological investigation on the possible expansion of the species to the nearby Naejang National Park as its leave shape and autumn color are very similar to those of maple trees. The number of naturalized plants around the RFT industrial complex will increase with an increase in floating population, in human activities in association with constructions of factories and operations of the complex. The result of this study provides baseline data for assessing the ecological change of the region according to the operation of the RFT industrial complex.

  15. Social complexity parallels vocal complexity: a comparison of three nonhuman primate species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène eBOUCHET

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Social factors play a key role in the structuring of vocal repertoires at the individual level, notably in nonhuman primates. Some authors suggested that, at the species level too, social life may have driven the evolution of communicative complexity, but this has rarely been empirically tested. Here, we use a comparative approach to address this issue. We investigated vocal variability, at both the call type and the repertoire levels, in three forest-dwelling species of Cercopithecinae presenting striking differences in their social systems, in terms of social organization as well as social structure. We collected female call recordings from twelve De Brazza’s monkeys (Cercopithecus neglectus, six Campbell’s monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli and seven red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus housed in similar conditions. First, we noted that the level of acoustic variability and individual distinctiveness found in several call types was related to their importance in social functioning. Contact calls, essential to intra-group cohesion, were the most individually distinctive regardless of the species, while threat calls were more structurally variable in mangabeys, the most ‘despotic’ of our three species. Second, we found a parallel between the degree of complexity of the species’ social structure and the size, diversity, and usage of its vocal repertoire. Mangabeys (most complex social structure called twice as often as guenons and displayed the largest and most complex repertoire. De Brazza’s monkeys (simplest social structure displayed the smallest and simplest repertoire. Campbell’s monkeys displayed an intermediate pattern. Providing evidence of higher levels of vocal variability in species presenting a more complex social system, our results are in line with the theory of a social-vocal coevolution of communicative abilities, opening new perspectives for comparative research on the evolution of communication systems in

  16. Ancestral polymorphism at the major histocompatibility complex (MHCIIß in the Nesospiza bunting species complex and its sister species (Rowettia goughensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rensburg Alexandra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is an important component of the vertebrate immune system and is frequently used to characterise adaptive variation in wild populations due to its co-evolution with pathogens. Passerine birds have an exceptionally diverse MHC with multiple gene copies and large numbers of alleles compared to other avian taxa. The Nesospiza bunting species complex (two species on Nightingale Island; one species with three sub-species on Inaccessible Island represents a rapid adaptive radiation at a small, isolated archipelago, and is thus an excellent model for the study of adaptation and speciation. In this first study of MHC in Nesospiza buntings, we aim to characterize MHCIIß variation, determine the strength of selection acting at this gene region and assess the level of shared polymorphism between the Nesospiza species complex and its putative sister taxon, Rowettia goughensis, from Gough Island. Results In total, 23 unique alleles were found in 14 Nesospiza and 2 R. goughensis individuals encoding at least four presumably functional loci and two pseudogenes. There was no evidence of ongoing selection on the peptide binding region (PBR. Of the 23 alleles, 15 were found on both the islands inhabited by Nesospiza species, and seven in both Nesospiza and Rowettia; indications of shared, ancestral polymorphism. A gene tree of Nesospiza MHCIIß alleles with several other passerine birds shows three highly supported Nesospiza-specific groups. All R. goughensis alleles were shared with Nesospiza, and these alleles were found in all three Nesospiza sequence groups in the gene tree, suggesting that most of the observed variation predates their phylogenetic split. Conclusions Lack of evidence of selection on the PBR, together with shared polymorphism across the gene tree, suggests that population variation of MHCIIß among Nesospiza and Rowettia is due to ancestral polymorphism rather than local selective

  17. Delimiting Species Boundaries within a Paraphyletic Species Complex: Insights from Morphological, Genetic, and Molecular Data on Paramecium sonneborni (Paramecium aurelia species complex, Ciliophora, Protozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Sawka, Natalia

    2015-09-01

    The demarcation of boundaries between protist species is often problematic because of the absence of a uniform species definition, the abundance of cryptic diversity, and the occurrence of convergent morphology. The ciliates belonging to the Paramecium aurelia complex, consisting of 15 species, are a good model for such systematic and evolutionary studies. One member of the complex is P. sonneborni, previously known only from one stand in Texas (USA), but recently found in two new sampling sites in Cyprus (creeks running to Salt Lake and Oroklini Lake near Larnaca). The studied Paramecium sonneborni strains (from the USA and Cyprus) reveal low viability in the F1 and F2 generations of interstrain hybrids and may be an example of ongoing allopatric speciation. Despite its molecular distinctiveness, we postulate that P. sonneborni should remain in the P. aurelia complex, making it a paraphyletic taxon. Morphological studies have revealed that some features of the nuclear apparatus of P. sonneborni correspond to the P. aurelia spp. complex, while others are similar to P. jenningsi and P. schewiakoffi. The observed discordance indicates rapid splitting of the P. aurelia-P. jenningsi-P. schewiakoffi group, in which genetic, morphological, and molecular boundaries between species are not congruent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue culture of three species of Laurencia complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Songdong; Wu, Xunjian; Yan, Binlun; He, Lihong

    2010-05-01

    To establish a micropropagation system of three Laurencia complex species ( Laurencia okamurai, Laurencia tristicha, and Chondrophycus undulatus) by tissue culture techniques, we studied the regeneration characteristics and optimal culture conditions of axenic algal fragments cultured on solid medium and in liquid medium. Regeneration structures were observed and counted regularly under a reverse microscope to investigate the regeneration process, polarity and optimal illumination, and temperature and salinity levels. The results show that in most cultures of the three species, we obtained bud regeneration on solidified medium with 0.5% agar and in liquid medium. Rhizoid-like regeneration was filamentous and developed from the lower cut surface of fragments in L. okamurai, but was discoid and developed from the apical back side of bud regeneration in L. tristicha and C. undulatus. Regeneration polarity was localized to the apical part of algal fronds in all three species, and on fragments cut from the basal part of algae buds could develop from both the upper and the lower cut surfaces. Buds could develop from both the medullary and the cortical portions in L. okamurai and C. undulatus, while in L. tristicha, buds only emerged from the cortex. The optimal culture conditions for L. okamurai were 4 500 lx, 20°C and 35 (salinity); for C. undulatus, 4 500 lx, 20°C and 30; and for L. tristicha, 4 500 lx, 25°C and 30.

  19. Mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex generates reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Fiskum, Gary; Chinopoulos, Christos; Lorenzo, Beverly J; Browne, Susan E; Patel, Mulchand S; Beal, M Flint

    2004-09-08

    Mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to contribute to cell death caused by a multitude of pathological conditions. The molecular sites of mitochondrial ROS production are not well established but are generally thought to be located in complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain. We measured H(2)O(2) production, respiration, and NADPH reduction level in rat brain mitochondria oxidizing a variety of respiratory substrates. Under conditions of maximum respiration induced with either ADP or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone,alpha-ketoglutarate supported the highest rate of H(2)O(2) production. In the absence of ADP or in the presence of rotenone, H(2)O(2) production rates correlated with the reduction level of mitochondrial NADPH with various substrates, with the exception of alpha-ketoglutarate. Isolated mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHC) complexes produced superoxide and H(2)O(2). NAD(+) inhibited ROS production by the isolated enzymes and by permeabilized mitochondria. We also measured H(2)O(2) production by brain mitochondria isolated from heterozygous knock-out mice deficient in dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld). Although this enzyme is a part of both KGDHC and PDHC, there was greater impairment of KGDHC activity in Dld-deficient mitochondria. These mitochondria also produced significantly less H(2)O(2) than mitochondria isolated from their littermate wild-type mice. The data strongly indicate that KGDHC is a primary site of ROS production in normally functioning mitochondria.

  20. Resistance Evaluation of Some Hybrid Rice, Conventional Early Indica and Late Japonica Rice to Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ying; Adreit Henry; ZHU Xu-dong; Milazzo Joelle; CHEN Hong-qi; Tharreau Didier

    2003-01-01

    Thirty isolates of Magnaporthe grisea collected from 18 provinces/cities representing 21 pathotypes and 9 different lineages were inoculated to rice varieties with known resistance genes and some hybrid rices,conventional early indica and late japonica varieties cultivated recently in China.Virulence spectrum of the 30 isolates was very different,showing that they recognize numerous different resistance genes.Varieties also revealed very different resistance patterns showing that they carry different resistance genes or combinations of resistance genes.On the basis of comparisons with international differential varieties with known resistance genes,resistance genes in certain Chinese varieties could be speculated.The results indicated that some of them were resistant to most of the isolates tested and that they could be of interest as resistance sources for hybrid parents or to be planted in the field directly.

  1. The integrative taxonomic approach reveals host specific species in an encyrtid parasitoid species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Chesters

    Full Text Available Integrated taxonomy uses evidence from a number of different character types to delimit species and other natural groupings. While this approach has been advocated recently, and should be of particular utility in the case of diminutive insect parasitoids, there are relatively few examples of its application in these taxa. Here, we use an integrated framework to delimit independent lineages in Encyrtus sasakii (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Encyrtidae, a parasitoid morphospecies previously considered a host generalist. Sequence variation at the DNA barcode (cytochrome c oxidase I, COI and nuclear 28S rDNA loci were compared to morphometric recordings and mating compatibility tests, among samples of this species complex collected from its four scale insect hosts, covering a broad geographic range of northern and central China. Our results reveal that Encyrtus sasakii comprises three lineages that, while sharing a similar morphology, are highly divergent at the molecular level. At the barcode locus, the median K2P molecular distance between individuals from three primary populations was found to be 11.3%, well outside the divergence usually observed between Chalcidoidea conspecifics (0.5%. Corroborative evidence that the genetic lineages represent independent species was found from mating tests, where compatibility was observed only within populations, and morphometric analysis, which found that despite apparent morphological homogeneity, populations clustered according to forewing shape. The independent lineages defined by the integrated analysis correspond to the three scale insect hosts, suggesting the presence of host specific cryptic species. The finding of hidden host specificity in this species complex demonstrates the critical role that DNA barcoding will increasingly play in revealing hidden biodiversity in taxa that present difficulties for traditional taxonomic approaches.

  2. Population structure and dynamics of Magnaporthe grisea in the Indian Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J; Nelson, R J; Zeigler, R S

    1999-07-01

    The population genetics of Magnaporthe grisea, the rice blast pathogen, were analyzed in a center of rice diversity (the Uttar Pradesh hills of the Indian Himalayas) using multilocus and single-, or low-copy, DNA markers. Based on DNA fingerprinting with the multilocus probe MGR586 and single-locus probes, 157 haplotypes clustered into 56 lineages (at >/=70% MGR586 band similarity, each with unique single-locus profiles) and high diversity indices were detected among 458 isolates collected from 29 sites during 1992-1995. Most valleys sampled had distinct populations (73% of the lineages were site specific) with some containing one or a few lineages, confirming the importance of clonal propagation, and others were very diverse. Widely distributed lineages suggested that migration occurs across the region and into the Indo-Gangetic plains. Repeated sampling at one site, Matli, (170 isolates, 1992-1995) yielded 19 lineages and diversity significantly greater than that reported from similar samples from Colombia and the Philippines. Analysis of allelic associations using pairwise comparisons and multilocus variance analysis failed to reject the hypothesis of gametic phase equilibrium. The Matli population shifted from highly diverse in 1992 to almost complete dominance by one lineage in 1995. Such population dynamics are consistent with recombination followed by differential survival of clonal descendants of recombinant progeny. At another site, Ranichauri, population (n = 84) composition changed from 2 to 11 lineages over 2 yr and yielded additional evidence for equilibrium. Sexually fertile and hermaphrodite isolates of both mating types were recovered from rice in both Matli and Ranichauri. We demonstrate that Himalayan M. grisea populations are diverse and dynamic and conclude that the structure of some populations may be affected to some extent by sexual recombination.

  3. Distribution of Magnaporthe grisea Population and Virulence of Predominant Race in Jiangsu Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-feng; CHEN Zhi-yi; HU Ming; LI Lian; LIU You-zhou

    2004-01-01

    Three hundred and forty-two mono-conidial isolates were obtained from rice blast specimens collected from five typical areas in Jiangsu Province during 2000-2002. The isolates could be classified into seven groups, thirty races when assessed with seven Chinese differential rice cultivars. The race ZG1 was predominant one of Magnaporthe grisea with a frequency of 65.00% in 2000, 56.90% in 2001 and 60.38% in 2002; the races ZB and ZC groups were also important in Jiangsu Province. By inoculating 130 ZG1 race isolates on thirteen Japanese cultivars with known resistance genes, forty-two pathotypes were found. Among them,30.77% of ZG1 race isolates had virulence to rice cultivars Shin 2(Pita-ks, Pi-eh), K1 (Pi-ta), Pi 4(Pi-ta2, Pi-sh), being the predominant pathotype, indicating the resistances of cultivars Shin 2 (Pita-ks, Pi-sh), K1 (Pi-ta), Pi 4(Pi-ta2, Pi-sh) had lost the resistance in Jiangsu Province. Rice cultivar K3(Pi-kh) was highly resistant to Magnaporthe grisea with 100% resistance frequency, and resistant to the two single isolates, 2003-184(ZC5) and 2003-14-1(ZG1), however, it was infected by a mixture of the two isolates. It was suggested that the change in virulence stemmed from the interaction of different pathotype isolates was one of the reasons that made variety lose its resistance.

  4. The Fusarium solani species complex: ubiquitous pathogens of agricultural importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-01

    Members of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) are capable of causing disease in many agriculturally important crops. The genomes of some of these fungi include supernumerary chromosomes that are dispensable and encode host-specific virulence factors. In addition to genomics, this review summarizes the known molecular mechanisms utilized by members of the FSSC in establishing disease. Kingdom Fungi; Phylum Ascomycota; Class Sordariomycetes; Order Hypocreales; Family Nectriaceae; Genus Fusarium. Members of the FSSC collectively have a very broad host range, and have been subdivided previously into formae speciales. Recent phylogenetic analysis has revealed that formae speciales correspond to biologically and phylogenetically distinct species. Typically, FSSC causes foot and/or root rot of the infected host plant, and the degree of necrosis correlates with the severity of the disease. Symptoms on above-ground portions of the plant can vary greatly depending on the specific FSSC pathogen and host plant, and the disease may manifest as wilting, stunting and chlorosis or lesions on the stem and/or leaves. Implementation of agricultural management practices, such as crop rotation and timing of planting, can reduce the risk of crop loss caused by FSSC. If available, the use of resistant varieties is another means to control disease in the field. http://genome.jgi-psf.org/Necha2/Necha2.home.html. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  5. New species of Moenkhausia Eigenmann, 1903 (Characiformes: Characidae with comments on the Moenkhausia oligolepis species complex

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    Ricardo C. Benine

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Moenkhausia is described from tributaries of the rio Paraguay, Brazil. The new species is diagnosed from congeners by characters related to body coloration, the number of lateral line scales, the degree of poring of the lateral line, and number of scales rows above and below the lateral line. Molecular analyses using partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene Cytochrome Oxidase I from specimens of the new species and specimens belonging to morphologically similar species demonstrated that the new species is easily differentiated by their high genetic distance and by their position in the phylogenetic hypothesis obtained through the Maximum Parsimony methodology. The analyses of three samples of M. oligolepis also revealed that they have high genetic distances and belong to different monophyletic groups suggesting that this species corresponds to a species complex rather than a single species.Uma nova espécie de Moenkhausia é descrita de tributários do rio Paraguai, Brasil. Essa nova espécie é diagnosticada de seus congêneres por caracteres relacionados ao padrão de colorido do corpo, número de escamas da linha lateral, grau de desenvolvimento dos poros sensoriais na linha lateral e número de séries de escamas acima e abaixo da linha lateral. Um análise molecular usando sequências parciais do gene mitocondrial Citocromo Oxidase I de espécimes representativos da nova espécie e espécimes pertencentes a espécies morfologicamente similares demonstrou que a nova espécie é facilmente diferenciada por sua elevada distância genética e por sua posição na hipótese filogenética obtida pelo método de máxima parcimônia. A análise de três amostras de M. oligolepis também revelou que estas apresentam distâncias genéticas elevadas e pertencem a grupos monofiléticos distintos, sugerindo que esta espécie corresponda a um complexo de espécies e não uma única espécie.

  6. The Complex Conductivity Signature of Geobacter Species in Geological Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I.; Atekwana, E. A.; Sarkisova, S.; Achang, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Complex Conductivity (CC) technique is a promising biogeophysical approach for sensing microbially-induced changes in geological media because of its low-invasive character and sufficient sensitivity to enhanced microbial activity in the near subsurface. Geobacter species have been shown to play important roles in the bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with petroleum and landfill leachate. This capability is based on the ability of Geobacter species to reduce Fe(III) by transferring of electrons from the reduced equivalents to Fe(III) rich minerals through respiration chain and special metallic-like conductors - pili. Only the cultivation of Geobacter species on Fe(III) oxides specifically express pili biosynthesis. Moreover, mutants that cannot produce pili are unable to reduce Fe(III) oxides. However, little is known about the contribution of these molecular conductors (nanowires) to the generation of complex conductivity signatures in geological media. Here, we present the results about the modulation of CC signatures in geological media by Geobacter sulfurreducens (G.s.). Cultures of wild strain G.s. and its pilA(-) mutant were anaerobically cultivated in the presence of the pair of such donors and acceptors of electrons: acetate - fumarate, and acetate - magnetite under anaerobic conditions. Each culture was injected in CC sample holders filled either with N2-CO2 mix (planktonic variant) or with this gases mix and glass beads, d=1 mm, (porous medium variant). Both strains of G.s. proliferated well in a medium supplemented with acetate-fumarate. However, pilA(-) mutant did not multiply in a medium supplemented with ox-red pair yeast extract - magnetite. This observation confirmed that only wild pilA(+) strain is capable of the dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) within magnetite molecule. The measurement of CC responses from planktonic culture of G.s. wild strain grown with acetate-fumarate did not show linear correlation with their magnitudes but

  7. Induced Pib Expression and Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea are Compromised by Cytosine Demethylation at Critical Promoter Regions in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Xia, Qiong; Kou, Hongping; Wang, Dan; Lin, Xiuyun; Wu, Ying; Xu, Chunming; Xing, Shaochen; Liu, Bao

    2011-10-01

    Pib is a well-characterized rice blast-resistance gene belonging to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily. Expression of Pib was low under non-challenged conditions, but strongly induced by the blast-causing fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea, thereby conferring resistance to the pathogen. It is generally established that cytosine methylation of the promoter-region often plays a repressive role in modulating expression of the gene in question. We report here that two critical regions of the Pib promoter were heavily CG cytosine-methylated in both cultivars studied. Surprisingly, induced expression of Pib by M. grisea infection did not entail its promoter demethylation, and partial demethylation by 5-azacytidine-treatment actually reduced Pib expression relative to wild-type plants. Accordingly, the blast disease-resistance was compromised in the 5'-azaC-treated plants relative to wild-type. In contrast, the disease susceptibility was not affected by the 5'-azaC treatment in another two rice cultivars that did not contain the Pib gene, ruling out effects of other R genes and non-specific genotoxic effects by the drug-treatment as a cause for the compromised Pib-conditioned blast-resistance. Taken together, our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation plays a novel enhancing role in conditioning high-level of induced expression of the Pib gene in times of M. grisea infection, and its conferred resistance to the pathogen.

  8. Phytochromes Regulate SA and JA Signaling Pathways in Rice and Are Required for Developmentally Controlled Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Zhi Xie; Yan-Jiu Xue; Jin-Jun Zhoua; Bin Zhang; Hong Chang; Makoto Takano

    2011-01-01

    Old leaves of wild-type rice plants (Oryza sativa L. Cv. Nipponbare)are more resistant to blast fungus (Mag-naporthe grisea)than new leaves. In contrast, both old and new leaves of the rice phytochrome triple mutant (phyAphyB-phyC)are susceptible to blast fungus. We demonstrate that pathogenesis-related class 1 (PR1)proteins are rapidly and strongly induced during M. Grisea infection and following exogenous jasmonate (JA)or salicylic acid (SA)exposure in the old leaves, but not in the new leaves of the wild-type. In contrast, the accumulation of PR1 proteins was significantly attenuated in old and new leaves of the phyAphyBphyC mutant. These results suggest that phytochromes are required for the induction of PR1 proteins in rice. Basal transcription levels of Prla and PRlb were substantially higher in the wild-type as compared to the phyAphyBphyC mutant, suggesting that phytochromes also are required for basal expression of PR1 genes. Moreover, the transcript levels of genes known to function in SA-or JA-dependent defense pathways were regulated by leaf age and functional phytochromes. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that phytochromes are required in rice for age-related resistance to M, grisea and may indirectly increase PR1 gene expression by regulating SA-and JA-dependent defense pathways.

  9. Multifaceted roles of metabolic enzymes of the Paracoccidioides species complex

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    Caroline Maria Marcos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides species are dimorphic fungi, and are the etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, a serious disease of multiple organs. The large number of tissues colonized by this fungus suggests the presence of a variety of surface molecules involved in adhesion. A surprising finding is that the majority of enzymes in the glycolytic pathway, tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and glyoxylate cycle in Paracoccidioides spp. has adhesive properties that aid in the interaction with the host extracellular matrix, and so act as ‘moonlighting’ proteins. Moonlighting proteins have multiple functions and add another dimension to cellular complexity, while benefiting cells in several ways. This phenomenon occurs in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. For example, moonlighting proteins from the glycolytic pathway or TCA cycle can play roles in bacterial pathogens, either by acting as proteins secreted in a conventional pathway or not and/or as cell surface component that facilitate adhesion or adherence . This review outlines the multifuncionality exposed by a variety of Paracoccidioides spp. enzymes including aconitase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, triose phosphate isomerase, fumarase and enolase. The roles that moonlighting activities play in the virulence characteristics of this fungus and several other human pathogens during their interactions with the host are discussed.

  10. Fusarium dimerum Species Complex (Fusarium penzigii) Keratitis After Corneal Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Anália; Costa, Esmeralda; Marques, Marco; Quadrado, Maria João; Tomé, Rui

    2016-12-01

    We report a case of a keratitis associated with a Fusarium penzigii-a Fusarium dimerum species complex (FDSC)-in a 81-year-old woman after a corneal trauma with a tree branch. At patient admittance, slit lamp biomicroscopy revealed an exuberant chemosis, an inferior corneal ulcer with an associated inflammatory infiltrate, a central corneal abscess, bullous keratopathy and posterior synechiae. Corneal scrapes were obtained for identification of bacteria and fungi, and the patient started antibiotic treatment on empirical basis. Few days later, the situation worsened with the development of hypopyon. By that time, Fusarium was identified in cultures obtained from corneal scrapes and the patient started topical amphotericin B 0.15 %. Upon the morphological identification of the Fusarium as a FDSC, and since there was no clinical improvement, the treatment with amphotericin B was suspended and the patient started voriconazole 10 mg/ml, eye drops, hourly and voriconazole 200 mg iv, every 12 h for 1 month. The hypopyon resolved and the inflammatory infiltrate improved, but the abscess persisted at the last follow-up visit. The molecular identification revealed that the FDSC was a F. penzigii.

  11. Complex patterns of speciation in cosmopolitan "rock posy" lichens--discovering and delimiting cryptic fungal species in the lichen-forming Rhizoplaca melanophthalma species-complex (Lecanoraceae, Ascomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Steven D; Fankhauser, Johnathon D; Leavitt, Dean H; Porter, Lyndon D; Johnson, Leigh A; St Clair, Larry L

    2011-06-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that in some cases morphology-based species circumscription of lichenized fungi misrepresents the number of existing species. The cosmopolitan "rock posy" lichen (Rhizoplaca melanophthalma) species-complex includes a number of morphologically distinct species that are both geographically and ecologically widespread, providing a model system to evaluate speciation in lichen-forming ascomycetes. In this study, we assembled multiple lines of evidence from nuclear DNA sequence data, morphology, and biochemistry for species delimitation in the R. melanophthalma species-complex. We identify a total of ten candidate species in this study, four of which were previously recognized as distinct taxa and six previously unrecognized lineages found within what has been thus far considered a single species. Candidate species are supported using inferences from multiple empirical operational criteria. Multiple instances of sympatry support the view that these lineages merit recognition as distinct taxa. Generally, we found little corroboration between morphological and chemical characters, and previously unidentified lineages were morphologically polymorphic. However, secondary metabolite data supported one cryptic saxicolous lineage, characterized by orsellinic-derived gyrophoric and lecanoric acids, which we consider to be taxonomically significant. Our study of the R. melanophthalma species-complex indicates that the genus Rhizoplaca, as presently circumscribed, is more diverse in western North American than originally perceived, and we present our analyses as a working example of species delimitation in morphologically cryptic and recently diverged lichenized fungi.

  12. Ongoing speciation in the Tibetan plateau Gymnocypris species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renyi; Peng, Zuogang; Li, Guogang; Zhang, Cunfang; Tang, Yongtao; Gan, Xiaoni; He, Shunping; Zhao, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Local adaptation towards divergent ecological conditions often results in genetic differentiation and adaptive phenotypic divergence. To illuminate the ecological distinctiveness of the schizothoracine fish, we studied a Gymnocypris species complex consisting of three morphs distributed across four bodies of water (the Yellow River, Lake Qinghai, the Ganzi River and Lake Keluke) in the Northeast Tibetan Plateau. We used a combination of mitochondrial (16S rRNA and Cyt b) and nuclear (RAG-2) genetic sequences to investigate the phylogeography of these morphs based on a sample of 277 specimens. Analysis of gill rakers allowed for mapping of phenotypic trajectories along the phylogeny. The phylogenetic and morphological analyses showed that the three sparsely rakered morphs were present at two extremes of the phylogenetic tree: the Yellow River morphs were located at the basal phylogenetic split, and the Lake Keluke and Ganzi River morphs at the peak, with the densely rakered Lake Qinghai morphs located between these two extremes. Age estimation further indicated that the sparsely rakered morphs constituted the oldest and youngest lineages, whereas the densely rakered morph was assigned to an intermediate-age lineage. These results are most compatible with the process of evolutionary convergence or reversal. Disruptive natural selection due to divergent habitats and dietary preferences is likely the driving force behind the formation of new morphs, and the similarities between their phenotypes may be attributable to the similarities between their forms of niche tracking associated with food acquisition. This study provides the first genetic evidence for the occurrence of convergence or reversal in the schizothoracine fish of the Tibetan Plateau at small temporal scales.

  13. Ongoing speciation in the Tibetan plateau Gymnocypris species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyi Zhang

    Full Text Available Local adaptation towards divergent ecological conditions often results in genetic differentiation and adaptive phenotypic divergence. To illuminate the ecological distinctiveness of the schizothoracine fish, we studied a Gymnocypris species complex consisting of three morphs distributed across four bodies of water (the Yellow River, Lake Qinghai, the Ganzi River and Lake Keluke in the Northeast Tibetan Plateau. We used a combination of mitochondrial (16S rRNA and Cyt b and nuclear (RAG-2 genetic sequences to investigate the phylogeography of these morphs based on a sample of 277 specimens. Analysis of gill rakers allowed for mapping of phenotypic trajectories along the phylogeny. The phylogenetic and morphological analyses showed that the three sparsely rakered morphs were present at two extremes of the phylogenetic tree: the Yellow River morphs were located at the basal phylogenetic split, and the Lake Keluke and Ganzi River morphs at the peak, with the densely rakered Lake Qinghai morphs located between these two extremes. Age estimation further indicated that the sparsely rakered morphs constituted the oldest and youngest lineages, whereas the densely rakered morph was assigned to an intermediate-age lineage. These results are most compatible with the process of evolutionary convergence or reversal. Disruptive natural selection due to divergent habitats and dietary preferences is likely the driving force behind the formation of new morphs, and the similarities between their phenotypes may be attributable to the similarities between their forms of niche tracking associated with food acquisition. This study provides the first genetic evidence for the occurrence of convergence or reversal in the schizothoracine fish of the Tibetan Plateau at small temporal scales.

  14. Danos em trigo causados pela infecção de Pyricularia grisea Damages in wheat caused by infection of Pyricularia grisea

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    Augusto César Pereira Goulart

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo quantificar os danos no rendimento de grãos, causados pela infecção natural da brusone (Pyricularia grisea, em diferentes cultivares e linhagens de trigo, na safra agrícola de 2004, no Município de Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul, isoladamente da ocorrência de outras doenças. Trabalhou-se em condições naturais e sem o emprego de fungicidas, em parcelas experimentais, na Embrapa Agropecuária Oeste e em Indápolis. Após o espigamento, todas as espigas de trigo com sintomas típicos da brusone (ponto preto de infecção na ráquis foram identificadas e marcadas, em uma área de 1m². As espigas doentes e sadias foram colhidas, contadas e trilhadas separadamente. Os danos foram calculados com base na diferença entre o rendimento real e a estimativa do rendimento potencial. Os resultados mostraram que os danos e a incidência da brusone variaram de acordo com as cultivares/linhagens testadas e a região tritícola avaliada. As menores incidências da brusone foram observadas na cv. BR 18-Terena, com 27% e 42% de espigas infectadas, nos ensaios instalados na Embrapa Agropecuária Oeste e em Indápolis, respectivamente. O dano médio devido à brusone, registrado nos 20 materiais testados, foi de 387kg/ha, o que representou 10,5% do rendimento de grãos, no ensaio instalado na Embrapa Agropecuária Oeste. Em Indápolis, os danos foram maiores, atingindo, em média, 609kg/ha (13,0% do rendimento de grãos. As perdas em peso por espiga foram maiores (63,4% quando a infecção foi precoce em comparação à infecção tardia (46,0%. Verificou-se que houve uma compensação das perdas causadas pela doença, através do melhor desenvolvimento de grãos produzidos abaixo do ponto de estrangulamento da ráquis. Observou-se, também, que em função das espigas brancas sobressaírem-se das demais, pode-se superestimar as perdas.This work was carried out in order to quantify the damages in wheat yield due to natural

  15. Chromosomal evidence for a putative cryptic species in the Gymnotus carapo species-complex (Gymnotiformes, Gymnotidae

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    De Souza Augusto CP

    2008-11-01

    represent cryptic sympatric species in the G. carapo species complex. We speculate that the chromosomal speciation occurred recently, allowing insufficient time for the fixation of other differences following post-zygotic isolation.

  16. In silico Analysis of the Potential Infection Mechanisms of Magnaporthe grisea from Horizontal Gene Transfer Hypothesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyang Li; Ying Wang; Hao Peng; Hejiao Bian; Mingwei Min; Longfei Chen; Qian Liu; Jinku Bao

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer(HGT)has long been considered as a principal force for an organism to gain novel genes in genome evolution. Homology search, phylogenetic analysis and nucleotide composition analysis are three major objective approaches to arguably determine the occurrence and directionality of HGT. Here, 21 genes that possess the potential to horizontal transfer were acquired from the whole genome of Magnaporthe grisea according to annotation, among which three can-didate genes(corresponding protein accession numbers are EAA55123, EAA47200 and EAA52136)were selected for further analysis. According to BLAST homology results, we subsequently conducted phylogenetic analysis of the three candidate HGT genes. Moreover, nucleotide composition analysis was conducted to further validate these HGTs. In addition, the functions of the three candidate genes were searched in COG database. Consequently, we conclude that the gene encoding protein EAA55123 is transferred from Clostridium perfringens. Another HGT event is between EAA52136 and a certain metazoan's corresponding gene, but the direction remains uncertain. Yet, EAA47200 is not a transferred gene.

  17. A Lipoxygenase Pathway Is Activated in Rice after Infection with the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, H; Shida, K; Peng, Y L; Furusawa, I; Shishiyama, J; Aibara, S; Morita, Y

    1991-09-01

    Lipoxygenase (LOX) and lipid hydroperoxide-decomposing activity (LHDA) markedly increased in the fifth leaves of rice (Oryza sativa cv Aichiasahi) after infection with the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea. The increases in the enzyme activities were significantly higher in response to infection with an incompatible strain (race 131) compared with infection with a compatible strain (race 007) of the fungus. Using ion-exchange chromatography, we isolated three LOX activities (leaf LOX-1, -2, -3) from both uninoculated and infected leaves. The activity of leaf LOX-3, in particular, increased in the incompatible race-infected leaves. The leaf LOX-3 had a pH optimum of 5.0 and produced preferentially 13-l-hydroperoxy-9,11 (Z,E)-octadecadienoic acid (13-HPODD) from linoleic acid. 13-HPODD and 13-l-hydroxy-9,11 (Z,E)-octadecadienoic acid, one of the reaction products from 13-HPODD by LHDA, were highly inhibitory to the germination of conidia of the fungus. The present study provides correlative evidence for important roles of LOX and LHDA in the resistance response of rice against the blast fungus.

  18. Hyper-cryptic marine meiofauna: species complexes in Nemertodermatida.

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    Inga Meyer-Wachsmuth

    Full Text Available Nemertodermatida are microscopically small, benthic marine worms. Specimens of two nominal species, Sterreria psammicola and Nemertinoides elongatus from 33 locations worldwide were sequenced for three molecular markers. Species delimitation and validation was done using gene trees, haplotype networks and multilocus Bayesian analysis. We found 20 supported species of which nine: Nemertinoides glandulosum n.sp., N. wolfgangi n.sp., Sterreria boucheti n.sp., S. lundini n.sp., S. martindalei n.sp., S. monolithes n.sp., S. papuensis n.sp., S. variabilis n.sp. and S. ylvae n.sp., are described including nucleotide-based diagnoses. The distribution patterns indicate transoceanic dispersal in some of the species. Sympatric species were found in many cases. The high level of cryptic diversity in this meiofauna group implies that marine diversity may be higher than previously estimated.

  19. Review of the Trifolium amabile Complex in Peru, with the Description of a New Species

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    Eduardo Antonio Molinari-Novoa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe Trifolium absconditum sp. nov., a new species of the T. amabile complex from South America. It differs from other Peruvian Trifolia of the complex by having smaller stipules, leaves, inflorescences, and floral pieces. A key for Peruvian species of the complex is presented, and typifications for them are made when necessary and material is available in Peruvian herbaria. Thus, the number of Peruvian species in the complex is elevated to three: T. amabile, T. absconditum, and a resurrected T. peruvianum. Finally, it is suggested that Chile must be excluded from the distribution of this complex.

  20. Evidence of tree species' range shifts in a complex landscape.

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    Vicente J Monleon

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to change the distribution of species. For long-lived, sessile species such as trees, tracking the warming climate depends on seedling colonization of newly favorable areas. We compare the distribution of seedlings and mature trees for all but the rarest tree species in California, Oregon and Washington, United States of America, a large, environmentally diverse region. Across 46 species, the mean annual temperature of the range of seedlings was 0.120°C colder than that of the range of trees (95% confidence interval from 0.096 to 0.144°C. The extremes of the seedling distributions also shifted towards colder temperature than those of mature trees, but the change was less pronounced. Although the mean elevation and mean latitude of the range of seedlings was higher than and north of those of the range of mature trees, elevational and latitudinal shifts run in opposite directions for the majority of the species, reflecting the lack of a direct biological relationship between species' distributions and those variables. The broad scale, environmental diversity and variety of disturbance regimes and land uses of the study area, the large number and exhaustive sampling of tree species, and the direct causal relationship between the temperature response and a warming climate, provide strong evidence to attribute the observed shifts to climate change.

  1. Colletotrichum caudatum s.l. is a species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Jo Anne

    2014-06-01

    Colletotrichum caudatum sensu lato is a widespread fungal pathogen of warm-season grasses. The fungus is easily differentiated from other Colletotrichum species through the presence of a unique filiform appendage at the apex of the conidium. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of four DNA sequence markers from 21 isolates of C. caudatum s.l. from six grass hosts recovered the morphospecies as a well-supported monophyletic group. Although closely related to other Colletotrichum species pathogenic to warm-season grasses (e.g. C. sublineola, C. falcatum, C. navitas, C. graminicola), the sister taxon placement of C. caudatum remained unclear. Four major subgroups and three monotypic lineages were identified from the C. caudatum s.l. isolates. Despite the presence of localized, taxon-specific incongruence between gene trees and evidence for recombination in the dataset, application of genealogical concordance species recognition criteria diagnosed the four subgroups as phylogenetic species. Traditional morphology-based species concept defines C. caudatum as one species with a broad host range; however, multi-locus phylogenetic analyses refuted this model. Instead, isolates from different hosts were mainly segregated into different lineages. In particular, isolates from the type locale and host (USA, Sorghastrum nutans) collected within a 400 km radius were divided into three distinct species that corresponded with the three sampling sites. These data established that traditional morphological and ecological features are not informative for recognition of taxa within C. caudatum s.l., although there is some evidence that some species may be host specific. To stabilize the application of the name C. caudatum, DNA sequence data from the lectotype was generated, an epitype strain consistent with the type was designated and illustrated, and an emended description of C. caudatum sensu stricto is provided. Colletotrichum alcornii, C. baltimorense, C. somersetense, and C. zoysiae

  2. Quantifying ecological, morphological, and genetic variation to delimit species in the coast horned lizard species complex (Phrynosoma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaché, Adam D; Koo, Michelle S; Spencer, Carol L; Papenfuss, Theodore J; Fisher, Robert N; McGuire, Jimmy A

    2009-07-28

    Lineage separation and divergence form a temporally extended process whereby populations may diverge genetically, morphologically, or ecologically, and these contingent properties of species provide the operational criteria necessary for species delimitation. We inferred the historical process of lineage formation in the coast horned lizard (Phrynosoma coronatum) species complex by evaluating a diversity of operational species criteria, including divergence in mtDNA (98 specimens; 2,781 bp) and nuclear loci (RAG-1, 1,054 bp; BDNF 529 bp), ecological niches (11 bioclimatic variables; 285 unique localities), and cranial horn shapes (493 specimens; 16 landmarks). A phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA recovers 5 phylogeographic groups arranged latitudinally along the Baja California Peninsula and in California. The 2 southern phylogeographic groups exhibit concordance between genetic, morphological, and ecological divergence; however, differentiation is weak or absent at more recent levels defined by phylogeographic breaks in California. Interpreting these operational species criteria together suggests that there are 3 ecologically divergent and morphologically diagnosable species within the P. coronatum complex. Our 3-species taxonomic hypothesis invokes a deep coalescence event when fitting the mtDNA genealogy into the species tree, which is not unexpected for populations that have diverged recently. Although the hypothesis that the 3 phylogeographic groups distributed across California each represent distinctive species is not supported by all of the operational species criteria evaluated in this study, the conservation status of the imperiled populations represented by these genealogical units remains critical.

  3. Quantifying ecological, morphological, and genetic variation to delimit species in the coast horned lizard species complex (Phrynosoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leache, A.D.; Koo, M.S.; Spencer, C.L.; Papenfuss, T.J.; Fisher, R.N.; McGuire, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Lineage separation and divergence form a temporally extended process whereby populations may diverge genetically, morphologically, or ecologically, and these contingent properties of species provide the operational criteria necessary for species delimitation.We inferred the historical process of lineage formation in the coast horned lizard (Phrynosoma coronatum) species complex by evaluating a diversity of operational species criteria, including divergence in mtDNA (98 specimens; 2,781 bp) and nuclear loci (RAG-1, 1,054 bp; BDNF 529 bp), ecological niches (11 bioclimatic variables; 285 unique localities), and cranial horn shapes (493 specimens; 16 landmarks). A phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA recovers 5 phylogeographic groups arranged latitudinally along the Baja California Peninsula and in California. The 2 southern phylogeographic groups exhibit concordance between genetic, morphological, and ecological divergence; however, differentiation is weak or absent at more recent levels defined by phylogeographic breaks in California. Interpreting these operational species criteria together suggests that there are 3 ecologically divergent and morphologically diagnosable species within the P. coronatum complex. Our 3-species taxonomic hypothesis invokes a deep coalescence event when fitting the mtDNA genealogy into the species tree, which is not unexpected for populations that have diverged recently. Although the hypothesis that the 3 phylogeographic groups distributed across California each represent distinctive species is not supported by all of the operational species criteria evaluated in this study, the conservation status of the imperiled populations represented by these genealogical units remains critical.

  4. Assessing species boundaries using multilocus species delimitation in a morphologically conserved group of neotropical freshwater fishes, the Poecilia sphenops species complex (Poeciliidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin C Bagley

    Full Text Available Accurately delimiting species is fundamentally important for understanding species diversity and distributions and devising effective strategies to conserve biodiversity. However, species delimitation is problematic in many taxa, including 'non-adaptive radiations' containing morphologically cryptic lineages. Fortunately, coalescent-based species delimitation methods hold promise for objectively estimating species limits in such radiations, using multilocus genetic data. Using coalescent-based approaches, we delimit species and infer evolutionary relationships in a morphologically conserved group of Central American freshwater fishes, the Poecilia sphenops species complex. Phylogenetic analyses of multiple genetic markers (sequences of two mitochondrial DNA genes and five nuclear loci from 10/15 species and genetic lineages recognized in the group support the P. sphenops species complex as monophyletic with respect to outgroups, with eight mitochondrial 'major-lineages' diverged by ≥2% pairwise genetic distances. From general mixed Yule-coalescent models, we discovered (conservatively 10 species within our concatenated mitochondrial DNA dataset, 9 of which were strongly supported by subsequent multilocus Bayesian species delimitation and species tree analyses. Results suggested species-level diversity is underestimated or overestimated by at least ~15% in different lineages in the complex. Nonparametric statistics and coalescent simulations indicate genealogical discordance among our gene tree results has mainly derived from interspecific hybridization in the nuclear genome. However, mitochondrial DNA show little evidence for introgression, and our species delimitation results appear robust to effects of this process. Overall, our findings support the utility of combining multiple lines of genetic evidence and broad phylogeographical sampling to discover and validate species using coalescent-based methods. Our study also highlights the

  5. Assessing species boundaries using multilocus species delimitation in a morphologically conserved group of neotropical freshwater fishes, the Poecilia sphenops species complex (Poeciliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Justin C; Alda, Fernando; Breitman, M Florencia; Bermingham, Eldredge; van den Berghe, Eric P; Johnson, Jerald B

    2015-01-01

    Accurately delimiting species is fundamentally important for understanding species diversity and distributions and devising effective strategies to conserve biodiversity. However, species delimitation is problematic in many taxa, including 'non-adaptive radiations' containing morphologically cryptic lineages. Fortunately, coalescent-based species delimitation methods hold promise for objectively estimating species limits in such radiations, using multilocus genetic data. Using coalescent-based approaches, we delimit species and infer evolutionary relationships in a morphologically conserved group of Central American freshwater fishes, the Poecilia sphenops species complex. Phylogenetic analyses of multiple genetic markers (sequences of two mitochondrial DNA genes and five nuclear loci) from 10/15 species and genetic lineages recognized in the group support the P. sphenops species complex as monophyletic with respect to outgroups, with eight mitochondrial 'major-lineages' diverged by ≥2% pairwise genetic distances. From general mixed Yule-coalescent models, we discovered (conservatively) 10 species within our concatenated mitochondrial DNA dataset, 9 of which were strongly supported by subsequent multilocus Bayesian species delimitation and species tree analyses. Results suggested species-level diversity is underestimated or overestimated by at least ~15% in different lineages in the complex. Nonparametric statistics and coalescent simulations indicate genealogical discordance among our gene tree results has mainly derived from interspecific hybridization in the nuclear genome. However, mitochondrial DNA show little evidence for introgression, and our species delimitation results appear robust to effects of this process. Overall, our findings support the utility of combining multiple lines of genetic evidence and broad phylogeographical sampling to discover and validate species using coalescent-based methods. Our study also highlights the importance of testing for

  6. Systematics of the Dendropsophus leucophyllatus species complex (Anura: Hylidae): Cryptic diversity and the description of two new species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminer, Marcel A.; Milá, Borja; Jansen, Martin; Fouquet, Antoine; Venegas, Pablo J.; Chávez, Germán; Lougheed, Stephen C.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic data in studies of systematics of Amazonian amphibians frequently reveal that purportedly widespread single species in reality comprise species complexes. This means that real species richness may be significantly higher than current estimates. Here we combine genetic, morphological, and bioacoustic data to assess the phylogenetic relationships and species boundaries of two Amazonian species of the Dendropsophus leucophyllatus species group: D. leucophyllatus and D. triangulum. Our results uncovered the existence of five confirmed and four unconfirmed candidate species. Among the confirmed candidate species, three have available names: Dendropsophus leucophyllatus, Dendropsophus triangulum, and Dendropsophus reticulatus, this last being removed from the synonymy of D. triangulum. A neotype of D. leucophyllatus is designated. We describe the remaining two confirmed candidate species, one from Bolivia and another from Peru. All confirmed candidate species are morphologically distinct and have much smaller geographic ranges than those previously reported for D. leucophyllatus and D. triangulum sensu lato. Dendropsophus leucophyllatus sensu stricto occurs in the Guianan region. Dendropsophus reticulatus comb. nov. corresponds to populations in the Amazon basin of Brazil, Ecuador, and Peru previously referred to as D. triangulum. Dendropsophus triangulum sensu stricto is the most widely distributed species; it occurs in Amazonian Ecuador, Peru and Brazil, reaching the state of Pará. We provide accounts for all described species including an assessment of their conservation status. PMID:28248998

  7. Insights into the genus Diaporthe: phylogenetic species delimitation in the D. eres species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Diaporthe comprises pathogenic, endophytic and saprobic species with both temperate and tropical distributions. Cryptic diversification, phenotypic plasticity and extensive host associations have long complicated accurate identifications of species in this genus. The delimitation of the ge...

  8. Induced Pib Expression and Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea are Compromised by Cytosine Demethylation at Critical Promoter Regions in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Li; Qiong Xia; Hongping Kou; Dan Wang; Xiuyun Lin; Ying Wu; Chunming Xu; Shaochen Xing

    2011-01-01

    Pib is a well-characterized rice blast-resistance gene belonging to the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily.Expression of Pib was low under non-challenged conditions,but strongly induced by the blast-causing fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea,thereby conferring resistance to the pathogen.It is generally established that cytosine methylation of the promoter-region often plays a repressive role in modulating expression of the gene in question.We report here that two critical regions of the Pib promoter were heavily CG cytosine-methylated in both cultivars studied.Surprisingly,induced expression of Pib by M.grisea infection did not entail its promoter demethylation,and partial demethylation by 5-azacytidine-treatment actually reduced Pib expression relative to wildtype plants.Accordingly,the blast disease-resistance was compromised in the 5’-azaC-treated plants relative to wild-type.In contrast,the disease susceptibility was not affected by the 5’-azaC treatment in another two rice cultivars that did not contain the Pib gene,ruling out effects of other R genes and non-specific genotoxic effects by the drug-treatment as a cause for the compromised Pib-conditioned blast-resistance.Taken together,our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation plays a novel enhancing role in conditioning high-level of induced expression of the Pib gene in times of M.grisea infection,and its conferred resistance to the pathogen.

  9. Sharpening the species boundaries in the Cladonia mediterranea complex (Cladoniaceae, Ascomycota)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino-Bodas, R.; Pérez-Vargas, I.; Stenroos, S.; Ahti, T.; Burgaz, A.R.

    2016-01-01

    The complex Cladonia mediterranea belongs to the section Impexae and is formed by C. azorica, C. macaronesica and C. mediterranea. These species are basically distributed in the Mediterranean and Macaronesian Regions. In the present work the limits between the species of this complex are re-examined

  10. Scorpions from Mexico: From Species Diversity to Venom Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibáñez-López, Carlos E; Francke, Oscar F; Ureta, Carolina; Possani, Lourival D

    2015-12-24

    Scorpions are among the oldest terrestrial arthropods, which are distributed worldwide, except for Antarctica and some Pacific islands. Scorpion envenomation represents a public health problem in several parts of the world. Mexico harbors the highest diversity of scorpions in the world, including some of the world's medically important scorpion species. The systematics and diversity of Mexican scorpion fauna has not been revised in the past decade; and due to recent and exhaustive collection efforts as part of different ongoing major revisionary systematic projects, our understanding of this diversity has changed compared with previous assessments. Given the presence of several medically important scorpion species, the study of their venom in the country is also important. In the present contribution, the diversity of scorpion species in Mexico is revised and updated based on several new systematic contributions; 281 different species are recorded. Commentaries on recent venomic, ecological and behavioral studies of Mexican scorpions are also provided. A list containing the most important peptides identified from 16 different species is included. A graphical representation of the different types of components found in these venoms is also revised. A map with hotspots showing the current knowledge on scorpion distribution and areas explored in Mexico is also provided.

  11. Molecular approaches to identify cryptic species and polymorphic species within a complex community of fig wasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hua Xiao

    Full Text Available Cryptic and polymorphic species can complicate traditional taxonomic research and both of these concerns are common in fig wasp communities. Species identification is very difficult, despite great effort and the ecological importance of fig wasps. Herein, we try to identify all chalcidoid wasp species hosted by one species of fig, using both morphological and molecular methods. We compare the efficiency of four different DNA regions and find that ITS2 is highly effective for species identification, while mitochondrial COI and Cytb regions appear less reliable, possibly due to the interference signals from either nuclear copies of mtDNA, i.e. NUMTs, or the effects of Wolbachia infections. The analyses suggest that combining multiple markers is the best choice for inferring species identifications as any one marker may be unsuitable in a given case.

  12. New Stands of Species of the Paramecium aurelia Complex; is the Occurrence of Particular Species Limited by Temperature Barriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa; Prajer, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of ciliates, especially the Paramecium aurelia complex, has not yet been studied in many parts of the world, or sampling was done only occasionally. Generally, the southern hemisphere still awaits investigation. In North America only the USA was studied in greater detail; the majority of species of the complex were there recorded. In Asia, more frequent sampling was performed only in Japan and Asiatic Russia. Europe was studied more carefully, however, a different number of habitats was studied in particular zones of Europe, the least in the southern zone. New stands of P. tetraurelia , P. sexaurelia, P. octaurelia, and P. novaurelia were revealed as a result of the present investigations carried out in Africa (Mozambique--P. tetraurelia, P. sexaurelia), Asia (Indonesia--P. sexaurelia), borderland of Asia and Europe (Georgia--P. octaurelia), and Europe (Macedonia--P. tetraurelia and Romania--P. novaurelia). Are climatic zones the main factor limiting the occurrence of species of the P. aurelia complex? Analysis of data on the distribution of the P. aurelia species complex in warm "tropical" zones on different continents may suggest such preferences for some species, including P. sexaurelia, P. octaurelia, P. tredecaurelia, P. quadecaurelia. The first two of these species were recorded herein in warm or "tropical" zone.

  13. Environmental Screening for the Scedosporium apiospermum Species Complex in Public Parks in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luplertlop, Natthanej; Pumeesat, Potjaman; Muangkaew, Watcharamat; Wongsuk, Thanwa; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The Scedosporium apiospermum species complex, comprising filamentous fungal species S. apiospermum sensu stricto, S. boydii, S. aurantiacum, S. dehoogii and S. minutispora, are important pathogens that cause a wide variety of infections. Although some species (S. boydii and S. apiospermum) have been isolated from patients in Thailand, no environmental surveys of these fungi have been performed in Thailand or surrounding countries. In this study, we isolated and identified species of these fungi from 68 soil and 16 water samples randomly collected from 10 parks in Bangkok. After filtration and subsequent inoculation of samples on Scedo-Select III medium, colony morphological examinations and microscopic observations were performed. Scedosporium species were isolated from soil in 8 of the 10 parks, but were only detected in one water sample. Colony morphologies of isolates from 41 of 68 soil samples (60.29%) and 1 of 15 water samples (6.67%) were consistent with that of the S. apiospermum species complex. Each morphological type was selected for species identification based on DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the β-tubulin gene. Three species of the S. apiospermum species complex were identified: S. apiospermum (71 isolates), S. aurantiacum (6 isolates) and S. dehoogii (5 isolates). In addition, 16 sequences could not be assigned to an exact Scedosporium species. According to our environmental survey, the S. apiospermum species complex is widespread in soil in Bangkok, Thailand.

  14. Epiverta Dieke (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Epilachnini): A Complex of Species, Not a Monotypic Genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Lizhi; Szawaryn, Karol; Wang, Xingmin

    2017-01-01

    Rich sampling and modern research techniques, including SEM, revealed that rarely collected epilachnine species Epiverta chelonia is a complex of four closely related species: E. chelonia (Mader, 1933), E. albopilosa, E. angusta, and E. supinata spp. nov. All Epiverta species are described and illustrated, a key to the species and a distribution map are provided. Lectotype of Solanophila cheloniaMader, 1933 is designated and its type locality delimited to Yunnan Province, Deqin County (China).

  15. Revisionary study on European species of the Empria candidata complex (Hymenoptera, Symphyta, Tenthredinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Jan; Kula, Emanuel

    2015-04-09

    Two species of the Empria candidata species complex, E. candidata (Fallén, 1808) and E. magnicornis (Eversmann, 1864) spec. rev., comb. nov., are revised and redescribed. The males and larvae of both species are identified, described and the males are associated with the corresponding females. The species are redefined based on the revision of the available types. Lectotypes are designated for Tenthredo (Allantus) repanda Klug, 1816 and Tenthredo (Macrophya) magnicornis Eversmann, 1864.

  16. Species-specific PCR to describe local-scale distributions of four cryptic species in the Penicillium chrysogenum complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Alexander G P; Fisher, Matthew C; Henk, Daniel A

    2013-10-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is a ubiquitous airborne fungus detected in every sampled region of the Earth. Owing to its role in Alexander Fleming's serendipitous discovery of Penicillin in 1928, the fungus has generated widespread scientific interest; however its natural history is not well understood. Research has demonstrated speciation within P. chrysogenum, describing the existence of four cryptic species. To discriminate the four species, we developed protocols for species-specific diagnostic PCR directly from fungal conidia. 430 Penicillium isolates were collected to apply our rapid diagnostic tool and explore the distribution of these fungi across the London Underground rail transport system revealing significant differences between Underground lines. Phylogenetic analysis of multiple type isolates confirms that the 'Fleming species' should be named Penicillium rubens and that divergence of the four 'Chrysogenum complex' fungi occurred about 0.75 million yr ago. Finally, the formal naming of two new species, Penicillium floreyi and Penicillium chainii, is performed.

  17. Systematics of the Trichoderma harzianum species complex and the re-identification of commercial biocontrol strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaverri, Priscila; Branco-Rocha, Fabiano; Jaklitsch, Walter; Gazis, Romina; Degenkolb, Thomas; Samuels, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum is known as a cosmopolitan, ubiquitous species associated with a wide variety of substrates. It is possibly the most commonly used name in agricultural applications involving Trichoderma, including biological control of plant diseases. While various studies have suggested that T. harzianum is a species complex, only a few cryptic species are named. In the present study the taxonomy of the T. harzianum species complex is revised to include at least 14 species. Previously named species included in the complex are T. guizhouense, T. harzianum, and T. inhamatum. Two new combinations are proposed, T. lentiforme and T. lixii. Nine species are described as new, T. afarasin, T. afroharzianum, T. atrobrunneum, T. camerunense, T. endophyticum, T. neotropicale, T. pyramidale, T. rifaii and T. simmonsii. We isolated Trichoderma cultures from four commercial biocontrol products reported to contain T. harzianum. None of the biocontrol strains were identified as T. harzianum s. str. In addition, the widely applied culture 'T. harzianum T22' was determined to be T. afroharzianum. Some species in the T. harzianum complex appear to be exclusively endophytic, while others were only isolated from soil. Sexual states are rare. Descriptions and illustrations are provided. A secondary barcode, nuc translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1) is needed to identify species in this complex.

  18. Delimitating cryptic species in the Gracilaria domingensis complex (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta) using molecular and morphological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, Goia de M; Gurgel, C Frederico D; Costa, Emmanuelle da S; de Jesus, Priscila B; Oliveira, Mariana C; Oliveira, Eurico C; Davis, Charles C; Nunes, José Marcos de Castro

    2016-12-01

    Species in the genus Gracilaria that display conspicuously flattened vegetative morphologies are a taxonomically challenging group of marine benthic red algae. This is a result of their species richness, morphological similarity, and broad phenotypic plasticity. Within this group, the Gracilaria domingensis complex is one of the most common, conspicuous, and morphologically variable species along the tropical western Atlantic Ocean. Previous research has identified that members of this complex belong to two distantly related clades. However, despite this increased phylogentic resolution, species delimitations within each of these clades remain unclear. Our study assessed the species diversity within this difficult complex using morphological and molecular data from three genetic markers (cox1, UPA, and rbcL). We additionally applied six single-marker species delimitation methods (SDM: ABGD, GMYCs, GMYCm, SPN, bPTP, and PTP) to rbcL, which were largely in agreement regarding species delimitation. These results, combined with our analysis of morphology, indicate that the G. domingensis complex includes seven distinct species, each of which are not all most closely related: G. cervicornis; a ressurected G. ferox; G. apiculata subsp. apiculata; a new species, Gracilaria baiana sp. nov.; G. intermedia subsp. intermedia; G. venezuelensis; and G. domingensis sensu stricto, which includes the later heterotypic synonym, G. yoneshigueana. Our study demonstrates the value of multipronged strategies, including the use of both molecular and morphological approaches, to decipher cryptic species of red algae.

  19. Systematics of the Platyrrhinus helleri species complex (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae), with descriptions of two new species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazco, Paúl M.; Gardner, Alfred L.; Patterson, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Platyrrhinus is a diverse genus of small to large phyllostomid bats characterized by a comparatively narrow uropatagium thickly fringed with hair, a white dorsal stripe, comparatively large inner upper incisors that are convergent at the tips, and three upper and three lower molars. Eighteen species are currently recognized, the majority occurring in the Andes. Molecular, morphological, and morphometric analyses of specimens formerly identified as Platyrrhinus helleri support recognition of Platyrrhinus incarum as a separate species and reveal the presence of two species from western and northern South America that we describe herein as new (Platyrrhinus angustirostris sp. nov. from eastern Colombia and Ecuador, north-eastern Peru, and Venezuela and Platyrrhinus fusciventris sp. nov. from Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, Trinidad and Tobago, northern Brazil, eastern Ecuador, and southern Venezuela). These two new species are sister taxa and, in turn, sister to Platyrrhinus incarum.

  20. True lemurs…true species - species delimitation using multiple data sources in the brown lemur complex

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Species are the fundamental units in evolutionary biology. However, defining them as evolutionary independent lineages requires integration of several independent sources of information in order to develop robust hypotheses for taxonomic classification. Here, we exemplarily propose an integrative framework for species delimitation in the “brown lemur complex” (BLC) of Madagascar, which consists of seven allopatric populations of the genus Eulemur (Primates: Lemuridae), which were s...

  1. Cytochrome b sequence data suggest rapid speciation within the Paramecium aurelia species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Dana; Przyboś, Ewa; Fokin, Sergei I; Schlegel, Martin; Berendonk, Thomas U

    2008-11-01

    We investigated mitochondrial Cytochrome b sequences from all 15 members of the enigmatic Paramecium aurelia species complex (Ciliophora). The analysis revealed high genetic distances between the different P. aurelia species (6.1-19.8%) and a largely unresolved, star-like phylogenetic tree. This result strongly supports a rapid radiation in the evolutionary history of this species complex and it correlates well with the hypothesis that the extant species diversity may have originated from the neutral consequences of a whole genome duplication in the common ancestor of P. aurelia.

  2. Epitypification of Fusisporium (Fusarium) solani and its assignment to a common phylogenetic species in the Fusarium solani species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroers, Hans-Josef; Samuels, Gary J; Zhang, Ning; Short, Dylan P G; Juba, Jean; Geiser, David M

    2016-01-01

    Fusisporium solani was described as the causal agent of a dry rot of potato in Germany in the mid 19th century. As Fusarium solani, the species became known as a plurivorous plant pathogen, endophyte, decomposer, and opportunistic pathogen of humans and nutritional symbiont of insects. In parallel, it became evident that the morphologically defined species F. solani represents a phylogenetically and biologically complex group of often morphologically cryptic species that has come to be known in part as the F. solani species complex (FSSC), accommodating several formae speciales and mating populations/biological species. The FSSC currently includes more than 60 phylogenetic species. Several of these have been named, but the majority remains unnamed and the identity of F. solani sensu stricto is unclear. To promote further taxonomic developments in the FSSC, lectoand epitypification is proposed for Fusisporium solani Although no type material for F. solani is known to exist, the species was abundantly illustrated in the protologue. Thus, a relevant illustration provided by von Martius is selected as the lectotype. The epitype selected here originates from a rotting potato collected in a field in Slovenia. This strain causes a dry rot of artificially inoculated potatoes. It groups in the heretofore unnamed phylogenetic species 5, which is nested within clade 3 of the FSSC (FSSC 5). Members of this phylogenetic species have a wide geographic distribution and include soil saprotrophs and plant and opportunistic human pathogens. This typification is consistent with the original description of Fusisporium solani and the concept of F. solani as a widely distributed soil inhabitant and pathogen. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  3. Defining species boundaries in the Merodon avidus complex (Diptera, Syrphidae using integrative taxonomy, with the description of a new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Ačanski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Several recent studies have detected and described complexes of cryptic and sibling species in the genus Merodon (Diptera, Syrphidae. One representative of these complexes is the Merodon avidus complex that contains four sibling species, which have proven difficult to distinguish using traditional morphological characters. In the present study, we use two geometric morphometric approaches, as well as molecular characters of the 5’-end of the mtDNA COI gene, to delimit sibling taxa. Analyses based on these data were used to strengthen species boundaries within the complex, and to validate the status of a previously-recognized cryptic taxon from Lesvos Island (Greece, here described as Merodon megavidus Vujić & Radenković sp. nov. Geometric morphometric results of both wing and surstylus shape confirm the present classification for three sibling species-M. avidus (Rossi, 1790, M. moenium Wiedemann in Meigen, 1822 and M. ibericus Vujić, 2015-and, importantly, clearly discriminate the newly-described taxon Merodon megavidus sp. nov. In addition to our geometric morphometric results, supporting characters were obtained from molecular analyses of mtDNA COI sequences, which clearly differentiated M. megavidus sp. nov. from the other members of the M. avidus complex. Molecular analyses revealed that the earliest divergence of M. ibericus occurred around 800 ky BP, while the most recent separation happened between M. avidus and M. moenium around 87 ky BP.

  4. Characterization of the Punta Toro species complex (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Michael R.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Guzman, Hilda; Quiroz, Evelia; Savji, Nazir; Carrera, Jean-Paul; Bussetti, Ana Valeria; Ladner, Jason T.; Ian Lipkin, W.; Tesh, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Punta Toro virus (PTV), a member of the PTV complex, is a relatively common causative agent of febrile illness in Panama that is often misdiagnosed as ‘dengue’ or ‘influenza’. Currently, only two named members make up this species complex, PTV and Buenaventura virus (BUEV). Genomic and antigenic characterization of 17 members of the PTV complex, nine of which were isolated from human acute febrile illness cases, reveals that this species complex is composed of six distant viruses. We propose to add four additional new viruses, designated Leticia virus, Cocle virus, Campana virus and Capira virus. PMID:25934793

  5. Pheromone Analyses of the Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) Cryptic Species Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Radka Břízová; Adriana L. Mendonça; Lucie Vanícková; Alana L. Mendonça; Carlos Eduardo Da Silva; Aleš Tomčala; Beatriz Aguiar Jordão Paranhos; Vanessa Simões Dias; Iara Sordi Joachim-Bravo; Michal Hoskovec; Blanka Kalinová; Ruth R. Do Nascimento

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The South American fruit fly Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) cryptic species complex is presently one of the most studied pest models in terms of speciation and population mating compatibility...

  6. Fish predation on a Daphnia hybrid species complex: A factor explaining species coexistence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaak, P.; Hoekstra, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies on the life histories of Daphnia hybrids and their parental species have revealed that hybrids can combine an intermediate size with a relatively high reproductive rate, which might explain their success in many European lakes. Based on this information, we formulated the temporal

  7. Description of three new species of Moenkhausia (Teleostei, Characiformes, Characidae) with the definition of the Moenkhausia jamesi species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrolli, Marina G; Benine, Ricardo C

    2015-07-20

    From the examination of extensive comparative material currently identified as M. jamesi we verified that there are, at least, three new species under this name. These, along with M. jamesi and M. justae, form what we herein called the M. jamesi species complex, by sharing the following group of characters: a short maxilla, with its distal margin not exceeding anterior third of the second infraorbital; first through third teeth of the inner row of premaxilla and first and second dentary teeth with cusps arranged in a pronounced arch, humeral spot positioned between the fourth and seventh scales of the lateral line and extending up to four scale rows above the lateral line and one scale row below the lateral line, and a vertically oval to round spot at the base of the caudal fin rays. Moenkhausia ischyognatha sp. n., from Rio Xingu basin, differs from the other species of the complex by its lower head depth. Moenkhausia alesis sp. n., from the river system Tocantins-Araguaia, differs from M. jamesi, M. ischyognatha, and M. sthenosthoma by the number of scale rows above the lateral line. Moenkhausia sthenosthoma sp. n., from the Rio Madeira basin, differs from M. jamesi by the number of scale rows between the lateral line and the midventral scale series. Moenkhausia justae can be diagnosed from the other species of the complex by having a tri to pentacuspidate tooth on the maxilla.

  8. Genetic diversity and evolutionary history of the Schizothorax species complex in the Lancang River (upper Mekong).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weitao; Shen, Yanjun; Gan, Xiaoni; Wang, Xuzhen; He, Shunping

    2016-09-01

    The genus Schizothorax (Cyprinidae), one of the most diverse genera of ichthyofauna of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP), is a good candidate for investigating patterns of genetic variation and evolutionary mechanisms. In this study, sequences from the mitochondrial control region, the cytochrome b gene, and two nuclear genes were used to re-examine the genetic diversity and investigate the evolutionary history of the Schizothorax species complex inhabiting the Lancang River. Three maternal clades were detected in the Schizothorax species complex, but frequent nuclear allele sharing also occurred among the three maternal clades. A discrepancy between topologies of mitochondrial and nuclear loci might result from introgression or/and incomplete lineage sorting. The divergence of the clades of the Schizothorax species complex was closely related to the Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene orogenesis of the QTP and Southwest Mountains of China. Demographic analyses indicated that the species complex subsequently persisted in situ with stable populations during Pleistocene glacial cycling, which suggested that Pleistocene climate changes did not exert a remarkable influence on the species complex. Our study provides a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of the Schizothorax species complex in the Lancang River.

  9. Evidence for the robustness of protein complexes to inter-species hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Leducq

    Full Text Available Despite the tremendous efforts devoted to the identification of genetic incompatibilities underlying hybrid sterility and inviability, little is known about the effect of inter-species hybridization at the protein interactome level. Here, we develop a screening platform for the comparison of protein-protein interactions (PPIs among closely related species and their hybrids. We examine in vivo the architecture of protein complexes in two yeast species (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces kudriavzevii that diverged 5-20 million years ago and in their F1 hybrids. We focus on 24 proteins of two large complexes: the RNA polymerase II and the nuclear pore complex (NPC, which show contrasting patterns of molecular evolution. We found that, with the exception of one PPI in the NPC sub-complex, PPIs were highly conserved between species, regardless of protein divergence. Unexpectedly, we found that the architecture of the complexes in F1 hybrids could not be distinguished from that of the parental species. Our results suggest that the conservation of PPIs in hybrids likely results from the slow evolution taking place on the very few protein residues involved in the interaction or that protein complexes are inherently robust and may accommodate protein divergence up to the level that is observed among closely related species.

  10. Paramecium aurelia species complex in the catchment area of the River Raba mountain course (the Carpathians).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komala, Z

    2001-01-01

    In the water bodies of the Beskid Wyspowy Mts three species of the Paramecium aurelia complex have been found, i.e. P. biaurelia, P. tetraurelia and P. novaurelia. P. tetraurelia, which in Europe is a very rare species, was for the first time recorded in this region of the Carpathians.

  11. Recent data on the occurrence of species of the Paramecium aurelia complex in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa

    2005-01-01

    Among 15 species of the Paramecium aurelia complex known world-wide, 10 have been found in Europe, namely: P. primaurelia, P. biaurelia, P. triaurelia, P. tetraurelia, P. pentaurelia, P. sexaurelia, P. septaurelia, P. novaurelia, P. dodecaurelia, and P. tredecaurelia. Recent data on the frequency of occurrence of the species in Europe are given in the paper.

  12. Species of the Paramecium aurelia complex in Russia: new stands and overall distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potekhin, Alexey; Przyboś, Ewa; Nekrasova, Irina; Yashchenko, Varvara; Rautian, Maria

    2010-01-01

    New stands of Paramecium biaurelia, P. triaurelia, P. tetraurelia, P. pentaurelia, P. novaurelia, and P. dodecaurelia were recorded in Russia. Especially interesting is the record of P. novaurelia in Vladivostok, Russian Far East, as it is a very rare species outside of Europe. The distribution of species of the Paramecium aurelia complex in Eurasia with emphasis on findings in Russia is discussed.

  13. Electrophoretic karyotype polymorphism of sibling species of the Paramecium aurelia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, Irina V; Przyboś, Ewa; Rautian, Maria S; Potekhin, Alexey A

    2010-01-01

    Variability of karyotypes is one of the main mechanisms of speciation in organisms. Electrophoretic karyotypes of the macronucleus (MAC) obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were compared for 86 strains of all 15 sibling species of the Paramecium aurelia complex in order to determine if karyotype differences corresponded to biological species boundaries. Because the electrophoretic karyotype of the MAC reflects indirectly the frequency and distribution of fragmentation sites in the micronuclear (MIC) chromosomes, any change in MAC electrophoretic karyotype may be a marker of certain chromosomal mutations in the MIC. Thirteen main variants of electrophoretic MAC karyotypes were observed in this species complex. Ten of them appeared to correspond to biological species, while the three other variants characterized several species each. Intraspecific polymorphism was observed for several species: in some cases a certain variant of MAC karyotype was specific for all strains from the same part of the world. Distribution of the MAC karyotype variants along molecular phylogenetic trees of the P. aurelia complex shows that isolation of each species or group of species of this complex was accompanied by divergence in the molecular organization of the genome. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2010 International Society of Protistologists.

  14. Genetic population structure of Fusarium graminearum species complex in Korean cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small grain cereals are frequently contaminated with toxigenic Fusarium species. Members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) are known as a head blight pathogens and mycotoxin producers. In order to characterize the FGSC populations associated with cereals in Korea, barley, corn, maiz...

  15. The effects of model and data complexity on predictions from species distributions models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Callejas, David; Bastos, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    study contradicts the widely held view that the complexity of species distributions models has significant effects in their predictive ability while findings support for previous observations that the properties of species distributions data and their relationship with the environment are strong...

  16. Species of the Colletotrichum acutatum complex associated with anthracnose diseases of fruit in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragança, Carlos A.D.; Damm, Ulrike; Baroncelli, Riccardo; Massola Júnior, Nelson S.; Crous, Pedro W.

    Abstract Although Colletotrichum acutatum was recently investigated and shown to be a species complex comprising about 30 species, the name is still used in its broad sense for anthracnose pathogens of fruits in Brazil. In this study, a multilocus molecular analysis was carried out based on a

  17. Phenotypic virulence analysis of Pyricularia grisea isolates from Brazilian upland rice cultivars Análise fenotípica da virulência dos isolados de Pyricularia grisea, coletados em cultivares de arroz de terras altas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cristina Filippi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic virulence analysis was made on population of Pyricularia grisea isolates collected from 10 upland cultivars in three distinct rice breeding sites, with the objective of studying the degree of similarity in the phenotypic virulence among the isolates, the composition of races, and their virulence pattern. Sixteen races were identified based on the reaction type on eight standard international differentials, the predominant ones being IB9 and IB41. The virulence frequency was high on IAC47 and IAC165 among medium and early maturing cultivars, respectively. The frequency of isolates virulent was greater on upland rice cultivars (51.1% than on irrigated rice cultivars (21.8%. Both virulent and avirulent isolates were present in the population of P. grisea to the known genes in the near isogenic lines. Of72test isolates, 94.4% were virulent for genes Pi3 and Pi4a. Thevirulence frequencies were relatively lower in decreasing order on Pi1, Pi4b and Pi2. Thecoefficient of similarity ranged from 0.28 to1.0 among the isolates pertaining to different races, while within the race IB9, it varied from 0.56 to1.0. Considering the coefficient of similarity of 0.81, 72% of isolates of race IB9 exhibited similar pattern of virulence.Foi conduzido um estudo de virulência fenotípica da população de Pyricularia grisea, coletada de 10 cultivares de arroz de terras altas, em três locais distintos, objetivando determinar o grau de similaridade entre virulência fenotípica de isolados, a composição de raças fisiológicas e seu padrão de virulência nas cultivares de arroz. Identificaram-se 16 raças, com base no tipo de reação nas oito diferenciadoras internacionais, das quais IB-9 e IB-41 foram as predominantes. A freqüência de virulência foi alta nas cultivares IAC47 e IAC165 entre as de ciclo médio e precoce, respectivamente. A freqüência dos isolados virulentos nas cultivares de terras altas foi maior (51,1% do que nas cultivares

  18. DNA barcode identification of lichen-forming fungal species in the Rhizoplaca melanophthalma species-complex (Lecanorales, Lecanoraceae, including five new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Leavitt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies using sequence data from multiple loci and coalescent-based species delimitation have revealed several species-level lineages within the phenotypically circumscribed taxon Rhizoplaca melanophthalma sensu lato. Here, we formally describe five new species within this group, R. occulta, R. parilis, R. polymorpha, R. porterii, and R. shushanii, using support from the coalescent-based species delimitation method implemented in the program Bayesian Phylogenetics and Phylogeography (BPP as the diagnostic feature distinguishing new species. We provide a reference DNA sequence database using the ITS marker as a DNA barcode for identifying species within this complex. We also assessed intraspecific genetic distances within the six R. melanophthalma sensu lato species. While intraspecific genetic distances within the five new species were less than or equal to the lowest interspecific pairwise comparison values, an overlap in genetic distances within the R. melanophthalma sensu stricto clade suggests the potential for additional phenotypically cryptic lineages within this broadly distributed lineage. Overall, our results demonstrate the potential for accurately identifying species within the R. melanophthalma group by using molecular-based identification methods.

  19. Characterization of the Candida parapsilosis complex in East China: species distribution differs among cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ge, Y.P.; Boekhout, T.; Zhan, P.; Lu, G.X.; Shen, Y.; Li, M.; Shao, H.F.; Liu, W.D.

    2011-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis, which was previously considered to be a complex of three genetically distinct groups, has emerged as a significant agent of nosocomial infections. Recently, this complex was separated into three species: C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. In Ch

  20. DNA taxonomy in morphologically plastic taxa: algorithmic species delimitation in the Boodlea complex (Chlorophyta: Cladophorales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leliaert, Frederik; Verbruggen, Heroen; Wysor, Brian; De Clerck, Olivier

    2009-10-01

    DNA-based taxonomy provides a convenient and reliable tool for species delimitation, especially in organisms in which morphological discrimination is difficult or impossible, such as many algal taxa. A group with a long history of confusing species circumscriptions is the morphologically plastic Boodlea complex, comprising the marine green algal genera Boodlea, Cladophoropsis, Phyllodictyon and Struveopsis. In this study, we elucidate species boundaries in the Boodlea complex by analysing nrDNA internal transcribed spacer sequences from 175 specimens collected from a wide geographical range. Algorithmic methods of sequence-based species delineation were applied, including statistical parsimony network analysis, and a maximum likelihood approach that uses a mixed Yule-coalescent model and detects species boundaries based on differences in branching rates at the level of species and populations. Sequence analyses resulted in the recognition of 13 phylogenetic species, although we failed to detect sharp species boundaries, possibly as a result of incomplete reproductive isolation. We found considerable conflict between traditional and phylogenetic species definitions. Identical morphological forms were distributed in different clades (cryptic diversity), and at the same time most of the phylogenetic species contained a mixture of different morphologies (indicating intraspecific morphological variation). Sampling outside the morphological range of the Boodlea complex revealed that the enigmatic, sponge-associated Cladophoropsis (Spongocladia) vaucheriiformis, also falls within the Boodlea complex. Given the observed evolutionary complexity and nomenclatural problems associated with establishing a Linnaean taxonomy for this group, we propose to discard provisionally the misleading morphospecies and genus names, and refer to clade numbers within a single genus, Boodlea.

  1. Molecular evidence for cryptic speciation in the Cyclophorus fulguratus (Pfeiffer, 1854) species complex (Caenogastropoda: Cyclophoridae) with description of new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantarat, Nattawadee; Wade, Christopher M; Jeratthitikul, Ekgachai; Sutcharit, Chirasak; Panha, Somsak

    2014-01-01

    A high degree of intraspecific variation, both genetic and in shell morphology, of the operculate land snail Cyclophorus fulguratus (Pfeiffer, 1854) suggests that its classification as a single species warrants reconsideration. We sequenced two nuclear (18S and 28S) and two mitochondrial (16S and COI) genes of 46 C. fulguratus specimens and used them to estimate the phylogeny and to determine the validity of species boundaries. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed the presence of three lineages corresponding to three geographically disjunctive populations of C. fulguratus in Thailand. Likelihood tests of topologies significantly supported the non-monophyly of the C. fulguratus-complex and Bayesian species delimitation analysis significantly supported the potential representation as distinct species of these three lineages. Discriminant function analysis based on geometric-morphometrics of shell shape allowed for significant distinction of these three candidate species, although they revealed a considerable degree of overlap of shell shape reflecting their crypsis morphologically. The diagnostic characters are provided by color pattern, pattern of protoconch and pattern of jaw. In conclusion, the results support that the C. fulguratus s.l., as currently recognized, consists of three distinct species in Thailand: C. fulguratus s.s., C. rangunensis and C. abditus sp.nov., which are described herein.

  2. Historical perspective on the synonymization of the four major pest species belonging to the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Alvin K W; Wee, Suk-Ling; Nishida, Ritsuo; Ono, Hajime; Hendrichs, Jorge; Haymer, David S; Tan, Keng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    An FAO/IAEA-sponsored coordinated research project on integrative taxonomy, involving close to 50 researchers from at least 20 countries, culminated in a significant breakthrough in the recognition that four major pest species, Bactrocera dorsalis, Bactrocera philippinensis, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera invadens, belong to the same biological species, Bactrocera dorsalis. The successful conclusion of this initiative is expected to significantly facilitate global agricultural trade, primarily through the lifting of quarantine restrictions that have long affected many countries, especially those in regions such as Asia and Africa that have large potential for fresh fruit and vegetable commodity exports. This work stems from two taxonomic studies: a revision in 1994 that significantly increased the number of described species in the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex; and the description in 2005 of Bactrocera invadens, then newly incursive in Africa. While taxonomically valid species, many biologists considered that these were different names for one biological species. Many disagreements confounded attempts to develop a solution for resolving this taxonomic issue, before the FAO/IAEA project commenced. Crucial to understanding the success of that initiative is an accounting of the historical events and perspectives leading up to the international, multidisciplinary collaborative efforts that successfully achieved the final synonymization. This review highlights the 21 year journey taken to achieve this outcome.

  3. The Drosophila bipectinata species complex: phylogenetic relationship among different members based on chromosomal variations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PARUL BANERJEE; BASHISTH N. SINGH

    2017-03-01

    Making interspecific hybridizations, where possible remains an unparalleled option for studying the intricacies of speciation. In the Drosophila bipectinata species complex comprising of four species, namely D. bipectinata, D. parabipectinata, D. malerkotliana and D. pseudoananassae, interspecific hybrids can be obtained in the laboratory, thus bequeathing an ideal opportunity for studying speciation and phylogeny. With the view of investigating the degree of divergence between each species pair, we planned to study the polytene chromosomes of the F1 hybrids, as it would mirror the level of compatibility between the genomes of the parental species. Two sets of crosses were made, one involving homozygous strains of all four species from India and the other including homozygous strains from different places across the globe. Polytene chromosomes of F1 larvae from both sets of crosses had similar configurations. In F1 larvae from crosses involving D. bipectinata, D. parabipectinata and D. malerkotliana, complex configurations (depicting overlapping inversions) could be detected in different arms. However, they were fairly synapsed, indicating that the differences are only at the level of gene arrangements. The polytene chromosomes of larvae obtained by crossing D. pseudoananassae with the other three species were very thin with gross asynapsis in all the arms, demonstrating that the genome of D. pseudoananassae is widely diverged from rest of the species. The overlapping inversions (reflected in complex configuration), are inferred in the light of earlier chromosomal studies performed in this complex.

  4. Growth response of four freshwater algal species to dissolved organic nitrogen of different concentration and complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiedler, Dorothea; Graeber, Daniel; Badrian, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    is within the range of concentrations that have been observed in a typical Central European shallow, eutrophic lake. 3. All studied species grew in all treatments, but their biomass gains decreased with increasing complexity of the N source. Urea addition caused the strongest biomass increase, only in some...... concentrations. The importance of complex DON compounds for growth of common phytoplankton species is still unknown. 2. This study compared changes in chlorophyll a concentrations of freshwater phytoplankton with different DON compounds of varying complexity (urea, dissolved free (DFAA) and combined amino acids...... cases matched by nitrate. 4. Urea was also utilised over a longer time period than any other compound, including nitrate. The assumed delay in availability with increasing compound complexity was not supported by this experiment. 5. The studied species differed in their temporal response...

  5. Molecular systematics of new world gopher, bull, and pinesnakes (Pituophis: Colubridae), a transcontinental species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Robles, J A; De Jesús-Escobar, J M

    2000-01-01

    Pituophis melanoleucus (gopher, bull, and pinesnakes) is among the most widely distributed polytypic species complexes in North America, with most authors recognizing from a single transcontinental species (the melanoleucus complex, composed of 15 subspecies) to four (monotypic and polytypic) species. We used mitochondrial gene sequences from the two middle American species, P. deppei and P. lineaticollis, and from 13 subspecies from most of the range of the melanoleucus complex to test various phylogenetic hypotheses for Pituophis. Maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods identified the same major clades within Pituophis and indicated that two segments of the melanoleucus complex, the lodingi-melanoleucus-mugitus eastern pinesnake clade and the affinis-annectens-bimaris-catenifer-deserticola- sayi-ruthveni-vertebr alis clade from central and western United States and northern Mexico, represent divergent, allopatric lineages with no known intergradation zone. We recognize each of these two groupings as a different species. Our data also indicate that some ruthveni are more closely related to sayi than to other ruthveni. Nonetheless, ruthveni is an allopatric taxon diagnosable from its closest relatives by a combination of morphometric characters, and because it is likely that at least some of these traits are independent and genetically inherited, we interpret this as evidence that ruthveni has attained the status of independent evolutionary lineage, despite the fact that it retains strong genetic affinities with sayi. The endemic Baja Californian gopher snakes (bimaris and vertebralis) are considered by some taxonomists as a different species, P. vertebralis, but we discovered that these serpents belong to two different clades and hence we do not agree with the recognition of P. vertebralis as presently defined. In summary, we believe that three distinct species are included in the melanoleucus complex, Pituophis melanoleucus (sensu stricto), P. catenifer

  6. Species of the Colletotrichum acutatum complex associated with anthracnose diseases of fruit in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragança, Carlos A D; Damm, Ulrike; Baroncelli, Riccardo; Massola Júnior, Nelson S; Crous, Pedro W

    2016-04-01

    Although Colletotrichum acutatum was recently investigated and shown to be a species complex comprising about 30 species, the name is still used in its broad sense for anthracnose pathogens of fruits in Brazil. In this study, a multilocus molecular analysis was carried out based on a dataset of ITS, HIS3, GAPDH, CHS-1, TUB2 and ACT sequences of Colletotrichum strains belonging to the C. acutatum species complex from fruits collected in different regions in Brazil combined with sequences of ex-type and other reference strains of species belonging to this complex. The strains were revealed to belong to Colletotrichum nymphaeae, Colletotrichum melonis, Colletotrichum abscissum and one new species, namely Colletotrichum paranaense, from apple and peach. Morphological descriptions of the new species and a strain closely related to but diverging from C. melonis are provided. From the data presently available, the most common species on apple fruits in Brazil is C. nymphaeae. In a pathogenicity test, strains of all four species caused lesions on detached apple, peach and guava fruits, except for strain CBS 134730 that did not infect guava fruits. Copyright © 2016 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Further insight into reproductive incompatibility between putative cryptic species of the Bemisia tabaci whitefly complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Pan, Li-Long; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), with its global distribution and extensive genetic diversity, is now known to be a complex of over 35 cryptic species. However, a satisfactory resolution of the systematics of this species complex is yet to be achieved. Here, we designed experiments to examine reproductive compatibility among species with different levels of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) divergence. The data show that putative species with mtCOI divergence of >8% between them consistently exhibited complete reproductive isolation. However, two of the putative species, Asia II 9 and Asia II 3, with mtCOI divergence of 4.47% between them, exhibited near complete reproductive compatibility in one direction of their cross, and partial reproductive compatibility in the other direction. Together with some recent reports on this topic from the literature, our data indicates that, while divergence in the mtCOI sequences provides a valid molecular marker for species delimitation in most clades, more genetic markers and more sophisticated molecular phylogeny will be required to achieve adequate delimitation of all species in this whitefly complex. While many attempts have been made to examine the reproductive compatibility among genetic groups of the B. tabaci complex, our study represents the first effort to conduct crossing experiments with putative species that were chosen with considerations of their genetic divergence. In light of the new data, we discuss the best strategy and protocols to conduct further molecular phylogenetic analysis and crossing trials, in order to reveal the overall pattern of reproductive incompatibility among species of this whitefly complex.

  8. The Bactrocera dorsalis species complex: comparative cytogenetic analysis in support of Sterile Insect Technique applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustinos, Antonios A; Drosopoulou, Elena; Gariou-Papalexiou, Aggeliki; Bourtzis, Kostas; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Zacharopoulou, Antigone

    2014-01-01

    The Bactrocera dorsalis species complex currently harbors approximately 90 different members. The species complex has undergone many revisions in the past decades, and there is still an ongoing debate about the species limits. The availability of a variety of tools and approaches, such as molecular-genomic and cytogenetic analyses, are expected to shed light on the rather complicated issues of species complexes and incipient speciation. The clarification of genetic relationships among the different members of this complex is a prerequisite for the rational application of sterile insect technique (SIT) approaches for population control. Colonies established in the Insect Pest Control Laboratory (IPCL) (Seibersdorf, Vienna), representing five of the main economic important members of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex were cytologically characterized. The taxa under study were B. dorsalis s.s., B. philippinensis, B. papayae, B. invadens and B. carambolae. Mitotic and polytene chromosome analyses did not reveal any chromosomal characteristics that could be used to distinguish between the investigated members of the B. dorsalis complex. Therefore, their polytene chromosomes can be regarded as homosequential with the reference maps of B. dorsalis s.s.. In situ hybridization of six genes further supported the proposed homosequentiallity of the chromosomes of these specific members of the complex. The present analysis supports that the polytene chromosomes of the five taxa under study are homosequential. Therefore, the use of the available polytene chromosome maps for B. dorsalis s.s. as reference maps for all these five biological entities is proposed. Present data provide important insight in the genetic relationships among the different members of the B. dorsalis complex, and, along with other studies in the field, can facilitate SIT applications targeting this complex. Moreover, the availability of 'universal' reference polytene chromosome maps for members of the complex

  9. Survey and competition assay data suggest species-specific difference in host/niche adaptation influence the distribution of Fusarium graminearum species complex pathogens in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) comprises at least 16 toxigenic species of economic concern to cereal crops. In Brazil, six species of the FGSC have been identified, but their frequencies vary according to the host species. Although F. graminearum (Fgra) is dominant in wheat (>90%) a...

  10. The famous cultivated mushroom Bailinggu is a separate species of the Pleurotus eryngii species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengran; Zhang, Jinxia; Chen, Qiang; Wu, Xiangli; Gao, Wei; Deng, Wangqiu; Huang, Chenyang

    2016-01-01

    The mushroom of the genus Pleurotus in western China, called Bailinggu, is a precious edible fungus with high economic value. However, its taxonomical position is unclear. Some researchers regard it as a variety of P. eryngii, namely P. eryngii var. tuoliensis, whereas others consider it to be a subspecies of P. eryngii, viz. P. eryngii subsp. tuoliensis. A total of 51 samples representing seven genetic groups of the genus Pleurotus were subjected to a phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of the translation elongation factor 1 alpha gene (ef1a), the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene (rpb1), the RNA polymerase II second largest subunit gene (rpb2) and nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS). Our data indicate that the mushroom Bailinggu is a lineage independent of P. eryngii and should be lifted as its own species, namely P. tuoliensis. In addition, its known distribution range consists of both western China and Iran. PMID:27629112

  11. Review of the Ambrysus stali La Rivers species complex (Heteroptera: Nepomorpha: Naucoridae) with the description of a new species from Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sites, Robert W; Reynoso-Velasco, Daniel

    2015-09-15

    The Neotropical Ambrysus stali La Rivers species complex is reviewed and includes A. bifidus La Rivers & Nieser, A. scolius La Rivers, A. stali La Rivers, and A. tricuspis La Rivers. Ambrysus oblongulus Montandon is removed as a member of this complex. Features uniting these species are related to male genitalia and associated structures. Ambrysus maya n. sp. is the fifth species in the complex and is described from Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico based on specimens from recent collecting and museum collections.

  12. Systematics of the Osteocephalus buckleyi species complex (Anura, Hylidae from Ecuador and Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Ron

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new phylogeny, based on DNA sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, for frogs of the genus Osteocephalus with emphasis in the Osteocephalus buckleyi species complex. Genetic, morphologic, and advertisement call data are combined to define species boundaries and describe new species. The phylogeny shows strong support for: (1 a basal position of O. taurinus + O. oophagus, (2 a clade containing phytotelmata breeding species, and (3 a clade that corresponds to the O. buckleyi species complex. Our results document a large proportion of hidden diversity within a set of populations that were previously treated as a single, widely distributed species, O. buckleyi. Individuals assignable to O. buckleyi formed a paraphyletic group relative to O. verruciger and O. cabrerai and contained four species, one of which is O. buckleyi sensu stricto and three are new. Two of the new species are shared between Ecuador and Peru (O. vilmae sp. n. and O. cannatellai sp. n. and one is distributed in the Amazon region of southern Peru (O. germani sp. n.. We discuss the difficulties of using morphological characters to define species boundaries and propose a hypothesis to explain them.

  13. Systematics of the Osteocephalus buckleyi species complex (Anura, Hylidae) from Ecuador and Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, Santiago R.; Venegas, Pablo J.; Toral, Eduardo; Morley Read; Diego A. Ortiz; Manzano, Andrea L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We present a new phylogeny, based on DNA sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, for frogs of the genus Osteocephalus with emphasis in the Osteocephalus buckleyi species complex. Genetic, morphologic, and advertisement call data are combined to define species boundaries and describe new species. The phylogeny shows strong support for: (1) a basal position of Osteocephalus taurinus + Osteocephalus oophagus, (2) a clade containing phytotelmata breeding species, and (3) a clade that corresponds to the Osteocephalus buckleyi species complex. Our results document a large proportion of hidden diversity within a set of populations that were previously treated as a single, widely distributed species, Osteocephalus buckleyi. Individuals assignable to Osteocephalus buckleyi formed a paraphyletic group relative to Osteocephalus verruciger and Osteocephalus cabrerai and contained four species, one of which is Osteocephalus buckleyi sensu stricto and three are new. Two of the new species are shared between Ecuador and Peru (Osteocephalus vilmae sp. n. and Osteocephalus cannatellai sp. n.) and one is distributed in the Amazon region of southern Peru (Osteocephalus germani sp. n.) We discuss the difficulties of using morphological characters to define species boundaries and propose a hypothesis to explain them. PMID:23166473

  14. Botrytis californica, a new cryptic species in the B. cinerea species complex causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, S; Margosan, D; Michailides, T J; Xiao, C L

    2016-01-01

    The Botrytis cinerea species complex comprises two cryptic species, originally referred to Group I and Group II based on Bc-hch gene RFLP haplotyping. Group I was described as a new cryptic species B. pseudocinerea During a survey of Botrytis spp. causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes in the Central Valley of California, six isolates, three from blueberries and three from table grapes, were placed in Group I but had a distinct morphological character with conidiophores significantly longer than those of B. cinerea and B. pseudocinerea We compared these with B. cinerea and B. pseudocinerea by examining morphological and physiological characters, sensitivity to fenhexamid and phylogenetic analysis inferred from sequences of three nuclear genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the three partial gene sequences encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), heat-shock protein 60 (HSP60) and DNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunit II (RPB2) supported the proposal of a new Botrytis species, B. californica, which is closely related genetically to B. cinerea, B. pseudocinerea and B. sinoviticola, all known as causal agents of gray mold of grapes. Botrytis californica caused decay on blueberry and table grape fruit inoculated with the fungus. This study suggests that B. californica is a cryptic species sympatric with B. cinerea on blueberries and table grapes in California.

  15. The Paramecium aurelia species complex, frequency and co-occurrence across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa; Barth, Dana; Berendonk, Thomas U

    2008-01-01

    In Europe, 10 among the 15 known species of the Paramecium aurelia complex have been recorded including P. primaurelia, P. biaurelia, P. triaurelia, P. tetraurelia, P. pentaurelia, P. sexaurelia, P. septaurelia, P. novaurelia, P. dodecaurelia, and P. tredecaurelia. The occurrence of species of this complex in Europe has been estimated on the basis of the number of habitats and the ratio value (r.v.), i.e. the number of habitats for a defined species to the total number of habitats with species of the P. aurelia complex. The r.v. presents the relative frequency of the particular species to others of the complex. In total, 483 habitats were considered. The dominant species is P. novaurelia (r.v. 0.38, found in 186 habitats), followed by P. biaurelia (r.v. 0.26 in 125 habitats) and P. primaurelia (0.23 in 113 habitats). Other species are less frequent, such as P. tetraurelia (r.v. 0.06 found in 29 habitats), P. triaurelia (r.v. 0.04 in 22 habitats), or rare such as P. septaurelia (r.v. 0.025 found in 12 habitats), as well as P. pentaurelia and P. sexaurelia (r.v. 0.02 for both, found in 11 and 10 habitats, respectively). P. dodecaurelia was found in three localities in Europe (r.v. 0.006) and P. tredecaurelia is known from a single habitat (r.v. 0.002). This paper presents new populations, found at present, of species of the P. aurelia complex in Europe (Germany, Italy, Spain, Iceland, Poland, Great Britain) and one new from the USA.

  16. A literature review of interaction of oxidized uranium species and uranium complexes with soluble organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Joan K.; Leventhal, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Organic material is commonly found associated with uranium ores in sandstone-type deposits. This review of the literature summarizes the classes and separations of naturally occurring organic material but the emphasis is on soluble organic species. The main class of materials of interest is humic substances which are high-molecular-weight complex molecules that are soluble in alkaline solution. These humic substances are able to solubilize (make soluble) minerals and also to complex [by ion exchange and (or) chelation] many cations. The natural process of soil formation results in both mineral decomposition and element complexing by organic species. Uranium in solution, such as ground water, can form many species with other elements or complexes present depending on Eh and pH. In natural systems (oxidizing Eh, pH 5-9) the uranium is usually present as a complex with hydroxide or carbonate. Thermodynamic data for these species are presented. Interacting metals and organic materials have been observed in nature and studied in the laboratory by many workers in diverse scientific disciplines. The results are not easily compared. Measurements of the degree of complexation are reported as equilibrium stability constant determinations. This type of research has been done for Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, Co, Mg, Ca, Al, and to a limited degree for U. The use of Conditional Stability Constants has given quantitative results in some cases. The methods utilized in experiments and calculations are reviewed.

  17. Multilocus sequence data reveal extensive phylogenetic species diversity within the Neurospora discreta complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettman, Jeremy R; Jacobson, David J; Taylor, John W

    2006-01-01

    Previous observations of morphological, reproductive and genetic variation have suggested that Neurospora discreta, as presently circumscribed, might represent a diverse complex of multiple species. To investigate this hypothesis we examined the phylogenetic relationships among 73 fungal strains traditionally identified as N. discreta. Strains were chosen from across the morphological, ecological and geographical ranges of the species. Sequence data were obtained from three unlinked nuclear loci, and phylogenetic species recognition was applied to the dataset using protocols that have been shown to be reliable for identifying independent lineages and delineating species of Neurospora. The results demonstrate that the present circumscription of N. discreta includes at least eight separate phylogenetic species. This research also reveals an abundance of previously unrecognized genetic diversity within the genus, characterizes the interspecific evolutionary relationships and contributes to a fuller understanding of species diversity in Neurospora.

  18. Current knowledge of the species complex Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera, Tephritidae) in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaníčková, Lucie; Hernández-Ortiz, Vicente; Bravo, Iara Sordi Joachim; Dias, Vanessa; Roriz, Alzira Kelly Passos; Laumann, Raul Alberto; Mendonça, Adriana de Lima; Paranhos, Beatriz Aguiar Jordão; do Nascimento, Ruth Rufino

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The study of the species complex Anastrepha fraterculus (Af complex) in Brazil is especially important in a taxonomical, evolutionary and pest management context, because there are evidences that some of them may occur in sympatry. In this review, we analyzed the main results supporting evidences that three cryptic species occur in Brazil. The taxonomical and phylogenetic relationships based on eggshell morphology, adult morphometrics, as well as cytotaxonomy and genetic differentiations are discussed. We also review available information on sexual behavior including acoustic communication of males during courtship and sexual incompatibility; and chemical signals involved in the communication between sexes, with a special focus on sex pheromones. We examined the role of long- and short-range pheromones (male-produced volatiles and cuticular hydrocarbons, respectively), their implications in sexual isolation, and their possible use for chemotaxonomic differentiation of the putative species of the Af complex. PMID:26798261

  19. The current status of the Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Nataly A; Brazil, Reginaldo P; Araki, Alejandra S

    2017-01-01

    Lutzomyia longipalpis s.l. is a complex of sibling species and is the principal vector of American visceral leishmaniasis. The present review summarises the diversity of efforts that have been undertaken to elucidate the number of unnamed species in this species complex and the phylogenetic relationships among them. A wide variety of evidence, including chemical, behavioral and molecular traits, suggests very recent speciation events and complex population structure in this group. Although significant advances have been achieved to date, differential vector capacity and the correlation between structure of parasite and vector populations have yet to be elucidated. Furthermore, increased knowledge about recent epidemiological changes, such as urbanisation, is essential for pursuing effective strategies for sandfly control in the New World. PMID:28225906

  20. Colour patterns do not diagnose species: quantitative evaluation of a DNA barcoded cryptic bumblebee complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Carolan

    Full Text Available Cryptic diversity within bumblebees (Bombus has the potential to undermine crucial conservation efforts designed to reverse the observed decline in many bumblebee species worldwide. Central to such efforts is the ability to correctly recognise and diagnose species. The B. lucorum complex (Bombus lucorum, B. cryptarum and B. magnus comprises one of the most abundant and important group of wild plant and crop pollinators in northern Europe. Although the workers of these species are notoriously difficult to diagnose morphologically, it has been claimed that queens are readily diagnosable from morphological characters. Here we assess the value of colour-pattern characters in species identification of DNA-barcoded queens from the B. lucorum complex. Three distinct molecular operational taxonomic units were identified each representing one species. However, no uniquely diagnostic colour-pattern character state was found for any of these three molecular units and most colour-pattern characters showed continuous variation among the units. All characters previously deemed to be unique and diagnostic for one species were displayed by specimens molecularly identified as a different species. These results presented here raise questions on the reliability of species determinations in previous studies and highlights the benefits of implementing DNA barcoding prior to ecological, taxonomic and conservation studies of these important key pollinators.

  1. New Stands of Species of the Paramecium aurelia Complex in Yakutia, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautian, Maria; Przyboś, Ewa; Beliavskaia, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium is one of the most studied genera among ciliates. In particular, it is a model organism for investigation of the sibling species problem (also known as the cryptic species problem), spatial distribution, and its role in speciation. The global distribution of Paramecium species and of sibling species belonging to the P. aurelia species complex (Ciliophora, Protista) still need study, e.g. sampling in some territories has been quite limited, while Europe has been investigated for years with the majority of the P. aurelia species isolated from here. The large territory of Yakutia (republic Sakha in the Russian Federation), known for its climate extremes and continuous permafrost that extended over several glacial and interglacial cycles of the Pleistocene, has not been studied before. In the present study we collected paramecia in the central part of Yakutia. Newly established strains were identified to species according to morphology and, in case of the P. aurelia complex, by crossing with the test strains (the reference strains for the particular species). New stands of P. primaurelia, P. biaurelia and P. novaurelia were described from the territory of Yakutia.

  2. Species-specific detection and identification of fusarium species complex, the causal agent of sugarcane pokkah boeng in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyue Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pokkah boeng disease caused by the Fusarium species complex results in significant yield losses in sugarcane. Thus, the rapid and accurate detection and identification of the pathogen is urgently required to manage and prevent the spreading of sugarcane pokkah boeng. METHODS: A total of 101 isolates were recovered from the pokkah boeng samples collected from five major sugarcane production areas in China throughout 2012 and 2013. The causal pathogen was identified by morphological observation, pathogenicity test, and phylogenetic analysis based on the fungus-conserved rDNA-ITS. Species-specific TaqMan real-time PCR and conventional PCR methods were developed for rapid and accurate detection of the causal agent of sugarcane pokkah boeng. The specificity and sensitivity of PCR assay were also evaluated on a total of 84 isolates of Fusarium from China and several isolates from other fungal pathogens of Sporisorium scitamineum and Phoma sp. and sugarcane endophyte of Acremonium sp. RESULT: Two Fusarium species (F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum that caused sugarcane pokahh boeng were identified by morphological observation, pathogenicity test, and phylogenetic analysis. Species-specific TaqMan PCR and conventional PCR were designed and optimized to target their rDNA-ITS regions. The sensitivity of the TaqMan PCR was approximately 10 pg of fungal DNA input, which was 1,000-fold over conventional PCR, and successfully detected pokkah boeng in the field-grown sugarcane. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study was the first to identify two species, F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum, that were causal pathogens of sugarcane pokkah boeng in China. It also described the development of a species-specific PCR assay to detect and confirm these pathogens in sugarcane plants from mainland China. This method will be very useful for a broad range of research endeavors as well as the regulatory response and management of sugarcane pokkah boeng.

  3. Comparative transcriptome analysis within the Lolium/Festuca species complex reveals high sequence conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czaban, Adrian; Sharma, Sapna; Byrne, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    -Festuca complex show very diverse phenotypes, including for many agronomically important traits. Analysis of sequenced transcriptomes of these non-model species may shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenotypic diversity. Results We have generated de novo transcriptome assemblies for four...... clusters for the four species using OrthoMCL and analyzed their inferred phylogenetic relationships. Our results indicate that VRN2 is a candidate gene for differentiating vernalization and non-vernalization types in the Lolium-Festuca complex. Grouping of the gene families based on their BLAST identity...

  4. New stands of species of the Paramecium aurelia complex in Africa and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautian, Maria; Przyboś, Ewa; Surmacz, Marta; Lebedeva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of geographical distribution and the roles of dispersal and spatial isolation during the speciation of microorganisms are nowadays of great interest. The Paramecium aurelia species complex is a perfect model system to explore these questions given its long history as a study subject and broad distribution. However, the world-wide distribution of the Paramecium aurelia complex (Ciliophora, Protista) still needs study, e.g., sampling in the southern hemisphere has been quite limited, while Europe has been investigated for years, with the majority of aurelia species isolated from here. Recently, new stands of species of the P. aurelia complex were found in southern Europe (Malta, Bulgaria, Cyprus) and in the Czech Republic (P. primaurelia, P. triaurelia, P. octaurelia). In Africa (Republic of South Africa), new stands of P. primaurelia, P. triaurelia, and P. octaurelia were found. Interestingly, the rare species P. triaurelia, and P. octaurelia were found to co-occur both in South Africa (SA 13) and the Czech Republic (CKV 8). Newly established strains were identified to species by crossing with the test strains (the reference strains for the particular species).

  5. Different risk factors for candidemia occur for Candida species belonging to the C. parapsilosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constante, C C; Monteiro, A A; Alves, S H; Carneiro, L C; Machado, M M; Severo, L C; Park, S; Perlin, D S; Pasqualotto, A C

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated reduced virulence in the species that comprise the Candida parapsilosis complex. We investigated a cohort of 93 patients with candidemia caused by this complex. Most infections were caused by C. parapsilosis (80.6%), followed by C. orthopsilosis (18.3%) and C. metapsilosis (1.1%). Renal failure (P orthopsilosis group, suggesting an association with patients who had a greater state of immune suppression in comparison with infections caused by C. parapsilosis sensu stricto.

  6. [Dynamics of chromosome number evolution in the Agrodiaetus phyllis species complex (Insecta: Lepidoptera)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershinina, A O; Lukhtanov, V A

    2013-01-01

    We employed phylogenetic comparative method to study karyotype evolution in the Agrodiaetus phyllis species complex in which haploid chromosome numbers vary greatly ranging from 10 to 134. We have found that different phylogenetic lineages of the group have different rates of chromosome number changes. Chromosome numbers in the complex posses phylogenetic signal, and their evolutionary transformation is difficult to explain in terms of punctual and gradual evolution.

  7. Comparative Analysis of Satellite DNA in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Madhav; Warsinger-Pepe, Natalie; Watase, George J; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2017-02-09

    Satellite DNAs are highly repetitive sequences that account for the majority of constitutive heterochromatin in many eukaryotic genomes. It is widely recognized that sequences and locations of satellite DNAs are highly divergent even in closely related species, contributing to the hypothesis that satellite DNA differences may underlie speciation. However, due to its repetitive nature, the mapping of satellite DNAs has been mostly left out of recent genomics analyses, hampering the use of molecular genetics techniques to better understand their role in speciation and evolution. Satellite DNAs are most extensively and comprehensively mapped in Drosophila melanogaster, a species that is also an excellent model system with which to study speciation. Yet the lack of comprehensive knowledge regarding satellite DNA identity and location in its sibling species (D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia) has prevented the full utilization of D. melanogaster in studying speciation. To overcome this problem, we initiated the mapping of satellite DNAs on the genomes of the D. melanogaster species complex (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia) using multi-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. Our study confirms a striking divergence of satellite DNAs in the D. melanogaster species complex, even among the closely related species of the D. simulans clade (D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia), and suggests the presence of unidentified satellite sequences in these species.

  8. No evidence for niche segregation in a North American Cattail (Typha) species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie-Gopsill, Andrew; Kirk, Heather; Drunen, Wendy Van; Freeland, Joanna R; Dorken, Marcel E

    2012-05-01

    Interspecific hybridization can lead to a breakdown of species boundaries, and is of particular concern in cases in which one of the parental species is invasive. Cattails (Typha spp.) have increased their abundance in the Great Lakes region of North America over the past 150 years. This increase in the distribution of cattails is associated with hybridization between broad-leaved (Typha latifolia) and narrow-leaved cattails (T. angustifolia). The resulting hybrids occur predominantly as F(1)s, which are known as T. × glauca, although later-generation hybrids have also been documented. It has been proposed that in sympatric populations, the parental species and hybrids are often spatially segregated according to growth in contrasting water depths, and that this should promote the maintenance of parental species. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the two species and their hybrids segregate along a water-depth gradient at sites where they are sympatric. We identified the two parental species and their hybrids using molecular genetic markers (SSR), and measured shoot elevations (a proxy for water depth) at 18 sites in Southern Ontario, Canada. We found no evidence for niche segregation among species based on elevation. Our data indicate that all three lineages compete for similar habitat where they co-occur suggesting that there is potential for an overall loss of biodiversity in the species complex, particularly if the hybrid lineage is more vigorous compared to the parental species, as has been suggested by other authors.

  9. Molecular Phylogeny and Zoogeography of the Capoeta damascina Species Complex (Pisces: Teleostei: Cyprinidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisreen Alwan

    Full Text Available Capoeta damascina was earlier considered by many authors as one of the most common freshwater fish species found throughout the Levant, Mesopotamia, Turkey, and Iran. However, owing to a high variation in morphological characters among and within its various populations, 17 nominal species were described, several of which were regarded as valid by subsequent revising authors. Capoeta damascina proved to be a complex of closely related species, which had been poorly studied. The current study aims at defining C. damascina and the C. damascina species complex. It investigates phylogenetic relationships among the various members of the C. damascina complex, based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Phylogenetic relationships were projected against paleogeographical events to interpret the geographic distribution of the taxa under consideration in relation to the area's geological history. Samples were obtained from throughout the geographic range and were subjected to genetic analyses, using two molecular markers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (n = 103 and the two adjacent divergence regions (D1-D2 of the nuclear 28S rRNA genes (n = 65. Six closely related species were recognized within the C. damascina complex, constituting two main lineages: A western lineage represented by C. caelestis, C. damascina, and C. umbla and an eastern lineage represented by C. buhsei, C. coadi, and C. saadii. The results indicate that speciation of these taxa is rather a recent event. Dispersal occurred during the Pleistocene, resulting in present-day distribution patterns. A coherent picture of the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of the C. damascina species complex is drawn, explaining the current patterns of distribution as a result of paleogeographic events and ecological adaptations.

  10. Molecular phylogenetic diversity, multilocus haplotype nomenclature, and in vitro antifungal resistance within the Fusarium solani species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Members of the species-rich Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) are responsible for approximately two-thirds all fusarioses of humans and other animals. In addition, many economically important phytopathogenic species are nested within this complex. Due to their increasing clinical relevance an...

  11. Genetic networking of the Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex reveals pattern of biological invasions.

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    Paul De Barro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A challenge within the context of cryptic species is the delimitation of individual species within the complex. Statistical parsimony network analytics offers the opportunity to explore limits in situations where there are insufficient species-specific morphological characters to separate taxa. The results also enable us to explore the spread in taxa that have invaded globally. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a 657 bp portion of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 from 352 unique haplotypes belonging to the Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex, the analysis revealed 28 networks plus 7 unconnected individual haplotypes. Of the networks, 24 corresponded to the putative species identified using the rule set devised by Dinsdale et al. (2010. Only two species proposed in Dinsdale et al. (2010 departed substantially from the structure suggested by the analysis. The analysis of the two invasive members of the complex, Mediterranean (MED and Middle East - Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1, showed that in both cases only a small number of haplotypes represent the majority that have spread beyond the home range; one MEAM1 and three MED haplotypes account for >80% of the GenBank records. Israel is a possible source of the globally invasive MEAM1 whereas MED has two possible sources. The first is the eastern Mediterranean which has invaded only the USA, primarily Florida and to a lesser extent California. The second are western Mediterranean haplotypes that have spread to the USA, Asia and South America. The structure for MED supports two home range distributions, a Sub-Saharan range and a Mediterranean range. The MEAM1 network supports the Middle East - Asia Minor region. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The network analyses show a high level of congruence with the species identified in a previous phylogenetic analysis. The analysis of the two globally invasive members of the complex support the view that global invasion often involve very small portions of

  12. New species from the Fusarium solani species complex derived from perithecia and soil in the old World tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalim, F Ameena; Samuels, Gary J; Wijesundera, Ravi L; Geiser, David M

    2011-01-01

    A large collection of strains belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) was isolated from soil and perithecia in primary forests in Sri Lanka (from fallen tree bark) and tropical Australia (Queensland, from fallen tree fruits and nuts). Portions of the translation elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1) gene, the nuclear large subunit (NLSU) and internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of the nuclear ribosomal RNA genes were sequenced in 52 isolates from soil and perithecia. The FSSC was divided previously into three clades with some biogeographic structure, termed Clades 1, 2 and 3. All Sri Lankan and Australian soil isolates were found to be members of Clade 3, most grouping with the cosmopolitan soil-associated species F. falciforme. All but two Sri Lankan perithecial isolates were associated with a set of five divergent phylogenetic lineages that were associated with Clade 2. Australian perithecial isolates resided in a subclade of Clade 3 where most of the previously defined mating populations of the FSSC reside. Isolates from perithecia and those cultured from soil were always members of different species lineages, even when derived from proximal locations. The previous biogeographic assignment of Clade 2 to South America is now expanded to the worldwide tropics. Sri Lanka appears to be an important center of diversity for the FSSC. Nectria haematococca is epitypified with a collection from the type locality in Sri Lanka; its anamorph is described as a new species, Fusarium haematococcum. Neocosmospora E.F. Smith is adopted as the correct genus for Nectria haematococca. These new species are described: F. kurunegalense/Neo. kurunegalensis, F. rectiphorus/Neo. rectiphora/, F. mahasenii/Neo. mahasenii/, F. kelerajum/Neo. keleraja.

  13. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Prashant

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI, U(V, U(IV, U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG, and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI to U(IV is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V- and U(IV-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI and U(IV rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids.

  14. Genetic and phenotypic diversity within the Fusarium graminearum species complex in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    As has been observed in several European countries, the frequency of Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) has increased in Norwegian cereals in recent years, resulting in elevated levels of deoxynivalenol in cereal grains. The objective of t...

  15. Species and ecological diversity within the Cladosporium cladosporioides complex (Davidiellaceae, Capnodiales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Cladosporium is one of the largest genera of dematiaceous hyphomycetes, and is characterised by a coronate scar structure, conidia in acropetal chains and Davidiella teleomorphs. Based on morphology and DNA phylogeny, the species complexes of C. herbarum and C. sphaerospermum have been res...

  16. Molecular karyotype analysis and mapping of housekeeping genes to chromosomes of selected species complexes of Leishmania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Cruz Tavares

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular karyotypes for 20 reference strais of species complexes of Leishmania were determined by contour-clamped homogeneous eletric field (CHEF electrosphoresis. Determination of number/position of chromosome-sized bands and chromosomal DNA locations of house-keeping genes were the two criteria used for differentiating and classifying the Leishmania species. We have established two gel running conditions of optimal separation of chromosomes, wich resolved DNA molecules as large as 2,500 kilobase pairs (kb. Chromosomes were polymorphic in number (22-30 and size (200-2,500 kb of bands among members of five complexes of Leishmania. Although each stock had a distinct karyotype, in general the differences found between strains and/or species within each complex were not clear enough for parasite identification. However, each group showed a specific number of size-concordant DNA molecules, wich allowed distinction among the Leishmania complex parasites. Clear differences between the Old and New world groups of parasites or among some New World Leishmania species were also apparent in relation to the chromosome locations of beta-tubulin genes. Based on these results as well as data from other published studies the potencial of using DNA karyotype for identifying and classifying leishmanial field isolates is discussed.

  17. Comparative genomics of the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex: biosynthetic pathways metabolite production and plant pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium is a huge genus of filamentous fungi causing plant diseases in a wide range of host plants that result in high economic losses to world agriculture every year. Phylogenetic studies have shown that the genus Fusarium consists of different species complexes. One of them is the “Fusarium fujik...

  18. An unrecognized species of the Culicoides obsoletus complex feeding on livestock in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiswinkel, R.; Bree, de F.M.; Vries, de Ruth; Elbers, A.R.W.

    2015-01-01

    In studies on Culicoides attacking livestock in the Netherlands, we chanced upon a species of the Obsoletus complex that we do not recognize, but whose dark wing pattern is distinctive. Nine cytochrome c oxidase (CO1) sequences of our so-called ‘dark obsoletus’ support its status as a separate

  19. Development of a new MLST scheme for differentiation of Fusarium solani Species Complex (FSSC) isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debourgogne, A.; Gueidan, C.; Hennequin, C.; Contet-Audonneau, N.; de Hoog, S.; Machouart, M.

    2010-01-01

    Fungi belonging to the Fusarium solani Species Complex (FSSC) are well known plant pathogens. In addition to being the causative agent of some superficial infections, FSSC has recently emerged as a group of common opportunistic moulds, mainly in patients with haematological malignancies. Molecular

  20. Using mating-type gene sequences for improved phylogenetic resolution of Collectotrichum species complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Meizhu; Schardl, Christopher L; Nuckles, Etta M; Vaillancourt, Lisa J

    2005-01-01

    Colletotrichum species are defined primarily on the basis of host preference and morphology of the organism in planta and in culture. However the genus contains several species complexes that encompass such a broad range of morphological and pathological variation that the species name is of relatively little use either to the taxonomist or plant pathologist. Phylogenetic analyses, primarily based on variable regions of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences, have indicated that these species complexes comprise a variable number of identifiable monophyletic clades. However rDNA sequences often are insufficiently diverse to fully resolve such closely related lineages. A group of isolates representing three species complexes (C. graminicola, C. gloeosporioides and C. acutatum) were analyzed by using the high mobility group (HMG)-encoding sequence of the MAT1-2 mating type sequence, which has been shown in other fungi to be especially suitable for distinguishing relationships among closely related groups. Results were compared with those obtained from analysis of variable regions of the rDNA as well as from standard morphological classification methods. Results achieved through analysis of MAT1-2 sequences correlated well with those obtained by analysis of rDNA sequences but provided significantly better resolution among the various lineages. Morphological traits, including hyphopodia size, colony appearance, spore size, appresorial shape and size and host preference, frequently were unreliable as indicators of phylogenetic association. Spore shape and hyphopodia shape more often were useful for this purpose.

  1. Volatiles as Chemosystematic Markers for Distinguishing Closely Related Species within the Pinus mugo Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiński, Konrad; Bonikowski, Radosław; Wojnicka-Półtorak, Aleksandra; Chudzińska, Ewa; Maliński, Tomasz

    2015-08-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to GC/MS analysis was used to identify the constituents of pine-needle volatiles differentiating three closely-related pine species within the Pinus mugo complex, i.e., P. uncinata Ramond ex DC., P. uliginosa G.E.Neumann ex Wimm., and P. mugo Turra. Moreover, chemosystematic markers were proposed for the three analyzed pine species. The major constituents of the pine-needle volatiles were α-pinene (28.4%) and bornyl acetate (10.8%) for P. uncinata, δ-car-3-ene (21.5%) and α-pinene (16.1%) for P. uliginosa, and α-pinene (20%) and δ-car-3-ene (18.1%) for P. mugo. This study is the first report on the application of the composition of pine-needle volatiles for the reliable identification of closely-related pine species within the Pinus mugo complex.

  2. Ultrastructural characteristics of nurse cell-larva complex of four species of Trichinella in several hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacchi L.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The nurse cell-larva complex of nematodes of the genus Trichinella plays an Important role in the survival of the larva in decaying muscles, frequently favouring the transmission of the parasite in extreme environmental conditions. The ultrastructure of the nurse cell-larva complex in muscles from different hosts infected with T. nativa (a walrus and a polar bear, T. spiralis (horses and humans, T. pseudospiralis (a laboratory mouse and T. papuae (a laboratory mouse were examined. Analysis with transmission electron microscope showed that the typical nurse cell structure was present in all examined samples, irrespective of the species of larva, of the presence of a collagen capsule, of the age of infection and of the host species, suggesting that there exists a molecular mechanism that in the first stage of larva invasion is similar for encapsulated and non-encapsulated species.

  3. Identification and characterization of multiple emissive species in aggregated minor antenna complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahadoszamen, Md; Belgio, Erica; Rahman, Md Ashiqur; Ara, Anjue Mane; Ruban, Alexander V; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-12-01

    Aggregation induced conformational change of light harvesting antenna complexes is believed to constitute one of the pathways through which photosynthetic organisms can safely dissipate the surplus of energy while exposed to saturating light. In this study, Stark fluorescence (SF) spectroscopy is applied to minor antenna complexes (CP24, CP26 and CP29) both in their light-harvesting and energy-dissipating states to trace and characterize different species generated upon energy dissipation through aggregation (in-vitro) induced conformational change. SF spectroscopy could identify three spectral species in the dissipative state of CP24, two in CP26 and only one in CP29. The comprehensive analysis of the SF spectra yielded different sets of molecular parameters for the multiple spectral species identified in CP24 or CP26, indicating the involvement of different pigments in their formation. Interestingly, a species giving emission around the 730nm spectral region is found to form in both CP24 and CP26 following transition to the energy dissipative state, but not in CP29. The SF analyses revealed that the far red species has exceptionally large charge transfer (CT) character in the excited state. Moreover, the far red species was found to be formed invariably in both Zeaxanthin (Z)- and Violaxathin (V)-enriched CP24 and CP26 antennas with identical CT character but with larger emission yield in Z-enriched ones. This suggests that the carotenoid Z is not directly involved but only confers an allosteric effect on the formation of the far red species. Similar far red species with remarkably large CT character were also observed in the dissipative state of the major light harvesting antenna (LHCII) of plants [Wahadoszamen et al. PCCP, 2012], the fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein (FCP) of brown algae [Wahadoszamen et al. BBA, 2014] and cyanobacterial IsiA [Wahadoszamen et al. BBA, 2015], thus pointing to identical sites and pigments active in the formation of the far red

  4. Species identification within Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex using MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Benjamin E W; Paterson, David L; Kamolvit, Witchuda; Zowawi, Hosam; Kvaskoff, David; Sidjabat, Hanna; Wailan, Alexander; Peleg, Anton Y; Huber, Charlotte A

    2015-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, one of the more clinically relevant species in the Acinetobacter genus is well known to be multi-drug resistant and associated with bacteremia, urinary tract infection, pneumonia, wound infection and meningitis. However, it cannot be differentiated from closely related species such as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Acinetobacter pittii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis by most phenotypic tests and can only be differentiated by specific, time consuming genotypic tests with very limited use in clinical microbiological laboratories. As a result, these species are grouped into the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii (Acb) complex. Herein we investigated the mass spectra of 73 Acinetobacter spp., representing ten different species, using an AB SCIEX 5800 MALDI-TOF MS to differentiate members of the Acinetobacter genus, including the species of the Acb complex. RpoB gene sequencing, 16S rRNA sequencing, and gyrB multiplex PCR were also evaluated as orthogonal methods to identify the organisms used in this study. We found that whilst 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequencing could not differentiate A. pittii or A. calcoaceticus, they can be differentiated using gyrB multiplex PCR and MALDI-TOF MS. All ten Acinetobacter species investigated could be differentiated by their MALDI-TOF mass spectra.

  5. A test of color-based taxonomy in nudibranchs: Molecular phylogeny and species delimitation of the Felimida clenchi (Mollusca: Chromodorididae) species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Vinicius; Bahia, Juliana; Stöger, Isabella; Camacho-García, Yolanda; Malaquias, Manuel António E; Cervera, Juan Lucas; Schrödl, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, species identification in nudibranch gastropods relies heavily on body color pattern. The Felimida clenchi species complex, a group of brightly colored Atlantic and Mediterranean species in the family Chromodorididae, has a history of exceptional controversy and discussion among taxonomists. The most widely accepted hypothesis is that the complex includes four species (Felimida clenchi, F. neona, F. binza and F. britoi), each with a characteristic body color pattern. In this study, we investigated the taxonomic value of coloration in the Felimida clenchi complex, using molecular phylogenetics, species-delimitation analyses (ABGD, GMYC, PTP), haplotype-network methods, and the anatomy of the reproductive system. None of our analyses recovered the traditional separation into four species. Our results indicated the existence of three species, a result inconsistent with previous taxonomic hypotheses. We distinguished an undescribed species of Felimida and redefined the concepts of F. clenchi and F. binza, both highly polychromatic species. For the first time, molecular data support the existence of extreme color polymorphism in chromatic nudibranch species, with direct implications for the taxonomy of the group and its diversity. The polychromatism observed in the F. clenchi complex apparently correlates with the regional occurrence of similar color patterns in congeneric species, suggesting different mimicry circles. This may represent a parallel in the marine environment to the mechanisms that play a major role in the diversification of color in terrestrial and fresh-water chromatic groups, such as heliconian butterflies.

  6. Species and ecological diversity within the Cladosporium cladosporioides complex (Davidiellaceae, Capnodiales)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensch, K.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Dijksterhuis, J.;

    2010-01-01

    The genus Cladosporium is one of the largest genera of dematiaceous hyphomycetes, and is characterised by a coronate scar structure, conidia in acropetal chains and Davidiella teleomorphs. Based on morphology and DNA phylogeny, the species complexes of C. herbarum and C. sphaerospermum have been...... regions ITS1 and ITS2, the 5.8S nrDNA, as well as partial actin and translation elongation factor 1-α gene sequences. For the saprobic, widely distributed species Cladosporium cladosporioides, both a neotype and epitype are designated in order to specify a well established circumscription and concept...... of this species. Cladosporium tenuissimum and C. oxysporum, two saprobes abundant in the tropics, are epitypified and shown to be allied to, but distinct from C. cladosporioides. Twenty-two species are newly described on the basis of phylogenetic characters and cryptic morphological differences. The most...

  7. Differential sensitivity of the species of Candida parapsilosis sensu lato complex against statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szenzenstein, Judit; Gácser, Attila; Grózer, Zsuzsanna; Farkas, Zoltán; Nagy, Katalin; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Márki-Zay, János; Pfeiffer, Ilona

    2013-10-01

    Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis are human fungal pathogens with clinical importance. The recently reclassified three closely related species have significant variation in virulence, clinical prevalence and susceptibility characteristics to different antifungal compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro activity of atorvastatin and fluvastatin against C. metapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis. Susceptibility tests showed that C. parapsilosis was the most sensitive while C. orthopsilosis was the least susceptible species to both drugs. On the basis of the differential sensitivity, we developed a simple, reliable and highly cost-effective plate assay to distinguish these closely related species. Applying this method, 54 isolates belonging to the C. parapsilosis sensu lato complex deposited in Szeged Microbial Collection could be sorted into the three species with 100 % probability.

  8. Integrative taxonomy and preliminary assessment of species limits in the Liolaemus walkeri complex (Squamata, Liolaemidae) with descriptions of three new species from Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, César; Wood Jr, Perry L.; Cusi, Juan C.; Guzmán, Alfredo; Huari, Frank; Lundberg, Mikael; Mortensen, Emma; Ramírez, César; Robles, Daniel; Suárez, Juana; Ticona, Andres; Vargas, Víctor J.; Venegas, Pablo J.; Sites Jr, Jack W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Species delimitation studies based on integrative taxonomic approaches have received considerable attention in the last few years, and have provided the strongest hypotheses of species boundaries. We used three lines of evidence (molecular, morphological, and niche envelopes) to test for species boundaries in Peruvian populations of the Liolaemus walkeri complex. Our results show that different lines of evidence and analyses are congruent in different combinations, for unambiguous delimitation of three lineages that were “hidden” within known species, and now deserve species status. Our phylogenetic analysis shows that L. walkeri, L. tacnae and the three new species are strongly separated from other species assigned to the alticolor-bibronii group. Few conventional morphological characters distinguish the new species from closely related taxa and this highlights the need to integrate other sources of data to erect strong hypothesis of species limits. A taxonomic key for known Peruvian species of the subgenus Lioalemus is provided. PMID:24453545

  9. Ecological speciation in anemone-associated snapping shrimps (Alpheus armatus species complex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, C; Silliman, K; Anker, A; Knowlton, N

    2013-09-01

    Divergent natural selection driven by competition for limited resources can promote speciation, even in the presence of gene flow. Reproductive isolation is more likely to result from divergent selection when the partitioned resource is closely linked to mating. Obligate symbiosis and host fidelity (mating on or near the host) can provide this link, creating ideal conditions for speciation in the absence of physical barriers to dispersal. Symbiotic organisms often experience competition for hosts, and host fidelity ensures that divergent selection for a specific host or host habitat can lead to speciation and strengthen pre-existing reproductive barriers. Here, we present evidence that diversification of a sympatric species complex occurred despite the potential for gene flow and that partitioning of host resources (both by species and by host habitat) has contributed to this diversification. Four species of snapping shrimps (Alpheus armatus, A. immaculatus, A. polystictus and A. roquensis) are distributed mainly sympatrically in the Caribbean, while the fifth species (A. rudolphi) is restricted to Brazil. All five species are obligate commensals of sea anemones with a high degree of fidelity and ecological specificity for host species and habitat. We analysed sequence data from 10 nuclear genes and the mitochondrial COI gene in 11-16 individuals from each of the Caribbean taxa and from the only available specimen of the Brazilian taxon. Phylogenetic analyses support morphology-based species assignments and a well-supported Caribbean clade. The Brazilian A. rudolphi is recovered as an outgroup to the Caribbean taxa. Isolation-migration coalescent analysis provides evidence for historical gene flow among sympatric sister species. Our data suggest that both selection for a novel host and selection for host microhabitat may have promoted diversification of this complex despite gene flow.

  10. Wolbachia strains in cryptic species of the Anastrepha fraterculus complex (Diptera, Tephritidae) along the Neotropical Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezotto, Leandro F; Perondini, André L P; Hernández-Ortiz, Vicente; Marino, Celso L; Selivon, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Infection by Wolbachia was described previously in eleven species of Anastrepha fruit flies some of which are important pests of fruticulture. One such species is the nominal Anastrepha fraterculus, the South American fruit fly, which actually comprises a complex of cryptic species. The suggestions of using Wolbachia for the control of these pest species, make imperative a more precise characterization of the existing strains of the bacteria. In this study, population samples of the A. fraterculus complex from Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Guatemala and Mexico were analyzed for Wolbachia infection. The bacteria were genotyped by the MLST and WSP Typing methodologies. All samples were infected with Wolbachia of supergroup "A". For each of the five MLST genes, unique as well as already known alleles were detected. Nineteen sequence types for the concatenated sequences of the five MLST genes, and twenty wsp alleles were found in the samples. Host-specific haplotypes, shared strains among distinct hosts, and more than one strain of Wolbachia were found in some population samples. Recombination among the MLST genes and intragenic recombination between wsp haplotypes was rare. Phylogenetic analysis showed a great similarity among the Wolbachia strains in the A. fraterculus complex. However, some strains of Wolbachia are found throughout the Neotropical Region and there are specific strains in determined geographical areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Epicuticular chemistry reinforces the new taxonomic classification of the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera: Tephritidae, Dacinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaníčková, Lucie; Nagy, Radka; Pompeiano, Antonio; Kalinová, Blanka

    2017-01-01

    Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White, Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock, and Bactrocera philippinensis Drew & Hancock, key pest species within the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex, have been recently synonymized under the name Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The closely related Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock remains as a discrete taxonomic entity. Although the synonymizations have been accepted by most researchers, debate about the species limits remains. Because of the economic importance of this group of taxa, any new information available to support or deny the synonymizations is valuable. We investigated the chemical epicuticle composition of males and females of B. dorsalis, B. invadens, B. papayae, B. philippinensis, and B. carambolae by means of one- and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, followed by multiple factor analyses and principal component analysis. Clear segregation of complex cuticule profiles of both B. carambolae sexes from B. dorsalis (Hendel) was observed. In addition to cuticular hydrocarbons, abundant complex mixtures of sex-specific oxygenated lipids (three fatty acids and 22 fatty acid esters) with so far unknown function were identified in epicuticle extracts from females of all species. The data obtained supports both taxonomic synonymization of B. invadens, B. papayae, and B. philippinensis with B. dorsalis, as well as the exclusion of B. carambolae from B. dorsalis.

  12. Breeding system, colony structure, and genetic differentiation in the Camponotus festinatus species complex of carpenter ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodisman, Michael A D; Hahn, Daniel A

    2005-10-01

    All social insects live in highly organized societies. However, different social insect species display striking variation in social structure. This variation can significantly affect the genetic structure within populations and, consequently, the divergence between species. The purpose of this study was to determine if variation in social structure was associated with species diversification in the Camponotus festinatus desert carpenter ant species complex. We used polymorphic DNA microsatellite markers to dissect the breeding system of these ants and to determine if distinct C. festinatus forms hybridized in their natural range. Our analysis of single-queen colonies established in the laboratory revealed that queens typically mated with only a single male. The genotypes of workers sampled from a field population suggested that multiple, related queens occasionally reproduced within colonies and that colonies inhabited multiple nests. Camponotus festinatus workers derived from colonies of the same form originating at different locales were strongly differentiated, suggesting that gene flow was geographically restricted. Overall, our data indicate that C. festinatus populations are highly structured. Distinct C. festinatus forms possess similar social systems but are genetically isolated. Consequently, our data suggest that diversification in the C. festinatus species complex is not necessarily associated with a shift in social structure.

  13. Genetic interactions underlying hybrid male sterility in the Drosophila bipectinata species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Paras Kumar; Singh, Bashisth Narayan

    2006-06-01

    Understanding genetic mechanisms underlying hybrid male sterility is one of the most challenging problems in evolutionary biology especially speciation. By using the interspecific hybridization method roles of Y chromosome, Major Hybrid Sterility (MHS) genes and cytoplasm in sterility of hybrid males have been investigated in a promising group, the Drosophila bipectinata species complex that consists of four closely related species: D. pseudoananassae, D. bipectinata, D. parabipectinata and D. malerkotliana. The interspecific introgression analyses show that neither cytoplasm nor MHS genes are involved but X-Y interactions may be playing major role in hybrid male sterility between D. pseudoananassae and the other three species. The results of interspecific introgression analyses also show considerable decrease in the number of males in the backcross offspring and all males have atrophied testes. There is a significant positive correlation between sex - ratio distortion and severity of sterility in backcross males. These findings provide evidence that D. pseudoananassae is remotely related with other three species of the D. bipectinata species complex.

  14. Mating Type Alleles,Female Fertility and Genetic Diversity of Magnaporthe grisea Populations Pathogenic to Rice from Some Asian Countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ying; Joelle Milazzo; YUAN Xiao-ping; Henry Adreit; WANG Yan-li; Jean Loup Notteghem; Didier Tharreau

    2003-01-01

    Five hundred and twenty-two isolates of Magnaporthe grisea isolated from rice in 5 Asian countries were characterized for their mating type by crossing them with 4 hermaphroditic isolates (KA3 and TH2: MAT1.1; Guy11 and TH-16: MAT1.2). Among them, 41% were MAT1.1 and 25% were MAT1.2.The remaining 34% did not produce perithecia with any of the 4 hermaphroditic testers. In Bangladesh, India,Nepal, Vietnam and in most provinces of China, both mating types were present. Only one mating type was found in 3 provinces and 1 city of China. Almost all the isolates had very low fertility, as they were in general female sterile and sometimes also male sterile. Hermaphroditic isolates were recovered from the 5 countries. In these countries, they represented between 13% and 75% of the isolates. In Zhejiang, Guizhou, Guangdong,Hunan, Yunnan and H-ubei provinces of China, hermaphroditic isolates represented between 6% and 67%.The genetic diversity of 143 isolates from these countries and provinces, where hermaphroditic isolates had been collected, was analyzed using SCAR markers. Genetic diversity was high and population structure did not resemble classical clonal structure described in most rice growing regions. The existence of sexual reproduction in the field, localization of a center of diversity in China, and migration between countries were discussed in this paper.

  15. EVALUATING THE NOVEL METHODS ON SPECIES DISTRIBUTION MODELING IN COMPLEX FOREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Tu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of species distribution has become a focus in ecology. For predicting a result more effectively and accurately, some novel methods have been proposed recently, like support vector machine (SVM and maximum entropy (MAXENT. However, high complexity in the forest, like that in Taiwan, will make the modeling become even harder. In this study, we aim to explore which method is more applicable to species distribution modeling in the complex forest. Castanopsis carlesii (long-leaf chinkapin, LLC, growing widely in Taiwan, was chosen as the target species because its seeds are an important food source for animals. We overlaid the tree samples on the layers of altitude, slope, aspect, terrain position, and vegetation index derived from SOPT-5 images, and developed three models, MAXENT, SVM, and decision tree (DT, to predict the potential habitat of LLCs. We evaluated these models by two sets of independent samples in different site and the effect on the complexity of forest by changing the background sample size (BSZ. In the forest with low complex (small BSZ, the accuracies of SVM (kappa = 0.87 and DT (0.86 models were slightly higher than that of MAXENT (0.84. In the more complex situation (large BSZ, MAXENT kept high kappa value (0.85, whereas SVM (0.61 and DT (0.57 models dropped significantly due to limiting the habitat close to samples. Therefore, MAXENT model was more applicable to predict species’ potential habitat in the complex forest; whereas SVM and DT models would tend to underestimate the potential habitat of LLCs.

  16. Magnetic interactions as a stabilizing factor of semiquinone species of lawsone by metal complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle-Bourrouet, Grettel [Universidad de Costa Rica, Escuela de Quimica, San Jose (Costa Rica); Ugalde-Saldivar, Victor M. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Gomez, Martin [Departamento de Sistemas Biologicos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, C.P. 04960, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz-Frade, Luis A. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro, Sanfandila, 76703, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico); Gonzalez, Ignacio [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Iztapalapa, Departamento de Quimica, Area de Electroquimica, Apartado postal 55-534, 09340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Frontana, Carlos, E-mail: ultrabuho@yahoo.com.m [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 2508 Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C.P. 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-12-01

    Changes in electrochemical reactivity for lawsone anions (lawsone, 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, HLw) being coordinated to a series of metallic ions in dimethylsulfoxide solution were evaluated. Upon performing cyclic voltammetry experiments for metal complexes of this quinone with pyridine (Py) - structural formula M(II)(Lw{sup -}){sub 2}(Py){sub 2}; M: Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) - it was found that the reduction of coordinated Lw{sup -} units occurs during the first and second electron uptake in the analyzed compounds. The stability of the electrogenerated intermediates for each complex depends on the d electron configuration in each metal center and is determined by magnetic interactions with the available spins considering an octahedral conformation for all the compounds. This was evidenced by in situ spectroelectrochemical-ESR measurements in the Zn(II) complex in which due to the lack of magnetic interaction owing to its electron configuration, the structure of the coordinated anion radical species was determined. Successive reduction of the associated Lw{sup -} units leads to partial dissociation of the complex, determined by the identification of free radical dianion structures in solution. These results show some insights on how metal-lawsone complexation can modify the solution reactivity and stability of the electrogenerated radical species.

  17. Evaluations of shorter exposures of contact lens cleaning solutions against Fusarium oxysporum species complex and Fusarium solani species complex to simulate inappropriate usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Rama; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2011-05-01

    An outbreak of Fusarium keratitis in contact lens users resulted in withdrawal of ReNu with MoistureLoc solution, although the exact cause of the outbreak remains enigmatic. We evaluated current and discontinued multipurpose cleaning solutions (MPSs; MoistureLoc, Equate, MultiPlus, and OptiFree Express) against plankton- and biofilm-derived cells of Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC) and F. solani species complex (FSSC). The methods included a traditional assay based on CFU counts and a novel flow cytometry (FC) assay based on percent cell subpopulation (PCS) stained with two fluorochromes (Sytox Red and 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate). The tests were done with the respective manufacturers' recommended cleaning regimens (240 to 360 min) and under shorter exposures (15 to 60 min) to simulate inappropriate usage by the customers. FC assay measured PCS, which was available rapidly, in 5 to 7 h, whereas 24 to 48 h was needed for CFU counts, and there was good correlation between the two methods (r2=0.97). FC assays allowed identification of injured fungal cells, which are likely to be missed with growth assays. In general, a time- and inoculum-dependent survival pattern was seen for both FOSC and FSSC cells, and biofilm-derived cells were more resistant than plankton-derived cells. MultiPlus and Equate produced 100% sterilization of fungi even under shorter exposures. However, biofilm FOSC and FSSC cells survived for up to 4 h in MoistureLoc solution and up to 6 h in OptiFree Express solution under shorter exposure times. This finding was enigmatic, as OptiFree Express is not associated with any outbreak of Fusarium keratitis. This study provides additional support for possible roles that improper lens cleaning regimens and fungal biofilms could play as predisposing factors for Fusarium keratitis.

  18. Insights on the identities of sharks of the Rhizoprionodon acutus (Elasmobranchii: Carcharhiniformes) species complex based on three new species of Phoreiobothrium (Cestoda: Onchoproteocephalidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caira, J N; Jensen, K

    2015-12-22

    Recent molecular work on milk sharks (Rhizoprionodon acutus [Rüppell]) suggests that, rather than a single widely distributed species, R. acutus represents a complex of four narrowly distributed cryptic species. Examination of the cestodes in three of the four members of that complex globally led to the discovery and description of three new species in the onchoproteocephalidean genus Phoreiobothrium Linton, 1889. The host associations and geographic distributions of the new species are fully congruent with the geographic distributions and species boundaries inferred for the sharks from molecular data: Phoreiobothrium jahki n. sp. parasitizes Rhizoprionodon cf. acutus 3 off Borneo, P. nadiae n. sp. parasitizes R. cf. acutus 1 off Senegal, and P. swaki n. sp. parasitizes R. cf. acutus 2 off northern Australia. The new cestodes differ from one another and from their 11 valid congeners in morphological features such as sublocular configuration and number, hook size, and testis number. Given the notoriously oioxenous nature of elasmobranch-hosted onchoproteocephalidean cestodes, these results provide further support for recognition of the milk shark species complex. This work also raises questions about the Phoreiobothrium species reported in cursory descriptions from India; further examination of these cestodes is key because they are potentially hosted by the fourth member of the R. acutus complex. To encourage future taxonomic work on the morphology of sharks in this complex, comparative photographs of representatives of the four potential host species are provided.

  19. Special Issue Introduction- The Whitefly Bemisia tabaci Species Complex and Begomoviruses: Research Progress and Future Prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-sheng; Linda L Walling; WANG Xiao-wei

    2012-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci species complex and the begomoviruses they transmit are devastating agricultural pests worldwide.With the rapid and further invasions by some members of the whitefly species complex into new regions,their impacts on human society are likely to increase in the years to come.This special issue of the Journal of Integrative Agriculture is devoted to these two groups of interacting organisms.The initial inspiration for this special issue came from the International Symposium on Future Directions in Bemisia Research held in Hangzhou,China,in October 2010.The symposium was organized by the Institute of Insect Sciences and the Institute of Biotechnology of Zhejiang University,China,in an effort to promote information exchange and international collaborative research on a few key aspects of the biology of B.tabaci.

  20. Evidence of constrained phenotypic evolution in a cryptic species complex of agamid lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katie L; Harmon, Luke J; Shoo, Luke P; Melville, Jane

    2011-04-01

    Lineages that exhibit little morphological change over time provide a unique opportunity to explore whether nonadaptive or adaptive processes explain the conservation of morphology over evolutionary time scales. We provide the most comprehensive evaluation to date of the evolutionary processes leading to morphological similarity among species in a cryptic species complex, incorporating two agamid lizard species (Diporiphora magna and D. bilineata). Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial (ND2) and nuclear (RAG-1) gene regions revealed the existence of eight deeply divergent clades. Analysis of morphological data confirmed the presence of cryptic species among these clades. Alternative evolutionary hypotheses for the morphological similarity of species were tested using a combination of phylogenetic, morphological, and ecological data. Likelihood model testing of morphological data suggested a history of constrained phenotypic evolution where lineages have a tendency to return to their medial state, whereas ecological data showed support for both Brownian motion and constrained evolution. Thus, there was an overriding signature of constrained evolution influencing morphological divergence between clades. Our study illustrates the utility of using a combination of phylogenetic, morphological, and ecological data to investigate evolutionary mechanisms maintaining cryptic species. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. Species Diversity and Food-web Complexity in the Caves of Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Liz Price

    2014-01-01

    Besides microbes a wide variety of cave animals inhabit various caves of Malaysia, ranging from tiny invertebrates through to small mammals, reptiles, amphibians and bats. Evidence even supports the visitation of elephants to some caves. In the present report the food web complexity and the species diversity that exist in Malaysian caves is described on the basis of direct sightings. Furthermore, the major threats to the present status of such caves are also discussed.

  2. Species Diversity and Food-web Complexity in the Caves of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Price

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Besides microbes a wide variety of cave animals inhabit various caves of Malaysia, ranging from tiny invertebrates through to small mammals, reptiles, amphibians and bats. Evidence even supports the visitation of elephants to some caves. In the present report the food web complexity and the species diversity that exist in Malaysian caves is described on the basis of direct sightings. Furthermore, the major threats to the present status of such caves are also discussed.

  3. Indigenous American species of the Bemisia tabaci complex are still widespread in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Leonardo da F; Marubayashi, Julio M; De Marchi, Bruno R; Yuki, Valdir A; Pavan, Marcelo A; Moriones, Enrique; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Krause-Sakate, Renate

    2014-10-01

    Bemisia tabaci is a complex of at least 36 putative cryptic species. Since the late 1980s, the Middle East-Asia Minor 1 species (MEAM1, formerly known as the B biotype), has emerged in many tropical and subtropical regions of the world and in some areas has displaced the indigenous populations of B. tabaci. Based on analysis of the mtCOI gene, two indigenous species native to America have been reported: New World (NW, formerly the A biotype) and New World 2 (NW2). NW is present at least in Argentina, Brazil, Martinique, Mexico, Texas and Venezuela, and NW2 in Argentina, Bolivia and Brazil. Wild plants (Euphorbia sp. and Ipomoea sp.), as well as important crops such as tomato, bean and cotton, are still hosts for native B. tabaci populations in the Americas. MEAM1 has not completely displaced the native B. tabaci from the Americas. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Molecular data reveal complex hybridization and a cryptic species of neotropical wild cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Tatiane C; Schneider, Alexsandra; de Oliveira, Tadeu G; Lehugeur, Livia M; Silveira, Leandro; Freitas, Thales R O; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2013-12-16

    Hybridization among animal species has recently become more recognized as an important phenomenon, especially in the context of recent radiations. Here we show that complex hybridization has led to contrasting patterns of genomic composition among closely related species of the Neotropical cat genus Leopardus. We show strong evidence of ancient hybridization and introgression between the pampas cat (L. colocolo) and northeastern populations of tigrina (L. tigrinus), leading to remarkable cytonuclear discordance in the latter. In contrast, southern tigrina populations show recent and continuing hybridization with Geoffroy's cat (L. geoffroyi), leading to extreme levels of interspecific admixture at their contact zone. Finally, we demonstrate that two seemingly continuous Brazilian tigrina populations show no evidence of ongoing gene flow between them, leading us to support their formal recognition as distinct species, namely L. tigrinus in the northeast and L. guttulus in the south.

  5. Not all spotted cats are leopards: evidence for a Hemilienardia ocellata species complex (Gastropoda: Conoidea: Raphitomidae

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    Alexander E. Fedosov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The small conoidean Hemilienardia ocellata is one of the easily recognizable Indo-Pacific “turrids”, primarily because of its remarkable eyespot colour pattern. Morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed four species that share this “characteristic” colour pattern but demonstrate consistent differences in size and shell proportions. Three new species – Hemilienardia acinonyx sp. nov. from the Philippines, H. lynx sp. nov. from Papua New Guinea and H. pardus sp. nov. from the Society and Loyalty Islands – are described based on the results of phylogenetic analyses. Although the H. ocellata species complex clade falls in a monophyletic Hemilienardia, H. ocellata and H. acinonyx sp. nov. possess a radula with semi-enrolled or notably flattened triangular marginal teeth, a condition that diverges substantially from the standard radular morphology of Hemilienardia and other raphitomids.

  6. Cytogenetic evidence for a species complex within Anopheles pseudopunctipennis theobald (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, M; Estrada-Franco, J G; Wunderlich, C A; Hunt, R H

    1999-04-01

    Anopheles pseudopunctipennis was collected from Acapulco, Mexico and Sallee River, Grenada, West Indies and used in cross-mating experiments. Larvae from the cross, Mexico female X Grenada male, died in the third instar. However, adult progeny were obtained from the reciprocal cross Grenada female x Mexico male. These hybrid males had testes with apparently normal appearance but some without viable sperm. Polytene chromosomes obtained from hybrid females exhibited extensive asynapsis of the X chromosomes. Previously undescribed fixed inversion differences between the two populations were noted on the X chromosome. It is concluded that the two populations belong to different species. The Grenada population is designated An. pseudopunctipennis species C, since it is the third taxon recognized in this species complex.

  7. Implementing the European policies for alien species – networking, science, and partnership in a complex environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios Katsanevakis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The European Commission has recognized the need for more stringent action to manage biological invasions and has committed to develop adedicated legislative instrument. Under this upcoming legislation, European countries and their relevant institutions will have additional obligations and commitments in respect to invasive alien species. In September 2012, the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC launched the European Alien Species Information Network (EASIN to facilitate the exploration of existing alien species information from distributed sources and to assist the implementation of European policies on biological invasions. Subsequent to the launching of EASIN, there was an evident need to define its niche within a complex environment of global, European, regional and national information systems. Herein we propose an organizational chart clearly defining the role of each actor in this framework, and we emphasize the need for collaboration in order to effectively support EU policies.

  8. Global population structure and taxonomy of the wandering albatross species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, T M; Croxall, J P

    2004-08-01

    A recent taxonomic revision of wandering albatross elevated each of the four subspecies to species. We used mitochondrial DNA and nine microsatellite markers to study the phylogenetic relationships of three species (Diomedea antipodensis, D. exulans and D. gibsoni) in the wandering albatross complex. A small number of samples from a fourth species, D. dabbenena, were analysed using mitochondrial DNA only. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analyses indicated the presence of three distinct groups within the wandering albatross complex: D. exulans, D. dabbenena and D. antipodensis/D. gibsoni. Although no fixed differences were found between D. antipodensis and D. gibsoni, a significant difference in the frequency of a single restriction site was detected using random fragment length polymorphism. Microsatellite analyses using nine variable loci, showed that D. exulans, D. antipodensis and D. gibsoni were genetically differentiated. Despite the widespread distribution of D. exulans, we did not detect any genetic differentiation among populations breeding on different island groups. The lower level of genetic differentiation between D. antipodensis and D. gibsoni should be reclassified as D. antipodensis. Within the context of the current taxonomy, these combined data support three species: D. dabbenena, D. exulans and D. antipodensis. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

  9. Using Google Earth Surface Metrics to Predict Plant Species Richness in a Complex Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Block

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Google Earth provides a freely available, global mosaic of high-resolution imagery from different sensors that has become popular in environmental and ecological studies. However, such imagery lacks the near-infrared band often used in studying vegetation, thus its potential for estimating vegetation properties remains unclear. In this study, we assess the potential of Google Earth imagery to describe and predict vegetation attributes. Further, we compare it to the potential of SPOT imagery, which has additional spectral information. We measured basal area, vegetation height, crown cover, density of individuals, and species richness in 60 plots in the oak forests of a complex volcanic landscape in central Mexico. We modelled each vegetation attribute as a function of surface metrics derived from Google Earth and SPOT images, and selected the best-supported linear models from each source. Total species richness was the best-described and predicted variable: the best Google Earth-based model explained nearly as much variation in species richness as its SPOT counterpart (R2 = 0.44 and 0.51, respectively. However, Google Earth metrics emerged as poor predictors of all remaining vegetation attributes, whilst SPOT metrics showed potential for predicting vegetation height. We conclude that Google Earth imagery can be used to estimate species richness in complex landscapes. As it is freely available, Google Earth can broaden the use of remote sensing by researchers and managers in low-income tropical countries where most biodiversity hotspots are found.

  10. Molecular phylogeny of Glossodoris (Ehrenberg, 1831) nudibranchs and related genera reveals cryptic and pseudocryptic species complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Matsuda, Shayle B.

    2017-03-01

    Chromodorid nudibranchs (Chromodorididae) are brightly coloured sea slugs that live in some of the most biodiverse and threatened coral reefs on the planet. However, the evolutionary relationships within this family have not been well understood, especially in the genus Glossodoris. Members of Glossodoris have experienced large-scale taxonomic instability over the last century and have been the subject of repeated taxonomic changes, in part due to morphological characters being the sole traditional taxonomic sources of data. Changing concepts of traditional generic boundaries based on morphology also have contributed to this instability. Despite recent advances in molecular systematics, many aspects of chromodorid taxonomy remain poorly understood, particularly at the traditional species and generic levels. In this study, 77 individuals comprising 32 previously defined species were used to build the most robust phylogenetic tree of Glossodoris and related genera using mitochondrial genes cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and 16S, and the nuclear gene 28S. Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony analyses verify the most recent hypothesized evolutionary relationships within Glossodoris. Additionally, a pseudocryptic and cryptic species complex within Glossodoris cincta and a pseudocryptic complex within Glossodoris pallida emerged, and three new species of Doriprismatica are identified.

  11. Analysis of inteins in the Candida parapsilosis complex for simple and accurate species identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandini, Tâmara Heloísa Rocha; Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Bruder-Nascimento, Ariane C M O; Scheel, Christina M; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    Inteins are coding sequences that are transcribed and translated with flanking sequences and then are excised by an autocatalytic process. There are two types of inteins in fungi, mini-inteins and full-length inteins, both of which present a splicing domain containing well-conserved amino acid sequences. Full-length inteins also present a homing endonuclease domain that makes the intein a mobile genetic element. These parasitic genetic elements are located in highly conserved genes and may allow for the differentiation of closely related species of the Candida parapsilosis (psilosis) complex. The correct identification of the three psilosis complex species C. parapsilosis, Candida metapsilosis, and Candida orthopsilosis is very important in the clinical setting for improving antifungal therapy and patient care. In this work, we analyzed inteins that are present in the vacuolar ATPase gene VMA and in the threonyl-tRNA synthetase gene ThrRS in 85 strains of the Candida psilosis complex (46 C. parapsilosis, 17 C. metapsilosis, and 22 C. orthopsilosis). Here, we describe an accessible and accurate technique based on a single PCR that is able to differentiate the psilosis complex based on the VMA intein. Although the ThrRS intein does not distinguish the three species of the psilosis complex by PCR product size, it can differentiate them by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Furthermore, this intein is unusually present as both mini- and full-length forms in C. orthopsilosis. Additional population studies should be performed to address whether this represents a common intraspecific variability or the presence of subspecies within C. orthopsilosis.

  12. Identification and differentiation of Candida parapsilosis complex species by use of exon-primed intron-crossing PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaobo; Wu, Zengbin; Ling, Bo; Pan, Shuming; Liao, Wanqing; Pan, Weihua; Yao, Zhirong

    2014-05-01

    The Candida parapsilosis complex is composed of Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, Candida metapsilosis, and the closely related species Lodderomyces elongisporus. An exon-primed intron-crossing PCR assay was developed here to distinguish the members of the species complex on the basis of the distinct sizes of amplicons, and Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis were further discriminated by restriction enzyme analysis.

  13. [Removal of different species of red tide organisms with an effective clay-complex system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiuxian; Yu, Zhiming; Gao, Yonghui

    2003-07-01

    An effective clay-complex system was composed on the base of clay by added other two components A and B. Different red tide species, such as Scrippsiella trochoidea, Amphidinium carterae and Heterosigma akashiwo, were coagulated by this clay-complex system, and the optimum conditions for removal red tide organisms were obtained by means of orthogonal test. The results showed that clay was the most important factors in this complex system to coagulate these three organisms. The removal efficiency on three species was in order of Scrippsiella trochoidea > Amphidinium carterae > Heterosigma akashiwo. At the same time, a preliminary study of mortality rate on Penaeus japonicus (length between 1.0 to 1.5 cm) was conducted with this system, and the result of toxic test revealed that the mortality of aquaculture shrimp in control group (nothing added) reached to 80% after 96 h, however, while that of other three groups which added clay and other two components A and B, was below 40%. Thus, it implied that the addition of clay would be harmless to Penaeus japonicas. Furthermore, suitable concentration of components A and B was not harmful for the aquaculture shrimp, but increased the removal efficiency of red tide organisms. The preliminary results showed that this clay-complex system would be available in the removal of red tide organisms in filed.

  14. New stands of species of the Paramecium aurelia complex (Ciliophora, Protozoa) in Europe and South America (Ecuador).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybós, Ewa; Rautian, Maria; Surmacz, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of species of the P. aurelia complex has been studied at a large scale in Europe and the majority of known species of the complex have been found there. However, a different number of habitats were studied in particular zones of Europe, the greatest number in the central zone. Herein new stands of several species of the Paramecium aurelia complex are presented from Europe including P. primaurelia, P. biaurelia, P. triaurelia, P. octaurelia, P. novaurelia, and P. dodecaurelia. In South America, studies concerning the distribution of the P. aurelia species complex were carried out only occasionally and the presence of some cosmopolitan species of the complex has been recorded, i.e. P. primaurelia, P. biaurelia, and P. tetraurelia. Recently, new stands of P. primaurelia and P. septaurelia were found in Ecuador. Ciliate biogeography and distribution is also discussed.

  15. The fate of complex ecologies: How do species organize? An exact method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Ahmed; Pleimling, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Complex ecology models present a bridge between far from equilibrium physics and biology of populations. The May-Leonard, Rock-Paper-Scissor and Lotka-Volterra models have been extensively studied in an attempt to understand the dynamics of finite but large populations. In this talk we present a new theoretical technique which predicts the dynamics of these models for any complex ecology with interactions similar to the aforementioned models. This method has applications to real-world systems as it presents a simple method to predict correlations among two or more species in a complex ecology. We apply this method to the models mentioned and show that exact agreement between predictions and Monte-Carlo simulation data is obtained. This method could be applied to a wide variety of problems from economics to biology and game theory. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation through grant DMR-1205309.

  16. Indução de variabilidade na cultivar de arroz Metica-1 para resistência a Pyricularia grisea Induction of variability for resistance in the rice cultivar Metica-1 to Pyricularia grisea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Garcês de Araújo

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A brusone é um dos fatores limitantes da produtividade da cultivar Metica-1, no Estado do Tocantins. Objetivando obter somaclones resistentes, foi realizada a indução de calos e a regeneração de plantas a partir de panículas imaturas da cultivar Metica-1. Duzentas e oitenta plantas R2 foram submetidas a inoculação inóculo de patótipos de Pyricularia grisea, ID-14 e II-1, provenientes das cultivares Metica-1 e Cica-8, respectivamente. Enquanto todas as 280 plantas R2 de Metica-1 foram resistentes em relação ao patótipo II-1, as progênies de duas plantas R1 mostraram resistência ao patótipo ID14, indicando a indução de variação genética com relação à resistência à brusone na cultivar suscetível, nas gerações iniciais. A geração R3 foi avançada e entre 280 somaclones R4 foram selecionados 51, incluindo dois somaclones, CNAI10390 e CNAI10393, que mostraram resistência vertical no viveiro de brusone. Nas gerações avançadas de R5 e R6, estes dois somaclones apresentaram resistência no viveiro e nas inoculações com cinco isolados, provenientes das cultivares Metica-1, Cica-8 e Epagri 108, e poderão ser usados como novas fontes de resistência à brusone nos programas de melhoramento de arroz.Rice blast is one of the yield limiting factors of the rice cultivar Metica-1, in the State of Tocantins, Brazil. Plants of this cultivar were regenerated from the callus cultures derived from immature panicles with the objective of obtaining blast resistant somaclones. Two hundred eighty R2 plants were assessed utilizing pathotypes ID-14 and II-1 of Pyricularia grisea, retrieved from the cultivars Metica-1 and Cica-8, respectively. While all R2 plants of the cultivar Metica1 were resistant to the pathotype II-1, the progenies of two R1 plants showed resistance to pathotype ID-14, indicating thereby the induction of genetic variation for blast resistance in the susceptible rice cultivar, in early generations. The R3

  17. A pollinator shift explains floral divergence in an orchid species complex in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Craig I.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Floral diversification driven by shifts between pollinators has been one of the key explanations for the radiation of angiosperms. According to the Grant–Stebbins model of pollinator-driven speciation, these shifts result in morphologically distinct ‘ecotypes’ which may eventually become recognizable as species. The current circumscription of the food-deceptive southern African orchid Eulophia parviflora encompasses a highly variable monophyletic species complex. In this study, two forms were identified within this complex that differ in distribution, floral morphology, scent chemistry and phenology, and a test was made of whether these differences represent adaptations for different pollinators. Methods and Results Multivariate analysis of floral and vegetative traits revealed that there are at least two discrete morphological forms in the species complex. Field observations revealed that each form is pollinated by a different insect species, and thus represent distinct ecotypes. The early-flowering coastal form which has long spurs and floral scent dominated by sesquiterpene compounds is pollinated exclusively by the long-tongued bee Amegilla fallax (Apidae, Anthophorinae), while the late-flowering inland form with short spurs and floral scent dominated by benzenoid compounds is pollinated exclusively by the beetle Cyrtothyrea marginalis (Cetoniinae; Scarabaeidae). Choice experiments in a Y-maze olfactometer showed that beetles are preferentially attracted to the scent of the short-spurred form. A spur-shortening experiment showed that long spurs are required for effective pollination of the bee-pollinated form. Although it was initially thought likely that divergence occurred across a geographical pollinator gradient, plants of the long-spurred form were effectively pollinated when transplanted to an inland locality outside the natural coastal range of this form. Thus, the underlying geographical basis for the evolution of ecotypes in

  18. Two new species in the Matelea stenopetala complex (Apocynaceae, Asclepiadoideae from the Guiana Shield and Amazonian Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krings

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two new species in the Matelea stenopetala complex (Apocynaceae, Asclepiadoideae are described from the Guiana Shield and Amazonian Brazil: Matelea brevistipitata Krings & Morillo, sp. nov. and M. trichopedicellata Krings & Morillo, sp. nov. The new species belong to a small group of adaxially-pubescent-flowered taxa within the complex, including M. hildegardiana and M. pakaraimensis. The new species are described and a dichotomous key is provided.

  19. Ecological constraints limit the fitness of fungal hybrids in the Heterobasidion annosum species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbelotto, Matteo; Gonthier, Paolo; Nicolotti, Giovanni

    2007-10-01

    The ability of two closely related species to maintain species boundaries in spite of retained interfertility between them is a documented driving force of speciation. Experimental evidence to support possible interspecific postzygotic isolation mechanisms for organisms belonging to the kingdom Fungi is still missing. Here we report on the outcome of a series of controlled comparative inoculation experiments of parental wild genotypes and F(1) hybrid genotypes between closely related and interfertile taxa within the Heterobasidion annosum fungal species complex. Results indicated that these fungal hybrids are not genetically unfit but can fare as well as parental genotypes when inoculated on substrates favorable to both parents. However, when placed in substrates favoring one of the parents, hybrids are less competitive than the parental genotypes specialized on that substrate. Furthermore, in some but not all fungus x plant combinations, a clear asymmetry in fitness was observed between hybrids carrying identical nuclear genomes but different cytoplasms. This work provides some of the first experimental evidence of ecologically driven postzygotic reinforcement of isolation between closely related fungal species characterized by marked host specificity. Host specialization is one of the most striking traits of a large number of symbiotic and parasitic fungi; thus, we suggest the ecological mechanism proven here to reinforce isolation among Heterobasidion spp. may be generally valid for host-specialized fungi. The validity of this generalization is supported by the low number of known fungal hybrids and by their distinctive feature of being found in substrates different from those colonized by parental species.

  20. Natural Enemies of the Frankliniella Complex Species (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in Ataulfo Mango Agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Franklin H; Infante, Francisco; Castillo, Alfredo; Ibarra-Nuñez, Guillermo; Goldarazena, Arturo; Funderburk, Joe E

    2015-01-01

    A field survey was conducted in Ataulfo mango (Mangifera indica L.) orchards in Chiapas, Mexico, with the objective of determining the natural enemies of the Frankliniella complex species (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Seven species of this genus feed and reproduce in large numbers during the mango flowering. Two representative orchards were selected: the orchard "Tres A" characterized by an intensive use of agrochemicals directed against thrips, and the orchard "La Escondida" that did not spray insecticides. During mango flowering, five inflorescences were randomly collected every 5 d in both orchards, for a total of 18 sampling dates. Results revealed the presence of 18 species of arthropods that were found predating on Frankliniella. There were 11 species in the families Aeolothripidae, Phlaeothripidae, Formicidae, Anthocoridae and Chrysopidae; and seven species of spiders in the families Araneidae, Tetragnathidae, and Uloboridae. Over 88% of predators were anthocorids, including, Paratriphleps sp. (Champion), Orius insidiosus (Say), Orius tristicolor (White), and O. perpunctatus (Reuter). The orchard that did not spray insecticides had a significantly higher number of predators suggesting a negative effect of the insecticides on the abundance of these organisms.

  1. A single-step sequencing method for the identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoheira Djelouadji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC comprises closely related species responsible for strictly human and zoonotic tuberculosis. Accurate species determination is useful for the identification of outbreaks and epidemiological links. Mycobacterium africanum and Mycobacterium canettii are typically restricted to Africa and M. bovis is a re-emerging pathogen. Identification of these species is difficult and expensive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Exact Tandem Repeat D (ETR-D; alias Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit 4 was sequenced in MTC species type strains and 110 clinical isolates, in parallel to reference polyphasic identification based on phenotype profiling and sequencing of pncA, oxyR, hsp65, gyrB genes and the major polymorphism tandem repeat. Inclusion of M. tuberculosis isolates in the expanding, antibiotic-resistant Beijing clone was determined by Rv0927c gene sequencing. The ETR-D (780-bp sequence unambiguously identified MTC species type strain except M. pinnipedii and M. microti thanks to six single nucleotide polymorphisms, variable numbers (1-7 copies of the tandem repeat and two deletions/insertions. The ETR-D sequencing agreed with phenotypic identification in 107/110 clinical isolates and with reference polyphasic molecular identification in all isolates, comprising 98 M. tuberculosis, 5 M. bovis BCG type, 5 M. canettii, and 2 M. africanum. For M. tuberculosis isolates, the ETR-D sequence was not significantly associated with the Beijing clone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ETR-D sequencing allowed accurate, single-step identification of the MTC at the species level. It circumvented the current expensive, time-consuming polyphasic approach. It could be used to depict epidemiology of zoonotic and human tuberculosis, especially in African countries where several MTC species are emerging.

  2. Phylogeny and biogeography of the Poecilia sphenops species complex (Actinopterygii, Poeciliidae) in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alda, Fernando; Reina, Ruth G; Doadrio, Ignacio; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2013-03-01

    We inferred the phylogenetic relationships among members of the Poecilia sphenops species complex to resolve the colonization process and radiation of this group in Central America. We analyzed 2550 base pairs (bp) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), including ATP synthase 6 and 8, cytochrome oxidase subunit I and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 genes, and 906bp of the nuclear S7 ribosomal protein of 86 ingroup individuals from 61 localities spanning most of its distribution from Mexico to Panama. Our mitochondrial data rendered a well-supported phylogeny for the P. sphenops complex that differed with the nuclear data set topology, which did not recover the monophyly of the P. mexicana mitochondrial lineage. Coalescent-based simulations tests indicated that, although hybridization cannot be completely ruled out, this incongruence is most likely due to incomplete lineage sorting in this group, which also showed the widest geographic distribution. A single colonization event of Central America from South America was estimated to have occurred between the early Paleocene and Oligocene (53-22millionyears ago). Subsequently, two largely differentiated evolutionary lineages diverged around the Early Oligocene-Miocene (38-13million years ago), which are considered two separate species complexes: P. sphenops and P. mexicana, which can also be distinguished by their tricuspid and unicuspid inner jaw teeth, respectively. Ultimately, within lineage diversification occurred mainly during the Miocene (22-5million years ago). All major cladogenetic events predated the final closure of the Isthmus of Panama. The allopatric distribution of lineages together with the long basal internodes suggest that vicariance and long term isolations could be the main evolutionary forces promoting radiation in this group, although dispersal through water barriers might also have occurred. Lastly, our results suggest the need to review the current species distribution and taxonomy of the P. sphenops

  3. Complexation of sodium caseinate with gum tragacanth: Effect of various species and rheology of coacervates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani Gorji, Sara; Ghorbani Gorji, Elham; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Zargaraan, Azizollaah

    2014-06-01

    We investigated complex coacervation of sodium caseinate/Astragalus rahensis (A.r) as a function of pH with light scattering, spectrophotometry, and viscosity measurements. Interestingly, sodium caseinate/A.r displayed five structural transitions; pH 7.00 to pH ∼5.40: no interaction occurred, pH ∼5.40 to pH ∼4.80: initiation of the formation of primary soluble complexes, pH ∼4.80 to ∼4.30: formation of interpolymer complexes, pH ∼4.30 to ∼4.02: optimum coacervation and pH ∼4.02 to ∼2.50: suppression of coacervation. In addition, rheological properties of sodium caseinate/A.r coacervates were studied at various pH values. A much higher storage modulus (G') than loss modulus (G″) for all sodium caseinate/A.r coacervates suggests the formation of highly interconnected gel-like network structures with mainly elastic behaviour. Moreover, sodium caseinate/A.r coacervates at all pH values exhibited a shear thinning behaviour across the entire shear rate range investigated. Effects of different species of gum tragacanth on the interactions with sodium caseinate have been scarcely studied. Our study showed that systems containing various species (A.r, soluble fraction of A.r and Astragalus gossypinus (A.g)) had different critical pH values and particle sizes during complex coacervation, which could be due to different ratio of soluble to insoluble fractions and uronic acid content of various species.

  4. Screening of sporogenous medium for Pyricularia grisea (Cooke) Sacc%灰梨孢菌产孢培养基筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍秀娟; 李朝生; 韩美丽; 陆荣生

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]To provide technical support for Pyricularia grisea research, common effective sporogenous medium with simple, suitable operation was screened in the present experiment. [ Method ] Six Pyricularia grisea isolates obtained from rice, banana, and crab-grass were inoculated on nine kinds of media, e.g., C. communis, sorghum grain and barleycorn, etc. Effects of different media on sporulation quantity of Pyricularia grisea were investigated, and pathogenicity of Pyricularia grisea as assayed in C. communis media. [Result]Sorghum grain, barleycorn and C. communis media pronouncedly stimulated the sporulation in six strains with C. communis bested. Compared to commonly -used sorghum grain medium, spores cultured in C. communis media had similar pathogenicity towards rice and banana. Magna-porthe oryzae and banana blast strains in C. communis medium could be preserved at 4℃ for two years. [Conclusion]C. communis media was found to be the most suitable media for spores of Pyricularia grisea, and it was also found to conserve Pyricularia grisea.%[目的]筛选操作方法简便、产孢效果好、适宜于大多数灰梨孢菌的产孢培养基,为灰梨孢菌研究提供一定的技术支持.[方法]从水稻、香蕉和杂草马唐上分离获得6个灰梨孢菌菌株,接种于紫花鸭趾草、高粱粒和大麦粒等9种培养基上,测定不同培养基对灰梨孢菌产孢量的影响,并比较分析紫花鸭趾草培养基对病菌致病力的影响.[结果]高粱粒、大麦粒和紫花鸭趾草培养基对6个菌株孢子形成均有明显的促进作用,以紫花鸭趾草培养基的促进作用最明显.与常用的高粱粒培养基相比,6个菌株在紫花鸭趾草培养基上形成的病菌分生孢子对香蕉和水稻的致病力没有明显差异.在4℃冰箱中,用紫花鸭趾草培养基保存蕉瘟病和稻瘟病菌菌种,两年后病菌仍具有生活力.[结论]紫花鸭趾草培养基是适宜于灰梨孢菌分生孢子形成的理想

  5. Morphological and genetic characteristics of the anisakid nematode Raphidascaris acus from the southwest Caspian Sea: evidence for the existence of sibling species within a species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahantab, Mikhak; Haseli, Mohammad; Salehi, Zivar

    2014-09-01

    Recently, it has been shown that many nematode species are in fact species complex, using exact morphological and genetic studies. In this case, there are no such studies related to the genus Raphidascaris Railliet & Henry, 1915. Herein, the morphological and genetic variations among the Iranian population of the species Raphidascaris acus (Bloch, 1779) Railliet & Henry, 1915 and the other allopatric populations with morphological and genetic information were compared to show whether this species can be considered as a species complex. R. acus is an anisakid species and has been frequently reported from different host species from the Caspian Sea. Nonetheless, there are no morphological and genetic information for this species from the region. In the present study, a total of 20 specimens of R. acus were collected from Esox lucius Linnaeus, and the morphology of the Caspian population of this species was surveyed for the first time using both light and scanning electron microscopy. Meanwhile, some parts of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) including internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8 s, and ITS2 were sequenced and presented as the genetic marker for this species. To understand whether R. acus can be considered as a species complex, the Caspian population of this species was compared morphologically with the allopatric populations of Czech and Canada and genetically with the allopatric population of Poland (Vistula lagoon). Morphologically, there was no difference between the Caspian and Czech populations, but the Caspian and Canadian populations differed in the length of ejaculatory duct and the presence of small triangular elevation between the bases of subventral lips. The nucleotide difference between the Caspian and Polish populations was 4.48%. In comparison with the interspecific genetic distances in the genus Raphidascaris, this value is notable. In conclusion, based on morphological and genetic differences among the allopatric populations of R. acus, this species

  6. Molecular typing of clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex from Northeast Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gloria M; Casillas-Vega, Néstor; Garza-González, Elvira; Hernández-Bello, Romel; Rivera, Gildardo; Rodríguez, Jesús Ancer; Bocanegra-Garcia, Virgilio

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is caused by members of the Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex. Based on molecular identification, these two species have been further differentiated into molecular types. The aim of this work was to characterize clinical cryptococcal isolates recovered from six hospitals in Northeast Mexico from 1995 to 2011. One hundred and sixty-six isolates, which were characterized by biochemical tests and in vitro susceptibility to amphotericin B, fluconazole, and voriconazole, and M13 PCR fingerprinting, were included in this study. Utilizing phenotypic tests, 153 isolates (92.16 %) were identified as C. neoformans and 13 (7.83 %) as C. gattii. All isolates were susceptible to all antifungals tested. Employing M13 PCR fingerprinting, eight molecular types were detected. VNI was the most common genotype (124 cases; 74.6 %), followed by VNII (15 cases; 9 %), VNIII (8 cases; 4.8 %), VNIV (6 cases; 3.6 %), VGI (6 cases; 3.6 %), VGII (3 cases; 1.8 %), and VGIII and VGIV (2 cases, 1.2 % each). We confirm the presence of C. gattii in clinical isolates in Northeast Mexico, and a high clonal diversity in the studied strains of C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex.

  7. Molecular analysis and mating behaviour of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symoens, Françoise; Jousson, Olivier; Planard, Chantal; Fratti, Marina; Staib, Peter; Mignon, Bernard; Monod, Michel

    2011-03-01

    Isolates of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex vary phenotypically. Whether the closely related zoophilic and anthropophilic anamorphs currently associated with Arthroderma vanbreuseghemii have to be considered as members of the same biological species remains an open question. In order to better delineate species in the T. mentagrophytes complex, we performed a mating analysis of freshly collected isolates from humans and animals with A. benhamiae and A. vanbreuseghemii reference strains, in comparison to internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 28S rDNA sequencing. Mating experiments as well as ITS and 28S sequencing unambiguously allowed the distinction of A. benhamiae and A. vanbreuseghemii. We have also shown that all the isolates from tinea pedis and tinea unguium identified as T. interdigitale based on ITS sequences mated with A. vanbreuseghemii tester strains, but had lost their ability to give fertile cleistothecia. Therefore, T. interdigitale has to be considered as a humanized species derived from the sexual relative A. vanbreuseghemii. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Aspartyl proteinase, phospholipase, esterase and hemolysin activities of clinical isolates of the Candida parapsilosis species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio de J; González, J Gerardo; González, Gloria M

    2013-04-01

    Candida parapsilosis is considered as an important emerging fungal pathogen and was recently found to be a complex that include three species, i.e., Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis. The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro aspartyl proteinase, phospholipase, esterase and hemolysin activities of 65 clinical isolates of the C. parapsilosis complex, which had been previously identified by RFLP-BanI analysis. Of the enzymes evaluated, aspartyl proteinase was the least produced by the C. parapsilosis species complex. Phospholipase and esterase were strongly expressed by C. orthopsilosis (67% of isolates), while 10% and 13% of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates were strong producers, respectively, of these two enzymes. In contrast, high production of both enzymes was not detected in C. metapsilosis. Hemolysin activity was significantly more abundant in C. orthopsilosis (87%) than C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (67%). Overall, C. orthopsilosis isolates were statistically associated with the production of hemolysins (P= 0.048) and phospholipases (Porthopsilosis and 20% of C. metapsilosis.

  9. Comparison of the Virulence-Associated Phenotypes of Five Species of Acinetobacter baumannii Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, In Young; Chung, Eun Seon; Jung, Chang-Yun; Kim, Dae Hun; Shin, Juyoun; Kang, KyeongJin; Kim, Seong-Tae; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we compared the virulence-associated factors of Acinetobacter baumannii complex species. Sixty-three isolates of five A. baumannii complex species, including 19 A. baumannii, 15 A. nosocomialis, 13 A. seifertii, 13 A. pittii, and 3 A. calcoaceticus isolates, were included in this study. For all isolates, biofilm formation, A549 cell adherence, resistance to normal human serum, and motility were evaluated. A. baumannii complex isolates showed diversity in biofilm formation, A549 cell adherence, and serum resistance, and no strong positive relationships among these virulence characteristics. However, A. seifertii showed relatively consistent virulence-associated phenotypes. In addition, A. baumannii clone ST110 exhibited consistently high virulence-associated phenotypes. Motility was observed in seven isolates, and all four A. baumannii ST110 isolates showed twitching motility. Although some inconsistencies in virulence-associated phenotypes were seen, high virulence characteristics were observed in A. seifertii, which has been mainly reported in Korea and shows high rates of colistin resistance.

  10. Perspectivas del uso de bacterias rizosféricas en el control de pyricularia grisea (cooke sacc.) en el cultivo del arroz (oryza sativa l.)

    OpenAIRE

    Acebo Guerrero, Yanelis; Hernández-Rodríguez, Annia; Rives Rodríguez, Narovis; Hernández-Lauzardo, Ana Niurka

    2011-01-01

    Prospect of the use of bacteria in the control Pyricularia grisea (Cooke Sacc.) on rice (Oriza sativa L.) Título corto: Bacterias rizosféricas para controlar la piriculariosis ResumenEl arroz es fuente de alimento para una gran parte de la población mundial, con alto promedio de consumo anual. En este cultivo las enfermedades de origen microbiano constituyen uno de los factores que inciden en la obtención de bajos rendimientos y calidad de los granos. La piriculariosis o añublo del arroz, cau...

  11. Perspectivas del uso de bacterias rizosféricas en el control de Pyricularia grisea (Cooke Sacc.) en el cultivo del arroz (Oryza sativa L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Yanelis Acebo Guerrero; Annia Hernández-Rodríguez; Narovis Rives Rodríguez; Ana Niurka Hernández-Lauzardo

    2011-01-01

    Prospect of the use of bacteria in the control Pyricularia grisea (Cooke Sacc.) on rice (Oriza sativa L.) Título corto: Bacterias rizosféricas para controlar la piriculariosis ResumenEl arroz es fuente de alimento para una gran parte de la población mundial, con alto promedio de consumo anual. En este cultivo las enfermedades de origen microbiano constituyen uno de los factores que inciden en la obtención de bajos rendimientos y calidad de los granos. La piriculariosis o añublo del arroz, cau...

  12. Perspectivas del uso de bacterias rizosféricas en el control de Pyricularia grisea (Cooke Sacc.) en el cultivo del arroz (Oryza sativa L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Yanelis Acebo Guerrero; Annia Hernández-Rodríguez; Narovis Rives Rodríguez; Miguel Gerardo Velázquez del Valle; Ana Niurka Hernández-Lauzardo

    2011-01-01

    El arroz es fuente de alimento para una gran parte de la población mundial, con alto promedio de consumo anual. En este cultivo las enfermedades de origen microbiano constituyen uno de los factores que inciden en la obtención de bajos rendimientos y calidad de los granos. La piriculariosis o añublo del arroz, causada por Pyricularia grisea, es la enfermedad más importante en este cultivo en América Latina, ya que puede provocar hasta el 100% de reducción de los rendimientos. Como parte de la ...

  13. Pyriculins A and B, two monosubstituted hex-4-ene-2,3-diols and other phytotoxic metabolites produced by Pyricularia grisea isolated from buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco Masi; Susan Meyer; Marcin Gorecki; Alessandro Mandoli; Lorenzo Di Bari; Gennaro Pescitelli; Alessio Cimmino; Massimo Cristofaro; Suzette Clement; Antonio Evidente

    2017-01-01

    Pyricularia grisea has been identified as a foliar pathogen on buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris) in North America and was studied as a potential source of phytotoxins for buffelgrass control. Two monosubstituted hex‐4‐ene‐2,3‐diols, named pyriculins A and B, were isolated from its culture filtrate organic extract together with (10S,11S)‐(−)‐epipyriculol, trans‐3...

  14. Complex species status for extinct moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from the genus Euryapteryx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M

    2014-01-01

    The exact species status of New Zealand's extinct moa remains unknown. In particular, moa belonging to the genus Euryapteryx have been difficult to classify. We use the DNA barcoding sequence on a range of Euryapteryx samples in an attempt to resolve the species status for this genus. We obtained mitochondrial control region and the barcoding region from Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit I (COI) from a number of new moa samples and use available sequences from previous moa phylogenies and eggshell data to try and clarify the species status of Euryapteryx. Using the COI barcoding region we show that species status in Euryapteryx is complex with no clear separation between various individuals. Eggshell, soil, and bone data suggests that a Euryapteryx subspecies likely exists on New Zealand's North Island and can be characterized by a single mitochondrial control region SNP. COI divergences between Euryapteryx individuals from the south of New Zealand's South Island and those from the Far North of the North Island exceed 1.6% and are likely to represent separate species. Individuals from other areas of New Zealand were unable to be clearly separated based on COI differences possibly as a result of repeated hybridisation events. Despite the accuracy of the COI barcoding region to determine species status in birds, including that for the other moa genera, for moa from the genus Euryapteryx, COI barcoding fails to provide a clear result, possibly as a consequence of repeated hybridisation events between these moa. A single control region SNP was identified however that segregates with the two general morphological variants determined for Euryapteryx; a smaller subspecies restricted to the North Island of New Zealand, and a larger subspecies, found on both New Zealand's North and South Island.

  15. STENOSTOMUM LEUCOPS DUGÈS, 1828 (PLATYHELMINTHES, CATENULIDA: A PUTATIVE SPECIES COMPLEX WITH PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCOS T. ROSA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Species of Stenostomum are small flatworms that live in freshwater and normally reproduce asexually by paratomy. They are basal in the phylogeny of Platyhelminthes. For more than a century, species of this genus, especially S. leucops, have been used in regeneration and other biological studies. However, some basic aspects of their biology are poorly known. Here, we characterized a strain of S. leucops that has been maintained in the laboratory for five years and a recent strain of S. grande. The time required for complete formation of zooids of S. leucops by asexual reproduction is approximately 42.5 hours at 28°C. The number of cells in the zooids, soon after paratomy, is approximately 2,500. The number of zooids formed in the chain is a plastic characteristic and is dependent on the conditions for cultivation. In some cultivation conditions of S. leucops, only worms with two zooids are formed. However, in other conditions, worms with up to five zooids are observed. Phylogenetic analyses of a fragment of the Cytochrome C Oxidase I (COI sequence showed S. leucops and S. grande species constitute a species complex, the lineages of which having high intraspecific divergences.

  16. Polyphasic characterisation of Burkholderia cepacia complex species isolated from children with cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicenzi, Fernando José; Pillonetto, Marcelo; de Souza, Helena Aguilar Peres Homem de Mello; Palmeiro, Jussara Kasuko; Riedi, Carlos Antônio; Rosario-Filho, Nelson Augusto; Dalla-Costa, Libera Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) pulmonary infections have high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to compare different methods for identification of Bcc species isolated from paediatric CF patients. Oropharyngeal swabs from children with CF were used to obtain isolates of Bcc samples to evaluate six different tests for strain identification. Conventional (CPT) and automatised (APT) phenotypic tests, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-recA, restriction fragment length polymorphism-recA, recAsequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) were applied. Bacterial isolates were also tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. PCR-recA analysis showed that 36 out of the 54 isolates were Bcc. Kappa index data indicated almost perfect agreement between CPT and APT, CPT and PCR-recA, and APT and PCR-recA to identify Bcc, and MALDI-TOF and recAsequencing to identify Bcc species. The recAsequencing data and the MALDI-TOF data agreed in 97.2% of the isolates. Based on recA sequencing, the most common species identified were Burkholderia cenocepacia IIIA (33.4%),Burkholderia vietnamiensis (30.6%), B. cenocepaciaIIIB (27.8%), Burkholderia multivorans (5.5%), and B. cepacia (2.7%). MALDI-TOF proved to be a useful tool for identification of Bcc species obtained from CF patients, although it was not able to identify B. cenocepacia subtypes. PMID:26814642

  17. Tephritid Integrative Taxonomy: Where We Are Now, with a Focus on the Resolution of Three Tropical Fruit Fly Species Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutze, Mark K; Virgilio, Massimiliano; Norrbom, Allen; Clarke, Anthony R

    2017-01-31

    Accurate species delimitation underpins good taxonomy. Formalization of integrative taxonomy in the past decade has provided a framework for using multidisciplinary data to make species delimitation hypotheses more rigorous. We address the current state of integrative taxonomy by using as a case study an international project targeted at resolving three important tephritid species complexes: Bactrocera dorsalis complex, Anastrepha fraterculus complex, and Ceratitis FAR (C. fasciventris, C. anonae, C. rosa) complex. The integrative taxonomic approach has helped deliver significant advances in resolving these complexes: It has been used to identify some taxa as belonging to the same biological species as well as to confirm hidden cryptic diversity under a single taxonomic name. Nevertheless, the general application of integrative taxonomy has not been without issue, revealing challenges that must be considered when undertaking an integrative taxonomy project. Scrutiny of this international case study provides a unique opportunity to document lessons learned for the benefit of not only tephritid taxonomists, but also the wider taxonomic community.

  18. Antifungal susceptibilities and identification of species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex isolated in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottonelli Stopiglia, Cheila Denise; Magagnin, Cibele Massotti; Castrillón, Mauricio Ramírez; Mendes, Sandra Denise Camargo; Heidrich, Daiane; Valente, Patricia; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic mycosis caused worldwide by the dimorphic species complex, Sporothrix schenckii. We studied 85 isolates recovered in Brazil to verify their identification and evaluate their in vitro antifungal susceptibility patterns. Based on phenotypic tests (microscopic features, ability to grow at 30°C and 37°C, colony diameters, as well as assimilation of sucrose and raffinose) and molecular assays (amplification of a fragment of the calmodulin gene), the strains were identified as S. schenckii, S. brasiliensis and S. globosa, with a predominance of S. schenckii isolates. There was 37.7% disagreement between the phenotypic and genotypic identification methodologies. In general, terbinafine was the most active drug, followed by ketoconazole and itraconazole, and the less active fluconazole and voriconazole. Five isolates (one S. globosa and four S. schenckii) were found to be itraconazole-resistant strains but, in general, there were no differences in the in vitro antifungal susceptibility profiles among the Sporothrix species.

  19. Taxonomic status of the Bemisia tabaci complex (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae and reassessment of the number of its constituent species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonhoon Lee

    Full Text Available Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae is one of the most important insect pests in the world. In the present study, the taxonomic status of B. tabaci and the number of species composing the B. tabaci complex were determined based on 1059 COI sequences of B. tabaci and 509 COI sequences of 153 hemipteran species. The genetic divergence within B. tabaci was conspicuously higher (on average, 11.1% than interspecific genetic divergence within the respective genera of the 153 species (on average, 6.5%. This result indicates that B. tabaci is composed of multiple species that may belong to different genera or subfamilies. A phylogenetic tree constructed based on 212 COI sequences without duplications revealed that the B. tabaci complex is composed of a total of 31 putative species, including a new species, JpL. However, genetic divergence within six species (Asia II 1, Asia II 7, Australia, Mediterranean, New World, and Sub Saharan Africa 1 was higher than 3.5%, which has been used as a threshold of species boundaries within the B. tabaci complex. These results suggest that it is necessary to increase the threshold for species boundaries up to 4% to distinguish the constituent species in the B. tabaci complex.

  20. Taxonomic status of the Bemisia tabaci complex (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and reassessment of the number of its constituent species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhoon; Park, Jongsun; Lee, Gwan-Seok; Lee, Seunghwan; Akimoto, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is one of the most important insect pests in the world. In the present study, the taxonomic status of B. tabaci and the number of species composing the B. tabaci complex were determined based on 1059 COI sequences of B. tabaci and 509 COI sequences of 153 hemipteran species. The genetic divergence within B. tabaci was conspicuously higher (on average, 11.1%) than interspecific genetic divergence within the respective genera of the 153 species (on average, 6.5%). This result indicates that B. tabaci is composed of multiple species that may belong to different genera or subfamilies. A phylogenetic tree constructed based on 212 COI sequences without duplications revealed that the B. tabaci complex is composed of a total of 31 putative species, including a new species, JpL. However, genetic divergence within six species (Asia II 1, Asia II 7, Australia, Mediterranean, New World, and Sub Saharan Africa 1) was higher than 3.5%, which has been used as a threshold of species boundaries within the B. tabaci complex. These results suggest that it is necessary to increase the threshold for species boundaries up to 4% to distinguish the constituent species in the B. tabaci complex.

  1. Simultaneous Identification of Neutral and Anionic Species in Complex Mixtures without Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanchuan; Chen, Lily; Swager, Timothy M

    2016-01-18

    A chemosensory system is reported that operates without the need for separation techniques and is capable of identifying anions and structurally similar bioactive molecules. In this strategy, the coordination of analytes to a metal complex with an open binding cleft generates "static structures" on the NMR timescale. Unique signals are created by strategically placing fluorine atoms in close proximity to bound analytes so that small structural differences induce distinct (19)F NMR shifts that can be used to identify each analyte. The utility of this method is illustrated by quantifying caffeine levels in coffee, by identifying ingredients in tea and energy drinks, and by discriminating between multiple biogenic amines with remote structural differences six carbon atoms away from the binding site. We further demonstrate the simultaneous identification of multiple neutral and anionic species in a complex mixture.

  2. Postantifungal Effect of Micafungin against the Species Complexes of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Micafungin is an effective antifungal agent useful for the therapy of invasive candidiasis. Candida albicans is the most common cause of invasive candidiasis; however, infections due to non-C. albicans species, such as Candida parapsilosis, are rising. Killing and postantifungal effects (PAFE) are important factors in both dose interval choice and infection outcome. The aim of this study was to determinate the micafungin PAFE against 7 C. albicans strains, 5 Candida dubliniensis, 2 Candida Africana, 3 C. parapsilosis, 2 Candida metapsilosis and 2 Candida orthopsilosis. For PAFE studies, cells were exposed to micafungin for 1 h at concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 8 μg/ml. Time-kill experiments (TK) were conducted at the same concentrations. Samples were removed at each time point (0-48 h) and viable counts determined. Micafungin (2 μg/ml) was fungicidal (≥ 3 log10 reduction) in TK against 5 out of 14 (36%) strains of C. albicans complex. In PAFE experiments, fungicidal endpoint was achieved against 2 out of 14 strains (14%). In TK against C. parapsilosis, 8 μg/ml of micafungin turned out to be fungicidal against 4 out 7 (57%) strains. Conversely, fungicidal endpoint was not achieved in PAFE studies. PAFE results for C. albicans complex (41.83 ± 2.18 h) differed from C. parapsilosis complex (8.07 ± 4.2 h) at the highest tested concentration of micafungin. In conclusion, micafungin showed significant differences in PAFE against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis complexes, being PAFE for the C. albicans complex longer than for the C. parapsilosis complex. PMID:26168269

  3. Postantifungal Effect of Micafungin against the Species Complexes of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Gil-Alonso

    Full Text Available Micafungin is an effective antifungal agent useful for the therapy of invasive candidiasis. Candida albicans is the most common cause of invasive candidiasis; however, infections due to non-C. albicans species, such as Candida parapsilosis, are rising. Killing and postantifungal effects (PAFE are important factors in both dose interval choice and infection outcome. The aim of this study was to determinate the micafungin PAFE against 7 C. albicans strains, 5 Candida dubliniensis, 2 Candida Africana, 3 C. parapsilosis, 2 Candida metapsilosis and 2 Candida orthopsilosis. For PAFE studies, cells were exposed to micafungin for 1 h at concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 8 μg/ml. Time-kill experiments (TK were conducted at the same concentrations. Samples were removed at each time point (0-48 h and viable counts determined. Micafungin (2 μg/ml was fungicidal (≥ 3 log10 reduction in TK against 5 out of 14 (36% strains of C. albicans complex. In PAFE experiments, fungicidal endpoint was achieved against 2 out of 14 strains (14%. In TK against C. parapsilosis, 8 μg/ml of micafungin turned out to be fungicidal against 4 out 7 (57% strains. Conversely, fungicidal endpoint was not achieved in PAFE studies. PAFE results for C. albicans complex (41.83 ± 2.18 h differed from C. parapsilosis complex (8.07 ± 4.2 h at the highest tested concentration of micafungin. In conclusion, micafungin showed significant differences in PAFE against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis complexes, being PAFE for the C. albicans complex longer than for the C. parapsilosis complex.

  4. Postantifungal Effect of Micafungin against the Species Complexes of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Micafungin is an effective antifungal agent useful for the therapy of invasive candidiasis. Candida albicans is the most common cause of invasive candidiasis; however, infections due to non-C. albicans species, such as Candida parapsilosis, are rising. Killing and postantifungal effects (PAFE) are important factors in both dose interval choice and infection outcome. The aim of this study was to determinate the micafungin PAFE against 7 C. albicans strains, 5 Candida dubliniensis, 2 Candida Africana, 3 C. parapsilosis, 2 Candida metapsilosis and 2 Candida orthopsilosis. For PAFE studies, cells were exposed to micafungin for 1 h at concentrations ranging from 0.12 to 8 μg/ml. Time-kill experiments (TK) were conducted at the same concentrations. Samples were removed at each time point (0-48 h) and viable counts determined. Micafungin (2 μg/ml) was fungicidal (≥ 3 log10 reduction) in TK against 5 out of 14 (36%) strains of C. albicans complex. In PAFE experiments, fungicidal endpoint was achieved against 2 out of 14 strains (14%). In TK against C. parapsilosis, 8 μg/ml of micafungin turned out to be fungicidal against 4 out 7 (57%) strains. Conversely, fungicidal endpoint was not achieved in PAFE studies. PAFE results for C. albicans complex (41.83 ± 2.18 h) differed from C. parapsilosis complex (8.07 ± 4.2 h) at the highest tested concentration of micafungin. In conclusion, micafungin showed significant differences in PAFE against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis complexes, being PAFE for the C. albicans complex longer than for the C. parapsilosis complex.

  5. The presence of six cryptic species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex in China as revealed by crossing experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wang; Di-Bing Sun; Bao-Li Qiu; Shu-Sheng Liu

    2011-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I(mtCOI)sequences of Bemisia tabaci worldwide indicates that the whitefly comprises at least 24 morphologically indistinguishable but genetically distinct cryptic species.While evidence of reproductive isolation has been reported for some of the putative species,more extensive crossing experiments are required to clarify the systematics of this species complex.In this study,we established laboratory cultures for six putative species of B.tabaci collected in China.We conducted 22 inter-species crosses among the six putative species.The data and those reported previously were collated,and the combined dataset covered all the 30 possible inter-species crosses among the six putative species.Intra-species controls always produced female and male progeny and the proportions of females in the first generation(F1)ranged from 56% to 70%.However,in inter-species crosses female progeny were rarely produced,and the few F1 females produced in four of the 30 inter-species crosses were either sterile or significantly weaker in viability.These results demonstrate a pattern of complete reproductive isolation among the six putative species and show that they are six cryptic species in the B.tabaci complex.

  6. Comparison of Phylogeny, Venom Composition and Neutralization by Antivenom in Diverse Species of Bothrops Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Pedro S.; Bernardoni, Juliana L.; Oliveira, Sâmella S.; Portes-Junior, José Antonio; Mourão, Rosa Helena V.; Lima-dos-Santos, Isa; Sano-Martins, Ida S.; Chalkidis, Hipócrates M.; Valente, Richard H.; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    In Latin America, Bothrops snakes account for most snake bites in humans, and the recommended treatment is administration of multispecific Bothrops antivenom (SAB – soro antibotrópico). However, Bothrops snakes are very diverse with regard to their venom composition, which raises the issue of which venoms should be used as immunizing antigens for the production of pan-specific Bothrops antivenoms. In this study, we simultaneously compared the composition and reactivity with SAB of venoms collected from six species of snakes, distributed in pairs from three distinct phylogenetic clades: Bothrops, Bothropoides and Rhinocerophis. We also evaluated the neutralization of Bothrops atrox venom, which is the species responsible for most snake bites in the Amazon region, but not included in the immunization antigen mixture used to produce SAB. Using mass spectrometric and chromatographic approaches, we observed a lack of similarity in protein composition between the venoms from closely related snakes and a high similarity between the venoms of phylogenetically more distant snakes, suggesting little connection between taxonomic position and venom composition. P-III snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) are the most antigenic toxins in the venoms of snakes from the Bothrops complex, whereas class P-I SVMPs, snake venom serine proteinases and phospholipases A2 reacted with antibodies in lower levels. Low molecular size toxins, such as disintegrins and bradykinin-potentiating peptides, were poorly antigenic. Toxins from the same protein family showed antigenic cross-reactivity among venoms from different species; SAB was efficient in neutralizing the B. atrox venom major toxins. Thus, we suggest that it is possible to obtain pan-specific effective antivenoms for Bothrops envenomations through immunization with venoms from only a few species of snakes, if these venoms contain protein classes that are representative of all species to which the antivenom is targeted. PMID

  7. Comparison of phylogeny, venom composition and neutralization by antivenom in diverse species of bothrops complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leijiane F Sousa

    Full Text Available In Latin America, Bothrops snakes account for most snake bites in humans, and the recommended treatment is administration of multispecific Bothrops antivenom (SAB--soro antibotrópico. However, Bothrops snakes are very diverse with regard to their venom composition, which raises the issue of which venoms should be used as immunizing antigens for the production of pan-specific Bothrops antivenoms. In this study, we simultaneously compared the composition and reactivity with SAB of venoms collected from six species of snakes, distributed in pairs from three distinct phylogenetic clades: Bothrops, Bothropoides and Rhinocerophis. We also evaluated the neutralization of Bothrops atrox venom, which is the species responsible for most snake bites in the Amazon region, but not included in the immunization antigen mixture used to produce SAB. Using mass spectrometric and chromatographic approaches, we observed a lack of similarity in protein composition between the venoms from closely related snakes and a high similarity between the venoms of phylogenetically more distant snakes, suggesting little connection between taxonomic position and venom composition. P-III snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs are the most antigenic toxins in the venoms of snakes from the Bothrops complex, whereas class P-I SVMPs, snake venom serine proteinases and phospholipases A2 reacted with antibodies in lower levels. Low molecular size toxins, such as disintegrins and bradykinin-potentiating peptides, were poorly antigenic. Toxins from the same protein family showed antigenic cross-reactivity among venoms from different species; SAB was efficient in neutralizing the B. atrox venom major toxins. Thus, we suggest that it is possible to obtain pan-specific effective antivenoms for Bothrops envenomations through immunization with venoms from only a few species of snakes, if these venoms contain protein classes that are representative of all species to which the antivenom is

  8. Interleukin-8 responses of multi-layer gingival epithelia to subgingival biofilms: role of the "red complex" species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios N Belibasakis

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal tissues. The Gram-negative anaerobic species Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, (also known as the "red complex" species are highly associated with subgingival biofilms at periodontitis-affected sites. A major chemokine produced by the gingival epithelium in response to biofilm challenge, is interleukin (IL-8. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the relative effect of the "red complex" species as constituents of subgingival biofilms, on the regulation of IL-8 by gingival epithelia. Multi-layered organotypic human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its 7-species variant, excluding the "red complex". IL-8 gene expression and secretion analyses were performed by qPCR and ELISA, respectively. After 3 h, both biofilms up-regulated IL-8 gene expression, but the presence of the "red complex" resulted in 3-fold greater response. IL-8 secretion was also up-regulated by both biofilms, with no differences between them. After 24 h, the 10-species biofilm reduced IL-8 secretion to 50% of the control, but this was not affected when the "red complex" was absent. In conclusion, as part of biofilms, "red complex" species differentially regulate IL-8 in gingival epithelia, potentially affecting the chemotactic responses of the tissue.

  9. Reticulate Speciation and Barriers to Introgression in the Anopheles gambiae Species Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jacob E; Riehle, Michelle M; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M; Gneme, Awa; Sagnon, N'Fale; Vernick, Kenneth D; Nielsen, Rasmus; Lazzaro, Brian P

    2015-11-28

    Speciation as a process remains a central focus of evolutionary biology, but our understanding of the genomic architecture and prevalence of speciation in the face of gene flow remains incomplete. The Anopheles gambiae species complex of malaria mosquitoes is a radiation of ecologically diverse taxa. This complex is well-suited for testing for evidence of a speciation continuum and genomic barriers to introgression because its members exhibit partially overlapping geographic distributions as well as varying levels of divergence and reproductive isolation. We sequenced 20 genomes from wild A. gambiae s.s., Anopheles coluzzii, Anopheles arabiensis, and compared these with 12 genomes from the "GOUNDRY" subgroup of A. gambiae s.l. Amidst a backdrop of strong reproductive isolation, we find strong evidence for a speciation continuum with introgression of autosomal chromosomal regions among species and subgroups. The X chromosome, however, is strongly differentiated among all taxa, pointing to a disproportionately large effect of X chromosome genes in driving speciation among anophelines. Strikingly, we find that autosomal introgression has occurred from contemporary hybridization between A. gambiae and A. arabiensis despite strong divergence (∼5× higher than autosomal divergence) and isolation on the X chromosome. In addition to the X, we find strong evidence that lowly recombining autosomal regions, especially pericentromeric regions, serve as barriers to introgression secondarily to the X. We show that speciation with gene flow results in genomic mosaicism of divergence and introgression. Such a reticulate gene pool connecting vector taxa across the speciation continuum has important implications for malaria control efforts.

  10. The calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A exhibits synergism with antifungals against Candida parapsilosis species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Macedo, Ramila de Brito; Teixeira, Carlos Eduardo Cordeiro; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2014-07-01

    Candida parapsilosis complex comprises three closely related species, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida metapsilosis and Candida orthopsilosis. In the last decade, antifungal resistance to azoles and caspofungin among C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains has been considered a matter of concern worldwide. In the present study, we evaluated the synergistic potential of antifungals and the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A (Cys) against planktonic and biofilms of C. parapsilosis complex from clinical sources. Susceptibility assays with amphotericin, fluconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin and Cys were performed by microdilution in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Synergy testing against planktonic cells of C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains was assessed by the chequerboard method. Combinations formed by antifungals with Cys were evaluated against mature biofilms in microtitre plates. No differences in the antifungal susceptibility pattern among species were observed, but C. parapsilosis sensu stricto strains were more susceptible to Cys than C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Synergism between antifungals and Cys was observed in C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains. Combinations formed by antifungals and Cys were able to prevent biofilm formation and showed an inhibitory effect against mature biofilms of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis. These results strengthen the potential of calcineurin inhibition as a promising approach to enhance the efficiency of antifungal drugs.

  11. Fisetin as a promising antifungal agent against Cryptocococcus neoformans species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, M P C; Carvalho, C R C; Andrade, F A; Fernandes, O F L; Arruda, W; Silva, M R R

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of action of fisetin, a flavonol with antifungal activity previously evaluated against the Cryptococcus neoformans species complex. Ergosterol content and flow cytometry analysis were determined for the C. neoformans species complex in the presence of fisetin and ultrastructural analysis of morphology was performed on Cryptococcus gattii and C. neoformans. Decrease in the total cellular ergosterol content after exposure to fisetin ranged from 25·4% after exposure to 128 μg ml(-1) to 21·6% after exposure to 64 μg ml(-1) of fisetin compared with the control (without fisetin). The fisetin effects obtained with flow cytometry showed metabolic impairment, and alterations in its normal morphology caused by fisetin in C. neoformans cells were verified using scanning electron microscopy. Fisetin is a compound that acts in the biosynthesis of ergosterol. Flow cytometry showed that fisetin reduced viability of the metabolically active cells of C. gattii, while morphological changes explain the action of fisetin in inhibiting growth of these fungi. This study supports the idea that fisetin may represent a good starting point for the development of future therapeutic substances for cryptococcosis. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Natural Crossbreeding between Sympatric Species of the Phyllosoma Complex (Insecta: Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Indicate the Existence of Only One Species with Morphologic and Genetic Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hernandez, Fernando; Martínez-Ibarra, Jose A.; Catalá, Silvia; Villalobos, Guiehdani; de la Torre, Patricia; Laclette, Juan P.; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Espinoza, Bertha

    2010-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the cytochrome B gene and the antennal phenotypes were analyzed for the following triatomine species: Triatoma longipennis, Triatoma pallidipennis, and Triatoma picturata, which belong to the Phyllosoma complex. These species inhabit sympatric areas from Talpa de Allende, Autlan de Navarro, and Teocuitatlan de Corona in Jalisco, Mexico. Molecular marker analysis showed that the sympatric individuals are the natural crossbred descendents of different individuals living in close proximity in these natural areas that resulted in mixed populations. The antennal phenotype results are coincident with these genetic findings, which point to the high similitude between all Phyllosoma complex populations analyzed. These data support the hypothesis that these species are morphotypes with chromatic and genetic varieties, which preserves the possibility of natural breeding with fertile descent. In conclusion, our results strongly support the hypothesis that T. pallidipennis, T. longipennis, and T. picturata are subspecies of the Phyllosoma complex. PMID:20064999

  13. Occupancy modeling and estimation of the holiday darter species complex within the Etowah River system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory B.; Freeman, Mary C.; Hagler, Megan M.; Freeman, Byron J.

    2012-01-01

    Documenting the status of rare fishes is a crucial step in effectively managing populations and implementing regulatory mechanisms of protection. In recent years, site occupancy has become an increasingly popular metric for assessing populations, but species distribution models that do not account for imperfect detection can underestimate the proportion of sites occupied and the strength of the relationship with a hypothesized covariate. However, valid detection requires temporal or spatial replication, which is often not feasible due to logistical or budget constraints. In this study, we used a method that allowed for spatial replication during a single visit to evaluate the current status of the holiday darter species complex, Etheostoma sp. cf. E. brevirostrum, within the Etowah River system. Moreover, the modeling approach used in this study facilitated comparisons of factors influencing stream occupancy as well as species detection within sites. The results suggest that there is less habitat available for the Etowah holiday darter form (Etheostoma sp. cf. E. brevirostrum B) than for the Amicalola holiday darter form (Etheostoma sp. cf. E. brevirostrum A). Additionally, occupancy models suggest that even small decreases in forest cover within these headwater systems adversely affect holiday darter populations.

  14. Biogeographic history of the species complex Basileuterus culicivorus (Aves, Parulidae) in the Neotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaça, Sibelle Torres; Santos, Fabrício Rodrigues

    2010-11-01

    The taxonomic status of Basileuterus culicivorus complex has been under debate for a long time. There are uncertainties about the relationships among recognized species (B. culicivorus and B. hypoleucus), and whether B. culicivorus can be considered as a single species. In order to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships among these species and their biogeographic history we used a broad geographic sampling from Mexico to Argentina of B. culicivorus and B. hypoleucus. Using a mitochondrial gene, a nuclear intron and microsatellites we identified highly structured groups according to their spatial distribution. The known subspecies of B. culicivorus formed monophyletic groups, except two ones from Brazil and Paraguay. Basileuterus hypoleucus sequences did not form a monophyletic clade, being more related to B. culicivorus from Brazil and Paraguay. The divergence time analysis indicated that the deep separation of the basal lineages of B. culicivorus occurred in Late Pliocene. Contrasting with the other geographically structured populations from Central and South America, the clade of birds from Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina showed a remarkably high population growth starting in the mid-Pleistocene, according to the most plausible evolutionary scenario expected for parulid birds of a range expansion directed southwards.

  15. Niche divergence builds the case for ecological speciation in skinks of the Plestiodon skiltonianus species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogan, Guinevere O.U.; Richmond, Jonathan Q.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to different thermal environments has the potential to cause evolutionary changes that are sufficient to drive ecological speciation. Here, we examine whether climate-based niche divergence in lizards of the Plestiodon skiltonianus species complex is consistent with the outcomes of such a process. Previous work on this group shows that a mechanical sexual barrier has evolved between species that differ mainly in body size and that the barrier may be a by-product of selection for increased body size in lineages that have invaded xeric environments; however, baseline information on niche divergence among members of the group is lacking. We quantified the climatic niche using mechanistic physiological and correlative niche models and then estimated niche differences among species using ordination techniques and tests of niche overlap and equivalency. Our results show that the thermal niches of size-divergent, reproductively isolated morphospecies are significantly differentiated and that precipitation may have been as important as temperature in causing increased shifts in body size in xeric habitats. While these findings alone do not demonstrate thermal adaptation or identify the cause of speciation, their integration with earlier genetic and behavioral studies provides a useful test of phenotype–environment associations that further support the case for ecological speciation in these lizards.

  16. AMPHIDINIUM REVISITED. II. RESOLVING SPECIES BOUNDARIES IN THE AMPHIDINIUM OPERCULATUM SPECIES COMPLEX (DINOPHYCEAE), INCLUDING THE DESCRIPTIONS OF AMPHIDINIUM TRULLA SP. NOV. AND AMPHIDINIUM GIBBOSUM. COMB. NOV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Shauna; Jørgensen, Mårten Flø; Daugbjerg, Niels;

    2004-01-01

    Amphidinium operculatum Claparède et Lachmann, the type species of the dinoflagellate genus Amphidinium, has long had an uncertain identity. It has been considered to be either difficult to distinguish from other similar species or a morphologically variable species itself. This has led to the hy......Amphidinium operculatum Claparède et Lachmann, the type species of the dinoflagellate genus Amphidinium, has long had an uncertain identity. It has been considered to be either difficult to distinguish from other similar species or a morphologically variable species itself. This has led...... to the hypothesis that A. operculatum represents a "species complex." Recently, the problem of distinguishing A. operculatum from similar species has become particularly acute, because several morphologically similar species have been found to produce bioactive compounds of potential interest to the pharmaceutical......, and partial large subunit (LSU) rDNA sequence data. Through morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses, six distinct species were identified, including Amphidinium trulla sp. nov. and Amphidinium gibbosum comb. nov. Amphidinium operculatum was redescribed based on four cultures. Genetic variability...

  17. Colletotrichum truncatum species complex: Treatment considerations and review of the literature for an unusual pathogen causing fungal keratitis and endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Squissato

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of Colletotrichum truncatum species complex fungal keratitis and endophthalmitis in an 87-year-old immunocompetent male in whom oral triazole antifungals were contraindicated. The patient had recently returned from 4 months in Jamaica with a one month history of progressively increasing pain and inflammation in his left eye. Corneal samples grew a filamentous fungus and internal transcribed spacer sequencing polymerase chain reaction confirmed the presence of C. truncatum species complex. Samples showed no microbial growth.

  18. Molecular phylogeny of the Afroedura nivaria (Reptilia: Gekkonidae) species complex in South Africa provides insight on cryptic speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhubo, Buyisile G; Tolley, Krystal A; Bates, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    The Afroedura nivaria species complex (A. nivaria, A. karroica, A. amatolica, A. tembulica and A. halli) is a morphologically conservative group of medium-sized flat geckos endemic to South Africa and Lesotho. Species are allopatric, as are some populations within species that are separated by large expanses of unsuitable habitat. Because of this isolation of populations we hypothesised that several cryptic species may be present. To investigate this hypothesis we constructed a molecular phylogeny using multiple markers, and included representatives of other Afroedura species. Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analyses (439bp 16S, 593bp ND4, 948bp RAG1) strongly supported the genetic distinctiveness of the five described species. However, the A. nivaria species complex as currently described is not monophyletic, as A. karroica was positioned outside a clade containing all other Afroedura species, and A. pondolia (which was presumed to belong to a different species complex) was recovered within the A. nivaria complex. Several distinct clades within A. halli and A. nivaria were also recovered, and the narrowly-distributed A. amatolica consisted of two highly divergent clades. We also conducted a multivariate analysis using 19 morphological characters to investigate whether the clades recovered by the phylogeny were distinct in terms of head, body and limb shape. The analysis showed some variation between clades in terms of locomotor apparatus (forelimbs and feet), head and body dimensions, but overall the morphological differences were minor. This morphological conservatism in the A. nivaria complex may be a result of adaptation to similar microhabitats. Exclusive of A. karroica, the results suggest that there are at least nine species in this complex, of which four are cryptic and undescribed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Natural Crossbreeding between Sympatric Species of the Phyllosoma Complex (Insecta: Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Indicate the Existence of Only One Species with Morphologic and Genetic Variations

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the cytochrome B gene and the antennal phenotypes were analyzed for the following triatomine species: Triatoma longipennis, Triatoma pallidipennis, and Triatoma picturata, which belong to the Phyllosoma complex. These species inhabit sympatric areas from Talpa de Allende, Autlan de Navarro, and Teocuitatlan de Corona in Jalisco, Mexico. Molecular marker analysis showed that the sympatric individuals are the natural crossbred descendents of different individuals liv...

  20. Perspectivas del uso de bacterias rizosféricas en el control de Pyricularia grisea (Cooke Sacc. en el cultivo del arroz (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanelis Acebo Guerrero

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Prospect of the use of bacteria in the control Pyricularia grisea (Cooke Sacc. on rice (Oriza sativa L. Título corto: Bacterias rizosféricas para controlar la piriculariosis ResumenEl arroz es fuente de alimento para una gran parte de la población mundial, con alto promedio de consumo anual. En este cultivo las enfermedades de origen microbiano constituyen uno de los factores que inciden en la obtención de bajos rendimientos y calidad de los granos. La piriculariosis o añublo del arroz, causada por Pyricularia grisea, es la enfermedad más importante en este cultivo en América Latina, ya que puede provocar hasta el 100% de reducción de los rendimientos. Como parte de la estrategia de agricultura sostenible, se trata de controlar estos patógenos y lograr altos rendimientos del cultivo mediante una combinación adecuada de fertilizantes químicos y productos biológicos. En este sentido, la aplicación de inoculantes bacterianos constituidos por bacterias promotoras del crecimiento vegetal (Plant Growth- Promoting Bacteria, PGPB, por sus siglas en inglés ha constituido una alternativa ecológica que favorece la conservación del medioambiente y el ecosistema. Este trabajo tiene como objetivo abordar el estado actual y las perspectivas de uso de bacterias rizosféricas en el control de Pyricularia grisea en el cultivo del arroz, tratando algunos temas relevantes, como son las principales enfermedades que afectan al cultivo, los géneros de PGPB más utilizados para el control de las mismas y sus principales mecanismos de acción. Palabras clave: bacterias rizosféricas, arroz, piriculariosis. AbstractRice is an important food supply for a large part of the world population and its consumption rates are very high. Microbial diseases are one of the main causes that provoke low yields and low-quality spotted grains. Although fungi, bacteria and viruses are mostly the responsible for these losses, fungal diseases strike more frequently

  1. Revision of the Ambrysus guttatipennis Stål species complex (Heteroptera: Naucoridae: Cryphocricinae) with the descriptions of six new species from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso-Velasco, Daniel; Sites, Robert W

    2016-08-22

    The Ambrysus guttatipennis Stål species complex is revised and includes A. arizonus La Rivers, A. bispinus La Rivers, A. drakei La Rivers, A. guttatipennis Stål, A. mexicanus Montandon, and A. mormon Montandon. Six new species that belong to this complex are described from Mexico: A. ayoyolin n. sp., A. bowlesi n. sp., A. contrerasi n. sp., A. itsipatsari n. sp., A. noveloi n. sp., and A. veracruzanus n. sp. The subspecies A. mormon australis La Rivers, A. m. heidemanni Montandon, and A. m. minor La Rivers are proposed as junior synonyms of A. m. mormon Montandon. A supplemental redescription of A. guttatipennis Stål based on the holotype is provided and a lectotype of A. mexicanus Montandon is designated. Ambrysus arizonus is newly recorded from Mexico and A. bispinus from Guatemala. Most of the species in this complex occur only in Mexico, although A. arizonus and A. mormon are distributed in Mexico and the United States, and A. bispinus is distributed in Mexico and Guatemala. Ambrysus mormon has the widest distribution of any species in this complex. Features uniting these species are related to male genitalia and structures associated with male and female genitalia.

  2. Susceptibility of species within the Sporothrix schenckii complex to a panel of killer yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopiglia, Cheila Denise Ottonelli; Heidrich, Daiane; Sorrentino, Julia Medeiros; Vieira, Fabiane Jamono; Landell, Melissa Fontes; Valente, Patrícia; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia

    2014-06-01

    The Sporothrix schenckii complex is the etiologic agent of sporotrichosis, a subacute or chronic mycosis which can affect humans and animals. Killer yeasts have been used in the medical field for development of novel antimycotics and biotyping of pathogenic fungi. The action of 18 killer yeasts on the growth of 88 characterized S. schenckii, Sporothrix globosa, Sporothrix brasiliensis, and Sporothrix mexicana clinical and environmental isolates was evaluated. Killer studies were performed on Petri dishes containing cheese black starch agar. The yeasts Candida catenulata (QU26, QU31, QU127, LV102); Trichosporon faecale (QU100); Trichosporon japonicum (QU139); Kluyveromyces lactis (QU30, QU99, QU73); Kazachstania unispora (QU49), Trichosporon insectorum (QU89), and Kluyveromyces marxianus (QU103) showed activity against all strains of the S. schenckii complex tested. Observation by optical microscopy of S. brasiliensis 61 within the inhibition haloes around the colonies of the killer yeasts QU100, QU139, and LV102 showed that there was no conidiation, but there was hyphal proliferation. The toxins were fungistatic against S. brasiliensis 61. There was no difference in susceptibility to the toxins among the S. schenckii species complex. Further investigations are necessary to clearly establish the mechanism of action of the toxins.

  3. Characterization of the Candida parapsilosis complex in East China: species distribution differs among cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yi P; Boekhout, Teun; Zhan, Ping; Lu, Gui X; Shen, Yong N; Li, Min; Shao, Hai F; Liu, Wei D

    2012-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis, which was previously considered to be a complex of three genetically distinct groups, has emerged as a significant agent of nosocomial infections. Recently, this complex was separated into three species: C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. In China, data pertaining to these fungi are limited. In this study, we examined 57 isolates of members of the C. parapsilosis complex collected from four cities in East China, i.e., Nanjing (n = 22), Nanchang (n = 20), Shanghai (n = 12) and Jinan (n = 3). C. parapsilosis sensu stricto represented 71.9% of all isolates, while C. metapsilosis accounted for the remaining 28.1%. C. orthopsilosis could not be identified. A significantly high prevalence of C. metapsilosis was observed in strains recovered from Nanchang, 60% (12/20) of the isolates were C. metapsilosis. Sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer region revealed two unevenly distributed genotypes among the C. metapsilosis strains. A PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was described for rapid identification. The strains were susceptible to fluconazole, voriconazole, amphoterincin B and micafungin. Six (15%) isolates of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and three (18.8%) of C. metapsilosis were found to be dose-dependent susceptible to itraconazole. C. parapsilosis sensu stricto strains were less susceptible to micafungin than C. metapsilosis.

  4. COMPLEXITY ANALYSIS AND COMPUTATION OF THE OPTIMAL HARVESTING FOR ONE-SPECIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiying JING; Zhaoyu YANG

    2006-01-01

    The exploitation of renewable resources creates many complex problems for culture, ecology and economics as well. Ascertaining the essentials behind the complex problems is very important. In this paper, we mainly study various complex relations appearing in the optimal exploitation process for renewable resources. First, we derive a sufficient condition on the existence of optimal harvesting policies for one-species population resources. Then we present every possible optimal harvesting pattern for such a model. On the basis of this, we give a computing formula for estimating the optimal harvesting period, optimal transitional period, and optimal recruitment period. The main difference with respect to the previous works in literature is that our optimal harvesting policy is a piece-wise continuous function of time t, at the piecewise point tc, which is called switching time. At the switching time we switch the harvesting rate from h to some transitional control u*, then to 0. Clearly this kind of harvesting policy is easier to carry out than those by others, provided that there exists a managing department which can highly supervise the resources.

  5. Phylogeography of the circumpolar Paranoplocephala arctica species complex (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) parasitizing collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickström, L M; Haukisalmi, V; Varis, S; Hantula, J; Fedorov, V B; Henttonen, H

    2003-12-01

    The Paranoplocephla arctica complex (Cyclophyllidea, Anoplocephalidae), host-specific cestodes of collared lemmings Dicrostonyx, include two morphospecies P. arctica and P. alternata, whose taxonomical status now must be considered ambiguous. The genetic population structure and phylogeography of the P. arctica complex was studied from 83 individuals sampled throughout the Holarctic distribution range using 600 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI). The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogeny divides the species complex into one main Nearctic and one main Palaearctic phylogroup, corresponding to the main phylogenetic division of the hosts. In the Palearctic phylogroup, the parasite clades correspond to the host clades although the parasites from Wrangel Island form an exception as the host on this island, D. groenlandicus, belongs to the Nearctic phylogroup. In the Nearctic, northern refugia beyond the ice limit of the Pleistocene glaciations are proposed for the hosts. All reconstructions of parasite phylogeny show a genetically differentiated population structure that in the Canadian Arctic lacks strict congruence between phylogeny and geography. The parasite phylogeny does not show complete congruence with host relationships, suggesting a history of colonization and secondary patterns of dispersal from Beringia into the Canadian Arctic, an event not proposed by the host phylogenies alone.

  6. Species delimitation of the Cycas segmentifida complex (Cycadaceae resolved by phylogenetic and distance analyses of molecular data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuyan eFeng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Cycas segmentifida complex consists of eight species whose distributions overlap in a narrow region in Southwest China. These eight taxa are also morphologically similar and are difficult to be distinguished. Consequently, their taxonomic status has been a matter of discussion in recent years. To study this species complex, we sequenced four plastid intergenic spacers (cpDNA, three nuclear genes and genotyped 12 microsatellites for the eight taxa from 19 different localities. DNA sequences were analyzed using Maximum Likelihood (ML method and Bayesian Inference (BI, and microsatellites were analyzed using the Neighbor-joining (NJ and structure inference methods. Results of cpDNA, nuclear gene GTP and microsatellites all rejected the hypotheses that this complex consisted of eight taxa or one distinct lineages (species but two previously described species were adopted: Cycas guizhouensis K. M. Lan et R. F. Zou and Cycas segmentifida D. Y. Wang et C. Y. Deng. Cycas longlinensis H. T. Chang et Y. C. Zhong was included in C. guizhouensis and the other five taxa were included in C. segmentifida. Our species delimitation inferred from molecular data largely corresponds to morphological differentiation. However, the other two nuclear genes were unable to resolve species boundaries for this complex independently. This study offered evidences from different genomes for dealing with the species boundaries and taxonomical treatment of the C. segmentifida complex in an integrated perspective.

  7. Learned vocal variation is associated with abrupt cryptic genetic change in a parrot species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul F H Ribot

    Full Text Available Contact zones between subspecies or closely related species offer valuable insights into speciation processes. A typical feature of such zones is the presence of clinal variation in multiple traits. The nature of these traits and the concordance among clines are expected to influence whether and how quickly speciation will proceed. Learned signals, such as vocalizations in species having vocal learning (e.g. humans, many birds, bats and cetaceans, can exhibit rapid change and may accelerate reproductive isolation between populations. Therefore, particularly strong concordance among clines in learned signals and population genetic structure may be expected, even among continuous populations in the early stages of speciation. However, empirical evidence for this pattern is often limited because differences in vocalisations between populations are driven by habitat differences or have evolved in allopatry. We tested for this pattern in a unique system where we may be able to separate effects of habitat and evolutionary history. We studied geographic variation in the vocalizations of the crimson rosella (Platycercus elegans parrot species complex. Parrots are well known for their life-long vocal learning and cognitive abilities. We analysed contact calls across a ca 1300 km transect encompassing populations that differed in neutral genetic markers and plumage colour. We found steep clinal changes in two acoustic variables (fundamental frequency and peak frequency position. The positions of the two clines in vocal traits were concordant with a steep cline in microsatellite-based genetic variation, but were discordant with the steep clines in mtDNA, plumage and habitat. Our study provides new evidence that vocal variation, in a species with vocal learning, can coincide with areas of restricted gene flow across geographically continuous populations. Our results suggest that traits that evolve culturally can be strongly associated with reduced gene flow

  8. No Evidence for Temporal Variation in a Cryptic Species Community of Freshwater Amphipods of the Hyalella azteca Species Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Nozais

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The co-occurrence of cryptic species of Hyalella amphipods is a challenge to our traditional views of how species assemble. Since these species have similar morphologies, it is not evident that they have developed phenotypic differences that would allow them to occupy different ecological niches. We examined the structure of a community of Hyalella amphipods in the littoral zone of a boreal lake to verify if temporal variation was present in relative abundances. Morphological and molecular analyses using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene enabled us to detect three cryptic species at the study site. No temporal variation was observed in the community, as one cryptic species was always more abundant than the two others. The relative abundances of each species in the community appeared constant at least for the open-water season, both for adult and juvenile amphipods. Niche differences are still to be found among these species, but it is suggested that migration from nearby sites may be an important factor explaining the species co-occurrence.

  9. Botrytis californica, a new cryptic species in the B. cinerea species complex causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis cinerea consists of two cryptic species, referred to as Group I and Group II based on Bc-hch gene RFLP haplotyping, and Group I has been described as a new cryptic species B. pseudocinerea. During a survey for Botrytis spp. causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes in the Central Va...

  10. Using mitogenomic and nuclear ribosomal sequence data to investigate the phylogeny of the Xiphinema americanum species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematodes within the Xiphinema americanum species complex are economically important because they vector nepoviruses which cause considerable damage to a variety of agricultural crops. The taxonomy of X. americanum is controversial, with the number of putative species being the subject of debate. Ac...

  11. Multilocus Genotyping and Molecular Phylogenetics Resolve a Novel Head Blight Pathogen within the Fusarium graminearum Species Complex from Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    A survey of Fusarium head blight (FHB)-contaminated wheat in Ethiopia recovered 31 isolates resembling members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex. Results of a multilocus genotyping (MLGT) assay for FHB species and trichothecene chemotype determination suggested that 22 of these isolates m...

  12. Molecular differentiation of the Old World Culicoides imicola species complex (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae), inferred using random amplified polymorphic DNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, F; Meiswinkel, R; Gomulski, L M; Guglielmino, C R; Mellor, P S; Malacrida, A R; Gasperi, G

    2001-07-01

    Samples of seven of the 10 morphological species of midges of the Culicoides imicola complex were considered. The importance of this species complex is connected to its vectorial capacity for African horse sickness virus (AHSV) and bluetongue virus (BTV). Consequently, the risk of transmission may vary dramatically, depending upon the particular cryptic species present in a given area. The species complex is confined to the Old World and our samples were collected in Southern Africa, Madagascar and the Ivory Coast. Genomic DNA of 350 randomly sampled individual midges from 19 populations was amplified using four 20-mer primers by the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. One hundred and ninety-six interpretable polymorphic bands were obtained. Species-specific RAPD profiles were defined and for five species diagnostic RAPD fragments were identified. A high degree of polymorphism was detected in the species complex, most of which was observed within populations (from 64 to 76%). Principal coordinate analysis (PCO) and cluster analysis provided an estimate of the degree of variation between and within populations and species. There was substantial concordance between the taxonomies derived from morphological and molecular data. The amount and the different distributions of genetic (RAPD) variation among the taxa can be associated to their life histories, i.e. the abundance and distribution of the larval breeding sites and their seasonality.

  13. An evaluation of the species status of Bactrocera invadens and the Systematics of the Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Bactrocera (Tephritidae) contains over 500 species, including many severe pests of fruits and vegetables. While native to tropical and sub-tropical areas of Africa, India, Southeast Asia and Australasia, a number of the pest species, largely members of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex, have...

  14. Unusual distribution of Burkholderia cepacia complex species in Danish cystic fibrosis clinics may stem from restricted transmission between patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Fenger, Mette G;

    2010-01-01

    Forty-four of 48 Burkholderia cepacia complex strains cultured from Danish cystic fibrosis patients were Burkholderia multivorans, a distribution of species that has not been reported before. Although cases of cross infections were demonstrated, no major epidemic clone was found. The species...... distribution may represent the sporadic acquisition of bacteria from the environment....

  15. Somatic hybrids of Solanum tuberosum and species of the Solanum nigrum-complex and their backcross progeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsman, K.

    2001-01-01

    The species of the Solanum nigrum-complex are wild relatives of the cultivated potato and potentially interesting sources of genetic variation. The traditional method of introgressing a specific trait from a related species is sexual hybridisation followed by recurrent backcrossing but often one or

  16. Flat and complex temperate reefs provide similar support for fish: Evidence for a unimodal species-habitat relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Avery B; Pickering, Emily A; Adler, Alyssa M; Taylor, J Christopher; Peterson, Charles H

    2017-01-01

    Structural complexity, a form of habitat heterogeneity, influences the structure and function of ecological communities, generally supporting increased species density, richness, and diversity. Recent research, however, suggests the most complex habitats may not harbor the highest density of individuals and number of species, especially in areas with elevated human influence. Understanding nuances in relationships between habitat heterogeneity and ecological communities is warranted to guide habitat-focused conservation and management efforts. We conducted fish and structural habitat surveys of thirty warm-temperate reefs on the southeastern US continental shelf to quantify how structural complexity influences fish communities. We found that intermediate complexity maximizes fish abundance on natural and artificial reefs, as well as species richness on natural reefs, challenging the current paradigm that abundance and other fish community metrics increase with increasing complexity. Naturally occurring rocky reefs of flat and complex morphologies supported equivalent abundance, biomass, species richness, and community composition of fishes. For flat and complex morphologies of rocky reefs to receive equal consideration as essential fish habitat (EFH), special attention should be given to detecting pavement type rocky reefs because their ephemeral nature makes them difficult to detect with typical seafloor mapping methods. Artificial reefs of intermediate complexity also maximized fish abundance, but human-made structures composed of low-lying concrete and metal ships differed in community types, with less complex, concrete structures supporting lower numbers of fishes classified largely as demersal species and metal ships protruding into the water column harboring higher numbers of fishes, including more pelagic species. Results of this study are essential to the process of evaluating habitat function provided by different types and shapes of reefs on the seafloor

  17. Digitonthophagus Balthasar, 1959: taxonomy, systematics, and morphological phylogeny of the genus revealing an African species complex (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génier, François; Moretto, Philippe

    2017-03-31

    The taxonomy and systematics of the genus Digitonthophagus Balthasar (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae: Onthophagini) is revised. A detailed study of the male genitalia combined with external morphology suggests that the variability, previously recognized, for D. gazella is hiding a species complex within the Afrotropical region and the Arabian Peninsula. The current study recognizes 16 species; 13 from the Afrotropical region and Arabian Peninsula and three from the eastern portion of the Saharo-Arabian region and the continental Indomalayan region. Species are organized into six species groups based on the results of the morphology-based phylogenetic analysis. The following 12 species are described as new: D. aksumensis Génier new species; D. biflagellatus Génier new species; D. dilatatus Génier new species; D. eucatta Génier new species; D. falciger Génier new species; D. fimator Génier new species; D. namaquensis Génier new species; D. petilus Génier new species; D. sahelicus Moretto new species; D. uks Génier new species; D. ulcerosus Génier new species; and D. viridicollis Génier new species. In order to stabilize nomenclature, lectotypes are designated for Scarabaeus bonasus Fabricius, 1775; Scarabaeus catta Fabricius, 1787, and Onthophagus gazella lusinganus d'Orbigny. A neotype is designated for Scarabaeus dorcas Olivier, 1789 whose status and synonymy need to be altered in order to clarify the status of Scarabaeus gazella auctorum, the widely introduced species with economic importance. A naming scheme is presented for the sclerites of the internal sac. External and male genitalia are illustrated and distribution maps are provided for each species.

  18. Three Members of the Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Cryptic Species Complex Occur Sympatrically in Argentine Horticultural Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemandri, V; Vaghi Medina, C G; Dumón, A D; Argüello Caro, E B; Mattio, M F; García Medina, S; López Lambertini, P M; Truol, G

    2015-04-01

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is a cryptic species complex that attacks >600 different species of plants and transmits several plant viruses causing severe economic losses. Until 2010, the B. tabaci complex comprised 24 distinct putative species. Recently, at least 15 new species have been reported. The objective of this study was to identify B. tabaci species present in bean, melon, and tomato crops in Argentina by applying phylogenetic analyses and pairwise comparison of genetic distances of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) sequences. The 39 proposed whitefly species were identified with both analyses, and the presence in Argentina of one indigenous species, New World 2 (NW2), and two introduced species, Middle East-Asia Minor one (MEAM1) and Mediterranean, was confirmed. Common bean crop presented the three whitefly species detected, with NW2, MEAM1, and Mediterranean being present all together under field conditions. Also, Mediterranean was the only species identified in tomato, whereas MEAM1 was found in melon. To the best of our knowledge, Mediterranean is a recent invasive species in open-field agriculture in the American continent and in greenhouse tomato in Argentina. Additionally, we provide the first report of MEAM1 in common bean and melon. These findings raise several questions on the future scenario of B. tabaci and the viruses it transmits in Argentina.

  19. Evidence of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism, but not of parallel evolution, despite high levels of concerted evolution in the major histocompatibility complex of flamingo species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillingham, M A F; Courtiol, A; Teixeira, M; Galan, M; Bechet, A; Cezilly, F

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a cornerstone in the study of adaptive genetic diversity. Intriguingly, highly polymorphic MHC sequences are often not more similar within species than between closely related species. Divergent selection of gene duplicates, balancing selection maintaining trans-species polymorphism (TSP) that predate speciation and parallel evolution of species sharing similar selection pressures can all lead to higher sequence similarity between species. In contrast, high rates of concerted evolution increase sequence similarity of duplicated loci within species. Assessing these evolutionary models remains difficult as relatedness and ecological similarities are often confounded. As sympatric species of flamingos are more distantly related than allopatric species, flamingos represent an ideal model to disentangle these evolutionary models. We characterized MHC Class I exon 3, Class IIB exon 2 and exon 3 of the six extant flamingo species. We found up to six MHC Class I loci and two MHC Class IIB loci. As all six species shared the same number of MHC Class IIB loci, duplication appears to predate flamingo speciation. However, the high rate of concerted evolution has prevented the divergence of duplicated loci. We found high sequence similarity between all species regardless of codon position. The latter is consistent with balancing selection maintaining TSP, as under this mechanism amino acid sites under pathogen-mediated selection should be characterized by fewer synonymous codons (due to their common ancestry) than under parallel evolution. Overall, balancing selection maintaining TSP appears to result in high MHC similarity between species regardless of species relatedness and geographical distribution. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  20. Analysis of Lignin-Polysaccharide Complexes Formed during Grass Lignin Degradation by Cultures of Pleurotus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, A; Bocchini, P; Galletti, G C; Martinez, A T

    1996-06-01

    A brown material, precipitable with ethanol, was formed during wheat straw and lignin degradation by liquid cultures of different species of Pleurotus. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and cross-polarization and magic-angle-spinning (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that most of the precipitable material was formed from exopolysaccharide secreted by the fungus but it also contained an aromatic fraction. The results of acid hydrolysis, methylation analysis, and Smith degradation indicated that the major exopolysaccharide produced by these fungi is a (1(symbl)3)-(beta)-glucan branched at C-6 every two or three residues along the main chain. The presence of lignin or straw in the culture medium had little effect on the composition and structure of the extracellular polysaccharide. Cross-polarization and magic-angle-spinning (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy provided an estimation of the aromatic content of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes, assigning 20% of the total (sup13)C signal in the material recovered from cultures of Pleurotus eryngii in lignin medium to aromatic carbon. Analytical pyrolysis indicated that the aromatic fractions of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes were derived from lignin, since products characteristic of pyrolytic breakdown of H (p-hydroxyphenylpropane), G (guaiacylpropane), and S (syringylpropane) lignin units were identified. These complexes cannot be fractionated by treatment with polyvinylpyrrolidone or extraction with lignin solvents, suggesting that the two polymers were chemically linked. Moreover, differences in composition with respect to the original lignin indicated that this macromolecule was modified by the fungi during the process of formation of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes.

  1. A novel species within the Fusarium graminearum complex from Ethiopia detected by a multilocus genotyping assay and molecular phylogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty isolates resembling members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (Fg complex; O’Donnell et al., Fungal Genet. Biol. 41:600-623, 2004) were isolated from ground wheat samples collected in two different geographic areas in Ethiopia. Results of a multilocus genotyping (MLGT) assay (Ward ...

  2. Plant DNA barcodes and species resolution in sedges (Carex, Cyperaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Julian R; Naczi, Robert F C; Chouinard, Brianna N

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the species discriminatory power of a subset of the proposed plant barcoding loci (matK, rbcL, rpoC1, rpoB, trnH-psbA) in Carex, a cosmopolitan genus that represents one of the three largest plant genera on earth (c. 2000 species). To assess the ability of barcoding loci to resolve Carex species, we focused our sampling on three of the taxonomically best-known groups in the genus, sections Deweyanae (6/8 species sampled), Griseae (18/21 species sampled), and Phyllostachyae (10/10 species sampled). Each group represents one of three major phylogenetic lineages previously identified in Carex and its tribe Cariceae, thus permitting us to evaluate the potential of DNA barcodes to broadly identify species across the tribe and to differentiate closely related sister species. Unlike some previous studies that have suggested that plant barcoding could achieve species identification rates around 90%, our results suggest that no single locus or multilocus barcode examined will resolve much greater than 60% of Carex species. In fact, no multilocus combination can significantly increase the resolution and statistical support (i.e., ≥ 70% bootstrap) for species than matK alone, even combinations involving the second most variable region, trnH-psbA. Results suggest that a matK barcode could help with species discovery as 47% of Carex taxa recently named or resolved within cryptic complexes in the past 25 years also formed unique species clusters in upgma trees. Comparisons between the nrDNA internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) and matK in sect. Phyllostachyae suggest that matK not only discriminates more species (50-60% vs. 25%), but it provides more resolved phylogenies than ITS. Given the low levels of species resolution in rpoC1 and rpoB (0-13%), and difficulties with polymerase chain reaction amplification and DNA sequencing in rbcL and trnH-psbA (alignment included), we strongly advocate that matK should be part of a universal plant barcoding system

  3. Recurrent evolution of host and vector association in bacteria of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Noémie S; Margos, Gabriele; Blum, Helmut; Krebs, Stefan; Graf, Alexander; Lane, Robert S; Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago; Sing, Andreas; Fingerle, Volker

    2016-09-15

    The Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) species complex consists of tick-transmitted bacteria and currently comprises approximately 20 named and proposed genospecies some of which are known to cause Lyme Borreliosis. Species have been defined via genetic distances and ecological niches they occupy. Understanding the evolutionary relationship of species of the complex is fundamental to explaining patterns of speciation. This in turn forms a crucial basis to frame testable hypotheses concerning the underlying processes including host and vector adaptations. Illumina Technology was used to obtain genome-wide sequence data for 93 strains of 14 named genospecies of the B. burgdorferi species complex and genomic data already published for 18 additional strain (including one new species) was added. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on 114 orthologous single copy genes shows that the genospecies represent clearly distinguishable taxa with recent and still ongoing speciation events apparent in Europe and Asia. The position of Borrelia species in the phylogeny is consistent with host associations constituting a major driver for speciation. Interestingly, the data also demonstrate that vector associations are an additional driver for diversification in this tick-borne species complex. This is particularly obvious in B. bavariensis, a rodent adapted species that has diverged from the bird-associated B. garinii most likely in Asia. It now consists of two populations one of which most probably invaded Europe following adaptation to a new vector (Ixodes ricinus) and currently expands its distribution range. The results imply that genotypes/species with novel properties regarding host or vector associations have evolved recurrently during the history of the species complex and may emerge at any time. We suggest that the finding of vector associations as a driver for diversification may be a general pattern for tick-borne pathogens. The core genome analysis presented here

  4. Potential distribution of Magnaporthe grisea in China and the world,predicted by MaxEnt%基于MaxEnt的麦瘟病在全球及中国的潜在分布区预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹学仁; 陈林; 周益林; 段霞瑜

    2011-01-01

    [目的]麦瘟病是小麦上的一种新病害,明确该病害在全球及我国的潜在分布区域,对于有效控制此病害在全球的扩展蔓延具有重要的意义.[方法]利用MaxEnt生态位模型预测麦瘟病在全球及我国的潜在分布.[结果]南美中东部、非洲东南部和中西部、南亚东南部和东南亚以及澳大利亚东部沿海地区是该病害在全球的主要适生区;而该病害在我国的适生区仅包括云南、广东和海南等省的少数地区.[结论]该病害在我国的适生区较小,但随着全球气候变化,该病原菌的潜在分布范围可能将进一步扩大.%[Objective]Wheat blast is a new wheat disease caused by Magnaporthe grisea, and now it has become one of the major diseases of wheat in South America.It is urgent to determine the potential geographical distribution of M.grisea in China and the world.[Method]The potential distribution regions of M.grisea in the world and China were predicted by using MaxEnt model.[Result]Mid-east of South America, Southeast and Midwest of Africa, southeast of South Asia, Southeast Asia and east coast of Australia are the main suitable areas for M.grisea in the world.The suitable areas for M.grisea cover only some areas in Yunnan, Guangdong and Hainan in China.[Conclusion]The predicted results showed that the suitable areas for M.grisea in China are relatively small.Climate change may make the potential distribution regions of M.grisea larger.

  5. New stands of species of the Paramecium aurelia complex (Ciliophora, Protista) in Russia (Siberia, Kamchatka).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa; Rautian, Maria; Surmacz, Marta; Bieliavskaya, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    New stands of P. primaurelia, P. biaurelia, and P. dodecaurelia were found in Russia. P. primaurelia was recorded in Tulun (Siberia, Irkutsk region) and in three stands situated on the Kamchatka peninsula: in Lake Chalaktyrskoye, in the Valley of Geysers, and Petropavlovsk Kamchatski. P. biaurelia was also found in Tulun and in two stands in the vicinity of Lake Baikal and the Buriatia region. P. dodecaurelia was recorded in Cheboksary in European Russia and in other stands situated in Asian Russia: Novosibirsk, the vicinity of Lake Baikal, Buriatia, Kamchatka (Petropavlovsk Kamchatski, Lake Chalaktyrskoye, and Nalychevo). These data extend the ranges of species of the P. aurelia complex in Russia, however, this large territory remains understudied.

  6. Identification of Fusarium solani species complex from infected zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xiaoli; Lu, Maixin; Wang, Jianguo

    2016-11-01

    Although Fusarium sp. infections have been reported in aquatic invertebrates, studies of Fusarium spp. as fish pathogens remain very limited. In our study, a fungus was isolated from diseased zebrafish (Danio rerio). DNA sequence analysis of the fungus, based on a partial region of the translation elongation factor 1α gene (EF-1α), the internal transcribed spacer region and domains D1 and D2 of the large subunit of the ribosomal RNA gene (ITS plus LSU), and the RNA polymerase II subunit gene (RPB2), showed 99.9-100% homology to Fusarium solani species complex sequences. Multilocus sequence typing analysis based on 3-locus haplotypes (EF-1α, ITS plus LSU, and RPB2) suggests that the isolated strain was type 3+4-P. Challenge experiments showed that this organism could be pathogenic to zebrafish, but usually does not infect healthy subjects under normal circumstances. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Fusarium foetens, a new species pathogenic to begonia elatior hybrids (Begonia x hiemalis) and the sister taxon of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroers, H-J; Baayen, R P; Meffert, J P; de Gruyter, J; Hooftman, M; O'Donnell, K

    2004-01-01

    A new disease recently was discovered in begonia elatior hybrid (Begonia × hiemalis) nurseries in The Netherlands. Diseased plants showed a combination of basal rot, vein yellowing and wilting and the base of collapsing plants was covered by unusually large masses of Fusarium macroconidia. A species of Fusarium was isolated consistently from the discolored veins of leaves and stems. It differed morphologically from F. begoniae, a known agent of begonia flower, leaf and stem blight. The Fusarium species resembled members of the F. oxysporum species complex in producing short monophialides on the aerial mycelium and abundant chlamydospores. Other phenotypic characters such as polyphialides formed occasionally in at least some strains, relatively long monophialides intermingled with the short monophialides formed on the aerial mycelium, distinct sporodochial conidiomata, and distinct pungent colony odor distinguished it from the F. oxysporum species complex. Phylogenetic analyses of partial sequences of the mitochondrial small subunit of the ribosomal DNA (mtSSU rDNA), nuclear translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) and β-tubulin gene exons and introns indicate that the Fusarium species represents a sister group of the F. oxysporum species complex. Begonia × hiemalis cultivars Bazan, Bellona and Netja Dark proved to be highly susceptible to the new species. Inoculated plants developed tracheomycosis within 4 wk, and most died within 8 wk. The new taxon was not pathogenic to Euphorbia pulcherrima, Impatiens walleriana and Saintpaulia ionantha that commonly are grown in nurseries along with B. × hiemalis. Inoculated plants of Cyclamen persicum did not develop the disease but had discolored vessels from which the inoculated fungus was isolated. Given that the newly discovered begonia pathogen is distinct in pathogenicity, morphology and phylogeny from other fusaria, it is described here as a new species, Fusarium foetens.

  8. A taxonomic revision of the Phrynosoma douglasii species complex (Squamata: Phrynosomatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanucci, Richard R

    2015-09-11

    Short-horned lizards (Phrynosoma douglasii species complex) occur throughout the inter-montane West and Great Plains of western North America. The comparative morphology and color pattern variation of short-horned lizards was studied in 3,174 specimens. Multivariate analyses of 20 morphological and color-pattern characters were applied to 977 specimens, and univariate statistics were summarized for 52 samples totaling 1,134 specimens. The results of the morphological data analyses support the recognition of P. douglasii (Bell 1828) as a distinct species, and the resurrection of P. brevirostris Girard 1858a and P. ornatissimum Girard 1858a as species distinct from P. hernandesi Girard 1858a. Two new species allied to P. brevirostris are described: P. bauri sp. nov. from the eastern plains of Colorado and northeastern New Mexico, southeastern Wyoming and southwestern Nebraska south of the North Platte River, and P. diminutum sp. nov. endemic to the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico. The Mexican taxon brachycercum Smith 1942 is reassigned as a subspecies of P. ornatissimum, based on non-discrete character differences and overall morphometric similarity. The ranges of P. hernandesi and P. ornatissimum broadly overlap in central New Mexico, the former taxon occupying the coniferous forests of disjunct mountain ranges, the latter occuring in the surrounding desert grasslands. Principal components analysis has revealed morphological evidence of hybridization where the two taxa meet, generally within ecotones between montane forest associations and grasslands. Principal components analysis has also revealed a high level of morphological variability in populations occurring in the Colorado Plateau region of northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, extreme southwestern Colorado and adjacent Utah. The evidence suggests that these populations arose through past hybridization between the two species. The taxon ornatum Girard 1858b, although

  9. Molecular typing of environmental Cryptococcus neoformans/C. gattii species complex isolates from Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Gleica Soyan Barbosa; Freire, Ana Karla Lima; Bentes, Amaury Dos Santos; Pinheiro, José Felipe de Souza; de Souza, João Vicente Braga; Wanke, Bodo; Matsuura, Takeshi; Jackisch-Matsuura, Ani Beatriz

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are the main causative agents of cryptococcosis, a systemic fungal disease that affects internal organs and skin, and which is acquired by inhalation of spores or encapsulated yeasts. It is currently known that the C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex has a worldwide distribution, however, some molecular types seem to prevail in certain regions. Few environmental studies of Cryptococcus have been conducted in the Brazilian Amazon. This is the first ecological study of the pathogenic fungi C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex in the urban area of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. A total of 506 samples from pigeon droppings (n = 191), captive bird droppings (n = 60) and tree hollows (n = 255) were collected from June 2012 to January 2014 at schools and public buildings, squares, pet shops, households, the zoo and the bus station. Samples were plated on niger seed agar (NSA) medium supplemented with chloramphenicol and incubated at 25°C for 5 days. Dark-brown colonies were isolated and tested for thermotolerance at 37°C, cycloheximide resistance and growth on canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue agar. Molecular typing was done by PCR-RFLP. Susceptibility to the antifungal drugs amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was tested using Etest(®) strips. In total, 13 positive samples were obtained: one tree hollow (C. gattiiVGII), nine pigeon droppings (C. neoformansVNI) and three captive bird droppings (C. neoformansVNI). The environmental cryptococcal isolates found in this study were of the same molecular types as those responsible for infections in Manaus. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. The molecular evolution of four anti-malarial immune genes in the Anopheles gambiae species complex

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    Simard Frederic

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If the insect innate immune system is to be used as a potential blocking step in transmission of malaria, then it will require targeting one or a few genes with highest relevance and ease of manipulation. The problem is to identify and manipulate those of most importance to malaria infection without the risk of decreasing the mosquito's ability to stave off infections by microbes in general. Molecular evolution methodologies and concepts can help identify such genes. Within the setting of a comparative molecular population genetic and phylogenetic framework, involving six species of the Anopheles gambiae complex, we investigated whether a set of four pre-selected immunity genes (gambicin, NOS, Rel2 and FBN9 might have evolved under selection pressure imposed by the malaria parasite. Results We document varying levels of polymorphism within and divergence between the species, in all four genes. Introgression and the sharing of ancestral polymorphisms, two processes that have been documented in the past, were verified in this study in all four studied genes. These processes appear to affect each gene in different ways and to different degrees. However, there is no evidence of positive selection acting on these genes. Conclusion Considering the results presented here in concert with previous studies, genes that interact directly with the Plasmodium parasite, and play little or no role in defense against other microbes, are probably the most likely candidates for a specific adaptive response against P. falciparum. Furthermore, since it is hard to establish direct evidence linking the adaptation of any candidate gene to P. falciparum infection, a comparative framework allowing at least an indirect link should be provided. Such a framework could be achieved, if a similar approach like the one involved here, was applied to all other anopheline complexes that transmit P. falciparum malaria.

  11. Comparison of fungi within the Gaeumannomyces-Phialophora complex by analysis of ribosomal DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, G T; Daniels, M J; Osbourn, A E

    1995-02-01

    Four ascomycete species of the genus Gaeumannomyces infect roots of monocotyledons. Gaeumannomyces graminis contains four varieties, var. tritici, var. avenae, var. graminis, and var. maydis. G. graminis varieties tritici, avenae, and graminis have Phialophora-like anamorphs and, together with the other Gaeumannomyces and Phialophora species found on cereal roots, constitute the Gaeumannomyces-Phialophora complex. Relatedness of a number of Gaeumannomyces and Phialophora isolates was assessed by comparison of DNA sequences of the 18S rRNA gene, the 5.8S rRNA gene, and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS). G. graminis var. tritici, G. graminis var. avenae, and G. graminis var. graminis isolates can be distinguished from each other by nucleotide sequence differences in the ITS regions. The G. graminis var. tritici isolates can be further subdivided into R and N isolates (correlating with ability [R] or inability [N] to infect rye). Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS regions of several oat-infecting G. graminis var. tritici isolates suggests that these isolates are actually more closely related to G. graminis var. avenae. The isolates of Magnaporthe grisea included in the analysis showed a surprising degree of relatedness to members of the Gaeumannomyces-Phialophora complex. G. graminis variety-specific oligonucleotide primers were used in PCRs to amplify DNA from cereal seedlings infected with G. graminis var. tritici or G. graminis var. avenae, and these should be valuable for sensitive detection of pathogenic isolates and for diagnosis of take-all.

  12. Further data on the production of beauvericin, enniatins and fusaproliferin and toxicity to Artemia salina by Fusarium species of Gibberella fujikuroi species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, A; Mulè, G; Ritieni, A; Logrieco, A

    2007-09-15

    The knowledge of toxigenic profiles of fungal plant pathogens is of extreme importance for evaluating the potential toxicity of infected plant products. Ninety-six fungal isolates belonging to 28 species in the Gibberella fujikuroi complex were studied for the production of beauvericin, enniatins and fusaproliferin in rice cultures. Toxin production ranged from 5 to 3000 microg/g for beauvericin, 2 to 131 microg/g for enniatins, and 4 to 440 microg/g for fusaproliferin. Beauvericin was the most common metabolite produced by 16 species followed by fusaproliferin with 11 species and enniatins with 4 species. The production of beauvericin by F. bulbicola, F. denticulatum, F. lactis, F. phyllophilum, F. pseudocircinatum, and F. succisae and fusaproliferin by F. antophilum, F. begoniae, F. bulbicola, F. circinatum, F. concentricum, F. succisae, and F. udum is reported here for the first time. Brine shrimp larvae were most sensitive to culture extracts of F. acutatum (up to 94+/-3%), F. concentricum (up to 99+/-1%), F. denticuatum (up to 100%) and F. sacchari (up to 100%). Toxicity towards brine shrimp was significantly correlated with the beauvericin content of the fungal extracts with few exceptions. These data indicate that beauvericin and fusaproliferin are common metabolites of species of the G. fujikuroi complex and pose a risk for a possible toxin accumulation in their respective host plant products. However, data from the brine shrimp bioassay showed that further toxic metabolites within this complex need to be characterized.

  13. Stomatal complex types, stomatal density, and the stomatal index in some species of dioscorea

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    Abdulrahaman A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dioscorea alata L. has three stomatal complex types, namely, paracytic, anisocytic, and tetracytic stomata, with percentage frequency values of 50, 18, and 32, respectively. Dioscorea bulbifera has paracytic and anisocytic stomata, with percentage frequency values of 87.60 and 12.40, respectively. Dioscorea cayenensis has anisocytic stomata, with a percent­age frequency value of 100. Dioscorea dumetorum has tetracytic and paractytic stomata, with percentage frequency values of 91.05 and 8.95, respectively. Both D. esculenta and D. rotundata have paracytic stomata, with a percentage frequency of 100. The range of variation of stomatal density is from 10 (lowest value in D. alata and D. dumentorum to 27 (highest value in D. bulbifera. The stomatal index also varies, from 24 in D. alata to 47 in D. cayenensis. The size of stomata in all species is small, varying in length from 0.74 μm in D. alata to 1.79 μm in D. dumentorum. An indented dichotomous key based on stomatal features was constructed to distinguish and identify the species.

  14. Susceptibility profile and epidemiological cut-off values of Cryptococcus neoformans species complex from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Susana; Isla, Maria G; Szusz, Wanda; Vivot, Walter; Altamirano, Rodrigo; Davel, Graciela

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological cut-off values (ECVs) based on minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution have been recently proposed for some antifungal drug/Cryptococcus neoformans combinations. However, these ECVs vary according to the species studied, being serotypes and the geographical origin of strains, variables to be considered. The aims were to define the wild-type (WT) population of the C. neoformans species complex (C. neoformans) isolated from patients living in Argentina, and to propose ECVs for six antifungal drugs. A total of 707 unique C. neoformans isolates obtained from HIV patients suffering cryptococcal meningitis were studied. The MIC of amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole was determined according to the EDef 7.2 (EUCAST) reference document. The MIC distribution, MIC50 , MIC90 and ECV for each of these drugs were calculated. The highest ECV, which included ≥95% of the WT population modelled, was observed for flucytosine and fluconazole (32 μg ml(-1) each). For amphotericin B, itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole, the ECVs were: 0.5, 0.5, 0.5 and 0.06 μg ml(-1) respectively. The ECVs determined in this study may aid in identifying the C. neoformans strains circulating in Argentina with decreased susceptibility to the antifungal drugs tested.

  15. Comparing population recovery after insecticide exposure for four aquatic invertebrate species using models of different complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baveco, J M Hans; Norman, Steve; Roessink, Ivo; Galic, Nika; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Population models, in particular individual-based models (IBMs), are becoming increasingly important in chemical risk assessment. They can be used to assess recovery of spatially structured populations after chemical exposure that varies in time and space. The authors used an IBM coupled to a toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic model, the threshold damage model (TDM), to assess recovery times for 4 aquatic organisms, after insecticide application, in a nonseasonal environment and in 3 spatial settings (pond, stream, and ditch). The species had different life histories (e.g., voltinism, reproductive capacity, mobility). Exposure was derived from a pesticide fate model, following standard European Union scenarios. The results of the IBM-TDM were compared with results from simpler models: one in which exposure was linked to effects by means of concentration-effect relationships (IBM-CE) and one in which the IBM was replaced by a nonspatial, logistic growth model (logistic). For the first, exposure was based on peak concentrations only; for the second, exposure was spatially averaged as well. By using comparisons between models of different complexity and species with different life histories, the authors obtained an understanding of the role spatial processes play in recovery and the conditions under which the full time-varying exposure needs to be considered. The logistic model, which is amenable to an analytic approach, provided additional insights into the sensitivity of recovery times to density dependence and spatial dimensions. © 2014 SETAC.

  16. Evolution of nickel hyperaccumulation and serpentine adaptation in the Alyssum serpyllifolium species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczyk, M K; Smith, J A C; Pollard, A J; Filatov, D A

    2017-01-01

    Metal hyperaccumulation is an uncommon but highly distinctive adaptation found in certain plants that can grow on metalliferous soils. Here we review what is known about evolution of metal hyperaccumulation in plants and describe a population-genetic analysis of the Alyssum serpyllifolium (Brassicaceae) species complex that includes populations of nickel-hyperaccumulating as well as non-accumulating plants growing on serpentine (S) and non-serpentine (NS) soils, respectively. To test whether the S and NS populations belong to the same or separate closely related species, we analysed genetic variation within and between four S and four NS populations from across the Iberian peninsula. Based on microsatellites, genetic variation was similar in S and NS populations (average Ho=0.48). The populations were significantly differentiated from each other (overall FST=0.23), and the degree of differentiation between S and NS populations was similar to that within these two groups. However, high S versus NS differentiation was observed in DNA polymorphism of two genes putatively involved in adaptation to serpentine environments, IREG1 and NRAMP4, whereas no such differentiation was found in a gene (ASIL1) not expected to play a specific role in ecological adaptation in A. serpyllifolium. These results indicate that S and NS populations belong to the same species and that nickel hyperaccumulation in A. serpyllifolium appears to represent a case of adaptation to growth on serpentine soils. Further functional and evolutionary genetic work in this system has the potential to significantly advance our understanding of the evolution of metal hyperaccumulation in plants.

  17. Lutzomyia umbratilis, the main vector of Leishmania guyanensis, represents a novel species complex?

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    Vera Margarete Scarpassa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lutzomyia umbratilis is an important Leishmania guyanensis vector in South America. Previous studies have suggested differences in the vector competence between L. umbratilis populations situated on opposite banks of the Amazonas and Negro Rivers in the central Amazonian Brazil region, likely indicating a species complex. However, few studies have been performed on these populations and the taxonomic status of L. umbratilis remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Phylogeographic structure was estimated for six L. umbratilis samples from the central Amazonian region in Brazil by analyzing mtDNA using 1181 bp of the COI gene to assess whether the populations on opposite banks of these rivers consist of incipient or distinct species. The genetic diversity was fairly high and the results revealed two distinct clades ( = lineages with 1% sequence divergence. Clade I consisted of four samples from the left bank of the Amazonas and Negro Rivers, whereas clade II comprised two samples from the right bank of Negro River. No haplotypes were shared between samples of two clades. Samples within clades exhibited low to moderate genetic differentiation (F(ST = -0.0390-0.1841, whereas samples between clades exhibited very high differentiation (F(ST = 0.7100-0.8497 and fixed differences. These lineages have diverged approximately 0.22 Mya in the middle Pleistocene. Demographic expansion was detected for the lineages I and II approximately 30,448 and 15,859 years ago, respectively, in the late Pleistocene. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The two genetic lineages may represent an advanced speciation stage suggestive of incipient or distinct species within L. umbratilis. These findings suggest that the Amazonas and Negro Rivers may be acting as effective barriers, thus preventing gene flow between populations on opposite sides. Such findings have important implications for epidemiological studies, especially those related to vector

  18. Evolutionary factors affecting Lactate dehydrogenase A and B variation in the Daphnia pulex species complex

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    Cristescu Melania E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence for historical, demographic and selective factors affecting enzyme evolution can be obtained by examining nucleotide sequence variation in candidate genes such as Lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh. Two closely related Daphnia species can be distinguished by their electrophoretic Ldh genotype and habitat. Daphnia pulex populations are fixed for the S allele and inhabit temporary ponds, while D. pulicaria populations are fixed for the F allele and inhabit large stratified lakes. One locus is detected in most allozyme surveys, but genome sequencing has revealed two genes, LdhA and LdhB. Results We sequenced both Ldh genes from 70 isolates of these two species from North America to determine if the association between Ldh genotype and habitat shows evidence for selection, and to elucidate the evolutionary history of the two genes. We found that alleles in the pond-dwelling D. pulex and in the lake-dwelling D. pulicaria form distinct groups at both loci, and the substitution of Glutamine (S for Glutamic acid (F at amino acid 229 likely causes the electrophoretic mobility shift in the LDHA protein. Nucleotide diversity in both Ldh genes is much lower in D. pulicaria than in D. pulex. Moreover, the lack of spatial structuring of the variation in both genes over a wide geographic area is consistent with a recent demographic expansion of lake populations. Neutrality tests indicate that both genes are under purifying selection, but the intensity is much stronger on LdhA. Conclusions Although lake-dwelling D. pulicaria hybridizes with the other lineages in the pulex species complex, it remains distinct ecologically and genetically. This ecological divergence, coupled with the intensity of purifying selection on LdhA and the strong association between its genotype and habitat, suggests that experimental studies would be useful to determine if variation in molecular function provides evidence that LDHA variants are adaptive.

  19. Development and optimization of a new MALDI-TOF protocol for identification of the Sporothrix species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Santos, Cledir; Sampaio, Paula; Romeo, Orazio; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Pais, Célia; Lima, Nelson; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2015-01-01

    Accurate species identification of the Sporothrix schenckii complex is essential, since identification based only on phenotypic characteristics is often inconclusive due to phenotypic variability within the species. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for species identification of 70 environmental and clinical isolates of the Sporothrix complex. A reference database was established for MALDI-TOF MS-based species identification according to minor adjustments in the manufacturer's guidelines. The MALDI-TOF MS clearly distinguished strains of Sporothrix brasiliensis, Sporothrix globosa, Sporothrix mexicana, S. schenckii, Sporothrix luriei and Sporothrix pallida, enabling identification of all isolates at the species level, as confirmed by partial calmodulin gene sequence analyses. The present methodology is simple, reliable, rapid and highly suitable for routine identification in clinical mycology laboratories and culture collections, particularly for updating and reclassifying of deposited Sporothrix isolates.

  20. Effect of water radiolysis and complexing species on the leaching of zirconolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribet, M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 Rue E. Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CEA/DEN/DTCD.SECM/LMPA, Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [CEA/DEN/Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 Rue E. Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPNL), Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 Rue E. Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Jegou, C.; Leturcq, G. [CEA/DEN/DTCD.SECM/LMPA, Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze cedex (France); Corbel, C. [CEA/DSM/DRECAM/LSI, Ecole Polytechnique, 91 128 Palaiseau (France); Toulhoat, P. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon1, CNRS/ISA, UFR de Chimie Biochimie, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); INERIS, Parc Technologique Alata, BP2 F-60550 Verneuil en Halatte (France)

    2008-07-01

    Zirconolite is one of the matrices considered for the confinement of minor actinides in case of deep geological disposal. Its chemical durability has been studied during dissolution under charged particle-induced water radiolysis (He{sup 2+} and proton external beams) to identify possible effects on dissolution rates and mechanisms. Two experimental geometries have been used to assess the influence of the solid irradiation on one hand and the total deposited energy into water on the other hand. These irradiations have been performed on polycrystalline zirconolite (Ca{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}ZrTi{sub 1.8}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 7}) in pure water or in presence of complexing ions such as F{sup -}. The sample dissolution has been monitored through the release of cations. Under radiolysis, an increase in the Zr, Ti and Nd releases of one order of magnitude has been observed compared to results obtained without radiolysis. The presence of complexing species has induced an additional increase of two orders of magnitude in the Ti and Zr releases. (authors)

  1. Species Distribution, Virulence Factors, and Antifungal Susceptibility Among Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates Recovered from Clinical Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Beatriz Virgínia; Silva, Larissa Beatriz; de Oliveira, Diego Batista Carneiro; da Silva, Paulo Roberto; Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Andrade-Silva, Leonardo Euripides; Silva-Vergara, Mario León; Andrade, Anderson Assunção

    2015-12-01

    The Candida parapsilosis complex has emerged as an important fungal pathogen. In spite of this, relatively little is known about its characteristics. Thus, the purposes of this study were (1) to determine by BanI-RFLP-assay the occurrence of C. parapsilosis complex species among 81 clinical isolates primarily identified as C. parapsilosis; (2) to evaluate their in vitro production of virulence factors; and (3) to compare their susceptibility profiles, grown as planktonic cells and biofilms, against amphotericin B, fluconazole, voriconazole, and caspofungin by following the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Seventy-seven isolates (95%) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 2 (2.5%) as C. orthopsilosis, and 2 (2.5%) as C. metapsilosis. Protease activity was detected in 29 (37.7%) isolates of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, whereas only 7 (9.1%) exhibited phospholipase activity. None of the C. metapsilosis or C. orthopsilosis was able to produce protease or phospholipase. Biofilm production was detected in 35 (43.2%) isolates, among which 33 were C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and 2 were C. orthopsilosis. Antifungal resistance was uncommon; only one C. metapsilosis was fluconazole resistant. However, biofilm-producing isolates showed a marked resistance to all antifungal agents tested, particularly to voriconazole. This knowledge could be of clinical relevance for guiding therapeutic decisions.

  2. Historical and current introgression in a Mesoamerican hummingbird species complex: a biogeographic perspective

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    Rosa Alicia Jiménez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of geologic and Pleistocene glacial cycles might result in morphological and genetic complex scenarios in the biota of the Mesoamerican region. We tested whether berylline, blue-tailed and steely-blue hummingbirds, Amazilia beryllina, Amazilia cyanura and Amazilia saucerottei, show evidence of historical or current introgression as their plumage colour variation might suggest. We also analysed the role of past and present climatic events in promoting genetic introgression and species diversification. We collected mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequence data and microsatellite loci scores for populations throughout the range of the three Amazilia species, as well as morphological and ecological data. Haplotype network, Bayesian phylogenetic and divergence time inference, historical demography, palaeodistribution modelling, and niche divergence tests were used to reconstruct the evolutionary history of this Amazilia species complex. An isolation-with-migration coalescent model and Bayesian assignment analysis were assessed to determine historical introgression and current genetic admixture. mtDNA haplotypes were geographically unstructured, with haplotypes from disparate areas interdispersed on a shallow tree and an unresolved haplotype network. Assignment analysis of the nuclear genome (nuDNA supported three genetic groups with signs of genetic admixture, corresponding to: (1 A. beryllina populations located west of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec; (2 A. cyanura populations between the Isthmus of Tehuantepec and the Nicaraguan Depression (Nuclear Central America; and (3 A. saucerottei populations southeast of the Nicaraguan Depression. Gene flow and divergence time estimates, and demographic and palaeodistribution patterns suggest an evolutionary history of introgression mediated by Quaternary climatic fluctuations. High levels of gene flow were indicated by mtDNA and asymmetrical isolation-with-migration, whereas the microsatellite analyses

  3. Diagnostic description and geographic distribution of four new cryptic species of the blue-spotted maskray species complex (Myliobatoidei: Dasyatidae; Neotrygon spp.) based on DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, Philippe; Arlyza, Irma S.; Hoareau, Thierry B.; Shen, Kang-Ning

    2017-08-01

    Nine morphologically similar but genetically distinct lineages in the blue-spotted maskray species complex, previously Neotrygon kuhlii (Müller and Henle) qualify as cryptic species. Four of these lineages have been previously described as Neotrygon australiae Last, White and Séret, Neotrygon caeruleopunctata Last, White and Séret, Neotrygon orientale Last, White and Séret, and Neotrygon varidens (Garman), but the morphological characters used in the descriptions offered poor diagnoses and their geographic distributions were not delineated precisely. The objective of the present work is to complete the description of the cryptic species in the complex. Here, an additional four lineages are described as new species on the basis of their mitochondrial DNA sequences: Neotrygon bobwardi, whose distribution extends from the northern tip of Aceh to the western coast of Sumatera; Neotrygon malaccensis, sampled from the eastern part of the Andaman Sea and from the Malacca Strait; Neotrygon moluccensis, from the eastern half of the Banda Sea; and Neotrygon westpapuensis from the central portion of northern West Papua. The geographic distributions of N. australiae, N. coeruleopunctata, N. orientale, and N. varidens are updated. For each species, a diagnosis is provided in the form of a combination of private or partly-private nucleotides at 2-4 nucleotide sites along a 519-base pair fragment of the CO1 gene. We believe that the present taxonomic revision will provide information relevant to the sound management and conservation of cryptic species of the blue-spotted maskray in the Coral Triangle region.

  4. Genetic diversity and virulence pattern in field populations of Pyricularia grisea from rice cultivar Metica-1 Diversidade genética e padrão de virulência em populações de Pyricularia grisea provenientes da cultivar de arroz Metica-1

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    Marta Cristina Filippi

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast is a major yield constraint of the irrigated rice in the State of Tocantins, Brazil. The objective of this investigation was to study the phenotypic and genetic diversity within the pathogen population of Pyricularia grisea in samples collected from four individual farms of rice cultivar Metica-1, under epidemic conditions of leaf blast. A set of 87 isolates was tested on 32 rice genotypes including eight international differentials. Considering 80% similarity in virulence, two groups comprising a total of 81 isolates were recognized, independently of the farms from which they were collected. Eighty percent of the isolates pertained to pathotype ID-14, indicating high cultivar specificity and narrow diversity of virulence in the sample population. The virulence in pathogen population on rice cultivars BR-IRGA 409 and Rio Formoso was low. Analysis of P. grisea isolates using rep-PCR with two primer sequences from Pot2 generated fingerprint profiles of one to nine bands. Cluster analysis revealed the occurrence of six fingerprint groups with similarities ranging from 0.09 to 1. There was no straight relationship between virulence of the isolates based on reaction pattern on 32 genotypes and grouping based on Pot2 rep-PCR analysis of P. grisea isolates collected from 'Metica-1'.A brusone é um dos fatores limitantes para a produção de arroz de várzea no Estado do Tocantins. A diversidade fenotípica e genética em população de Pyricularia grisea foi estudada, em amostras coletadas em quatro lavouras da cultivar Metica-1, sob condições de epidemias de brusone nas folhas. Foram testados 87 isolados em 32 genótipos, incluindo oito diferenciadoras internacionais. Considerando 80% de similaridade em virulência, dois grupos compostos por 81 isolados foram identificados, independentemente das lavouras onde foram coletados. Oitenta por cento dos isolados pertencem ao patótipo ID-14, indicando alta especificidade da cultivar e a

  5. Padrão de integração de pAN7-1 em mutantes de Magnaporthe grisea com patogenicidade alterada em arroz pAN7-1 integration pattern in mutants of Magnaporthe grisea impaired in pathogenicity to rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Marchi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ensaios foram conduzidos para verificar a presença, o número de cópias e de sítios de integração de pAN7-1 no genoma de mutantes de M. grisea I-22 com patogenicidade alterada em arroz. Foram analisados T41, T93, T251 (gerados por mutagênese REMI e T108 (oriundo de mutagênese convencional, os quais exibiram diferentes fenótipos mutantes. O DNA total desses mutantes foi submetido à reação em cadeia de polimerase (PCR e às análises de hibridização com o vetor (Southern blot. A presença de pAN7-1 no genoma de todos os mutantes foi confirmada por PCR. Segundo as análises de Southern blot, T41 exibiu duas integrações do vetor, ambas na forma de cópia única. No genoma de T93 também foram detectados dois sítios de inserção de pAN7-1, um dos quais envolvendo múltiplas cópias do vetor. Os resultados indicaram a presença de apenas uma cópia do vetor em um único sítio nos genomas de T108 e T251. O padrão de integração em T251 foi o único a sugerir a ocorrência de evento REMI. As diferenças quanto ao tamanho dos fragmentos com homologia a pAN7-1 refletiram a possível aleatoriedade dos eventos de integração no genoma de M. grisea. Os resultados evidenciaram o potencial de REMI para a mutagênese insercional de M. grisea, quando conduzida com pAN7-1 e HindIIIExperiments were conducted to investigate the presence, number of copies and integration site of pAN7-1 in the genome of mutants of Magnaporthe grisea impaired in pathogenicity to rice. The mutants T41, T93, T251 (obtained by REMI and T108 (obtained by conventional mutagenesis exhibiting different alterations in pathogenicity were analyzed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Southern blot analyses were conducted with total DNA of mutants. The presence of pAN7-1 in genome of mutants was confirmed by PCR. Based in Southern blot analyses, two single-copy integration of vector were detected in T41. Two insertion sites of pAN7-1 were detected in the genome of T93

  6. Shifts in patterns of microhabitat occupation by six closely related species of mosses along a complex altitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Maxine A

    1980-01-01

    Changes in patterns of microhabitat occupation were examined for six closely related moss species (family Polytrichaceae) found growing together along a complex altitudinal gradient on the northeast face of Mount Washington, New Hampshire. Little evidence could be found to support the hypothesis that the relative distributions of these six moss species were determined by competitive interactions occurring among them. Instead, the data support the hypothesis that changing patterns in the relative distributions of these six moss species result from differences in microhabitat availability among sites. The moss species appear to behave in an opportunistic manner, occupying a wide array of microhabitats as these microhabitats become available to them.

  7. Comparative sensitivity to methyl eugenol of four putative Bactrocera dorsalis complex sibling species - further evidence that they belong to one and the same species B. dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Alvin K W; Ooi, Yue-Shin; Wee, Suk-Ling; Tan, Keng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Males of certain species belonging to the Bactrocera dorsalis complex are strongly attracted to, and readily feed on methyl eugenol (ME), a plant secondary compound that is found in over 480 plant species worldwide. Amongst those species is one of the world's most severe fruit pests the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., and the former taxonomic species Bactrocera invadens, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera philippinensis. The latter species have been recently synonymised with Bactrocera dorsalis based on their very similar morphology, mating compatibility, molecular genetics and identical sex pheromones following consumption of ME. Previous studies have shown that male fruit fly responsiveness to lures is a unique phenomenon that is dose species-specific, besides showing a close correlation to sexual maturity attainment. This led us to use ME sensitivity as a behavioural parameter to test if Bactrocera dorsalis and the three former taxonomic species had similar sensitivity towards odours of ME. Using Probit analysis, we estimated the median dose of ME required to elicit species' positive response in 50% of each population tested (ED50). ED50 values were compared between Bactrocera dorsalis and the former species. Our results showed no significant differences between Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., and the former Bactrocera invadens, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera philippinensis in their response to ME. We consider that the Bactrocera males' sensitivity to ME may be a useful behavioural parameter for species delimitation and, in addition to other integrative taxonomic tools used, provides further supportive evidence that the four taxa belong to one and the same biological species, Bactrocera dorsalis.

  8. Phylogeny and Haplotype Analysis of Fungi Within the Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti Species Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdial, H; Latchoo, R K; Hosein, F N; Rampersad, S N

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium spp. are ranked among the top 10 most economically and scientifically important plant-pathogenic fungi in the world and are associated with plant diseases that include fruit decay of a number of crops. Fusarium isolates infecting bell pepper in Trinidad were identified based on sequence comparisons of the translation elongation factor gene (EF-1a) with sequences of Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex (FIESC) verified in the FUSARIUM-ID database. Eighty-two isolates were identified as belonging to one of four phylogenetic species within the subclades FIESC-1, FIESC-15, FIESC-16, and FIESC-26, with the majority of isolates belonging to FIESC-15. A comparison of the level of DNA polymorphism and phylogenetic inference for sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) and EF-1a sequences for Trinidad and FUSARIUM-ID type species was carried out. The ITS sequences were less informative, had lower haplotype diversity and restricted haplotype distribution, and resulted in poor resolution and taxa placement in the consensus maximum-likelihood tree. EF-1a sequences enabled strongly supported phylogenetic inference with highly resolved branching patterns of the 30 phylogenetic species within the FIESC and placement of representative Trinidad isolates. Therefore, global phylogeny was inferred from EF-1a sequences representing 11 countries, and separation into distinct Incarnatum and Equiseti clades was again evident. In total, 42 haplotypes were identified: 12 were shared and the remaining were unique haplotypes. The most diverse haplotype was represented by sequences from China, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Trinidad and consisted exclusively of F. incarnatum isolates. Spain had the highest haplotype diversity, perhaps because both F. equiseti and F. incarnatum sequences were represented; followed by the United States, which contributed both F. equiseti and F. incarnatum sequences to the data set; then by countries representing Southeast

  9. Genome-assisted development of nuclear intergenic sequence markers for entomopathogenic fungi of the Metarhizium anisopliae species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, R M; Rehner, S A

    2013-03-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi in the genus Metarhizium are useful for biological control programmes against economically important arthropod pests worldwide. However, understanding the true diversity and ecology of these organisms is hampered by convergent morphologies between species. The application of molecular techniques has enabled greater resolution of species than allowed by morphology alone. In particular, the commonly used biocontrol agent M. anisopliae was found to be a species complex composed of nine species. This prior work was conducted with commonly used markers in fungal phylogenetics (BTUB, RPB1, RPB2 and TEF), which likely under-represent diversity in the M. anisopliae complex. Using sequence data from nuclear genomes of M. acridum and M. robertsii we identified regions of conserved gene synteny and developed primers to amplify intergenic regions of seven loci. Using ex-type and authenticated tissue specimens for species in the M. anisopliae complex, we demonstrate that sequence data derived from intergenic loci is more variable and phylogenetically informative than previously available markers. These new markers will facilitate investigations at or below the species level for the M. anisopliae complex. The method of marker development employed here should be extendable to any group with sufficiently divergent genome data available.

  10. Caracterização da virulência de Magnaporthe grisea em cultivares diferenciadoras japonesas e linhas quase-isogênicas das cultivares IAC-25 e de CO-39 de arroz Characterization of virulence of Magnaporthe grisea on Japanese differentials, near-isogenic lines of IAC-25 and CO-39 of rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Barata da Silva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudada a virulência de 681 isolados de Magnaporthe grisea provenientes de oito lavouras de arroz de terras altas, quatro da cv. BRS Bonança e quatro da cv. Primavera, localizadas em cinco municípios no Estado de Goiás. Foram avaliados 321 isolados de M. grisea de folha e de panícula obtidos da cv. BRS Bonança e 360 da cv. Primavera. Para diferenciar a virulência dos isolados foram utilizados nove cultivares diferenciadoras japonesas, seis linhagens quase-isogências (NIL's da cv. IAC-25, cinco linhagens quase-isogênicas da cv. CO-39, e as cultivares Primavera, BRS Bonança, IAC-25 e CO-39. Os isolados de M. grisea provenientes da cv. BRS Bonança foram mais virulentos nas NIL's de IAC-25 do que isolados da cv. Primavera. A maioria das subpopulações de M. grisea provenientes de folhas e panícula, de ambas as cultivares, foram avirulentos à linhagem quase-isogênica CNA-8212. A virulência, em baixa freqüência, foi observada nos isolados de M. grisea provenientes de BRS Bonança aos genes Pi-z t (Toride-1 e de Primavera aos genes Pi-z (Fukunishiki. Uma baixa freqüência de isolados virulentos foram virulentos nas NIL's C101 LAC (Pi-1 e C101 A 51(Pi-2. Considerando as reações compatíveis e incompatíveis das NIL's de IAC-25 à população de M. grisea de BRS Bonança, o dendrograma mostrou um grupo (90% de similaridade, diferindo do parental recorrente. Por outro lado, a população de 'Primavera', com exceção da CNA-8199, formou um grupo (93% de similaridade, incluindo o parental recorrente. Os genes de resistência Pi-z e Pi-z t das cultivares Fukunishiki e Toride-1, respectivamente, os genes Pi-1 e Pi-2 das NIL's de CO-39 e os genes desconhecidos das NIL's IAC-25, que apresentaram maior espectro de resistência às populações estudadas podem ser utilizados no programa de melhoramento, para desenvolvimento de linhas isogênicas de BRS Bonança e Primavera.The virulence of the population of Magnaporthe grisea collected

  11. Using mitogenomic and nuclear ribosomal sequence data to investigate the phylogeny of the Xiphinema americanum species complex.

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    Inga A Zasada

    Full Text Available Nematodes within the Xiphinema americanum species complex are economically important because they vector nepoviruses which cause considerable damage to a variety of agricultural crops. The taxonomy of X. americanum species complex is controversial, with the number of putative species being the subject of debate. Accurate phylogenetic knowledge of this group is highly desirable as it may ultimately reveal genetic differences between species. For this study, nematodes belonging to the X. americanum species complex, including potentially mixed species populations, were collected from 12 geographically disparate locations across the U.S. from different crops and in varying association with nepoviruses. At least four individuals from each population were analyzed. A portion of the 18S nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA gene was sequenced for all individuals while the internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1 of rDNA was cloned and 2 to 6 clones per individual were sequenced. Mitochondrial genomes for numerous individuals were sequenced in parallel using high-throughput DNA sequencing (HTS technology. Phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rDNA revealed virtually identical sequences across all populations. Analysis of ITS1 rDNA sequences revealed several well-supported clades, with some degree of congruence with geographic location and viral transmission, but also numerous presumably paralogous sequences that failed to form clades with other sequences from the same population. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA indicated the presence of three distinct monophyletic clades of X. americanum species complex nematodes. Two clades contained nematodes found in association with nepovirus and the third contained divergent mtDNA sequences from three nematode populations from the western U.S. where nepovirus was absent. The inherent heterogeneity in ITS1 rDNA sequence data and lack of informative sites in 18S rDNA analysis suggests that mtDNA may be more useful in sorting

  12. Using mitogenomic and nuclear ribosomal sequence data to investigate the phylogeny of the Xiphinema americanum species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasada, Inga A; Peetz, Amy; Howe, Dana K; Wilhelm, Larry J; Cheam, Daravuth; Denver, Dee R; Smythe, Ashleigh B

    2014-01-01

    Nematodes within the Xiphinema americanum species complex are economically important because they vector nepoviruses which cause considerable damage to a variety of agricultural crops. The taxonomy of X. americanum species complex is controversial, with the number of putative species being the subject of debate. Accurate phylogenetic knowledge of this group is highly desirable as it may ultimately reveal genetic differences between species. For this study, nematodes belonging to the X. americanum species complex, including potentially mixed species populations, were collected from 12 geographically disparate locations across the U.S. from different crops and in varying association with nepoviruses. At least four individuals from each population were analyzed. A portion of the 18S nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene was sequenced for all individuals while the internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) of rDNA was cloned and 2 to 6 clones per individual were sequenced. Mitochondrial genomes for numerous individuals were sequenced in parallel using high-throughput DNA sequencing (HTS) technology. Phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rDNA revealed virtually identical sequences across all populations. Analysis of ITS1 rDNA sequences revealed several well-supported clades, with some degree of congruence with geographic location and viral transmission, but also numerous presumably paralogous sequences that failed to form clades with other sequences from the same population. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) indicated the presence of three distinct monophyletic clades of X. americanum species complex nematodes. Two clades contained nematodes found in association with nepovirus and the third contained divergent mtDNA sequences from three nematode populations from the western U.S. where nepovirus was absent. The inherent heterogeneity in ITS1 rDNA sequence data and lack of informative sites in 18S rDNA analysis suggests that mtDNA may be more useful in sorting out the

  13. Comparative sensitivity to methyl eugenol of four putative Bactrocera dorsalis complex sibling species – further evidence that they belong to one and the same species B. dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Alvin K.W.; Ooi, Yue-Shin; Wee, Suk-Ling; Tan, Keng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Males of certain species belonging to the Bactrocera dorsalis complex are strongly attracted to, and readily feed on methyl eugenol (ME), a plant secondary compound that is found in over 480 plant species worldwide. Amongst those species is one of the world’s most severe fruit pests the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., and the former taxonomic species Bactrocera invadens, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera philippinensis. The latter species have been recently synonymised with Bactrocera dorsalis based on their very similar morphology, mating compatibility, molecular genetics and identical sex pheromones following consumption of ME. Previous studies have shown that male fruit fly responsiveness to lures is a unique phenomenon that is dose species-specific, besides showing a close correlation to sexual maturity attainment. This led us to use ME sensitivity as a behavioural parameter to test if Bactrocera dorsalis and the three former taxonomic species had similar sensitivity towards odours of ME. Using Probit analysis, we estimated the median dose of ME required to elicit species’ positive response in 50% of each population tested (ED50). ED50 values were compared between Bactrocera dorsalis and the former species. Our results showed no significant differences between Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., and the former Bactrocera invadens, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera philippinensis in their response to ME. We consider that the Bactrocera males’ sensitivity to ME may be a useful behavioural parameter for species delimitation and, in addition to other integrative taxonomic tools used, provides further supportive evidence that the four taxa belong to one and the same biological species, Bactrocera dorsalis. PMID:26798265

  14. Morphological Differences between Larvae of the Ciona intestinalis Species Complex: Hints for a Valid Taxonomic Definition of Distinct Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennati, Roberta; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Brunetti, Riccardo; Caicci, Federico; Gasparini, Fabio; Griggio, Francesca; Sato, Atsuko; Stach, Thomas; Kaul-Strehlow, Sabrina; Gissi, Carmela; Manni, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The cosmopolitan ascidian Ciona intestinalis is the most common model species of Tunicata, the sister-group of Vertebrata, and widely used in developmental biology, genomics and evolutionary studies. Recently, molecular studies suggested the presence of cryptic species hidden within the C. intestinalis species, namely C. intestinalis type A and type B. So far, no substantial morphological differences have been identified between individuals belonging to the two types. Here we present morphometric, immunohistochemical, and histological analyses, as well as 3-D reconstructions, of late larvae obtained by cross-fertilization experiments of molecularly determined type A and type B adults, sampled in different seasons and in four different localities. Our data point to quantitative and qualitative differences in the trunk shape of larvae belonging to the two types. In particular, type B larvae exhibit a longer pre-oral lobe, longer and relatively narrower total body length, and a shorter ocellus-tail distance than type A larvae. All these differences were found to be statistically significant in a Discriminant Analysis. Depending on the number of analyzed parameters, the obtained discriminant function was able to correctly classify > 93% of the larvae, with the remaining misclassified larvae attributable to the existence of intra-type seasonal variability. No larval differences were observed at the level of histology and immunohistochemical localization of peripheral sensory neurons. We conclude that type A and type B are two distinct species that can be distinguished on the basis of larval morphology and molecular data. Since the identified larval differences appear to be valid diagnostic characters, we suggest to raise both types to the rank of species and to assign them distinct names.

  15. Morphological Differences between Larvae of the Ciona intestinalis Species Complex: Hints for a Valid Taxonomic Definition of Distinct Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Pennati

    Full Text Available The cosmopolitan ascidian Ciona intestinalis is the most common model species of Tunicata, the sister-group of Vertebrata, and widely used in developmental biology, genomics and evolutionary studies. Recently, molecular studies suggested the presence of cryptic species hidden within the C. intestinalis species, namely C. intestinalis type A and type B. So far, no substantial morphological differences have been identified between individuals belonging to the two types. Here we present morphometric, immunohistochemical, and histological analyses, as well as 3-D reconstructions, of late larvae obtained by cross-fertilization experiments of molecularly determined type A and type B adults, sampled in different seasons and in four different localities. Our data point to quantitative and qualitative differences in the trunk shape of larvae belonging to the two types. In particular, type B larvae exhibit a longer pre-oral lobe, longer and relatively narrower total body length, and a shorter ocellus-tail distance than type A larvae. All these differences were found to be statistically significant in a Discriminant Analysis. Depending on the number of analyzed parameters, the obtained discriminant function was able to correctly classify > 93% of the larvae, with the remaining misclassified larvae attributable to the existence of intra-type seasonal variability. No larval differences were observed at the level of histology and immunohistochemical localization of peripheral sensory neurons. We conclude that type A and type B are two distinct species that can be distinguished on the basis of larval morphology and molecular data. Since the identified larval differences appear to be valid diagnostic characters, we suggest to raise both types to the rank of species and to assign them distinct names.

  16. DNA barcoding, MALDI-TOF, and AFLP data support Fusarium ficicrescens as a distinct species within the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Mirabolfathy, Mansoureh; Hagen, Ferry; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Stielow, J Benjamin; Karami-Osbo, Rouhollah; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Meis, Jacques F; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2016-02-01

    The Fusarium fujikuroi species complex (FFSC) is one of the most common groups of fusaria associated with plant diseases, mycotoxin production and traumatic and disseminated human infections. Here we present the description and taxonomy of a new taxon, Fusarium ficicrescens sp. nov., collected from contaminated fig fruits in Iran. Initially this species was identified as Fusarium andiyazi by morphology. In the present study the species was studied by multilocus sequence analysis, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and phenotypic characters. Multilocus analyses were based on translation elongation factor 1α (TEF1), RNA polymerase subunit (RPB2) and beta-tubulin (BT2) and proved F. ficicrescens as a member of the FFSC. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the fungus is closely related to Fusarium lactis, Fusarium ramigenum, and Fusarium napiforme; known plant pathogens, mycotoxin producers, and occasionally occurring multidrug resistant opportunists. The new species differed by being able to grow at 37 °C and by the absence of mycotoxin production. TEF1 was confirmed as an essential barcode for identifying Fusarium species. In addition to TEF1, we evaluated BT2 and RPB2 in order to provide sufficient genetic and species boundaries information for recognition of the novel species. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A complex of species related to Paradiscogaster glebulae (Digenea: Faustulidae) in chaetodontid fishes (Teleostei: Perciformes) of the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Pablo E; Bray, Rodney A; Cutmore, Scott C; Ward, Selina; Cribb, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    A total of 1523 individuals of 34 species of chaetodontids from the Great Barrier Reef were examined for faustulid trematodes. Specimens resembling Paradiscogaster glebulae Bray, Cribb & Barker, 1994 were found in nine chaetodontid species at three localities. These specimens are shown, on the basis of combined morphological and molecular analyses, to comprise a complex of morphologically similar and partly cryptic species. The complex may comprise as many as six distinct species of which three are resolved here. The true P. glebulae is identified in Chaetodon ornatissimus Cuvier, 1831, Chaetodon aureofasciatus Macleay, 1878, Chaetodon plebeius Cuvier, 1831, Chaetodon rainfordi McCulloch, 1923 and Chaetodon speculum Cuvier, 1831. Two new species are described, Paradiscogaster munozae n. sp. from Heniochus varius (Cuvier, 1829), Heniochus chrysostomus Cuvier, 1831 and Chaetodon citrinellus Cuvier, 1831 and Paradiscogaster melendezi n. sp. from Chaetodon kleinii Bloch, 1790. In terms of morphology the three species differ most clearly in the development of the appendages on the ventral sucker. The three species differ at 3-6consistent bp of ITS2 rDNA. The host-specificity of the three species differs strikingly. P. melendezi n. sp. infects just one fish species, P. glebulae infects species of only one clade of Chaetodon, and P. munozae n. sp. infects quite unrelated species. The basis of this unusual pattern of host-specificity requires further exploration. Two of the species recognised here, P. glebulae and P. munozae n. sp., showed apparent intra-individual variation in the ITS2 rDNA sequences as demonstrated by clear, replicated double peaks in the electropherograms.

  18. Latitudinal variation of a defensive symbiosis in the Bugula neritina (Bryozoa sibling species complex.

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    Jonathan Linneman

    Full Text Available Mutualistic relationships are beneficial for both partners and are often studied within a single environment. However, when the range of the partners is large, geographical differences in selective pressure may shift the relationship outcome from positive to negative. The marine bryozoan Bugula neritina is a colonial invertebrate common in temperate waters worldwide. It is the source of bioactive polyketide metabolites, the bryostatins. Evidence suggests that an uncultured vertically transmitted symbiont, "Candidatus Endobugula sertula", hosted by B. neritina produces the bryostatins, which protect the vulnerable larvae from predation. Studies of B. neritina along the North American Atlantic coast revealed a complex of two morphologically similar sibling species separated by an apparent biogeographic barrier: the Type S sibling species was found below Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, while Type N was found above. Interestingly, the Type N colonies lack "Ca. Endobugula sertula" and, subsequently, defensive bryostatins; their documented northern distribution was consistent with traditional biogeographical paradigms of latitudinal variation in predation pressure. Upon further sampling of B. neritina populations, we found that both host types occur in wider distribution, with Type N colonies living south of Cape Hatteras, and Type S to the north. Distribution of the symbiont, however, was not restricted to Type S hosts. Genetic and microscopic evidence demonstrates the presence of the symbiont in some Type N colonies, and larvae from these colonies are endowed with defensive bryostatins and contain "Ca. Endobugula sertula". Molecular analysis of the symbiont from Type N colonies suggests an evolutionarily recent acquisition, which is remarkable for a symbiont thought to be transmitted only vertically. Furthermore, most Type S colonies found at higher latitudes lack the symbiont, suggesting that this host-symbiont relationship is more flexible than

  19. Evidence for homoploid speciation in Phytophthora alni supports taxonomic reclassification in this species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husson, C; Aguayo, J; Revellin, C; Frey, P; Ioos, R; Marçais, B

    2015-04-01

    Alder decline has been a problem along European watercourses since the early 1990s. Hybridization was identified as the main cause of this emerging disease. Indeed, the causal agent, a soil-borne pathogen named Phytophthora alni subsp. alni (Paa) is the result of interspecific hybridization between two taxa, Phytophthora alni subsp. multiformis (Pam) and Phytophthora alni subsp. uniformis (Pau), initially identified as subspecies of Paa. The aim of this work was to characterize the ploidy level within the P. alni complex that is presently poorly understood. For that, we used two complementary approaches for a set of 31 isolates of Paa, Pam and Pau: (i) quantification of allele copy number of three single-copy nuclear genes using allele-specific real-time PCR and (ii) comparison of the genome size estimated by flow cytometry. Relative quantification of alleles of the three single-copy genes showed that the copy number of a given allele in Paa was systematically half that of its parents Pau or Pam. Moreover, DNA content estimated by flow cytometry in Paa was equal to half the sum of those in Pam and Pau. Our results therefore suggest that the hybrid Paa is an allotriploid species, containing half of the genome of each of its parents Pam and Pau, which in turn are considered to be allotetraploid and diploid, respectively. Paa thus results from a homoploid speciation process. Based on published data and on results from this study, a new formal taxonomic name is proposed for the three taxa Paa, Pam and Pau which are raised to species status and renamed P. ×alni, P. ×multiformis and P. uniformis, respectively.

  20. Evaluación agronómica de líneas mutantes de arroz con tolerancia a Pyricularia grisea (ING

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    Jorge Madriz Muñoz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Utilizando el procedimiento de mutagénesis inducida con rayos Gamma Co60, seguida de selección individual, CRUZ et al. (1992 lograron obtener 53 plantas de arroz con resistencia parcial a Pyricularia grisea (Cooke Sacc. provenientes de una variedad comercial (CR-1113 originalmente susceptible a esta enfermedad. La primera etapa del presente trabajo consistió en la evaluación de 52 líneas obtenidas por los autores mencionados. De ellas se seleccionaron 14, siete por su buen comportamiento agronómico, buen rendimiento y resistencia parcial a la enfermedad, y siete por su precocidad y buenas características agronómicas. Posteriormente estas líneas fueron reproducidas y evaluadas en ensayos de campo. Los resultados obtenidos confirmaron que las líneas escogidas mantenían las características ventajosas por las que fueron seleccionadas.

  1. Interspecific hybridization does not affect the level of fluctuating asymmetry (FA) in the Drosophila bipectinata species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Parul; Singh, B N

    2015-08-01

    The Drosophila bipectinata species complex comprises of four very closely related species namely D. bipectinata, D. parabipectinata, D. malerkotliana and D. pseudoananassae. It was found that irrespective of the evolutionary divergence among the species, FA which is reflective of the developmental precision remains nearly same in four species. During the present study, the level of FA in different morphological traits was studied in interspecific hybrids and compared with that of parental species with the view that it would throw light on the degree of divergence between the parental species. If they have not diverged much, the interspecific hybrids may have a similar FA level, incompatibilities between their genomes being negligible. On the other hand, if there is substantial divergence, the level of FA may be higher due to incompatibility between the genomes of the parental species. The morphological traits taken were sternopleural bristle number and wing length in both males and females and ovariole number and sex-comb tooth number in females and males respectively. However, except in a few cases, we could not detect any significant differences in the level of FA in hybrids as compared to pure species. On the other hand, a number of abnormalities like poor viability, dystrophied ovaries, asymmetrical eyes etc., could be detected in hybrids from crosses involving D. pseudoananassae as one of the parents. Therefore, we conclude that specific developmental pathways are more susceptible to developmental disturbances due to genomic incompatibilities than the large complex system bringing about developmental stability.

  2. A species delimitation approach in the Trochulus sericeus/hispidus complex reveals two cryptic species within a sharp contact zone

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    Pfenninger Markus

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA sequencing increasingly results in the recognition of genetically divergent, but morphologically cryptic lineages. Species delimitation approaches that rely on multiple lines of evidence in areas of co-occurrence are particularly powerful to infer their specific status. We investigated the species boundaries of two cryptic lineages of the land snail genus Trochulus in a contact zone, using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA marker as well as shell morphometrics. Results Both mitochondrial lineages have a distinct geographical distribution with a small zone of co-occurrence. In the same area, we detected two nuclear genotype clusters, each being highly significantly associated to one mitochondrial lineage. This association however had exceptions: a small number of individuals in the contact zone showed intermediate genotypes (4% or cytonuclear disequilibrium (12%. Both mitochondrial lineage and nuclear cluster were statistically significant predictors for the shell shape indicating morphological divergence. Nevertheless, the lineage morphospaces largely overlapped (low posterior classification success rate of 69% and 78%, respectively: the two lineages are truly cryptic. Conclusion The integrative approach using multiple lines of evidence supported the hypothesis that the investigated Trochulus lineages are reproductively isolated species. In the small contact area, however, the lineages hybridise to a limited extent. This detection of a hybrid zone adds an instance to the rare reported cases of hybridisation in land snails.

  3. Otolith shape analysis and mitochondrial DNA markers distinguish three sand smelt species in the Atherina boyeri species complex in western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudinar, A. S.; Chaoui, L.; Quignard, J. P.; Aurelle, D.; Kara, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    Atherina boyeri is a common euryhaline teleost fish in the Mediterranean and adjacent areas, which inhabits coastal and estuarine waters, including coastal lagoons and more rarely inland waters. Several recent studies have pointed the possible existence of three distinct groups or species, one lagoon/freshwater group and two 'punctuated and unpunctuated on the flanks' marine groups, within an A. boyeri species complex. This study is a combined approach using otolith shape and molecular markers to better define the structure of the species in the western Mediterranean. Genetic differentiation and species delimitation among nine Atherina boyeri populations from several marine and lagoon/brakish habitat sites in Algeria, Tunisia and France were investigated using three mitochondrial (control region, Cyt b and 16S) and one nuclear markers (2nd intron of S7). For further phylogenetic and phylogeographic study, we added sequences from Genbank covering more areas (Ionian Sea, Adriatic Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea, Black Sea, Atlantic). Five groups were found. Two of them perfectly corresponded to two species already recognized Atherina presbyter and Atherina hepsetus, both living in marine waters; and three additional, including Atherina boyeri (brackish and freshwater environments) and two independent groups of marine punctated and unpunctated individuals. Those findings are corroborated by the study of the otolith contour shape of 362 individuals of seven populations from different habitats using Fourier analysis. Individuals could be discriminated into five groups based on the first two functions (Wilk's lambda = 0.07, p < 0.001). Samples from Ziama inlet, marine punctuated individuals and unpunctuated marine specimens from Annaba's Gulf formed three well separated groups. Specimens from Mellah and Mauguio lagoons formed another group. The last one includes individuals from Bizerte and Thau lagoons. The divergences between them strongly support the potential species within the

  4. Universal plant DNA barcode loci may not work in complex groups: a case study with Indian berberis species.

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    Sribash Roy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The concept of DNA barcoding for species identification has gained considerable momentum in animals because of fairly successful species identification using cytochrome oxidase I (COI. In plants, matK and rbcL have been proposed as standard barcodes. However, barcoding in complex genera is a challenging task. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the species discriminatory power of four reportedly most promising plant DNA barcoding loci (one from nuclear genome--ITS, and three from plastid genome--trnH-psbA, rbcL and matK in species of Indian Berberis L. (Berberidaceae and two other genera, Ficus L. (Moraceae and Gossypium L. (Malvaceae. Berberis species were delineated using morphological characters. These characters resulted in a well resolved species tree. Applying both nucleotide distance and nucleotide character-based approaches, we found that none of the loci, either singly or in combinations, could discriminate the species of Berberis. ITS resolved all the tested species of Ficus and Gossypium and trnH-psbA resolved 82% of the tested species in Ficus. The highly regarded matK and rbcL could not resolve all the species. Finally, we employed amplified fragment length polymorphism test in species of Berberis to determine their relationships. Using ten primer pair combinations in AFLP, the data demonstrated incomplete species resolution. Further, AFLP analysis showed that there was a tendency of the Berberis accessions to cluster according to their geographic origin rather than species affiliation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We reconfirm the earlier reports that the concept of universal barcode in plants may not work in a number of genera. Our results also suggest that the matK and rbcL, recommended as universal barcode loci for plants, may not work in all the genera of land plants. Morphological, geographical and molecular data analyses of Indian species of Berberis suggest probable reticulate evolution and thus

  5. DNA barcoding of Bemisia tabaci complex (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) reveals southerly expansion of the dominant whitefly species on cotton in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfaq, Muhammad; Hebert, Paul D N; Mirza, M Sajjad; Khan, Arif M; Mansoor, Shahid; Shah, Ghulam S; Zafar, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    Although whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci complex) are an important pest of cotton in Pakistan, its taxonomic diversity is poorly understood. As DNA barcoding is an effective tool for resolving species complexes and analyzing species distributions, we used this approach to analyze genetic diversity in the B. tabaci complex and map the distribution of B. tabaci lineages in cotton growing areas of Pakistan. Sequence diversity in the DNA barcode region (mtCOI-5') was examined in 593 whiteflies from Pakistan to determine the number of whitefly species and their distributions in the cotton-growing areas of Punjab and Sindh provinces. These new records were integrated with another 173 barcode sequences for B. tabaci, most from India, to better understand regional whitefly diversity. The Barcode Index Number (BIN) System assigned the 766 sequences to 15 BINs, including nine from Pakistan. Representative specimens of each Pakistan BIN were analyzed for mtCOI-3' to allow their assignment to one of the putative species in the B. tabaci complex recognized on the basis of sequence variation in this gene region. This analysis revealed the presence of Asia II 1, Middle East-Asia Minor 1, Asia 1, Asia II 5, Asia II 7, and a new lineage "Pakistan". The first two taxa were found in both Punjab and Sindh, but Asia 1 was only detected in Sindh, while Asia II 5, Asia II 7 and "Pakistan" were only present in Punjab. The haplotype networks showed that most haplotypes of Asia II 1, a species implicated in transmission of the cotton leaf curl virus, occurred in both India and Pakistan. DNA barcodes successfully discriminated cryptic species in B. tabaci complex. The dominant haplotypes in the B. tabaci complex were shared by India and Pakistan. Asia II 1 was previously restricted to Punjab, but is now the dominant lineage in southern Sindh; its southward spread may have serious implications for cotton plantations in this region.

  6. A Molecular Phylogeny of Anopheles Annulipes (Diptera: Culicidae) sensu lato: The Most Species-Rich Anopheline Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-27

    myxomatosis to con- trol rabbits (Fenner and RatcliVe, 1965). Chris Green used data from cross-matings and the band- ing pattern of polytene chromosomes to...most likely vectors of malaria in the past in southern Australia and are involved in the spread of myxo- matosis among rabbits . In this, the Wrst...Maximum parsimony; Sibling species; Species complex; Myxomatosis ; DNA barcoding; Australia; Papua New Guinea; ITS2; COI; COII; EF-11. Introduction

  7. Heterogeneity in optical properties of near white-light emissive europium complex species revealed by spectroscopy of single nanoaggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfanullah, Mir; Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Chulliyil, Ramya; Layek, Arunasish; De, Suman; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2017-01-01

    Photoluminescence microscopy has been used to interrogate individual nanoaggregates (NAs) of visible light excitable Eu(III)-complex species with 9-hydroxyphenalenone which we found to emit near-white light in methanol. In the solid state however, NAs display diverse emission spectra due to varied sensitization efficiencies, and thereby exhibit a wide range of emission colours. Heterogeneity in sensitization efficiency and asymmetry ratios for Eu-emission is intriguing because all measurable photoluminescence parameters are expected to average out over large number of Eu-complex species which constitute NAs, and suggests the existence of relatively few yet efficient Eu3+ radiative trap centres of varied asymmetry within NAs.

  8. First report of Fusarium oxysporum species complex infection in zebrafish culturing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulatunga, D C M; Dananjaya, S H S; Park, B K; Kim, C-H; Lee, J; De Zoysa, M

    2017-04-01

    Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC) is a highly diverse fungus. Recently, F. oxysporum infection was identified from zebrafish (Danio rerio) culturing system in Korea. Initially, a rapid whitish smudge was appeared in the water with the fungal blooming on walls of fish tanks. Microscopic studies were conducted on fungal hyphae, colony pigmentation and chlamydospore formation and the presence of macro- and microspores confirmed that the isolated fungus as F. oxysporum. Furthermore, isolated F. oxysporum was confirmed by internal transcribed spacer sequencing which matched (100%) to nine F. oxysporum sequences available in GenBank. Experimental hypodermic injection of F. oxysporum into adult zebrafish showed the development of fungal mycelium and pathogenicity similar to signs observed. Histopathologic results revealed a presence of F. oxysporum hyphae in zebrafish muscle. Fusarium oxysporum growth was increased with sea salt in a concentration-dependent manner. Antifungal susceptibility results revealed that F. oxysporum is resistant to copper sulphate (up to 200 μg mL(-1) ) and sensitive to nystatin (up to 40 μg mL(-1) ). This is the first report of FOSC from zebrafish culture system, suggesting it appears as an emerging pathogen, thus posing a significant risk on zebrafish facilities in the world. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Interplay among nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species: a complex network determining cell survival or death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian

    2007-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integrated cellular process occurring in plant growth, development, and defense responses to facilitate normal growth and development and better survival against various stresses as a whole. As universal toxic chemicals in plant and animal cells, reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS or RNS), mainly superoxide anion (O(2) (-*)), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) or nitric oxide ((*)NO), have been studied extensively for their roles in PCD induction. Physiological and genetic studies have convincingly shown their essential roles. However, the details and mechanisms by which ROS and (*)NO interplay and induce PCD are not well understood. Our recent study on Cupressus lusitanica culture cell death revealed the elicitor-induced co-accumulation of ROS and (*)NO and interactions between (*)NO and H(2)O(2) or O(2)-(*) in different ways to regulate cell death. (*)NO and H(2)O(2) reciprocally enhanced the production of each other whereas (*)NO and O(2) (-*) showed reciprocal suppression on each other's production. It was the interaction between (*)NO and O(2)-(*) but not between (*)NO and H(2)O(2) that induced PCD, probably through peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). In this addendum, some unsolved issues in the study were discussed based on recent studies on the complex network of ROS and (*)NO leading to PCD in animals and plants.

  10. Peroxidase complex with concomitant anodal and cathodal variation in red-fruited tomato species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, C M; Fobes, J F

    1976-03-01

    Four groups of bands (a-d) are controlled by 19 alleles of the Peroxidase-4 (Prx-4) complex in the red-fruited tomato species, Lycopersicon esculentum and L. pimpinellifolium. Heterozygotes can be detected by virtue of codominance in all combinations except a few in which bands of single groups are absent ("semi-null" alleles). No recombinations were detected in 7419 F(2) segregants of 53 different combinations of alleles. A maximum fiducial limit (P = 0.01) of 0.08% crossing-over between any Prx-4 band groups is estimated. Variation of the anodal b bands is absolutely associated with that of the cathodal d band in respect to presence versus absence and direction of migration. In respect to the origin of these variants, the probability of 18 instances of simultaneous mutation of genes at two loci, always in such complete agreement, is so remote that no more than one locus could conceivably govern b and d. The disposition of a is not similarly associated with that of the other bands, while that of the faint-staining c could not always be reliably resolved. The negation of all save extremely low recombination rates and the observed concomitant variation of b and d strongly support the concept of single locus control of all Prx-4 banding, this hypothesis being espoused until rejection should be required be required by future research. Models of single locus control of several isozymes are discussed.

  11. The multifaceted roles of metabolic enzymes in the Paracoccidioides species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Caroline M.; de Oliveira, Haroldo C.; da Silva, Julhiany de F.; Assato, Patrícia A.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Paracoccidioides species are dimorphic fungi and are the etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis, which is a serious disease that involves multiple organs. The many tissues colonized by this fungus suggest a variety of surface molecules involved in adhesion. A surprising finding is that most enzymes in the glycolytic pathway, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and glyoxylate cycle in Paracoccidioides spp. have adhesive properties that aid in interacting with the host extracellular matrix and thus act as ‘moonlighting’ proteins. Moonlighting proteins have multiple functions, which adds a dimension to cellular complexity and benefit cells in several ways. This phenomenon occurs in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. For example, moonlighting proteins from the glycolytic pathway or TCA cycle can play a role in bacterial pathogenesis by either acting as proteins secreted in a conventional pathway and/or as cell surface components that facilitate adhesion or adherence. This review outlines the multifunctionality exhibited by many Paracoccidioides spp. enzymes, including aconitase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, triose phosphate isomerase, fumarase, and enolase. We discuss the roles that moonlighting activities play in the virulence characteristics of this fungus and several other human pathogens during their interactions with the host. PMID:25566229

  12. Systematics of treefrogs of the Hypsiboas calcaratus and Hypsiboas fasciatus species complex (Anura, Hylidae with the description of four new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Caminer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the systematics of the Hypsiboas calcaratus species complex, a group of widely distributed Amazonian hylid frogs. A comprehensive analysis of genetic, morphological, and bioacoustic datasets uncovered the existence of eleven candidate species, six of which are confirmed. Two of them correspond to Hypsiboas fasciatus and Hypsiboas calcaratus and the remaining four are new species that we describe here. Hypsiboas fasciatus sensu stricto has a geographic range restricted to the eastern Andean foothills of southern Ecuador while Hypsiboas calcaratus sensu stricto has a wide distribution in the Amazon basin. Hypsiboas almendarizae sp. n. occurs at elevations between 500 and 1950 m in central and northern Ecuador; the other new species (H. maculateralis sp. n., H. alfaroi sp. n., and H. tetete sp. n. occur at elevations below 500 m in Amazonian Ecuador and Peru. The new species differ from H. calcaratus and H. fasciatus in morphology, advertisement calls, and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Five candidate species from the Guianan region, Peru, and Bolivia are left as unconfirmed. Examination of the type material of Hyla steinbachi, from Bolivia, shows that it is not conspecific with H. fasciatus and thus is removed from its synonymy.

  13. Fractal dimension does not adequately describe the complexity of leaf margin in seedlings of Quercus species

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    Camarero, Jesús Julio

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available We quantified the complexity of leaf margin in a set of Quercus tree species using fractal dimension estimated by the box-counting method (FDb. Leaves were sampled from seedlings in a set of 15 Quercus species with a wide range of leaf morphology (Q. agrifolia, Q. alba, Q. cerris, Q. chrysolepis, Q. coccifera, Q.faginea, Q. frainetto, Q. ilex subsp. ballota, Q. ilex subsp. ilex, Q. petraea, Q. pyrenaica, Q. robur, Q. rubra, Q. suber, and Q. velutina. To describe leaf-edge roughness, we used simple indices: P/L - the ratio of leaf perimeter (P to maximum leaf length (L along the main nerve; P/A - the ratio of leaf perimeter to leaf-blade area (A and its dimensionless version (P/A0'; and WM/Wm -the ratio of maximum distance from the lobe tip to the main nerve (WM to minimum distance from the lobe incision to the main nerve (Wm. There was a strong positive relationship between FDb and P/A. Clustering analysis revealed the existence of three groups of leaves, namely those with: smooth or spiny margins (e.g., Q. coccifera, Q. velutina, shallow lobes (e.g., Q. petraea, and deep lobes (e.g., Q. pyrenaica. In the studied Quercus species, the ratio WM/Wm is a simple and suitable leaflobation index. It is suggested that the flux rate along the leaf edge is related to the complexity of this boundary.Se ha cuantificado la complejidad del margen de las hojas de varias especies arboreas del genero Quercus utilizando la dimension fractal estimada mediante el modo del recuento de cajas (FDb. Se tomaron hojas procedentes de plantulas pertenecientes a 15 especies de Quercus con un amplio rango de morfologfa foliar (Q. agrifolia, Q. alba, Q. cerris, Q. chrysolepis, Q. coccifera, Q. faginea, Q. frainetto, Q. ilex subsp. ballota, Q. ilex subsp. ilex, Q. petraea, Q. pyrenaica, Q. robur, Q. rubra, Q. suber y Q. velutina. Se usaron varios Indices sencillos para describir la complejidad del borde de la hoja: P/L, la relation entre el perimetro foliar (P y la longitud

  14. Report of Prionospio complex (Annelida: Polychaeta: Spionidae) from China' s waters, with description of a new species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jin; LI Xinzheng

    2009-01-01

    Nine species of Prionospio complex are recorded from China' s waters, including one new species and six newly recorded species. Prionospio (Priorvaspio) pacifica sp. Nov. , is characterized by having first and forth pairs of branchiae pinnate, second and third pairs of apinnate, ventral crest on Setiger 9 and dorsal crests on Setigers 10-25. Apoprionospio kirrae (Wilson, 1990), Prionospio (Aquilaspio) convexa Imajima, 1990, Prionospio (Minuspio) muhibranchiata Berkeley, 1927, Prionospio (Prionospio) bocki Soderstrom, 1920, Prionospio (Prionospio) dubia Maciolek, 1985 and Prionospio (Prionospio) paradisea Imajima, 1990 are recorded for the first time from China' s waters.

  15. New, world-wide data on the distribution of species of the Paramecium aurelia complex (Ciliophora, Protozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa; Surmacz, Marta

    2010-01-01

    This is the first report on the presence of P. biaurelia in Tasmania, an island that has probably never been investigated before for the occurrence of the P. aurelia species. P. tetraurelia was recorded in Brazil, another very poorly investigated country in terms of this species complex. New stands of P. biaurelia and P. tetraurelia were also recorded in Japan. We present data concerning the occurrence and distribution of the P. aurelia species on different continents as a background for the newly described stands of P. aurelia spp.

  16. Dichotomous electrophoretic taxonomic key for identification of sibling species A, B, and C of the Anopheles quadrimaculatus complex (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, S K; Kaiser, P E; Seawright, J A

    1989-03-01

    Samples of 17 populations of Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say from Florida, Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, New York, and New Jersey were analyzed for genetic variability at 33 enzyme loci. Statistical analysis of electromorph frequency distributions indicated that sympatric sibling (morphologically indistinguishable) species occurred in about 59% of the populations tested. The association of polytene chromosome and electrophoretic patterns of individual field-collected females confirmed species-specific diagnostic allozymes, which were useful in identifying sibling species A, B, and C and in estimating the proportions of each species at the 17 collection sites. A dichotomous electrophoretic key is presented for the identification of sibling species of the An. quadrimaculatus complex. The electrophoretic method is better than the ovarian polytene chromosome method, because mosquitoes of both sexes and females irrespective of their gonotrophic condition can be identified.

  17. Genetic variation in a tropical tree species influences the associated epiphytic plant and invertebrate communities in a complex forest ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zytynska, Sharon E; Fay, Michael F; Penney, David; Preziosi, Richard F

    2011-05-12

    Genetic differences among tree species, their hybrids and within tree species are known to influence associated ecological communities and ecosystem processes in areas of limited species diversity. The extent to which this same phenomenon occurs based on genetic variation within a single tree species, in a diverse complex ecosystem such as a tropical forest, is unknown. The level of biodiversity and complexity of the ecosystem may reduce the impact of a single tree species on associated communities. We assessed the influence of within-species genetic variation in the tree Brosimum alicastrum (Moraceae) on associated epiphytic and invertebrate communities in a neotropical rainforest. We found a significant positive association between genetic distance of trees and community difference of the epiphytic plants growing on the tree, the invertebrates living among the leaf litter around the base of the tree, and the invertebrates found on the tree trunk. This means that the more genetically similar trees are host to more similar epiphyte and invertebrate communities. Our work has implications for whole ecosystem conservation management, since maintaining sufficient genetic diversity at the primary producer level will enhance species diversity of other plants and animals.

  18. Distribution Patterns of the Morphology, Species, and Sex in the Stingray Species Complex of Himantura uarnak, Himantura undulata, and Himantura leoparda in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Shita Arlyza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the morphology and stingray species distribution of the Himantura uarnak species complex covers eight sampling sites in western and eastern Indonesia as many as 113 individuals. The observation of the reticulate pattern was accomplished by directly checking the dorsal side of the stingrays, and growth observations also carried out. The distribution patterns were analyzed using the principal component analysis (PCA, while the growth patterns were evaluated using correlation analyses. The reticulation patterns of the H. uarnak species complex were highly variable, and the distribution patterns based on the morphological parameters, species, and sex produced four groups. The distribution of the length frequency of H. undulata and H. uarnak showed a range of different sizes. The body length of the female in the western region is relatively longer than the male, while in the eastern region the female revealed a range in relative size showing that the male was longer than the female. The length-weight relationships of the stingrays were negative allometric, indicating a b-value of less than 3. The b-values of both the male and female H. undulata were 1.5860 and 0.4380, respectively; while the male and female H. uarnak were 0.2956 and 0.4376, respectively.

  19. Molecular phylogeny and historical biogeography of the Indonesian freshwater fish Rasbora lateristriata species complex (Actinopterygii: Cyprinidae): Cryptic species and west-to-east divergences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Wahyu Endra; Ratmuangkhwang, Sahat; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2016-12-01

    Rasbora lateristriata is a primary freshwater fish described from Java Island of Indonesia but its taxonomy, phylogeny, and distributional boundary have not been fully studied. Rasbora baliensis was described as a species endemic to Balinese lakes but its taxonomic status has been controversial in relation to R. lateristriata. Here, we collected Rasbora fishes from various freshwater localities of Java Island, as well as five neighboring islands to conduct molecular and morphological analyses on their phylogenetic relationships. Both molecular analyses using two mitochondrial and two nuclear gene sequences and morphological analyses featuring the body color pattern consistently support that the currently recognized R. lateristriata forms a species complex including at least four major lineages that possibly represent different species. In one of the major lineages, Balinese individuals cluster with those from East Javanese, Lombok and Sumbawa localities, calling for taxonomic revision on R. baliensis. The other three major lineages occur in distinct regions of central, west-central, and western Java and they can be clearly distinguished by the combination of pigmentation patterns in the basicaudal blotch and the supra anal pigment. Our molecular phylogeny suggests west-to-east divergences of the R. lateristriata species complex in Java Island from the late Miocene to Plio-Pleistocene before it finally crossed Wallace's Line, colonizing Lombok and Sumbawa Islands very recently. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Armored scale insect endosymbiont diversity at the species level: genealogical patterns of Uzinura diasipipdicola in the Chionaspis pinifoliae-Chionaspis heterophyllae species complex (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Diaspididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J C; Gwiazdowski, R A; Gdanetz, K; Gruwell, M E

    2015-02-01

    Armored scale insects and their primary bacterial endosymbionts show nearly identical patterns of co-diversification when viewed at the family level, though the persistence of these patterns at the species level has not been explored in this group. Therefore we investigated genealogical patterns of co-diversification near the species level between the primary endosymbiont Uzinura diaspidicola and its hosts in the Chionaspis pinifoliae-Chionaspis heterophyllae species complex. To do this we generated DNA sequence data from three endosymbiont loci (rspB, GroEL, and 16S) and analyzed each locus independently using statistical parsimony network analyses and as a concatenated dataset using Bayesian phylogenetic reconstructions. We found that for two endosymbiont loci, 16S and GroEL, sequences from U. diaspidicola were broadly associated with host species designations, while for rspB this pattern was less clear as C. heterophyllae (species S1) shared haplotypes with several other Chionaspis species. We then compared the topological congruence of the phylogenetic reconstructions generated from a concatenated dataset of endosymbiont loci (including all three loci, above) to that from a concatenated dataset of armored scale hosts, using published data from two nuclear loci (28S and EF1α) and one mitochondrial locus (COI-COII) from the armored scale hosts. We calculated whether the two topologies were congruent using the Shimodaira-Hasegawa test. We found no significant differences (P = 0.4892) between the topologies suggesting that, at least at this level of resolution, co-diversification of U. diaspidicola with its armored scale hosts also occurs near the species level. This is the first such study of co-speciation at the species level between U. diaspidicola and a group of armored scale insects.

  1. Genotyping of Fusarium Isolates from Onychomycoses in Colombia: Detection of Two New Species Within the Fusarium solani Species Complex and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Suarez, Marcela; Cano-Lira, José Francisco; de García, María Caridad Cepero; Sopo, Leticia; De Bedout, Catalina; Cano, Luz Elena; García, Ana María; Motta, Adriana; Amézquita, Adolfo; Cárdenas, Martha; Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Guarro, Josep; Restrepo, Silvia; Celis, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Fusariosis have been increasing in Colombia in recent years, but its epidemiology is poorly known. We have morphologically and molecularly characterized 89 isolates of Fusarium obtained between 2010 and 2012 in the cities of Bogotá and Medellín. Using a multi-locus sequence analysis of rDNA internal transcribed spacer, a fragment of the translation elongation factor 1-alpha (Tef-1α) and of the RNA-dependent polymerase subunit II (Rpb2) genes, we identified the phylogenetic species and circulating haplotypes. Since most of the isolates studied were from onychomycoses (nearly 90 %), we carried out an epidemiological study to determine the risk factors associated with such infections. Five phylogenetic species of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), i.e., F. falciforme, F. keratoplasticum, F. lichenicola, F. petroliphilum, and FSSC 6 as well as two of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (FOSC), i.e., FOSC 3 and FOSC 4, were identified. The most prevalent species were FOSC 3 (38.2%) followed by F. keratoplasticum (33.7%). In addition, our isolates were distributed into 23 haplotypes (14 into FOSC and nine into FSSC). Two of the FSSC phylogenetic species and two haplotypes of FSSC were not described before. Our results demonstrate that recipients of pedicure treatments have a lower probability of acquiring onychomycosis than those not receiving such treatments. The antifungal susceptibility of all the isolates to five clinically available agents showed that amphotericin B was the most active drug, while the azoles exhibited lower in vitro activity.

  2. A comparison of the application of a biological and morphological species concept in the Hebeloma crustuliniforme complex within a phylogenetic framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented to derive an operational phenetic species concept for the Hebeloma crustuliniforme complex in northwestern Europe. The complex was found to consist of at least 22 biological species (intercompatibility groups; ICGs). Almost none of these biological species could be recognised

  3. A comparison of the application of a biological and phenetic species concept in the Hebeloma crustuliniforme complex within a phylogenetic framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, Duur K.; Kuyper, Thomas W.

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented to derive an operational phenetic species concept for the Hebeloma crustuliniforme complex in northwestern Europe. The complex was found to consist of at least 22 biological species (intercompatibility groups; ICGs). Almost none of these biological species could be recognised

  4. Limnephilid taxa revised by speciation traits: Rhadicoleptus, Isogamus, Melampophylax genera, Chaetopteryx rugulosa, Psilopteryx psorosa species groups, Drusus bolivari, Annitella kosciuszkii species complexes (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oláh, J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Speciation traits of paramere, paraproct and aedeagus were applied to find initial split criteria with fine structure analysis in order to prepare diverged trait matrices for delimiting phylogenetic incipient species of unsettled limnephilid taxa in the early stages of reproductive isolation. A brief history is presented how this phenotypic taxonomic tool of the speciation traits was discovered and applied in caddisfly taxonomy. The theoretical basis was elaborated for the phenotypic speciation trait by reviewing several relevant topics in the sciences of taxonomy, molecular genetics and phylogenetics. Perspectives of integrative taxonomy is discussed in context of phenotype versus genotype, immensely complex phenotype versus phenomic challenge, taxonomic impediment versus genetic expedient, taxonomic adaptation of genetic vocabulary versus genetic sophistication and virtualization, New Systematics of Huxley and Mayr versus New Taxonomy of Wheeler. Debates on magic trait, speciation phenotype, speciation trait and super traits are discussed concluding that evolution works with phenotype and why the cryptic species concept is irrelevant. Briefly summarized how speciation traits evolve in sexual selection, through accelerated reproductive isolation with genital evolution through sex-limited speciation traits, including minor sex chromosomes. Why neutral molecular markers are blind compared to the adaptive speciation traits sensitized by fine structure analysis and backed by the potential of high-tech and high-throughput phenotyping and cyber-infrastructure broadly accessible and fed by computable phenotype descriptions. What sort of genetics could really help taxonomy to describe biodiversity of the over 100 million unknown taxa? Collecting new and re-examining old type materials deposited in various collections, the following taxonomic actions were elaborated by speciation traits. Drusus bolivari new species complex has been erected with

  5. Resolving phenotypic plasticity and species designation in the morphologically challenging Caulerpa racemosa-peltata complex (Chlorophyta, Caulerpaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Gareth S; van Reine, Willem F Prud'homme; Huisman, John M; Draisma, Stefano G A; D Gurgel, Carlos Frederico

    2014-02-01

    Although recent molecular studies have indicated the presence of a number of distinct species within the Caulerpa racemosa-peltata complex, due to the difficulties presented by high levels of phenotypic plasticity and the large number of synonyms, infra-specific taxa, and names of uncertain affinity, taxonomic proposals are yet to be made. In this study, we aimed to resolve the taxonomy of the complex and provide an example of how historical nomenclature can best be integrated into molecular based taxonomies. We accomplished this by first determining the number of genetic species within our globally sampled data set through a combination of phylogenetic and species-delimitation approaches of partial elongation factor TU and RUBISCO large subunit gene sequences. Guided by these results, comparative morphological examinations were then undertaken to gauge the extent of phenotypic plasticity within each species, as well as any morphological overlap between them. Our results revealed the presence of 11 distinct species within the complex, five of which showed high levels of phenotypic plasticity and partial overlap with other species. On the basis of observations of a large number of specimens, including type specimens/descriptions, and geographic inferences, we were able to confidently designate names for the lineages. Caulerpa peltata, C. imbricata and C. racemosa vars. laetevirens, occidentalis and turbinata were found to represent environmentally induced forms of a single species, for which the earlier-described C. chemnitzia, previously regarded as a synonym of C. racemosa var. turbinata, is reinstated. C. cylindracea, C. lamourouxii, C. macrodisca, C. nummularia and C. oligophylla are also reinstated and two new species, C. macra stat. nov. and C. megadisca sp. nov., are proposed.

  6. New stands of species of the Paramecium aurelia complex (Ciliophora, Protozoa) in the Mediterranean region (Italy, Greece, Morocco).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa; Rautian, Maria

    2012-01-01

    New stands of species of the Paramecium aurelia complex are presented in the paper, P. primaurelia recorded in Italy (Pisa) and in Morocco (Marrakesh), P. biaurelia in Italy (Calabria), P. triaurelia in Morocco (Ifrane), P. pentaurelia in Greece (Kastorya), and P. dodecaurelia in Italy (Padua).

  7. Peptaibol, Secondary‐Metabolite, and Hydrophobin Pattern of Commercial Biocontrol Agents Formulated with Species of the Trichoderma harzianum Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Dieckmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The production of bioactive polypeptides (peptaibiotics) in vivo is a sophisticated adaptation strategy of both mycoparasitic and saprotrophic Trichoderma species for colonizing and defending their natural habitats. This feature is of major practical importance, as the detection of peptaibiotics...... in plant‐protective Trichoderma species, which are successfully used against economically relevant bacterial and fungal plant pathogens, certainly contributes to a better understanding of these complex antagonistic interactions. We analyzed five commercial biocontrol agents (BCAs), namely Canna®, Trichosan......®, Vitalin®, Promot® WP, and TrichoMax®, formulated with recently described species of the Trichoderma harzianum complex, viz. T. afroharzianum, T. simmonsii, and T. guizhouense. By using the well‐established, HPLC/MS‐based peptaibiomics approach, it could unequivocally be demonstrated that all...

  8. Estimation of divergence time between two sibling species of the Anopheles (Kerteszia cruzii complex using a multilocus approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzoni Camila J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles cruzii is the primary human Plasmodium vector in southern and southeastern Brazil. The distribution of this mosquito follows the coast of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Previous studies indicated that An. cruzii is a complex of cryptic species. Results A multilocus approach using six loci, three circadian clock genes and three encoding ribosomal proteins, was implemented to investigate in more detail the genetic differentiation between the An. cruzii populations from Santa Catarina (southern Brazil and Bahia States (northeastern Brazil that represent two sibling species. The analysis revealed very high FST values and fixed differences between the two An. cruzii sibling species in all loci, irrespective of their function. An Isolation with Migration model was fit to the data using the IM program. The results reveal no migration in either direction and allowed a rough estimate of the divergence time between the two sibling species. Conclusions Population genetics analysis of An. cruzii samples from two Brazilian localities using a multilocus approach confirmed that they represent two different sibling species in this complex. The results suggest that the two species have not exchanged migrants since their separation and that they possibly diverged between 1.1 and 3.6 million years ago, a period of intense climatic changes.

  9. Speciation in the Rana chensinensis species complex and its relationship to the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei-Wei; Wen, Yang; Fu, Jinzhong; Xu, Yong-Biao; Jin, Jie-Qiong; Ding, Li; Min, Mi-Sook; Che, Jing; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2012-02-01

    Speciation remains a fundamental issue in biology. Herein, we report an investigation into speciation in the Rana chensinensis species complex using DNA sequence data from one mitochondrial and five nuclear genes. A phylogenetic analysis of the data revealed four major clades in the complex, and each of them was found to likely represent a species, including one cryptic species. Ecological niche models were generated from 19 climatic variables for three of the four major clades, which were represented by widespread sampling, including R. chensinensis, Rana kukunoris and the potential cryptic species. Each clade is associated with a unique ecological unit, and this indicates that ecological divergence probably drove speciation. Ecological divergence is likely related to the late Cenozoic orogenesis of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. In addition, gene flow between species was detected but only in peripheral portions of the ranges of the four major clades, thus likely had little influence on the speciation processes. Discordances between mitochondrial and nuclear genes were also found; the nominal species, R. chensinensis, contains multiple maternal clades, suggesting potential mitochondrial introgression between R. chensinensis and R. kukunoris.

  10. Genotyping-by-Sequencing in a Species Complex of Australian Hummock Grasses (Triodia): Methodological Insights and Phylogenetic Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Kevin R.; Krauss, Siegfried L.; Barrett, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is becoming increasingly accessible to researchers asking biosystematic questions, but current best practice in both choosing a specific approach and effectively analysing the resulting data set is still being explored. We present a case study for the use of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) to resolve relationships in a species complex of Australian arid and semi-arid grasses (Triodia R.Br.), highlighting our solutions to methodological challenges in the use of GBS data. We merged overlapping paired-end reads then optimised locus assembly in the program PyRAD to generate GBS data sets for phylogenetic and distance-based analyses. In addition to traditional concatenation analyses in RAxML, we also demonstrate the novel use of summary species tree analyses (taking gene trees as input) with GBS loci. We found that while species tree analyses were relatively robust to variation in PyRAD assembly parameters, our RAxML analyses resulted in well-supported but conflicting topologies under different assembly settings. Despite this conflict, multiple clades in the complex were consistently supported as distinct across analyses. Our GBS data assembly and analyses improve the resolution of taxa and phylogenetic relationships in the Triodia basedowii complex compared to our previous study based on Sanger sequencing of nuclear (ITS/ETS) and chloroplast (rps16-trnK spacer) markers. The genomic results also partly support previous evidence for hybridization between species in the complex. Our methodological insights for analysing GBS data will assist researchers using similar data to resolve phylogenetic relationships within species complexes. PMID:28135342

  11. Genotyping-by-Sequencing in a Species Complex of Australian Hummock Grasses (Triodia): Methodological Insights and Phylogenetic Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin M; Thiele, Kevin R; Krauss, Siegfried L; Barrett, Matthew D

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is becoming increasingly accessible to researchers asking biosystematic questions, but current best practice in both choosing a specific approach and effectively analysing the resulting data set is still being explored. We present a case study for the use of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) to resolve relationships in a species complex of Australian arid and semi-arid grasses (Triodia R.Br.), highlighting our solutions to methodological challenges in the use of GBS data. We merged overlapping paired-end reads then optimised locus assembly in the program PyRAD to generate GBS data sets for phylogenetic and distance-based analyses. In addition to traditional concatenation analyses in RAxML, we also demonstrate the novel use of summary species tree analyses (taking gene trees as input) with GBS loci. We found that while species tree analyses were relatively robust to variation in PyRAD assembly parameters, our RAxML analyses resulted in well-supported but conflicting topologies under different assembly settings. Despite this conflict, multiple clades in the complex were consistently supported as distinct across analyses. Our GBS data assembly and analyses improve the resolution of taxa and phylogenetic relationships in the Triodia basedowii complex compared to our previous study based on Sanger sequencing of nuclear (ITS/ETS) and chloroplast (rps16-trnK spacer) markers. The genomic results also partly support previous evidence for hybridization between species in the complex. Our methodological insights for analysing GBS data will assist researchers using similar data to resolve phylogenetic relationships within species complexes.

  12. An Integrative Approach for Understanding Diversity in the Punctelia rudecta Species Complex (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alors

    Full Text Available High levels of cryptic diversity have been documented in lichenized fungi, especially in Parmeliaceae, and integrating various lines of evidence, including coalescent-based species delimitation approaches, help establish more robust species circumscriptions. In this study, we used an integrative taxonomic approach to delimit species in the lichen-forming fungal genus Punctelia (Parmeliaceae, with a particular focus on the cosmopolitan species P. rudecta. Nuclear, mitochondrial ribosomal DNA and protein-coding DNA sequences were analyzed in phylogenetic and coalescence-based frameworks. Additionally, morphological, ecological and geographical features of the sampled specimens were evaluated. Five major strongly supported monophyletic clades were recognized in the genus Punctelia, and each clade could be characterized by distinct patterns in medullary chemistry. Punctelia rudecta as currently circumscribed was shown to be polyphyletic. A variety of empirical species delimitation methods provide evidence for a minimum of four geographically isolated species within the nominal taxon Punctelia rudecta, including a newly described saxicolous species, P. guanchica, and three corticolous species. In order to facilitate reliable sample identification for biodiversity, conservation, and air quality bio-monitoring research, these three species have been epitypified, in addition to the description of a new species.

  13. Speciation on the rocks: integrated systematics of the Heteronotia spelea species complex (Gekkota; Reptilia from Western and Central Australia.

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    Mitzy Pepper

    Full Text Available The isolated uplands of the Australian arid zone are known to provide mesic refuges in an otherwise xeric landscape, and divergent lineages of largely arid zone taxa have persisted in these regions following the onset of Miocene aridification. Geckos of the genus Heteronotia are one such group, and have been the subject of many genetic studies, including H. spelea, a strongly banded form that occurs in the uplands of the Pilbara and Central Ranges regions of the Australian arid zone. Here we assess the systematics of these geckos based on detailed examination of morphological and genetic variation. The H. spelea species complex is a monophyletic lineage to the exclusion of the H. binoei and H. planiceps species complexes. Within the H. spelea complex, our previous studies based on mtDNA and nine nDNA loci found populations from the Central Ranges to be genetically divergent from Pilbara populations. Here we supplement our published molecular data with additional data gathered from central Australian samples. In the spirit of integrative species delimitation, we combine multi-locus, coalescent-based lineage delimitation with extensive morphological analyses to test species boundaries, and we describe the central populations as a new species, H. fasciolatus sp. nov. In addition, within the Pilbara there is strong genetic evidence for three lineages corresponding to northeastern (type, southern, and a large-bodied melanic population isolated in the northwest. Due to its genetic distinctiveness and extreme morphological divergence from all other Heteronotia, we describe the melanic form as a new species, H. atra sp. nov. The northeastern and southern Pilbara populations are morphologically indistinguishable with the exception of a morpho-type in the southeast that has a banding pattern resembling H. planiceps from the northern monsoonal tropics. Pending more extensive analyses, we therefore treat Pilbara H. spelea as a single species with

  14. Integrative taxonomy: Combining morphological, molecular and chemical data for species delineation in the parthenogenetic Trhypochthonius tectorum complex (Acari, Oribatida, Trhypochthoniidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigmann Gerd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a long-standing controversial about how parthenogenetic species can be defined in absence of a generally accepted species concept for this reproductive mode. An integrative approach was suggested, combining molecular and morphological data to identify distinct monophyletic entities. Using this approach, speciation of parthenogenetic lineages was recently demonstrated for groups of bdelloid rotifers and oribatid mites. Trhypochthonius tectorum, an oribatid mite from the entirely parthenogenetic desmonomatan family Trhypochthoniidae, is traditionally treated as a single species in Central Europe. However, two new morphological lineages were recently proposed for some Austrian populations of T. tectorum, and were described as novel subspecies (T. silvestris europaeus or form (T. japonicus forma occidentalis. We used the morphological and morphometrical data which led to this separation, and added mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences and the chemical composition of complex exocrine oil gland secretions to test this taxonomical hypothesis. This is the first attempt to combine these three types of data for integrative taxonomical investigations of oribatid mites. Results We show that the previous European species T. tectorum represents a species complex consisting of three distinct lineages in Austria (T.tectorum, T. silvestris europaeus and T. japonicus forma occidentalis, each clearly separated by morphology, oil gland secretion profiles and mitochondrial cox1 sequences. This diversification happened in the last ten million years. In contrast to these results, no variation among the lineages was found in the nuclear 18S rDNA. Conclusions Our approach combined morphological, molecular and chemical data to investigate diversity and species delineation in a parthenogenetic oribatid mite species complex. To date, hypotheses of a general oribatid mite phylogeny are manifold, and mostly based on single-method approaches

  15. Species in the Cryptococcus gattii Complex Differ in Capsule and Cell Size following Growth under Capsule-Inducing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Kenya E.; Dwyer, Christine; Campbell, Leona T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus gattii causes invasive fungal infections that have been increasing in incidence and global distribution in recent years. The major molecular genotypes of C. gattii that were previously classified as VGI to VGIV have recently been described as four new species: C. gattii (VGI), C. deuterogattii (VGII), C. bacillisporus (VGIII), and C. tetragattii (VGIV). The main driver for their classification has been phylogeny, and phenotypic diversity has not yet been extensively characterized. This study examines variation in attributes related to virulence and pathogenicity, including capsule thickness, cell size, tolerance to temperature, oxidative and osmotic stress, and cell wall integrity. A capsule induction agar using diluted Sabouraud medium revealed significant differences in capsule and cell size across the C. gattii species complex and produced irregularly shaped elongated cells in a number of strains. C. gattii/VGI strains possessed the largest capsules of all species but had smaller cells, while C. deuterogattii/VGII strains possessed the largest cells of all species but had smaller capsules. Overall thermotolerance was highest in C. deuterogattii/VGII strains, while a number of C. bacillisporus/VGIII, and C. tetragattii/VGIV strains had substantially reduced growth at 37°C. There was no significant difference among species in their tolerances to oxidative or osmotic stresses, and there was no evidence for defects in cell wall integrity in strains producing irregular cells. These data support the division of the C. gattii species complex into distinctly identified species and suggest underlying reasons for their differences in virulence, epidemiology, and host preference. IMPORTANCE Infections with the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus gattii have been increasing in recent years. Recently, four different species have been described within C. gattii, which correspond to four previously known molecular genotypes (VGI to VGIV). Examining

  16. Urban Bird Diversity and Landscape Complexity: Species-environment Associations Along a Multiscale Habitat Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Kathy Martin; Susan M. Glenn; Stephanie Melles

    2003-01-01

    For birds in urban environments, the configuration of local habitat within the landscape may be as critical as the composition of the local habitat itself. We examined the relative importance of environmental attributes (e.g., tree cover, composition, and number of tree species) measured at different spatial scales in relation to urban bird species richness and abundance. We expected that some bird species and nesting guilds would have a closer association with landscape-level features (withi...

  17. The complex interplay of iron metabolism, reactive oxygen species, and reactive nitrogen species: insights into the potential of various iron therapies to induce oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskenkorva-Frank, Taija S; Weiss, Günter; Koppenol, Willem H; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2013-12-01

    Production of minute concentrations of superoxide (O2(*-)) and nitrogen monoxide (nitric oxide, NO*) plays important roles in several aspects of cellular signaling and metabolic regulation. However, in an inflammatory environment, the concentrations of these radicals can drastically increase and the antioxidant defenses may become overwhelmed. Thus, biological damage may occur owing to redox imbalance-a condition called oxidative and/or nitrosative stress. A complex interplay exists between iron metabolism, O2(*-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and NO*. Iron is involved in both the formation and the scavenging of these species. Iron deficiency (anemia) (ID(A)) is associated with oxidative stress, but its role in the induction of nitrosative stress is largely unclear. Moreover, oral as well as intravenous (iv) iron preparations used for the treatment of ID(A) may also induce oxidative and/or nitrosative stress. Oral administration of ferrous salts may lead to high transferrin saturation levels and, thus, formation of non-transferrin-bound iron, a potentially toxic form of iron with a propensity to induce oxidative stress. One of the factors that determine the likelihood of oxidative and nitrosative stress induced upon administration of an iv iron complex is the amount of labile (or weakly-bound) iron present in the complex. Stable dextran-based iron complexes used for iv therapy, although they contain only negligible amounts of labile iron, can induce oxidative and/or nitrosative stress through so far unknown mechanisms. In this review, after summarizing the main features of iron metabolism and its complex interplay with O2(*-), H2O2, NO*, and other more reactive compounds derived from these species, the potential of various iron therapies to induce oxidative and nitrosative stress is discussed and possible underlying mechanisms are proposed. Understanding the mechanisms, by which various iron formulations may induce oxidative and nitrosative stress, will help us

  18. Using Different Methods to Access the Difficult Task of Delimiting Species in a Complex Neotropical Hyperdiverse Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Silva, Guilherme J.; Rodriguez, Mónica S.; Roxo, Fábio F.; Foresti, Fausto; Oliveira, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The genus Rineloricaria is a Neotropical freshwater fish group with a long and problematic taxonomic history, attributed to the large number of species and the pronounced similarity among them. In the present work, taxonomic information and different molecular approaches were used to identify species boundaries and characterize independent evolutionary units. We analyzed 228 samples assembled in 53 distinct morphospecies. A general mixed yule-coalescent (GMYC) analysis indicated the existence of 70 entities, while BOLD system analyses showed the existence of 56 distinct BINs. When we used a new proposed integrative taxonomy approach, mixing the results obtained by each analysis, we identified 73 OTUs. We suggest that Rineloricaria probably has some complexity in the known species and several species not formally described yet. Our data suggested that other hyperdiverse fish groups with wide distributions can be further split into many new evolutionary taxonomic units. PMID:26332320

  19. Molecular phylogenetic relationships of the Liolaemus rothi complex and a new species of lizard from Auca Mahuida Volcano (Squamata: Liolaemini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Luciano Javier; Olave, Melisa; Perez, Cristian Hernan Fulvio; Perez, Daniel Roberto; Morando, Mariana

    2013-01-21

    A new species of lizard of the genus Liolaemus from Neuquén Province, western Argentina, is described. The new species is a member of the Liolaemus rothi species complex, and mitochondrial and nuclear molecular data show it as sister taxon of the clade composed of (L. hermannunezi (L. tromen + L. loboi)), differing in size, squamation, coloration, and sexual dimorphism from the other species of this group. Liolaemus sitesi sp. nov. has a dark body coloration with series of notched blotches on the dorsum, with bright spots, and a very iridescent yellow-green coloration in natural light. Liolaemus sitesi sp. nov. is found only in the Auca Mahuida volcano and is terrestrial, dwelling on the stony slopes with sandy soil between 1300 m and the volcano summit.

  20. The Rhynchosia totta complex (Phaseoleae, Fabaceae in Southern Africa, including the description of a new variety and new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annah N. Moteetee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Rhynchosia totta complex is one of three taxonomically complicated African groups in the genus Rhynchosia. Numerous southern African species and infraspecific taxa (at least 19 names, 17 species and 2 varieties have been described by various authors in the past, but were later reduced into synonymy with  R. totta. Currently, only the typical variety is recognised in Southern Africa.Objectives:  To investigate and update the circumscription of the taxa within the  R. totta complex in southern Africa and to update their synonymies and distribution ranges. Methods: Specimens of R. totta at GRA, JRAU, K, NH and PRE were studied and compared, and measurements of characters recorded. Populations were also observed during field studies.Results: The examination of numerous specimens, as well as field investigations, has prompted the recognition of four varieties (one described here as new: R. totta var. longicalyx and a new species (R. pedunculata in southern Africa.Conclusions: A great variation in leaf structure and vestiture occurs within the R. totta complex, with the extreme forms easily recognisable. However, the total number of varieties are limited to four [R. totta vars. totta,  longicalyx,  rigidula and venulosa] and a new species described to accommodate specimens with a distinctly prostrate habit and upwardly directed leaves.

  1. Morphometric study of third-instar larvae from five morphotypes of the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Nelson A; Hernández-Ortiz, Vicente; Salas, Juan O Tigrero; Selivon, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of cryptic species among economically important fruit flies strongly affects the development of management tactics for these pests. Tools for studying cryptic species not only facilitate evolutionary and systematic studies, but they also provide support for fruit fly management and quarantine activities. Previous studies have shown that the South American fruit fly, Anastrepha fraterculus, is a complex of cryptic species, but few studies have been performed on the morphology of its immature stages. An analysis of mandible shape and linear morphometric variability was applied to third-instar larvae of five morphotypes of the Anastrepha fraterculus complex: Mexican, Andean, Ecuadorian, Peruvian and Brazilian-1. Outline geometric morphometry was used to study the mouth hook shape and linear morphometry analysis was performed using 24 linear measurements of the body, cephalopharyngeal skeleton, mouth hook and hypopharyngeal sclerite. Different morphotypes were grouped accurately using canonical discriminant analyses of both the geometric and linear morphometry. The shape of the mandible differed among the morphotypes, and the anterior spiracle length, number of tubules of the anterior spiracle, length and height of the mouth hook and length of the cephalopharyngeal skeleton were the most significant variables in the linear morphometric analysis. Third-instar larvae provide useful characters for studies of cryptic species in the Anastrepha fraterculus complex.

  2. Recognition and identification of bumblebee species in the Bombus lucorum-complex (Hymenoptera, Apidae – A review and outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silas Bossert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of cryptic species represents one of the major challenges in current taxonomy and affects our understanding of global diversity. In practice, the process from discovery to acceptance in the scientific community can take an extensive length of time. A prime example is the traditionally difficult taxonomy of the cryptic bumblebee species belonging to the Bombus lucorum-complex. The status of the three European species in the group – Bombus lucorum and the closely related Bombus cryptarum and Bombus magnus – has recently become widely accepted, primarily due to investigations of nucleotide sequences and marking pheromones. In contrast, doubts prevail concerning the validity of species identification based on morphology. As a consequence, our knowledge of the species is muddled in a mire of unreliable and confusing literature data from a large number of authors over the centuries. To clarify this issue, this paper provides a recapitulation of the historical literature and highlights the milestones in the process of species recognition. Further, the possibility of a morphologically based species identification is discussed in the context of new molecular data. Finally, this review outlines the current challenges and provides directions for future issues.

  3. Candida vulturna pro tempore sp. nov., a dimorphic yeast species related to the Candida haemulonis species complex isolated from flowers and clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipiczki, Matthias; Tap, Ratna Mohd

    2016-10-01

    In a taxonomic study of yeasts isolated from flowers in Cagayan de Oro, Mindenao Island, The Philippines, strains were identified as representing Kabatiella microsticta, Metschnikowia koreensis and a hitherto undescribed dimorphic species. Sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU 26S rRNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the SSU 18S rRNA genes were identical in the strains of the last-named group and differed from the corresponding sequences of the type strain of the closest related species, Candida duobushaemulonii, by 4 % (D1/D2), 7 % (ITS) and 1 % (SSU). In an independent study, a strain with D1/D2 and ITS sequences very similar to those of the Philippine strains was isolated in Malaysia from the blood of a patient dying of aspiration pneumonia. Both groups of isolates were moderately sensitive to anidulafungin, caspofungin, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole but resistant to amphotericin B. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the sequences placed the Philippine and Malaysian isolates close to the Candida haemulonis complex of Candida species. To reflect the geographical location of the sites of sample collection, the novel species name Candida vulturna pro tempore sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains. The type strain is 11-1170T (=CBS 14366T=CCY 094-001-001T=NCAIM-Y02177T) isolated in Cagayan de Oro, The Philippines. Mycobank: MB 817222.

  4. Deciphering the complex leaf transcriptome of the allotetraploid species Nicotiana tabacum: a phylogenomic perspective

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    Bombarely Aureliano

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyploidization is an important mechanism in plant evolution. By analyzing the leaf transcriptomes taken from the allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco and parental genome donors, N. sylvesteris (S-Genome and N. tomentosiformis (T-Genome, a phylogenomic approach was taken to map the fate of homeologous gene pairs in this plant. Results A comparison between the genes present in the leaf transcriptomes of N. tabacum and modern day representatives of its progenitor species demonstrated that only 33% of assembled transcripts could be distinguished based on their sequences. A large majority of the genes (83.6% of the non parent distinguishable and 87.2% of the phylogenetic topology analyzed clusters expressed above background level (more than 5 reads showed similar overall expression levels. Homeologous sequences could be identified for 968 gene clusters, and 90% (6% of all genes of the set maintained expression of only one of the tobacco homeologs. When both homeologs were expressed, only 15% (0.5% of the total showed evidence of differential expression, providing limited evidence of subfunctionalization. Comparing the rate of synonymous nucleotide substitution (Ks and non-synonymous nucleotide substitution (Kn provided limited evidence for positive selection during the evolution of tobacco since the polyploidization event took place. Conclusions Polyploidization is a powerful mechanism for plant speciation that can occur during one generation; however millions of generations may be necessary for duplicate genes to acquire a new function. Analysis of the tobacco leaf transcriptome reveals that polyploidization, even in a young tetraploid such as tobacco, can lead to complex changes in gene expression. Gene loss and gene silencing, or subfunctionalization may explain why both homeologs are not expressed by the associated genes. With Whole Genome Duplication (WGD events, polyploid genomes usually maintain a high percentage of

  5. Secondary metabolite comparison of the species within the Heterobasidion annosum s.l. complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, David; Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Olson, Åke

    2014-01-01

    .s. and H. irregulare are pine infecting species, and H. parviporum, H. occidentale and H. abietinum are non-pine infecting. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the LC–HRMS data showed that samples from the five species could be separated into five groups and in accordance with the differences in host...

  6. What Can Molecular Markers Tell Us About the Evolutionary History of Daphnia Species Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwenk, K.; Ender, A.; Streit, B.

    1995-01-01

    Despite the wealth of information on the ecology of Daphnia species, the systematics and phylogeny of the genus is still unresolved. The taxonomic uncertainties are based in part on the phenomenon of interspecific hybridization, which has been well documented for species of the D. galeata/cucullata/

  7. Two new species of the Hagnagora anicata complex (Geometridae, Larentiinae from Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bolling Sullivan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Examination of the lectotype (here designated reveals that Hagnagora anicata (Felder & Rogenhofer does not occur in Costa Rica. Instead two new species are described, H. elianne sp. n. and H. unnia sp. n., and their distribution is discussed. The previous treatment of H. anicata as a single widespread species ranging from Jamaica and Mexico to Bolivia needs to be critically evaluated.

  8. What Can Molecular Markers Tell Us About the Evolutionary History of Daphnia Species Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwenk, K.; Ender, A.; Streit, B.

    1995-01-01

    Despite the wealth of information on the ecology of Daphnia species, the systematics and phylogeny of the genus is still unresolved. The taxonomic uncertainties are based in part on the phenomenon of interspecific hybridization, which has been well documented for species of the D. galeata/cucullata/

  9. Ten new species of Rhagovelia in the angustipes complex (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Veliidae) from Colombia, with a key to the Colombian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Gil, Dora Nancy

    2015-12-21

    Ten new species of Rhagovelia are described from Colombia as follows: Rhagovelia penta sp. n., and Rhagovelia santanderi sp. n., from the Upper and Middle Magdalena River Valley respectively; Rhagovelia carina sp. n., Rhagovelia tricoma sp. n., and Rhagovelia barbacoensis sp. n., from Altaquer, Río Ñambi; Rhagovelia caunapi sp. n. from Río Caunapi; Rhagovelia tumaquensis sp. n., from Tumaco, Río Mejicano; Rhagovelia jagua sp. n., from Eastern Andes; Rhagovelia mocoa sp. n. and Rhagovelia umbria sp. n., from Amazonas region. Rhagovelia tantilla Drake & Harris is recorded from Colombia, for the first time; the description of macropterous morph of Rhagovelia espriella Padilla-Gil, 2011 and a key to the Rhagovelia, angustipes complex of Colombian species are provided.

  10. Taxonomic studies of the Lygephila lubrica (Freyer, 1842 species complex with notes on other species in the genus (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Toxocampinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Pekarsky

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The taxa of the Lygephila lubrica (Freyer, 1846 species complex are revised. The genital features of all known taxa are described and illustrated, with special reference to the structure of the vesica. Genitalia of L. lubrica from different places in Russia, Central Asia and China are studied, illustrated and compared with different Mongolian populations. L. kazachkaratavika, described as a subspecies, is raised to a species level, stat. n. Neotypes of Lygephila lubrosa (Staudinger, 1901, L. lubrosa kazachkaratavika Stshetkin YuL & Stshetkin YuYu, 1994 [1997] and L. lubrosa orbonaria Stshetkin YuL & Stshetkin YuYu, 1994 [1997] are designated. The female genitalia of the type of L. lupina (Graeser, 1890 is described and illustrated for the first time, and L. mirabilis (Bryk, 1948 treated here as a junior subjective synonym, syn. n.

  11. Revalidation of Triatoma bahiensis Sherlock & Serafim, 1967 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) and phylogeny of the T. brasiliensis species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Vagner José; Alevi, Kaio Cesar Chaboli; Pinotti, Heloisa; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Pita, Sebastián; Guerra, Ana Letícia; Panzera, Francisco; De Araújo, Renato Freitas; Azeredo-Oliveir, Maria Tercília Vilela De; Rosa, João Aristeu Da

    2016-05-02

    Triatoma bahiensis Sherlock & Serafim, 1967, T. lenti Sherlock & Serafim, 1967, and T. pessoai Sherlock & Serafim, 1967 were described based on material collected in the Brazilian state of Bahia. These species were later included in the T. brasiliensis complex based on their geographic distribution. Triatoma bahiensis and T. pessoai were subsequently synonymized with T. lenti. However, the phylogenetic position of T. lenti within the T. brasiliensis complex has remained doubtful. This study aims to assess the taxonomic status of T. bahiensis and to infer the phylogenetic relationships between T. lenti, T. bahiensis and the other members of the T. brasiliensis species complex. The identities of the species in concern were confirmed by comparisons with high resolution photos of the respective type materials; lectotypes are designated for T. pessoai and T. bahiensis. Morphological, morphometric, molecular, and cytogenetic approaches as well as experimental crosses were used. The low viability of experimental crosses combined with morphological and morphometric data allow the differentiation of T. bahiensis and T. lenti. Pairwise cyt b sequence divergence between T. lenti and T. bahiensis was 2.5%. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses grouped T. lenti and T. bahiensis as members of the T. brasiliensis complex. These results revalidate the specific status of T. bahiensis.

  12. Improvement of MALDI-TOF MS profiling for the differentiation of species within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šedo, Ondrej; Nemec, Alexandr; Křížová, Lenka; Kačalová, Magdaléna; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2013-12-01

    MALDI-TOF MS is currently becoming the method of choice for rapid identification of bacterial species in routine diagnostics. Yet, this method suffers from the inability to differentiate reliably between some closely related bacterial species including those of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex, namely A. baumannii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis. In the present study, we evaluated a protocol which was different from that used in the Bruker Daltonics identification system (MALDI BioTyper) to improve species identification using a taxonomically precisely defined set of 105 strains representing the four validly named species of the ACB complex. The novel protocol is based on the change in matrix composition from alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (saturated solution in water:acetonitrile:trifluoroacetic acid, 47.5:50:2.5, v/v) to ferulic acid (12.5mgml(-1) solution in water:acetonitrile:formic acid 50:33:17, v/v), while the other steps of sample processing remain unchanged. Compared to the standard protocol, the novel one extended the range of detected compounds towards higher molecular weight, produced signals with better mass resolution, and allowed the detection of species-specific signals. As a result, differentiation of A. nosocomialis and A. baumannii strains by cluster analysis was improved and 13 A. nosocomialis strains, assigned erroneously or ambiguously by using the standard protocol, were correctly identified.

  13. Vicariance and Its Impact on the Molecular Ecology of a Chinese Ranid Frog Species-Complex (Odorrana schmackeri, Ranidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmin Li

    Full Text Available Paleogeological events and Pleistocene climatic fluctuations have had profound influences on the genetic patterns and phylogeographic structure of species in southern China. In this study, we investigated the population genetic structure and Phylogeography of the Odorrana schmackeri species complex, mountain stream-dwelling odorous frogs, endemic to southern China. We obtained mitochondrial sequences (1,151bp of the complete ND2 gene and two flanking tRNAs of 511 individuals from 25 sites for phylogeographic analyses. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed seven divergent evolutionary lineages, with mean pairwise (K2P sequence distances from 7.8% to 21.1%, except for a closer ND2 distance (3.4%. The complex geological history of southern China drove matrilineal divergence in the O. schmackeri species complex into highly structured geographical units. The first divergence between lineage A+B and other lineages (C-G had likely been influenced by the uplift of coastal mountains of Southeast China during the Mio-Pliocene period. The subsequent divergences between the lineages C-G may have followed the formation of the Three Gorges and the intensification of the East Asian summer monsoon during the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Demographic analyses indicated that major lineages A and C have been experienced recent population expansion (c. 0.045-0.245 Ma from multiple refugia prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. Molecular analysis suggest that these seven lineages may represent seven different species, three described species and four cryptic species and should at least be separated into seven management units corresponding to these seven geographic lineages for conservation.

  14. Phylogeography, colonization and population history of the Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus spp. in the Nicaraguan crater lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Axel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidation of the mechanisms driving speciation requires detailed knowledge about the phylogenetic relationships and phylogeography of the incipient species within their entire ranges as well as their colonization history. The Midas cichlid species complex Amphilophus spp. has been proven to be a powerful model system for the study of ecological specialization, sexual selection and the mechanisms of sympatric speciation. Here we present a comprehensive and integrative phylogeographic analysis of the complete Midas Cichlid species complex in Nicaragua (> 2000 individuals covering the entire distributional range, using two types of molecular markers (the mitochondrial DNA control region and 15 microsatellites. We investigated the majority of known lake populations of this species complex and reconstructed their colonization history in order to distinguish between alternative speciation scenarios. Results We found that the large lakes contain older and more diverse Midas Cichlid populations, while all crater lakes hold younger and genetically less variable species assemblages. The large lakes appear to have repeatedly acted as source populations for all crater lakes, and our data indicate that faunal exchange among crater lakes is extremely unlikely. Despite their very recent (often only a few thousand years old and common origin from the two large Nicaraguan lakes, all crater lake Midas Cichlid radiations underwent independent, but parallel, evolution, and comprise distinct genetic units. Indeed several of these crater lakes contain multiple genetically distinct incipient species that most likely arose through sympatric speciation. Several crater lake radiations can be traced back to a single ancestral line, but some appear to have more than one founding lineage. The timing of the colonization(s of each crater lake differs, although most of them occurred more (probably much more recently than 20,000 years ago. Conclusion The

  15. Vicariance and Its Impact on the Molecular Ecology of a Chinese Ranid Frog Species-Complex (Odorrana schmackeri, Ranidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongmin; Wu, Xiaoyou; Zhang, Huabin; Yan, Peng; Xue, Hui; Wu, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Paleogeological events and Pleistocene climatic fluctuations have had profound influences on the genetic patterns and phylogeographic structure of species in southern China. In this study, we investigated the population genetic structure and Phylogeography of the Odorrana schmackeri species complex, mountain stream-dwelling odorous frogs, endemic to southern China. We obtained mitochondrial sequences (1,151bp) of the complete ND2 gene and two flanking tRNAs of 511 individuals from 25 sites for phylogeographic analyses. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed seven divergent evolutionary lineages, with mean pairwise (K2P) sequence distances from 7.8% to 21.1%, except for a closer ND2 distance (3.4%). The complex geological history of southern China drove matrilineal divergence in the O. schmackeri species complex into highly structured geographical units. The first divergence between lineage A+B and other lineages (C-G) had likely been influenced by the uplift of coastal mountains of Southeast China during the Mio-Pliocene period. The subsequent divergences between the lineages C-G may have followed the formation of the Three Gorges and the intensification of the East Asian summer monsoon during the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Demographic analyses indicated that major lineages A and C have been experienced recent population expansion (c. 0.045-0.245 Ma) from multiple refugia prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Molecular analysis suggest that these seven lineages may represent seven different species, three described species and four cryptic species and should at least be separated into seven management units corresponding to these seven geographic lineages for conservation.

  16. Inter and intra-guild interactions in egg parasitoid species of the soybean stink bug complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujii Edison Ryoiti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the parasitism behavior of Telenomus podisi Ashmead, Trissolcus basalis (Wollaston e Trissolcus urichi Crawford (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae on eggs of Nezara viridula L., Euschistus heros F., Piezodorus guildinii Westwood and Acrosternum aseadum Rolston (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae, in no choice and multiple choice experiments. For all parasitoid species, the results demonstrated the existence of a main host species that maximizes the reproductive success. The competitive interactions among the parasitoid species were investigated in experiments of sequential and simultaneous release of different combinations of parasitoid pairs on the hosts N. viridula, E. heros and A. aseadum. Exploitative competition was observed for egg batches at the genus level (Telenomus vs. Trissolcus and interference competition at the species level (T. basalis vs. T. urichi. Trissolcus urichi was the most aggressive species, interfering with the parasitism of T. basalis. Generally, T. basalis showed an opportunistic behavior trying to parasitise eggs after T. urichi had abandoned the egg batch. The selection of parasitoid species for use in augmentative biological control programs should take into account the diversity of pentatomids present in soybean in addition to the interactions among the different species of parasitoids.

  17. Construction and Evaluation of a TAC Library of Magnaporthe grisea%稻瘟菌TAC文库的构建与评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏士平; 王扬; 刘耀光; 国立耘; 李家瑞; 彭友良

    2003-01-01

    A TAC library of rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea, was constructed in a vector pYLTAC7. The librarycontains 16 128 individual clones and approximately 74% of the clones harbor foreign DNA inserts with an average size of59 kb. The content of the library corresponds to 18 equivalents of the genome. To confirm the representative of the library,three single-copy DNA markers were used as probes to hybridize with the library clones on the high-density membranes. Six-teen, 17 and 16 positive clones were obtained respectively from the library screening, and the numbers of positive clonesmatching corresponding probes are consistent with the estimated coverage of the library. Further analysis of the restrictionenzyme maps of 8 positive clones screened with a single copy marker, MH18S1, revealed that the contigs covered a 153 kbregion without chimerism or deletion. It is suggested that the TAC library is suitable for genome analysis of M. grisea.%本文构建了一个包含16128个克隆的稻瘟菌基因组的TAC文库,74%的克隆含有外源插入片段,其插入片段大小平均为59kb,该库相当于稻瘟菌基因组的18倍.本文并对文库的代表性进行了评价,采用3个单拷贝的标记作为探针筛库,分别得到16,17和16个阳性克隆,这与估算的该库的覆盖率是一致的;从MH18S1为探针所筛选的阳性克隆中,随机挑取8个并对其限制性酶切图谱进行分析,结果表明:其组成的重叠群跨度为153kb,未发现嵌合和缺失现象.以上结果表明,此TAC文库适合用于稻瘟菌基因组的分析.

  18. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol.

  19. Comparative phylogeography and niche modeling for three species complexes of SE China (Paradoxornisspp., Pycnonotus spp.,Spizixos spp.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luke B KLICKA; Luke C CAMPILLO; Joseph D MANTHEY; Yanhua QU

    2015-01-01

    Contrasting multiple organisms with similar contemporary distributions, researchers can identify shared evolutionary patterns and provide historical context for community composition. We used three species complexes with overlapping distribu-tions in Southeastern China and surrounding islands to explore the phylogeographic history of the region. Despite similar geo-graphic distributions, genetic data revealed few congruent patterns, but all complexes displayed genetic divergence for Taiwanese populations. Additionally, niche modeling and divergence dating did not find support for diversification associated with the Last Glacial Maximum [Current Zoology 61 (5): 943–950 , 2015].

  20. Mating type locus of Chinese black truffles reveals heterothallism and the presence of cryptic species within the T. indicum species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Belfiori

    Full Text Available Tuber spp. are filamentous ascomycetes which establish symbiosis with the roots of trees and shrub species. By virtue of this symbiosis they produce hypogeous ascocarps, known as truffles. Filamentous ascomycetes can reproduce by homothallism or heterothallism depending on the structure and organization of their mating type locus. The first mating type locus in a truffle species has been recently characterized in Tuber melanosporum and it has been shown that this fungus, endemic in Europe, is heterothallic. The availability of sequence information for T. melanosporum mating type genes is seminal to cloning their orthologs from other Tuber species and assessing their reproductive mode. Here we report on the organization of the mating type region in T. indicum, the black truffle species present in Asia, which is the closest relative to T. melanosporum and is characterized by an high level of morphological and genetic variability. The present study shows that T. indicum is also heterothallic. Examination of Asiatic black truffles belonging to different genetic classes, sorted according to the sequence polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region, has revealed sequence variations and rearrangements in both coding and non-coding regions of the mating type locus, to suggest the existence of cryptic species within the T. indicum complex. The presence of transposable elements within or linked to the mating type region suggests a role of these elements in generating the genotypic diversity present among T. indicum strains. Overall, comparative analyses of the mating type locus have thus allowed us to tackle taxonomical and phylogenetic issues within black truffles and make inferences about the evolution of T. melanosporum-T. indicum lineage. Our results are not only of fundamental but also of applied relevance as T. indicum produces edible fruit bodies that are imported also into Europe and thus may represent a biological threat for T

  1. Does the ring species concept predict vocal variation in the crimson rosella, Platycercus elegans, complex?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribot, Raoul F. H.; Berg, Mathew L.; Buchanan, Katherine L.; Komdeur, Jan; Joseph, Leo; Bennett, Andrew T. D.

    2009-01-01

    Vocal variation may be important in population divergence. We studied geographical variation in contact calls of parrots of the crimson rosella, Platycercus elegans, complex, which is characterized by striking geographical plumage coloration variation. This complex has long been considered a rare ex

  2. Biotic Habitat Complexity Controls Species Diversity and Nutrient Effects on Net Biomass Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Rubach, Anja; Hillebrand, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    Canopy-forming plants and algae commonly contribute to spatial variation in habitat complexity for associated organisms and thereby create a biotic patchiness of communities. In this study, we tested for interaction effects between biotic habitat complexity and resource availability on net biomass p

  3. Biotic Habitat Complexity Controls Species Diversity and Nutrient Effects on Net Biomass Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Rubach, Anja; Hillebrand, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    Canopy-forming plants and algae commonly contribute to spatial variation in habitat complexity for associated organisms and thereby create a biotic patchiness of communities. In this study, we tested for interaction effects between biotic habitat complexity and resource availability on net biomass

  4. The Scirtothrips dorsalis species complex: Endemism and invasion in a global pest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive arthropods pose unique management challenges in various environments, the first of which is correct identification. This apparently mundane task is particularly difficult if multiple species are morphologically indistinguishable but accurate identification can be determined with DNA barcodi...

  5. Genotyping species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex by PCR-RFLP of calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2014-04-01

    Sporotrichosis is one of the most common subcutaneous mycosis in Latin America and is caused by 4 pathogenic thermodimorphic fungi in the genus Sporothrix. From both therapeutic and epidemiological perspectives, it is essential to identify the causative agents down to the species level. Traditional parameters may overlap among closely related species, and we propose polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) as an alternative approach. In the present study, the calmodulin gene was amplified and digested with HhaI to yield 5 different electrophoretic patterns representing all medically important Sporothrix species: Sporothrix brasiliensis, Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto, Sporothrix globosa, and Sporothrix luriei. The PCR-RFLP protocol described here is a simple and inexpensive method and is highly suitable for accurate routine genotyping of relevant Sporothrix species.

  6. Extensive introgression in a malaria vector species complex revealed by phylogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Michael C.; Pease, James B.; Steele, Aaron; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Sharakhov, Igor V.; Jiang, Xiaofang; Hall, Andrew B.; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Kakani, Evdoxia; Mitchell, Sara N.; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Smith, Hilary A.; Love, R. Rebecca; Lawniczak, Mara K.; Slotman, Michel A.; Emrich, Scott J.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Besansky, Nora J.

    2015-01-01

    Introgressive hybridization is now recognized as a widespread phenomenon, but its role in evolution remains contested. Here we use newly available reference genome assemblies to investigate phylogenetic relationships and introgression in a medically important group of Afrotropical mosquito sibling species. We have identified the correct species branching order to resolve a contentious phylogeny, and show that lineages leading to the principal vectors of human malaria were among the first to split. Pervasive autosomal introgression between these malaria vectors means that only a small fraction of the genome, mainly on the X chromosome, has not crossed species boundaries. Our results suggest that traits enhancing vectorial capacity may be gained through interspecific gene flow, including between non-sister species. PMID:25431491

  7. Urban Bird Diversity and Landscape Complexity: Species-environment Associations Along a Multiscale Habitat Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Martin

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available For birds in urban environments, the configuration of local habitat within the landscape may be as critical as the composition of the local habitat itself. We examined the relative importance of environmental attributes (e.g., tree cover, composition, and number of tree species measured at different spatial scales in relation to urban bird species richness and abundance. We expected that some bird species and nesting guilds would have a closer association with landscape-level features (within 1000 m, such as proximity to large forested areas, than with local-scale habitat measures (within 50 m. To investigate this, avian community data were collected at 285 point-count stations in 1997 and 1998 along four roadside transects located in Vancouver and Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. Transects (5–25 km in length bisected three large parks (>324 ha and proceeded along residential streets in urban and suburban areas. In total, 48 bird species were observed, including 25 common species. Species richness declined in relation to a gradient of increasing urbanization, as measured by local- and landscape-level habitat features. We further examined the significance and importance of local- vs. landscape-level habitat attributes using logistic regression and found that both scales explained the presence/absence distributions of residential birds. Local-scale habitat features such as large coniferous trees, berry-producing shrubs, and freshwater streams were of particular importance in estimating the likelihood of finding bird species. Landscape measures, particularly forest cover (within 500 m and park area (measured at different scales as a function of distance from point-count stations significantly improved likelihood estimations based solely on local-scale habitat features. Our results suggest that both local- and landscape-scale resources were important in determining the distribution of birds in urban areas. Parks, reserves, and the surrounding

  8. Multiple origins of pyrethroid insecticide resistance across the species complex of a nontarget aquatic crustacean, Hyalella azteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Donald P; Poynton, Helen C; Wellborn, Gary A; Lydy, Michael J; Blalock, Bonnie J; Sepulveda, Maria S; Colbourne, John K

    2013-10-08

    Use of pesticides can have substantial nonlethal impacts on nontarget species, including driving evolutionary change, often with unknown consequences for species, ecosystems, and society. Hyalella azteca, a species complex of North American freshwater amphipods, is widely used for toxicity testing of water and sediment and has frequently shown toxicity due to pyrethroid pesticides. We demonstrate that 10 populations, 3 from laboratory cultures and 7 from California water bodies, differed by at least 550-fold in sensitivity to pyrethroids. The populations sorted into four phylogenetic groups consistent with species-level divergence. By sequencing the primary pyrethroid target site, the voltage-gated sodium channel, we show that point mutations and their spread in natural populations were responsible for differences in pyrethroid sensitivity. At least one population had both mutant and WT alleles, suggesting ongoing evolution of resistance. Although nonresistant H. azteca were susceptible to the typical neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids, gene expression analysis suggests the mode of action in resistant H. azteca was not neurotoxicity but was oxidative stress sustained only at considerably higher pyrethroid concentrations. The finding that a nontarget aquatic species has acquired resistance to pesticides used only on terrestrial pests is troubling evidence of the impact of chronic pesticide transport from land-based applications into aquatic systems. Our findings have far-reaching implications for continued uncritical use of H. azteca as a principal species for monitoring and environmental policy decisions.

  9. Molecular study of Astyanax altiparanae (Osteichthyes, Characidae) as a probable species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprá, I C; Gomes, V N; Deprá, G C; Oliveira, I J; Prioli, S M A P; Prioli, A J

    2014-08-07

    Astyanax altiparanae, belonging to the bimaculatus group, which includes species with similar colors and morphology, occurs in the upper Paraná River basin. As the use of mitochondrial DNA has made great strides in the diagnosis of species, in previous researches, two strains were detected in A. altiparanae with a high divergence in the D-loop region, provisionally called AltoPR and AltoPR-D. Evidence led to the hypothesis that the two strains did not belong to the same species. Phylogenetic hypotheses were produced by maximum-likelihood. Mean internal distances of the AltoPR and AltoPR-D groups were respectively 0.002 and 0.003, with the distance between them being 0.037. Sequences from GenBank of specimens collected from the Paraíba do Sul River basin were also divided into two groups, of which one may be identified as AltoPR. Since the other group provided an intermediate distance when compared to AltoPR-D, an in-depth investigation was required. The other species analyzed showed a greater distance and was revealed to be a monophyletic taxon. The results suggested that they are really two species and that neither corresponds to the other species used in the current study.

  10. Species diversity of Fergusonina Malloch gall flies (Diptera: Fergusoninidae) forming leaf bud galls on snow gum (Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng. complex), with a description of a new species from Tasmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new species of Fergusonina (Diptera: Fergusoninidae) fly is described from terminal leaf bud galls (TLBGs) from the Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng. (snow gum) species complex. Fergusonina tasmaniensis Nelson sp.n. is the first species from the genus Fergusonina to be described from Tasmania...

  11. [First Report of Intraorbital Abscess Caused by Candida allociferrii and Specific PCR for Differentiating Stephanoascus ciferrii Complex Species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soki, Hironobu; Abo, Kazushige; Yamazaki, Kenichiro; Kojima, Takayoshi; Oda, Toshimi; Uzawa, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Ken

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of intraorbital abscess caused by Candida allociferrii, which was described as a new species of Stephanoascus ciferrii complex in 2002, in a patient after enucleation of choroidal melanoma. This strain showed resistance to itraconazole, and fluconazole. After debridement and topical use of amphotericin B, his wound abscess was disappeared. To our knowledge, this is the first C. allociferrii infection case in human.

  12. Species-richness of the Anopheles annulipes Complex (Diptera: Culicidae) Revealed by Tree and Model-Based Allozyme Clustering Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    and systematics ofAnopheles: insights from a molecular phy· logeny of Australasian mosquitoes. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 9: 262-275. Foley... systematics and pop- ulation studies. Sydney: Academic Press. Roscnberg NA, Burke T, Elo K, Feldman MW, Freidlin PJ, Groenen MAM, Hillel J, Maki·Taniia...of molecular-functional variation patterns among butterfly species complexes IColias: Lepidoptera , Pieridae). Molecular Ecology 12: 1265-1275. © 2007

  13. Species of the Paramecium aurelia complex in Russia (western region of European Russia) with molecular characteristics of Paramecium novaurelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Potekhin, Alexey

    2006-01-01

    The presence of P. primaurelia, P. biaurelia, P. triaurelia, and P. novaurelia of the P. aurelia complex was revealed in the studied region of Russia. RAPD-PCR fingerprints (band patterns) of newly identified P. novaurelia strains from Russia were compared to those characteristic for the other chosen European strains of the species. The strains revealed intraspecific polymorphism as several groups of genotypes confirming the existence of polymorphism within P. novaurelia.

  14. Population Dynamics Among six Major Groups of the Oryza rufipogon Species Complex, Wild Relative of Cultivated Asian Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyunjung; Jung, Janelle; Singh, Namrata; Greenberg, Anthony; Jeff J. Doyle; Tyagi, Wricha; Chung, Jong-Wook; Kimball, Jennifer; Hamilton, Ruaraidh Sackville; McCouch, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding population structure of the wild progenitor of Asian cultivated rice (O. sativa), the Oryza rufipogon species complex (ORSC), is of interest to plant breeders and contributes to our understanding of rice domestication. A collection of 286 diverse ORSC accessions was evaluated for nuclear variation using genotyping-by-sequencing (113,739 SNPs) and for chloroplast variation using Sanger sequencing (25 polymorphic sites). Results Six wild subpopulations were identified, ...

  15. PhyloToAST: Bioinformatics tools for species-level analysis and visualization of complex microbial datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabdoub, Shareef M; Fellows, Megan L; Paropkari, Akshay D; Mason, Matthew R; Huja, Sarandeep S; Tsigarida, Alexandra A; Kumar, Purnima S

    2016-06-30

    The 16S rRNA gene is widely used for taxonomic profiling of microbial ecosystems; and recent advances in sequencing chemistry have allowed extremely large numbers of sequences to be generated from minimal amounts of biological samples. Analysis speed and resolution of data to species-level taxa are two important factors in large-scale explorations of complex microbiomes using 16S sequencing. We present here new software, Phylogenetic Tools for Analysis of Species-level Taxa (PhyloToAST), that completely integrates with the QIIME pipeline to improve analysis speed, reduce primer bias (requiring two sequencing primers), enhance species-level analysis, and add new visualization tools. The code is free and open source, and can be accessed at http://phylotoast.org.

  16. Colony geometry and structural complexity of the endangered species Acropora cervicornis partly explains the structure of their associated fish assemblage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban A. Agudo-Adriani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, significant efforts have been made to describe fish-habitat associations. However, most studies have oversimplified actual connections between fish assemblages and their habitats by using univariate correlations. The purpose of this study was to identify the features of habitat forming corals that facilitate and influences assemblages of associated species such as fishes. For this we developed three-dimensional models of colonies of Acropora cervicornis to estimate geometry (length and height, structural complexity (i.e., volume, density of branches, etc. and biological features of the colonies (i.e., live coral tissue, algae. We then correlated these colony characteristics with the associated fish assemblage using multivariate analyses. We found that geometry and complexity were better predictors of the structure of fish community, compared to other variables such as percentage of live coral tissue or algae. Combined, the geometry of each colony explained 40% of the variability of the fish assemblage structure associated with this coral species; 61% of the abundance and 69% of fish richness, respectively. Our study shows that three-dimensional reconstructions of discrete colonies of Acropora cervicornis provides a useful description of the colonial structural complexity and may explain a great deal of the variance in the structure of the associated coral reef fish community. This demonstration of the strongly trait-dependent ecosystem role of this threatened species has important implications for restoration and conservation efforts.

  17. Colony geometry and structural complexity of the endangered species Acropora cervicornis partly explains the structure of their associated fish assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo-Adriani, Esteban A; Cappelletto, Jose; Cavada-Blanco, Francoise; Croquer, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, significant efforts have been made to describe fish-habitat associations. However, most studies have oversimplified actual connections between fish assemblages and their habitats by using univariate correlations. The purpose of this study was to identify the features of habitat forming corals that facilitate and influences assemblages of associated species such as fishes. For this we developed three-dimensional models of colonies of Acropora cervicornis to estimate geometry (length and height), structural complexity (i.e., volume, density of branches, etc.) and biological features of the colonies (i.e., live coral tissue, algae). We then correlated these colony characteristics with the associated fish assemblage using multivariate analyses. We found that geometry and complexity were better predictors of the structure of fish community, compared to other variables such as percentage of live coral tissue or algae. Combined, the geometry of each colony explained 40% of the variability of the fish assemblage structure associated with this coral species; 61% of the abundance and 69% of fish richness, respectively. Our study shows that three-dimensional reconstructions of discrete colonies of Acropora cervicornis provides a useful description of the colonial structural complexity and may explain a great deal of the variance in the structure of the associated coral reef fish community. This demonstration of the strongly trait-dependent ecosystem role of this threatened species has important implications for restoration and conservation efforts.

  18. A revision of the Ewartia oldfieldi (Distant) species complex (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettinae) with five new species from eastern and northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popple, Lindsay W

    2017-05-10

    The identity of Ewartia oldfieldi (Distant) is re-examined and this species is redescribed. Five new species belonging to the genus Ewartia Moulds are described. Ewartia oldfieldi s. str. occurs in association with wattles (Acacia spp.; Mimosaceae) with large or fleshy phyllodes growing in soils derived from sandstone and coarse-grained metasediments throughout the south-eastern third of Queensland. Ewartia roberti n. sp. is associated with wattles that possess narrow or delicate phyllodes, growing in loam soils in southern Queensland and northern New South Wales. Ewartia lapidosa n. sp. occurs in dryer inland and semi-arid areas between Croydon in northern Queensland and the Capertee Valley in central New South Wales where it occurs on various wattles growing in hard, rocky soils, including those derived from laterite and sandstone. Ewartia etesia n. sp. occurs principally on wattles growing along drainage lines in the Top End of the Northern Territory and the eastern edge of the Kimberley in Western Australia. Ewartia thamna n. sp. occurs in low, shrubby vegetation (presumably on wattles) in gravelly soils on low rises and along floodplains at the southern edge of the Top End in the Northern Territory. Ewartia carina n. sp. occurs in transitional habitats with tropical rainforest elements on the eastern edge of Cape York Peninsula in north Queensland. The distinctive, sometimes variable and typically complex calling songs specific to each of the species are illustrated and documented as part of these descriptions and comparisons.

  19. A distinct alleles and genetic recombination of pmrCAB operon in species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hun; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate pmrCAB sequence divergence in 5 species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex, a total of 80 isolates from a Korean hospital were explored. We evaluated nucleotide and amino acid polymorphisms of pmrCAB operon, and phylogenetic trees were constructed for each gene of prmCAB operon. Colistin and polymyxin B susceptibility was determined for all isolates, and multilocus sequence typing was also performed for A. baumannii isolates. Our results showed that each species of A. baumannii complex has divergent pmrCAB operon sequences. We identified a distinct pmrCAB allele allied with Acinetobacter nosocomialis in gene trees. Different grouping in each gene tree suggests sporadic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes among Acinetobacter species. Sequence polymorphisms among Acinetobacter species might not be associated with colistin resistance. We revealed that a distinct pmrCAB allele may be widespread across the continents such as North America and Asia and that sporadic genetic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes might occur.

  20. A cryptic new species of hummingbird of the Campylopterus largipennis complex (Aves: Trochilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Leonardo Esteves; Vasconcelos, Marcelo Ferreira DE; Gonzaga, Luiz Pedreira

    2017-05-15

    A new species of Campylopterus sabrewing is described from eastern Brazilian tropical dry forests occurring below 900 m asl. Its holotype (MZUSP 99024) is an adult female from Sítio Duboca (16°43'19''S, 43°58'20''W, elevation 840 m), municipality of Montes Claros, state of Minas Gerais. A taxonomic revision based on more than 1,000 museum specimens revealed that the new taxon, together with C. largipennis, C. diamantinensis and C. obscurus (with C. aequatorialis considered as a subjective junior synonym) should be ranked as species. We provide a key to permit easy identification of the four species. The new species is very similar to the parapatric C. diamantinensis of high altitude "campos rupestres" above 1,000 m asl, differing from it by its smaller size and longer light tail tips, as well as by sternum measurements. Given the several threats faced by the habitat to which the new species is endemic, we propose to consider it as Vulnerable under the IUCN criteria.

  1. Untangling a species complex of arid zone grasses (Triodia) reveals patterns congruent with co-occurring animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin M; Barrett, Matthew D; Krauss, Siegfried L; Thiele, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    The vast Australian arid zone formed over the last 15million years, and gradual aridification as well as more extreme Pliocene and Pleistocene climate shifts have impacted the evolution of its biota. Understanding the evolutionary history of groups of organisms or regional biotas such as the Australian arid biota requires clear delimitation of the units of biodiversity (taxa). Here we integrate evidence from nuclear (ETS and ITS) and chloroplast (rps16-trnK spacer) regions and morphology to clarify taxonomic boundaries in a species complex of Australian hummock grasses (Triodia) to better understand the evolution of Australian arid zone plants and to evaluate congruence in distribution patterns with co-occurring organisms. We find evidence for multiple new taxa in the T. basedowii species complex, but also incongruence between data sets and indications of hybridization that complicate delimitation. We find that the T. basedowii complex has high lineage diversity and endemism in the biologically important Pilbara region of Western Australia, consistent with the region acting as a refugium. Taxa show strong geographic structure in the Pilbara, congruent with recent work on co-occurring animals and suggesting common evolutionary drivers across the biota. Our findings confirm recognition of the Pilbara as an important centre of biodiversity in the Australian arid zone, and provide a basis for future taxonomic revision of the T. basedowii complex and more detailed study of its evolutionary history and that of arid Australia.

  2. Highly acidic glycans from sea cucumbers. Isolation and fractionation of fucose-rich sulfated polysaccharides from the body wall of Ludwigothurea grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, P A; Bastos, I G

    1987-08-03

    The body wall of the sea cucumber contains high amounts of sulfated glycans, which differ in structure from glycosaminoglycans of animal tissues and also from the fucose-rich sulfated polysaccharides isolated from marine algae and from the jelly coat of sea urchin eggs. In Ludwigothurea grisea, glycans can be separated into three fractions which differ in molecular mass and chemical composition. The fraction containing a high-molecular-mass component has a high proportion of fucose and small amounts of amino sugars, whereas another fraction contains primarily a sulfated fucan. The third fraction, which represents the major portion of the sea cucumber polysaccharides, contains besides fucose, approximately equimolar proportions of glucuronic acid and amino sugars, and has a sulfate content higher than that in the other two fractions. Both D and L-isomers of fucose are found in these polysaccharides, and the sulfate is linked to the O-3 position of the fucose residues. The attachment position of the sulfate groups to the glucuronic acid units and amino sugars is still undetermined. It is possible that these compounds are involved in maintaining the integrity of the sea cucumber's body wall, in analogy with the role of other macromolecules in the vertebrate connective tissue.

  3. Phylogeography of the trumpetfishes (Aulostomus): ring species complex on a global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, W; Bass, A L; Rocha, L A; Grant, W S; Robertson, D R

    2001-05-01

    The distribution of circumtropical marine species is limited by continental boundaries, cold temperate conditions, and oceanic expanses, but some of these barriers are permeable over evolutionary time scales. Sister taxa that evolved in separate ocean basins can come back into contact, and the consequences of this renewed sympatry may be a key to understanding evolutionary processes in marine organisms. The circumtropical trumpetfishes (Aulostomus) include a West Atlantic species (A. maculatus), an Indian-Pacific species (A. chinensis), and an East Atlantic species (A. strigosus) that may be the product of a recent invasion from the Indian Ocean. To resolve patterns of divergence and speciation, we surveyed 480 bp of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b in 196 individuals from 16 locations. Based on a conventional molecular clock of 2% sequence divergence per million years, the deepest partitions in a neighbor-joining tree (d = 0.063-0.082) are consistent with separation of West Atlantic and Indian-Pacific species by the Isthmus of Panama, 3-4 million years ago. By the same criteria, trumpetfish in the East Atlantic were isolated from the Indian Ocean about 2.5 million years ago (d = 0.044-0.054), coincident with the advent of glacial cycles and cold-water upwelling around South Africa. Continental barriers between tropical oceans have only rarely been surmounted by trumpetfishes, but oceanic barriers do not appear to be substantial, as indicated by weak population partitioning (phiST = 0.093) in A. chinensis across the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Finally, morphological and mitochondrial DNA data indicate hybridization of A. strigosus and A. maculatus in Brazil. After 3-4 million years and a globe-spanning series of vicariant and dispersal events, trumpetfish lineages have come back into contact in the southwest Atlantic and appear to be merging. This ring species phenomenon may occur in a broad array of marine organisms, with clear implications for the production and

  4. The mate recognition protein gene mediates reproductive isolation and speciation in the Brachionus plicatilis cryptic species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribble Kristin E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemically mediated prezygotic barriers to reproduction likely play an important role in speciation. In facultatively sexual monogonont rotifers from the Brachionus plicatilis cryptic species complex, mate recognition of females by males is mediated by the Mate Recognition Protein (MRP, a globular glycoprotein on the surface of females, encoded by the mmr-b gene family. In this study, we sequenced mmr-b copies from 27 isolates representing 11 phylotypes of the B. plicatilis species complex, examined the mode of evolution and selection of mmr-b, and determined the relationship between mmr-b genetic distance and mate recognition among isolates. Results Isolates of the B. plicatilis species complex have 1–4 copies of mmr-b, each composed of 2–9 nearly identical tandem repeats. The repeats within a gene copy are generally more similar than are gene copies among phylotypes, suggesting concerted evolution. Compared to housekeeping genes from the same isolates, mmr-b has accumulated only half as many synonymous differences but twice as many non-synonymous differences. Most of the amino acid differences between repeats appear to occur on the outer face of the protein, and these often result in changes in predicted patterns of phosphorylation. However, we found no evidence of positive selection driving these differences. Isolates with the most divergent copies were unable to mate with other isolates and rarely self-crossed. Overall the degree of mate recognition was significantly correlated with the genetic distance of mmr-b. Conclusions Discrimination of compatible mates in the B. plicatilis species complex is determined by proteins encoded by closely related copies of a single gene, mmr-b. While concerted evolution of the tandem repeats in mmr-b may function to maintain identity, it can also lead to the rapid spread of a mutation through all copies in the genome and thus to reproductive isolation. The mmr-b gene is evolving

  5. Complex interactions between regional dispersal of native taxa and an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strecker, Angela L; Arnott, Shelley E

    2010-04-01

    In the event of an environmental disturbance, dispersal of native taxa may provide species and genetic diversity to ecosystems, increasing the likelihood that there will be species and genotypes present that are less vulnerable to the disturbance. This may allow communities to maintain functioning during a disturbance and may be particularly important when the perturbation is novel to the system, such as the establishment of an invasive species. We examined how dispersal of native species may influence crustacean zooplankton communities in freshwater lakes invaded by the invertebrate predator, Bythotrephes longimanus. Using large enclosures, we experimentally tested the effect of dispersal on zooplankton community abundance, richness, and composition in (1) a community invaded by Bythotrephes, (2) the same community with the invader removed, and (3) a community that was never invaded. Dispersal increased zooplankton community abundance and richness; however, these effects were usually only significant in the invader-removed treatment. Dispersal tended to make the invader-removed communities more similar to never-invaded communities in abundance, richness, and composition. Dispersal had little effect on zooplankton abundance in the invaded community; however, richness significantly increased, and the community composition changed to resemble a never-invaded community by the end of the experiment. Our results have implications for understanding the role of dispersal during transitory states in communities. Dispersal of native taxa may be particularly important during the period between the arrival and broad-scale establishment of Bythotrephes, as dispersal through space or time (i.e., from resting eggs) may rapidly increase zooplankton abundance when the invader is absent or in low abundances. Overall, our results suggest that communities with strong local predatory and competitive interactions may be closed to immigration from colonists, but that invasive species

  6. Comparison of transmission of Papaya leaf curl China virus among four cryptic species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tao; Guo, Qi; Cui, Xi-Yun; Liu, Yin-Quan; Hu, Jian; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Begomoviruses are transmitted by cryptic species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex, often in a species-specific manner. Papaya leaf curl China virus (PaLCuCNV) has been recorded to infect several crops including papaya, tomato and tobacco in China. To help assess the risks of spread of this virus, we compared the acquisition, retention and transmission of PaLCuCNV among four species of whiteflies, Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1), Mediterranean (MED), Asia 1 and Asia II 7. All four species of whiteflies are able to acquire, retain and transmit the virus, but with different levels of efficiency. Transmission tests using tomato as the host plant showed that MEAM1 transmitted PaLCuCNV with substantially higher efficiency than did MED, Asia 1 and Asia II 7. Furthermore, accumulation of PaLCuCNV in the whiteflies was positively associated with its efficiency of transmitting the virus. Altogether, these findings indicate that MEAM1 is the most efficient vector for PaLCuCNV in the four species of whiteflies, and suggest that risks of PaLCuCNV pandemics are high in regions where MEAM1 occurs. PMID:26486606

  7. Genotyping species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex by PCR-RFLP of calmodulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, A.M.; de Hoog, G.S.; Pires Camargo, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is one of the most common subcutaneous mycosis in Latin America and is caused by 4 pathogenic thermodimorphic fungi in the genus Sporothrix. From both therapeutic and epidemiological perspectives, it is essential to identify the causative agents down to the species level. Traditional

  8. Two new species of the Liolaemus elongatus-kriegi complex (Iguania, Liolaemidae from Andean highlands of southern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Troncoso-Palacios

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The elongatus-kriegi complex is one of the most diverse clades of the Liolaemus (sensu stricto subgenus of lizards. There are currently 29 species recognized in this group distributed between Chile and Argentina. Based on molecular evidence, there seem to be five main clades nested within this complex: the elongatus, leopardinus, kriegi, petrophilus and punmahuida clades. Liolaemus buergeri and L. kriegi, both of the kriegi clade, were believed to inhabit the surroundings of the Laja Lagoon, in the Biobío Region of Chile. Moreover, this Chilean population of L. kriegi was recently recognized as an undescribed taxon called “Liolaemus sp. A” based on molecular phylogenetics. In this work, we studied these two populations of the Laja Lagoon and provided the morphological diagnosis to describe them as two new species: L. scorialis sp. n. and L. zabalai sp. n., previously considered L. buergeri and “L. kriegi/Liolaemus sp. A” respectively. Additionally, we identified another population of L. scorialis in the vicinity of La Mula Lagoon in the Araucanía Region of Chile. Liolaemus scorialis differs from almost all of the species of the elongatus-kriegi complex by its considerably smaller size. Nevertheless, without molecular data we cannot assign it to any particular subclade. Liolaemus zabalai belongs to the kriegi clade based on published molecular phylogenies. Finally, we provide some natural history data on both species and we document for the first time the presence of L. neuquensis in Chile from a museum specimen from La Mula Lagoon.

  9. Selection and trans-species polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in the order Crocodylia.

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    Weerachai Jaratlerdsiri

    Full Text Available Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class II genes encode for molecules that aid in the presentation of antigens to helper T cells. MHC characterisation within and between major vertebrate taxa has shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the diversity within this genomic region, though little characterisation has been performed within the Order Crocodylia. Here we investigate the extent and effect of selective pressures and trans-species polymorphism on MHC class II α and β evolution among 20 extant species of Crocodylia. Selection detection analyses showed that diversifying selection influenced MHC class II β diversity, whilst diversity within MHC class II α is the result of strong purifying selection. Comparison of translated sequences between species revealed the presence of twelve trans-species polymorphisms, some of which appear to be specific to the genera Crocodylus and Caiman. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered MHC class II α sequences into two major clades representing the families Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae. However, no further subdivision within these clades was evident and, based on the observation that most MHC class II α sequences shared the same trans-species polymorphisms, it is possible that they correspond to the same gene lineage across species. In contrast, phylogenetic analyses of MHC class II β sequences showed a mixture of subclades containing sequences from Crocodilidae and/or Alligatoridae, illustrating orthologous relationships among those genes. Interestingly, two of the subclades containing sequences from both Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae shared specific trans-species polymorphisms, suggesting that they may belong to ancient lineages pre-dating the divergence of these two families from the common ancestor 85-90 million years ago. The results presented herein provide an immunogenetic resource that may be used to further assess MHC diversity and functionality in Crocodylia.

  10. Selection and trans-species polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in the order Crocodylia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P; Miles, Lee G; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes encode for molecules that aid in the presentation of antigens to helper T cells. MHC characterisation within and between major vertebrate taxa has shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the diversity within this genomic region, though little characterisation has been performed within the Order Crocodylia. Here we investigate the extent and effect of selective pressures and trans-species polymorphism on MHC class II α and β evolution among 20 extant species of Crocodylia. Selection detection analyses showed that diversifying selection influenced MHC class II β diversity, whilst diversity within MHC class II α is the result of strong purifying selection. Comparison of translated sequences between species revealed the presence of twelve trans-species polymorphisms, some of which appear to be specific to the genera Crocodylus and Caiman. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered MHC class II α sequences into two major clades representing the families Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae. However, no further subdivision within these clades was evident and, based on the observation that most MHC class II α sequences shared the same trans-species polymorphisms, it is possible that they correspond to the same gene lineage across species. In contrast, phylogenetic analyses of MHC class II β sequences showed a mixture of subclades containing sequences from Crocodilidae and/or Alligatoridae, illustrating orthologous relationships among those genes. Interestingly, two of the subclades containing sequences from both Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae shared specific trans-species polymorphisms, suggesting that they may belong to ancient lineages pre-dating the divergence of these two families from the common ancestor 85-90 million years ago. The results presented herein provide an immunogenetic resource that may be used to further assess MHC diversity and functionality in Crocodylia.

  11. Phenotypic convergence in genetically distinct lineages of a Rhinolophus species complex (Mammalia, Chiroptera.

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    David S Jacobs

    Full Text Available Phenotypes of distantly related species may converge through adaptation to similar habitats and/or because they share biological constraints that limit the phenotypic variants produced. A common theme in bats is the sympatric occurrence of cryptic species that are convergent in morphology but divergent in echolocation frequency, suggesting that echolocation may facilitate niche partitioning, reducing competition. If so, allopatric populations freed from competition, could converge in both morphology and echolocation provided they occupy similar niches or share biological constraints. We investigated the evolutionary history of a widely distributed African horseshoe bat, Rhinolophus darlingi, in the context of phenotypic convergence. We used phylogenetic inference to identify and date lineage divergence together with phenotypic comparisons and ecological niche modelling to identify morphological and geographical correlates of those lineages. Our results indicate that R. darlingi is paraphyletic, the eastern and western parts of its distribution forming two distinct non-sister lineages that diverged ~9.7 Mya. We retain R. darlingi for the eastern lineage and argue that the western lineage, currently the sub-species R. d. damarensis, should be elevated to full species status. R. damarensis comprises two lineages that diverged ~5 Mya. Our findings concur with patterns of divergence of other co-distributed taxa which are associated with increased regional aridification between 7-5 Mya suggesting possible vicariant evolution. The morphology and echolocation calls of R. darlingi and R. damarensis are convergent despite occupying different biomes. This suggests that adaptation to similar habitats is not responsible for the convergence. Furthermore, R. darlingi forms part of a clade comprising species that are bigger and echolocate at lower frequencies than R. darlingi, suggesting that biological constraints are unlikely to have influenced the

  12. Phenotypic convergence in genetically distinct lineages of a Rhinolophus species complex (Mammalia, Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, David S; Babiker, Hassan; Bastian, Anna; Kearney, Teresa; van Eeden, Rowen; Bishop, Jacqueline M

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypes of distantly related species may converge through adaptation to similar habitats and/or because they share biological constraints that limit the phenotypic variants produced. A common theme in bats is the sympatric occurrence of cryptic species that are convergent in morphology but divergent in echolocation frequency, suggesting that echolocation may facilitate niche partitioning, reducing competition. If so, allopatric populations freed from competition, could converge in both morphology and echolocation provided they occupy similar niches or share biological constraints. We investigated the evolutionary history of a widely distributed African horseshoe bat, Rhinolophus darlingi, in the context of phenotypic convergence. We used phylogenetic inference to identify and date lineage divergence together with phenotypic comparisons and ecological niche modelling to identify morphological and geographical correlates of those lineages. Our results indicate that R. darlingi is paraphyletic, the eastern and western parts of its distribution forming two distinct non-sister lineages that diverged ~9.7 Mya. We retain R. darlingi for the eastern lineage and argue that the western lineage, currently the sub-species R. d. damarensis, should be elevated to full species status. R. damarensis comprises two lineages that diverged ~5 Mya. Our findings concur with patterns of divergence of other co-distributed taxa which are associated with increased regional aridification between 7-5 Mya suggesting possible vicariant evolution. The morphology and echolocation calls of R. darlingi and R. damarensis are convergent despite occupying different biomes. This suggests that adaptation to similar habitats is not responsible for the convergence. Furthermore, R. darlingi forms part of a clade comprising species that are bigger and echolocate at lower frequencies than R. darlingi, suggesting that biological constraints are unlikely to have influenced the convergence. Instead, the

  13. Preliminary studies on identification of inorganic species in complex mixtures by electrospray mass spectrometry in the counter ion mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollah, Sahana

    1999-11-08

    Suppression of mass spectral peaks due to matrix problem is a major hurdle to overcome during identification work. So far, preliminary studies have been done in investigating solutions containing various percentages of nitric and hydrochloric acid. Since other anions would also be present in real samples, also needed to be examined is how the extent of suppression of metal complexes by Cl{sup {minus}} compares with suppression by other anions such as PO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. If suppression of other anions is as severe as that of the chloride ion, then it would be virtually impossible to analyze unknown samples containing large amount of such anions by direct infusion electrospray mass spectrometry. It seems like a separation step is needed to separate these matrix anions from the metal complexes prior to putting the solution through the electrospray. However, separation of inorganic complexes can be difficult and has not been studied thoroughly as LC separation of bioorganic compounds. Both zinc and copper chloro complexes have been observed to be more tolerant to higher amount of chloride ion present in a solution compared to the group I and II metal chloro complexes. Other transition metals including the lanthanide complexes need to be examined more intensively to see how they fare against other transition metal complexes. So far, only preliminary work has been done in identifying inorganic species in solutions using both ICP-MS and ES-MS. The solution contained a number of metals but only one major anion, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Therefore, complex solutions containing a number of anions and metals can be examined to see if identification is still feasible. This identification work can be continued on into investigating real samples.

  14. Inferring selection in the Anopheles gambiae species complex: an example from immune-related serine protease inhibitors

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    Little Tom J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae species complex are the primary vectors of human malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. Many host genes have been shown to affect Plasmodium development in the mosquito, and so are expected to engage in an evolutionary arms race with the pathogen. However, there is little conclusive evidence that any of these mosquito genes evolve rapidly, or show other signatures of adaptive evolution. Methods Three serine protease inhibitors have previously been identified as candidate immune system genes mediating mosquito-Plasmodium interaction, and serine protease inhibitors have been identified as hot-spots of adaptive evolution in other taxa. Population-genetic tests for selection, including a recent multi-gene extension of the McDonald-Kreitman test, were applied to 16 serine protease inhibitors and 16 other genes sampled from the An. gambiae species complex in both East and West Africa. Results Serine protease inhibitors were found to show a marginally significant trend towards higher levels of amino acid diversity than other genes, and display extensive genetic structuring associated with the 2La chromosomal inversion. However, although serpins are candidate targets for strong parasite-mediated selection, no evidence was found for rapid adaptive evolution in these genes. Conclusion It is well known that phylogenetic and population history in the An. gambiae complex can present special problems for the application of standard population-genetic tests for selection, and this may explain the failure of this study to detect selection acting on serine protease inhibitors. The pitfalls of uncritically applying these tests in this species complex are highlighted, and the future prospects for detecting selection acting on the An. gambiae genome are discussed.

  15. Four new bat species (Rhinolophus hildebrandtii complex reflect Plio-Pleistocene divergence of dwarfs and giants across an Afromontane archipelago.

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    Peter J Taylor

    Full Text Available Gigantism and dwarfism evolve in vertebrates restricted to islands. We describe four new species in the Rhinolophus hildebrandtii species-complex of horseshoe bats, whose evolution has entailed adaptive shifts in body size. We postulate that vicissitudes of palaeoenvironments resulted in gigantism and dwarfism in habitat islands fragmented across eastern and southern Africa. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences recovered two clades of R. hildebrandtii senso lato which are paraphyletic with respect to a third lineage (R. eloquens. Lineages differ by 7.7 to 9.0% in cytochrome b sequences. Clade 1 includes R. hildebrandtii sensu stricto from the east African highlands and three additional vicariants that speciated across an Afromontane archipelago through the Plio-Pleistocene, extending from the Kenyan Highlands through the Eastern Arc, northern Mozambique and the Zambezi Escarpment to the eastern Great Escarpment of South Africa. Clade 2 comprises one species confined to lowland savanna habitats (Mozambique and Zimbabwe. A third clade comprises R. eloquens from East Africa. Speciation within Clade 1 is associated with fixed differences in echolocation call frequency, and cranial shape and size in populations isolated since the late Pliocene (ca 3.74 Mya. Relative to the intermediate-sized savanna population (Clade 2, these island-populations within Clade 1 are characterised by either gigantism (South African eastern Great Escarpment and Mts Mabu and Inago in Mozambique or dwarfism (Lutope-Ngolangola Gorge, Zimbabwe and Soutpansberg Mountains, South Africa. Sympatry between divergent clades (Clade 1 and Clade 2 at Lutope-Ngolangola Gorge (NW Zimbabwe is attributed to recent range expansions. We propose an "Allometric Speciation Hypothesis", which attributes the evolution of this species complex of bats to divergence in constant frequency (CF sonar calls. The origin of species-specific peak frequencies (overall range = 32 to 46 kHz represents the

  16. Candidemia by species of the Candida parapsilosis complex in children's hospital: prevalence, biofilm production and antifungal susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Luciana da Silva; Khouri, Sonia; Hahn, Rosane Christine; da Silva, Eriques Gonçalves; de Oliveira, Vanessa Krummer Perinazzo; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues

    2013-04-01

    Opportunistic infections are an increasingly common problem in hospitals, and the yeast Candida parapsilosis has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen. The aims of this study were to determine and compare (i) the prevalence rate among C. parapsilosis complex organisms isolated from blood in a public children's hospital in São Paulo state, (ii) the ability of the complex C. parapsilosis species identified to produce biofilm and (iii) the antifungal susceptibility profiles. Forty-nine (49) specimens of isolated blood yeast were analyzed, previously identified as C. parapsilosis by conventional methods. After the molecular analysis, the isolates were characterized as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (83.7 %), C. orthopsilosis (10.2 %) and C. metapsilosis (6.1 %). All species were able to form biofilm. The species with the highest biofilm production was C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, followed by C. orthopsilosis and further by C. metapsilosis. All of the strains have demonstrated similar susceptibility to fluconazole, caspofungin, voriconazole, cetoconazole and 5-flucytosine. Only one strain of C. parapsilosis was resistant to amphotericin B. Regarding itraconazole, 66.6 and 43.9 % isolates of C. metapsilosis and C. parapsilosis, respectively, have demonstrated to be susceptible dose-dependent, with one isolate of the latter species resistant to the drug. Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto has demonstrated to be the less susceptible, mainly to amphotericin B, caspofungin and "azoles" such as fluconazole. Therefore, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis are still involved in a restricted number of infections, but these data have become essential for there are very few studies of these species in Latin America.

  17. Fumigant antifungal activity of Corymbia citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus essential oils and citronellal against three fungal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Raimundo Wagner de S; Ootani, Marcio A; Ascencio, Sérgio Donizeti; Ferreira, Talita P S; Dos Santos, Manoel M; dos Santos, Gil R

    2014-01-01

    Corymbia citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus essential oils samples were analyzed by GC and GC-MS and their qualitative and quantitative compositions established. The main component of essential oils of C. citriodora and C. nardus was citronellal, at 61.78% and 36.6%, respectively. The essential oils and citronellal were tested for their fumigant antifungal activity against Pyricularia (Magnaporthe) grisea, Aspergillus spp., and Colletotrichum musae. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranged from 100 to 200 ppm for the essential oils and 25 to 50 mg · mL(-1) for citronellal. The contact assay using the essential oils and citronellal showed growth inhibition of the three fungal species. However, a concentration of 1.47 mg · mL(-1) only reduced the inhibition of Aspergillus growth to 90% at 14 days of exposure. For the fumigant assay, 0.05, 0.11, and 0.23 mg · mL(-1) of essential oils and citronellal drastically affected growth of P. grisea, Aspergillus spp., and C. musae. Harmful effects on the sporulation and germination of the three fungi were seen, and there was complete inhibition at 0.15 mg · mL(-1) with both oils and citronellal. This showed that the crude component of essential oils of C. citriodora and C. nardus markedly suppressed spore production, germination, and growth inhibition of P. grisea, Aspergillus spp., and Colletotrichum musae.

  18. Fumigant Antifungal Activity of Corymbia citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus Essential Oils and Citronellal against Three Fungal Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundo Wagner de S. Aguiar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corymbia citriodora and Cymbopogon nardus essential oils samples were analyzed by GC and GC-MS and their qualitative and quantitative compositions established. The main component of essential oils of C. citriodora and C. nardus was citronellal, at 61.78% and 36.6%, respectively. The essential oils and citronellal were tested for their fumigant antifungal activity against Pyricularia (Magnaporthe grisea, Aspergillus spp., and Colletotrichum musae. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC ranged from 100 to 200 ppm for the essential oils and 25 to 50 mg·mL−1 for citronellal. The contact assay using the essential oils and citronellal showed growth inhibition of the three fungal species. However, a concentration of 1.47 mg·mL−1 only reduced the inhibition of Aspergillus growth to 90% at 14 days of exposure. For the fumigant assay, 0.05, 0.11, and 0.23 mg·mL−1 of essential oils and citronellal drastically affected growth of P. grisea, Aspergillus spp., and C. musae. Harmful effects on the sporulation and germination of the three fungi were seen, and there was complete inhibition at 0.15 mg·mL−1 with both oils and citronellal. This showed that the crude component of essential oils of C. citriodora and C. nardus markedly suppressed spore production, germination, and growth inhibition of P. grisea, Aspergillus spp., and Colletotrichum musae.

  19. Contribution to the systematics and zoogeography of the East-African Acomys spinosissimus Peters 1852 species complex and the description of two new species (Rodentia: Muridae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verheyen, W.; Hulselmans, J.; Wendelen, W.

    2011-01-01

    We revised the taxonomic status of the putative Acomys spinosissimus complex based on the comparative study of specimen collections from Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, DR Congo and South Africa, by means of analysis of external morphology, craniometry, enzymes, mitochondrial DNA sequences....... transvaalensis) occurs further to the South (i.e. northern limit seemingly just north of the Limpopo River). The investigated populations north of the Zambezi River are morphologically and genetically distinct from A. spinosissimus and A. selousi. Based on this evidence, we described Acomys muzei sp. nov....... and Acomys ngurui sp. nov., each one occurring separately along one side of the Eastern Arc Mountains. Finally, we lacked sufficient information to describe a third new species from the area north of the Zambesi River...

  20. Species of the Colletotrichum gloeosporioides complex associated with anthracnose diseases of Proteaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, F.; Damm, U.; Cai, L.; Crous, P.W.

    2013-01-01

    Anthracnose disease of Proteaceae has in the past chiefly been attributed to infections by C. acutatum, C. boninense and C. gloeosporioides. In the present study, a multi-locus phylogenetic analysis (ACT, CAL, CHS-1, GAPDH, GS, ITS, TUB2) revealed that strains of the C. gloeosporioides complex

  1. Integrative taxonomy of the Russet Bush Warbler Locustella mandelli complex reveals a new species from central China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Per; Alstr?m; Canwei; Xia; Pamela; C; Rasmussen; Urban; Olsson; Bo; Dai; Jian; Zhao; Paul; J; Leader; Geoff; J; Carey; Lu; Dong; Tianlong; Cai; Paul; I; Holt; Hung; Le; Manh; Gang; Song; Yang; Liu; Yanyun; Zhang; Fumin; Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Russet Bush Warbler Locustella(previously Bradypterus) mandelli complex occurs in mountains in the eastern Himalayas, southern China, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Indonesia. The taxonomy has been debated,with one(L. seebohmi) to four(L. seebohmi, L. mandelli, L. montis and L. timorensis) species having been recognised.Methods: We used an integrative approach, incorporating analyses of morphology, vocalizations and a molecular marker, to re-evaluate species limits in the L. mandelli complex.Results: We found that central Chinese L. mandelli differed from those from India through northern Southeast Asia to southeast China in plumage, morphometrics and song. All were easily classified by song, and(wing + culmen)/tail ratio overlapped only marginally. Both groups were reciprocally monophyletic in a mitochondrial cytochrome b(cytb) gene tree, with a mean divergence of 1.0 ± 0.2%. They were sympatric and mostly altitudinally segregated in the breeding season in southern Sichuan province. We found that the Mt Victoria(western Myanmar) population differed vocally from other L. mandelli, but no specimens are available. Taiwan Bush Warbler L. alishanensis was sister to the L. mandelli complex, with the most divergent song. Plumage, vocal and cytb evidence supported the distinctness of the south Vietnamese L. mandelli idonea. The Timor Bush Warbler L. timorensis, Javan Bush Warbler L.montis and Benguet Bush Warbler L. seebohmi differed distinctly in plumage, but among-population song variation in L. montis exceeded the differences between some populations of these taxa, and mean pairwise cytb divergences were only 0.5–0.9%. We also found that some L. montis populations differed morphologically.Conclusions: We conclude that the central Chinese population of Russet Bush Warbler represents a new species,which we describe herein, breeding at mid elevations in Sichuan, Shaanxi, Hubei, Hunan and Guizhou provinces.The taxonomic status of the other allopatric

  2. Integrative taxonomy of the Russet Bush Warbler Locustella mandelli complex reveals a new species from central China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Per Alström; Tianlong Cai1; Paul I Holt; Hung Le Manh; Gang Song; Yang Liu; Yanyun Zhang; Fumin Lei; Canwei Xia; Pamela C Rasmussen; Urban Olsson; Bo Dai; Jian Zhao; Paul J Leader; Geoff J Carey; Lu Dong

    2015-01-01

    Background:The Russet Bush Warbler Locustel a (previously Bradypterus) mandel i complex occurs in mountains in the eastern Himalayas, southern China, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Indonesia. The taxonomy has been debated, with one (L. seebohmi) to four (L. seebohmi, L. mandel i, L. montis and L. timorensis) species having been recognised. Methods:We used an integrative approach, incorporating analyses of morphology, vocalizations and a molecular marker, to re-evaluate species limits in the L. mandel i complex. Results:We found that central Chinese L. mandel i differed from those from India through northern Southeast Asia to southeast China in plumage, morphometrics and song. All were easily classified by song, and (wing+culmen)/tail ratio overlapped only marginally. Both groups were reciprocally monophyletic in a mitochondrial cytochrome b (cytb) gene tree, with a mean divergence of 1.0 ± 0.2%. They were sympatric and mostly altitudinally segregated in the breeding season in southern Sichuan province. We found that the Mt Victoria (western Myanmar) population differed vocally from other L. mandel i, but no specimens are available. Taiwan Bush Warbler L. alishanensis was sister to the L. mandel i complex, with the most divergent song. Plumage, vocal and cytb evidence supported the distinctness of the south Vietnamese L. mandel i idonea. The Timor Bush Warbler L. timorensis, Javan Bush Warbler L. montis and Benguet Bush Warbler L. seebohmi differed distinctly in plumage, but among-population song variation in L. montis exceeded the differences between some populations of these taxa, and mean pairwise cytb divergences were only 0.5–0.9%. We also found that some L. montis populations differed morphologically. Conclusions:We conclude that the central Chinese population of Russet Bush Warbler represents a new species, which we describe herein, breeding at mid elevations in Sichuan, Shaanxi, Hubei, Hunan and Guizhou provinces. The taxonomic status of the other

  3. The first European stand of Paramecium sonneborni (P. aurelia complex), a species known only from North America (Texas, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Lebedeva, Natalia

    2014-06-01

    P. aurelia is currently defined as a complex of 15 sibling species including 14 species designated by Sonneborn (1975) and one, P. sonneborni, by Aufderheide et al. (1983). The latter was known from only one stand (Texas, USA). The main reason for the present study was a new stand of Paramecium in Cyprus, with strains recognized as P. sonneborni based on the results of strain crosses, cytological slides, and molecular analyses of three loci (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-5'LSU rDNA, COI, CytB). The new stand of P. sonneborni in Europe shows that the species, previously considered endemic, may have a wider range. This demonstrates the impact of under-sampling on the knowledge of the biogeography of microbial eukaryotes. Phylogenetic trees based on all the studied fragments revealed that P. sonneborni forms a separate cluster that is closer to P. jenningsi and P. schewiakoffi than to the other members of the P. aurelia complex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Candida glabrata species complex prevalence and antifungal susceptibility testing in a culture collection: First description of Candida nivariensis in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-López, Soraya Eugenia; Taverna, Constanza G; Bosco-Borgeat, María Eugenia; Maldonado, Ivana; Vivot, Walter; Szusz, Wanda; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo; Córdoba, Susana B

    2016-12-01

    The presence of the cryptic species belonging to the Candida glabrata complex has not been studied in Argentina. We analyzed a collection of 117 clinical isolates of C. glabrata complex belonging to a National Culture Collection of Instituto Nacional de Microbiología "Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán" from Argentina (40 isolates from blood samples, 18 from other normally sterile sites, 20 from vagina, 14 from urine, 7 from oral cavity, 3 from catheter, 1 from a stool sample and 14 isolates whose clinical origin was not recorded). The aims of this work were to determine the prevalence of the cryptic species Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis and to evaluate the susceptibility profile of isolates against nine antifungal drugs. Identification was carried out by using classical phenotypic tests, CHROMagar™ Candida, PCR and MALDI-TOF. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, caspofungin and anidulafungin were determined according to the EDef 7.3 (EUCAST) reference document. Of the 117 isolates, 114 were identified as C. glabrata and three as C. nivariensis by using PCR and MALDI-TOF. There were no major differences between C. nivariensis and C. glabrata susceptibility profiles. No resistant strains were found to echinocandins. We have found that the percentage of C. nivariensis in our culture collection was 2.56. This is the first description of C. nivariensis in Argentina, and data obtained could contribute to the knowledge of the epidemiology of this cryptic species.

  5. Interglacial microrefugia and diversification of a cactus species complex: phylogeography and palaeodistributional reconstructions for Pilosocereus aurisetus and allies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatelli, Isabel A S; Perez, Manolo F; Peterson, A Townsend; Taylor, Nigel P; Zappi, Daniela C; Machado, Marlon C; Koch, Ingrid; Pires, Adriana H C; Moraes, Evandro M

    2014-06-01

    The role of Pleistocene climate changes in promoting evolutionary diversification in global biota is well documented, but the great majority of data regarding this subject come from North America and Europe, which were greatly affected by glaciation. The effects of Pleistocene changes on cold- and/or dry-adapted species in tropical areas where glaciers were not present remain sparsely investigated. Many such species are restricted to small areas surrounded by unfavourable habitats, which may represent potential interglacial microrefugia. Here, we analysed the phylogeographic structure and diversification history of seven cactus species in the Pilosocereus aurisetus complex that are restricted to rocky areas with high diversity and endemism within the Neotropical savannas of eastern South America. We combined palaeodistributional estimates with standard phylogeographic approaches based on two chloroplast DNA regions (trnT-trnL and trnS-trnG), exon 1 of the nuclear gene PhyC and 10 nuclear microsatellite loci. Our analyses revealed a phylogeographic history marked by multiple levels of distributional fragmentation, isolation leading to allopatric differentiation and secondary contact among divergent lineages within the complex. Diversification and demographic events appear to have been affected by the Quaternary climatic cycles as a result of isolation in multiple patches of xerophytic vegetation. These small patches presently harbouring P. aurisetus populations seem to operate as microrefugia, both at present and during Pleistocene interglacial periods; the role of such microrefugia should be explored and analysed in greater detail.

  6. Comparison of four molecular approaches to identify Candida parapsilosis complex species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2017-01-01

    Since the description of Candida orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis in 2005, several methods have been proposed to identify and differentiate these species from C. parapsilosis sensu stricto. Species-specific uniplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed and compared with sequencing of the D1/D2 region of the LSU 28S rDNA gene, microsatellite typing of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns in the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA gene. There was agreement between results of testing of 98 clinical isolates with the four PCR-based methods, with 59 isolates identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 as C. orthopsilosis, and two as C. metapsilosis. PMID:28225905

  7. DNA Barcoding in a Crop Genebank: Resolving the Capsicum annuum Species Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variability within eight cpDNA introns including trnS-trnfM, trnL-trnT, trnH-psbA, trnF-trnL, trnD-trnT, trnC-rpoB, rps16, and matK, and the nuclear waxy intron was examined in seven species of Capsicum (C. annuum, C. baccatum, C. chinense, C. frutescens, C. pubescens, C. chacoense, and C. rhomboide...

  8. Hydraulic complexity, larval drift, and endangered species recovery in the Upper Missouri River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, S. O.; Bulliner, E. A., IV; Jacobson, R. B.; Fischenich, C. J.; Braaten, P.

    2016-12-01

    Connectivity is recognized as an important attribute of river ecosystems. In highly fragmented rivers restoring longitudinal connectivity is often difficult or impossible. In systems where removal of dams is not viable and bypass does not address needs of target fish species, manipulation of flows to meet requirements of aquatic organisms may aid species recovery. Such is the case in the Missouri River basin, where dams and reservoirs impede fish migration and larval drift, critical life history events for many species, notably the endangered pallid sturgeon. In 2016, we conducted a large-scale dye-trace experiment in the Upper Missouri River downstream from Fort Peck Reservoir, MT. A slug injection of Rhodamine WT was tracked and measured over a 135-km reach. Direct measurements of downstream dye concentrations were used to calibrate a one-dimensional advection-dispersion model, which is being used to explore alternative reservoir operations for Fort Peck and the downstream reservoir, Lake Sakakawea. Results are used to evaluate the effects of flow regulation on dispersal of endangered sturgeon larvae. Additionally, we employ a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model to evaluate particle residence times and inform understanding of hydraulic processes that may control the shape of breakthrough curves observed from the field experiment. Lateral connectivity also has a potential role in river management and species recovery. Reservoir management can determine whether flow is contained within the channel, where dispersion is low, or laterally connected to rough floodplains which can result in high dispersion, long-tailed particle residence times, and greater opportunities for drifting larvae to transition to exogenous feeding and survive. We discuss our findings in the context of basin-wide restoration efforts and highlight the critical contributions of both large-scale field experiments and numerical modeling to inform management.

  9. A review of the Paectes arcigera species complex (Guenée (Lepidoptera, Euteliidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pogue

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Five new species of Paectes Hübner [1818] related to Paectes arcigera (Guenée (Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, Guadeloupe, Dominica, St. Lucia, Trinidad and P. longiformis Pogue (Brazil are described: P. asper sp. n. (Florida, Bahamas, Cuba, Cayman Islands, Jamaica, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, British Virgin Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Dominica, Colombia, P. medialba sp. n. (Argentina, P. similis sp. n. (Brazil, P. sinuosa sp. n. (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and P. tumida sp. n. (Colombia, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana. Adults and genitalia are illustrated for all species. Taxonomic changes include the rev. stat. of P. nana (Walker (Florida, Greater Antilles, Mexico, Guatemala, Galapagos as a valid species and revised synonyms P. indefatigabilis Schaus and P. isabel Schaus as junior synonyms of P. nana instead of P. arcigera. New host records for P. sinuosa and P. nana reared on Brazilian peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, Anacardiaceae are presented. The holotype and female genitalia of P. obrotunda (Guenée are illustrated.

  10. Complexation of labile aluminium species by chelating resins Iontosorb--a new method for Al environmental risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matús, Peter; Kubová, Jana

    2005-09-01

    The utilization of chelating ion-exchange by the method based on binding strength and kinetic discrimination for aluminium fractionation was studied. Two chelating cellulose resins, Iontosorb Oxin (IO) and Iontosorb Salicyl (IS), were used for the determination of quickly reacting labile aluminium species. The possibilities of aluminium fractionation on these chelating resins were investigated by a solid phase extraction technique. The study of the pH (2.5-6.0) influence on the Al complexation by both resins indicates that at low pH the IS has lower sorption capacity but better adsorptive kinetic properties than IO. The optimal resin complexation time for reactive Al species was experimentally found after aluminium sorption study at pH 4.0 in synthetic solutions containing some inorganic and organic ligands, which simulate the composition of analysed acid soil and water samples. The negative influence of sulphate and iron on the Al complexation by IS resin was found and investigated. The flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used for the aluminium quantification.

  11. Nonrandom patterns of genetic admixture expose the complex historical hybrid origin of unisexual leaf beetle species in the genus Calligrapha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelongo, Tinguaro; Gómez-Zurita, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Many unisexual animal lineages supposedly arose from hybridization. However, support for their putative hybrid origins mostly comes from indirect methodologies, which are rarely confirmatory. Here we provide compelling data indicating that tetraploid unisexual Calligrapha are true genetic mosaics obtained via analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and allelic variation and coalescence times for three single-copy nuclear genes (CPS, HARS, and Wg) in five of six unisexual Calligrapha and a representative sample of bisexual species. Nuclear allelic diversity in unisexuals consistently segregates in the gene pools of at least two but up to three divergent bisexual species, interpreted as putative parentals of interspecific hybridization crosses. Interestingly, their mtDNA diversity derives from an additional yet undiscovered older evolutionary lineage that is possibly the same for all independently originated unisexual species. One possibly extinct species transferred its mtDNA to several evolutionary lineages in a wave of hybridization events during the Pliocene, whereby descendant species retained a polymorphic mtDNA constitution. Recent hybridizations, in the Pleistocene and always involving females with the old introgressed mtDNA, seemingly occurred in the lineages leading to unisexual species, decoupling mtDNA introgression (and inferences derived from these data, such as timing and parentage) from subsequent acquisition of the new reproductive mode. These results illuminate an unexpected complexity in possible routes to animal unisexuality, with implications for the interpretation of ancient unisexuality. If the origin of unisexuality requires a mechanism where (1) hybridization is a necessary but insufficient condition and (2) multiple bouts of hybridization involving more than two divergent lineages are required, then the origins of several classical unisexual systems may have to be reassessed.

  12. Modeling co-expression across species for complex traits: insights to the difference of human and mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Cai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex interactions between genes or proteins contribute substantially to phenotypic evolution. We present a probabilistic model and a maximum likelihood approach for cross-species clustering analysis and for identification of conserved as well as species-specific co-expression modules. This model enables a "soft" cross-species clustering (SCSC approach by encouraging but not enforcing orthologous genes to be grouped into the same cluster. SCSC is therefore robust to obscure orthologous relationships and can reflect different functional roles of orthologous genes in different species. We generated a time-course gene expression dataset for differentiating mouse embryonic stem (ES cells, and compiled a dataset of published gene expression data on differentiating human ES cells. Applying SCSC to analyze these datasets, we identified conserved and species-specific gene regulatory modules. Together with protein-DNA binding data, an SCSC cluster specifically induced in murine ES cells indicated that the KLF2/4/5 transcription factors, although critical to maintaining the pluripotent phenotype in mouse ES cells, were decoupled from the OCT4/SOX2/NANOG regulatory module in human ES cells. Two of the target genes of murine KLF2/4/5, LIN28 and NODAL, were rewired to be targets of OCT4/SOX2/NANOG in human ES cells. Moreover, by mapping SCSC clusters onto KEGG signaling pathways, we identified the signal transduction components that were induced in pluripotent ES cells in either a conserved or a species-specific manner. These results suggest that the pluripotent cell identity can be established and maintained through more than one gene regulatory network.

  13. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility profiles of Candida parapsilosis complex species isolated from culture collection of clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Silvestre Ataides

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractINTRODUCTION:Candida parapsilosis is a common yeast species found in cases of onychomycosis and candidemia associated with infected intravascular devices. In this study, we differentiated Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis , and Candida metapsilosis from a culture collection containing blood and subungual scraping samples. Furthermore, we assessed the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of these species to fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin.METHODS:Differentiation of C. parapsilosis complex species was performed by amplification of the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH gene and digestion by the restriction enzyme Ban I. All isolates were evaluated for the determination of minimal inhibitory concentrations using Etest, a method for antifungal susceptibility testing.RESULTS:Among the 87 isolates, 78 (89.7% were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto , five (5.7% were identified as C. orthopsilosis , and four (4.6% were identified as C. metapsilosis . Analysis of antifungal susceptibility showed that C. parapsilosis sensu strictoisolates were less susceptible to amphotericin B and itraconazole. One C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolate was resistant to amphotericin B and itraconazole. Moreover, 10.2% of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates were resistant to caspofungin. Two C. parapsilosis sensu strictoisolates and one C. metapsilosis isolate were susceptible to fluconazole in a dose-dependent manner.CONCLUSIONS:We reported the first molecular identification of C. parapsilosiscomplex species in State of Goiás, Brazil. Additionally, we showed that although the three species exhibited differences in antifungal susceptibility profiles, the primary susceptibility of this species was to caspofungin.

  14. Fusarium paranaense sp. nov., a member of the Fusarium solani species complex causes root rot on soybean in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sarah S; Matos, Kedma S; Tessmann, Dauri J; Seixas, Claudine D S; Pfenning, Ludwig H

    2016-01-01

    Isolates of Fusarium obtained from soybean plants showing symptoms of root rot collected in subtropical southern and tropical central Brazil were characterized based on phylogenetic analyses, sexual crossing, morphology, and pathogenicity tests. A novel species within the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) causing soybean root rot is formally described herein as Fusarium paranaense. This species can be distinguished from the other soybean root rot pathogens in the FSSC, which are commonly associated with soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) based on analyses of the combined DNA sequences of translation elongation factor 1-α and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and on interspecies mating compatibility. Bayesian and maximum parsimony phylogenetic analyses showed that isolates of F. paranaense formed a distinct group in clade 3 of the FSSC in contrast to the pathogens currently known to cause SDS, which are in clade 2. Female fertile tester strains were developed that can be used for the identification of this new species in the FSSC based on sexual crosses. All isolates were heterothallic and belonged to a distinct mating population. Fusarium tucumaniae, a known SDS pathogen, was found in the subtropical southern region of the country.

  15. Identity of the ailanthus webworm moth (Lepidoptera, Yponomeutidae, a complex of two species: evidence from DNA barcoding, morphology and ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wilson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available During extensive ongoing campaigns to inventory moths of North America and Area de Conservacion Guanacaste (ACG, northwestern Costa Rica, we discovered that morphologically similar yponomeutid moths were assigned two different names, Atteva ergatica Walsingham in Costa Rica and A. punctella (Stoll in North America, but had identical DNA barcodes. Combining DNA barcoding, morphology and food plant records also revealed a complex of two sympatric species that are diagnosable by their DNA barcodes and their facies in Costa Rica. However, neither of the names could be correctly applied to either species, as A. ergatica is a junior synonym and A. punctella a junior homonym. By linking our specimens to type material through morphology and DNA barcoding, we determined that the ACG dry forest species, distributed from Costa Rica to southern Quebec and Ontario, should be called A. aurea, whereas the similar and marginally sympatric ACG rain forest species found in Central America should be called A. pustulella. Neotypes are designated for Phalaena Tinea punctella Stoll, 1781 and Deiopeia aurea Fitch, 1857. Atteva floridana has identical barcodes to A. aurea and provisionally maintained as a synonym.

  16. Genetic and morphological variability in South American rodent Oecomys (Sigmodontinae, Rodentia): evidence for a complex of species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, C C; Flores, T; Pieczarka, J C; Rossi, R V; Sampaio, M I C; Rissino, J D; Amaral, P J S; Nagamachi, C Y

    2012-01-01

    The rodent genus Oecomys (Sigmodontinae) comprises ~16 species that inhabit tropical and subtropical forests in Central America and South America. In this study specimens of Oecomys paricola Thomas, 1904 from Belém and Marajó island, northern Brazil, were investigated using cytogenetic, molecular and morphological analyses. Three karyotypes were found, two from Belém (2n = 68, fundamental number (FN) = 72 and 2n = 70, FN = 76) and a third from Marajó island (2n = 70, FN = 72). No molecular or morphological differences were found between the individuals with differing cytotypes from Belém, but differences were evident between the individuals from Belém and Marajó island. Specimens from Belém city region may represent two cryptic species because two different karyotypes are present in the absence of significant differences in morphology and molecular characteristics. The Marajó island and Belém populations may represent distinct species that have been separated for some time, and are in the process of morphological and molecular differentiation as a consequence of reproductive isolation at the geographic and chromosomal levels. Thus, the results suggest that O. paricola may be a complex of species.

  17. Susceptibility of Anopheles campestris-like and Anopheles barbirostris species complexes to Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongsahuan, Sorawat; Baimai, Visut; Junkum, Anuluck; Saeung, Atiporn; Min, Gi-Sik; Joshi, Deepak; Park, Mi-Hyun; Somboon, Pradya; Suwonkerd, Wannapa; Tippawangkosol, Pongsri; Jariyapan, Narissara; Choochote, Wej

    2011-02-01

    Nine colonies of five sibling species members of Anopheles barbirostris complexes were experimentally infected with Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. They were then dissected eight and 14 days after feeding for oocyst and sporozoite rates, respectively, and compared with Anopheles cracens. The results revealed that Anopheles campestris-like Forms E (Chiang Mai) and F (Udon Thani) as well as An. barbirostris species A3 and A4 were non-potential vectors for P. falciparum because 0% oocyst rates were obtained, in comparison to the 86.67-100% oocyst rates recovered from An. cracens. Likewise, An. campestris-like Forms E (Sa Kaeo) and F (Ayuttaya), as well as An. barbirostris species A4, were non-potential vectors for P. vivax because 0% sporozoite rates were obtained, in comparison to the 85.71-92.31% sporozoite rates recovered from An. cracens. An. barbirostris species A1, A2 and A3 were low potential vectors for P. vivax because 9.09%, 6.67% and 11.76% sporozoite rates were obtained, respectively, in comparison to the 85.71-92.31% sporozoite rates recovered from An. cracens. An. campestris-like Forms B and E (Chiang Mai) were high-potential vectors for P. vivax because 66.67% and 64.29% sporozoite rates were obtained, respectively, in comparison to 90% sporozoite rates recovered from An. cracens.

  18. Susceptibility of Anopheles campestris-like and Anopheles barbirostris species complexes to Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorawat Thongsahuan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nine colonies of five sibling species members of Anopheles barbirostris complexes were experimentally infected with Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. They were then dissected eight and 14 days after feeding for oocyst and sporozoite rates, respectively, and compared with Anopheles cracens. The results revealed that Anopheles campestris-like Forms E (Chiang Mai and F (Udon Thani as well as An. barbirostris species A3 and A4 were non-potential vectors for P. falciparum because 0% oocyst rates were obtained, in comparison to the 86.67-100% oocyst rates recovered from An. cracens. Likewise, An. campestris-like Forms E (Sa Kaeo and F (Ayuttaya, as well as An. barbirostris species A4, were non-potential vectors for P. vivax because 0% sporozoite rates were obtained, in comparison to the 85.71-92.31% sporozoite rates recovered from An. cracens. An. barbirostris species A1, A2 and A3 were low potential vectors for P. vivax because 9.09%, 6.67% and 11.76% sporozoite rates were obtained, respectively, in comparison to the 85.71-92.31% sporozoite rates recovered from An. cracens. An. campestris-like Forms B and E (Chiang Mai were high-potential vectors for P. vivax because 66.67% and 64.29% sporozoite rates were obtained, respectively, in comparison to 90% sporozoite rates recovered from An. cracens.

  19. Genetic and morphological variability in South American rodent Oecomys (Sigmodontinae, Rodentia): evidence for a complex of species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. C. Rosa; T. Flores; J. C. Pieczarka; R. V. Rossi; M. I. C. Sampaio; J. D. Rissino; P. J. S. Amaral; C. Y. Nagamachi

    2012-12-01

    The rodent genus Oecomys (Sigmodontinae) comprises ∼16 species that inhabit tropical and subtropical forests in Central America and South America. In this study specimens of Oecomys paricola Thomas, 1904 from Belém and Marajó island, northern Brazil, were investigated using cytogenetic, molecular and morphological analyses. Three karyotypes were found, two from Belém ($2n = 68$, fundamental number (FN) = 72 and $2n = 70$, FN = 76) and a third from Marajó island ($2n = 70$, FN = 72). No molecular or morphological differences were found between the individuals with differing cytotypes from Belém, but differences were evident between the individuals from Belém and Marajó island. Specimens from Belém city region may represent two cryptic species because two different karyotypes are present in the absence of significant differences in morphology and molecular characteristics. The Marajó island and Belém populations may represent distinct species that have been separated for some time, and are in the process of morphological and molecular differentiation as a consequence of reproductive isolation at the geographic and chromosomal levels. Thus, the results suggest that O. paricola may be a complex of species.

  20. Analyses of volatiles produced by the African fruit fly species complex ( Diptera , Tephritidae )

    OpenAIRE

    Břízová, Radka; Vaníčková, Lucie; Faťarová, Mária; Ekesi, Sunday; Hoskovec,Michal; Kalinová, Blanka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ceratitis fasciventris , Ceratitis anonae and Ceratitis rosa are polyphagous agricultural pests originating from the African continent. The taxonomy of this group (the so-called Ceratitis FAR complex) is unclear. To clarify the taxonomic relationships, male and female-produced volatiles presumably involved in pre-mating communication were studied using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) followed by multivariate analysi...

  1. Simultaneous Identification of Neutral and Anionic Species in Complex Mixtures without Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yanchuan; Chen, Lily; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    A chemosensory system is reported that operates without the need for separation techniques and is capable of identifying anions and structurally similar bioactive molecules. In this strategy, the coordination of analytes to a metal complex with an open binding cleft generates “static structures” on the NMR timescale. Unique signals are created by strategically placing fluorine atoms in close proximity to bound analytes so that small structural differences induce distinct 19F NMR shifts that c...

  2. Simultaneous Identification of Neutral and Anionic Species in Complex Mixtures without Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yanchuan; Chen, Lily; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    A chemosensory system is reported that operates without the need for separation techniques and is capable of identifying anions and structurally similar bioactive molecules. In this strategy, the coordination of analytes to a metal complex with an open binding cleft generates “static structures” on the NMR time scale. Unique signals are created by strategically placing fluorine atoms in close proximity to bound analytes so that small structural differences induce distinct 19F NMR shifts that ...

  3. The genome of African yam (Dioscorea cayenensis-rotundata complex) hosts endogenous sequences from four distinct Badnavirus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umber, Marie; Filloux, Denis; Muller, Emmanuelle; Laboureau, Nathalie; Galzi, Serge; Roumagnac, Philippe; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Pavis, Claudie; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves; Seal, Susan E

    2014-10-01

    Several endogenous viral elements (EVEs) have been identified in plant genomes, including endogenous pararetroviruses (EPRVs). Here, we report the first characterization of EPRV sequences in the genome of African yam of the Dioscorea cayenensis-rotundata complex. We propose that these sequences should be termed 'endogenous Dioscorea bacilliform viruses' (eDBVs). Molecular characterization of eDBVs shows that they constitute sequences originating from various parts of badnavirus genomes, resulting in a mosaic structure that is typical of most EPRVs characterized to date. Using complementary molecular approaches, we show that eDBVs belong to at least four distinct Badnavirus species, indicating multiple, independent, endogenization events. Phylogenetic analyses of eDBVs support and enrich the current taxonomy of yam badnaviruses and lead to the characterization of a new Badnavirus species in yam. The impact of eDBVs on diagnosis, yam germplasm conservation and movement, and breeding is discussed. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  4. Molecular analysis (RAPD-PCR) of inter-strain hybrids of the Paramecium aurelia species complex (Ciliophora, Protozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa; Prajer, Małgorzata; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena

    2005-01-01

    RAPD-PCR analysis showed that species of the Paramecium aurelia complex possessed characteristic band patterns and that the majority were also polymorphic intra-specifically. A comparison of band patterns was performed for some inter-strain hybrids within P. primaurelia, P. tetraurelia, P. pentaurelia, P. septaurelia, P. octaurelia, P. decaurelia, P. dodecaurelia, P. tredecaurelia, and P. quadecaurelia to band patterns characteristic for the parental strains. The investigations, however, did not reveal a close correlation between the degree of inbreeding characteristic for the species and similarity of genotypes. A low similarity of hybrid and parental band patterns was observed in P. octaurelia, P. dodecaurelia, P. quadecaurelia and also P. primaurelia. A high similarity of band patterns of hybrid and parental strains was found in P. tetraurelia, P. septaurelia, P. decaurelia, and P. tredecaurelia.

  5. New molecular data shed light on the global phylogeny and species limits of the Rhipicephalus sanguineus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekimoğlu, Olcay; Sağlam, İsmail K; Özer, Nurdan; Estrada-Peña, Agustin

    2016-07-01

    The Rhipicephalus sanguineus complex is a group of closely related tick species distributed all around the world. In this study, using mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA, new specimens of R sanguineus sensu lato from Turkey and Rhipicephalus camicasi from Kenya, were evaluated together with available sequences of this complex in GenBank. Our objectives were to delimit the complex, re-evaluate its global phylogeny and develop a reconstruction of its biogeographic history. Given Turkey's geographical location and its neighboring status within Africa, Asia and Europe, molecular information of R. sanguineus s.l. species from this region could have important implications both on a regional and global scale. Phylogenetic trees obtained with three methods (Bayesian, Maximum Likelihood and Maximum Parsimony) were highly similar and consensus trees gave the same branching patterns and similar node support values. A total of four different clades with up to 9 Operational Taxonomic Units formed strong monophyletic groups. Biogeographic reconstructions demonstrated the importance of populations in Middle East (Turkey) in the spread of the group from Europe to Africa and Asia. Data supported previous conclusions on the existence of two species of R. sanguineus s.l. in South America and the strong molecular similarity between R. camicasi and the so-called tropical lineage of R. sanguineus s.l. These results point to the need of a re-evaluation of most specimens designated as R. sanguineus s.l. in East Europe, Middle East, Africa and Asia after an adequate re-description of this taxon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Malaria vectors in the Republic of Benin: distribution of species and molecular forms of the Anopheles gambiae complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djogbénou, Luc; Pasteur, Nicole; Bio-Bangana, Sahabi; Baldet, Thierry; Irish, Seth R; Akogbeto, Martin; Weill, Mylène; Chandre, Fabrice

    2010-05-01

    Members of the Anopheles gambiae complex are among the best malaria vectors in the world, but their vectorial capacities vary between species and populations. A large-scale sampling of An. gambiae sensu lato was carried out in 2006 and 2007 in various bioclimatic areas of Benin (West Africa). The objective of this study was to collate data on the relative frequencies of species and forms within the An. gambiae complex and to produce a map of their spatial distribution. Sampling took place at 30 sites and 2122 females were analyzed. Two species were identified through molecular methods. The overall collection showed a preponderance of An. gambiae s.s., but unexpectedly, An. arabiensis was reported in the coastal-Guinean bioclimatic area characterized by a mean annual rainfall of >1500 mm where only An. gambiae s.s. was reported previously. Our study of Benin indicates that An. arabiensis would be adapted not only to the urban areas but also to the rural humid regions. Among 1717 An. gambiae s.s., 26.5% were of the M form and 73.3% were S form. Few hybrid specimens between the M and S forms were observed (0.2%). Only the spatial distribution of the M form appears to be mainly a function of bioclimatic area. Factors that influence the distribution of these malaria vectors are discussed. This study underlines the need of further investigations of biological, ecological, and behavioral traits of these species and forms to better appreciate their vectorial capacities. Acquisition of entomological field data appears essential to better estimate the stratification of malaria risk and help improve malaria vector control interventions.

  7. Peptaibol, secondary-metabolite, and hydrophobin pattern of commercial biocontrol agents formulated with species of the Trichoderma harzianum complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Fog Nielsen, Kristian; Dieckmann, Ralf; Branco-Rocha, Fabiano; Chaverri, Priscila; Samuels, Gary J; Thrane, Ulf; von Döhren, Hans; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Brückner, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The production of bioactive polypeptides (peptaibiotics) in vivo is a sophisticated adaptation strategy of both mycoparasitic and saprotrophic Trichoderma species for colonizing and defending their natural habitats. This feature is of major practical importance, as the detection of peptaibiotics in plant-protective Trichoderma species, which are successfully used against economically relevant bacterial and fungal plant pathogens, certainly contributes to a better understanding of these complex antagonistic interactions. We analyzed five commercial biocontrol agents (BCAs), namely Canna(®) , Trichosan(®) , Vitalin(®) , Promot(®) WP, and TrichoMax(®) , formulated with recently described species of the Trichoderma harzianum complex, viz. T. afroharzianum, T. simmonsii, and T. guizhouense. By using the well-established, HPLC/MS-based peptaibiomics approach, it could unequivocally be demonstrated that all of these formulations contained new and recurrent peptaibols, i.e., peptaibiotics carrying an acetylated N-terminus, the C-terminus of which is reduced to a 1,2-amino alcohol. Their chain lengths, including the amino alcohol, were 11, 14, and 18 residues, respectively. Peptaibols were also to be the dominating secondary metabolites in plate cultures of the four strains obtained from four of the Trichoderma- based BCAs, contributing 95% of the UHPLC-UV/VIS peak areas and 99% of the total ion count MS peak area from solid media. Furthermore, species-specific hydrophobins, as well as non-peptaibiotic secondary metabolites, were detected, the latter being known for their antifungal, siderophore, or plant-growth-promoting activities. Notably, none of the isolates produced low-molecular weight mycotoxins. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  8. Single-molecule magnets: a Mn25 complex with a record S = 51/2 spin for a molecular species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesu, Muralee; Habrych, Malgorzata; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Abboud, Khalil A; Christou, George

    2004-04-21

    The reaction of MnCl2.4H2O (3 equiv), pyridine-2,6-dimethanol (pdmH2) (10 equiv), and NaN3 (10 equiv) in MeOH/MeCN (1:2 v/v) with NMe4OH (1 equiv) gave [Mn25O18(OH)2(N3)12(pdm)6(pdmH)6](Cl)2.12MeCN (1.12MeCN) in approximately 30% yield. The cation of complex 1 comprises five Mnx layers of three types in an ABCBA arrangement. Fitting of variable-temperature and -field magnetization data establishes that 1 has an S = 51/2 ground state, the largest value for a molecular species. The complex also displays hysteresis loops below 0.6 K in magnetization vs applied field sweeps, establishing it as the largest spin single-molecule magnet to date.

  9. Plate tectonics and biogeographical patterns of the Pseudophoxinus (Pisces: Cypriniformes) species complex of central Anatolia, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrbek, Tomas; Stölting, Kai N; Bardakci, Fevzi; Küçük, Fahrettin; Wildekamp, Rudolf H; Meyer, Axel

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the phylogenetic relationships of Pseudophoxinus (Cyprinidae: Leuciscinae) species from central Anatolia, Turkey to test the hypothesis of geographic speciation driven by early Pliocene orogenic events. We analyzed 1141 aligned base pairs of the complete cytochrome b mitochondrial gene. Phylogenetic relationships reconstructed by maximum likelihood, Bayesian likelihood, and maximum parsimony methods are identical, and generally well supported. Species and clades are restricted to geologically well-defined units, and are deeply divergent from each other. The basal diversification of central Anatolian Pseudophoxinus is estimated to have occurred approximately 15 million years ago. Our results are in agreement with a previous study of the Anatolian fish genus Aphanius that also shows a diversification pattern driven by the Pliocene orogenic events. The distribution of clades of Aphanius and Pseudophoxinus overlap, and areas of distribution comprise the same geological units. The geological history of Anatolia is likely to have had a major impact on the diversification history of many taxa occupying central Anatolia; many of these taxa are likely to be still unrecognized as distinct. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  10. MLPA diagnostics of complex microbial communities: relative quantification of bacterial species in oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terefework, Zewdu; Pham, Chi L; Prosperi, Anja C; Entius, Mark M; Errami, Abdellatif; van Spanning, Rob J M; Zaura, Egija; Ten Cate, Jacob M; Crielaard, Wim

    2008-12-01

    A multitude of molecular methods are currently used for identification and characterization of oral biofilms or for community profiling. However, multiplex PCR techniques that are able to routinely identify several species in a single assay are not available. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) identifies up to 45 unique fragments in a single tube PCR. Here we report a novel use of MLPA in the relative quantification of targeted microorganisms in a community of oral microbiota. We designed 9 species specific probes for: Actinomyces gerencseriae, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Rothia dentocariosa, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis and Veillonella parvula; and genus specific probes for selected oral Streptococci and Lactobacilli based on their 16S rDNA sequences. MLPA analysis of DNA pooled from the strains showed the expected specific MLPA products. Relative quantification of a serial dilution of equimolar DNA showed that as little as 10 pg templates can be detected with clearly discernible signals. Moreover, a 2 to 7% divergence in relative signal ratio of amplified probes observed from normalized peak area values suggests MLPA can be a cheaper alternative to using qPCR for quantification. We observed 2 to 6 fold fluctuations in signal intensities of MLPA products in DNAs isolated from multispecies biofilms grown in various media for various culture times. Furthermore, MLPA analyses of DNA isolated from saliva obtained from different donors gave a varying number and intensity of signals. This clearly shows the usefulness of MLPA in a quantitative description of microbial shifts.

  11. Evolutionary history of tall fescue morphotypes inferred from molecular phylogenetics of the Lolium-Festuca species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Alan V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The agriculturally important pasture grass tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb. syn. Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb. Darbysh. is an outbreeding allohexaploid, that may be more accurately described as a species complex consisting of three major (Continental, Mediterranean and rhizomatous morphotypes. Observation of hybrid infertility in some crossing combinations between morphotypes suggests the possibility of independent origins from different diploid progenitors. This study aims to clarify the evolutionary relationships between each tall fescue morphotype through phylogenetic analysis using two low-copy nuclear genes (encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase [Acc1] and centroradialis [CEN], the nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (rDNA ITS and the chloroplast DNA (cpDNA genome-located matK gene. Other taxa within the closely related Lolium-Festuca species complex were also included in the study, to increase understanding of evolutionary processes in a taxonomic group characterised by multiple inter-specific hybridisation events. Results Putative homoeologous sequences from both nuclear genes were obtained from each polyploid species and compared to counterparts from 15 diploid taxa. Phylogenetic reconstruction confirmed F. pratensis and F. arundinacea var. glaucescens as probable progenitors to Continental tall fescue, and these species are also likely to be ancestral to the rhizomatous morphotype. However, these two morphotypes are sufficiently distinct to be located in separate clades based on the ITS-derived data set. All four of the generated data sets suggest independent evolution of the Mediterranean and Continental morphotypes, with minimal affinity between cognate sequence haplotypes. No obvious candidate progenitor species for Mediterranean tall fescues were identified, and only two putative sub-genome-specific haplotypes were identified for this morphotype. Conclusions This study describes the first

  12. Environmental Conditions and Threatened and Endangered Species Populations near the Titain, Atlas, and Delta Launch Complexes, Cape Canaveral Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddy, Donna M.; Stolen, Eric D.; Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Hall, Patrice; Larson, Vickie L.; Turek, Shannon R.

    1999-01-01

    Launches of Delta, Atlas, and Titan rockets from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) have potential environmental effects. These could occur from direct impacts of launches or indirectly from habitat alterations. This report summarizes a three-year study (1995-1998) characterizing the environment, with particular attention to threatened and endangered species, near Delta, Atlas, and Titan launch facilities. Cape Canaveral has been modified by Air Force development and by 50 years of fire suppression. The dominant vegetation type around the Delta and Atlas launch complexes is coastal oak hammock forest. Oak scrub is the predominant upland vegetation type near the Titan launch complexes. Compositionally, these are coastal scrub communities that has been unburned for greater than 40 years and have developed into closed canopy, low-stature forests. Herbaceous vegetation around active and inactive facilities, coastal strand and dune vegetation near the Atlantic Ocean, and exotic vegetation in disturbed areas are common. Marsh and estuarine vegetation is most common west of the Titan complexes. Launch effects to vegetation include scorch, acid, and particulate deposition. Discernable, cumulative effects are limited to small areas near the launch complexes. Water quality samples were collected at the Titan, Atlas, and Delta launch complexes in September 1995 (wet season) and January 1996 (dry season). Samples were analyzed for heavy metals, chloride, total organic carbon, calcium, iron, magnesium, sodium, total alkalinity, pH, and conductivity. Differences between fresh, brackish, and saline surface waters were evident. The natural buffering capacity of the environment surrounding the CCAS launch complexes is adequate for neutralizing acid deposition in rainfall and launch deposition. Populations of the Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens), a Federally- listed, threatened species, reside near the launch complexes. Thirty-seven to forty-one scrub-jay territories were

  13. Using mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data for disentangling population structure in complex pest species: a case study with Dermanyssus gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Lise; Buronfosse, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Among global changes induced by human activities, association of breakdown of geographical barriers and impoverishered biodiversity of agroecosystems may have a strong evolutionary impact on pest species. As a consequence of trade networks' expansion, secondary contacts between incipient species, if hybrid incompatibility is not yet reached, may result in hybrid swarms, even more when empty niches are available as usual in crop fields and farms. By providing important sources of genetic novelty for organisms to adapt in changing environments, hybridization may be strongly involved in the emergence of invasive populations. Because national and international trade networks offered multiple hybridization opportunities during the previous and current centuries, population structure of many pest species is expected to be the most intricate and its inference often blurred when using fast-evolving markers. Here we show that mito-nuclear sequence datasets may be the most helpful in disentangling successive layers of admixture in the composition of pest populations. As a model we used D. gallinae s. l., a mesostigmatid mite complex of two species primarily parasitizing birds, namely D. gallinae L1 and D. gallinae s. str. The latter is a pest species, considered invading layer farms in Brazil. The structure of the pest as represented by isolates from both wild and domestic birds, from European (with a focus on France), Australian and Brazilian farms, revealed past hybridization events and very recent contact between deeply divergent lineages. The role of wild birds in the dissemination of mites appears to be null in European and Australian farms, but not in Brazilian ones. In French farms, some recent secondary contact is obviously consecutive to trade flows. Scenarios of populations' history were established, showing five different combinations of more or less dramatic bottlenecks and founder events, nearly interspecific hybridizations and recent population mixing within D

  14. Using mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data for disentangling population structure in complex pest species: a case study with Dermanyssus gallinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Roy

    Full Text Available Among global changes induced by human activities, association of breakdown of geographical barriers and impoverishered biodiversity of agroecosystems may have a strong evolutionary impact on pest species. As a consequence of trade networks' expansion, secondary contacts between incipient species, if hybrid incompatibility is not yet reached, may result in hybrid swarms, even more when empty niches are available as usual in crop fields and farms. By providing important sources of genetic novelty for organisms to adapt in changing environments, hybridization may be strongly involved in the emergence of invasive populations. Because national and international trade networks offered multiple hybridization opportunities during the previous and current centuries, population structure of many pest species is expected to be the most intricate and its inference often blurred when using fast-evolving markers. Here we show that mito-nuclear sequence datasets may be the most helpful in disentangling successive layers of admixture in the composition of pest populations. As a model we used D. gallinae s. l., a mesostigmatid mite complex of two species primarily parasitizing birds, namely D. gallinae L1 and D. gallinae s. str. The latter is a pest species, considered invading layer farms in Brazil. The structure of the pest as represented by isolates from both wild and domestic birds, from European (with a focus on France, Australian and Brazilian farms, revealed past hybridization events and very recent contact between deeply divergent lineages. The role of wild birds in the dissemination of mites appears to be null in European and Australian farms, but not in Brazilian ones. In French farms, some recent secondary contact is obviously consecutive to trade flows. Scenarios of populations' history were established, showing five different combinations of more or less dramatic bottlenecks and founder events, nearly interspecific hybridizations and recent

  15. Astyanax hastatus Myers, 1928 (Teleostei, Characidae): A new species complex within the genus Astyanax?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Four populations of Astyanax hastatus Myers 1928 from the Guapimirim River basin (Rio de Janeiro State) were analyzed and three distinct cytotypes identified. These cytotypes presented 2n = 50 chromosomes, with 4M+8SM+10ST+28A (Cytotype A), 8M+10SM+14ST+18A (Cytotype B), 6M+8SM+4ST+32A (Cytotype C) and scanty heterochromatin, mainly located throughout pericentromeric regions of several chromosomal pairs. No homologies with the As-51 satellite DNA were observed in the three cytotypes, although all of them presented multiple 18S rDNA sites, as detected by both silver nitrate staining and FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization). The application of the term “species complex” in Astyanax is discussed from a cytotaxonomic viewpoint. PMID:21637509

  16. Morphometric analysis to discriminate between species: The case of the Megalobulimus leucostoma complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Borda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity of conchological characters had led to erroneous descriptions and the accumulation of synonyms making difficult the discrimination among species. The land snail genus Megalobulimus is an example of this problem. Megalobulimus leucostoma (Sowerby, 1835 has three subspecies which are difficult to differentiate by using the original descriptions. The aim of this paper is to discriminate among the subspecies of M. leucostoma by using morphometric and distribution analyses. Both provide substantial differences between M. l. leucostoma and M. l lacunosus that would not support the subspecies status of the former. Megalobulimus leucostoma weyrauchi fits into the great conchological variability of M. l .leucostoma; also the sympatric status between these two subspecies would not support the subspecies status of the former, and M. l. weyrauchi should be considered as part of M. l. leucostoma.

  17. Eukaryotic extracellular catalase–peroxidase from Magnaporthe grisea – Biophysical/chemical characterization of the first representative from a novel phytopathogenic KatG group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Droghetti, Enrica; Bellei, Marzia; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Pabst, Martin; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Smulevich, Giulietta; Obinger, Christian

    2012-01-01

    All phytopathogenic fungi have two catalase–peroxidase paralogues located either intracellularly (KatG1) or extracellularly (KatG2). Here, for the first time a secreted bifunctional, homodimeric catalase–peroxidase (KatG2 from the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea) has been produced heterologously with almost 100% heme occupancy and comprehensively investigated by using a broad set of methods including UV–Vis, ECD and resonance Raman spectroscopy (RR), thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry, mass spectrometry, steady-state & presteady-state spectroscopy. RR spectroscopy reveals that MagKatG2 shows a unique mixed-spin state, non-planar heme b, and a proximal histidine with pronounced imidazolate character. At pH 7.0 and 25 °C, the standard reduction potential E°′ of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple for the high-spin native protein was found to fall in the range typical for the KatG family. Binding of cyanide was relatively slow at pH 7.0 and 25 °C and with a Kd value significantly higher than for the intracellular counterpart. Demonstrated by mass spectrometry MagKatG2 has the typical Trp118-Tyr251-Met277 adduct that is essential for its predominantly catalase activity at the unique acidic pH optimum. In addition, MagKatG2 acts as a versatile peroxidase using both one- and two-electron donors. Based on these data, structure–function relationships of extracellular eukaryotic KatGs are discussed with respect to intracellular KatGs and possible role(s) in host–pathogen interaction. PMID:21971530

  18. Eukaryotic extracellular catalase-peroxidase from Magnaporthe grisea - Biophysical/chemical characterization of the first representative from a novel phytopathogenic KatG group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Droghetti, Enrica; Bellei, Marzia; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Pabst, Martin; Furtmüller, Paul G; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Smulevich, Giulietta; Obinger, Christian

    2012-03-01

    All phytopathogenic fungi have two catalase-peroxidase paralogues located either intracellularly (KatG1) or extracellularly (KatG2). Here, for the first time a secreted bifunctional, homodimeric catalase-peroxidase (KatG2 from the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea) has been produced heterologously with almost 100% heme occupancy and comprehensively investigated by using a broad set of methods including UV-Vis, ECD and resonance Raman spectroscopy (RR), thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry, mass spectrometry, steady-state & presteady-state spectroscopy. RR spectroscopy reveals that MagKatG2 shows a unique mixed-spin state, non-planar heme b, and a proximal histidine with pronounced imidazolate character. At pH 7.0 and 25 °C, the standard reduction potential E°' of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple for the high-spin native protein was found to fall in the range typical for the KatG family. Binding of cyanide was relatively slow at pH 7.0 and 25 °C and with a K(d) value significantly higher than for the intracellular counterpart. Demonstrated by mass spectrometry MagKatG2 has the typical Trp118-Tyr251-Met277 adduct that is essential for its predominantly catalase activity at the unique acidic pH optimum. In addition, MagKatG2 acts as a versatile peroxidase using both one- and two-electron donors. Based on these data, structure-function relationships of extracellular eukaryotic KatGs are discussed with respect to intracellular KatGs and possible role(s) in host-pathogen interaction.

  19. Environmental Conditions and Threatened and Endangered Species Populations near the Titan, Atlas, and Delta Launch Complexes, Cape Canaveral Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddy, Donna M.; Stolen, Eric D.; Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Hall, Patrice; Larson, Vickie L.; Turek, Shannon R.

    1999-01-01

    Launches of Delta, Atlas, and Titan rockets from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) have potential environmental effects. These could occur from direct impacts of launches or indirectly from habitat alterations. This report summarizes a three-year study (1 995-1 998) characterizing the environment, with particular attention to threatened and endangered species, near Delta, Atlas, and Titan launch facilities. Cape Canaveral has been modified by Air Force development and by 50 years of fire suppression. The dominant vegetation type around the Delta and Atlas launch complexes is coastal oak hammock forest. Oak scrub is the predominant upland vegetation type near the Titan launch complexes. Compositionally, these are coastal scrub communities that has been unburned for > 40 years and have developed into closed canopy, low-stature forests. Herbaceous vegetation around active and inactive facilities, coastal strand and dune vegetation near the Atlantic Ocean, and exotic vegetation in disturbed areas are common. Marsh and estuarine vegetation is most common west of the Titan complexes. Launch effects to vegetation include scorch, acid, and particulate deposition. Discernable, cumulative effects are limited to small areas near the launch complexes. Water quality samples were collected at the Titan, Atlas, and Delta launch complexes in September 1995 (wet season) and January 1996 (dry season). Samples were analyzed for heavy metals, chloride, total organic carbon, calcium, iron, magnesium, sodium, total alkalinity, pH, and conductivity. Differences between fresh, brackish, and saline surface waters were evident. The natural buffering capacity of the environment surrounding the CCAS launch complexes is adequate for neutralizing acid deposition in rainfall and launch deposition. Populations of the Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens), a Federally-listed, threatened species, reside near the launch complexes. Thirty-seven to forty-one scrub-jay territories were located at

  20. Anonymous nuclear markers reveal taxonomic incongruence and long-term disjunction in a cactus species complex with continental-island distribution in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Manolo F; Carstens, Bryan C; Rodrigues, Gustavo L; Moraes, Evandro M

    2016-02-01

    The Pilosocereus aurisetus complex consists of eight cactus species with a fragmented distribution associated to xeric enclaves within the Cerrado biome in eastern South America. The phylogeny of these species is incompletely resolved, and this instability complicates evolutionary analyses. Previous analyses based on both plastid and microsatellite markers suggested that this complex contained species with inherent phylogeographic structure, which was attributed to recent diversification and recurring range shifts. However, limitations of the molecular markers used in these analyses prevented some questions from being properly addressed. In order to better understand the relationship among these species and make a preliminary assessment of the genetic structure within them, we developed anonymous nuclear loci from pyrosequencing data of 40 individuals from four species in the P. aurisetus complex. The data obtained from these loci were used to identify genetic clusters within species, and to investigate the phylogenetic relationship among these inferred clusters using a species tree methodology. Coupled with a palaeodistributional modelling, our results reveal a deep phylogenetic and climatic disjunction between two geographic lineages. Our results highlight the importance of sampling more regions from the genome to gain better insights on the evolution of species with an intricate evolutionary history. The methodology used here provides a feasible approach to develop numerous genealogical molecular markers throughout the genome for non-model species. These data provide a more robust hypothesis for the relationship among the lineages of the P. aurisetus complex.

  1. Colonization of a Central Venous Catheter by the Hyaline Fungus Fusarium solani Species Complex: A Case Report and SEM Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Colombo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of opportunistic infections by filamentous fungi is increasing partly due to the widespread use of central venous catheters (CVC, indwelling medical devices, and antineoplastic/immunosuppressive drugs. The case of a 13-year-old boy under treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia is presented. The boy was readmitted to the Pediatric Ward for intermittent fever of unknown origin. Results of blood cultures drawn from peripheral venous sites or through the CVC were compared. CVC-derived bottles (but not those from peripheral veins yielded hyaline fungi that, based on morphology, were identified as belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex. Gene amplification and direct sequencing of the fungal ITS1 rRNA region and the EF-1alpha gene confirmed the isolate as belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex. Portions of the CVC were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Fungi mycelia with long protruding hyphae were seen into the lumen. The firm adhesion of the fungal formation to the inner surface of the catheter was evident. In the absence of systemic infection, catheter removal and prophylactic voriconazole therapy were followed by disappearance of febrile events and recovery. Thus, indwelling catheters are prone to contamination by environmental fungi.

  2. Sequential utilization of hosts from different fly families by genetically distinct, sympatric populations within the Entomophthora muscae species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii P Gryganskyi

    Full Text Available The fungus Entomophthora muscae (Entomophthoromycota, Entomophthorales, Entomophthoraceae is a widespread insect pathogen responsible for fatal epizootic events in many dipteran fly hosts. During epizootics in 2011 and 2012 in Durham, North Carolina, we observed a transition of fungal infections from one host, the plant-feeding fly Delia radicum, to a second host, the predatory fly Coenosia tigrina. Infections first appeared on Delia in the middle of March, but by the end of May, Coenosia comprised 100% of infected hosts. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that E. muscae in Durham comprises two distinct subpopulations (clades with several haplotypes in each. Fungi from either clade are able to infect both fly species, but vary in their infection phenologies and host-specificities. Individuals of the more phylogenetically diverse clade I predominated during the beginning of the spring epizootic, infecting mostly phytophagous Delia flies. Clade II dominated in late April and May and affected mostly predatory Coenosia flies. Analysis of population structure revealed two subpopulations within E. muscae with limited gene exchange. This study provides the first evidence of recombination and population structure within the E. muscae species complex, and illustrates the complexity of insect-fungus relationships that should be considered for development of biological control methods.

  3. The microgeographical patterns of morphological and molecular variation of a mixed ploidy population in the species complex Actinidia chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifei; Li, Dawei; Yan, Ling; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy and hybridization are thought to have significant impacts on both the evolution and diversification of the genus Actinidia, but the structure and patterns of morphology and molecular diversity relating to ploidy variation of wild Actinidia plants remain much less understood. Here, we examine the distribution of morphological variation and ploidy levels along geographic and environmental variables of a large mixed-ploidy population of the A. chinensis species complex. We then characterize the extent of both genetic and epigenetic diversity and differentiation exhibited between individuals of different ploidy levels. Our results showed that while there are three ploidy levels in this population, hexaploids were constituted the majority (70.3%). Individuals with different ploidy levels were microgeographically structured in relation to elevation and extent of niche disturbance. The morphological characters examined revealed clear difference between diploids and hexaploids, however tetraploids exhibited intermediate forms. Both genetic and epigenetic diversity were high but the differentiation among cytotypes was weak, suggesting extensive gene flow and/or shared ancestral variation occurred in this population even across ploidy levels. Epigenetic variation was clearly correlated with changes in altitudes, a trend of continuous genetic variation and gradual increase of epigenomic heterogeneities of individuals was also observed. Our results show that complex interactions between the locally microgeographical environment, ploidy and gene flow impact A. chinensis genetic and epigenetic variation. We posit that an increase in ploidy does not broaden the species habitat range, but rather permits A. chinensis adaptation to specific niches.

  4. The microgeographical patterns of morphological and molecular variation of a mixed ploidy population in the species complex Actinidia chinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Liu

    Full Text Available Polyploidy and hybridization are thought to have significant impacts on both the evolution and diversification of the genus Actinidia, but the structure and patterns of morphology and molecular diversity relating to ploidy variation of wild Actinidia plants remain much less understood. Here, we examine the distribution of morphological variation and ploidy levels along geographic and environmental variables of a large mixed-ploidy population of the A. chinensis species complex. We then characterize the extent of both genetic and epigenetic diversity and differentiation exhibited between individuals of different ploidy levels. Our results showed that while there are three ploidy levels in this population, hexaploids were constituted the majority (70.3%. Individuals with different ploidy levels were microgeographically structured in relation to elevation and extent of niche disturbance. The morphological characters examined revealed clear difference between diploids and hexaploids, however tetraploids exhibited intermediate forms. Both genetic and epigenetic diversity were high but the differentiation among cytotypes was weak, suggesting extensive gene flow and/or shared ancestral variation occurred in this population even across ploidy levels. Epigenetic variation was clearly correlated with changes in altitudes, a trend of continuous genetic variation and gradual increase of epigenomic heterogeneities of individuals was also observed. Our results show that complex interactions between the locally microgeographical environment, ploidy and gene flow impact A. chinensis genetic and epigenetic variation. We posit that an increase in ploidy does not broaden the species habitat range, but rather permits A. chinensis adaptation to specific niches.

  5. Species identification and profiling of complex microbial communities using shotgun Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Hoe Ong

    Full Text Available The high throughput and cost-effectiveness afforded by short-read sequencing technologies, in principle, enable researchers to perform 16S rRNA profiling of complex microbial communities at unprecedented depth and resolution. Existing Illumina sequencing protocols are, however, limited by the fraction of the 16S rRNA gene that is interrogated and therefore limit the resolution and quality of the profiling. To address this, we present the design of a novel protocol for shotgun Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, optimized to amplify more than 90% of sequences in the Greengenes database and with the ability to distinguish nearly twice as many species-level OTUs compared to existing protocols. Using several in silico and experimental datasets, we demonstrate that despite the presence of multiple variable and conserved regions, the resulting shotgun sequences can be used to accurately quantify the constituents of complex microbial communities. The reconstruction of a significant fraction of the 16S rRNA gene also enabled high precision (>90% in species-level identification thereby opening up potential application of this approach for clinical microbial characterization.

  6. Multilocus phylogeny of the avian family Alaudidae (larks) reveals complex morphological evolution, non-monophyletic genera and hidden species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alström, Per; Barnes, Keith N; Olsson, Urban; Barker, F Keith; Bloomer, Paulette; Khan, Aleem Ahmed; Qureshi, Masood Ahmed; Guillaumet, Alban; Crochet, Pierre-André; Ryan, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    The Alaudidae (larks) is a large family of songbirds in the superfamily Sylvioidea. Larks are cosmopolitan, although species-level diversity is by far largest in Africa, followed by Eurasia, whereas Australasia and the New World have only one species each. The present study is the first comprehensive phylogeny of the Alaudidae. It includes 83.5% of all species