WorldWideScience

Sample records for gris surface melt

  1. Atmospheric river impacts on Greenland Ice Sheet surface melt and mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, K.; Mote, T. L.

    2017-12-01

    Mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has accelerated during the early part of the 21st Century. Several episodes of widespread GrIS melt in recent years have coincided with intense poleward moisture transport by atmospheric rivers (ARs), suggesting that variability in the frequency and intensity of these events may be an important driver of the surface mass balance (SMB) of the GrIS. ARs may contribute to GrIS surface melt through the greenhouse effect of water vapor, the radiative effects of clouds, condensational latent heating within poleward-advected air masses, and the energy provided by liquid precipitation. However, ARs may also provide significant positive contributions to GrIS SMB through enhanced snow accumulation. Prior research on the role of ARs in Arctic climate has consisted of case studies of ARs associated with major GrIS melt events or examined the effects of poleward moisture flux on Arctic sea ice. In this study, a long-term (1979-2016) record of intense moisture transport events affecting Greenland is compiled using a conventional AR identification algorithm as well as a self-organizing map (SOM) classification applied to integrated water vapor transport (IVT) data from several atmospheric reanalysis datasets. An analysis of AR effects on GrIS melt and SMB is then performed with GrIS surface melt data from passive microwave satellite observations and the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR) regional climate model. Results show that meltwater production is above normal during and after AR impact days throughout the GrIS during all seasons, with surface melt enhanced most by strong (> 85th percentile IVT) and extreme (> 95th percentile IVT) ARs. This relationship holds at the seasonal scale, as the total amount of water vapor transported to the GrIS by ARs is significantly greater during above-normal melt seasons. ARs exert a more complex influence on SMB. Normal (< 85th percentile IVT) ARs generally do not have a substantial impact on

  2. Future projections of the Greenland ice sheet energy balance driving the surface melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simulations at 25 km resolution are performed over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, using the regional climate model MAR forced by four RCP scenarios from three CMIP5 global circulation models (GCMs, in order to investigate the projected changes of the surface energy balance (SEB components driving the surface melt. Analysis of 2000–2100 melt anomalies compared to melt results over 1980–1999 reveals an exponential relationship of the GrIS surface melt rate simulated by MAR to the near-surface air temperature (TAS anomalies, mainly due to the surface albedo positive feedback associated with the extension of bare ice areas in summer. On the GrIS margins, the future melt anomalies are preferentially driven by stronger sensible heat fluxes, induced by enhanced warm air advection over the ice sheet. Over the central dry snow zone, the surface albedo positive feedback induced by the increase in summer melt exceeds the negative feedback of heavier snowfall for TAS anomalies higher than 4 °C. In addition to the incoming longwave flux increase associated with the atmosphere warming, GCM-forced MAR simulations project an increase of the cloud cover decreasing the ratio of the incoming shortwave versus longwave radiation and dampening the albedo feedback. However, it should be noted that this trend in the cloud cover is contrary to that simulated by ERA-Interim–forced MAR for recent climate conditions, where the observed melt increase since the 1990s seems mainly to be a consequence of more anticyclonic atmospheric conditions. Finally, no significant change is projected in the length of the melt season, which highlights the importance of solar radiation absorbed by the ice sheet surface in the melt SEB.

  3. A characterization of Greenland Ice Sheet surface melt and runoff in contemporary reanalyses and a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eCullather

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS, large-scale melt area has increased in recent years and is detectable via remote sensing, but its relation to runoff is not known. Historical, modeled melt area and runoff from Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-Replay, the Interim Re-Analysis of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ERA-I, the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR, the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR, and the Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR are examined. These sources compare favorably with satellite-derived estimates of surface melt area for the period 2000-2012. Spatially, the models markedly disagree on the number of melt days in the interior of the southern part of the ice sheet, and on the extent of persistent melt areas in the northeastern GrIS. Temporally, the models agree on the mean seasonality of daily surface melt and on the timing of large-scale melt events in 2012. In contrast, the models disagree on the amount, seasonality, spatial distribution, and temporal variability of runoff. As compared to global reanalyses, time series from MAR indicate a lower correlation between runoff and melt area (r2 = 0.805. Runoff in MAR is much larger in the second half of the melt season for all drainage basins, while the ASR indicates larger runoff in the first half of the year. This difference in seasonality for the MAR and to an extent for the ASR provide a hysteresis in the relation between runoff and melt area, which is not found in the other models. The comparison points to a need for reliable observations of surface runoff.

  4. Disordering and Melting of Aluminum Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoltze, Per; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Landman, U.

    1988-01-01

    We report on a molecular-dynamics simulation of an Al(110) surface using the effective-medium theory to describe the interatomic interactions. The surface region is found to start melting ≅200 K below the bulk melting temperature with a gradual increase in the thickness of the disordered layer as...

  5. Greenland ice sheet surface mass-balance modelling and freshwater flux for 2007, and in a 1995-2007 perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Liston, Glen E.; Hiemstra, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    y-1); the only year with a negative GrIS SMB. Runoff in 2007 was approximately 35% greater than average for 1995-2006. From 1995 through 2007 overall, precipitation decreased while ablation increased, leading to an increased average SMB loss of 127 km3. The modelled GrIS SMB was merged with previous......-stations) were used as model inputs. The GrIS minimum surface melt extent of 29% occurred in 1996, while the greatest extent of 51% was present in 2007. The 2007 melt extent was 20% greater than the average for 1995-2006. The year 2007 had the highest GrIS surface runoff (523 km3 y-1) and the lowest SMB (-3 km3...... estimates of GrIS subglacial runoff (from geothermal melt) and GrIS calving to quantify GrIS freshwater flux to the ocean, indicating an average negative mass-balance of 265 (±83) km3 y-1. This study further suggests an average GrIS freshwater flux of approximately 786 km3 y-1 to the ocean, of which 45...

  6. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Mireles, Jose (Universidad Aut%C3%94onoma de Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez, Mexico); Marquez, Noel (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Quinones, Stella (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX)

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  7. Surface Hardening by Laser Skin Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    typical cross-sectional view of a melt region. Various solutions includina Murakami’s reaqent, Vilella’s reagent and an oxalic acid solution were used...each type selectively revealinq different microstructu- ral features. A second etch in an oxalic acid /hydrochloric acid solution was used in the...genization due to vigorous hydrothermal mixing and liquid super- heating. Computations by Greenwald (13) from a heat flow model are graphically represented

  8. Effects of surface shape on the geometry and surface topography of the melt pool in low-power density laser melting

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Youngdeuk; Kim, Wooseung

    2011-01-01

    The quantitative correlations between workpiece volume and melt pool geometry, as well as the flow and thermal features of the melt pool are established. Thermocapillary convections in melt pool with a deformable free surface are investigated

  9. El suicido de Grisóstomo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Zimic

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available El episodio amoroso de Grisóstomo y Marcela del Quijote (P Parte, capitulos XII-XIV ha inspirado ya muchas interpretaciones, algunas muy interesantes, otras desvariadas, a veces tan acaloradamente opuestas que ban herido vanidades académicas y provocado insultos, humillaciones personates y hasta pundonorosos alardes de nobleza de linaje y de ortodoxia católica. Indudablemente, en el episodio hay problemas controversiales, delicados y formulados de modo muy sutil, lo que se traduce en un texto muy complejo aun para el lector mejor preparado.

  10. Plasma carburizing with surface micro-melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanovsky, A. E.; Grechneva, M. V.; Van Huy, Vu; Ponomarev, B. B.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents carburizing the surface of 20 low carbon steel using electric arc and graphite prior. A carbon black solution was prepared with graphite powder and sodium silicate in water. A detailed analysis of the phase structure and the distribution profile of the sample hardness after plasma treatment were given. The hardened layer consists of three different zones: 1 – the cemented layer (thin white zone) on the surface, 2 – heat-affected zone (darkly etching structure), 3 – the base metal. The experimental result shows that the various microstructures and micro-hardness profiles were produced depending on the type of graphite coating (percentage of liquid glass) and processing parameters. The experiment proved that the optimum content of liquid glass in graphite coating is 50–87.5%. If the amount of liquid glass is less than 50%, adhesion to metal is insufficient. If liquid glass content is more than 87.5%, carburization of a metal surface does not occur. A mixture of the eutectic lamellar structure, martensite and austenite was obtained by using graphite prior with 67% sodium silicate and the levels of the hardness layer increased to around 1000 HV. The thickness of the cemented layer formed on the surface was around 200 μm. It is hoped that this plasma surface carburizing treatment could improve the tribological resistance properties.

  11. Self-jumping Mechanism of Melting Frost on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolin; Chen, Huawei; Zhao, Zehui; Wang, Yamei; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Deyuan

    2017-11-07

    Frost accretion on surfaces may cause severe problems and the high-efficiency defrosting methods are still urgently needed in many application fields like heat transfer, optical and electric power system, etc. In this study, a nano-needle superhydrophobic surface is prepared and the frosting/defrosting experiments are conducted on it. Three steps are found in the defrosting process: melting frost shrinking and splitting, instantaneous self-triggered deforming followed by deformation-induced movements (namely, in-situ shaking, rotating, rolling, and self-jumping). The self-jumping performance of the melting frost is extremely fascinating and worth studying due to its capability of evidently shortening the defrosting process and reducing (even avoiding) residual droplets after defrosting. The study on the melting frost self-jumping phenomena demonstrates that the kinetic energy transformed from instantaneous superficial area change in self-triggered deforming step is the intrinsic reason for various melting frost self-propelled movements, and when the transformed energy reaches a certain amount, the self-jumping phenomena occur. And some facilitating conditions for melting frost self-jumping phenomena are also discussed. This work will provide an efficient way for defrosting or an inspiration for further research on defrosting.

  12. Surface characterization and wear behaviour of laser surface melted AISI 316L stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study concerns an in depth investigation of the influence of laser surface melting of AISI 316L stainless steel using Ar and N2 as shrouding atmosphere. Laser surface melting has been carried out using a 5 kW continuous wave (CW) fibre...

  13. Self-jumping Mechanism of Melting Frost on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaolin; Chen, Huawei; Zhao, Zehui; Wang, Yamei; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Deyuan

    2017-01-01

    Frost accretion on surfaces may cause severe problems and the high-efficiency defrosting methods are still urgently needed in many application fields like heat transfer, optical and electric power system, etc. In this study, a nano-needle superhydrophobic surface is prepared and the frosting/defrosting experiments are conducted on it. Three steps are found in the defrosting process: melting frost shrinking and splitting, instantaneous self-triggered deforming followed by deformation-induced m...

  14. Development of silicon growth techniques from melt with surface heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Anatoly

    2018-05-01

    The paper contains literary and personal data on the development history of silicon-growing technology with volumetric and surface melt heating. It discusses the advantages and disadvantages of surface-heating technology. Examples are given of the implementation of such processes in the 60s-70s of the last century, and the reasons for the discontinuation of the relevant work. It describes the main solutions for the implementation of crystal growth process with the electron-beam heating of the melt surface, implemented by KEPP EU (Latvia). It discusses differences in the management of the growth process for the crystals with constant diameters compared to the Czochralski method. It lists geometrical and electro-physical properties of the obtained crystals. It describes the possible use of such crystals and the immediate challenges of technology development.

  15. Wetting of polymer melts on coated and uncoated steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Julie; Contraires, Elise; Brulez, Anne-Catherine; Larochette, Mathieu; Valette, Stéphane; Benayoun, Stéphane

    2017-07-01

    A comparative study of the wetting of three different commercial polymer melts on various coated and uncoated steel surfaces is described in this report. The wettability of steel and coatings (three different titanium nitride coatings, TiN, TiNOx, TiNOy, a chromium coating, CrN, and a diamond-like carbon coating, DLC) used for mold in polymer processing is determined at different temperatures between 25 °C and 120 °C. Contact angle measurements of melted polypropylene (PP), Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) and Polycarbonate (PC) on steel and on the different coatings were performed to investigate the wetting behavior under closer-to-processing conditions. Recommendations for good measurement conditions were proposed. Moreover, the surface free energy of each melt polymer was determined. The works of adhesion between all polymers and all substrates were established. Among all tested polymers, the lowest value of the works of adhesion is calculated for ABS and for PC thereafter, and the highest value is calculated for PP. These results will be particularly important for such applications as determining the extent to which these polymers can contribute to the replication quality in injection molding.

  16. Atmospheric summer teleconnections and Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass variations: insights from MERRA-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Schubert, Siegfried D; Molod, Andrea M; Cullather, Richard I; Zhao, Bin; Nowicki, Sophie M J; Lee, Jae N; Velicogna, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between leading atmospheric teleconnection patterns and Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) temperature, precipitation, and surface mass balance (SMB) are investigated for the last 36 summers (1979–2014) based on Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications version 2 reanalyses. The results indicate that the negative phase of both the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation, associated with warm and dry conditions for the GrIS, lead to SMB decreases within 0–1 months. Furthermore, the positive phase of the East Atlantic (EA) pattern often lags the negative NAO, reflecting a dynamical linkage between these modes that acts to further enhance the warm and dry conditions over the GrIS, leading to a favorable environment for enhanced surface mass loss. The development of a strong negative NAO in combination with a strong positive EA in recent years leads to significantly larger GrIS warming compared to when the negative NAO occurs in combination with a negative or weak positive EA (0.69 K versus 0.13 K anomaly). During 2009 and 2011, weakened (as compared to conditions during the severe surface melt cases of 2010 and 2012) local high pressure blocking produced colder northerly flow over the GrIS inhibiting warming despite the occurrence of a strong negative NAO, reflecting an important role for the EA during those years. In particular, the EA acts with the NAO to enhance warming in 2010 and 2012, and weaken high pressure blocking in 2009 and 2011. In general, high pressure blocking primarily impacts the western areas of the GrIS via advective temperature increases, while changes in net surface radiative fluxes account for both western and eastern GrIS temperature changes. (letter)

  17. Water boiling on the corium melt surface under VVER severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Khabensky, V.B.; Lopukh, D.B.; Petrov, Y.B.; Pechenkov, A.Y.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the interaction of corium melt with water supplied on its surface. The tests were conducted in the 'Rasplav-2' experimental facility. Corium melt was generated by induction melting in the cold crucible. The following data were obtained: heat transfer at boiling water-melt surface interaction, gas and aerosol release, post-interaction solidified corium structure. The corium melt charge had the following composition, mass%: 60% UO 2+x -16% ZrO 2 -15% Fe 2 O 3 -6% Cr 2 O 3 -3% Ni 2 O 3 . The melt surface temperature ranged within 1920-1970 K. (orig.)

  18. Water boiling on the corium melt surface under VVER severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the interaction between corium melt and water supplied onto its surface. The tests were conducted on the Rasplav-2' experimental facility. Induction melting in a cold crucible was used to produce the melt. The following data have been obtained: heat transfer at water boiling on the melt surface, aerosol release, structure of the post-interaction solidified corium. The corium melt had the following composition, mass %: 60%UO 2 - 16%ZrO 2 - 15%Fe 2 O 3 - 6%Cr 2 O 3 -3%Ni 2 O 3 . The melt surface temperature was 1650-1700degC. (author)

  19. Wetting and surface tension of bismate glass melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Seung-Bo; Kim, Dong-Sun; Hwang, Seongjin; Kim, Hyungsun

    2009-01-01

    Lead oxide glass frits are used widely in the electronics industry for low-temperature firing. On the other hand, one of the low-sintering and low-melting lead-free glass systems available, the bismate glass system, is considered to be an alternative to lead oxide glass. In order to extend the applications of Bi 2 O 3 glasses, this study examined the thermophysical properties of low-melting Bi 2 O 3 -B 2 O 3 -ZnO-BaO-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 glass frits with various ZnO/B 2 O 3 ratios. The fundamental thermal properties, such as glass transition temperature and softening point, were examined by differential thermal analysis and a glass softening point determination system. The wetting angles, viscosities and surface tension of the various bismate glasses on an alumina substrate were measured using hot-stage microscopy and the sessile drop method. These thermophysical properties will be helpful in understanding the work of adhesion and the liquid spread kinetics of glass frits.

  20. Effects of surface shape on the geometry and surface topography of the melt pool in low-power density laser melting

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Youngdeuk

    2011-04-15

    The quantitative correlations between workpiece volume and melt pool geometry, as well as the flow and thermal features of the melt pool are established. Thermocapillary convections in melt pool with a deformable free surface are investigated with respect to surface shape and laser intensity. When the contact angle between the tangent to the top surface and the vertical wall at the hot center is acute, the free surface flattens, compared with that of the initial free surface. Otherwise, the free surface forms a bowl-like shape with a deep crater and a low peripheral rim when the contact angle at the hot center is obtuse. Increasing the workpiece volume at a fixed laser intensity and a negative radial height gradient cause linear decreases in the geometric size and magnitude of flow and temperature of the melt pool. Conversely, linear increases are observed with a positive radial height gradient. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  1. Ion beam surface treatment: A new capability for rapid melt and resolidification of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinnett, R.W.; McIntyre, D.C.; Buchheit, R.G.; Greenly, J.B.; Thompson, M.O.

    1994-01-01

    The emerging capability to produce high average power (5--250 kW) pulsed ion beams at 0.2--2 MeV energies is enabling us to develop a new, commercial-scale thermal surface treatment technology called Ion Beam Surface Treatment (IBEST). This technique uses high energy, pulsed (≤100 ns) ion beams to directly deposit energy in the top 2--20 micrometers of the surface of any material. Depth of treatment is controllable by varying the ion energy and species. Deposition of the energy with short pulses in a thin surface layer allows melting of the layer with relatively small energies and allows rapid cooling of the melted layer by thermal diffusion into the underlying substrate. Typical cooling rates of this process (10 9 10 10 K/sec) cause rapid resolidification, resulting in production of non-equilibrium microstructures (nano-crystalline and metastable phases) that have significantly improved corrosion, wear, and hardness properties. We have conducted IBEST feasibility experiments with results confirming surface hardening, nanocrystaline grain formation, metal surface polishing, controlled melt of ceramic surfaces, and surface cleaning

  2. Snow cover as a source of technogenic pollution of surface water during the snow melting period

    OpenAIRE

    Labuzova Olga; Noskova Tatyana; Lysenko Maria; Ovcharenko Elena; Papina Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The study of pollutants in melt water of snow cover and snow disposal sites in the city of Barnaul showed that during the snow melting period the surface water is not subjected to significant technogenic impact according to a number of studied indices. The oils content is an exception: it can exceed MAC more than 20 times in river- water due to the melting of city disposal sites. Environmental damage due to an oils input into water resources during the snow melting period...

  3. Estimation of Melt Ponds over Arctic Sea Ice using MODIS Surface Reflectance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Y.; Cheng, X.; Liu, J.

    2017-12-01

    Melt ponds over Arctic sea ice is one of the main factors affecting variability of surface albedo, increasing absorption of solar radiation and further melting of snow and ice. In recent years, a large number of melt ponds have been observed during the melt season in Arctic. Moreover, some studies have suggested that late spring to mid summer melt ponds information promises to improve the prediction skill of seasonal Arctic sea ice minimum. In the study, we extract the melt pond fraction over Arctic sea ice since 2000 using three bands MODIS weekly surface reflectance data by considering the difference of spectral reflectance in ponds, ice and open water. The preliminary comparison shows our derived Arctic-wide melt ponds are in good agreement with that derived by the University of Hamburg, especially at the pond distribution. We analyze seasonal evolution, interannual variability and trend of the melt ponds, as well as the changes of onset and re-freezing. The melt pond fraction shows an asymmetrical growth and decay pattern. The observed melt ponds fraction is almost within 25% in early May and increases rapidly in June and July with a high fraction of more than 40% in the east of Greenland and Beaufort Sea. A significant increasing trend in the melt pond fraction is observed for the period of 2000-2017. The relationship between melt pond fraction and sea ice extent will be also discussed. Key Words: melt ponds, sea ice, Arctic

  4. Surface tension and density of fusible metal melt with sulphur and selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najdich, Yu.V.; Krasovskij, Yu.P.; Chuvashov, Yu.N.

    1990-01-01

    Surface tension and density at 970 K have been determined for melts of Ga, In, Sn and Pb with S and Se. High surface activity of chalcogens in the melts has been found. A maximal adsorption of the active components and their ultimate surface activity that correlate with thermodinamical strength of the corresponding sulfides and selenides have been calculated

  5. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2015-07-24

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re∼2×104–3×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  6. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Chan, Derek Y.  C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2015-01-01

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re∼2×104–3×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  7. Gradient limitation in accelerating structures imposed by surface melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Perry B

    2003-01-01

    A rough picture is beginning to emerge of the physics behind the maximum gradient that can be sustained in an accelerating structure without producing surface damage at a level sufficient to cause a measurable change in the rf properties of the structure. Field emission sites are known to trigger the formation of so-called plasma spots in regions of high dc or rf surface electric fields. A single plasma spot has a finite lifetime (∼ 20-50ns) and leaves behind a single crater. In the rf case, some fraction of the electrons emitted from the spot pick up energy from the rf field and back-bombard the area around the spot. Depending on the gradient, pulse length and available rf energy, multiple spots can form in close proximity. The combined back-bombardment power density from such a spot cluster can be sufficient to raise the surface temperature to the melting point in tens of nanoseconds over an area on the order of 100 microns in diameter. This molten area can now support a plasma capable of emitting several kiloamperes of electrons with an average energy of 50-100kV. This is sufficient beam power to collapse the field in a travelling structure in 30 ns or so. The plasma also exerts a tremendous pressure on the molten surface, sufficient to cause a macroscopic amount of material to migrate toward a region of lower surface field. Over time, this process can modify the profile of the iris tip and produce an unacceptable change in the phase shift per cell

  8. Segregation of chain ends to polymer melt surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W.; Zhao, X.; Rafailovich, M.H.; Sokolov, J.; Composto, R.J.; Smith, S.D.; Satkowski, M.; Russell, T.P.; Dozier, W.D.; Mansfield, T.

    1993-01-01

    The conformation of polymer chains in the melt near an impenetrable boundary has recently been studied by molecular dynamics and off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations. Both types of calculations show an enhancement of the chain end density within a distance of approximately two polymer segment lengths of the interface relative to the bulk. In the absence of preferential interactions between monomers and the interface, the segregation arises from minimizing the loss of conformational entropy near an impenetrable boundary; i.e., by positioning an end near the surface, only one unit rather than two is reflected. In order to obtain an experimental measure of this effect, monodisperse polystyrene (PS) chains of molecular weight 63 000 with short blocks of deuterated polystyrene (dPS) at each end were prepared. The block length was kept as short as possible, while yet producing sufficient neutron scattering contrast in order to minimize any preferential surface segregation due to isotopic effects. The synthesis was carried out via living anionic polymerization of a purified styrene monomer in cyclohexane at 60 C, utilizing sec-butyllithium as the initiator. The process was terminated using degassed methanol

  9. How much can Greenland melt? An upper bound on mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet through surface melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Bassis, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    With observations showing accelerated mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet due to surface melt, the Greenland Ice Sheet is becoming one of the most significant contributors to sea level rise. The contribution of the Greenland Ice Sheet o sea level rise is likely to accelerate in the coming decade and centuries as atmospheric temperatures continue to rise, potentially triggering ever larger surface melt rates. However, at present considerable uncertainty remains in projecting the contribution to sea level of the Greenland Ice Sheet both due to uncertainty in atmospheric forcing and the ice sheet response to climate forcing. Here we seek an upper bound on the contribution of surface melt from the Greenland to sea level rise in the coming century using a surface energy balance model coupled to an englacial model. We use IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP8.5, RCP6, RCP4.5, RCP2.6) climate scenarios from an ensemble of global climate models in our simulations to project the maximum rate of ice volume loss and related sea-level rise associated with surface melting. To estimate the upper bound, we assume the Greenland Ice Sheet is perpetually covered in thick clouds, which maximize longwave radiation to the ice sheet. We further assume that deposition of black carbon darkens the ice substantially turning it nearly black, substantially reducing its albedo. Although assuming that all melt water not stored in the snow/firn is instantaneously transported off the ice sheet increases mass loss in the short term, refreezing of retained water warms the ice and may lead to more melt in the long term. Hence we examine both assumptions and use the scenario that leads to the most surface melt by 2100. Preliminary models results suggest that under the most aggressive climate forcing, surface melt from the Greenland Ice Sheet contributes ~1 m to sea level by the year 2100. This is a significant contribution and ignores dynamic effects. We also examined a lower bound

  10. Can Nano-Particle Melt below the Melting Temperature of Its Free Surface Partner?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Xiao-Hong; Qin Shao-Jing; Wang Zong-Guo; Kang Kai; Wang Chui-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The phonon thermal contribution to the melting temperature of nano-particles is inspected. The discrete summation of phonon states and its corresponding integration form as an approximation for a nano-particle or for a bulk system have been analyzed. The discrete phonon energy levels of pure size effect and the wave-vector shifts of boundary conditions are investigated in detail. Unlike in macroscopic thermodynamics, the integration volume of zero-mode of phonon for a nano-particle is not zero, and it plays an important role in pure size effect and boundary condition effect. We find that a nano-particle will have a rising melting temperature due to purely finite size effect; a lower melting temperature bound exists for a nano-particle in various environments, and the melting temperature of a nano-particle with free boundary condition reaches this lower bound. We suggest an easy procedure to estimation the melting temperature, in which the zero-mode contribution will be excluded, and only several bulk quantities will be used as input. We would like to emphasize that the quantum effect of discrete energy levels in nano-particles, which is not present in early thermodynamic studies on finite size corrections to melting temperature in small systems, should be included in future researches. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  11. Arctic Sea Ice Basal Melt Onset Variability and Associated Ocean Surface Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, R. A.; Hutchings, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    The interannual and regional variability in Arctic sea ice melt has previously been characterized only in terms of surface melting. A focus on the variability in the onset of basal melt is additionally required to understand Arctic melt patterns. Monitoring basal melt provides a glimpse into the importance of ocean heating to sea ice melt. This warming is predominantly through seawater exposure due to lead opening and the associated solar warming at the ocean's surface. We present the temporal variability in basal melt onset observed by ice mass balance buoys throughout the Arctic Ocean since 2003, providing a different perspective than the satellite microwave data used to measure the onset of surface melt. We found that melt onset varies greatly, even for buoys deployed within 100km of each other. Therefore large volumes of data are necessary to accurately estimate the variability of basal melt onset. Once the variability of basal melt onset has been identified, we can investigate how this range has been changing as a response to atmospheric and oceanic warming, changes in ice morphology as well as the intensification of the ice albedo feedback.

  12. Water boiling on the corium melt surface under VVER severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Khabensky, V.B. [Sci. Res. Technol. Inst., Leningrad (Russian Federation); Lopukh, D.B.; Petrov, Y.B.; Pechenkov, A.Y. [St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University (SPbEU), Prof. Popov st 5/3, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2000-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the interaction of corium melt with water supplied on its surface. The tests were conducted in the 'Rasplav-2' experimental facility. Corium melt was generated by induction melting in the cold crucible. The following data were obtained: heat transfer at boiling water-melt surface interaction, gas and aerosol release, post-interaction solidified corium structure. The corium melt charge had the following composition, mass%: 60% UO{sub 2+x}-16% ZrO{sub 2}-15% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-6% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-3% Ni{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The melt surface temperature ranged within 1920-1970 K. (orig.)

  13. Water boiling on the corium melt surface under VVER severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V. [Research Institute of Technology, Sosnovy Bor (NITI) (RU)] [and others

    1999-07-01

    Experimental results are presented on the interaction between corium melt and water supplied onto its surface. The tests were conducted on the Rasplav-2' experimental facility. Induction melting in a cold crucible was used to produce the melt. The following data have been obtained: heat transfer at water boiling on the melt surface, aerosol release, structure of the post-interaction solidified corium. The corium melt had the following composition, mass %: 60%UO{sub 2}- 16%ZrO{sub 2}- 15%Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 6%Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-3%Ni{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The melt surface temperature was 1650-1700degC. (author)

  14. Model of coordination melting of crystals and anisotropy of physical and chemical properties of the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokarev, Valery P.; Krasnikov, Gennady Ya

    2018-02-01

    Based on the evaluation of the properties of crystals, such as surface energy and its anisotropy, the surface melting temperature, the anisotropy of the work function of the electron, and the anisotropy of adsorption, were shown the advantages of the model of coordination melting (MCM) in calculating the surface properties of crystals. The model of coordination melting makes it possible to calculate with an acceptable accuracy the specific surface energy of the crystals, the anisotropy of the surface energy, the habit of the natural crystals, the temperature of surface melting of the crystal, the anisotropy of the electron work function and the anisotropy of the adhesive properties of single-crystal surfaces. The advantage of our model is the simplicity of evaluating the surface properties of the crystal based on the data given in the reference literature. In this case, there is no need for a complex mathematical tool, which is used in calculations using quantum chemistry or modeling by molecular dynamics.

  15. On the role of melt flow into the surface structure and porosity development during selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Chunlei; Panwisawas, Chinnapat; Ward, Mark; Basoalto, Hector C.; Brooks, Jeffery W.; Attallah, Moataz M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the development of surface structure and porosity of Ti–6Al–4V samples fabricated by selective laser melting under different laser scanning speeds and powder layer thicknesses has been studied and correlated with the melt flow behaviour through both experimental and modelling approaches. The as-fabricated samples were investigated using optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interaction between laser beam and powder particles was studied by both high speed imaging observation and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation. It was found that at a high laser power and a fixed powder layer thickness (20 μm), the samples contain particularly low porosity when the laser scanning speeds are below 2700 mm/s. Further increase of scanning speed led to increase of porosity but not significantly. The porosity is even more sensitive to powder layer thickness with the use of thick powder layers (above 40 μm) leading to significant porosity. The increase of porosity with laser scanning speed and powder layer thickness is not inconsistent with the observed increase in surface roughness complicated by increasingly irregular-shaped laser scanned tracks and an increased number of discontinuity and cave-like pores on the top surfaces. The formation of pores and development of rough surfaces were found by both high speed imaging and modelling, to be strongly associated with unstable melt flow and splashing of molten material

  16. Microstructure and properties of high chrome steel roller after laser surface melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Meiyan, E-mail: lmy_102411@163.com [College of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, 271 Bei' er Road, Dongying 257061 (China); Wang Yong; Han Bin; Zhao Weimin; Han Tao [College of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, 271 Bei' er Road, Dongying 257061 (China)

    2009-06-15

    Laser surface melting of high chrome steels was achieved by a 5 kW continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser. The microstructure of the laser surface-melted steels was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry, and the hardness profiles were determined by a Vickers hardness tester. The corrosion behavior in 3.5% NaCl solution was studied by electrochemical corrosion equipment. The large carbides of high chrome steels are completely dissolved and ultrafine dendrites of austenite with submicroscopic M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitation are formed in the melted zone. The austenite in the melted zone has a high tempering stability. The corrosion resistance of the laser surface-melted steels is significantly improved due to the dissolution of carbides and the increase of the alloying elements in the solid solution as well as the large amount of austenite.

  17. Microstructure and properties of high chrome steel roller after laser surface melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Meiyan; Wang Yong; Han Bin; Zhao Weimin; Han Tao

    2009-01-01

    Laser surface melting of high chrome steels was achieved by a 5 kW continuous wave CO 2 laser. The microstructure of the laser surface-melted steels was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry, and the hardness profiles were determined by a Vickers hardness tester. The corrosion behavior in 3.5% NaCl solution was studied by electrochemical corrosion equipment. The large carbides of high chrome steels are completely dissolved and ultrafine dendrites of austenite with submicroscopic M 23 C 6 carbides precipitation are formed in the melted zone. The austenite in the melted zone has a high tempering stability. The corrosion resistance of the laser surface-melted steels is significantly improved due to the dissolution of carbides and the increase of the alloying elements in the solid solution as well as the large amount of austenite.

  18. Snow cover as a source of technogenic pollution of surface water during the snow melting period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labuzova Olga

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of pollutants in melt water of snow cover and snow disposal sites in the city of Barnaul showed that during the snow melting period the surface water is not subjected to significant technogenic impact according to a number of studied indices. The oils content is an exception: it can exceed MAC more than 20 times in river- water due to the melting of city disposal sites. Environmental damage due to an oils input into water resources during the snow melting period can be more than 300000 thousand rubles.

  19. Melting of the Primitive Mercurian Mantle, Insights into the Origin of Its Surface Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujibar, A.; Righter, K.; Rapp, J. F.; Ross, D. K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L. R.; Fontaine, E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings of the MESSENGER mission on Mercury have brought new evidence for its reducing nature, widespread volcanism and surface compositional heteregeneity. MESSENGER also provided major elemental ratios of its surface that can be used to infer large-scale differentiation processes and the thermal history of the planet. Mercury is known as being very reduced, with very low Fe-content and high S and alkali contents on its surface. Its bulk composition is therefore likely close to EH enstatite chondrites. In order to elucidate the origin of the chemical diversity of Mercury's surface, we determined the melting properties of EH enstatite chondrites, at pressures between 1 bar and 3 GPa and oxygen fugacity of IW-3 to IW-5, using piston-cylinder experiments, combined with a previous study on EH4 melting at 1 bar. We found that the presence of Ca-rich sulfide melts induces significant decrease of Ca-content in silicate melts at low pressure and low degree of melting (F). Also at pressures lower than 3 GPa, the SiO2-content decreases with F, while it increases at 3 GPa. This is likely due to the chemical composition of the bulk silicate which has a (Mg+Fe+Ca)/Si ratio very close to 1 and to the change from incongruent to congruent melting of enstatite. We then tested whether the various chemical compositions of Mercury's surface can result from mixing between two melting products of EH chondrites. We found that the majority of the geochemical provinces of Mercury's surface can be explained by mixing of two melts, with the exception of the High-Al plains that require an Al-rich source. Our findings indicate that Mercury's surface could have been produced by polybaric melting of a relatively primitive mantle.

  20. Effect of complex alloying of powder materials on properties of laser melted surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesker, E.I.; Gur'ev, V.A.; Elistratov, V.S.; Savchenko, A.N.

    2001-01-01

    Quality and properties of laser melted surface layers produced using self-fluxing powder mixture of Ni-Cr-B-Si system and the same powders with enhanced Fe content alloyed with Co, Ti, Nb, Mo have been investigated. Composition of powder material is determined which does not cause of defect formation under laser melting and makes possible to produce a good mechanical and tribological properties of treated surface [ru

  1. Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Temperature, Melt, and Mass Loss: 2000-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Luthcke, Scott B.; DiGirolamo, Nocolo

    2007-01-01

    Extensive melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet has been documented by a variety of ground and satellite measurements in recent years. If the well-documented warming continues in the Arctic, melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet will likely accelerate, contributing to sea-level rise. Modeling studies indicate that an annual or summer temperature rise of 1 C on the ice sheet will increase melt by 20-50% therefore, surface temperature is one of the most important ice-sheet parameters to study for analysis of changes in the mass balance of the ice-sheet. The Greenland Ice Sheet contains enough water to produce a rise in eustatic sea level of up to 7.0 m if the ice were to melt completely. However, even small changes (centimeters) in sea level would cause important economic and societal consequences in the world's major coastal cities thus it is extremely important to monitor changes in the ice-sheet surface temperature and to ultimately quantify these changes in terms of amount of sea-level rise. We have compiled a high-resolution, daily time series of surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet, using the I-km resolution, clear-sky land-surface temperature (LST) standard product from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), from 2000 - 2006. We also use Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data, averaged over 10-day periods, to measure change in mass of the ice sheet as it melt and snow accumulates. Surface temperature can be used to determine frequency of surface melt, timing of the start and the end of the melt season, and duration of melt. In conjunction with GRACE data, it can also be used to analyze timing of ice-sheet mass loss and gain.

  2. A century of variation in the dependence of Greenland iceberg calving on ice sheet surface mass balance and regional climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigg, G R; Wei, H L; Wilton, D J; Zhao, Y; Billings, S A; Hanna, E; Kadirkamanathan, V

    2014-06-08

    Iceberg calving is a major component of the total mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS). A century-long record of Greenland icebergs comes from the International Ice Patrol's record of icebergs (I48N) passing latitude 48° N, off Newfoundland. I48N exhibits strong interannual variability, with a significant increase in amplitude over recent decades. In this study, we show, through a combination of nonlinear system identification and coupled ocean-iceberg modelling, that I48N's variability is predominantly caused by fluctuation in GrIS calving discharge rather than open ocean iceberg melting. We also demonstrate that the episodic variation in iceberg discharge is strongly linked to a nonlinear combination of recent changes in the surface mass balance (SMB) of the GrIS and regional atmospheric and oceanic climate variability, on the scale of the previous 1-3 years, with the dominant causal mechanism shifting between glaciological (SMB) and climatic (ocean temperature) over time. We suggest that this is a change in whether glacial run-off or under-ice melting is dominant, respectively. We also suggest that GrIS calving discharge is episodic on at least a regional scale and has recently been increasing significantly, largely as a result of west Greenland sources.

  3. Effect of surface oxide on the melting behavior of lead-free solder nanowires and nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fan; Rajathurai, Karunaharan; Cui, Qingzhou; Zhou, Guangwen; NkengforAcha, Irene; Gu Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    Lead-free nanosolders have shown promise in nanowire and nanoelectronics assembly. Among various important parameters, melting is the most fundamental property affecting the assembly process. Here we report that the melting behavior of tin and tin/silver nanowires and nanorods can be significantly affected by the surface oxide of nanosolders. By controlling the nanosolder reflow atmosphere using a flux, the surface oxide of the nanowires/nanorods can be effectively removed and complete nanosolder melting can be achieved. The complete melting of the nanosolders leads to the formation of nanoscale to microscale spherical solder balls, followed by Ostwald ripening phenomenon. The contact angle of the microscale solder balls formed on Si substrate was measured by direct electron microscopic imaging. These results provide new insights into micro- and nanoscale phase transition and liquid droplet coalescence from nanowires/nanorods to spheroids, and are relevant to nanoscale assembly and smaller ball grid array formation.

  4. Sediment plume response to surface melting and supraglacial lake drainages on the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Vena W.; Smith, Laurence C; Rennermalm, Asa K.

    2009-01-01

    ) supraglacial lake drainage events from MODIS. Results confirm that the origin of the sediment plume is meltwater release from the ice sheet. Interannual variations in plume area reflect interannual variations in surface melting. Plumes appear almost immediately with seasonal surface-melt onset, provided...... the estuary is free of landfast sea ice. A seasonal hysteresis between melt extent and plume area suggests late-season exhaustion in sediment supply. Analysis of plume sensitivity to supraglacial events is less conclusive, with 69% of melt pulses and 38% of lake drainage events triggering an increase in plume...... area. We conclude that remote sensing of sediment plume behavior offers a novel tool for detecting the presence, timing and interannual variability of meltwater release from the ice sheet....

  5. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of pulsed laser surface melted AISI D2 cold work tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasavol, N.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Ganjali, M.; Alidokht, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    D2 cold work tool steel (CWTS) was subjected to pulse laser surface melting (PLSM) at constant frequency of 20 Hz Nd: YAG laser with different energies, scanning rate and pulse durations radiated to the surface. Characterizing the PLSM, with optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction and surface hardness mapping technique was used to evaluate the microhardness and mechanical behavior of different regions of melting pool. Increasing laser energy and reducing the laser scanning rate results in deeper melt pool formation. Moreover, PLSM has led to entirely dissolution of the carbides and re-solidification of cellular/dendritic structure of a fine scale surrounded by a continuous interdendritic network. This caused an increase in surface microhardness, 2-4 times over that of the base metal.

  6. Sum-frequency spectroscopic studies: I. Surface melting of ice, II. Surface alignment of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Xing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Surface vibrational spectroscopy via infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) has been established as a useful tool to study the structures of different kinds of surfaces and interfaces. This technique was used to study the (0001) face of hexagonal ice (Ih). SFG spectra in the O-H stretch frequency range were obtained at various sample temperatures. For the vapor(air)/ice interface, the degree of orientational order of the dangling OH bonds at the surface was measured as a function of temperature. Disordering sets in around 200 K and increases dramatically with temperature, which is strong evidence of surface melting of ice. For the other ice interfaces (silica/OTS/ice and silica/ice), a similar temperature dependence of the hydrogen bonded OH stretch peak was observed; the free OH stretch mode, however, appears to be different from that of the vapor (air)/ice interface due to interactions at the interfaces. The technique was also used to measure the orientational distributions of the polymer chains on a rubbed polyvinyl alcohol surface. Results show that the polymer chains at the surface appear to be well aligned by rubbing, and the adsorbed liquid crystal molecules are aligned, in turn, by the surface polymer chains. A strong correlation exists between the orientational distributions of the polymer chains and the liquid crystal molecules, indicating that the surface-induced bulk alignment of a liquid crystal film by rubbed polymer surfaces is via an orientational epitaxy-like mechanism. This thesis also contains studies on some related issues that are crucial to the above applications. An experiment was designed to measure SFG spectra in both reflection and transmission. The result confirms that SFG in reflection is generally dominated by the surface contribution. Another issue is the motional effect due to fast orientational motion of molecules at a surface or interface. Calculations show that the effect is significant if the molecular orientation varies

  7. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  8. Effects of Humidity and Surfaces on the Melt Crystallization of Ibuprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il Won Kim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Melt crystallization of ibuprofen was studied to understand the effects of humidity and surfaces. The molecular self-assembly during the amorphous-to-crystal transformation was examined in terms of the nucleation and growth of the crystals. The crystallization was on Al, Au, and self-assembled monolayers with –CH3, –OH, and –COOH functional groups. Effects of the humidity were studied at room temperature (18–20 °C with relative humidity 33%, 75%, and 100%. Effects of the surfaces were observed at −20 °C (relative humidity 36% to enable close monitoring with slower crystal growth. The nucleation time of ibuprofen was faster at high humidity conditions probably due to the local formation of the unfavorable ibuprofen melt/water interface. The crystal morphologies of ibuprofen were governed by the nature of the surfaces, and they could be associated with the growth kinetics by the Avrami equation. The current study demonstrated the effective control of the melt crystallization of ibuprofen through the melt/atmosphere and melt/surface interfaces.

  9. Effects of humidity and surfaces on the melt crystallization of ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Joo; Lee, Suyang; Kim, Il Won

    2012-01-01

    Melt crystallization of ibuprofen was studied to understand the effects of humidity and surfaces. The molecular self-assembly during the amorphous-to-crystal transformation was examined in terms of the nucleation and growth of the crystals. The crystallization was on Al, Au, and self-assembled monolayers with -CH(3), -OH, and -COOH functional groups. Effects of the humidity were studied at room temperature (18-20 °C) with relative humidity 33%, 75%, and 100%. Effects of the surfaces were observed at -20 °C (relative humidity 36%) to enable close monitoring with slower crystal growth. The nucleation time of ibuprofen was faster at high humidity conditions probably due to the local formation of the unfavorable ibuprofen melt/water interface. The crystal morphologies of ibuprofen were governed by the nature of the surfaces, and they could be associated with the growth kinetics by the Avrami equation. The current study demonstrated the effective control of the melt crystallization of ibuprofen through the melt/atmosphere and melt/surface interfaces.

  10. Observation of melt surface depressions during electron beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    2000-08-01

    Depths of depressed surface of liquid gadolinium, cerium and copper during electron beam evaporation were measured by triangulation method using a CCD camera. The depression depths estimated from the balance of the vapor pressure and the hydrostatic pressure at the evaporation surface agreed with the measured values. The periodic fluctuation of atomic beam was observed when the depression of 3∼4 mm in depth was formed at the evaporation spot. (author)

  11. Contact Angles and Surface Tension of Germanium-Silicon Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croell, A.; Kaiser, N.; Cobb, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Precise knowledge of material parameters is more and more important for improving crystal growth processes. Two important parameters are the contact (wetting) angle and the surface tension, determining meniscus shapes and surface-tension driven flows in a variety of methods (Czochralski, EFG, floating-zone, detached Bridgman growth). The sessile drop technique allows the measurement of both parameters simultaneously and has been used to measure the contact angles and the surface tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.3) alloys on various substrate materials. Fused quartz, Sapphire, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, carbon-based aerogel, pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN), AIN, Si3N4, and polycrystalline CVD diamond were used as substrate materials. In addition, the effect of different cleaning procedures and surface treatments on the wetting behavior were investigated. Measurements were performed both under dynamic vacuum and gas atmospheres (argon or forming gas), with temperatures up to 1100 C. In some experiments, the sample was processed for longer times, up to a week, to investigate any changes of the contact angle and/or surface tension due to slow reactions with the substrate. For pure Ge, stable contact angles were found for carbon-based substrates and for pBN, for Ge(1-x)Si(x) only for pBN. The highest wetting angles were found for pBN substrates with angles around 170deg. For the surface tension of Ge, the most reliable values resulted in gamma(T) = (591- 0.077 (T-T(sub m)) 10(exp -3)N/m. The temperature dependence of the surface tension showed similar values for Ge(1-x)Si(x), around -0.08 x 10(exp -3)N/m K, and a compositional dependence of 2.2 x 10(exp -3)N/m at%Si.

  12. Surface tension and density of Si-Ge melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Enrica; Amore, Stefano; Giuranno, Donatella; Novakovic, Rada; Tuissi, Ausonio; Sobczak, Natalia; Nowak, Rafal; Korpala, Bartłomiej; Bruzda, Grzegorz

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the surface tension and density of Si-Ge liquid alloys were determined by the pendant drop method. Over the range of measurements, both properties show a linear temperature dependence and a nonlinear concentration dependence. Indeed, the density decreases with increasing silicon content exhibiting positive deviation from ideality, while the surface tension increases and deviates negatively with respect to the ideal solution model. Taking into account the Si-Ge phase diagram, a simple lens type, the surface tension behavior of the Si-Ge liquid alloys was analyzed in the framework of the Quasi-Chemical Approximation for the Regular Solutions model. The new experimental results were compared with a few data available in the literature, obtained by the containerless method.

  13. The Origin of the Compositional Diversity of Mercury's Surface Constrained From Experimental Melting of Enstatite Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujibar, A.; Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.

    2015-01-01

    Mercury is known as an endmember planet as it is the most reduced terrestrial planet with the highest core/mantle ratio. MESSENGER spacecraft has shown that its surface is FeO-poor (2-4 wt%) and Srich (up to 6-7 wt%), which confirms the reducing nature of its silicate mantle. Moreover, high resolution images revealed large volcanic plains and abundant pyroclastic deposits, suggesting important melting stages of the Mercurian mantle. This interpretation was confirmed by the high crustal thickness (up to 100 km) derived from Mercury's gravity field. This is also corroborated by a recent experimental result that showed that Mercurian partial melts are expected to be highly buoyant within the Mercurian mantle and could have risen from depths as high as the core-mantle boundary. In addition MESSENGER spacecraft provided relatively precise data on major elemental compositions of Mercury's surface. These results revealed important chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities that suggested several stages of differentiation and re-melting processes. However, the extent and nature of compositional variations produced by partial melting remains poorly constrained for the particular compositions of Mercury (very reducing conditions, low FeO-contents and high sulfur-contents). Therefore, in this study, we investigated the processes that lead to the various compositions of Mercury's surface. Melting experiments with bulk Mercury-analogue compositions were performed and compared to the compositions measured by MESSENGER.

  14. Surface melting technique of small diameter stainless steel pipe by means of yttrium aluminium garnet laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katahira, Fujito; Hirano, Kenji; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Kazuo; Kuribayashi, Munetaka; Umemoto, Tadahiro

    1994-01-01

    A new method of surface melting by using a high power yttrium aluminium garnet laser was developed. This method is applicable to a long distance and narrow space, because of the good accessibility of the laser beam through optical fibre.A desensitization of sensitized type 304 stainless steel pipe was demonstrated by using this technique. A melted layer of thickness approximately 200μm had a very finite solidification structure, which contained approximately 1.5% δ-ferrite. The average chemical composition of this layer was almost the same as that of type 304 stainless steel, and a band of 300μm thickness under the melted layer underwent solution heat treatment (SHT).As a result of such surface melting, the melted layer exhibited superior resistance to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Since the SHT layer is highly resistant to IGSCC generally, it may be possible to improve the IGSCC resistance of base metal to a comparatively deep extent (500μm from the surface) by this technique. ((orig.))

  15. Surface melting technique of small diameter stainless steel pipe by means of yttrium aluminium garnet laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katahira, Fujito (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakahara-Cho, Isogo-Ku, Yokohama 235 (Japan)); Hirano, Kenji (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakahara-Cho, Isogo-Ku, Yokohama 235 (Japan)); Tanaka, Yasuhiro (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakahara-Cho, Isogo-Ku, Yokohama 235 (Japan)); Yoshida, Kazuo (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakahara-Cho, Isogo-Ku, Yokohama 235 (Japan)); Kuribayashi, Munetaka (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakahara-Cho, Isogo-Ku, Yokohama 235 (Japan)); Umemoto, Tadahiro (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakahara-Cho, Isogo-Ku, Yokohama 235 (Japan))

    1994-12-01

    A new method of surface melting by using a high power yttrium aluminium garnet laser was developed. This method is applicable to a long distance and narrow space, because of the good accessibility of the laser beam through optical fibre.A desensitization of sensitized type 304 stainless steel pipe was demonstrated by using this technique. A melted layer of thickness approximately 200[mu]m had a very finite solidification structure, which contained approximately 1.5% [delta]-ferrite. The average chemical composition of this layer was almost the same as that of type 304 stainless steel, and a band of 300[mu]m thickness under the melted layer underwent solution heat treatment (SHT).As a result of such surface melting, the melted layer exhibited superior resistance to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Since the SHT layer is highly resistant to IGSCC generally, it may be possible to improve the IGSCC resistance of base metal to a comparatively deep extent (500[mu]m from the surface) by this technique. ((orig.))

  16. Analysis and optimisation of vertical surface roughness in micro selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abele, Eberhard; Kniepkamp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Surface roughness is a major disadvantage of many additive manufacturing technologies like selective laser melting (SLM) compared to established processes like milling or drilling. With recent advancements the resolution of the SLM process could be increased to layer heights of less than 10 μm leading to a new process called micro selective laser melting (μSLM). The purpose of this paper is to analyze the influence of the μSLM process parameters and exposure strategies on the morphology of vertical surfaces. Contour scanning using varying process parameters was used to increase the surface quality. It is shown that it is possible to achieve average surface roughness of less than 1.7 μm using low scan speeds compared to 8–10 μm without contour scanning. Furthermore it is shown that a contour exposure prior to the core exposure leads to surface defects and thus increased roughness. (paper)

  17. Multiscale radar mapping of surface melt over mountain glaciers in High Mountain Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, N.; McDonald, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    Glacier melt dominates input for many hydrologic systems in the Himalayan Hindukush region that feed rivers that are critical for downstream ecosystems and hydropower generation in this highly populated area. Deviation in seasonal surface melt timing and duration with a changing climate has the potential to affect up to a billion people on the Indian Subcontinent. Satellite-borne microwave remote sensing has unique capabilities that allow monitoring of numerous landscape processes associated with snowmelt and freeze/thaw state, without many of the limitations in optical-infrared sensors such as solar illumination or atmospheric conditions. The onset of regional freeze/thaw and surface melting transitions determine important surface hydrologic variables like river discharge. Theses regional events are abrupt therefore difficult to observe with low-frequency observation sensors. Recently launched synthetic aperture radar (SAR) onboard the Sentinel-1 A and B satellites from the European Space Agency (ESA) provide wide-swath and high spatial resolution (50-100 m) C-Band SAR observations with observations frequencies not previously available, on the order of 8 to 16 days. The Sentinel SARs provide unique opportunity to study freeze/thaw and mountain glacier melt dynamics at process level scales, spatial and temporal. The melt process of individual glaciers, being fully resolved by imaging radar, will inform on the radiometric scattering physics associated with surface hydrology during the transition from melted to thawed state and during refreeze. Backscatter observations, along with structural information about the surface will be compared with complimentary coarse spatial resolution C-Band radar scatterometers, Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT Met Op A+B), to understand the sub-pixel contribution of surface melting and freeze/thaw signals. This information will inform on longer-scale records of backscatter from ASCAT, 2006-2017. We present a comparison of polarimetric C

  18. Influence of repetitive pulsed laser irradiation on the surface characteristics of an aluminum alloy in the melting regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Ho; Jhang, Kyung Young

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of repetitive near-infrared (NIR) pulsed laser shots in the melting regime on the surface characteristics of an aluminum 6061-T6 alloy. Characteristics of interest include surface morphology, surface roughness, and surface hardness in the melted zone as well as the size of the melted zone. For this study, the proper pulse energy for inducing surface melting at one shot is selected using numerical simulations that calculate the variation in temperature at the laser beam spot for various input pulse energies in order to find the proper pulse energy for raising the temperature to the melting point. In this study, 130 mJ was selected as the input energy for a Nd:YAG laser pulse with a duration of 5 ns. The size of the melted zone measured using optical microscopy (OM) increased logarithmically with an increasing shot number. The surface morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) clearly showed a re-solidified microstructure evolution after surface melting. The surface roughness and hardness were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nano-indentation, respectively. The surface roughness showed almost no variation due to the surface texturing after laser shots over 10. The hardness inside the melted zone was lower than that outside the zone because the β'' phase was transformed to a β phase or dissolved into a matrix.

  19. Modelling of the isothermal replication of surface microstructures in polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Eriksson, Torbjörn Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    boundary condition. This allows an investigation of the effect of the rheological properties of the polymer melt on the ability of the material to fill small structures in a mould surface. Series of isothermal compression moulding experiments were performed with a polycarbonate (PC) and a polystyrene (PS...

  20. Surface Quality Research for Selective Laser Melting of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Król M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the innovative technology of producing the components is Selective Laser Melting (SLM belongs to additive manufacturing techniques. SLM technology has already been successfully applied in the automotive, aerospace and medical industries. Despite progress in material flexibility and mechanical performances, relatively poor surface finish still presents a significant weakness in the SLM process.

  1. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of pulsed laser surface melted AISI D2 cold work tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasavol, N.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Ganjali, M.; Alidokht, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Melted zone contained fine dendrites in the bottom and equiaxed grains on the top. ► Microstructural refinements of PLSM led to microhardness enhancement. ► Higher scanning rate and lower laser energy were more effective to refine the microstructure. - Abstract: D2 cold work tool steel (CWTS) was subjected to pulse laser surface melting (PLSM) at constant frequency of 20 Hz Nd: YAG laser with different energies, scanning rate and pulse durations radiated to the surface. Characterizing the PLSM, with optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction and surface hardness mapping technique was used to evaluate the microhardness and mechanical behavior of different regions of melting pool. Increasing laser energy and reducing the laser scanning rate results in deeper melt pool formation. Moreover, PLSM has led to entirely dissolution of the carbides and re-solidification of cellular/dendritic structure of a fine scale surrounded by a continuous interdendritic network. This caused an increase in surface microhardness, 2–4 times over that of the base metal.

  2. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of pulsed laser surface melted AISI D2 cold work tool steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasavol, N. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, M. [Materials and Energy Research Center, P.O. Box 14155-4777, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alidokht, S.A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melted zone contained fine dendrites in the bottom and equiaxed grains on the top. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural refinements of PLSM led to microhardness enhancement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher scanning rate and lower laser energy were more effective to refine the microstructure. - Abstract: D2 cold work tool steel (CWTS) was subjected to pulse laser surface melting (PLSM) at constant frequency of 20 Hz Nd: YAG laser with different energies, scanning rate and pulse durations radiated to the surface. Characterizing the PLSM, with optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction and surface hardness mapping technique was used to evaluate the microhardness and mechanical behavior of different regions of melting pool. Increasing laser energy and reducing the laser scanning rate results in deeper melt pool formation. Moreover, PLSM has led to entirely dissolution of the carbides and re-solidification of cellular/dendritic structure of a fine scale surrounded by a continuous interdendritic network. This caused an increase in surface microhardness, 2-4 times over that of the base metal.

  3. Experimental and theoretical evidence for bilayer-by-bilayer surface melting of crystalline ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez, M. Alejandra; Kling, Tanja; Ishiyama, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    , and its nature, we investigate the surface melting of hexagonal ice by combining noncontact, surfacespecific vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and spectra calculated from molecular dynamics simulations. Using SFG, we probe the outermost water layers of distinct single crystalline ice...

  4. Surface energy balance of seasonal snow cover for snow-melt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study describes time series analysis of snow-melt, radiation data and energy balance for a seasonal snow cover at Dhundi field station of SASE, which lies in Pir Panjal range of the. N–W Himalaya, for a winter season from 13 January to 12 April 2005. The analysis shows that mean snow surface temperature remains ...

  5. Kinetics of final stages of spreading of melts on solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlynov, V.V.; Pastukhov, B.A.; Bokser, Eh.L.

    1978-01-01

    Kinetics of the spreading of Fe, Ni and Co melts over the surface of W-Re alloy (27% Re) was studied at 1580, 1500 and 1540 deg C, respectively. The time variant wetting spot radius and wetting angle were recorded using a modified Langmuir's method. Kinetic equations of the propagation of liquid interfacial layer and of the wetting, satisfactorily describing the obtained experimental data, have been derived. The melts have been found to spread by viscous flow and by migration atoms in small regions adjacent to the wetting perimeter

  6. Pulsed melting of silicon (111) and (100) surfaces simulated by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, F.F.; Broughton, J.Q.

    1986-01-01

    The pulsed heating of Si (100) and (111) surfaces has been simulated by molecular dynamics. The (111) crystal-melt interface propagates by layer-by-layer growth whereas the (100) interface grows in a continuous fashion. The equilibrium crystal-melt interface is sharp for the (111) orientation and broad for the (100) orientation. These simulations are the first use of nonpairwise potentials to study interfaces between condensed phases, and the results support models of interfaces which heretofore had to be deduced from indirect experimental information

  7. Quantifying the surface energy fluxes in South Greenland during the 2012 high melt episodes using in-situ observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Fausto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two high melt episodes occurred on the Greenland ice sheet in July 2012, during which nearly the entire ice sheet surface experienced melting. Observations from an automatic weather station (AWS in the lower ablation area in South Greenland reveal the largest daily melt rates (up to 28 cm d-1 ice equivalent ever recorded on the ice sheet. The two melt episodes lasted 6 days, equivalent to 6% of the June-August melt period, but contributed 14 % to the total annual ablation of 8.5 m ice equivalent. We employ a surface energy balance model driven by AWS data to quantify the relative importance of the energy budget components contributing to melt through the melt season. During the days with largest daily melt rates, surface turbulent heat input peaked at 552 Wm-2, 77 % of the surface melt energy, which is otherwise typically dominated by absorbed solar radiation. We find that rain contributed ca. 7 % to melt during these episodes.

  8. Simulation of the Greenland Ice Sheet over two glacial–interglacial cycles: investigating a sub-ice-shelf melt parameterization and relative sea level forcing in an ice-sheet–ice-shelf model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Bradley

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Observational evidence, including offshore moraines and sediment cores, confirm that at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS expanded to a significantly larger spatial extent than seen at present, grounding into Baffin Bay and out onto the continental shelf break. Given this larger spatial extent and its close proximity to the neighbouring Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS and Innuitian Ice Sheet (IIS, it is likely these ice sheets will have had a strong non-local influence on the spatial and temporal behaviour of the GrIS. Most previous paleo ice-sheet modelling simulations recreated an ice sheet that either did not extend out onto the continental shelf or utilized a simplified marine ice parameterization which did not fully include the effect of ice shelves or neglected the sensitivity of the GrIS to this non-local bedrock signal from the surrounding ice sheets. In this paper, we investigated the evolution of the GrIS over the two most recent glacial–interglacial cycles (240 ka BP to the present day using the ice-sheet–ice-shelf model IMAU-ICE. We investigated the solid earth influence of the LIS and IIS via an offline relative sea level (RSL forcing generated by a glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA model. The RSL forcing governed the spatial and temporal pattern of sub-ice-shelf melting via changes in the water depth below the ice shelves. In the ensemble of simulations, at the glacial maximums, the GrIS coalesced with the IIS to the north and expanded to the continental shelf break to the southwest but remained too restricted to the northeast. In terms of the global mean sea level contribution, at the Last Interglacial (LIG and LGM the ice sheet added 1.46 and −2.59 m, respectively. This LGM contribution by the GrIS is considerably higher (∼  1.26 m than most previous studies whereas the contribution to the LIG highstand is lower (∼  0.7 m. The spatial and temporal behaviour of the northern margin was

  9. Estimating the Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance contribution to future sea level rise using the regional atmospheric climate model MAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Fettweis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the sea level rise (SLR originating from changes in surface mass balance (SMB of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS, we present 21st century climate projections obtained with the regional climate model MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional, forced by output of three CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 general circulation models (GCMs. Our results indicate that in a warmer climate, mass gain from increased winter snowfall over the GrIS does not compensate mass loss through increased meltwater run-off in summer. Despite the large spread in the projected near-surface warming, all the MAR projections show similar non-linear increase of GrIS surface melt volume because no change is projected in the general atmospheric circulation over Greenland. By coarsely estimating the GrIS SMB changes from GCM output, we show that the uncertainty from the GCM-based forcing represents about half of the projected SMB changes. In 2100, the CMIP5 ensemble mean projects a GrIS SMB decrease equivalent to a mean SLR of +4 ± 2 cm and +9 ± 4 cm for the RCP (Representative Concentration Pathways 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios respectively. These estimates do not consider the positive melt–elevation feedback, although sensitivity experiments using perturbed ice sheet topographies consistent with the projected SMB changes demonstrate that this is a significant feedback, and highlight the importance of coupling regional climate models to an ice sheet model. Such a coupling will allow the assessment of future response of both surface processes and ice-dynamic changes to rising temperatures, as well as their mutual feedbacks.

  10. Modelling the climate and surface mass balance of polar ice sheets using RACMO2 - Part 1: Greenland (1958-2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Brice; van de Berg, Willem Jan; Melchior van Wessem, J.; van Meijgaard, Erik; van As, Dirk; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Lhermitte, Stef; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Smeets, C. J. P. Paul; van Ulft, Lambertus H.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2018-03-01

    We evaluate modelled Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) near-surface climate, surface energy balance (SEB) and surface mass balance (SMB) from the updated regional climate model RACMO2 (1958-2016). The new model version, referred to as RACMO2.3p2, incorporates updated glacier outlines, topography and ice albedo fields. Parameters in the cloud scheme governing the conversion of cloud condensate into precipitation have been tuned to correct inland snowfall underestimation: snow properties are modified to reduce drifting snow and melt production in the ice sheet percolation zone. The ice albedo prescribed in the updated model is lower at the ice sheet margins, increasing ice melt locally. RACMO2.3p2 shows good agreement compared to in situ meteorological data and point SEB/SMB measurements, and better resolves the spatial patterns and temporal variability of SMB compared with the previous model version, notably in the north-east, south-east and along the K-transect in south-western Greenland. This new model version provides updated, high-resolution gridded fields of the GrIS present-day climate and SMB, and will be used for projections of the GrIS climate and SMB in response to a future climate scenario in a forthcoming study.

  11. Wear characterization of a tool steel surface modified by melting and gaseous alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Hot forging dies are subjected to laborious service conditions and so there is a need to explore means of improving die life to increase productivity and quality of forgings. Surface modification in order to produce wear resistant surface is an attractive method as it precludes the need to use expensive and highly alloyed steels. In this study, a novel, inexpensive surface modification technique is used to improve the tri biological properties of an H13 tool steel. Surface melting was achieved using a tungsten heat source and gaseous alloying produced under a shield of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide-argon mixture and nitrogen gases. The change in wear behaviour was compared through micro-hardness indentation measurements and using a dry sliding pin-on-plate wear testing machine. This study shows superior wear behaviour of the modified surfaces when compared to the untreated surfaces. The increase in wear resistance is attributed to the formation of carbides when surfaces are melted under a carbon dioxide shield. However, in the case of nitrogen and argon gaseous alloying, an increase in wear resistance can be attributed to an increase in surface hardness which in turn effects surface deformation behaviour. (author)

  12. The Impact Of Snow Melt On Surface Runoff Of Sava River In Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, A.; Brilly, M.; Vidmar, A.; Kobold, M.

    2009-04-01

    Snow is a type of precipitation in the form of crystalline water ice, consisting of a multitude of snowflakes that fall from clouds. Snow remains on the ground until it melts or sublimates. Spring snow melt is a major source of water supply to areas in temperate zones near mountains that catch and hold winter snow, especially those with a prolonged dry summer. In such places, water equivalent is of great interest to water managers wishing to predict spring runoff and the water supply of cities downstream. In temperate zone like in Slovenia the snow melts in the spring and contributes certain amount of water to surface flow. This amount of water can be great and can cause serious floods in case of fast snow melt. For this reason we tried to determine the influence of snow melt on the largest river basin in Slovenia - Sava River basin, on surface runoff. We would like to find out if snow melt in Slovenian Alps can cause spring floods and how serious it can be. First of all we studied the caracteristics of Sava River basin - geology, hydrology, clima, relief and snow conditions in details for each subbasin. Furtermore we focused on snow and described the snow phenomenom in Slovenia, detailed on Sava River basin. We collected all available data on snow - snow water equivalent and snow depth. Snow water equivalent is a much more useful measurement to hydrologists than snow depth, as the density of cool freshly fallen snow widely varies. New snow commonly has a density of between 5% and 15% of water. But unfortunately there is not a lot of available data of SWE available for Slovenia. Later on we compared the data of snow depth and river runoff for some of the 40 winter seasons. Finally we analyzed the use of satellite images for Slovenia to determine the snow cover for hydrology reason. We concluded that snow melt in Slovenia does not have a greater influence on Sava River flow. The snow cover in Alps can melt fast due to higher temperatures but the water distributes

  13. Corrosion behaviour of laser surface melted magnesium alloy AZ91D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taltavull, C.; Torres, B.; Lopez, A.J.; Rodrigo, P.; Otero, E.; Atrens, A.; Rams, J.

    2014-01-01

    A high power diode laser (HPDL) was used to produce laser surface melting (LSM) treatments on the surface of the Mg alloy AZ91D. Different treatments with different microstructures were produced by varying the laser-beam power and laser-scanning speed. Corrosion evaluation, using hydrogen evolution and electrochemical measurements, led to a relationship between microstructure and corrosion. Most corrosion rates for LSM treated specimens were within the scatter of the as-received AZ91D, whereas some treatments gave higher corrosion rates and some of the samples had corrosion rates lower than the average of the corrosion rate for AZ91D. There were differences in corroded surface morphology. Nevertheless laser treatments introduced surface discontinuities, which masked the effect of the microstructure. Removing these surface defects decreased the corrosion rate for the laser-treated samples. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior of AZ91D Mg alloys is intimately related with its microstructure. • Laser surface melting treatments allows surface modification of the microstructure. • Different laser parameters can achieve different microstructures. • Controlling laser parameters can produce different corrosion rates and morphologies. • Increase of surface roughness due to laser treatment is relevant to the corrosion rate

  14. Onset and end of the summer melt season over sea ice: thermal structure and surface energy perspective from SHEBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, P.O.G. [University of Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), Boulder, CO (United States); National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth Systems Research Laboratory, Physical Sciences Division (NOAA/ESRL/PSD), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Various measurements from the Surface Heat Flux of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment have been combined to study structures and processes producing the onset and end of summer melt over Arctic sea ice. The analysis links the surface energy budget to free-troposphere synoptic variables, clouds, precipitation, and in-ice temperatures. The key results are (1) SHEBA melt-season transitions are associated with atmospheric synoptic events (2) onset of melt clearly occurs on May 28, while the end of melt is produced by a sequence of three atmospheric storm events over a 28-day period producing step-like reductions in the net surface energy flux. The last one occurs on August 22.; (3) melt onset is primarily due to large increases in the downwelling longwave radiation and modest decreases in the surface albedo; (4) decreases in the downwelling longwave radiation occur for all end-of-melt transition steps, while increases in surface albedo occur for the first two; (5) decreases in downwelling shortwave radiation contribute only to the first end-of-melt transition step; (6) springtime free-tropospheric warming preconditions the atmosphere-ice system for the subsequent melt onset; and (7) melt-season transitions also mark transitions in system responses to radiative energy flux changes because of invariant melt-season surface temperatures. The extensive SHEBA observations enable an understanding of the complex processes not available from other field program data. The analysis provides a basis for future testing of the generality of the results, and contributes to better physical understanding of multi-year analyses of melt-season trends from less extensive data sets. (orig.)

  15. The surface quasiliquid melt acceleration and the role of thermodynamic phase in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, Bryan F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We show that melt acceleration in the thermal decomposition of crystalline organic solids is a manifestation of the surface quasiliquid phase. We derive a single universal rate law for melt acceleration that is a simple function of the metastable liquid activity below the melting point, and has a zero order term proportional to the quasiliquid thickness. We argue that the underlying mechanisms of this model will provide a molecular definition for the stability of the class of secondary explosives.

  16. The dynamics of nucleation and growth of a particle in the ternary alloy melt with anisotropic surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Wen; Li, Lin-Yan; Guo, Hui-Min

    2017-08-28

    The dynamics of nucleation and growth of a particle affected by anisotropic surface tension in the ternary alloy melt is studied. The uniformly valid asymptotic solution for temperature field, concentration field, and interface evolution of nucleation and particle growth is obtained by means of the multiple variable expansion method. The asymptotic solution reveals the critical radius of nucleation in the ternary alloy melt and an inward melting mechanism of the particle induced by the anisotropic effect of surface tension. The critical radius of nucleation is dependent on isotropic surface tension, temperature undercooling, and constitutional undercooling in the ternary alloy melt, and the solute diffusion melt decreases the critical radius of nucleation. Immediately after a nucleus forms in the initial stage of solidification, the anisotropic effect of surface tension makes some parts of its interface grow inward while some parts grow outward. Until the inward melting attains a certain distance (which is defined as "the melting depth"), these parts of interface start to grow outward with other parts. The interface of the particle evolves into an ear-like deformation, whose inner diameter may be less than two times the critical radius of nucleation within a short time in the initial stage of solidification. The solute diffusion in the ternary alloy melt decreases the effect of anisotropic surface tension on the interface deformation.

  17. Reconstruction of the 1979–2006 Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance using the regional climate model MAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Fettweis

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Results from a 28-year simulation (1979–2006 over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS reveal an increase of solid precipitation (+0.4±2.5 km3 yr−2 and run-off (+7.9±3.3 km3 yr−2 of surface meltwater. The net effect of these competing factors is a significant Surface Mass Balance (SMB loss of −7.2±5.1 km3 yr−2. The contribution of changes in the net water vapour flux (+0.02±0.09 km3 yr−2 and rainfall (+0.2±0.2 km3 yr−2 to the SMB variability is negligible. The meltwater supply has increased because the GrIS surface has been warming up +2.4°C since 1979. Sensible heat flux, latent heat flux and net solar radiation have not varied significantly over the last three decades. However, the simulated downward infrared flux has increased by 9.3 W m−2 since 1979. The natural climate variability (e.g. the North Atlantic Oscillation does not explain these changes. The recent global warming, due to the greenhouse gas concentration increase induced by human activities, could be a cause of these changes. The doubling of surface meltwater flux into the ocean over the period 1979–2006 suggests that the overall ice sheet mass balance has been increasingly negative, given the likely meltwater-induced acceleration of outlet glaciers. This study suggests that increased melting overshadows over an increased accumulation in a warming scenario and that the GrIS is likely to keep losing mass in the future. An enduring GrIS melting will probably affect in the future an certain effect on the stability of the thermohaline circulation and the global sea level rise.

  18. Simulation of GRIS spectrometer response to the solar gamma-ray flare of 23 July 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimov, Yu A; Kotov, Yu D; Yurov, V N; Lupar, E E; Faradzhaev, R M; Glyanenko, A S

    2017-01-01

    GRIS is a prospective experiment designed to measure hard X-rays and γ-rays of solar flares in the energy range from 50 keV to 200 MeV as well as solar neutrons > 30 MeV. This study considers results of GEANT 4 simulation of GRIS detectors response to cosmic background radiation and to the solar flare SOL2002-07-23 (X4.8). It is shown that the GRIS spectrometers have enough sensitivity and energy resolution to measure redshifts of some narrow γ-rays in flare spectra, that the low energy thresholds of the detectors can be lowered considerably without a risk of counting rate saturation during high magnitude flares and that at a choice between LaBr 3 (Ce) and CeBr 3 the second one is a preferable scintillator for a hard X-ray and γ-ray spectrometer of solar flares. (paper)

  19. A contribution to the electron-beam surface-melting process of metallic materials. Numerical simulation and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckner, A.

    1996-08-01

    For the optimization of the surface melting process it is necessary to make many different experiments. Therefore, the simulation of the surface melting process becomes a major role for the optimization. Most of the simulations, developed for the laser surface melting process, are not usable for the electron-beam surface melting process, because of the different energy input and the possibility of high frequent movement of the electron-beam. In this thesis, a calculation model for electron-beam surface melting is presented. For this numerical simulation a variable volume source is used, which moves in axial direction with the same velocity as the vapor cavity into the material. With this calculation model also the high frequent movement of the electron-beam may be taken into account. The electron-beam diameter is measured with a method of drilling holes with short electron-beam pulses in thin foils. The diameter of the holes depends on the pulse length and reaches a maximal value, which is used for the diameter of the volume source in the calculation. The crack-formation, seen in many treated surfaces, is examined with the Acoustic-Emission Testing. The possibilities of the electron-beam surface melting process are shown with some experiments for different requirements of the treated surfaces, like increasing the hardness, reducing the porosity of a sintered material and the alloying of tin in an aluminium-silicon surface. (author)

  20. Characterization of ion distributions near the surface of sodium-containing and sodium-depleted calcium aluminosilicate glass melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrales, Louis R.; Du, Jincheng

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of cation and anion components of sodium containing calcium aluminosilicate glass was studied by classical molecular dynamics simulations in a high temperature melt in the bulk and at the vacuum-melt interface. A significant redistribution of the sodium and non-bridging oxygen ions was observed. Subsequently, a sodium depleted calcium aluminosilicate glass melt was simulated to determine the sensitivity of the redistribution of ions near the vacuum-melt interface to the presence of sodium ions. It is found that the thermodynamic equilibrium condition near a surface favors the enrichment of non-bridging oxygen ions that is closely associated with enrichment of the sodium ions

  1. Effect of Build Angle on Surface Properties of Nickel Superalloys Processed by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias, Ernesto E.; Eshraghi, Mohsen

    2018-03-01

    Aerospace, automotive, and medical industries use selective laser melting (SLM) to produce complex parts through solidifying successive layers of powder. This additive manufacturing technique has many advantages, but one of the biggest challenges facing this process is the resulting surface quality of the as-built parts. The purpose of this research was to study the surface properties of Inconel 718 alloys fabricated by SLM. The effect of build angle on the surface properties of as-built parts was investigated. Two sets of sample geometries including cube and rectangular artifacts were considered in the study. It was found that, for angles between 15° and 75°, theoretical calculations based on the "stair-step" effect were consistent with the experimental results. Downskin surfaces showed higher average roughness values compared to the upskin surfaces. No significant difference was found between the average roughness values measured from cube and rectangular test artifacts.

  2. Influence of pre-heating on the surface modification of powder-metallurgy processed cold-work tool steel during laser surface melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šturm, Roman, E-mail: roman.sturm@fs.uni-lj.si [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Aškerčeva 6, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Štefanikova, Maria [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Aškerčeva 6, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Steiner Petrovič, Darja [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Heat-treatment protocol for laser surface melting of cold-work tool steel is proposed. • The laser melted steel surface is hardened, and morphologically modified. • The pre-heating of substrate creates a crack-and pore-free steel surface. • The optimum pre-heating temperature is determined to be 350 °C. • Using pre-heating the quantity of retained austenite is reduced. - Abstract: In this study we determine the optimal parameters for surface modification using the laser surface melting of powder-metallurgy processed, vanadium-rich, cold-work tool steel. A combination of steel pre-heating, laser surface melting and a subsequent heat treatment creates a hardened and morphologically modified surface of the selected high-alloy tool steel. The pre-heating of the steel prior to the laser surface melting ensures a crack- and pore-free modified surface. Using a pre-heating temperature of 350 °C, the extremely fine microstructure, which typically evolves during the laser-melting, became slightly coarser and the volume fraction of retained austenite was reduced. In the laser-melted layer the highest values of microhardness were achieved in the specimens where a subsequent heat treatment at 550 °C was applied. The performed thermodynamic calculations were able to provide a very valuable assessment of the liquidus temperature and, especially, a prediction of the chemical composition as well as the precipitation and dissolution sequence for the carbides.

  3. Rapid changes in surface water carbonate chemistry during Antarctic sea ice melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth M.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Venables, Hugh J.; Whitehouse, Michael J.; Korb, Rebecca E.; Watson, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT The effect of sea ice melt on the carbonate chemistry of surface waters in the Weddell-Scotia Confluence, Southern Ocean, was investigated during January 2008. Contrasting concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA) and the fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) were observed in and around the receding sea ice edge. The precipitation of carbonate minerals such as ikaite (CaCO3.6H2O) in sea ice brine has the net effect of decreasing DIC and TA and increasing the fCO2 in the brine. Deficits in DIC up to 12 +/- 3 μmol kg-1 in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) were consistent with the release of DIC-poor brines to surface waters during sea ice melt. Biological utilization of carbon was the dominant processes and accounted for 41 +/- 1 μmol kg-1 of the summer DIC deficit. The data suggest that the combined effects of biological carbon uptake and the precipitation of carbonates created substantial undersaturation in fCO2 of 95 μatm in the MIZ during summer sea ice melt. Further work is required to improve the understanding of ikaite chemistry in Antarctic sea ice and its importance for the sea ice carbon pump.

  4. Influence of additives on melt viscosity, surface tension, and film formation of dry powder coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Dorothea; McGinity, James W

    2009-06-01

    Limited information on thermally cured dry-powder coatings used for solid dosage forms has been available in the literature. The aim of this study was to characterize the film formation process of Eudragit L 100-55 dry-powder coatings and to investigate the influence of film additives on melt viscosity and surface tension. The coating process employed no liquids and the plasticizer was combined with the polymer using hot melt extrusion. Thermoanalytical methods including differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to investigate the thermal properties of the dry-coating formulations. The rheological behavior of the coating formulations were characterized with the extrusion torque, and the surface energy parameters were determined from contact angle measurements. The influence of the level of triethyl citrate (TEC) as plasticizer and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 in the polymer film on film formation was investigated using a digital force tester. TGA confirmed thermal stability of all coating excipients at the investigated curing conditions. Increasing TEC levels and the addition of PEG 3350 as a low melting excipient in the coating reduced the viscosity of the polymer. Plasticization of the polymer with TEC increased the surface free energy, whereas the admixture of 10% PEG 3350 did not affect the surface free energy of Eudragit L 100-55. The spreading coefficient of the polymers over two sample tablet formulations was reduced with increasing surface free energy. During the curing process, puncture strength, and elongation of powder-cast films increased. The effect of curing time on the mechanical properties was dependent on the plasticizer content. The incorporation of TEC and PEG 3350 into the Eudragit L 100-55 powder coating formulation improved film formation. Mechanical testing of powder-cast films showed an increase of both elongation and puncture strength over the curing process as criterion for polymer particle fusion

  5. Supplementary Microstructural Features Induced During Laser Surface Melting of Thermally Sprayed Inconel 625 Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nauman; Voisey, K. T.; McCartney, D. G.

    2014-02-01

    Laser surface melting of thermally sprayed coatings has the potential to enhance their corrosion properties by incorporating favorable microstructural changes. Besides homogenizing the as-sprayed structure, laser melting may induce certain microstructural modifications (i.e., supplementary features) in addition to those that directly improve the corrosion performance. Such features, being a direct result of the laser treatment process, are described in this paper which is part of a broader study in which high velocity oxy-fuel sprayed Inconel 625 coatings on mild-steel substrates were treated with a diode laser and the modified microstructure characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The laser treated coating features several different zones, including a region with a microstructure in which there is a continuous columnar dendritic structure through a network of retained oxide stringers.

  6. Theoretical Understanding the Relations of Melting-point Determination Methods from Gibbs Thermodynamic Surface and Applications on Melting Curves of Lower Mantle Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, K.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Zhou, H.; Lu, X.

    2016-12-01

    The melting temperatures of materials in the interior of the Earth has significant implications in many areas of geophysics. The direct calculations of the melting point by atomic simulations would face substantial hysteresis problem. To overcome the hysteresis encountered in the atomic simulations there are a few different melting-point determination methods available nowadays, which are founded independently, such as the free energy method, the two-phase or coexistence method, and the Z method, etc. In this study, we provide a theoretical understanding the relations of these methods from a geometrical perspective based on a quantitative construction of the volume-entropy-energy thermodynamic surface, a model first proposed by J. Willard Gibbs in 1873. Then combining with an experimental data and/or a previous melting-point determination method, we apply this model to derive the high-pressure melting curves for several lower mantle minerals with less computational efforts relative to using previous methods only. Through this way, some polyatomic minerals at extreme pressures which are almost unsolvable before are calculated fully from first principles now.

  7. The COMET-L3 experiment on long-term melt. Concrete interaction and cooling by surface flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmeyer, H.; Cron, T.; Fluhrer, B.; Messemer, G.; Miassoedov, A.; Schmidt-Stiefel, S.; Wenz, T.

    2007-02-01

    The COMET-L3 experiment considers the long-term situation of corium/concrete interaction in an anticipated core melt accident of a light-water-reactor, after the metal melt is layered beneath the oxide melt. The experimental focus is on cavity formation in the basemat and the risk of long term basemat penetration. The experiment investigates the two-dimensional concrete erosion in a cylindrical crucible fabricated from siliceous concrete in the first phase of the test, and the influence of surface flooding in the second phase. Decay heating in the two-component metal and oxide melt is simulated by sustained induction heating of the metal phase that is overlaid by the oxide melt. The inner diameter of the concrete crucible was 60 cm, the initial mass of the melt was 425 kg steel and 211 kg oxide at 1665 C, resulting in a melt height of 450 mm. The net power to the metal melt was about 220 kW from 0 s to 1880 s, when the maximum erosion limit of the crucible was reached and heating was terminated. In the initial phase of the test (less than 100 s), the overheated, highly agitated metal melt causes intense interaction with the concrete, which leads to fast decrease of the initial melt overheat and reduction of the initially high concrete erosion rate. Thereafter, under quasistationary conditions until about 800 s, the erosion by the metal melt slows down to some 0.07 mm/s into the axial direction. Lateral erosion is a factor 3 smaller. Video observation of the melt surface shows an agitated melt with ongoing gas release from the decomposing concrete. Several periods of more intense gas release, gas driven splashing, and release of crusts from the concrete interface indicate the existence and iterative break-up of crusts that probably form at the steel/concrete interface. Surface flooding of the melt is initiated at 800 s by a shower from the crucible head with 0.375 litre water/s. Flooding does not lead to strong melt/water interactions, and no entrapment reactions or

  8. Acceleration of the GrIS mass loss as observed by GRACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2012-01-01

    The mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has previously been analysed in a variety of ways, including altimetry, gravimetry and mass budget calculations, establishing a continuing decrease in the ice mass, with a number of studies finding acceleration in the mass loss. Here, we examine...

  9. Density and surface tension of melts of zirconium and hafnium fluorides with lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katyshev, S.F.; Artemov, V.V.; Desyatnik, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the temperature dependence of the density and surface tension of melts of LiF-ZrF 4 and LiF-HfF 4 . Density and surface tension were determined by the method of maximum pressure in an argon bubble. On the basis of experimental data over the entire concentration range the molar volumes and their relative deviations from the additive molar volumes were calculated for 1100 0 K. The positive deviations of the molar volumes from additivity in the LiF-HfF 4 system (22.45%) were greater than in the LiF-ZrF 4 system (15.75%). This indicated that the reaction with lithium fluoride is intensified with the switch to the hafnium fluoride. Results also demonstrated that the fluorides are surface-active components in the molten mixtures

  10. Study of Internal Channel Surface Roughnesses Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting in Aluminum and Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, Jukka; Calignano, Flaviana; Trevisan, Francesco; Lorusso, Massimo; Ambrosio, Elisa Paola; Manfredi, Diego; Fino, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has gained considerable impetus over the past decade. One of the driving factors for AM success is the ability to create unique designs with intrinsic characteristics as, e.g., internal channels used for hydraulic components, cooling channels, and heat exchangers. However, a couple of the main problems in internal channels manufactured by AM technologies are the high surface roughness obtained and the distortion of the channel shape. There is still much to understand in these design aspects. In this study, a cylindrical geometry for internal channels to be built with different angles with respect to the building plane in AlSi10Mg and Ti6Al4V alloys by selective laser melting was considered. The internal surfaces of the channels produced in both materials were analyzed by means of a surface roughness tester and by optical and electron microscopy to evaluate the effects of the material and design choices.

  11. Effects of Humidity and Surfaces on the Melt Crystallization of Ibuprofen

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong-Joo; Lee, Suyang; Kim, Il Won

    2012-01-01

    Melt crystallization of ibuprofen was studied to understand the effects of humidity and surfaces. The molecular self-assembly during the amorphous-to-crystal transformation was examined in terms of the nucleation and growth of the crystals. The crystallization was on Al, Au, and self-assembled monolayers with –CH3, –OH, and –COOH functional groups. Effects of the humidity were studied at room temperature (18–20 °C) with relative humidity 33%, 75%, and 100%. Effects of t...

  12. Growth of binary solid solution single crystals and calculation of melt surface displacement velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agamaliyev, Z.A.; Tahirov, V.I.; Hasanov, Z.Y.; Quliyev, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    A binary solid solution single crystal growth method has been worked out. Cylinder feeding alloy with complex content distribution and truncated cone crucible are used. Second component distribution coefficient is more than unit. Content distribution along grown crystal is found by solving continuity equation. After reaching dynamic equilibrium state second component concentration in grown crystal is saturated the value of which is less than the average ona in the feeding alloy. Using the method Ge-Si perfect single crystals has been grown. Calculation method of melt surface displacement velocity has been offered as well

  13. "Gris Quintana": a Spanish granite from the Past into the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Tejado, Juan; Mota, M. Isabel; Pereira, Dolores

    2014-05-01

    "Gris Quintana" is a medium-grained, biotite and amphibole granodiorite extracted in the Pluton of Quintana de la Serena (Extremadura, Spain). It is a constant light grey granite from the Hercynian geologic with excellent physicomechanical and physicochemical properties. The granodiorite is composed of plagioclase, biotite, quartz and alkali feldspar, with accessory allanite, titanite, apatite, zircon and ilmenite, mostly as inclusions within the biotite crystals. This commercial variety is extracted from many quarries in the late Hercynian plutons located in the Iberian Massif in Spain period (transition between Central Iberian and Ossa-Moren Zones), having large reserves of granite. Many of the quarries have their own transformation factory (high production zone), with which the sector is offered an endless variety of finishes and constructive rock typologies. A wide range of solutions to architects and designers are offered. Gris Quintana granite is one of the materials with highest technological benefits that are used in arquitecture. "Gris Quintana" granite has been used since ancient times, not only at a regional, but also at national and international level: paving, building (structural, exterior façadas, interior uses), urban decoration and funeral art. It can be found in monuments and more recently, in buildings of different styles and uses, that stand out in beauty and splendor, lasting in time. Some singular works in "Gris Quintana" granite all over the world: extension to the "Congreso de Diputados" (Parliament) in Madrid, "Puerta de San Vicente" in Madrid, Andalucia Parliament columns in Sevilla, New Senate Buiding in Madird, "Gran Vía" pavement in Madrid, "Teatro Real façade" in Madrid… "Gris Quintana" granite accomplishes all the requirements for its nomination as Global Heritage Stone Resource, for both its use in construction and for artistic purposes.

  14. Melt flow and mechanical properties of silica/perfluoropolymer nanocomposites Fabricated by direct melt-compounding without surface modification on nano-silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Yusuke; Lee, Jeong-Chang; Takeda, Kunihiko; Fujisawa, Toshiharu

    2009-01-01

    The authors have previously developed a novel method for the fabrication of silica/perfluoropolymer nanocomposites, wherein nano-sized silica particles without surface modification were dispersed uniformly through breakdown of loosely packed agglomerates of silica nanoparticles with low fracture strength in a polymer melt during direct melt-compounding. The method consists of two stages; the first stage involves preparation of the loose silica agglomerate, and the second stage involves melt-compounding of a completely hydrophobic perfluoropolymer, PFA (poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropylvinylether)), with the loose silica agglomerates. By using this simple method without any lipophilic treatment of the silica surfaces, silica nanoparticles with a primary diameter of 190 nm could be dispersed uniformly into the PFA matrix. The main purpose of the present study is to evaluate the melt flow and tensile properties of silica/PFA nanocomposites fabricated by the above method. In order to elucidate the effects of the size of the dispersed silica in the PFA matrix on the properties of the composites, silica/PFA composite samples exhibiting the dispersion of larger-sized silica particle-clusters were fabricated as negative controls of the silica dispersion state. The results obtained under the present experimental conditions showed that the size of the dispersed silica in the PFA matrix exerts a strong influence on the ultimate tensile properties, such as tensile strength and elongation at break, and the melt flow rate (MFR) of the composite materials. The MFR of the silica/PFA nanocomposite became higher than that of the pure PFA without silica addition, although the MFR of the PFA composites containing larger silica particle-clusters became much lower than that of the pure PFA. Furthermore, uniform dispersion of isolated silica nanoparticles was found to improve not only the Young's modulus but also the ultimate tensile properties of the composite.

  15. A thermodynamic model for predicting surface melting and overheating of different crystal planes in BCC, FCC and HCP pure metallic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahangir, Vafa; Riahifar, Reza; Sahba Yaghmaee, Maziar

    2016-01-01

    In order to predict as well as study the surface melting phenomena in contradiction to surface overheating, a generalized thermodynamics model including the surface free energy of solid and the melt state along with the interfacial energy of solid–liquid (melt on substrate) has been introduced. In addition, the effect of different crystal structures of surfaces in fcc, bcc and hcp metals was included in surface energies as well as in the atomistic model. These considerations lead us to predict surface melting and overheating as two contradictory melting phenomena. The results of the calculation are demonstrated on the example of Pb and Al thin films in three groups of (100), (110) and (111) surface planes. Our conclusions show good agreement with experimental results and other theoretical investigations. Moreover, a computational algorithm has been developed which enables users to investigate the surface melt or overheating of single component metallic thin film with variable crystal structures and different crystalline planes. This model and developed software can be used for studying all related surface phenomena. - Highlights: • Investigating the surface melting and overheating phenomena • Effect of crystal orientations, surface energies, geometry and different atomic surface layers • Developing a computational algorithm and its related code (free-software SMSO-Ver1) • Thickness and orientation of surface plane dominate the surface melting or overheating. • Total excess surface energy as a function of thickness and temperature explains melting.

  16. A thermodynamic model for predicting surface melting and overheating of different crystal planes in BCC, FCC and HCP pure metallic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahangir, Vafa, E-mail: vafa.jahangir@yahoo.com; Riahifar, Reza, E-mail: reza_rfr@yahoo.com; Sahba Yaghmaee, Maziar, E-mail: fkmsahba@uni-miskolc.hu

    2016-03-31

    In order to predict as well as study the surface melting phenomena in contradiction to surface overheating, a generalized thermodynamics model including the surface free energy of solid and the melt state along with the interfacial energy of solid–liquid (melt on substrate) has been introduced. In addition, the effect of different crystal structures of surfaces in fcc, bcc and hcp metals was included in surface energies as well as in the atomistic model. These considerations lead us to predict surface melting and overheating as two contradictory melting phenomena. The results of the calculation are demonstrated on the example of Pb and Al thin films in three groups of (100), (110) and (111) surface planes. Our conclusions show good agreement with experimental results and other theoretical investigations. Moreover, a computational algorithm has been developed which enables users to investigate the surface melt or overheating of single component metallic thin film with variable crystal structures and different crystalline planes. This model and developed software can be used for studying all related surface phenomena. - Highlights: • Investigating the surface melting and overheating phenomena • Effect of crystal orientations, surface energies, geometry and different atomic surface layers • Developing a computational algorithm and its related code (free-software SMSO-Ver1) • Thickness and orientation of surface plane dominate the surface melting or overheating. • Total excess surface energy as a function of thickness and temperature explains melting.

  17. Permeability Study of Austenitic Stainless Steel Surfaces Produced by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Segura-Cardenas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Selective laser melting (SLM is emerging as a versatile process for fabricating different metal components with acceptable mechanical properties and geometrical accuracy. The process has been used in the manufacturing of several parts (e.g., aerospace or biomedical components, and offers the capability to tailor the performance of several surface and mechanical properties. In this work, permeability properties and surface roughness of stainless steel (SS316L surfaces were evaluated through experimentation with three different laser scanning patterns (chessboard, meander, and stripe, and different sloping angles between the fabricated surface and the laser beam incident on the process. Results showed that for each scanning pattern, the roughness decreased as the sloping angle increased consistently in all experimental trials. Furthermore, in the case of the permeability evaluation, the manufactured surfaces showed changes in properties for each series of experiments performed with different scanning patterns. The chessboard pattern showed a change of 67° to 107° in contact angle, while the meander and stripe patterns showed a variation in contact angle in a range of 65° to 85°. The different scanning strategies in the SLM process resulted in an alternative method for surface enhancement with different hydrophobicity properties, valuable for designing the most appropriate permeability characteristics for specific applications.

  18. Surface properties and corrosion behavior of Co-Cr alloy fabricated with selective laser melting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xian-zhen; Chen, Jie; Xiang, Nan; Wei, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We sought to study the corrosion behavior and surface properties of a commercial cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy which was fabricated with selective laser melting (SLM) technique. For this purpose, specimens were fabricated using different techniques, such as SLM system and casting methods. Surface hardness testing, microstructure observation, surface analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical corrosion test were carried out to evaluate the corrosion properties and surface properties of the specimens. We found that microstructure of SLM specimens was more homogeneous than that of cast specimens. The mean surface hardness values of SLM and cast specimens were 458.3 and 384.8, respectively; SLM specimens showed higher values than cast ones in hardness. Both specimens exhibited no differences in their electrochemical corrosion properties in the artificial saliva through potentiodynamic curves and EIS, and no significant difference via XPS. Therefore, we concluded that within the scope of this study, SLM-fabricated restorations revealed good surface properties, such as proper hardness, homogeneous microstructure, and also showed sufficient corrosion resistance which could meet the needs of dental clinics.

  19. Investigation of Selective Laser Melting Surface Alloyed Aluminium Metal Matrix Dispersive Reinforced Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburov, V. V.; Dimitrova, R. B.; Kandeva, M. K.; Sofronov, Y. P.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the improvement of mechanical properties and in particular wear resistance of laser surface alloyed dispersive reinforced thin layers produced by selective laser melting (SLM) technology. The wear resistance investigation of aluminium matrix composite layers in the conditions of dry friction surface with abrasive particles and nanoindentation tests were carried out. The process parameters (as scan speed) and their impact on the wear resistant layers have been evaluated. The alloyed layers containing metalized SiC particles were studied by Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The obtained experimental results of the laser alloyed thin layers show significant development of their wear resistance and nanohardness due to the incorporated reinforced phase of electroless nickel coated SiC particles.

  20. How does the surface treatment change the cytocompatibility of implants made by selective laser melting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matouskova, Lucie; Ackermann, Michal; Horakova, Jana; Capek, Lukas; Henys, Petr; Safka, Jiri

    2018-04-01

    The study investigates the potential for producing medical components via Selective Laser Melting technology (SLM). The material tested consisted of the biocompatible titanium alloy Ti6Al4V. The research involved the testing of laboratory specimens produced using SLM technology both in vitro and for surface roughness. The aim of the research was to clarify whether SLM technology affects the cytocompatibility of implants and, thus, whether SLM implants provide suitable candidates for medical use following zero or minimum post-fabrication treatment. Areas covered: The specimens were tested with an osteoblast cell line and, subsequently, two post-treatment processes were compared: non-treated (as-fabricated) and glass-blasted. Interactions with MG-63 cells were evaluated by means of metabolic MTT assay and microscope techniques (scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy). Surface roughness was observed on both the non-treated and glass-blasted SLM specimens. Expert Commentary: The research concluded that the glass-blasting of SLM Ti6Al4V significantly reduces surface roughness. The arithmetic mean roughness Ra was calculated at 3.4 µm for the glass-blasted and 13.3 µm for the non-treated surfaces. However, the results of in vitro testing revealed that the non-treated surface was better suited to cell growth.

  1. Use of the microcrystalline limestone as building material: the "GrisPulpis"case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García del Cura, M. A.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Gris Pulpis is a Jurassic microcrystalline limestone found in the Maestrazgo Area of the Iberian Mountain Range (province of Castellón, Spain. This paper reports the results of a detailed study of the mineralogical, pelrographic and chromatic characteristics, as well as the durability, of this stone, classified as a commercial marble for its polish ability. The study determined the relationship between the structural characteristics of the stone, with a proliferation of stylolites and veins, and its physical properties. Its flexura I strength was found to be greater than would normally be expected in a structure with such a dense web of stylolites and veins. This is due to the structural and mineralogical properties of these stylolites, characterised by an extremely wavy design, scant mineral infillings and, occasionally, subsequent cementation. The characteristics of the porous media of homogeneous microcrystalline limestones such as Gris Pulpis largely explain the durability of this stone when exposed to freeze-thaw cycles and salt crystallisation. These arc the properties that make Gris Pulpis limestone, quarried in the Spanish Region of Valencia, a valuable building material for both architectural and civil engineering applications

    En este trabajo se analizan las propiedades físicas y la durabilidad de una caliza microcristalina.El Gris Pulpis es una caliza microcristalina del Jurásico de la Cordillera Ibérica (Maestrazgo, cuyas características mineralógicas, petrográficas, cromáticas y alterabilidad se determinan detalladamente. Su aptitud para el pulido hace que sea un mármol comercial. Se establece la influencia de sus características estructurales (estilolitos, vénulas... en sus propiedades físicas. Su resistencia a flexión supera los valores que cabría esperar en función de la estructura de esta roca que, a veces, presenta abundantes estilolitos y vénulas. Esto es debido a las características estructurales y

  2. A Stabilizing Feedback Between Cloud Radiative Effects and Greenland Surface Melt: Verification From Multi-year Automatic Weather Station Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zender, C. S.; Wang, W.; van As, D.

    2017-12-01

    Clouds have strong impacts on Greenland's surface melt through the interaction with the dry atmosphere and reflective surfaces. However, their effects are uncertain due to the lack of in situ observations. To better quantify cloud radiative effects (CRE) in Greenland, we analyze and interpret multi-year radiation measurements from 30 automatic weather stations encompassing a broad range of climatological and topographical conditions. During melt season, clouds warm surface over most of Greenland, meaning the longwave greenhouse effect outweighs the shortwave shading effect; on the other hand, the spatial variability of net (longwave and shortwave) CRE is dominated by shortwave CRE and in turn by surface albedo, which controls the potential absorption of solar radiation when clouds are absent. The net warming effect decreases with shortwave CRE from high to low altitudes and from north to south (Fig. 1). The spatial correlation between albedo and net CRE is strong (r=0.93, palbedo determines the net CRE seasonal trend, which decreases from May to July and increases afterwards. On an hourly timescale, we find two distinct radiative states in Greenland (Fig. 2). The clear state is characterized by clear-sky conditions or thin clouds, when albedo and solar zenith angle (SZA) weakly correlates with CRE. The cloudy state is characterized by opaque clouds, when the combination of albedo and SZA strongly correlates with CRE (r=0.85, palbedo and solar zenith angle, explains the majority of the CRE variation in spatial distribution, seasonal trend in the ablation zone, and in hourly variability in the cloudy radiative state. Clouds warm the brighter and colder surfaces of Greenland, enhance snow melt, and tend to lower the albedo. Clouds cool the darker and warmer surfaces, inhibiting snow melt, which increases albedo, and thus stabilizes surface melt. This stabilizing mechanism may also occur over sea ice, helping to forestall surface melt as the Arctic becomes dimmer.

  3. Highly temporally resolved response to seasonal surface melt of the Zachariae and 79N outlet glaciers in Northeast Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathmann, N. M.; Hvidberg, C. S.; Solgaard, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The seasonal response to surface melting of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream outlets, Zachariae and 79N, is investigated using new highly temporally resolved surface velocity maps for 2016 combined with numerical modelling. The seasonal speed-up at 79N of 0.15km/yr is suggested to be driven by ...

  4. Determination of surface energies of hot-melt extruded sugar-starch pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Chi-Wah; Rein, Hubert

    2018-02-01

    Hot-melt extruded sugar-starch pellets are an alternative for commercial sugar spheres, but their coating properties remain to be studied. Both the European Pharmcopoeia 8.6 and the United States Pharmacopoeia 40 specify the composition of sugar-starch pellets without giving requirements for the manufacturing process. Due to various fabrication techniques, the physicochemical properties of pellets may differ. Therefore, the adhesion energies of three coating dispersions (sustained, enteric and immediate release) on different types of pellets were investigated. In this context, the surface energies of various kinds of corn starch (normal, waxy, high-amylose) and sucrose pellets were analyzed using the sessile drop method, whereas the surface tensions of the coating dispersions were examined using the pendant drop method. The adhesion forces were calculated from the results of these studies. Furthermore, sugar spheres were characterized in terms of particle size distribution, porosity and specific surface area. An increase of the pellets' sucrose content leads to a more porous surface structure, which gives them an enhanced wetting behavior with coating dispersions. The adhesion energies of extruded sugar-starch pellets are similar to those of commercial sugar spheres, which comply with pharmacopeial requirements. Both types of pellets are equally suited for coating.

  5. Influence of Inherent Surface and Internal Defects on Mechanical Properties of Additively Manufactured Ti6Al4V Alloy: Comparison between Selective Laser Melting and Electron Beam Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fousová, Michaela; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Doubrava, Karel; Daniel, Matěj; Lin, Chiu-Feng

    2018-03-31

    Additive manufacture (AM) appears to be the most suitable technology to produce sophisticated, high quality, lightweight parts from Ti6Al4V alloy. However, the fatigue life of AM parts is of concern. In our study, we focused on a comparison of two techniques of additive manufacture-selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM)-in terms of the mechanical properties during both static and dynamic loading. All of the samples were untreated to focus on the influence of surface condition inherent to SLM and EBM. The EBM samples were studied in the as-built state, while SLM was followed by heat treatment. The resulting similarity of microstructures led to comparable mechanical properties in tension, but, due to differences in surface roughness and specific internal defects, the fatigue strength of the EBM samples reached only half the value of the SLM samples. Higher surface roughness that is inherent to EBM contributed to multiple initiations of fatigue cracks, while only one crack initiated on the SLM surface. Also, facets that were formed by an intergranular cleavage fracture were observed in the EBM samples.

  6. Influence of Inherent Surface and Internal Defects on Mechanical Properties of Additively Manufactured Ti6Al4V Alloy: Comparison between Selective Laser Melting and Electron Beam Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Fousová

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacture (AM appears to be the most suitable technology to produce sophisticated, high quality, lightweight parts from Ti6Al4V alloy. However, the fatigue life of AM parts is of concern. In our study, we focused on a comparison of two techniques of additive manufacture—selective laser melting (SLM and electron beam melting (EBM—in terms of the mechanical properties during both static and dynamic loading. All of the samples were untreated to focus on the influence of surface condition inherent to SLM and EBM. The EBM samples were studied in the as-built state, while SLM was followed by heat treatment. The resulting similarity of microstructures led to comparable mechanical properties in tension, but, due to differences in surface roughness and specific internal defects, the fatigue strength of the EBM samples reached only half the value of the SLM samples. Higher surface roughness that is inherent to EBM contributed to multiple initiations of fatigue cracks, while only one crack initiated on the SLM surface. Also, facets that were formed by an intergranular cleavage fracture were observed in the EBM samples.

  7. Molecular dynamics studies of the melting of butane and hexane monolayers adsorbed on the basal-plane surface of graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Newton, J. C.; Taub, H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of molecular steric properties on the melting of quasi-two-dimensional solids is investigated by comparing results of molecular dynamics simulations of the melting of butane and hexane monolayers adsorbed on the basal-plane surface of graphite. These molecules differ only in their length......, being members of the n-alkane series [CH3(CH2)n−2CH3] where n=4 for butane and n=6 for hexane. The simulations employ a skeletal model, which does not include the hydrogen atoms explicitly, to represent the intermolecular and molecule–substrate interactions. Nearest-neighbor intramolecular bonds...... are fixed in length, but the molecular flexibility is preserved by allowing the bend and dihedral torsion angles to vary. The simulations show a qualitatively different melting behavior for the butane and hexane monolayers consistent with neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. The melting of the low...

  8. Estado del zorro gris Lycalopex griseus (Gray, 1837 (Mammalia: Canidae en el Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vivar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Se sustenta la presencia del zorro gris Lycalopex griseus (Gray, 1837 en la costa sur del Perú en base a información morfológica externa y craneal. Esta especie es de similar tamaño a L. sechurae (Thomas, 1900 pero diferenciable en una mayor longitud del hocico y menor amplitud del cráneo; esta diferencia es respaldada en un Análisis de Componentes Principales. Se sugiere que la población del zorro gris en el Perú podría constituir una subespecie nueva de L. griseus por encontrarse más al norte de su distribución tradicionalmente conocida y separada de otras subespecies por el Desierto de Atacama en el norte de Chile, notable barrera biogeográfica.

  9. Impact of improved Greenland ice sheet surface representation in the NASA GISS ModelE2 GCM on simulated surface mass balance and regional climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P. M.; LeGrande, A. N.; Fischer, E.; Tedesco, M.; Kelley, M.; Schmidt, G. A.; Fettweis, X.

    2017-12-01

    Towards achieving coupled simulations between the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE2 general circulation model (GCM) and ice sheet models (ISMs), improvements have been made to the representation of the ice sheet surface in ModelE2. These include a sub-grid-scale elevation class scheme, a multi-layer snow model, a time-variable surface albedo scheme, and adjustments to parameterization of sublimation/evaporation. These changes improve the spatial resolution and physical representation of the ice sheet surface such that the surface is represented at a level of detail closer to that of Regional Climate Models (RCMs). We assess the impact of these changes on simulated Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface mass balance (SMB). We also compare ModelE2 simulations in which winds have been nudged to match the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim reanalysis with simulations from the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) RCM forced by the same reanalysis. Adding surface elevation classes results in a much higher spatial resolution representation of the surface necessary for coupling with ISMs, but has a negligible impact on overall SMB. Implementing a variable surface albedo scheme increases melt by 100%, bringing it closer to melt simulated by MAR. Adjustments made to the representation of topography-influenced surface roughness length in ModelE2 reduce a positive bias in evaporation relative to MAR. We also examine the impact of changes to the GrIS surface on regional atmospheric and oceanic climate in coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations with ModelE2, finding a general warming of the Arctic due to a warmer GrIS, and a cooler North Atlantic in scenarios with doubled atmospheric CO2 relative to pre-industrial levels. The substantial influence of changes to the GrIS surface on the oceans and atmosphere highlight the importance of including these processes in the GCM, in view of potential feedbacks between the ice sheet

  10. Computational procedure of a turbulent boundary layer with thermo-capillary effects in laser melted pool with free surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benisahnoune, Omar

    1996-01-01

    A numerical procedure of a turbulent boundary layer with free surface in melted zone of metals is developed to describe interaction between Marangoni convection and turbulence. This study takes into account the phenomena below: Near the surface, vertical motions are damped while stream wise and span wise motions are promoted. Considering a plane surface, the validity of this turbulent model is verified in comparison with experimental results and laminar models. (author) [fr

  11. Novel microstructural growth in the surface of Inconel 625 by the addition of SiC under electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M., E-mail: maqomer@yahoo.com [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, G.; Ahmed, Ejaz; Haq, M.A.; Akhter, J.I. [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-06-15

    Electron beam melting is being used to modify the microstructure of the surfaces of materials due to its ability to cause localized melting and supercooling of the melt. This article presents an experimental study on the surface modification of Ni-based superalloy (Inconel 625) reinforced with SiC ceramic particles under electron beam melting. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques have been applied to characterize the resulted microstructure. The results revealed growth of novel structures like wire, rod, tubular, pyramid, bamboo and tweezers type morphologies in the modified surface. In addition to that fibrous like structure was also observed. Formation of thin carbon sheet has been found at the regions of decomposed SiC. Electron beam modified surface of Inconel 625 alloy has been hardened twice as compared to the as-received samples. Surface hardening effect may be attributed to both the formation of the novel structures as well as the introduction of Si and C atom in the lattice of Inconel 625 alloy.

  12. Novel microstructural growth in the surface of Inconel 625 by the addition of SiC under electron beam melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, M.; Ali, G.; Ahmed, Ejaz; Haq, M. A.; Akhter, J. I.

    2011-06-01

    Electron beam melting is being used to modify the microstructure of the surfaces of materials due to its ability to cause localized melting and supercooling of the melt. This article presents an experimental study on the surface modification of Ni-based superalloy (Inconel 625) reinforced with SiC ceramic particles under electron beam melting. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques have been applied to characterize the resulted microstructure. The results revealed growth of novel structures like wire, rod, tubular, pyramid, bamboo and tweezers type morphologies in the modified surface. In addition to that fibrous like structure was also observed. Formation of thin carbon sheet has been found at the regions of decomposed SiC. Electron beam modified surface of Inconel 625 alloy has been hardened twice as compared to the as-received samples. Surface hardening effect may be attributed to both the formation of the novel structures as well as the introduction of Si and C atom in the lattice of Inconel 625 alloy.

  13. Novel microstructural growth in the surface of Inconel 625 by the addition of SiC under electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Ali, G.; Ahmed, Ejaz; Haq, M.A.; Akhter, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam melting is being used to modify the microstructure of the surfaces of materials due to its ability to cause localized melting and supercooling of the melt. This article presents an experimental study on the surface modification of Ni-based superalloy (Inconel 625) reinforced with SiC ceramic particles under electron beam melting. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques have been applied to characterize the resulted microstructure. The results revealed growth of novel structures like wire, rod, tubular, pyramid, bamboo and tweezers type morphologies in the modified surface. In addition to that fibrous like structure was also observed. Formation of thin carbon sheet has been found at the regions of decomposed SiC. Electron beam modified surface of Inconel 625 alloy has been hardened twice as compared to the as-received samples. Surface hardening effect may be attributed to both the formation of the novel structures as well as the introduction of Si and C atom in the lattice of Inconel 625 alloy.

  14. Enhanced Surface Warming and Accelerated Snow Melt in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau Induced by Absorbing Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K.; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lee, Woo-Seop

    2010-01-01

    Numerical experiments with the NASA finite-volume general circulation model show that heating of the atmosphere by dust and black carbon can lead to widespread enhanced warming over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and accelerated snow melt in the western TP and Himalayas. During the boreal spring, a thick aerosol layer, composed mainly of dust transported from adjacent deserts and black carbon from local emissions, builds up over the Indo-Gangetic Plain, against the foothills of the Himalaya and the TP. The aerosol layer, which extends from the surface to high elevation (approx.5 km), heats the mid-troposphere by absorbing solar radiation. The heating produces an atmospheric dynamical feedback the so-called elevated-heat-pump (EHP) effect, which increases moisture, cloudiness, and deep convection over northern India, as well as enhancing the rate of snow melt in the Himalayas and TP. The accelerated melting of snow is mostly confined to the western TP, first slowly in early April and then rapidly from early to mid-May. The snow cover remains reduced from mid-May through early June. The accelerated snow melt is accompanied by similar phases of enhanced warming of the atmosphere-land system of the TP, with the atmospheric warming leading the surface warming by several days. Surface energy balance analysis shows that the short-wave and long-wave surface radiative fluxes strongly offset each other, and are largely regulated by the changes in cloudiness and moisture over the TP. The slow melting phase in April is initiated by an effective transfer of sensible heat from a warmer atmosphere to land. The rapid melting phase in May is due to an evaporation-snow-land feedback coupled to an increase in atmospheric moisture over the TP induced by the EHP effect.

  15. Enhanced surface warming and accelerated snow melt in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau induced by absorbing aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, William K M; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Lee, Woo-Seop; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2010-01-01

    Numerical experiments with the NASA finite-volume general circulation model show that heating of the atmosphere by dust and black carbon can lead to widespread enhanced warming over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and accelerated snow melt in the western TP and Himalayas. During the boreal spring, a thick aerosol layer, composed mainly of dust transported from adjacent deserts and black carbon from local emissions, builds up over the Indo-Gangetic Plain, against the foothills of the Himalaya and the TP. The aerosol layer, which extends from the surface to high elevation (∼5 km), heats the mid-troposphere by absorbing solar radiation. The heating produces an atmospheric dynamical feedback-the so-called elevated-heat-pump (EHP) effect, which increases moisture, cloudiness, and deep convection over northern India, as well as enhancing the rate of snow melt in the Himalayas and TP. The accelerated melting of snow is mostly confined to the western TP, first slowly in early April and then rapidly from early to mid-May. The snow cover remains reduced from mid-May through early June. The accelerated snow melt is accompanied by similar phases of enhanced warming of the atmosphere-land system of the TP, with the atmospheric warming leading the surface warming by several days. Surface energy balance analysis shows that the short-wave and long-wave surface radiative fluxes strongly offset each other, and are largely regulated by the changes in cloudiness and moisture over the TP. The slow melting phase in April is initiated by an effective transfer of sensible heat from a warmer atmosphere to land. The rapid melting phase in May is due to an evaporation-snow-land feedback coupled to an increase in atmospheric moisture over the TP induced by the EHP effect.

  16. Biodegradable polyester films from renewable aleuritic acid: surface modifications induced by melt-polycondensation in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benítez, José Jesús; De Vargas-Parody, María Inmaculada; Cruz-Carrillo, Miguel Antonio; Heredia-Guerrero, José Alejandro; Morales-Flórez, Victor; De la Rosa-Fox, Nicolás; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Good water barrier properties and biocompatibility of long-chain biopolyesters like cutin and suberin have inspired the design of synthetic mimetic materials. Most of these biopolymers are made from esterified mid-chain functionalized ω-long chain hydroxyacids. Aleuritic (9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic) acid is such a polyhydroxylated fatty acid and is also the major constituent of natural lac resin, a relatively abundant and renewable resource. Insoluble and thermostable films have been prepared from aleuritic acid by melt-condensation polymerization in air without catalysts, an easy and attractive procedure for large scale production. Intended to be used as a protective coating, the barrier's performance is expected to be conditioned by physical and chemical modifications induced by oxygen on the air-exposed side. Hence, the chemical composition, texture, mechanical behavior, hydrophobicity, chemical resistance and biodegradation of the film surface have been studied by attenuated total reflection–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR–FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindentation and water contact angle (WCA). It has been demonstrated that the occurrence of side oxidation reactions conditions the surface physical and chemical properties of these polyhydroxyester films. Additionally, the addition of palmitic acid to reduce the presence of hydrophilic free hydroxyl groups was found to have a strong influence on these parameters. (paper)

  17. The effect of laser surface melting on microstructure and corrosion behavior of friction stir welded aluminum alloy 2219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shengchong; Zhao, Yong; Zou, Jiasheng; Yan, Keng; Liu, Chuan

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to explore the electrochemical properties and microstructure of friction stir welds to understand the correlation between their properties and processing. Friction stir welding is a promising solid-state joining process for high-strength aluminum alloys (AA). Although friction stir welding (FSW) eliminates the problems of fusion welding due to the fact that it is performed below Tm, it causes severe plastic deformation in the material. Some AA welded by FSW exhibit relatively poor corrosion resistance. In this research, the corrosion resistance of such welds was enhanced through laser surface melting. A friction stir weld of AA 2219 was laser melted. The melt depth and microstructure were observed using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The melt zone exhibited epitaxially grown columnar grains. The redistribution of elemental composition was analyzed using energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The anticorrosion properties of both laser-melted and original welds were studied in aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization. The results indicated a noticeable increase in the pitting corrosion resistance after the laser treatment on the surface. The repassivation potential was nobler than the corrosion potential after the laser treatment, confirming that the resistance to pitting growth improved.

  18. Equivalence of chain conformations in the surface region of a polymer melt and a single Gaussian chain nder critical conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skvortsov, A.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Fleer, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the melt polymer conformations are nearly ideal according to Flory's ideality hypothesis. Silberberg generalized this statement for chains in the interfacial region. We check the Silberberg argument by analyzing the conformations of a probe chain end-grafted at a solid surface in a sea of

  19. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bsat, S.; Yavari, S.; Munsch, M.; Valstar, E.R.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM), can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be

  20. Physical metallurgy of laser surface melted plastic mould steels: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colaço, R.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the potential of laser surface melting to improve the surface characteristics of plastic mould steels, using a typical plastic mould steel (DIN X43Cr12 as a case study. After laser surface melting the microstructure of this steel is formed by fine dendrites of austenite partially transformed into martensite. Although the equilibrium solidification phase is 8- ferrite, the formation of primary austenite is kinetically favored and this phase tends to predominate at the high solidification speeds used in laser processing. It was observed that the volume fraction of retained austenite depends critically on the laser processing parameters, so that the microstructure can change from almost completely martensitic to almost completely austenitic by changing the laser processing parameters. Laser melted tool steels show remarkable secondary hardening after tempering at suitable temperatures. In DIN X42Cr13 the secondary hardening peak temperature after LSM (600°C is 100°C higher than after conventional heat treatment (500°C, due to the presence of large amounts of retained austenite. It was observed that this phase only destabilizes above 600°C, due to the precipitation of M7C3 and stress relieving. After destabilization, retained austenite transforms into martensite during cooling. Secondary hardening is due to the transformation of retained austenite into martensite and to the precipitation of M7C3 and M23C6 carbides.

    El objetivo del presente trabajo es ilustrar el potencial de la fusión superficial mediante láser para la mejora de las características estructurales de los moldes de acero para plásticos, centrándolo en el caso concreto del acero DIN X42Cr13. Tras el tratamiento de fusión superficial mediante láser, la microestructura del material está formada por dendritas finas de austenita parcialmente transformadas en

  1. A thermodynamical model for the surface tension of silicate melts in contact with H2O gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Simone; Battaglia, Maurizio; Trigila, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Surface tension plays an important role in the nucleation of H2O gas bubbles in magmatic melts and in the time-dependent rheology of bubble-bearing magmas. Despite several experimental studies, a physics based model of the surface tension of magmatic melts in contact with H2O is lacking. This paper employs gradient theory to develop a thermodynamical model of equilibrium surface tension of silicate melts in contact with H2O gas at low to moderate pressures. In the last decades, this approach has been successfully applied in studies of industrial mixtures but never to magmatic systems. We calibrate and verify the model against literature experimental data, obtained by the pendant drop method, and by inverting bubble nucleation experiments using the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). Our model reproduces the systematic decrease in surface tension with increased H2O pressure observed in the experiments. On the other hand, the effect of temperature is confirmed by the experiments only at high pressure. At atmospheric pressure, the model shows a decrease of surface tension with temperature. This is in contrast with a number of experimental observations and could be related to microstructural effects that cannot be reproduced by our model. Finally, our analysis indicates that the surface tension measured inverting the CNT may be lower than the value measured by the pendant drop method, most likely because of changes in surface tension controlled by the supersaturation.

  2. Kinetics of the melting front movement in process of centrifugal induction surfacing of powder material with nanoscale modificaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasnouski, I.; Kurylionak, A.

    2018-03-01

    For solving the problem of improving the powder coatings modified by nanostructure components obtained by induction surfacing method tribological characteristics it is necessary to study the kinetics of the powdered layer melting and define the minimum time of melting. For powdered layer predetermined temperature maintenance at sintering mode stage it is required to determine the temperature difference through blank thickness of the for one hundred-day of the define the warm-up swing on of the stocking up by solving the thermal conductivity stationary problem for quill (hollow) cylinder with internal heat source. Herewith, since in practice thickness of the cylinder wall is much less then its diameter and the temperature difference is comparatively small, the thermal conductivity dependence upon the temperature can be treated as negligible. As it was shown by our previous studies, in the induction heating process under powdered material centrifugal surfacing (i.e. before achieving the melting temperature) the temperature distribution in powdered layer thickness may be considered even. Hereinafter, considering the blank part induction heating process quasi-stationarity under Fo big values, it is possible to consider its internal surface heating as developing with constant velocity. As a result of development the melting front movement mathematical model in a powdered material with nanostructure modifiers the minimum surfacing time is defined. It allows to minimize negative impact of thermal influence on formation of applied coating structure, to raise productivity of the process, to lower power inputs and to ensure saving of nonferrous and high alloys by reducing the allowance for machining. The difference of developed mathematical model of melting front movement from previously known is that the surface temperature from which the heat transfer occures is a variable and varies with a time after the linear law.

  3. Surface chemistry of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan, E-mail: Jayasheelan.Vaithilingam@nottingham.ac.uk [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Prina, Elisabetta [School of Pharmacy, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Goodridge, Ruth D.; Hague, Richard J.M. [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Edmondson, Steve [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Rose, Felicity R.A.J. [School of Pharmacy, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Christie, Steven D.R. [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) has previously been shown to be a viable method for fabricating biomedical implants; however, the surface chemistry of SLM fabricated parts is poorly understood. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the surface chemistries of (a) SLM as-fabricated (SLM-AF) Ti6Al4V and (b) SLM fabricated and mechanically polished (SLM-MP) Ti6Al4V samples and compared with (c) traditionally manufactured (forged) and mechanically polished Ti6Al4V samples. The SLM–AF surface was observed to be porous with an average surface roughness (Ra) of 17.6 ± 3.7 μm. The surface chemistry of the SLM-AF was significantly different to the FGD-MP surface with respect to elemental distribution and their existence on the outermost surface. Sintered particles on the SLM-AF surface were observed to affect depth profiling of the sample due to a shadowing effect during argon ion sputtering. Surface heterogeneity was observed for all three surfaces; however, vanadium was witnessed only on the mechanically polished (SLM-MP and FGD-MP) surfaces. The direct and indirect 3T3 cell cytotoxicity studies revealed that the cells were viable on the SLM fabricated Ti6Al4V parts. The varied surface chemistry of the SLM-AF and SLM-MP did not influence the cell behaviour. - Highlights: • Surface chemistry of selective laser melted (SLM) Ti6Al4V parts was compared with conventionally forged Ti6Al4V parts. • The surface elemental compositions of the SLM as-fabricated surfaces were significantly different to the forged surface. • Surface oxide-layer of the SLM as-fabricated was thicker than the polished SLM surfaces and the forged Ti6Al4V surfaces.

  4. Sheet production apparatus for removing a crystalline sheet from the surface of a melt using gas jets located above and below the crystalline sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellerman, Peter L.; Thronson, Gregory D.

    2017-06-14

    In one embodiment, a sheet production apparatus comprises a vessel configured to hold a melt of a material. A cooling plate is disposed proximate the melt and is configured to form a sheet of the material on the melt. A first gas jet is configured to direct a gas toward an edge of the vessel. A sheet of a material is translated horizontally on a surface of the melt and the sheet is removed from the melt. The first gas jet may be directed at the meniscus and may stabilize this meniscus or increase local pressure within the meniscus.

  5. Fracture behaviour of a magnesium–aluminium alloy treated by selective laser surface melting treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taltavull, C.; López, A.J.; Torres, B.; Rams, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • β-Mg 17 Al 12 presents fragile fracture behavior decreasing the ductility of AZ91D. • SLSM treatment only modifies the β-Mg 17 Al 12 phase whilst α-Mg remains unaltered. • In-situ SEM bending test allows to observe and data record of the crack propagation. • Eutectic microestructure of modified β-phase presents ductile fracture behaviour. • Fracture toughness of laser treated specimen is 40% greater than as-received alloy. - Abstract: Fracture behaviour of AZ91D magnesium alloy is dominated by the brittle fracture of the β-Mg 17 Al 12 phase so its modification is required to improve the toughness of this alloy. The novel laser treatment named as Selective Laser Surface Melting (SLSM) is characterized by the microstructural modification of the β-Mg 17 Al 12 phase without altering the α-Mg matrix. We have studied the effect of the selected microstructural modification induced by the laser treatment in the fracture behaviour of the alloy has been studied using in situ Scanning Electron Microscopy bending test. This test configuration allows the in situ observation of the crack progression and the record of the load–displacement curve. It has been observed that the microstructural modification introduced by SLSM causes an increase of 40% of the fracture toughness of the treated specimen. This phenomenon can be related with the transition from brittle to ductile fracture behaviour of the laser modified β-phase

  6. Methane excess in Arctic surface water-triggered by sea ice formation and melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E; Rudels, B; Schauer, U; Mau, S; Dieckmann, G

    2015-11-10

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  7. Point, surface and volumetric heat sources in the thermal modelling of selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yabin; Ayas, Can

    2017-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a powder based additive manufacturing technique suitable for producing high precision metal parts. However, distortions and residual stresses within products arise during SLM because of the high temperature gradients created by the laser heating. Residual stresses limit the load resistance of the product and may even lead to fracture during the built process. It is therefore of paramount importance to predict the level of part distortion and residual stress as a function of SLM process parameters which requires a reliable thermal modelling of the SLM process. Consequently, a key question arises which is how to describe the laser source appropriately. Reasonable simplification of the laser representation is crucial for the computational efficiency of the thermal model of the SLM process. In this paper, first a semi-analytical thermal modelling approach is described. Subsequently, the laser heating is modelled using point, surface and volumetric sources, in order to compare the influence of different laser source geometries on the thermal history prediction of the thermal model. The present work provides guidelines on appropriate representation of the laser source in the thermal modelling of the SLM process.

  8. Silica/Perfluoropolymer nanocomposites fabricated by direct melt-compounding: a novel method without surface modification on nano-silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Mitsuru; Hirose, Masaki; Watanabe, Yusuke; Lee, Jeong-Chang; Takeda, Kunihiko

    2007-07-01

    A novel method for the fabrication of silica/perfluoropolymer nanocomposites was investigated, whereby nano-sized silica particles without surface modification were dispersed uniformly through mechanical breakdown of loosely packed agglomerates of silica nanoparticles with low fracture strength in a polymer melt during direct melt-compounding. The method consists of two stages. The first stage involves preparation of the loose silica agglomerate, and the second stage involves melt-compounding of a completely hydrophobic perfluoropolymer, poly(tetrafluoroethyleneco-perfluoropropylvinylether), with the loose silica agglomerates prepared in the first stage. In the first stage, the packing structure and the fracture strength of the silica agglomerate were controlled by destabilizing an aqueous colloidal silica solution with a mean primary diameter of 190 nm via pH control and salt addition. In the next stage, the silica/perfluoropolymer nanocomposite was fabricated by breaking down the prepared loose silica agglomerates with low fracture strength by means of a shear force inside the polymer melt during melt-compounding.

  9. Spray forming: A numerical investigation of the influence of the gas to melt ratio on the billet surface temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Hattel, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    atomisation taking thermal coupling into consideration and the deposition of material at the surface of the billet taking geometrical aspects such as shading into account. The coupling between these two models is accomplished by ensuring that the total droplet size distribution of the spray is the summation......The relationship between the Gas to Melt Ratio (GMR) and the surface temperature of an evolving billet surface in spray forming is investigated numerically. The basis for the analysis is an integrated approach for modelling the entire spray forming process. This model includes the droplet...... of "local" droplet size distributions along the r-axis of the spray cone. The criterion for a successful process has been a predefined process window characterised by a desired fraction solid range at a certain distance from the atomizer. Inside this process window, the gas and melt flows have been varied...

  10. La Section d´Or y Juan Gris: Un camino hacia un cubismo espiritual

    OpenAIRE

    Sarriugarte Gómez, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    [ES] El artista de origen madrileño Juan Gris tuvo la oportunidad de ser testigo directo de la gestación del cubismo a raíz de su estancia en 1906 en la capital francesa. A partir de aquí, comienza a relacionarse con distintos pintores y críticos vanguardistas, que le ofertarán nuevas posibilidades aperturistas para su posterior involucración cubista. El año 1912 marca su definitiva integración bajo la estela pictórica del cubismo sintético, destacando igualmente su relación con el g...

  11. Cariotipo del tit? gris (Saguinus leucopus): similitudes con el cariotipo humano

    OpenAIRE

    Tabares, Juan Hember; Fierro, Carlos Humberto; Pulido, Paola Del Pilar; Ossa Reyes, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    El tit? gris (Saguinus leucopus) es un primate end?mico de Colombia cuyo cariotipo se describe en el presente estudio a partir de una pareja de individuos ubicados en el Centro de Rehabilitaci?n de Fauna Silvestre del Oriente de Caldas, Colombia. Las muestras de sangre fueron recolectadas de la vena femoral y anticoaguladas con heparina de sodio. Los cromosomas se obtuvieron por el m?todo cl?sico de cultivo de linfocitos y bandeamiento Q y G Los individuos presentan 46 cromosomas (2n = 46: 30...

  12. Microstructures induced by excimer laser surface melting of the SiC{sub p}/Al metal matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, D.S., E-mail: Daishu.qian@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Zhong, X.L.; Yan, Y.Z.; Hashimoto, T.; Liu, Z.

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Microstructural analysis of the excimer laser-melted SiC{sub p}/AA2124;. • Analytical, FEM, and SPH simulation of the laser-material interaction;. • Mechanism of the formation of the laser-induced microstructure. - Abstract: Laser surface melting (LSM) was carried out on the SiC{sub p}/Al metal matrix composite (MMC) using a KrF excimer laser with a fluence of 7 J/cm{sup 2}. The re-solidification microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray detector, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. It was found that a 2.5 μm thick melted layer was formed in the near-surface region, in which dissolution of the intermetallics and removal of the SiC particles occurred. The thermal and material response upon laser irradiation was simulated using three models, i.e. analytical model, finite element model (FEM) and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model. The effect of SiC particles on the LSM process, the mechanism of the SiC removal and the re-solidification microstructures in the melted layer were discussed. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results and contributed to the generic understanding of the re-solidification microstructures induced by ns-pulsed lasers.

  13. Empirical Retrieval of Surface Melt Magnitude from Coupled MODIS Optical and Thermal Measurements over the Greenland Ice Sheet during the 2001 Ablation Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampkin, Derrick; Peng, Rui

    2008-08-22

    Accelerated ice flow near the equilibrium line of west-central Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) has been attributed to an increase in infiltrated surface melt water as a response to climate warming. The assessment of surface melting events must be more than the detection of melt onset or extent. Retrieval of surface melt magnitude is necessary to improve understanding of ice sheet flow and surface melt coupling. In this paper, we report on a new technique to quantify the magnitude of surface melt. Cloud-free dates of June 10, July 5, 7, 9, and 11, 2001 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) daily reflectance Band 5 (1.230-1.250μm) and surface temperature images rescaled to 1km over western Greenland were used in the retrieval algorithm. An optical-thermal feature space partitioned as a function of melt magnitude was derived using a one-dimensional thermal snowmelt model (SNTHERM89). SNTHERM89 was forced by hourly meteorological data from the Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net) at reference sites spanning dry snow, percolation, and wet snow zones in the Jakobshavn drainage basin in western GIS. Melt magnitude or effective melt (E-melt) was derived for satellite composite periods covering May, June, and July displaying low fractions (0-1%) at elevations greater than 2500m and fractions at or greater than 15% at elevations lower than 1000m assessed for only the upper 5 cm of the snow surface. Validation of E-melt involved comparison of intensity to dry and wet zones determined from QSCAT backscatter. Higher intensities (> 8%) were distributed in wet snow zones, while lower intensities were grouped in dry zones at a first order accuracy of ~ ±2%.

  14. Modelling the influence of the gas to melt ratio on the fraction solid of the surface in spray formed billets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Pryds, Nini

    2006-01-01

    the atomisation stage taking thermal coupling into consideration and the deposition of the droplets at the surface of the billet taking geometrical aspects such as shading into account. The coupling between these two models is accomplished by ensuring that the total droplet size distribution of the spray......In this paper, the relationship between the Gas to Melt Ratio (GMR) and the solid fraction of an evolving billet surface is investigated numerically. The basis for the analysis is a recently developed integrated procedure for modelling the entire spray forming process. This model includes...... is the summation of “local” droplet size distributions along the r-axis of the spray cone. The criterion for a successful process has been a predefined process window characterised by a desired solid fraction range at a certain distance from the atomizer. Inside this process window, the gas and melt flows have...

  15. Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Roughness Analysis for AlSi10Mg Produced by Selective Laser Melting (SLM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarudin K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective Laser Melting (SLM is an Additive Manufacturing (AM technique that built 3D part in a layer-by-layer method by melting the top surface layer of a powder bed with a high intensity laser according to sliced 3D CAD data. AlSi10Mg alloy is a traditional cast alloy that is broadly used for die-casting process and used in automotive industry due its good mechanical properties. This paper seeks to investigate the requirement SLM in rapid tooling application. The feasibility study is done by examining the surface roughness and dimensional accuracy as compared to the benchmark part produced through the SLM process with constant parameters. The benchmark produced by SLM shows the potential of SLM in a manufacturing application particularly in moulds.

  16. Opto-mechanical design of an image slicer for the GRIS spectrograph at GREGOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Reyes, N.; Esteves, M. A.; Sánchez-Capuchino, J.; Salaun, Y.; López, R. L.; Gracia, F.; Estrada Herrera, P.; Grivel, C.; Vaz Cedillo, J. J.; Collados, M.

    2016-07-01

    An image slicer has been proposed for the Integral Field Spectrograph [1] of the 4-m European Solar Telescope (EST) [2] The image slicer for EST is called MuSICa (Multi-Slit Image slicer based on collimator-Camera) [3] and it is a telecentric system with diffraction limited optical quality offering the possibility to obtain high resolution Integral Field Solar Spectroscopy or Spectro-polarimetry by coupling a polarimeter after the generated slit (or slits). Considering the technical complexity of the proposed Integral Field Unit (IFU), a prototype has been designed for the GRIS spectrograph at GREGOR telescope at Teide Observatory (Tenerife), composed by the optical elements of the image slicer itself, a scanning system (to cover a larger field of view with sequential adjacent measurements) and an appropriate re-imaging system. All these subsystems are placed in a bench, specially designed to facilitate their alignment, integration and verification, and their easy installation in front of the spectrograph. This communication describes the opto-mechanical solution adopted to upgrade GRIS while ensuring repeatability between the observational modes, IFU and long-slit. Results from several tests which have been performed to validate the opto-mechanical prototypes are also presented.

  17. Tratamiento Híbrido de agua residual gris doméstica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Paredes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available El reúso del agua residual gris doméstica es una práctica que también puede aplicarse en nuestro país. Este reúso ayudaria a reducir los costos de consumo de agua potable que actualmente poseen las personas de estratos medio y bajo en el país. Este estudio aplica un concepto nuevo de sistema de tratamiento híbrido para descontaminar el agua y poderla reusar para riego de jardines o para llenar el tanque de los inodoros en una vivienda. Un tratamiento de agua residual gris doméstica híbrido plantea la consecución de remociones totales de materia orgánica, sólidos suspendidos totales, coliformes fecales del 93 %, 92 % y 99,2 %, respectivamente. Este tipo de tratamiento puede tener un valor agregado al disminuir las descargas de aguas servidas a través del sistema de alcantarillado sanitario, con el abaratamiento de la infraestructura para los organismos seccionales del país.

  18. Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) instrument and plans for serving SN 1987A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tueller, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Teegarden, B.J.; Leventhal, M.; MacCallum, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) is a powerful second-generation high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer. It consists of an array of seven large (typically >200 cm 3 ) n-type Germanium detectors surrounded by a thick (15 m) NaI active shield. Its energy range is 0.02 to 10 MeV. A new detector segmentation technique will be employed to reduce the detector background. The β-decay background component, which is expected to be dominant in the 0.2--2 MeV range, will be suppressed by roughly a factor of 20. The 3σ GRIS sensitivity to a narrow Fe line at 847 keV (expected to be the most intense from a supernova) will be ∼2 x 10 -4 photons/cm 2 -s for an 8 hr observation of the LMC over Alice Springs, Australia with unsegmented detectors. The instrument in simplified form will be ready to observe SN 1987A in early 1988

  19. Shock therapy: Gris Gun's shock absorber can take the punch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-04-01

    A newly developed shock impedance tool that isolates downhole tools that measure the effects of well stimulation techniques from being damaged by the violent shaking caused by various well stimulation techniques which combine perforating and propellant technology in a single tool, is discussed. The shock exerted by a perforating gun can exceed 25,000 G forces within 100 to 300 milliseconds, may damage or even destroy the sensitive electronics housed in the various recorders that record data about fracture gradients, permeability and temperature. The shock absorber developed by Tesco Gris Gun and Computalog, incorporates the mechanics of a piston style shock absorber in combination with a progressive spring stack and energy-dampening silicone oil chambers. The end results is an EUE 'slim line' assembly that is adaptable between the gun perforating string and the electronic equipment. It is typically attached below, reducing the shock load by as much as 90 per cent. The shock absorber is now available commercially through Gris Gun's exclusive distributorship. An improved version, currently under development, will be used for wireline perforating and tubing-conveyed perforating applications. 2 figs.

  20. The pattern of anthropogenic signal emergence in Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fyke, J.G.; Vizcaino, M.; Lipscomb, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Surface mass balance (SMB) trends influence observed Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) mass loss, but the component of these trends related to anthropogenic forcing is unclear. Here we study the simulated spatial pattern of emergence of an anthropogenically derived GrIS SMB signal between 1850 and 2100

  1. Future climate warming increases Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fyke, J.G.; Vizcaino, M.; Lipscomb, W.; Price, S.

    2014-01-01

    The integrated surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has large interannual variability. Long-term future changes to this variability will affect GrIS dynamics, freshwater fluxes, regional oceanography, and detection of changes in ice volume trends. Here we analyze a simulated

  2. Improvement of gel strength and melting point of fish gelatin by addition of coenhancers using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koli, Jayappa M; Basu, Subrata; Nayak, Binay B; Kannuchamy, Nagalakshmi; Gudipati, Venkateshwarlu

    2011-08-01

    Fish gelatin is a potential alternative to mammalian gelatin. However, poor gel strength and low melting point limit its applications. The study was aimed at improving these properties by adding coenhancers in the range obtained from response surface methodology (RSM) by using Box-Behnken design. Three different coenhancers, MgSO₄, sucrose, and transglutaminase were used as the independent variables for improving the gel strength and melting point of gelatin extracted from Tiger-toothed croaker (Otolithes ruber). Addition of coenhancers at different combinations resulted gel strength and melting point in the range of 150.5 to 240.5 g and 19.5 to 22.5 °C, respectively. The optimal concentrations of coenhancers for predicted maximum gel strength (242.8 g) obtained by RSM were 0.23 M MgSO₄, 12.60% sucrose (w/v), and 5.92 mg/g transglutaminase and for predicted maximum melting point (22.57 °C), the values were 0.24 M MgSO₄, 10.44% sucrose (w/v), and 5.72 mg/g transglutaminase. By addition of coenhancers at these optimal concentrations in verification experiments, the gel strength and melting point were improved from 170 to 240.89 g and 20.3 to 22.7 °C, respectively. These experimental values agreed well with the predicted values demonstrating the fitness of the models. Results from the present study clearly revealed that the addition of coenhancers at a particular combination can improve the gel strength and melting point of fish gelatin to enhance its range of applications. There is a growing interest in the use of fish gelatin as an alternative to mammalian gelatin. However, poor gel strength and low melting point of fish gelatin have limited its commercial applications. The gel strength and melting point of fish gelatin can be increased by incorporation of coenhancers such as magnesium sulphate, sucrose, and transglutaminase. Results of this work help to produce the fish gelatin suitable for wide range of applications in the food industry. © 2011 Institute

  3. In Situ X-Ray Diffraction Study on Surface Melting of Bi Nanoparticles Embedded in a SiO2 Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiao-Ming; Huo Kai-Tuo; Liu Peng

    2014-01-01

    Bi nanoparticles embedded in a SiO 2 matrix were prepared via the high energy ball milling method. The melting behavior of Bi nanoparticles was studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). DSC cannot distinguish the surface melting from ‘bulk’ melting of the Bi nanoparticles. The XRD intensity of the Bi nanoparticles decreases progressively during the in situ heating process. The variation in the normalized integrated XRD intensity versus temperature is related to the average grain size of Bi nanoparticles. Considering the effects of temperature on Debye—Waller factor and Lorentz-polarization factor, we discuss the XRD results in accordance with surface melting. Our results show that the in situ XRD technique is effective to explore the surface melting of nanoparticles

  4. Equivalence of chain conformations in the surface region of a polymer melt and a single Gaussian chain under critical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, A M; Leermakers, F A M; Fleer, G J

    2013-08-07

    In the melt polymer conformations are nearly ideal according to Flory's ideality hypothesis. Silberberg generalized this statement for chains in the interfacial region. We check the Silberberg argument by analyzing the conformations of a probe chain end-grafted at a solid surface in a sea of floating free chains of concentration φ by the self-consistent field (SCF) method. Apart from the grafting, probe chain and floating chains are identical. Most of the results were obtained for a standard SCF model with freely jointed chains on a six-choice lattice, where immediate step reversals are allowed. A few data were generated for a five-choice lattice, where such step reversals are forbidden. These coarse-grained models describe the equilibrium properties of flexible atactic polymer chains at the scale of the segment length. The concentration was varied over the whole range from φ = 0 (single grafted chain) to φ = 1 (probe chain in the melt). The number of contacts with the surface, average height of the free end and its dispersion, average loop and train length, tail size distribution, end-point and overall segment distributions were calculated for a grafted probe chain as a function of φ, for several chain lengths and substrate∕polymer interactions, which were varied from strong repulsion to strong adsorption. The computations show that the conformations of the probe chain in the melt do not depend on substrate∕polymer interactions and are very similar to the conformations of a single end-grafted chain under critical conditions, and can thus be described analytically. When the substrate∕polymer interaction is fixed at the value corresponding to critical conditions, all equilibrium properties of a probe chain are independent of φ, over the whole range from a dilute solution to the melt. We believe that the conformations of all flexible chains in the surface region of the melt are close to those of an appropriate single chain in critical conditions, provided

  5. Bone ingrowth potential of electron beam and selective laser melting produced trabecular-like implant surfaces with and without a biomimetic coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, J.E.; Hannink, G.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; Buma, P.

    2013-01-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of trabecular-like implant surfaces produced by either selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM), with or without a biomimetic calciumphosphate coating, was examined in goats. For histological analysis and histomorphometry of bone ingrowth depth and

  6. Surface chemistry of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan; Prina, Elisabetta; Goodridge, Ruth D; Hague, Richard J M; Edmondson, Steve; Rose, Felicity R A J; Christie, Steven D R

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) has previously been shown to be a viable method for fabricating biomedical implants; however, the surface chemistry of SLM fabricated parts is poorly understood. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the surface chemistries of (a) SLM as-fabricated (SLM-AF) Ti6Al4V and (b) SLM fabricated and mechanically polished (SLM-MP) Ti6Al4V samples and compared with (c) traditionally manufactured (forged) and mechanically polished Ti6Al4V samples. The SLM-AF surface was observed to be porous with an average surface roughness (Ra) of 17.6±3.7μm. The surface chemistry of the SLM-AF was significantly different to the FGD-MP surface with respect to elemental distribution and their existence on the outermost surface. Sintered particles on the SLM-AF surface were observed to affect depth profiling of the sample due to a shadowing effect during argon ion sputtering. Surface heterogeneity was observed for all three surfaces; however, vanadium was witnessed only on the mechanically polished (SLM-MP and FGD-MP) surfaces. The direct and indirect 3T3 cell cytotoxicity studies revealed that the cells were viable on the SLM fabricated Ti6Al4V parts. The varied surface chemistry of the SLM-AF and SLM-MP did not influence the cell behaviour. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental investigation on densification behavior and surface roughness of AlSi10Mg powders produced by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-zhi; Wang, Sen; Wu, Jiao-jiao

    2017-11-01

    Effects of laser energy density (LED) on densities and surface roughness of AlSi10Mg samples processed by selective laser melting were studied. The densification behaviors of the SLM manufactured AlSi10Mg samples at different LEDs were characterized by a solid densitometer, an industrial X-ray and CT detection system. A field emission scanning electron microscope, an automatic optical measuring system, and a surface profiler were used for measurements of surface roughness. The results show that relatively high density can be obtained with the point distance of 80-105 μm and the exposure time of 140-160 μs. The LED has an important influence on the surface morphology of the forming part, too high LED may lead to balling effect, while too low LED tends to produce defects, such as porosity and microcrack, and then affect surface roughness and porosities of the parts finally.

  8. Point, surface and volumetric heat sources in the thermal modelling of selective laser melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Ayas, C.; Brabazon, Dermot; Naher, Sumsun; Ul Ahad, Inam

    2017-01-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a powder based additive manufacturing technique suitable for producing high precision metal parts. However, distortions and residual stresses within products arise during SLM because of the high temperature gradients created by the laser heating. Residual stresses

  9. Influence of Contact Angle, Growth Angle and Melt Surface Tension on Detached Solidification of InSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhen; Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    2000-01-01

    We extended the previous analysis of detached solidification of InSb based on the moving meniscus model. We found that for steady detached solidification to occur in a sealed ampoule in zero gravity, it is necessary for the growth angle to exceed a critical value, the contact angle for the melt on the ampoule wall to exceed a critical value, and the melt-gas surface tension to be below a critical value. These critical values would depend on the material properties and the growth parameters. For the conditions examined here, the sum of the growth angle and the contact angle must exceed approximately 130, which is significantly less than required if both ends of the ampoule are open.

  10. X-ray and the Gamma spectrometer GRIS on the Russian segment of the International space station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, Yu.D.; Yurov, V.N.; Glyanenko, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Planned experiment on research X-ray and gamma radiation and neutrons of solar flares is described in the paper. Descriptions of scientific equipment of GRIS, a condition of carrying out experiment and results of calculation of characteristics of its detector are provided [ru

  11. X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy Study on Dynamics of the Free Surface in Entangled Polystyrene Melt Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Tadanori; Li Chunhua; Endoh, Maya K; Narayanan, Suresh; Lurio, Laurence; Sinha, Sunil K

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of polymer chains near the surface of a melt and within thin films remains a subject of inquiry along with the nature of the glass transition in these systems. Recent studies show that the properties of the free surface region are crucial in determining the anomalous glass transition temperature (T g ) reduction of polymer thin films. In this study, by embedding 'dilute' gold nanoparticles in polystyrene (PS) thin films as 'markers', we could successfully probe the diffusive Brownian motion which tracks the local viscosity both at the free surface and within the rest of the single PS thin film far above bulk T g . The technique used was X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy with resonance-enhanced X-rays that allows us to independently measure the motion in the regions of interest at the nanometer scale. We found the presence of the surface reduced viscosity layer in entangled PS thin films at T>>T g .

  12. MuSICa at GRIS: a prototype image slicer for EST at GREGOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcines, A.; Collados, M.; López, R. L.

    2013-05-01

    This communication presents a prototype image slicer for the 4-m European Solar Telescope (EST) designed for the spectrograph of the 1.5-m GREGOR solar telescope (GRIS). The design of this integral field unit has been called MuSICa (Multi-Slit Image slicer based on collimator-Camera). It is a telecentric system developed specifically for the integral field, high resolution spectrograph of EST and presents multi-slit capability, reorganizing a bidimensional field of view of 80 arcsec^{2} into 8 slits, each one of them with 200 arcsec length × 0.05 arcsec width. It minimizes the number of optical components needed to fulfil this multi-slit capability, three arrays of mirrors: slicer, collimator and camera mirror arrays (the first one flat and the other two spherical). The symmetry of the layout makes it possible to overlap the pupil images associated to each part of the sliced entrance field of view. A mask with only one circular aperture is placed at the pupil position. This symmetric characteristic offers some advantages: facilitates the manufacturing process, the alignment and reduces the costs. In addition, it is compatible with two modes of operation: spectroscopic and spectro-polarimetric, offering a great versatility. The optical quality of the system is diffraction-limited. The prototype will improve the performances of GRIS at GREGOR and is part of the feasibility study of the integral field unit for the spectrographs of EST. Although MuSICa has been designed as a solar image slicer, its concept can also be applied to night-time astronomical instruments (Collados et al. 2010, Proc. SPIE, Vol. 7733, 77330H; Collados et al. 2012, AN, 333, 901; Calcines et al. 2010, Proc. SPIE, Vol. 7735, 77351X)

  13. Localization and subcellular association of Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus in grapevine leaf tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquini, Giulia; Ermacora, Paolo; Bianchi, Gian Luca; De Amicis, Francesca; Pagliari, Laura; Martini, Marta; Loschi, Alberto; Saldarelli, Pasquale; Loi, Nazia; Musetti, Rita

    2018-05-01

    Despite the increasing impact of Grapevine Pinot gris disease (GPG-disease) worldwide, etiology about this disorder is still uncertain. The presence of the putative causal agent, the Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV), has been reported in symptomatic grapevines (presenting stunting, chlorotic mottling, and leaf deformation) as well as in symptom-free plants. Moreover, information on virus localization in grapevine tissues and virus-plant interactions at the cytological level is missing at all. Ultrastructural and cytochemical investigations were undertaken to detect virus particles and the associated cytopathic effects in field-grown grapevine showing different symptom severity. Asymptomatic greenhouse-grown grapevines, which tested negative for GPGV by real time RT-PCR, were sampled as controls. Multiplex real-time RT-PCR and ELISA tests excluded the presence of viruses included in the Italian certification program both in field-grown and greenhouse-grown grapevines. Conversely, evidence was found for ubiquitous presence of Grapevine Rupestris Stem Pitting-associated Virus (GRSPaV), Hop Stunt Viroid (HSVd), and Grapevine Yellow Speckle Viroid 1 (GYSVd-1) in both plant groups. Moreover, in every field-grown grapevine, GPGV was detected by real-time RT-PCR. Ultrastructural observations and immunogold labelling assays showed filamentous flexuous viruses in the bundle sheath cells, often located inside membrane-bound organelles. No cytological differences were observed among field-grown grapevine samples showing different symptom severity. GPGV localization and associated ultrastructural modifications are reported and discussed, in the perspective of assisting management and control of the disease.

  14. Combate del moho gris (Botrytis cinerea de la fresa mediante Gliocladium roseum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Chaves

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available En la zona de Poasito de Alajuela, se evaluó la acción del antagonista Gliocladium roseum, en forma individual y en conjunto con los fungicidas empleados en la finca, para el combate de Botrytis cinerea en fresa; comparándose los resultados contra los obtenidos con el manejo comercial. Se empleó un diseño de bloques completos al azar con 4 repeticiones y se hicieron aplicaciones semanales del antagonista (a una concentración ³ 107 conidios ml-1 durante un período aproximado de 4 meses (julio-octubre del 2000. Se evaluó la incidencia de moho gris en condiciones de campo y poscosecha, así como el efecto de los fungicidas aplicados sobre la germinación de los conidios del antagonista, mediante una prueba in vitro. Se obtuvo un combate más efectivo de la enfermedad en condiciones de campo al emplear el biocontrolador sólo o en conjunto con los fungicidas, con respecto al manejo comercial que se hace de la misma. En poscosecha, el desempeño del antagonista fue estadísticamente igual al del combate químico. Estos resultados muestran que los fungicidas aplicados no afectan considerablemente al antagonista, lo que se corroboró con la prueba in vitro. Al emplear G. roseum para el combate de B. cinerea no sólo se logra combatir efectivamente a este, sino también el resto de los patógenos (Colletotrichum, Phytophthora, Rhizoctonia, Rhizopus,Alternaria, Fusarium, Verticillium y Penicillium, ya que el porcentaje de frutas sanas es mayor al integrar la acción del antagonista al manejo de enfermedades de la finca. Sin embargo, estas diferencias no son estadísticamente significativas. Por lo anterior se concluye que G. roseum constituye una posible alternativa de manejo integrado del moho gris en fresa.

  15. Melt Inclusion Analysis of RBT 04262 with Relationship to Shergottites and Mars Surface Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. A.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Martian meteorite RBT 04262 is in the shergottite class. It displays the two lithologies typically found in "lherzolitic shergottites": one with a poikilitic texture of large pyroxene enclosing olivine and another with non-poikilitic texture. In the case of RBT 04262, the latter strongly ressembles an olivine- phyric shergottite which led the initial classification of this meteorite in that class. RBT 04262 has been studied with regards to its petrology, geochemistry and cosmic ray exposure and belongs to the enriched oxidized end-member of the shergottites. Studies on RBT 04262 have primarily focused on the bulk rock composition or each of the lithologies independently. To further elucidate RBT 04262's petrology and use it to better understand Martian geologic history, an in-depth study of its melt inclusions (MI) is being conducted. The MI chosen for this study are found within olivine grains. MI are thought to be trapped melts of the crystallizing magma preserved by the encapsulating olivine and offer snapshots of the composition of the magma as it evolves. Some MI, in the most Mg-rich part of the olivine of olivine-pyric shergottites, may even be representative of the meteorite parent melt.

  16. Linking Regional Winter Sea Ice Thickness and Surface Roughness to Spring Melt Pond Fraction on Landfast Arctic Sea Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha Nasonova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic sea ice cover has decreased strongly in extent, thickness, volume and age in recent decades. The melt season presents a significant challenge for sea ice forecasting due to uncertainty associated with the role of surface melt ponds in ice decay at regional scales. This study quantifies the relationships of spring melt pond fraction (fp with both winter sea ice roughness and thickness, for landfast first-year sea ice (FYI and multiyear sea ice (MYI. In 2015, airborne measurements of winter sea ice thickness and roughness, as well as high-resolution optical data of melt pond covered sea ice, were collected along two ~5.2 km long profiles over FYI- and MYI-dominated regions in the Canadian Arctic. Statistics of winter sea ice thickness and roughness were compared to spring fp using three data aggregation approaches, termed object and hybrid-object (based on image segments, and regularly spaced grid-cells. The hybrid-based aggregation approach showed strongest associations because it considers the morphology of the ice as well as footprints of the sensors used to measure winter sea ice thickness and roughness. Using the hybrid-based data aggregation approach it was found that winter sea ice thickness and roughness are related to spring fp. A stronger negative correlation was observed between FYI thickness and fp (Spearman rs = −0.85 compared to FYI roughness and fp (rs = −0.52. The association between MYI thickness and fp was also negative (rs = −0.56, whereas there was no association between MYI roughness and fp. 47% of spring fp variation for FYI and MYI can be explained by mean thickness. Thin sea ice is characterized by low surface roughness allowing for widespread ponding in the spring (high fp whereas thick sea ice has undergone dynamic thickening and roughening with topographic features constraining melt water into deeper channels (low fp. This work provides an important contribution towards the parameterizations of fp in

  17. Improvement of pitting corrosion resistance of AISI 304L stainless steel by nano-pulsed laser surface melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacquentin, W.; Blanc, C.; Caron, N.; Thro, P.Y.; Cheniere, A.; Tabarant, M.; Moutiers, G.; Miserque, F.; Plouzennec, H.; Oltra, R.

    2013-01-01

    The stainless steel 304L is widely used, however, in particular conditions, it may be sensitive to pitting corrosion. Nano-pulsed laser surface melting is a surface treatment which allows improving the corrosion resistance of this steel. This treatment consists in focusing a laser beam on the surface of the material, involving its quite immediately melting through a few microns depth, then an ultra-fast solidification occurs with cooling rate about 1011 K/s. The laser parameters control the modifications of the physico-chemical properties. In particular, we studied the influence of the impacts overlap of an ytterbium laser-fiber on the corrosion resistance of a 304L stainless steel in conditions of an aerated and agitated solution of NaCl (concentration of 30 g/L). We obtained an increase of the pitting potential of 220 mV, highlighting an improvement of the corrosion resistance. The study of the chemical and structural modifications is not enough to explain the improvement of the corrosion resistance. Other phenomena must be taken into account, as the quality of the oxide layer, in terms of physico-chemical and mechanical properties. (authors)

  18. [Energy dispersive spectrum analysis of surface compositions of selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by different processing parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liang; Zeng, Li; Wei, Bin; Gong, Yao

    2015-06-01

    To fabricate selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples by different processing parameters, and to analyze the changes of energy dispersive spectrum(EDS) on their surface. Nine groups were set up by orthogonal experimental design according to different laser powers,scanning speeds and powder feeding rates(laser power:2500-3000 W, scanning speed: 5-15 mm/s, powder feeding rate: 3-6 r/min). Three cylinder specimens(10 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were fabricated in each group through Rofin DL 035Q laser cladding system using cobalt-chromium alloy powders which were developed independently by our group.Their surface compositions were then measured by EDS analysis. Results of EDS analysis of the 9 groups fabricated by different processing parameters(Co:62.98%-67.13%,Cr:25.56%-28.50%,Si:0.49%-1.23%) were obtained. They were similar to the compositions of cobalt-chromium alloy used in dental practice. According to EDS results, the surface compositions of the selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples are stable and controllable, which help us gain a preliminary sight into the range of SLM processing parameters. Supported by "973" Program (2012CB910401) and Research Fund of Science and Technology Committee of Shanghai Municipality (12441903001 and 13140902701).

  19. Formation of recent martian debris flows by melting of near-surface ground ice at high obliquity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costard, F; Forget, F; Mangold, N; Peulvast, J P

    2002-01-04

    The observation of small gullies associated with recent surface runoff on Mars has renewed the question of liquid water stability at the surface of Mars. The gullies could be formed by groundwater seepage from underground aquifers; however, observations of gullies originating from isolated peaks and dune crests question this scenario. We show that these landforms may result from the melting of water ice in the top few meters of the martian subsurface at high obliquity. Our conclusions are based on the analogy between the martian gullies and terrestrial debris flows observed in Greenland and numerical simulations that show that above-freezing temperatures can occur at high obliquities in the near surface of Mars, and that such temperatures are only predicted at latitudes and for slope orientations corresponding to where the gullies have been observed on Mars.

  20. The effect of sudden ice sheet melt on ocean circulation and surface climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, R. F.; Gregoire, L. J.; Wickert, A. D.; Valdes, P. J.; Burke, A.

    2017-12-01

    Collapse of ice sheets can cause significant sea-level rise and widespread climate change. Around 14.6 thousand years ago, global mean sea level rose by 15 m in less than 350 years during an event known as Meltwater Pulse 1a. Ice sheet modelling and sea-level fingerprinting has suggested that approximately half of this 50 mm yr-1 sea level rise may have come from a North American ice Saddle Collapse that drained into the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans. However, dating uncertainties make it difficult to determine the sequence of events and their drivers, leaving many fundamental questions. For example, was melting from the northern ice sheets responsible for the Older-Dryas or other global-scale cooling events, or did a contribution from Antarctica counteract the climatic effects? What was the role of the abrupt Bølling Warming? And how were all these signals linked to changes in Atlantic Ocean overturning circulation?To address these questions, we examined the effect of the North American ice Saddle Collapse using a high resolution network drainage model coupled to an atmosphere-ocean-vegetation General Circulation Model. Here, we present the quantitative routing estimates of the consequent meltwater discharge and its impact on climate. We also tested a suite of more idealised meltwater forcing scenarios to examine the global influence of Arctic versus Antarctic ice melt. The results show that 50% of the Saddle Collapse meltwater pulse was routed via the Mackenzie River into the Arctic Ocean, and 50% was discharged directly into the Atlantic/Gulf of Mexico. This meltwater flux, equivalent to a total of 7.3 m of sea-level rise, caused a strong (6 Sv) weakening of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and widespread Northern Hemisphere cooling of 1-5 °C. The greatest cooling is in the Arctic (5-10 °C in the winter), but there is also significant winter warming over eastern North America (1-3 °C). We propose that this robust submillennial mechanism was

  1. Influence of Ultrasonic Surface Rolling on Microstructure and Wear Behavior of Selective Laser Melted Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The present article studied the effect of ultrasonic surface rolling process (USRP on the microstructure and wear behavior of a selective laser melted Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Surface characteristics were investigated using optical microscope, nano-indentation, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and laser scanning confocal microscope. Results indicated that the thickness of pore-free surfaces increased to 100~200 μm with the increasing ultrasonic surface rolling numbers. Severe work hardening occurred in the densified layer, resulting in the formation of refined grains, dislocation walls and deformation twins. After 1000 N 6 passes, about 15.5% and 14.1% increment in surficial Nano-hardness and Vickers-hardness was obtained, respectively. The hardness decreased gradually from the top surface to the substrate. Wear tests revealed that the friction coefficient declined from 0.74 (polished surface to 0.64 (USRP treated surface and the wear volume reduced from 0.205 mm−3 to 0.195 mm−3. The difference in wear volume between USRP treated and polished samples increased with sliding time. The enhanced wear resistance was concluded to be associated with the improvement of hardness and shear resistance and also the inhibition of delamination initiation.

  2. A Solvent-Free Surface Suspension Melt Technique for Making Biodegradable PCL Membrane Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratima Suntornnond

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In tissue engineering, there is limited availability of a simple, fast and solvent-free process for fabricating micro-porous thin membrane scaffolds. This paper presents the first report of a novel surface suspension melt technique to fabricate a micro-porous thin membrane scaffolds without using any organic solvent. Briefly, a layer of polycaprolactone (PCL particles is directly spread on top of water in the form of a suspension. After that, with the use of heat, the powder layer is transformed into a melted layer, and following cooling, a thin membrane is obtained. Two different sizes of PCL powder particles (100 µm and 500 µm are used. Results show that membranes made from 100 µm powders have lower thickness, smaller pore size, smoother surface, higher value of stiffness but lower ultimate tensile load compared to membranes made from 500 µm powder. C2C12 cell culture results indicate that the membrane supports cell growth and differentiation. Thus, this novel membrane generation method holds great promise for tissue engineering.

  3. Surface cracking and melting of different tungsten grades under transient heat and particle loads in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Ueda, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Surface damage of pure tungsten (W), W alloys with 2 wt.% tantalum (W-Ta) and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W coating on a reduced activation material of ferritic steel (F82H) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (˜0.3 ms) deuterium plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. Surface cracks appeared on a pure W sample exposed to 10 plasma pulses of ˜0.3 MJ m-2, while a W-Ta sample did not show surface cracks with similar pulsed plasma irradiation. The energy density threshold for surface cracking was significantly increased by the existence of the alloying element of tantalum. No surface morphology change of a VPS W coated F82H sample was observed under 10 plasma pulses of ˜0.3 MJ m-2, although surface melting and cracks in the resolidification layer occurred at higher energy density of ˜0.9 MJ m-2. There was no indication of exfoliation of the W coating from the substrate of F82H after the pulsed plasma exposures.

  4. Surface cracking and melting of different tungsten grades under transient heat and particle loads in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Y., E-mail: ykikuchi@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Surface damage of pure tungsten (W), W alloys with 2 wt.% tantalum (W–Ta) and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W coating on a reduced activation material of ferritic steel (F82H) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (∼0.3 ms) deuterium plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. Surface cracks appeared on a pure W sample exposed to 10 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m{sup −2}, while a W–Ta sample did not show surface cracks with similar pulsed plasma irradiation. The energy density threshold for surface cracking was significantly increased by the existence of the alloying element of tantalum. No surface morphology change of a VPS W coated F82H sample was observed under 10 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m{sup −2}, although surface melting and cracks in the resolidification layer occurred at higher energy density of ∼0.9 MJ m{sup −2}. There was no indication of exfoliation of the W coating from the substrate of F82H after the pulsed plasma exposures.

  5. Effect of melt surface depression on the vaporization rate of a metal heated by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilbaud, D.

    1995-01-01

    In order to produce high density vapor, a metal confined in a water cooled crucible is heated by an electron beam (eb). The energy transfer to the metal causes partial melting, forming a pool where the flow is driven by temperature induced buoyancy and capillary forces. Furthermore, when the vaporization rate is high, the free surface is depressed by the thrust of the vapor. The main objective of this paper is to analyse the combined effects of liquid flow and vapor condensation back on the liquid surface. This is done with TRIO-EF, a general purpose fluid mechanics finite element code. A suitable iterative scheme is used to calculate the free surface flow and the temperature field. The numerical simulation gives an insight about the influence of the free surface in heat transfer. The depression of the free surface induces strong effects on both liquid and vapor. As liquid is concerned, buoyancy convection in the pool is enhanced, the energy flux from electron beam is spread and constriction of heat flux under the eb spot is weakened. It results that heat transfer towards the crucible is reinforced. As vapor is concerned, its fraction that condenses back on the liquid surface is increased. These phenomena lead to a saturation of the net vaporization rate as the eb spot radius is reduced, at constant eb power. (author). 8 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Melting heat transfer in stagnation point flow of carbon nanotubes towards variable thickness surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work concentrates on the mathematical modeling for stagnation point flow of nanofluids over an impermeable stretching sheet with variable thickness. Carbon nanotubes [single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs] as the nanoparticles are utilized. Water and kerosene oil are taken as the base fluids. Heat transfer through melting effect is discussed. Transformation procedure is adapted to obtain the non-linear ordinary differential equations from the fundamental laws of mass, linear momentum and energy. The optimal values of convergence control parameters and corresponding individual and total residual errors for SWCNTs and MWCNTs are computed by means of homotopy analysis method (HAM based BVPh 2.0. Characteristics of different involved parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are discussed. Higher velocity profile is observed for wall thickness parameter in case of water carbon nanotubes when compared with the kerosene oil carbon nanotubes.

  7. Analysis of a Lennard-Jones fcc structure melting to the corresponding frozen liquid: Differences between the bulk and the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivi-Tran, N.; Faivre, A.

    2009-01-01

    We computed a Lennard-Jones frozen liquid with a free surface using classical molecular dynamics. The structure factor curves on the free surface of this sample were calculated for different depths knowing that we have periodic boundary conditions on the other parts of the sample. The resulting structure factor curves show an horizontal shift of their first peak depending on how deep in the sample the curves are computed. We analyze our resulting curves in the light of spatial correlation functions during melting. The conclusion is that the differences between bulk and surface are quite small during melting and that at the end of melting, only the very surface happens to be less dense than the bulk. This result is intrinsic to the shape of the Lennard-Jones potential and does not depend on any other parameter.

  8. Microstructural and surface modifications and hydroxyapatite coating of Ti-6Al-4V triply periodic minimal surface lattices fabricated by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunze; Hao, Liang; Hussein, Ahmed; Wei, Qingsong; Shi, Yusheng

    2017-06-01

    Ti-6Al-4V Gyroid triply periodic minimal surface (TPMS) lattices were manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM). The as-built Ti-6Al-4V lattices exhibit an out-of-equilibrium microstructure with very fine α' martensitic laths. When subjected to the heat treatment of 1050°C for 4h followed by furnace cooling, the lattices show a homogenous and equilibrium lamellar α+β microstructure with less dislocation and crystallographic defects compared with the as-built α' martensite. The as-built lattices present very rough strut surfaces bonded with plenty of partially melted metal particles. The sand blasting nearly removed all the bonded metal particles, but created many tiny cracks. The HCl etching eliminated these tiny cracks, and subsequent NaOH etching resulted in many small and shallow micro-pits and develops a sodium titanate hydrogel layer on the surfaces of the lattices. When soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF), the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices were covered with a compact and homogeneous biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) layer. This work proposes a new method for making Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices with a homogenous and equilibrium microstructure and biomimetic HA coating, which show both tough and bioactive characteristics and can be promising materials usable as bone substitutes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of chemical polishing on surface roughness and dimensional quality of electron beam melting process (EBM) parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolimont, Adrien; Rivière-Lorphèvre, Edouard; Ducobu, François; Backaert, Stéphane

    2018-05-01

    Additive manufacturing is growing faster and faster. This leads us to study the functionalization of the parts that are produced by these processes. Electron Beam melting (EBM) is one of these technologies. It is a powder based additive manufacturing (AM) method. With this process, it is possible to manufacture high-density metal parts with complex topology. One of the big problems with these technologies is the surface finish. To improve the quality of the surface, some finishing operations are needed. In this study, the focus is set on chemical polishing. The goal is to determine how the chemical etching impacts the dimensional accuracy and the surface roughness of EBM parts. To this end, an experimental campaign was carried out on the most widely used material in EBM, Ti6Al4V. Different exposure times were tested. The impact of these times on surface quality was evaluated. To help predicting the excess thickness to be provided, the dimensional impact of chemical polishing on EBM parts was estimated. 15 parts were measured before and after chemical machining. The improvement of surface quality was also evaluated after each treatment.

  10. Use of IR pyrometry to measure free-surface temperatures of partially melted tin as a function of shock pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifter, A.; Furlanetto, M. R.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Obst, A. W.; Payton, J. R.; Stone, J. B.; Tabaka, L. J.; Grover, M.; Macrum, G. S.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Swift, D. C.; Veeser, L. R.

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrium equation of state theory predicts that the free-surface release temperature of shock-loaded tin will show a plateau at 505 K in the stress range from 19.5 to 33.0 GPa, corresponding to the solid-liquid, mixed-phase region of tin. In this paper we report free-surface temperature measurements on shock-loaded tin from 15 to 31 GPa using multiwavelength optical pyrometry. The shock waves were generated by direct contact of detonating high explosive with a tin sample, and the stress in the sample was determined by free-surface velocity measurements using photon Doppler velocimetry. We measured the emitted thermal radiance in the near IR region at four wavelengths from 1.5 to 5.0 μm. Above 25 GPa the measured free-surface temperatures were higher than the predicted 505 K, and they increased with increasing stress. This deviation may be explained by hot spots and/or variations in surface emissivity, and it may indicate a weakness in the use of a simple analysis of multiwavelength pyrometry data for conditions, such as above the melt threshold, where hot spots or emissivity variations may be significant. We are continuing to study the discrepancy to determine its cause.

  11. Influence of additive laser manufacturing parameters on surface using density of partially melted particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Benoit; Brient, Antoine; Samper, Serge; Hascoët, Jean-Yves

    2016-12-01

    Mastering the additive laser manufacturing surface is a real challenge and would allow functional surfaces to be obtained without finishing. Direct Metal Deposition (DMD) surfaces are composed by directional and chaotic textures that are directly linked to the process principles. The aim of this work is to obtain surface topographies by mastering the operating process parameters. Based on experimental investigation, the influence of operating parameters on the surface finish has been modeled. Topography parameters and multi-scale analysis have been used in order to characterize the DMD obtained surfaces. This study also proposes a methodology to characterize DMD chaotic texture through topography filtering and 3D image treatment. In parallel, a new parameter is proposed: density of particles (D p). Finally, this study proposes a regression modeling between process parameters and density of particles parameter.

  12. Comparison of modelling and experimental results of anode surface melting by femtosecond laser-stimulated electrical discharges in small gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; He Lingna; Farson, Dave F; Rokhlin, Stanislav I

    2011-01-01

    Experiments and particle-in-cell simulations of femtosecond laser-stimulated electrical discharges in submicrometre gaps between scanning tunnelling microscope tip cathodes and gold film anodes are described. In experiments at applied potentials of 35 V and less, discharges were detected either as self-terminating low-current pulses with durations less than 10 ns and magnitudes less than 200 mA or as higher-current, longer-duration current waveforms. The probability of occurrence of low-current pulses increased as applied potential was decreased, being certain at low potentials of 20-25 V. Low-current pulse waveforms and surface melting of gold anodes predicted by the simulations were compared with experiments. Laser stimulation was modelled by introducing partially ionized electrode materials into the simulation domain at a controlled rate. Simulation results showed that the duration of low-current pulses was influenced by the time over which material was added to the gap region, establishing the importance of electrode vaporization on discharge duration. Subsequently, partially ionized electrode materials were preloaded into the gap in controlled amounts in subsequent simulations. Peak currents predicted by these simulations were nearly equal to the low-current pulse measurements but simulated pulse durations were shorter than experiments. Thus, the time axis of simulation current profiles was normalized for equality of charge transfer with experiments. Anode temperatures and melt diameters calculated from normalized simulated heat input profiles were well matched to experimental measurements.

  13. Nanoparticle dispersion effect of laser-surface melting in ZrB{sub 2p}/6061Al composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yida; Chao, Yuhjin; Luo, Zhen, E-mail: lz-tju@163.com [Tianjin University, School of Material Science and Engineering (China); Huang, Yongxian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology (China)

    2017-04-15

    Zirconium diboride (ZrB{sub 2p}, 15 vol%)/6061 aluminum (Al) composites were fabricated via in situ reaction. The existence, morphologies, and dispersion degree of the in situ ZrB{sub 2} particles with size from tens to hundreds of nanometers were studied by X-ray diffractometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. As the particle-settlement effect becomes dominant during the composite fabrication process, ZrB{sub 2} nanoparticles agglomerate to a certain extent in some areas of the as-cast composites. A laser-surface melting (LSM) strategy was applied to disperse agglomerated ZrB{sub 2} nanoparticles in as-cast composites, and the ZrB{sub 2} nanoparticle dispersion is affected visibly by LSM. After LSM, nanoparticles tend to distribute along the grain boundary. Particle clusters were dispersed in an explosive orientation and the particle diffusion distance varied in terms of its radius and melt-viscosity vicinity. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the existence of a subgrain structure near the ZrB{sub 2}–Al interface after LSM. This may increase the yield strength when a dislocation tangle forms.

  14. Effects of Processing Parameters on Surface Roughness of Additive Manufactured Ti-6Al-4V via Electron Beam Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Wai Jack; Nai, Mui Ling Sharon; Wei, Jun

    2017-01-01

    As one of the powder bed fusion additive manufacturing technologies, electron beam melting (EBM) is gaining more and more attention due to its near-net-shape production capacity with low residual stress and good mechanical properties. These characteristics also allow EBM built parts to be used as produced without post-processing. However, the as-built rough surface introduces a detrimental influence on the mechanical properties of metallic alloys. Thereafter, understanding the effects of processing parameters on the part’s surface roughness, in turn, becomes critical. This paper has focused on varying the processing parameters of two types of contouring scanning strategies namely, multispot and non-multispot, in EBM. The results suggest that the beam current and speed function are the most significant processing parameters for non-multispot contouring scanning strategy. While for multispot contouring scanning strategy, the number of spots, spot time, and spot overlap have greater effects than focus offset and beam current. The improved surface roughness has been obtained in both contouring scanning strategies. Furthermore, non-multispot contouring scanning strategy gives a lower surface roughness value and poorer geometrical accuracy than the multispot counterpart under the optimized conditions. These findings could be used as a guideline for selecting the contouring type used for specific industrial parts that are built using EBM. PMID:28937638

  15. Greenland in Warm (1.5 °C) and Warmer (RCP 8.5) Worlds: The Influence of the Paris Agreement on Ice Sheet Surface Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, D. B.

    2017-12-01

    Melting on the surface of the Greenland ice sheet has been changing dramatically as global air temperatures have increased in recent decades, including melt extent often exceeding the 1981-2010 median through much of the melt season and the onset of intermittent melt moving to earlier in the year. To evaluate potential future change, we investigate surface melting characteristics under both "low" (limited to 1.5 °C) and "high" (RCP 8.5) warming scenarios including analysis of differences in scenario outcomes. Climatologies of melt-relevant variables are developed from two publicly available ensembles of CESM1-CAM5-BGC GCM runs: the 30-member Large Ensemble (CESM LE; Kay et al. 2015) for historical calibration and the RCP 8.5 scenario and the 11-member Low Warming ensemble (CESM LW; Sanderson et al. 2017) for the 1.5 °C scenario. For higher spatial resolution (15 km) and improved polar-centric model physics, we also apply the regional forecast model Polar WRF to decadal subsets (1996-2005; 2071-80) using GCM data archived at sub-daily resolution for boundary conditions. Models were skill-tested against ERA-Interim Reanalysis (ERAI) and AWS observations. For example, CESM LE tends to overpredict both maximum (above-freezing) and minimum daily average surface temperatures compared to observations from the GC-Net Swiss Camp AWS. Ensembles of members differing only by initial conditions allow us to also estimate intramodel uncertainty. Historical (1981-2000) CESM LE spatially averaged July temperatures are 2 +/- 0.2 °C cooler than ERAI while local anomalies in individual members reach up to +/- 2 °C. As expected, Greenland does not escape future (2081-2100) warming (and expectations of more widespread surface melting) even in the LW scenario, but positive changes versus ERAI are mostly coastal (2-3 °C) with the interior showing only minor change (+/- 1 °C). In contrast, under RCP 8.5, the entire ice sheet has warmed by 2-6 °C, or a median increase of 5 °C versus

  16. High Surface Area Iridium Anodes and Melt Containers for Molten Oxide Electrolysis, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is the most attractive method of oxygen production on the lunar surface, because no additional chemical reagents...

  17. An investigation on the effect of surface characteristics on adhesion between polymer melts and replication tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delaney, Kevin D.; Kennedy, Jonathan David; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Understanding interfacial characteristics between a polymer and its associated tool surface is critical to successful optimization of processes such as injection moulding, embossing and extrusion used to produce polymer parts. One of the factors characterizing the strength of the polymer-tool int......Understanding interfacial characteristics between a polymer and its associated tool surface is critical to successful optimization of processes such as injection moulding, embossing and extrusion used to produce polymer parts. One of the factors characterizing the strength of the polymer...... the results of an experimental study aimed at determining the effect of selected tool surface characteristics on the work of adhesion, by measuring contact angles of polymer droplets on the surfaces. The experimental set-up, selection of test parameters and main challenges faced to date are described...

  18. Influence of surface melting effects and availability of reagent ions on LDI-MS efficiency after UV laser irradiation of Pd nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silina, Yuliya E; Koch, Marcus; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the influence of surface morphology, reagent ions and surface restructuring effects on atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization (LDI) for small molecules after laser irradiation of palladium self-assembled nanoparticular (Pd-NP) structures has been systematically studied. The dominant role of surface morphology during the LDI process, which was previously shown for silicon-based substrates, has not been investigated for metal-based substrates before. In our experiments, we demonstrated that both the presence of reagent ions and surface reorganization effects--in particular, melting--during laser irradiation was required for LDI activity of the substrate. The synthesized Pd nanostructures with diameters ranging from 60 to 180 nm started to melt at similar temperatures, viz. 890-898 K. These materials exhibited different LDI efficiencies, however, with Pd-NP materials being the most effective surface in our experiments. Pd nanostructures of diameters >400-800 nm started to melt at higher temperatures, >1000 K, making such targets more resistant to laser irradiation, with subsequent loss of LDI activity. Our data demonstrated that both melting of the surface structures and the presence of reagent ions were essential for efficient LDI of the investigated low molecular weight compounds. This dependence of LDI on melting points was exploited further to improve the performance of Pd-NP-based sampling targets. For example, adding sodium hypophosphite as reducing agent to Pd electrolyte solutions during synthesis lowered the melting points of the Pd-NP materials and subsequently gave reduced laser fluence requirements for LDI. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Bsat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM, can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be bio-functionalized to promote bone growth. In the current work, EBM porous Ti6Al4V alloy was exposed to an alkali acid heat (AlAcH treatment to bio-functionalize the surface of the porous structure. Various molar concentrations (3, 5, 10M and immersion times (6, 24 h of the alkali treatment were used to determine optimal parameters. The apatite forming ability of the samples was evaluated using simulated body fluid (SBF immersion testing. The micro-topography and surface chemistry of AlAcH treated samples were evaluated before and after SBF testing using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The AlAcH treatment successfully modified the topographical and chemical characteristics of EBM porous titanium surface creating nano-topographical features ranging from 200–300 nm in size with a titania layer ideal for apatite formation. After 1 and 3 week immersion in SBF, there was no Ca or P present on the surface of as manufactured porous titanium while both elements were present on all AlAcH treated samples except those exposed to 3M, 6 h alkali treatment. An increase in molar concentration and/or immersion time of alkali treatment resulted in an increase in the number of nano-topographical features per unit area as well as the amount of titania on the surface.

  20. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bsat, Suzan; Yavari, Saber Amin; Munsch, Maximilian; Valstar, Edward R; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2015-04-08

    Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM), can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be bio-functionalized to promote bone growth. In the current work, EBM porous Ti6Al4V alloy was exposed to an alkali acid heat (AlAcH) treatment to bio-functionalize the surface of the porous structure. Various molar concentrations (3, 5, 10M) and immersion times (6, 24 h) of the alkali treatment were used to determine optimal parameters. The apatite forming ability of the samples was evaluated using simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion testing. The micro-topography and surface chemistry of AlAcH treated samples were evaluated before and after SBF testing using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The AlAcH treatment successfully modified the topographical and chemical characteristics of EBM porous titanium surface creating nano-topographical features ranging from 200-300 nm in size with a titania layer ideal for apatite formation. After 1 and 3 week immersion in SBF, there was no Ca or P present on the surface of as manufactured porous titanium while both elements were present on all AlAcH treated samples except those exposed to 3M, 6 h alkali treatment. An increase in molar concentration and/or immersion time of alkali treatment resulted in an increase in the number of nano-topographical features per unit area as well as the amount of titania on the surface.

  1. Surface tension estimation of high temperature melts of the binary alloys Ag-Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Ali; Arslan, Hüseyin

    2017-11-01

    Surface tension calculation of the binary alloys Ag-Au at the temperature of 1381 K, where Ag and Au have similar electronic structures and their atomic radii are comparable, are carried out in this study using several equations over entire composition range of Au. Apparently, the deviations from ideality of the bulk solutions, such as activities of Ag and Au are small and the maximum excess Gibbs free energy of mixing of the liquid phase is for instance -4500 J/mol at XAu = 0.5. Besides, the results obtained in Ag-Au alloys that at a constant temperature the surface tension increases with increasing composition while the surface tension decreases as the temperature increases for entire composition range of Au. Although data about surface tension of the Ag-Au alloy are limited, it was possible to make a comparison for the calculated results for the surface tension in this study with the available experimental data. Taken together, the average standard error analysis that especially the improved Guggenheim model in the other models gives the best agreement along with the experimental results at temperature 1383 K although almost all models are mutually in agreement with the other one.

  2. Satellite-derived, melt-season surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet (2000-2005) and its relationship to mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S.; Casey, K.A.; DiGirolamo, N.E.; Wan, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mean, clear-sky surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet was measured for each melt season from 2000 to 2005 using Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)–derived land-surface temperature (LST) data-product maps. During the period of most-active melt, the mean, clear-sky surface temperature of the ice sheet was highest in 2002 (−8.29 ± 5.29°C) and 2005 (−8.29 ± 5.43°C), compared to a 6-year mean of −9.04 ± 5.59°C, in agreement with recent work by other investigators showing unusually extensive melt in 2002 and 2005. Surface-temperature variability shows a correspondence with the dry-snow facies of the ice sheet; a reduction in area of the dry-snow facies would indicate a more-negative mass balance. Surface-temperature variability generally increased during the study period and is most pronounced in the 2005 melt season; this is consistent with surface instability caused by air-temperature fluctuations.

  3. Fusion surface material melting, ablation, and ejection under high heat loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holliday, M.R.; Doster, J.M.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Limiters, divertor plates, and sections of the first wall are exposed to intense heat loads during normal operation and plasma disruptions. This results in severe thermal stresses as well as erosion of the surface material. Large surface areas of compact high-field tokamaks are expected to be exposed to these high heat loads. The need for a fast and accurate computational model describing the heat transfer and phase change process has arisen as a part of the larger model of the plasma-edge region. The authors report on a solution scheme that has been developed that minimizes computational time for this time-dependent, one-dimensional, moving boundary problem. This research makes use of the heat balance integral technique, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than previous finite difference techniques. In addition, we report on the effect of molten material ejection (by external forces) on the total surface erosion rate

  4. Fabrication of friction-reducing texture surface by selective laser melting of ink-printed (SLM-IP) copper (Cu) nanoparticles(NPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinjian; Liu, Junyan; Wang, Yang; Fu, Yanan

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports a process of selective laser melting of ink-printed (SLM-IP) copper (Cu) nanoparticles(NPs) for the fabrication of full dense Cu friction-reducing texture on the metallic surface in ambient condition. This technique synthesizes pure Cu by chemical reduction route using an organic solvent during laser melting in the atmosphere environment, and provides a flexible additive manufacture approach to form complex friction-reduction texture on the metallic surface. Microtextures of ring and disc arrays have been fabricated on the stainless steel surface by SLM-IP Cu NPs. The friction coefficient has been measured under the lubricating condition of the oil. Disc texture surface (DTS) has a relatively low friction coefficient compared with ring texture surface (RTS), Cu film surface (Cu-FS) and the untreated substrate. The study suggests a further research on SLM-IP approach for complex microstructure or texture manufacturing, possibly realizing its advantage of flexibility.

  5. Influence of Selective Laser Melting Processing Parameters of Co-Cr-W Powders on the Roughness of Exterior Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baciu, M. A.; Baciu, E. R.; Bejinariu, C.; Toma, S. L.; Danila, A.; Baciu, C.

    2018-06-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) represents an Additive Manufacturing method widely used in medical practice, mainly in dental medicine. The powder of 59% Co, 25% Cr, 2.5% W alloy (Starbond CoS Powder 55, S&S Scheftner C, Germany) was processed (SLM) on a Realizer SLM 50 device (SLM Solution, Germany). After laser processing and simple sanding with Al2O3 or two-phase sanding (Al2O3 and glass balls), measurements of surface roughness were conducted. This paper presents the influences exercised by laser power (P = 60 W, 80 W and 100 W), the scanning speed (vscan = 333 mm/s, 500 mm/s and 1000 mm/s) and exposure time (te = 20 µs, 40 µs and 60 µs) on the roughness of surfaces obtained by SLM processing. Based on the experimental results obtained for roughness (Ra), some recommendations regarding the choice of favorable combinations among the values of technological parameters under study in order to obtain the surface quality necessary for subsequent applications of the processed parts (SLM) have been made.

  6. Surface morphology and physical properties of partially melt textured Mn doped Bi-2223

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Verma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The samples of Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3-xMnxO10+δ (x = 0.0 to 0.30 were prepared by the standard solid-state reaction method. The phase identification characteristics of synthesized (HTSC materials were explored through powder X-ray diffractometer reveals that all the samples crystallize in orthorhombic structure with lattice parameters a = 5.4053 Å, b = 5.4110 Å and c = 37.0642 Å up to Mn concentration of x = 0.30. The critical temperature (Tc measured by standard four probe method has been found to depress from 108 K to 70 K as Mn content (x increases from 0.00 to 0.30. The effects of sintering temperature on the surface morphology of Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3-xMnxO10+δ have also been investigated. The surface morphology investigated through scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy (SEM & AFM results that voids are decreasing but grains size increases as the Mn concentration increases besides, nanosphere like structures on the surface of the Mn doped Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3-xMnxO10+δ (Bi-2223 samples.

  7. Influence of surface roughness and melt superheat on HDA process to form a tritium permeation barrier on RAFM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purushothaman, J. [B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Chennai 600048 (India); MTD, MMG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Ramaseshan, R., E-mail: seshan@igcar.gov.in [TFCS, SND, MSG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Albert, S.K. [MTD, MMG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Rajendran, R. [B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Chennai 600048 (India); Gowrishankar, N. [IP Rings Ltd., Maraimalainagar, Chennai 603209 (India); Ramasubbu, V. [MTD, MMG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Murugesan, S.; Dasgupta, Arup [PMG, MMG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Jayakumar, T. [MTD, MMG, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Surface modified RAFMS samples were subjected to HDA and thermal oxidation. • Sample modified by SB process showed better coating and interface morphology. • Aluminized samples at 740 °C for 2 min showed Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 9}Si{sub 2} intermetallic phase. • Oxidized samples showed Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 8}Si, Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 3}Si{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 3} intermetallic phases. • A uniform permeation barrier Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was formed on the coating of oxidized HDA samples. - Abstract: The most optimal candidate material for fabrication of Test Blanket Module (TBM) in the installation of ITER and future fusion reactors is Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, yet one of the major challenges that need to be addressed with RAFM is minimizing the loss of tritium in a reactor environment through the formation of tritium permeation barrier. One of the most promising methods for the tritium permeation barrier is through duplex coating with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Fe–Al which is well known to reduce tritium permeation rate by several orders of magnitude. The present work aims to form an alumina layer on RAFM steel by a two-step method, which consists of (i) Hot Dip Aluminizing (HDA) and (ii) conversion of Al into alumina by a subsequent oxidation process. In addition, the influence of surface roughness of the substrate, superheat condition of the Al alloy melt and its composition on microstructural properties of coating before and after oxidation were investigated using OM, SEM–EDS, XRD, indentation micro hardness and scratch test. The experimental results confirmed the formation of alumina layer on RAFM steel after the HDA and oxidation process. Moreover, the surface roughness of the substrate, melt superheat of Al alloy and its composition are found to have a significant influence on the microstructure, thickness, micro-hardness, nature of intermetallic compounds formed and adhesion strength of the coating.

  8. Annealing and surface conduction on Hydrogen peroxide treated bulk melt-grown, single crystal ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mtangi, W.; Nel, J.M.; Auret, F.D.; Chawanda, A.; Diale, M.; Nyamhere, C.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the studies carried out on hydrogen peroxide treated melt-grown, bulk single crystal ZnO samples. Results show the existence of two shallow donors in the as-received ZnO samples with energy levels (37.8±0.3) meV that has been suggested as Zn i related and possibly H-complex related and (54.5±0.9) meV, which has been assigned to an Al-related donor. Annealing studies performed on the hydrogen peroxide treated samples reveal the existence of a conductive channel in the samples in which new energy levels have been observed, Zn vacancies, related to the Group I elements, X Zn . The surface donor volume concentration of the conductive channel was calculated from a theory developed by Look (2007) . Results indicate an increase in the surface volume concentration with increasing annealing temperature from 60×10 17 cm −3 at 200 °C to 4.37×10 18 cm -3 at 800 °C.

  9. Annealing and surface conduction on Hydrogen peroxide treated bulk melt-grown, single crystal ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mtangi, W., E-mail: wilbert.mtangi@up.ac.za [University of Pretoria, Physics Department, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Nel, J.M.; Auret, F.D.; Chawanda, A.; Diale, M. [University of Pretoria, Physics Department, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Nyamhere, C. [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Physics Department, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    We report on the studies carried out on hydrogen peroxide treated melt-grown, bulk single crystal ZnO samples. Results show the existence of two shallow donors in the as-received ZnO samples with energy levels (37.8{+-}0.3) meV that has been suggested as Zn{sub i} related and possibly H-complex related and (54.5{+-}0.9) meV, which has been assigned to an Al-related donor. Annealing studies performed on the hydrogen peroxide treated samples reveal the existence of a conductive channel in the samples in which new energy levels have been observed, Zn vacancies, related to the Group I elements, X{sub Zn}. The surface donor volume concentration of the conductive channel was calculated from a theory developed by Look (2007) . Results indicate an increase in the surface volume concentration with increasing annealing temperature from 60 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} at 200 Degree-Sign C to 4.37 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} at 800 Degree-Sign C.

  10. Quality Control of Laser-Beam-Melted Parts by a Correlation Between Their Mechanical Properties and a Three-Dimensional Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, T.; Wiora, G.; Witt, G.

    2017-03-01

    Good correlations between three-dimensional surface analyses of laser-beam-melted parts of nickel alloy HX and their mechanical properties were found. The surface analyses were performed with a confocal microscope, which offers a more profound surface data basis than a conventional, two-dimensional tactile profilometry. This new approach results in a wide range of three-dimensional surface parameters, which were each evaluated with respect to their feasibility for quality control in additive manufacturing. As a result of an automated surface analysis process by the confocal microscope and an industrial six-axis robot, the results are an innovative approach for quality control in additive manufacturing.

  11. Volume changes of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, due to surface mass balance, ice flow, and subglacial melting at geothermal areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Björnson, Helgi; Dall, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    We present observed changes in the geometry of western Vatnajökull over a period of about ten years which are caused by the surface mass balance, ice flow (both during surges and quiescent periods), and basal melting due to geothermal and volcanic activity. Comparison of two digital elevation...

  12. Theory of melt polyelectrolyte blends and block copolymers: Phase behavior, surface tension, and microphase periodicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sing, Charles E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Zwanikken, Jos W.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    Polymer mixtures such as blends or block copolymers are of great interest in energy applications and functional materials, and often, one or more of these species contain charges. The traditional fashion in which such materials are studied uses Self-Consistent Field Theory (SCFT) methods that incorporate electrostatics using Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. We adapt a new and rigorous approach that does not rely on the mean-field assumptions inherent in the PB theory and instead uses Liquid State (LS) integral equation theory to articulate charge correlations that are completely neglected in PB. We use this theory to calculate phase diagrams for both blends and block copolyelectrolytes using SCFT-LS and demonstrate how their phase behavior is highly dependent on chain length, charge fraction, charge size, and the strength of Coulombic interactions. Beyond providing phase behavior of blends and block copolyelectrolytes, we can use this theory to investigate the interfacial properties such as surface tension and block copolyelectrolyte lamellar spacing. Lamellar spacing provides a way to directly compare the SCFT-LS theory to the results of experiments. SCFT-LS will provide conceptual and mathematical clarification of the role of charge correlations in these systems and aid in the design of materials based on charge polymers.

  13. Theory of melt polyelectrolyte blends and block copolymers: Phase behavior, surface tension, and microphase periodicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sing, Charles E.; Zwanikken, Jos W.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Polymer mixtures such as blends or block copolymers are of great interest in energy applications and functional materials, and often, one or more of these species contain charges. The traditional fashion in which such materials are studied uses Self-Consistent Field Theory (SCFT) methods that incorporate electrostatics using Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. We adapt a new and rigorous approach that does not rely on the mean-field assumptions inherent in the PB theory and instead uses Liquid State (LS) integral equation theory to articulate charge correlations that are completely neglected in PB. We use this theory to calculate phase diagrams for both blends and block copolyelectrolytes using SCFT-LS and demonstrate how their phase behavior is highly dependent on chain length, charge fraction, charge size, and the strength of Coulombic interactions. Beyond providing phase behavior of blends and block copolyelectrolytes, we can use this theory to investigate the interfacial properties such as surface tension and block copolyelectrolyte lamellar spacing. Lamellar spacing provides a way to directly compare the SCFT-LS theory to the results of experiments. SCFT-LS will provide conceptual and mathematical clarification of the role of charge correlations in these systems and aid in the design of materials based on charge polymers

  14. Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS): a new balloon-borne experiment for gamma-ray line astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teegarden, B.J.; Cline, T.L.; Gehrels, N.; Porreca, G.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Huters, A.F.; Maccallum, C.J.; Stang, P.D.; Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is a relatively new field that holds great promise for further understanding of high energy astrophysical processes. When the high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer (GRSE) was removed from the GRO payload, a balloon program was initiated to permit continued development and improvement of instrumentation in this field, as well as continued scientific observations. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) is one of the experiments selected as part of this program. The instrument contains a number of new and innovative features that are expected to produce a significant improvement in source location accuracy and sensitivity over previous balloon and satellite experiments

  15. Hållbarhetsredovisning i svenska börsbolag : En studie utifrån GRI:s riktlinjer

    OpenAIRE

    Nyberg, Niklas; Moberg, Sofia

    2008-01-01

    Sammanfattning Titel: ”Hållbarhetsredovisning i svenska börsbolag – En studie utifrån GRI:s riktlinjer” Seminariedatum: Måndagen 25 Februari 2008 Ämne/kurs: Företagsekonomi C-uppsats, 15 p Författare: Niklas Nyberg, Sofia Moberg Handledare: Margareta Paulsson Nyckelord: GRI, Hållbarhetsredovisning, redovisning, svenska företag Bakgrund: De senaste åren har kraven på svenska företag ökat, och intressenter efterfrågar nu information angående produktion, underleverantörer m.m. Att visa att de ta...

  16. Gamma Ray Imaging System (GRIS) GammaCam trademark. Final report, January 3, 1994 - May 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the activities undertaken during the development of the Gamma Ray Imaging System (GRIS) program now referred to as the GammaCam trademark. The purpose of this program is to develop a 2-dimensional imaging system for gamma-ray energy scenes that may be present in nuclear power plants. The report summarizes the overall accomplishments of the program and the most recent GammaCam measurements made at LANL and Estonia. The GammaCam is currently available for sale from AIL Systems as an off-the-shelf instrument

  17. Investigation into the influence of laser energy input on selective laser melted thin-walled parts by response surface method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jian; Pang, Zhicong; Wu, Weihui

    2018-04-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) provides a feasible way for manufacturing of complex thin-walled parts directly, however, the energy input during SLM process, namely derived from the laser power, scanning speed, layer thickness and scanning space, etc. has great influence on the thin wall's qualities. The aim of this work is to relate the thin wall's parameters (responses), namely track width, surface roughness and hardness to the process parameters considered in this research (laser power, scanning speed and layer thickness) and to find out the optimal manufacturing conditions. Design of experiment (DoE) was used by implementing composite central design to achieve better manufacturing qualities. Mathematical models derived from the statistical analysis were used to establish the relationships between the process parameters and the responses. Also, the effects of process parameters on each response were determined. Then, a numerical optimization was performed to find out the optimal process set at which the quality features are at their desired values. Based on this study, the relationship between process parameters and SLMed thin-walled structure was revealed and thus, the corresponding optimal process parameters can be used to manufactured thin-walled parts with high quality.

  18. Diazotroph Diversity in the Sea Ice, Melt Ponds, and Surface Waters of the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Turk-Kubo, Kendra A; Buttigieg, Pier L; Rapp, Josephine Z; Krumpen, Thomas; Zehr, Jonathan P; Boetius, Antje

    2016-01-01

    The Eurasian basin of the Central Arctic Ocean is nitrogen limited, but little is known about the presence and role of nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Recent studies have indicated the occurrence of diazotrophs in Arctic coastal waters potentially of riverine origin. Here, we investigated the presence of diazotrophs in ice and surface waters of the Central Arctic Ocean in the summer of 2012. We identified diverse communities of putative diazotrophs through targeted analysis of the nifH gene, which encodes the iron protein of the nitrogenase enzyme. We amplified 529 nifH sequences from 26 samples of Arctic melt ponds, sea ice and surface waters. These sequences resolved into 43 clusters at 92% amino acid sequence identity, most of which were non-cyanobacterial phylotypes from sea ice and water samples. One cyanobacterial phylotype related to Nodularia sp. was retrieved from sea ice, suggesting that this important functional group is rare in the Central Arctic Ocean. The diazotrophic community in sea-ice environments appear distinct from other cold-adapted diazotrophic communities, such as those present in the coastal Canadian Arctic, the Arctic tundra and glacial Antarctic lakes. Molecular fingerprinting of nifH and the intergenic spacer region of the rRNA operon revealed differences between the communities from river-influenced Laptev Sea waters and those from ice-related environments pointing toward a marine origin for sea-ice diazotrophs. Our results provide the first record of diazotrophs in the Central Arctic and suggest that microbial nitrogen fixation may occur north of 77°N. To assess the significance of nitrogen fixation for the nitrogen budget of the Arctic Ocean and to identify the active nitrogen fixers, further biogeochemical and molecular biological studies are needed.

  19. Diazotroph diversity in the sea ice, melt ponds and surface waters of the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Fernández-Méndez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Eurasian basin of the Central Arctic Ocean is nitrogen limited, but little is known about the presence and role of nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Recent studies have indicated the occurrence of diazotrophs in Arctic coastal waters potentially of riverine origin. Here, we investigated the presence of diazotrophs in ice and surface waters of the Central Arctic Ocean in the summer of 2012. We identified diverse communities of putative diazotrophs through targeted analysis of the nifH gene, which encodes the iron protein of the nitrogenase enzyme. We amplified 529 nifH sequences from 26 samples of Arctic melt ponds, sea ice and surface waters. These sequences resolved into 43 clusters at 92% amino acid sequence identity, most of which were non-cyanobacterial phylotypes from sea ice and water samples. One cyanobacterial phylotype related to Nodularia sp. was retrieved from sea ice, suggesting that this important functional group is rare in the Central Arctic Ocean. The diazotrophic community in sea-ice environments appear distinct from other cold-adapted diazotrophic communities, such as those present in the coastal Canadian Arctic, the Arctic tundra and glacial Antarctic lakes. Molecular fingerprinting of nifH and the intergenic spacer region of the rRNA operon revealed differences between the communities from river-influenced Laptev Sea waters and those from ice-related environments pointing towards a marine origin for sea-ice diazotrophs. Our results provide the first record of diazotrophs in the Central Arctic and suggest that microbial nitrogen fixation may occur north of 77ºN. To assess the significance of nitrogen fixation for the nitrogen budget of the Arctic Ocean and to identify the active nitrogen fixers, further biogeochemical and molecular biological studies are needed.

  20. The influence of heterogeneous nucleation on the surface crystallization of guaifenesin from melt extrudates containing Eudragit L10055 or Acryl-EZE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Caroline D; Fegely, Kurt A; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R; McGinity, James W

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of talc and humidity conditions during storage on the crystal growth of guaifenesin on the surface of melt-extruded matrix tablets. Tablets consisted of the model drug guaifenesin in a matrix of either Acryl-EZE(R) or Eudragit(R) L10055 and either no talc, 25% or 50% talc. After processing, the hot-melt-extruded matrix tablets were supersaturated with amorphous guaifenesin, which resulted in the development of guaifenesin drug crystals on exposed surfaces of the tablet during storage (all tablets were stored at 24 degrees C). A previously developed, quantitative test was used to assay for surface guaifenesin. In tablets with a drug-to-polymer ratio of 19:81, talc-containing tablets exhibited an earlier onset of crystal growth (storage at 17% relative humidity). The presence of talc also increased the amount of surface crystallization and was independent of the talc concentration, since the talc levels used in this study exceeded the critical nucleant concentration. Additional non-melting components did not have an additive effect on surface crystal growth. High humidity during storage (78%) increased guaifenesin crystallization, but moisture uptake of tablets did not correlate with increased drug recrystallization. When storage at 17% relative humidity was interrupted for 3days by storage at 78% relative humidity before the tablets were returned to their previous low RH storage conditions, crystal growth quickly increased during the high RH interval and remained at an elevated level throughout the remaining storage period. A similar intermediate period of low, 17% relative humidity in tablets stored before and after that time at 78% RH did not affect surface crystallization levels. The effects of humidity and talc on the crystallization of guaifenesin from melt-extruded dosage forms supersaturated with amorphous drug were ascribed to heterogeneous nucleation.

  1. Fabrication of Microfibrous and Nano-/Microfibrous Scaffolds: Melt and Hybrid Electrospinning and Surface Modification of Poly(L-lactic acid with Plasticizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Il Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid (PLA fibrous scaffolds were prepared by electrospinning from a PLA melt containing poly(ethylene glycol (PEG as a plasticizer to obtain thinner fibers. The effects of PEG on the melt electrospinning of PLA were examined in terms of the melt viscosity and fiber diameter. Among the parameters, the content of PEG had a more significant effect on the average fiber diameter and its distribution than those of the spinning temperature. Furthermore, nano-/microfibrous silk fibroin (SF/PLA and PLA/PLA composite scaffolds were fabricated by hybrid electrospinning, which involved a combination of solution electrospinning and melt electrospinning. The SF/PLA (20/80 scaffolds consisted of a randomly oriented structure of PLA microfibers (average fiber diameter = 8.9 µm and SF nanofibers (average fiber diameter = 820 nm. The PLA nano-/microfiber (20/80 scaffolds were found to have similar pore parameters to the PLA microfiber scaffolds. The PLA scaffolds were treated with plasma in the presence of either oxygen or ammonia gas to modify the surface of the fibers. This approach of controlling the surface properties and diameter of fibers could be useful in the design and tailoring of novel scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  2. Development of Fabrication Methods of Filler/Polymer Nanocomposites: With Focus on Simple Melt-Compounding-Based Approach without Surface Modification of Nanofillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Tanahashi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Many attempts have been made to fabricate various types of inorganic nanoparticle-filled polymers (filler/polymer nanocomposites by a mechanical or chemical approach. However, these approaches require modification of the nanofiller surfaces and/or complicated polymerization reactions, making them unsuitable for industrial-scale production of the nanocomposites. The author and coworkers have proposed a simple melt-compounding method for the fabrication of silica/polymer nanocomposites, wherein silica nanoparticles without surface modification were dispersed through the breakdown of loose agglomerates of colloidal nano-silica spheres in a kneaded polymer melt. This review aims to discuss experimental techniques of the proposed method and its advantages over other developed methods.

  3. Development of Fabrication Methods of Filler/Polymer Nanocomposites: With Focus on Simple Melt-Compounding-Based Approach without Surface Modification of Nanofillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    Many attempts have been made to fabricate various types of inorganic nanoparticle-filled polymers (filler/polymer nanocomposites) by a mechanical or chemical approach. However, these approaches require modification of the nanofiller surfaces and/or complicated polymerization reactions, making them unsuitable for industrial-scale production of the nanocomposites. The author and coworkers have proposed a simple melt-compounding method for the fabrication of silica/polymer nanocomposites, wherein silica nanoparticles without surface modification were dispersed through the breakdown of loose agglomerates of colloidal nano-silica spheres in a kneaded polymer melt. This review aims to discuss experimental techniques of the proposed method and its advantages over other developed methods.

  4. Microstructures and wear properties of surface treated Ti–36Nb–2Ta–3Zr–0.35O alloy by electron beam melting (EBM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zijin; Liu, Yong; Wu, Hong; Zhang, Weidong; Guo, Wei; Tang, Huiping; Liu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Gum metal was firstly modified via electron beam melting method. • The surface hardness and the wear resistance of TNTZO alloys are significantly increased through EBM process. • The phase constitutions and microstructural features of EBM treated TNTZO alloys are sensitive to the processing parameters. • The relationship between the wear property and the surface microstructure of TNTZO alloy is discussed. - Abstract: Ti–36Nb–2Ta–3Zr–0.35O (wt.%) (TNTZO, also called gum metal) alloy was surface treated by electron beam melting (EBM), in order to improve wear properties. The microstructures and phase constitutions of the treated surface were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The results showed that the martensitic phase and dendrites were formed from the β phase alloy after the EBM treatment, and microstructures in the surface changed with the processing parameters. Compared with the untreated TNTZO alloy, the surface modified TNTZO alloys exhibited higher nano-hardness, 8.0 GPa, and the wear loss was also decreased apparently. The samples treated at a scanning speed of 0.5 m/s exhibited the highest wear resistance due to the fast cooling rate and the precipitation of acicular α″ phase. The relationship between the wear property and the surface microstructure of TNTZO alloy was discussed.

  5. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice - implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysgaard, S.; Glud, R. N.; Lennert, K.; Cooper, M.; Halden, N.; Leakey, R. J. G.; Hawthorne, F. C.; Barber, D.

    2012-08-01

    A major issue of Arctic marine science is to understand whether the Arctic Ocean is, or will be, a source or sink for air-sea CO2 exchange. This has been complicated by the recent discoveries of ikaite (a polymorph of CaCO3·6H2O) in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, which indicate that multiple chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km2 (0.5-1 m thick) drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced the ice floe thickness by 0.2 m per week and resulted in an estimated 3.8 ppm decrease of pCO2 in the ocean surface mixed layer. This corresponds to an air-sea CO2 uptake of 10.6 mmol m-2 sea ice d-1 or to 3.3 ton km-2 ice floe week-1. This is markedly higher than the estimated primary production within the ice floe of 0.3-1.3 mmol m-2 sea ice d-1. Finally, the presence of ikaite in sea ice and the dissolution of the mineral during melting of the sea ice and mixing of the melt water into the surface oceanic mixed layer accounted for half of the estimated pCO2 uptake.

  6. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice – implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. G. Leakey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A major issue of Arctic marine science is to understand whether the Arctic Ocean is, or will be, a source or sink for air–sea CO2 exchange. This has been complicated by the recent discoveries of ikaite (a polymorph of CaCO3·6H2O in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, which indicate that multiple chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km2 (0.5–1 m thick drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced the ice floe thickness by 0.2 m per week and resulted in an estimated 3.8 ppm decrease of pCO2 in the ocean surface mixed layer. This corresponds to an air–sea CO2 uptake of 10.6 mmol m−2 sea ice d−1 or to 3.3 ton km−2 ice floe week−1. This is markedly higher than the estimated primary production within the ice floe of 0.3–1.3 mmol m−2 sea ice d−1. Finally, the presence of ikaite in sea ice and the dissolution of the mineral during melting of the sea ice and mixing of the melt water into the surface oceanic mixed layer accounted for half of the estimated pCO2 uptake.

  7. Laser surface melting of 10 wt% Mo alloyed hardfacing Stellite 12 plasma transferred arc deposits: Structural evolution and high temperature wear performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilawary, Shaikh Asad Ali; Motallebzadeh, Amir; Afzal, Muhammad; Atar, Erdem; Cimenoglu, Huseyin

    2018-05-01

    Laser surface melting (LSM) process has been applied on the plasma transferred arc (PTA) deposited Stellite 12 and 10 wt% Mo alloyed Stellite 12 in this study. Following the LSM process, structural and mechanical property comparison of the LSM'ed surfaces has been made. Hardness of the LSM'ed surfaces was measured as 549 HV and 623 HV for the Stellite 12 and Stellite 12 + 10 wt% Mo deposits, respectively. Despite their different hardness and structural features, the LSM'ed surfaces exhibited similar tribological performance at room temperature (RT), where fatigue wear mechanism operates. However, the wear at 500 °C promotes tribo-oxide layer formation whose composition depended on the alloying with Mo. Thus, addition of 10 wt% Mo into Stellite 12 PTA deposit has remarkably enhanced the high temperature wear performance of the LSM'ed surface as a result of participation of complex oxide (CoMoO4) in tribo-oxide layer.

  8. Gamma-ray imaging spectrometer (GRIS): a new balloon-borne experiment for gamma-ray line astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teegarden, B.J.; Cline, T.L.; Gehrels, N.; Porreca, G.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Huters, A.F.; MacCallum, C.J.; Stang, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is a relatively new field that holds great promise for further understanding of high energy astrophysical processes. Preliminary results such as the annihilation radiation from the galactic center, the 26 Al line from the galactic plane and cyclotron lines from neutron stars may well be just the initial discoveries of a rich and as yet undeveloped field. When the high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer (GRSE) was removed from the GRO payload NASA decided to initiate a balloon program to permit continued development and improvement of instrumentation in this field, as well as continued scientific observations. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) is one of the experiments selected as part of this program. The instrument contains a number of new and innovative features that are expected to produce a significant improvement in source location accuracy and sensitivity over previous balloon and satellite experiments. 6 refs., 2 figs

  9. Ti-6Al-4V triply periodic minimal surface structures for bone implants fabricated via selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunze; Hao, Liang; Hussein, Ahmed; Young, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Triply periodic minimal surface (TPMS) structures have already been shown to be a versatile source of biomorphic scaffold designs. Therefore, in this work, Ti-6Al-4V Gyroid and Diamond TPMS lattices having an interconnected high porosity of 80-95% and pore sizes in the range of 560-1600 μm and 480-1450 μm respectively were manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM) for bone implants. The manufacturability, microstructure and mechanical properties of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices were evaluated. Comparison between 3D micro-CT reconstructed models and original CAD models of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices shows excellent reproduction of the designs. The as-built Ti-6Al-4V struts exhibit the microstructure of columnar grains filled with very fine and orthogonally oriented α' martensitic laths with the width of 100-300 nm and have the microhardness of 4.01 ± 0.34 GPa. After heat treatment at 680°C for 4h, the α' martensite was converted to a mixture of α and β, in which the α phase being the dominant fraction is present as fine laths with the width of 500-800 nm and separated by a small amount of narrow, interphase regions of dark β phase. Also, the microhardness is decreased to 3.71 ± 0.35 GPa due to the coarsening of the microstructure. The 80-95% porosity TPMS lattices exhibit a comparable porosity with trabecular bone, and the modulus is in the range of 0.12-1.25 GPa and thus can be adjusted to the modulus of trabecular bone. At the same range of porosity of 5-10%, the moduli of cortical bone and of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices are in a similar range. Therefore, the modulus and porosity of Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices can be tailored to the levels of human bones and thus reduce or avoid "stress shielding" and increase longevity of implants. Due to the biomorphic designs, and high interconnected porosity and stiffness comparable to human bones, SLM-made Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices can be a promising material for load bearing bone implants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  10. Imaging the Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, central Chile using magnetotellurics: Evidence for crustal melt regions laterally-offset from surface vents and lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Darcy; Unsworth, Martyn J.; Díaz, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) data were collected at the Laguna del Maule volcanic field (LdMVF), located in central Chile (36°S, 70.5°W), which has been experiencing unprecedented upward ground deformation since 2007. These data were used to create the first detailed three-dimensional electrical resistivity model of the LdMVF and surrounding area. The resulting model was spatially complex with several major conductive features imaged at different depths and locations around Laguna del Maule (LdM). A near-surface conductor (C1; 0.5 Ωm) approximately 100 m beneath the lake is interpreted as a conductive smectite clay cap related to a shallow hydrothermal reservoir. At 4 km depth, a strong conductor (C3; 0.3 Ωm) is located beneath the western edge of LdM. The proximity of C3 to the recent Pleistocene-to-Holocene vents in the northwest LdMVF and nearby hot springs suggests that C3 is a hydrous (>5 wt% H2O), rhyolitic partial melt with melt fraction >35% and a free-water hydrothermal component. C3 dips towards, and is connected to, a deeper conductor (C4; 1 Ωm). C4 is located to the north of LdM at >8 km depth below surface and is interpreted as a long-lived, rhyolitic-to-andesitic magma reservoir with melt fractions less than 35%. It is hypothesized that the deeper magma reservoir (C4) is providing melt and hydrothermal fluids to the shallower magma reservoir (C3). A large conductor directly beneath the LdMVF is not imaged with MT suggesting that any mush volume beneath LdM must be anhydrous (10 km) as it moves from the deep magma reservoir (C4) to create small, ephemeral volumes of eruptible melt (C3). It is hypothesized that there may be a north-south contrast in physical processes affecting the growth of melt-rich zones since major conductors are imaged in the northern LdMVF while no major conductors are detected beneath the southern vents. The analysis and interpretation of features directly beneath the lake is complicated by the surface conductor C1 which attenuates

  11. Surface energy budget of landfast sea ice during the transitions from winter to snowmelt and melt pond onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Else, B.G.T.; Papakyriakou, T.N.; Raddatz, R.

    2014-01-01

    onset supports past findings, and confirms the importance of clouds and water vapor associated with synoptic weather systems. However, we also observed a period of strong turbulent energy exchange associated with the passage of a cyclone. The cyclone event occurred shortly after melt pond formation...

  12. Surface Roughness of a 3D-Printed Ni-Cr Alloy Produced by Selective Laser Melting: Effect of Process Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Min-Ho; Son, Jun Sik; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2018-03-01

    The selective laser melting (SLM) process parameters, which directly determine the melting behavior of the metallic powders, greatly affect the nanostructure and surface roughness of the resulting 3D object. This study investigated the effect of various laser process parameters (laser power, scan rate, and scan line spacing) on the surface roughness of a nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloy that was three-dimensionally (3D) constructed using SLM. Single-line formation tests were used to determine the optimal laser power of 200 W and scan rate of 98.8 mm/s, which resulted in beads with an optimal profile. In the subsequent multi-layer formation tests, the 3D object with the smoothest surface (Ra = 1.3 μm) was fabricated at a scan line spacing of 60 μm (overlap ratio = 73%). Narrow scan line spacing (and thus large overlap ratios) was preferred over wide scan line spacing to reduce the surface roughness of the 3D body. The findings of this study suggest that the laser power, scan rate, and scan line spacing are the key factors that control the surface quality of Ni-Cr alloys produced by SLM.

  13. Surface Properties of Al-Functionalized Mesoporous MCM-41 and the Melting Behavior of Water in Al-MCM-41 Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterczyńska, Angelina; Deryło-Marczewska, Anna; Zienkiewicz-Strzałka, Małgorzata; Śliwińska-Bartkowiak, Małgorzata; Domin, Kamila

    2017-10-24

    We report an experimental investigation of structural and adhesive properties for Al-containing mesoporous MCM-41 and MCM-41 surfaces. In this work, highly ordered hexagonal mesoporous structures of aluminosilica with two different Si/Al molar ratios equal to 50 and 80 and silica samples were studied; Al was incorporated into the MCM-41 structures using the direct synthesis method, with CTAB as a surfactant. The incorporation of aluminum was evidenced simultaneously without any change in the hexagonal arrangement of cylindrical mesopores. The porous materials were examined by techniques such as low-temperature nitrogen sorption, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Surface properties were determined through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, potentiometric titration, and static contact angle measurements. It was shown that an increase in surface acidity leads to an increase in the wetting energy of the surface. To investigate the influence of acidity on the confinement effects, the melting behavior of water in Al-MCM-41 and MCM-41 with the same pore size was determined by using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry methods. We found that the melting-point depression of water in pores is larger in the functionalized pores than in pure silica pores of the same pore diameter.

  14. Modelling the surface mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet and neighbouring ice caps : A dynamical and statistical downscaling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noël, B.P.Y.

    2018-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is the world’s second largest ice mass, storing about one tenth of the Earth’s freshwater. If totally melted, global sea level would rise by 7.4 m, affecting low-lying regions worldwide. Since the mid-1990s, increased atmospheric and oceanic temperatures have

  15. The Influence of As-Built Surface Conditions on Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V Additively Manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y. Y.; Gulizia, S.; Oh, C. H.; Fraser, D.; Leary, M.; Yang, Y. F.; Qian, M.

    2016-03-01

    Achieving a high surface finish is a major challenge for most current metal additive manufacturing processes. We report the first quantitative study of the influence of as-built surface conditions on the tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V produced by selective electron beam melting (SEBM) in order to better understand the SEBM process. Tensile ductility was doubled along with noticeable improvements in tensile strengths after surface modification of the SEBM-fabricated Ti-6Al-4V by chemical etching. The fracture surfaces of tensile specimens with different surface conditions were characterised and correlated with the tensile properties obtained. The removal of a 650- μm-thick surface layer by chemical etching was shown to be necessary to eliminate the detrimental influence of surface defects on mechanical properties. The experimental results and analyses underline the necessity to modify the surfaces of SEBM-fabricated components for structural applications, particularly for those components which contain complex internal concave and convex surfaces and channels.

  16. Seasonal monitoring of melt and accumulation within the deep percolation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet and comparison with simulations of regional climate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Achim; Eisen, Olaf; MacFerrin, Michael; Tedesco, Marco; Fettweis, Xavier

    2018-06-01

    Increasing melt over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) recorded over the past several years has resulted in significant changes of the percolation regime of the ice sheet. It remains unclear whether Greenland's percolation zone will act as a meltwater buffer in the near future through gradually filling all pore space or if near-surface refreezing causes the formation of impermeable layers, which provoke lateral runoff. Homogeneous ice layers within perennial firn, as well as near-surface ice layers of several meter thickness have been observed in firn cores. Because firn coring is a destructive method, deriving stratigraphic changes in firn and allocation of summer melt events is challenging. To overcome this deficit and provide continuous data for model evaluations on snow and firn density, temporal changes in liquid water content and depths of water infiltration, we installed an upward-looking radar system (upGPR) 3.4 m below the snow surface in May 2016 close to Camp Raven (66.4779° N, 46.2856° W) at 2120 m a.s.l. The radar is capable of quasi-continuously monitoring changes in snow and firn stratigraphy, which occur above the antennas. For summer 2016, we observed four major melt events, which routed liquid water into various depths beneath the surface. The last event in mid-August resulted in the deepest percolation down to about 2.3 m beneath the surface. Comparisons with simulations from the regional climate model MAR are in very good agreement in terms of seasonal changes in accumulation and timing of onset of melt. However, neither bulk density of near-surface layers nor the amounts of liquid water and percolation depths predicted by MAR correspond with upGPR data. Radar data and records of a nearby thermistor string, in contrast, matched very well for both timing and depth of temperature changes and observed water percolations. All four melt events transferred a cumulative mass of 56 kg m-2 into firn beneath the summer surface of 2015. We find that

  17. A study on the impact of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on the viscosity of PEG melt suspensions using surface plots and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ching Mien; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah

    2015-04-01

    An understanding of the rheological behaviour of polymer melt suspensions is crucial in pharmaceutical manufacturing, especially when processed by spray congealing or melt extruding. However, a detailed comparison of the viscosities at each and every temperature and concentration between the various grades of adjuvants in the formulation will be tedious and time-consuming. Therefore, the statistical method, principal component analysis (PCA), was explored in this study. The composite formulations comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) of ten different grades (K100 LV, K4M, K15M, K100M, E15 LV, E50 LV, E4M, F50 LV, F4M and Methocel VLV) at various concentrations were prepared and their viscosities at different temperatures determined. Surface plots showed that concentration of HPMC had a greater effect on the viscosity compared to temperature. Particle size and size distribution of HPMC played an important role in the viscosity of melt suspensions. Smaller particles led to a greater viscosity than larger particles. PCA was used to evaluate formulations of different viscosities. The complex viscosity profiles of the various formulations containing HPMC were successfully classified into three clusters of low, moderate and high viscosity. Formulations within each group showed similar viscosities despite differences in grade or concentration of HPMC. Formulations in the low viscosity cluster were found to be sprayable. PCA was able to differentiate the complex viscosity profiles of different formulations containing HPMC in an efficient and time-saving manner and provided an excellent visualisation of the data.

  18. Thermodynamic and structural study of two-dimensional melting within monolayers or rare gases or methane physically adsorbed upon the surface of layer-like solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessier, Christine

    1983-01-01

    The 2D (two-dimensional) melting of monolayers of rare gases or methane physically adsorbed on the basal face of lamellar solids (graphite, boron nitride and lamellar halides) has been studied. Two different experimental measurements have been made: i) adsorption isotherms; ii) neutron diffraction spectra. The main part of this report deals with the 2D liquid-incommensurate solid transition within monolayers of rare gases or methane adsorbed on the basal face of lamellar halides. This transition is first order. It is observed only if certain conditions of dimensional incompatibility between the substrate and the absorbate are fulfilled. It is little affected by the structure of the underlying substrate. A number of thermodynamic parameters associated with it, are constants once properly scaled. These constants agree well with theoretical estimates for 6-12 Lennard Jones particles adsorbed on a smooth surface. For the monolayer of Xe adsorbed on graphite the temperature of the tricritical point above which melting becomes a continuous transition has been measured. The isotope effect associated with 2D melting has been investigated by comparing the behaviour of monolayers of CH 4 and CD 4 adsorbed on boron nitride. The vapor pressure of Xe has been determined in the temperature range 101-120 K. (author) [fr

  19. Effect of microstructure and chemical composition on localized corrosion resistance of a AISI 304L stainless steel after nanopulsed-laser surface melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacquentin, W.; Caron, N.; Oltra, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser surface melting treatments require neither additional feedstock nor contact. • By affecting 1 μm, the pitting potential of laser treated 304L increases by 500 mV. • Surface modification of laser treated sample observed by TEM. • The physico-chemical properties of the surface are correlated to overlap rate. • AISI 304L pitting corrosion resistance strongly depends of overlap rate. - Abstract: Changes induced in the surface properties of AISI 304L stainless steel when it is treated with a nanopulsed ytterbium-doped fiber laser were investigated to determine the microscale distribution of its physico-chemical properties. A Gaussian energy distribution was created with a radius of 71 μm (1/e 2 ) at the focal point. Local investigations were carried out using transmission electron microscopy to consider the effect of overlapping individual laser impacts. The results obtained reveal that laser surface melting leads to changes in the crystallographic structure of the steel through the formation of a δ-ferritic phase. It also results in the creation of an oxide layer that increases the corrosion resistance of the steel, with the chemical composition, structure and thickness of this layer being dependent on the overlap percentage and the position along the beam radius. Measurement of the localized corrosion resistance in a 30 g L −1 NaCl solution using polarization curves found that optimal laser treatment conditions can led to an increase in the breakdown potential of more than 500 mV, which corresponds to a significant improvement in corrosion resistance.

  20. Crystal structure and nanotopographical features on the surface of heat-treated and anodized porous titanium biomaterials produced using selective laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin Yavari, S., E-mail: s.aminyavari@tudelft.nl [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); FT Innovations BV, Braamsluiper 1, 5831 PW Boxmeer (Netherlands); Wauthle, R. [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Section Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation (PMA), Celestijnenlaan 300B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); LayerWise NV, Kapeldreef 60, Leuven (Belgium); Böttger, A.J. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Schrooten, J. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 PB 2450, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Weinans, H. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Orthopedics and Department of Rheumatology, UMC Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Zadpoor, A.A. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-01-30

    Porous titanium biomaterials manufactured using additive manufacturing techniques such as selective laser melting are considered promising materials for orthopedic applications where the biomaterial needs to mimic the properties of bone. Despite their appropriate mechanical properties and the ample pore space they provide for bone ingrowth and osseointegration, porous titanium structures have an intrinsically bioinert surface and need to be subjected to surface bio-functionalizing procedures to enhance their in vivo performance. In this study, we used a specific anodizing process to build a hierarchical oxide layer on the surface of porous titanium structures made by selective laser melting of Ti6Al4V ELI powder. The hierarchical structure included both nanotopographical features (nanotubes) and micro-features (micropits). After anodizing, the biomaterial was heat treated in Argon at different temperatures ranging between 400 and 600 °C for either 1 or 2 h to improve its bioactivity. The effects of applied heat treatment on the crystal structure of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes and the nanotopographical features of the surface were studied using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was shown that the transition from the initial crystal structure, i.e. anatase, to rutile occurs between 500 and 600 °C and that after 2 h of heat treatment at 600 °C the crystal structure is predominantly rutile. The nanotopographical features of the surface were found to be largely unchanged for heat treatments carried out at 500 °C or below, whereas they were partially or largely disrupted after heat treatment at 600 °C. The possible implications of these findings for the bioactivity of porous titanium structures are discussed.

  1. Photometric analysis of the structure evolution on the Pb-19.4%Sn melt surface in the S-L temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyakhovitskii M.M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure evolution of alloys in solidification range is considered as the first-order phase transformation from the solid state to the liquid one, which occurs by the mechanism of nucleation and growth of more symmetrical phase to less symmetrical crystalline phase. The kinetic regularities of this transformation are studied by the method of the photometric analysis of structure images (PHASI, which makes it possible to establish the temperature dependence of the relationship between the solid and liquid phases and their distribution on the melt surface. The PHASI method is based on the combined analysis of the brightness spectra of the visible light reflections from the sample surface and of the distribution of its scattering centers in different intensity intervals. The data on the structure evolution of the Sn+19.4%Pb alloy upon melting and solidification were considered in parallel with the measured spectra of sound signals. It was revealed that a distinct maximum is observed in the temperature dependence of radiation energy in the temperature range of phase transformation from the liquid into the solid state and hot crack formation occurs near the transition zone in the region of the contact of the ingot with the crucible.

  2. Near-surface elastic changes in the Ross Ice Shelf arising from transient storm and melt forcing observed with high-frequency ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, J.; Aster, R. C.; Baker, M. G.; Gerstoft, P.; Bromirski, P. D.; Nyblade, A.; Stephen, R. A.; Wiens, D.

    2017-12-01

    Ice shelf collapse can herald subsequent grounded ice instability. However, robust understanding of external mechanisms capable of triggering rapid changes remains elusive. Improved understanding therefore requires improved remote and in-situ measurements of ice shelf properties. Using nearly three years of continuous data from a recently deployed 34-station broadband seismic array on the Ross Ice Shelf, we analyze persistent temporally varying, anisotropic near-surface resonant wave modes at frequencies above 1 Hz that are highly sensitive to small changes in elastic shelf properties to depths of tens of m. We further find that these modes exhibit both progressive (on the scale of months) and rapid (on the scale of hours) changes in frequency content. The largest and most rapid excursions are associated with forcing from local storms, and with a large regional ice shelf melt event in January 2016. We hypothesize that temporally variable behavior of the resonance features arises from wind slab formation during storms and/or to porosity changes, and to the formation of percolation-related refrozen layers and thinning in the case of surface melting. These resonance variations can be reproduced and inverted for structural changes using numerical wave propagation models, and thus present an opportunity for 4-D structural monitoring of shallow ice shelf elasticity and structure using long-duration seismic recordings.

  3. Layered surface structure of gas-atomized high Nb-containing TiAl powder and its impact on laser energy absorption for selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. H.; Lin, S. F.; Hou, Y. H.; Wang, D. W.; Zhou, P.; Han, P. L.; Li, Y. L.; Yan, M.

    2018-05-01

    Ti45Al8Nb alloy (in at.%) is designed to be an important high-temperature material. However, its fabrication through laser-based additive manufacturing is difficult to achieve. We present here that a good understanding of the surface structure of raw material (i.e. Ti45Al8Nb powder) is important for optimizing its process by selective laser melting (SLM). Detailed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses were conducted to determine the surface structure of Ti45Al8Nb powder. An envelope structure (∼54.0 nm in thickness) was revealed for the powder, consisting of TiO2 + Nb2O5 (as the outer surface layer)/Al2O3 + Nb2O5 (as the intermediate layer)/Al2O3 (as the inner surface layer)/Ti45Al8Nb (as the matrix). During SLM, this layered surface structure interacted with the incident laser beam and improved the laser absorptivity of Ti45Al8Nb powder by ∼32.21%. SLM experiments demonstrate that the relative density of the as-printed parts can be realized to a high degree (∼98.70%), which confirms good laser energy absorption. Such layered surface structure with appropriate phase constitution is essential for promoting SLM of the Ti45Al8Nb alloy.

  4. Influence of processing medium on frictional wear properties of ball bearing steel prepared by laser surface melting coupled with bionic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hong; Wang Chengtao; Guo Qingchun; Yu Jiaxiang; Wang Mingxing; Liao Xunlong; Zhao Yu; Ren Luquan

    2010-01-01

    Coupling with bionic principles, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of ball bearing steel (GCr15) with biomimetic units on the surface was made using a pulsed Nd: YAG laser. Air and water film was employed as processing medium, respectively. The microstructures of biomimeitc units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases as functions of different mediums as well as water film with different thicknesses. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film were more refined and had better wear resistance increased by 55.8% in comparison with that processed in air; a significant improvement in microhardness was achieved by laser surface melting. The application of water film provided considerable microstructural changes and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the wear resistance of ball bearing steel.

  5. Thin concentrator photovoltaic module with micro-solar cells which are mounted by self-align method using surface tension of melted solder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Terauchi, Masaharu; Aya, Youichirou; Kanayama, Shutetsu; Nishitani, Hikaru; Nakagawa, Tohru; Takase, Michihiko

    2017-09-01

    We are developing a thin and lightweight CPV module using small size lens system made from poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) with a short focal length and micro-solar cells to decrease the transporting and the installing costs of CPV systems. In order to achieve high conversion efficiency in CPV modules using micro-solar cells, the micro-solar cells need to be mounted accurately to the irradiated region of the concentrated sunlight. In this study, we have successfully developed self-align method thanks to the surface tension of the melted solder even utilizing commercially available surface-mounting technology (SMT). Solar cells were self-aligned to the specified positions of the circuit board by this self-align method with accuracy within ±10 µm. We actually fabricated CPV modules using this self-align method and demonstrated high conversion efficiency of our CPV module.

  6. Surface Observation and Pore Size Analyses of Polypropylene/Low-Melting Point Polyester Filter Materials: Influences of Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jia-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes making filter materials with polypropylene (PP and low-melting point (LPET fibers. The influences of temperatures and times of heat treatment on the morphology of thermal bonding points and average pore size of the PP/LPET filter materials. The test results indicate that the morphology of thermal bonding points is highly correlated with the average pore size. When the temperature of heat treatment is increased, the fibers are joined first with the thermal bonding points, and then with the large thermal bonding areas, thereby decreasing the average pore size of the PP/LPET filter materials. A heat treatment of 110 °C for 60 seconds can decrease the pore size from 39.6 μm to 12.0 μm.

  7. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthje, Mikael; Feltham, D.L.; Taylor, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a mathematical model describing the summer melting of sea ice. We simulate the evolution of melt ponds and determine area coverage and total surface ablation. The model predictions are tested for sensitivity to the melt rate of unponded ice, enhanced melt rate beneath the melt ponds...

  8. Investigation on Selective Laser Melting AlSi10Mg Cellular Lattice Strut: Molten Pool Morphology, Surface Roughness and Dimensional Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Han

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available AlSi10Mg inclined struts with angle of 45° were fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM using different scanning speed and hatch spacing to gain insight into the evolution of the molten pool morphology, surface roughness, and dimensional accuracy. The results show that the average width and depth of the molten pool, the lower surface roughness and dimensional deviation decrease with the increase of scanning speed and hatch spacing. The upper surface roughness is found to be almost constant under different processing parameters. The width and depth of the molten pool on powder-supported zone are larger than that of the molten pool on the solid-supported zone, while the width changes more significantly than that of depth. However, if the scanning speed is high enough, the width and depth of the molten pool and the lower surface roughness almost keep constant as the density is still high. Therefore, high dimensional accuracy and density as well as good surface quality can be achieved simultaneously by using high scanning speed during SLMed cellular lattice strut.

  9. Investigation on Selective Laser Melting AlSi10Mg Cellular Lattice Strut: Molten Pool Morphology, Surface Roughness and Dimensional Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Zhu, Haihong; Nie, Xiaojia; Wang, Guoqing; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2018-03-07

    AlSi10Mg inclined struts with angle of 45° were fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM) using different scanning speed and hatch spacing to gain insight into the evolution of the molten pool morphology, surface roughness, and dimensional accuracy. The results show that the average width and depth of the molten pool, the lower surface roughness and dimensional deviation decrease with the increase of scanning speed and hatch spacing. The upper surface roughness is found to be almost constant under different processing parameters. The width and depth of the molten pool on powder-supported zone are larger than that of the molten pool on the solid-supported zone, while the width changes more significantly than that of depth. However, if the scanning speed is high enough, the width and depth of the molten pool and the lower surface roughness almost keep constant as the density is still high. Therefore, high dimensional accuracy and density as well as good surface quality can be achieved simultaneously by using high scanning speed during SLMed cellular lattice strut.

  10. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice – implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, Søren; Glud, R.N.; Lennert, K.

    2012-01-01

    A major issue of Arctic marine science is to understand whether the Arctic Ocean is, or will be, a source or sink for air-sea CO 2 exchange. This has been complicated by the recent discoveries of ikaite (a polymorph of CaCO 3•6H 2O) in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, which indicate that multiple...... chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO 2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km 2 (0.5-1 m thick) drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait...... during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced...

  11. Bone ingrowth potential of electron beam and selective laser melting produced trabecular-like implant surfaces with and without a biomimetic coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemond, J E; Hannink, G; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P

    2013-03-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of trabecular-like implant surfaces produced by either selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM), with or without a biomimetic calciumphosphate coating, was examined in goats. For histological analysis and histomorphometry of bone ingrowth depth and bone implant contact specimens were implanted in the femoral condyle of goats. For mechanical push out tests to analyse mechanical implant fixation specimens were implanted in the iliac crest. The follow up periods were 4 (7 goats) and 15 weeks (7 goats). Both the SLM and EBM produced trabecular-like structures showed a variable bone ingrowth after 4 weeks. After 15 weeks good bone ingrowth was found in both implant types. Irrespective to the follow up period, and the presence of a coating, no histological differences in tissue reaction around SLM and EBM produced specimens was found. Histological no coating was detected at 4 and 15 weeks follow up. At both follow up periods the mechanical push out strength at the bone implant interface was significantly lower for the coated SLM specimens compared to the uncoated SLM specimens. The expected better ingrowth characteristics and mechanical fixation strength induced by the coating were not found. The lower mechanical strength of the coated specimens produced by SLM is a remarkable result, which might be influenced by the gross morphology of the specimens or the coating characteristics, indicating that further research is necessary.

  12. LIBERACIÓN Y SEGUIMIENTO DE DOS GRUPOS DE TITÍ GRIS (Saguinus leucopus EN EL DEPARTAMENTO DE TOLIMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Leal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio fue realizado con dos grupos de tití gris (Saguinus leucopus, procedentes de decomisos y entregas voluntarias. Los animales fueron rehabilitados durante aproximadamente un año en la ciudad de Bogotá, con el fin de estimular el desarrollo y recuperación de las habilidades necesarias para su sobrevivencia al ser devueltos al medio ambiente natural. Se construyeron dos jaulas como plataformas de liberación en un bosque en el departamento del Tolima, y los animales fueron alojados en ellas para iniciar su proceso de acostumbramiento al medio. Durante este tiempo se realizó un estudio etológico, con el propósito de determinar las posibles variaciones comportamentales derivadas del cambio en el entorno. Los animales fueron liberados y se llevó a cabo el seguimiento visual para evaluar el proceso de rehabilitación y la adaptación de los individuos al nuevo hábitat. Se observó una variación en la presentación de comportamientos relacionados con actividades de desplazamiento, descanso e interacciones sociales en comparación con estudios realizados en cautiverio. Después de la liberación, los animales fueron vistos en sitios próximos a las jaulas de acostumbramiento, lo cual podría indicar que establecieron sus territorios en estas áreas; no se registraron variaciones significativas en la conformación de los grupos ni enfrentamientos entre las dos tropas. Estas observaciones indicarían que el proceso de liberación cumplió con su objetivo, y puede considerarse exitoso.

  13. Arterial vascular supply of the thymus in poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus of the Master Gris Cou Plumé lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Maurício Mendes de Lima

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Seeking to expand information on the comparative morphology of poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus of the Máster Gris Cou Plumé lineage, a study was conducted to provide data on the number of lobes of the thymus in addition to origin, number and distribution of the arteries that promoted the sanguineous supply of this organ. To this end 30 poultry (15 males and 15 females were used. They were about six week old and were donated after natural death by poultry farms of the Federal District. The arterial supply was injected with a “450” Neoprene Latex stained solution. Subsequently, the poultry were fixed in a 10% formoldehyde aqueous solution by means of deep intramuscular, subcutaneous and intracaviteous applications and were kept in the same solution. Four to nine cervical lobes were found, in addition to one or two thoracic lobes on the left side. On the right side, three to seven cervical lobes and one or two thoracic lobes were found. The lobes were supplied indirectly by branches coming from the common carotidal artery, the cranial and caudal thyroidal arteries, the ascending esophageal artery, the ingluvial artery, the common vagus nerve artery, the occipital artery and the cutaneous branches. They were also supplied by direct by branches from the ingluvial artery, cranial thyroidal artery and common vagus nerve artery. It was possible to verify that poultry of this breed not only possessed characteristics that were defining for the breed as such, but also demonstrated particular arrangements for each of the individuals.

  14. Comunicación vocal de dos grupos de Tití gris (Saguinus leucopus en Mariquita, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Elena Rueda-C.

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un estudio del repertorio vocal y su significado, de dos grupos de tití gris (Saguinus leucopus en San Sebastián de Mariquita, departamento del Tolima. Uno de los grupos habita una zona urbana, la casa de la Fundación Segunda Expedición Botánica (Funbotánica y el otro se encuentra en el Bosque del Municipio (José Celestino Mutis. Se identificaron 27 tipos de sonidos, de los cuales se registraron 21 en el grupo Funbotánica y 13 en el grupo Bosque. Se caracterizaron cada una de las señales y en particular se hizo énfasis en la asociación entre las vocalizaciones y los patrones de comportamiento que exhibe la especie. Los titíes emitieron señales específicas en contextos como alimentación, alarma, amenaza y establecimiento de contacto con individuos que se encuentran fuera de vista (señales de llamada. Igualmente, se encontró relación entre las señales y algunos mensajes no conductuales (sexo, edad y posición jerárquica; esto demuestra que las vocalizaciones brindan gran cantidad de información sobre la identidad del emisor, acontecimientos en el ambiente y conductas específicas de los individuos. No se logró establecer diferencias estadísticas entre las señales emitidas en cada grupo, sin embargo, los titíes produjeron vocalizaciones similares en los dos ambientes, con algunas variaciones en frecuencia y duración; aspectos que podrían estar influenciados por las características propias del hábitat.

  15. Mechanical behavior of Ti-Ta-based surface alloy fabricated on TiNi SMA by pulsed electron-beam melting of film/substrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, S. N.; Yakovlev, E. V.; Semin, V. O.; Meisner, L. L.; Rotshtein, V. P.; Neiman, A. A.; D'yachenko, F.

    2018-04-01

    The physical-mechanical properties of the Ti-Ta based surface alloy with thickness up to ∼2 μm fabricated through the multiple (up to 20 cycles) alternation of magnetron deposition of Ti70Ta30 (at.%) thin (50 nm) films and their liquid-phase mixing with the NiTi substrate by microsecond low-energy, high current pulsed electron beam (LEHCPEB: ≤15 keV, ∼2 J/cm2) are presented. Two types of NiTi substrates (differing in the methods of melting alloys) were pretreated with LEHCPEB to improve the adhesion of thin-film coating and to protect it from local delimitation because of the surface cratering under pulsed melting. The methods used in the research include nanoindentation, transmission electron microscopy, and depth profile analysis of nanohardness, Vickers hardness, elastic modulus, depth recovery ratio, and plasticity characteristic as a function of indentation depth. For comparison, similar measurements were carried out with NiTi substrates in the initial state and after LEHCPEB pretreatment, as well as on "Ti70Ta30(1 μm) coating/NiTi substrate" system. It was shown that the upper surface layer in both NiTi substrates is the same in properties after LEHCPEB pretreatment. Our data suggest that the type of multilayer surface structure correlates with its physical-mechanical properties. For NiTi with the Ti-Ta based surface alloy ∼1 μm thick, the highest elasticity falls on the upper submicrocrystalline layer measuring ∼0.2 μm and consisting of two Ti-Ta based phases: α‧‧ martensite (a = 0.475 nm, b = 0.323 nm, c = 0.464 nm) and β austenite (a = 0.327 nm). Beneath the upper layer there is an amorphous sublayer followed by underlayers with coarse (>20 nm) and fine (<20 nm) average grain sizes which provide a gradual transition of the mechanical parameters to the values of the NiTi substrate.

  16. ANALYSIS OF PERIODIC NANOSTRUCTURES FORMATION ON A GOLD SURFACE UNDER EXPOSURE TO ULTRASHORT LASER PULSES NEAR THE MELTING THRESHOLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Ivanov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study. The mechanism of surface restructuring by ultrashort laser pulses involves a lot of fast, non-equilibrium, and interrelated processes while the solid is in a transient state. As a result, the analysis of the experimental data cannot cover all the mechanisms of nanostructuring. We present a direct comparison of a simulation and experimental results of surface nanomodification induced by a single laser pulse. Method. The experimental results were obtained by using a mask projection setup with a laser wavelength equal to 248 nm and a pulse length equal to 1.6 ps. This setup is used to produce an intensity grating on a gold surface with a sinusoidal shape and a period of 500 nm. The formed structures were analyzed by a scanning and transmission electron microscope, respectively. Then a hybrid atomistic-continuum model capable of capturing the essential mechanisms responsible for the nanostructuring process was used for modeling the interaction of the laser pulse with a thick gold target. Main Results. A good agreement between simulation and experimental data justifies the proposed approach as a powerful tool revealing the physics behind the nanostructuring process at a gold surface and providing a microscopic insight into the dynamics of the structuring processes of metals in general. The presented model, therefore, is an important step towards a new computational tool in predicting materials response to an ultrashort laser pulse on the atomic scale and properties of the modified surfaces. Practical Relevance. This detailed understanding of the dynamics of the process will pave the way towards pre-designed topologies for functionalized surfaces on the nano- and micro-scales.

  17. Improved bioactivity of selective laser melting titanium: Surface modification with micro-/nano-textured hierarchical topography and bone regeneration performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia-Yun; Chen, Xian-Shuai; Zhang, Chun-Yu; Liu, Yun; Wang, Jing; Deng, Fei-Long

    2016-11-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) titanium requires surface modification to improve its bioactivity. The microrough surface of it can be utilized as the micro primary substrate to create a micro-/nano-textured topography for improved bone regeneration. In this study, the microrough SLM titanium substrate was optimized by sandblasting, and nano-porous features of orderly arranged nanotubes and disorderly arranged nanonet were produced by anodization (SAN) and alkali-heat treatment (SAH), respectively. The results were compared with the control group of an untreated surface (native-SLM) and a microtopography only surface treated by acid etching (SLA). The effects of the different topographies on cell functions and bone formation performance were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. It was found that micro-/nano-textured topographies of SAN and SAH showed enhanced cell behaviour relative to the microtopography of SLA with significantly higher proliferation on the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th day (P<0.05) and higher total protein contents on the 14th day (P<0.05). In vivo, SAN and SAH formed more successively regenerated bone, which resulted in higher bone-implant contact (BIC%) and bone-bonding force than native-SLM and SLA. In addition, the three-dimensional nanonet of SAH was expected to be more similar to native extracellular matrix (ECM) and thus led to better bone formation. The alkaline phosphatase activity of SAH was significantly higher than the other three groups at an earlier stage of the 7th day (P<0.05) and the BIC% was nearly double that of native-SLM and SLA in the 8th week. In conclusion, the addition of nano-porous features on the microrough SLM titanium surface is effective in improving the bioactivity and bone regeneration performance, in which the ECM-like nanonet with a disorderly arranged biomimetic feature is suggested to be more efficient than nanotubes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Melting method for miscellaneous radioactive solid waste and melting furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osaki, Toru; Furukawa, Hirofumi; Uda, Nobuyoshi; Katsurai, Kiyomichi

    1998-01-01

    A vessel containing miscellaneous solid wastes is inserted in a crucible having a releasable material on the inner surface, they are induction-heated from the outside of the crucible by way of low temperature heating coils to melt low melting point materials in the miscellaneous wastes within a temperature range at which the vessel does not melt. Then, they are induction-heated by way of high temperature heating coils to melt the vessel and not yet melted materials, those molten materials are cooled, solidified molten material and the releasable material are taken out, and then the crucible is used again. Then, the crucible can be used again, so that it can be applied to a large scaled melting furnace which treats wastes by a unit of drum. In addition, since the cleaning of the used crucible and the application of the releasable material can be conducted without interrupting the operation of the melting furnace, the operation cycle of the melting furnace can be shortened. (N.H.)

  19. The effect of surface depletion on the work function of arc-melted dilute solution tungsten-iridium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Cruz, L.A.; Bosch, D.R.; Jacobson, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements of thermionic electrode materials have emphasized the need for substantial improvements in microstructural stability, strength, and creep resistance at service temperature in excess of 2,500K. The present work extends an earlier study of the effective work function trends of a series of dilute solution tungsten, iridium alloys with iridium contents of 1, 3, and 5 wt%. Since the lifetime of candidate electrode materials is an important consideration, the present work attempts to evaluate the repeatability of the work function trends in these alloys. The effective work function was obtained from measurements of the current emitted from the electrode surface under UHV conditions in the temperature range of 1,800-2,500K using a Vacuum Emission Vehicle (VEV). The data generated in this work have been compared with data obtained in earlier studies performed on these alloys. It was found that the magnitude of the effective work function of these alloys was affected by changes in the subsurface iridium concentration. Furthermore, these alloys exhibited a dependence of the work function on temperature, after prolonged exposure to elevated temperatures. Such a temperature dependence can be explained by diffusion-controlled changes in the coverage of an iridium monolayer on the surface. It is proposed that the significant difference in effective work function trends obtained after prolonged exposure to elevated temperatures is a direct consequence of changes in the coverage of an iridium-rich monolayer on the electrode surface. The constitution of such a surface layer, however, would be governed by composition changes in the subsurface regions of the electrode caused thermally-activated transport processes

  20. Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and electrochemically driven melting to discriminate Yersinia pestis from Y. pseudotuberculosis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms within unpurified polymerase chain reaction amplicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Evanthia; Goodchild, Sarah A; Cleary, David W; Weller, Simon A; Gale, Nittaya; Stubberfield, Michael R; Brown, Tom; Bartlett, Philip N

    2015-02-03

    The development of sensors for the detection of pathogen-specific DNA, including relevant species/strain level discrimination, is critical in molecular diagnostics with major impacts in areas such as bioterrorism and food safety. Herein, we use electrochemically driven denaturation assays monitored by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to target single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that distinguish DNA amplicons generated from Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, from the closely related species Y. pseudotuberculosis. Two assays targeting SNPs within the groEL and metH genes of these two species have been successfully designed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to produce Texas Red labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) amplicons of 262 and 251 bases for the groEL and metH targets, respectively. These amplicons were used in an unpurified form to hybridize to immobilized probes then subjected to electrochemically driven melting. In all cases electrochemically driven melting was able to discriminate between fully homologous DNA and that containing SNPs. The metH assay was particularly challenging due to the presence of only a single base mismatch in the middle of the 251 base long PCR amplicon. However, manipulation of assay conditions (conducting the electrochemical experiments at 10 °C) resulted in greater discrimination between the complementary and mismatched DNA. Replicate data were collected and analyzed for each duplex on different days, using different batches of PCR product and different sphere segment void (SSV) substrates. Despite the variability introduced by these differences, the assays are shown to be reliable and robust providing a new platform for strain discrimination using unpurified PCR samples.

  1. Biologia floral e sistema reprodutivo de duas espécies de marantaceae no Nordeste do Brasil : Ischnosiphon gracilis (Rudge) Köern. e Stromanthe porteana A. Gris

    OpenAIRE

    Virgínia de Lima Leite, Ana

    2002-01-01

    As espécies de Marantaceae apresentam um elaborado mecanismo de polinização caracterizado pela apresentação secundária de pólen associada a um mecanismo explosivo do estilete. Neste trabalho foram feitas análises da biologia floral e do sistema reprodutivo em populações naturais de Ischnosiphon gracilis (Rudge) Köern. e Stromanthe porteana A. Gris ocorrentes no Parque Estadual Dois Irmãos (8º7 30 S 34º52 30 W), estado de Pernambuco, Brasil. A inflorescência de I. gracil...

  2. Viscous Dissipation Effects on the Motion of Casson Fluid over an Upper Horizontal Thermally Stratified Melting Surface of a Paraboloid of Revolution: Boundary Layer Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Ajayi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a non-Newtonian fluid flow past an upper surface of an object that is neither a perfect horizontal/vertical nor inclined/cone in which dissipation of energy is associated with temperature-dependent plastic dynamic viscosity is considered. An attempt has been made to focus on the case of two-dimensional Casson fluid flow over a horizontal melting surface embedded in a thermally stratified medium. Since the viscosity of the non-Newtonian fluid tends to take energy from the motion (kinetic energy and transform it into internal energy, the viscous dissipation term is accommodated in the energy equation. Due to the existence of internal space-dependent heat source; plastic dynamic viscosity and thermal conductivity of the non-Newtonian fluid are assumed to vary linearly with temperature. Based on the boundary layer assumptions, suitable similarity variables are applied to nondimensionalized, parameterized and reduce the governing partial differential equations into a coupled ordinary differential equations. These equations along with the boundary conditions are solved numerically using the shooting method together with the Runge-Kutta technique. The effects of pertinent parameters are established. A significant increases in Rex1/2Cfx is guaranteed with St when magnitude of β is large. Rex1/2Cfx decreases with Ec and m.

  3. Improved bioactivity of selective laser melting titanium: Surface modification with micro-/nano-textured hierarchical topography and bone regeneration performance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jia-yun [Department of Oral Implantology, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Chen, Xian-shuai; Zhang, Chun-yu [Guangzhou Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou 511458 (China); Liu, Yun; Wang, Jing [Department of Oral Implantology, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Deng, Fei-long, E-mail: drdfl@163.com [Department of Oral Implantology, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou 510055 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) titanium requires surface modification to improve its bioactivity. The microrough surface of it can be utilized as the micro primary substrate to create a micro-/nano-textured topography for improved bone regeneration. In this study, the microrough SLM titanium substrate was optimized by sandblasting, and nano-porous features of orderly arranged nanotubes and disorderly arranged nanonet were produced by anodization (SAN) and alkali-heat treatment (SAH), respectively. The results were compared with the control group of an untreated surface (native-SLM) and a microtopography only surface treated by acid etching (SLA). The effects of the different topographies on cell functions and bone formation performance were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. It was found that micro-/nano-textured topographies of SAN and SAH showed enhanced cell behaviour relative to the microtopography of SLA with significantly higher proliferation on the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th day (P < 0.05) and higher total protein contents on the 14th day (P < 0.05). In vivo, SAN and SAH formed more successively regenerated bone, which resulted in higher bone-implant contact (BIC%) and bone-bonding force than native-SLM and SLA. In addition, the three-dimensional nanonet of SAH was expected to be more similar to native extracellular matrix (ECM) and thus led to better bone formation. The alkaline phosphatase activity of SAH was significantly higher than the other three groups at an earlier stage of the 7th day (P < 0.05) and the BIC% was nearly double that of native-SLM and SLA in the 8th week. In conclusion, the addition of nano-porous features on the microrough SLM titanium surface is effective in improving the bioactivity and bone regeneration performance, in which the ECM-like nanonet with a disorderly arranged biomimetic feature is suggested to be more efficient than nanotubes. - Highlights: • SLM titanium is modified by adding nano-porous features to the microrough substrate

  4. Improved bioactivity of selective laser melting titanium: Surface modification with micro-/nano-textured hierarchical topography and bone regeneration performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jia-yun; Chen, Xian-shuai; Zhang, Chun-yu; Liu, Yun; Wang, Jing; Deng, Fei-long

    2016-01-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) titanium requires surface modification to improve its bioactivity. The microrough surface of it can be utilized as the micro primary substrate to create a micro-/nano-textured topography for improved bone regeneration. In this study, the microrough SLM titanium substrate was optimized by sandblasting, and nano-porous features of orderly arranged nanotubes and disorderly arranged nanonet were produced by anodization (SAN) and alkali-heat treatment (SAH), respectively. The results were compared with the control group of an untreated surface (native-SLM) and a microtopography only surface treated by acid etching (SLA). The effects of the different topographies on cell functions and bone formation performance were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. It was found that micro-/nano-textured topographies of SAN and SAH showed enhanced cell behaviour relative to the microtopography of SLA with significantly higher proliferation on the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th day (P < 0.05) and higher total protein contents on the 14th day (P < 0.05). In vivo, SAN and SAH formed more successively regenerated bone, which resulted in higher bone-implant contact (BIC%) and bone-bonding force than native-SLM and SLA. In addition, the three-dimensional nanonet of SAH was expected to be more similar to native extracellular matrix (ECM) and thus led to better bone formation. The alkaline phosphatase activity of SAH was significantly higher than the other three groups at an earlier stage of the 7th day (P < 0.05) and the BIC% was nearly double that of native-SLM and SLA in the 8th week. In conclusion, the addition of nano-porous features on the microrough SLM titanium surface is effective in improving the bioactivity and bone regeneration performance, in which the ECM-like nanonet with a disorderly arranged biomimetic feature is suggested to be more efficient than nanotubes. - Highlights: • SLM titanium is modified by adding nano-porous features to the microrough substrate

  5. Du gris au vert

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ont fait des essais en ce qui concerne l'épandage d'engrais, la densité des semis et les semis en ligne. Ils ont recueilli conjointement les don- nées et ont discuté des résultats. Les agricul- teurs ont récolté les tubercules, les ont classés et ont analysé le rapport coûts-avantages. À la lumière des résultats, les agriculteurs ont.

  6. Laser melting treatment of Ni-P surface alloys on mild steel. Influence of initial coating thickness and laser scanning rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Alonso, M. C.

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Different thickness Ni-P coatings deposited on mild steel are submitted to laser surface melting at different scanning rates. The microstructure of the alloys is characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy and microprobe analysis. It is shown that both the initial coating thickness and the laser scanning rate have an influence on the shape, extent and size of the different structures resulting from the solidification process. Thus, when the laser scanning rate increases a progressive refinement of the structure takes place that could even totally block the dendritic growth produced during solidification for a high initial coating thickness.

    Recubrimientos de Ni-P, con distinto espesor, depositados sobre un acero microaleado fueron tratados con láser a diferentes velocidades de barrido. La microestructura, tanto del recubrimiento como del acero base, ha sido caracterizada por microscopía óptica y electrónica y por microanálisis. En el proceso de solidificación se han obtenido distintas estructuras que varían en cuanto a la forma, extensión y tamaño dependiendo del espesor inicial de recubrimiento y de la velocidad de barrido del haz láser. A medida que la velocidad del haz aumenta, se produce un refinamiento progresivo de la microestructura dendrítica y, en casos extremos de alto espesor de recubrimiento y velocidades grandes, este crecimiento dendrítico se bloquea.

  7. DEPENDENCY OF SULFATE SOLUBILITY ON MELT COMPOSITION AND MELT POLYMERIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JANTZEN, CAROL M.

    2004-01-01

    Sulfate and sulfate salts are not very soluble in borosilicate waste glass. When sulfate is present in excess it can form water soluble secondary phases and/or a molten salt layer (gall) on the melt pool surface which is purported to cause steam explosions in slurry fed melters. Therefore, sulfate can impact glass durability while formation of a molten salt layer on the melt pool can impact processing. Sulfate solubility has been shown to be compositionally dependent in various studies, (e.g. , B2O3, Li2O, CaO, MgO, Na2O, and Fe2O3 were shown to increase sulfate solubility while Al2O3 and SiO2 decreased sulfate solubility). This compositional dependency is shown to be related to the calculated melt viscosity at various temperatures and hence the melt polymerization

  8. A study of the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite on melt quenched Bioglass using surface sensitive shallow angle X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R A; Twyman, H; Qiu, D; Knowles, J C; Newport, R J

    2009-04-01

    Melt quenched silicate glasses containing calcium, phosphorous and alkali metals have the ability to promote bone regeneration and to fuse to living bone. These glasses, including 45S5 Bioglass((R)) [(CaO)(26.9)(Na(2)O)(24.4)(SiO(2))(46.1)(P(2)O(5))(2.6)], are routinely used as clinical implants. Consequently there have been numerous studies on the structure of these glasses using conventional diffraction techniques. These studies have provided important information on the atomic structure of Bioglass((R)) but are of course intrinsically limited in the sense that they probe the bulk material and cannot be as sensitive to thin layers of near-surface dissolution/growth. The present study therefore uses surface sensitive shallow angle X-ray diffraction to study the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite on Bioglass((R)) samples, pre-reacted in simulated body fluid (SBF). Unreacted Bioglass((R)) is dominated by a broad amorphous feature around 2.2 A(-1) which is characteristic of sodium calcium silicate glass. After reacting Bioglass((R)) in SBF a second broad amorphous feature evolves ~1.6 A(-1) which is attributed to amorphous calcium phosphate. This feature is evident for samples after only 4 h reacting in SBF and by 8 h the amorphous feature becomes comparable in magnitude to the background signal of the bulk Bioglass((R)). Bragg peaks characteristic of hydroxyapatite form after 1-3 days of reacting in SBF.

  9. Modification of AISI M2 high speed tool steels after laser surface melting under different operation conditions; Modificacion de los aceros rapidos de herramientas AISI M2 por fusion superficial con laser bajo diferentes condiciones de operacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, J.; Cabeza, M.; Castro, G.; Feijoo, I.; Merino, P.; Pena, G.

    2010-07-01

    We applied a laser surface melting treatment to AISIM2 high-speed steel hardened and tempered- and studied the resulting surface characteristics (microstructure) and mechanical behavior (hardness and wear performance). The steel was treated using a Nd:YAG continuous-wave laser with different operation conditions. The influence of the laser processing parameters on the single tracks and on melted surface layer obtained by multipass system with 50% overlap were studied. The microstructure for all conditions is formed by MC- and M{sub 2}C-type carbides, martensite and retained austenite; the quantities of this phase depends on the operations conditions. It has been determined that low levels of power density and high speed scanning of the beam leads to greater homogeneity in the microstructure with high hardness values and wear resistance. (Author) 26 refs.

  10. Electron beam melting of sponge titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Hiroshi; Kusamichi, Tatsuhiko; Muraoka, Tetsuhiro; Onouye, Toshio; Nishimura, Takashi

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental investigations were done on electron beam (EB) melting of sponge titanium by using 80 kW EB melting furnace. Results obtained are as follows: (1) To increase the melting yield of titanium in EB melting of sponge titanium, it is important to recover splashed metal by installation of water-cooled copper wall around the hearth and to decrease evaporation loss of titanium by keeping the surface temperature of molten metal just above the melting temperature of titanium without local heating. (2) Specific power consumption of drip melting of pressed sponge titanium bar and hearth melting of sponge titanium are approximately 0.9 kWh/kg-Ti and 0.5-0.7 kWh/kg-Ti, respectively. (3) Ratios of the heat conducted to water-cooled mould in the drip melting and to water-cooled hearth in the hearth melting to the electron beam input power are 50-65% and 60-65%, respectively. (4) Surface defects of EB-melted ingots include rap which occurs when the EB output is excessively great, and transverse cracks when the EB output is excessively small. To prevent surface defects, the up-down withdrawal method is effective. (author)

  11. UN MODELO DE GESTIÓN DE LA CALIDAD Y CANTIDAD DE AGUA CON LÓGICA DIFUSA GRIS PARA EL RÍO ABURRÁ

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Fernando Carvajal Serna

    2013-01-01

    Este artículo presenta un modelo de lógica difusa gris para la gestión de la calidad y cantidad del agua en el río Aburrá, el cual permite tener en cuenta la incertidumbre de los parámetros ambientales, que por lo general hacen que la toma de decisiones para las autoridades ambientales presente conflictos con los descargadores o contaminadores de los cuerpos de agua. La aplicación del modelo se hizo a una campaña del río Aburrá tomando como datos el caudal, el oxígeno disuelto y la demanda bi...

  12. Melting in super-earths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stixrude, Lars

    2014-04-28

    We examine the possible extent of melting in rock-iron super-earths, focusing on those in the habitable zone. We consider the energetics of accretion and core formation, the timescale of cooling and its dependence on viscosity and partial melting, thermal regulation via the temperature dependence of viscosity, and the melting curves of rock and iron components at the ultra-high pressures characteristic of super-earths. We find that the efficiency of kinetic energy deposition during accretion increases with planetary mass; considering the likely role of giant impacts and core formation, we find that super-earths probably complete their accretionary phase in an entirely molten state. Considerations of thermal regulation lead us to propose model temperature profiles of super-earths that are controlled by silicate melting. We estimate melting curves of iron and rock components up to the extreme pressures characteristic of super-earth interiors based on existing experimental and ab initio results and scaling laws. We construct super-earth thermal models by solving the equations of mass conservation and hydrostatic equilibrium, together with equations of state of rock and iron components. We set the potential temperature at the core-mantle boundary and at the surface to the local silicate melting temperature. We find that ancient (∼4 Gyr) super-earths may be partially molten at the top and bottom of their mantles, and that mantle convection is sufficiently vigorous to sustain dynamo action over the whole range of super-earth masses.

  13. Preparation of a non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric with partially embedded apatite surface for bone tissue engineering applications by partial surface melting of poly(ε-caprolactone) fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Ae; Rhee, Sang-Hoon

    2017-07-01

    This article describes a novel method for the preparation of a biodegradable non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric with a partially embedded apatite surface designed for application as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. The non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric was generated by the electro-spinning technique and then apatite was coated in simulated body fluid after coating the PVA solution containing CaCl 2 ·2H 2 O. The apatite crystals were partially embedded or fully embedded into the thermoplastic poly(ε-caprolactone) fibers by controlling the degree of poly(ε-caprolactone) fiber surface melting in a convection oven. Identical apatite-coated poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric that did not undergo heat-treatment was used as a control. The features of the embedded apatite crystals were evaluated by FE-SEM, AFM, EDS, and XRD. The adhesion strengths of the coated apatite layers and the tensile strengths of the apatite coated fabrics with and without heat-treatment were assessed by the tape-test and a universal testing machine, respectively. The degree of water absorbance was assessed by adding a DMEM droplet onto the fabrics. Moreover, cell penetrability was assessed by seeding preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells onto the fabrics and observing the degrees of cell penetration after 1 and 4 weeks by staining nuclei with DAPI. The non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric with a partially embedded apatite surface showed good water absorbance, cell penetrability, higher apatite adhesion strength, and higher tensile strength compared with the control fabric. These results show that the non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) fabric with a partially embedded apatite surface is a potential candidate scaffold for bone tissue engineering due to its strong apatite adhesion strength and excellent cell penetrability. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1973-1983, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Improvement of sensitizatiuon in weld metals of austenitic stainless steels by laser surface melting treatment. Report 3. Study on low temperature sensitization in weldments of austenitic stainless steels ans its improvement by laser surface melting treatment; Reza hyomen yoyu shori ni yoru sutenresu ko yosetsu kinzoku no enbinka kaizen. 3. Osutenaito kei sutenresu ko yosetsubu no teion enbinka to reza hyomen yoyu shori ni yoru sono kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimoto, K. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Mori, H. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan). Graduate School; Yamamura, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-05

    Laser surface melting treatment used for the improvement of intergranular corrosion resistance of sensitized austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. As a result, it was revealed that as compared to untreated material, sensitization was improved widely and intergranular corrosion resistance was improved to a level of base metal when laser surface melting treatment of sensitized weld metal was carried out. Further, sensitization effect at a condition of laser traveling velocity of 0.00167m/s was slightly insufficient compared to that of laser traveling velocity above 0.00833m/s. This phenomena was caused due to the existence of {delta} ferrite that accelerates the precipitation of Cr carbides inside the laser treatment portion and together with this, the Cr carbides are precipitated in {delta}/{gamma} grain boundary due to the effect of laser heat cycle with insufficient cooling velocity and this has caused desensitization. 16 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Electron beam melting of bearing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmied, G.; Schuler, A. (Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik); Elsinger, G.; Koroschetz, F. (MIBA Gleitlager AG, Laakirchen (Austria)); Tschegg, E.K. (Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte und Technische Physik)

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports on a surface treatment method for the bearing materials AlSn6 which permits the use of this material without the overlay usually required. Microstructural refinement is achieved by means of a surface melting technique using an electron beam with successive rapid solidification. Extremely fine tin precipitates are formed in the melted surface layer which lead to significantly better tribological properties of the bearing material. Tests compared the tribological properties for AlSn6 bearings treated by the surface melting technique with those of untreated bearings. Whereas all untreated bearings failed by seizure after only 2 h of testing, 30% of the tested bearings which had been surface melted survived the entire testing program without damage.

  16. Assimilation of MODIS Ice Surface Temperature and Albedo into the Snow and Ice Model CROCUS Over the Greenland Ice Sheet Along the K-transect Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navari, M.; Margulis, S. A.; Bateni, S. M.; Alexander, P. M.; Tedesco, M.

    2016-12-01

    Estimating the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface mass balance (SMB) is an important component of current and future projections of sea level rise. In situ measurement provides direct estimates of the SMB, but are inherently limited by their spatial extent and representativeness. Given this limitation, physically based regional climate models (RCMs) are critical for understanding GrIS physical processes and estimating of the GrIS SMB. However, the uncertainty in estimates of SMB from RCMs is still high. Surface remote sensing (RS) has been used as a complimentary tool to characterize various aspects related to the SMB. The difficulty of using these data streams is that the links between them and the SMB terms are most often indirect and implicit. Given the lack of in situ information, imperfect models, and under-utilized RS data it is critical to merge the available data in a systematic way to better characterize the spatial and temporal variation of the GrIS SMB. This work proposes a data assimilation (DA) framework that yields temporally-continuous and physically consistent SMB estimates that benefit from state-of-the-art models and relevant remote sensing data streams. Ice surface temperature (IST) is the most important factor that regulates partitioning of the net radiation into the subsurface snow/ice, sensible and latent heat fluxes and plays a key role in runoff generation. Therefore it can be expected that a better estimate of surface temperature from a data assimilation system would contribute to a better estimate of surface mass fluxes. Albedo plays an important role in the surface energy balance of the GrIS. However, even advanced albedo modules are not adequate to simulate albedo over the GrIS. Therefore, merging remotely sensed albedo product into a physically based model has a potential to improve the estimates of the GrIS SMB. In this work a MODIS-derived IST and a 16-day albedo product are independently assimilated into the snow and ice model CROCUS

  17. Cloud screening and melt water detection over melting sea ice using AATSR/SLSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomina, Larysa; Heygster, Georg

    2014-05-01

    With the onset of melt in the Arctic Ocean, the fraction of melt water on sea ice, the melt pond fraction, increases. The consequences are: the reduced albedo of sea ice, increased transmittance of sea ice and affected heat balance of the system with more heat passing through the ice into the ocean, which facilitates further melting. The onset of melt, duration of melt season and melt pond fraction are good indicators of the climate state of the Arctic and its change. In the absence of reliable sea ice thickness retrievals in summer, melt pond fraction retrieval from satellite is in demand as input for GCM as an indicator of melt state of the sea ice. The retrieval of melt pond fraction with a moderate resolution radiometer as AATSR is, however, a non-trivial task due to a variety of subpixel surface types with very different optical properties, which give non-unique combinations if mixed. In this work this has been solved by employing additional information on the surface and air temperature of the pixel. In the current work, a concept of melt pond detection on sea ice is presented. The basis of the retrieval is the sensitivity of AATSR reflectance channels 550nm and 860nm to the amount of melt water on sea ice. The retrieval features extensive usage of a database of in situ surface albedo spectra. A tree of decisions is employed to select the feasible family of in situ spectra for the retrieval, depending on the melt stage of the surface. Reanalysis air temperature at the surface and brightness temperature measured by the satellite sensor are analyzed in order to evaluate the melting status of the surface. Case studies for FYI and MYI show plausible retrieved melt pond fractions, characteristic for both of the ice types. The developed retrieval can be used to process the historical AATSR (2002-2012) dataset, as well as for the SLSTR sensor onboard the future Sentinel-3 mission (scheduled for launch in 2015), to keep the continuity and obtain longer time sequence

  18. Melting of superheated molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeta, Ulyana; Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2017-07-01

    Melting dynamics of micrometer scale, polycrystalline samples of isobutane, dimethyl ether, methyl benzene, and 2-propanol were investigated by fast scanning calorimetry. When films are superheated with rates in excess of 105 K s-1, the melting process follows zero-order, Arrhenius-like kinetics until approximately half of the sample has transformed. Such kinetics strongly imply that melting progresses into the bulk via a rapidly moving solid-liquid interface that is likely to originate at the sample's surface. Remarkably, the apparent activation energies for the phase transformation are large; all exceed the enthalpy of vaporization of each compound and some exceed it by an order of magnitude. In fact, we find that the crystalline melting kinetics are comparable to the kinetics of dielectric α-relaxation in deeply supercooled liquids. Based on these observations, we conclude that the rate of non-isothermal melting for superheated, low-molecular-weight crystals is limited by constituent diffusion into an abnormally dense, glass-like, non-crystalline phase.

  19. Melting under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.I.

    1980-10-01

    A simple model, using experimentally measured shock and particle velocities, is applied to the Lindemann melting formula to predict the density, temperature, and pressure at which a material will melt when shocked from room temperature and zero pressure initial conditions

  20. Estimating Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance contribution to future sea level rise using the regional atmospheric climate model MAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fettweis, X.; Franco, B.; Tedesco, M.; van Angelen, J.H.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Gallee, H

    2012-01-01

    We report future projections of Surface Mass Balance (SMB) over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) obtained with the regional climate model MAR, forced by the outputs of three CMIP5 General Circulation Models (GCMs) when considering two different warming scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). The GCMs

  1. Investigation of the microstructure and surface morphology of a Ti6Al4V plate fabricated by vacuum selective laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Masuno, Shinichiro; Abe, Nobuyuki [Osaka University, Joining and Welding Research Institute, Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan); Yamashita, Yorihiro [Industrial Research Institute of Ishikawa, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Yamashita, Kensuke; Tanigawa, Daichi [Osaka University, Graduate School of Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    As an additive manufacturing technology, the selective laser melting (SLM) process is useful to directly form complicated shapes. The SLM process in a vacuum has been used to fabricate three-dimensional Ti6Al4V (Ti64) plates because this method can control the phase transformation. To investigate the laser melting and solidification dynamics, the formation of a Ti64 plate by SLM in a vacuum was captured by a high-speed video camera. Due to the effects of temperature and scanning speed on the phase transformation, the crystal orientation was evaluated with X-ray diffraction. A phase transformation of the crystal orientation occurred as the baseplate temperature was heated up from 50 to 150 C. (orig.)

  2. Influence of Powder Surface Contamination in the Ni-Based Superalloy Alloy718 Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting and Hot Isostatic Pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ling Kuo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to gain a deep understanding of the microstructure-mechanical relationship between solid-state sintering and full-melting processes. The IN718 superalloy was fabricated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP and selective laser melting (SLM. Continuous precipitates were clearly localized along the prior particle boundary (PPB in the HIP materials, while SLM materials showed a microstructure free of PPB. The mechanical properties of specimens that underwent SLM + solution treatment and aging were comparable to those of conventional wrought specimens both at room temperature and 650 °C. However, a drop was observed in the ductility of HIP material at 650 °C. The brittle particles along the PPB were found to affect the HIP materials’ creep life and ductility during solid-state sintering.

  3. Investigation of the microstructure and surface morphology of a Ti6Al4V plate fabricated by vacuum selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Masuno, Shinichiro; Abe, Nobuyuki; Yamashita, Yorihiro; Yamashita, Kensuke; Tanigawa, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    As an additive manufacturing technology, the selective laser melting (SLM) process is useful to directly form complicated shapes. The SLM process in a vacuum has been used to fabricate three-dimensional Ti6Al4V (Ti64) plates because this method can control the phase transformation. To investigate the laser melting and solidification dynamics, the formation of a Ti64 plate by SLM in a vacuum was captured by a high-speed video camera. Due to the effects of temperature and scanning speed on the phase transformation, the crystal orientation was evaluated with X-ray diffraction. A phase transformation of the crystal orientation occurred as the baseplate temperature was heated up from 50 to 150 C. (orig.)

  4. Melting of Dense Sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoryanz, Eugene; Degtyareva, Olga; Hemley, Russell J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Somayazulu, Maddury

    2005-01-01

    High-pressure high-temperature synchrotron diffraction measurements reveal a maximum on the melting curve of Na in the bcc phase at ∼31 GPa and 1000 K and a steep decrease in melting temperature in its fcc phase. The results extend the melting curve by an order of magnitude up to 130 GPa. Above 103 GPa, Na crystallizes in a sequence of phases with complex structures with unusually low melting temperatures, reaching 300 K at 118 GPa, and an increased melting temperature is observed with further increases in pressure

  5. Fission Product Release from Molten Pool: ceramic melt tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Yu.B.; Lopukh, D.B.; Petchenkov, A.Yu. [AO ' NP Sintez' , St. Petersburg (RU)] [and others

    1999-07-01

    Experimental results are presented on the volatilisation of UO{sub 2{+-}}{sub x}, SrO, BaO, CeO{sub 2} from corium melts. Corium melts were generated by high frequency induction melting in a cold crucible. The surface temperature of the melts was in the range from 1753 to 3023 K. Some results of the tests are discussed and a comparison with published data is made. (author)

  6. Integral analysis of cavity pressurization in a fuel rod during an ULOF driven TOP with inclusion of surface tension effects on froth gas bubbles and variable cavity conditions due to fuel melting and ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royl, P.

    1984-02-01

    The transient cavity pressurization in an ULOF driven TOP excursion has been analyzed for the SPX-1 reactor with an equation of state that allows to simulate the contribution of small froth gas bubbles to the pressure build-up in a fuel pin with inclusion of restraints from surface tension. Calculations were performed for various bubble parameters. Estimates are made for effective gas availabilities at fuel melting which can be used in a cavity model with an ideal gas equation to arrive at similar pressure transients

  7. UN MODELO DE GESTIÓN DE LA CALIDAD Y CANTIDAD DE AGUA CON LÓGICA DIFUSA GRIS PARA EL RÍO ABURRÁ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Carvajal Serna

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta un modelo de lógica difusa gris para la gestión de la calidad y cantidad del agua en el río Aburrá, el cual permite tener en cuenta la incertidumbre de los parámetros ambientales, que por lo general hacen que la toma de decisiones para las autoridades ambientales presente conflictos con los descargadores o contaminadores de los cuerpos de agua. La aplicación del modelo se hizo a una campaña del río Aburrá tomando como datos el caudal, el oxígeno disuelto y la demanda bioquímica de oxígeno. El modelo toma los aportes de las quebradas como los puntos de contaminación de los descargadores. Este modelo implica una optimización de acuerdo con los objetivos de la autoridad ambiental y los descargadores. El modelo se desarrolló en Matlab. Como conclusión se muestra el potencial del modelo para la gestión del agua del río y para alcanzar las metas planteadas por la autoridad ambiental.

  8. Shape evolution of a melting nonspherical particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintea, Daniel M.; Hauk, Tobias; Roisman, Ilia V.; Tropea, Cameron

    2015-09-01

    In this study melting of irregular ice crystals was observed in an acoustic levitator. The evolution of the particle shape is captured using a high-speed video system. Several typical phenomena have been discovered: change of the particle shape, appearance of a capillary flow of the melted liquid on the particle surface leading to liquid collection at the particle midsection (where the interface curvature is smallest), and appearance of sharp cusps at the particle tips. No such phenomena can be observed during melting of spherical particles. An approximate theoretical model is developed which accounts for the main physical phenomena associated with melting of an irregular particle. The agreement between the theoretical predictions for the melting time, for the evolution of the particle shape, and the corresponding experimental data is rather good.

  9. Model of interfacial melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is proposed to describe systems with phase transitions which take place in terms of crystalline as well as internal degrees of freedom. Computer simulation of the model shows that the interplay between the two sets of degrees of freedom permits observation of grain-boundar......-boundary formation and interfacial melting, a nonequilibrium process by which the system melts at the boundaries of a polycrystalline domain structure. Lipid membranes are candidates for systems with pronounced interfacial melting behavior....

  10. Estimating the Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance contribution to future sea level rise using the regional atmospheric climate model MAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fettweis, X.; Franco, B.; Tedesco, M.; van Angelen, J.H.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Gallée, H.

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the sea level rise (SLR) originating from changes in surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS), we present 21st century climate projections obtained with the regional climate model MAR (Mod`ele Atmosph´erique R´egional), forced by output of three CMIP5 (Coupled Model

  11. Causes of Glacier Melt Extremes in the Alps Since 1949

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibert, E.; Dkengne Sielenou, P.; Vionnet, V.; Eckert, N.; Vincent, C.

    2018-01-01

    Recent record-breaking glacier melt values are attributable to peculiar extreme events and long-term warming trends that shift averages upward. Analyzing one of the world's longest mass balance series with extreme value statistics, we show that detrending melt anomalies makes it possible to disentangle these effects, leading to a fairer evaluation of the return period of melt extreme values such as 2003, and to characterize them by a more realistic bounded behavior. Using surface energy balance simulations, we show that three independent drivers control melt: global radiation, latent heat, and the amount of snow at the beginning of the melting season. Extremes are governed by large deviations in global radiation combined with sensible heat. Long-term trends are driven by the lengthening of melt duration due to earlier and longer-lasting melting of ice along with melt intensification caused by trends in long-wave irradiance and latent heat due to higher air moisture.

  12. The ability of S.aureus to form biofilm on the Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting and subjected to the different types of surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczyk, Patrycja; Junka, Adam; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Smutnicka, Danuta; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive coccus, Staphylococcus aureus, is the leading etiologic agent of limb and life-threatening biofilm-related infections in the patients following the orthopaedic implantations. The aim of the present paper is to estimate the ability of S. aureus to form biofilm on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-7Nb) scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and subjected to the different types of surface modifications, including ultrasonic cleaning and chemical polishing. The results obtained indicate significantly the decreased ability of S.aureus to form biofilm on the surface of scaffolds subjected to the chemical polishing in comparison to the scaffolds cleaned ultrasonically. The data provided can be useful for future applications of the SLM technology in production of Ti-6Al-7Nb medical implants.

  13. Liquid phase surface melting of AA8011 aluminum alloy by addition of Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-composite powders synthesized by high-energy milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohi, M. Heydarzadeh [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hojjatzadeh, S.M.H., E-mail: Hojatzadeh@yahoo.com [Department of Welding, Science and Research Branch, Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moosavifar, Sh. S.; Heshmati-Manesh, S. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Aluminum matrix composite layers reinforced with alumina particles were fabricated. • Non milled powders caused porosity in the microstructures because of poor wettability. • The ball milling of powders was significantly improved the wettability of nano ceramic particles. • The micro hardness of the layers was approximately 3 times greater than that of the base metal. - Abstract: Poor wettability of particles is an obstacle in formation of sound composite layer via surface melting. Pre-coating of particles with metallic material by different techniques, such as ball milling may enhance the wettability of the particles with molten metal. In this study, composite surface layers containing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were fabricated on the surface of AA8011 aluminum substrates by tungsten inert gas (TIG) surface melting using preplaced layers of Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder mixtures in two different forms: (1) a mixture of 40 wt% Al and 60 wt% of 50 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders and (2) a mixture obtained by mechanical alloying of 40 wt% Al and 60 wt% of 60 μm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders. Morphology evolution of powders during ball milling and the microstructure of the fabricated composite layers were studied through conventional characterization techniques, such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Microhardness measurements were also performed across the alloyed zone. The results indicated that the layer fabricated by the second route showed a defect free structure with a more uniform distribution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in comparison with the layer obtained by the first route. It was also noticed that the uniform dispersion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in the fabricated layer increased the hardness to 133 HV which was over 3 times of that of the base metal.

  14. Electrodepositions on Tantalum in Alkali Halide Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barner, Jens H. Von; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Surface layers of tantalum metal were electrodeposited on steel from K2TaF7-LiF-NaF-KF melts. With careful control of the oxide contents dense and adherent deposits could be obtained by pulse plating. In NaCl-KCl-NaF-Na2CO3 and NaCl-KCl-Na2CO3 melts carbonate ions seems to be reduced to carbon in...

  15. Electrodepositions on Tantalum in alkali halide melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barner, Jens H. Von; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Surface layers of tantalum metal were electrodeposited on steel from K 2TaF7-LiF-NaF-KF melts. With careful control of the oxide contents dense and adherent deposits could be obtained by pulse plating. In NaCl-KCl-NaF-Na2CO3 and NaCl-KCl-Na2CO 3 melts carbonate ions seems to be reduced to carbon ...

  16. Liberación y seguimiento de dos grupos de tití gris (Saguinus leucopus en el departamento de Tolima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Leal

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio fue realizado con dos grupos de tití gris (Saguinus leucopus, procedentesde decomisos y entregas voluntarias. Los animales fueron rehabilitados duranteaproximadamente un año en la ciudad de Bogotá, con el fin de estimular el desarrolloy recuperación de las habilidades necesarias para su sobrevivencia al ser devueltos almedio ambiente natural. Se construyeron dos jaulas como plataformas de liberaciónen un bosque en el departamento del Tolima, y los animales fueron alojados en ellaspara iniciar su proceso de acostumbramiento al medio. Durante este tiempo se realizóun estudio etológico, con el propósito de determinar las posibles variaciones comportamentalesderivadas del cambio en el entorno. Los animales fueron liberados y se llevóa cabo el seguimiento visual para evaluar el proceso de rehabilitación y la adaptación delos individuos al nuevo hábitat. Se observó una variación en la presentación de comportamientosrelacionados con actividades de desplazamiento, descanso e interaccionessociales en comparación con estudios realizados en cautiverio. Después de la liberación,los animales fueron vistos en sitios próximos a las jaulas de acostumbramiento,lo cual podría indicar que establecieron sus territorios en estas áreas; no se registraronvariaciones significativas en la conformación de los grupos ni enfrentamientos entre lasdos tropas. Estas observaciones indicarían que el proceso de liberación cumplió con suobjetivo, y puede considerarse exitoso.

  17. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  18. In vivo behavior of surface modified Ti6Al7Nb alloys used in selective laser melting for custom-made implants. A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, H; Armencea, G; Spîrchez, Diana; Berce, C; Marcu, Teodora; Leordean, D; Kim, Seong Gon; Lee, Sang Woon; Dinu, C; Băciuţ, G; Băciuţ, Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the biocompatibility and to evaluate the osseointegration of Titanium-Aluminum-Niobium (Ti6Al7Nb) alloy used in the manufacturing of personalized implants with selective laser melting (SLM) technology and to compare the growth viability of osteoblastic-like cells on different Ti6Al7Nb alloy samples (plain, coated with hydroxyapatite or SiO2-TiO2) implanted into the cranial bone of Wistar rats. In terms of biocompatibility, the cone-beam computer-tomography head scans taken at the moment of sacrifice of each group (one, two and three months) showed no implant displacement, no osteolysis and no liquid collection around the implants. At one month, around all types of implants new bone formation was noticed, although around the plain Ti6Al7Nb implant a large amount of powder debris was present. Still, no inflammatory reaction was seen. At two months, the distance between the implants and the calvarial bone margins diminished. A thin layer of fibrous tissue was noticed around the Ti6Al7Nb implant coated with hydroxyapatite but no bone contact was achieved. In the group sacrificed at three months there was still no bone contact, but noticeable were the SiO2-TiO2. In the group sacrificed at three months SiO2-TiO2 particles detached from the implant and completely integrated in the tissue were noticeable. All results suggested that the Ti6Al7Nb alloy with or without infiltration is well biologically tolerated.

  19. Melting point of yttria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, S.R.

    1977-06-01

    Fourteen samples of 99.999 percent Y 2 O 3 were melted near the focus of a 250-W CO 2 laser. The average value of the observed melting point along the solid-liquid interface was 2462 +- 19 0 C. Several of these same samples were then melted in ultrahigh-purity oxygen, nitrogen, helium, or argon and in water vapor. No change in the observed temperature was detected, with the exception of a 20 0 C increase in temperature from air to helium gas. Post test examination of the sample characteristics, clarity, sphericity, and density is presented, along with composition. It is suggested that yttria is superior to alumina as a secondary melting-point standard

  20. Force induced DNA melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K

    2009-01-01

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f m , at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  1. Influence of a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 9.4 μm on the surface morphology, reflectivity, and acid resistance of dental enamel below the threshold for melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Wan; Lee, Raymond; Chan, Kenneth H.; Jew, Jamison M.; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Below the threshold for laser ablation, the mineral phase of enamel is converted into a purer phase hydroxyapatite with increased acid resistance. Studies suggest the possibility of achieving the conversion without visible surface alteration. In this study, changes in the surface morphology, reflectivity, and acid resistance were monitored with varying irradiation intensity. Bovine enamel specimens were irradiated using a CO2 laser operating at 9.4 μm with a Gaussian spatial beam profile-1.6 to 3.1 mm in diameter. After laser treatment, samples were subjected to demineralization to simulate the acidic intraoral conditions of dental decay. The resulting demineralization and erosion were assessed using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography, three-dimensional digital microscopy, and polarized light microscopy. Distinct changes in the surface morphology and the degree of inhibition were found within the laser-treated area in accordance with the laser intensity profile. Subtle visual changes were noted below the melting point for enamel that appear to correspond to thresholds for denaturation of the organic phase and thermal decomposition of the mineral phase. There was significant protection from laser irradiation in areas in which the reflectivity was not increased significantly, suggesting that aesthetically sensitive areas of the tooth can be treated for caries prevention.

  2. The seasonal cycle and interannual variability of surface energy balance and melt in the ablation zone of the west Greenland ice sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broeke, M.R.; Smeets, C.J.P.P.; van de Wal, R.S.W.

    2011-01-01

    We present the seasonal cycle and interannual variability of the surface energy balance (SEB) in the ablation zone of the west Greenland ice sheet, using seven years (September 2003–August 2010) of hourly observations from three automatic weather stations (AWS). The AWS are situated along the 67◦ N

  3. Materias primas vs materia gris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Aldemar Gómez Sierra

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Los alimentos y los combustibles, en la última década, sobre pasaron el límite de la demanda; la causa no es sólo la evolución demográfica, ni el cambio climático, también es el efecto de las emergentes y poderosas economías asiáticas, especialmente la China, que está aumentando la exigencia energética y consume más y mejores alimentos; 500 millones de ciudadanos chinos están en capacidad de requerirlos y de viajar por el mundo como turistas.

  4. BERRYA ROXB. and CARPODIPTERA GRIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    a. j. g. h. kostermans

    1969-03-01

    Full Text Available In his monographic treatment of Tiliaceae, Burret {in Notizbl. bot.Gart. Berlin 9: 607. 1926 pointed out the close affinity of Berrya andCarpodiptera, the former represented in Asia and the Pacific area, thelatter from Africa and America.

  5. Electron beam melting state-of-the-art 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakish, R.

    1984-01-01

    In 1984 electron beam melting and refining appear poised for an important new growth phase. The driving force for this phase is improved production economics made possible by technological advances. There is also a new and exciting growth application for electron beam melting: its use for surface properties beneficiation. This article is based in part on the content of the Conference on Electron Beam Melting and Refining, The State-of-the-Art 1983, held in November 1983 in Reno, Nevada

  6. Volatilization behavior of transactinides from metal surfaces and melts (thermochemical calculation); Verfluechtigungsverhalten der Transaktinoide von Metalloberflaechen und aus Schmelzen (Thermochemische Kalkulation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichler, B

    2003-01-01

    Volatilization properties of elements with the atomic numbers Z=104 to 116 are determined on the basis of empirical relations. These empirical correlations are deduced from the analysis of thermochemical data of metallic elements in the periodic table and their relations to the material constant: Structure specific connections are shown to exist between the electron densities at the 'Wigner-Seitz' cell borders of metals and the specific surface energies of solid metals with hexagonal, cubic face-centred, cubic body-centred and rhombohedral lattices. Analogously, structure specific relations can be found between the standard enthalpies of the gaseous monoatomic metals and their surface energies. Linear correlations with exceptionally high correlation coefficients are observed between the standard sublimation enthalpies of isotypic metals in the dimeric state and the surface energies. Volatilization properties are deduced for the transactinides on the basis of these established relations, applying a predicted structure and further empirical correlations. These volatilization properties are in detail: the standard enthalpies of the gaseous monomers; the standard sublimation enthalpies of the dimers; the standard dissociation enthalpies of the dimers; the standard enthalpies of adsorption on metal surfaces; the volatilization enthalpies from molten metals, and the standard formation enthalpies of hetero binuclear intermetallic molecules. Thermochemical constants required for the calculation of the intermetallic interactions are determined using the Miedema model. The closed systematic approach facilitate: the assessment of the calculated data considering the agreement with known rules of metal chemistry, trends in the 7{sup t}h row and along the groups of the periodic table, the coherence of the data, and the action of closed shell effects in the electron configurations. From the obtained data conclusions are possible regarding the design of volatilization

  7. Monitoring device for glass melting furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Noboru; Asano, Naoki; Higuchi, Tatsuo; Koyama, Mayumi; Hanado, Shinji.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention can monitor, from a remote place, a liquid surface in a glass melting furnace for use in a solidification treatment, for example, of high level radioactive wastes. Namely, a vertical sleeve is disposed penetrating a ceiling wall of a melting vessel. A reflection mirror is disposed above the vertical sleeve and flex an optical axis. A monitoring means is disposed on the optical axis of the reflecting mirror at a spaced position. The monitoring means may have an optical telescopic means, a monitoring camera by way of a half mirror and an illumination means. The reflection mirror may be made of a metal. The monitoring device thus constituted suffer from no effects of high temperature and high radiation dose rate, thereby enabling to easily monitor the liquid surface in the melting furnace. (I.S.)

  8. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  9. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  10. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florio, B. J., E-mail: brendan.florio@ul.ie [University of Limerick, Mathematics Applications Consortium for Science and Industry (MACSI), Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Ireland); Myers, T. G., E-mail: tmyers@crm.cat [Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  11. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  12. Endmembers of Ice Shelf Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, A.; Child, S. F.; Kingslake, J.; Tedesco, M.; Bell, R. E.; Alexandrov, O.; McMichael, S.

    2017-12-01

    Studies of surface melt on ice shelves have defined a spectrum of meltwater behavior. On one end the storage of meltwater in persistent surface ponds can trigger ice shelf collapse as in the 2002 event leading to the disintegration of the Larsen B Ice Shelf. On the other, meltwater export by rivers can stabilize an ice shelf as was recently shown on the Nansen Ice Shelf. We explore this dichotomy by quantifying the partitioning between stored and transported water on two glaciers adjacent to floating ice shelves, Nimrod (Antarctica) and Peterman (Greenland). We analyze optical satellite imagery (LANDSAT, WorldView), airborne imagery (Operation IceBridge, Trimetrogon Aerial Phototography), satellite radar (Sentinel-1), and digital elevation models (DEMs) to categorize surface meltwater fate and map the evolution of ice shelf hydrology and topographic features through time. On the floating Peterman Glacier tongue a sizable river exports water to the ocean. The surface hydrology of Nimrod Glacier, geometrically similar to Peterman but with ten times shallower surface slope, is dominated by storage in surface lakes. In contrast, the Nansen has the same surface slope as Nimrod but transports water through surface rivers. Slope alone is not the sole control on ice shelf hydrology. It is essential to track the storage and transport volumes for each of these systems. To estimate water storage and transport we analyze high resolution (40 cm - 2 m) modern and historical DEMs. We produce historical (1957 onwards) DEMs with structure-from-motion photogrammetry. The DEMs are used to constrain water storage potential estimates of observed basins and water routing/transport potential. We quantify the total volume of water stored seasonally and interannually. We use the normalize difference water index to map meltwater extent, and estimate lake water depth from optical data. We also consider the role of stored water in subsurface aquifers in recharging surface water after

  13. Melting of gold microclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, I.L.; Jellinek, J.

    1991-01-01

    The transition from solid-like to liquid-like behavior in Au n , n=6, 7, 13, clusters is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. A Gupta-type potential with all-neighbour interactions is employed to incorporate n-body effects. The melting-like transition is described in terms of short-time averages of the kinetic energy per particle, root-mean-square bond length fluctuations and mean square displacements. A comparison between melting temperatures of Au n and Ni n clusters is presented. (orig.)

  14. GLASS MELTING PHENOMENA, THEIR ORDERING AND MELTING SPACE UTILISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Němec L.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Four aspects of effective glass melting have been defined – namely the fast kinetics of partial melting phenomena, a consideration of the melting phenomena ordering, high utilisation of the melting space, and effective utilisation of the supplied energy. The relations were defined for the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption of the glass melting process which involve the four mentioned aspects of the process and indicate the potentials of effective melting. The quantity “space utilisation” has been treated in more detail as an aspect not considered in practice till this time. The space utilisation was quantitatively defined and its values have been determined for the industrial melting facility by mathematical modelling. The definitions of the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption have been used for assessment of the potential impact of a controlled melt flow and high space utilisation on the melting process efficiency on the industrial scale. The results have shown that even the partial control of the melt flow, leading to the partial increase of the space utilisation, may considerably increase the melting performance, whereas a decrease of the specific energy consumption was determined to be between 10 - 15 %.

  15. CARIOTIPO DEL TITÍ GRIS (Saguinus leucopus MEDIANTE BANDAS R-REPLICATIVAS KARYOTYPE OF TITÍ GREY (Saguinus leucopus THROUGH R-REPLICATIVE BANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Posada Céspedes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen. Colombia es considerado un país megabiodiverso, ostentando varias especies endémicas como Saguinus leucopus. El Tití gris, como es vulgarmente llamado, habita bosques tropicales, es omnívoro y de hábitos diurnos, y se destaca como dispersor de semillas. Morfológicamente se caracteriza por su reducido tamaño, pelaje café y dorso plateado. Se organiza en grupos familiares formados por la pareja y su descendencia, con una hembra dominante, la cual es la única que cría. Debido a factores fundamentalmente de origen antrópico, se encuentra catalogada como especies en peligro de extinción por la UICN y está registrado en el apéndice I del CITES. Aun cuando se han realizados estudios sobre su biología básica, son pocos los reporte sobre la evaluación citogenética y ninguno sobre cariotipo con bandas R-Replicativa. En esta investigación se realizó el cariotipo y el idiograma, con bandas R-Replicativas, mediante la incorporación de 5'-bromo-2'-deoxiuridina (BrdU en sangre periférica estimulada con fitohemaglutinina de S. leucopus. Los resultados mostraron un cariotipo 2n = 46, con un número fundamental (NF de 76. Los cromosomas se organizaron en cinco grupos de acuerdo con su forma y tamaño. El grupo A, es conformado por 3 pares de cromosomas grandes submetacéntricos; el grupo B, por 5 pares de cromosomas de tamaño medio metacéntricos o submetacéntricos; el grupo C, por 6 pares acrocéntricos y el grupo D, por 8 pares subtelocéntricos y el par sexual XX/XY. El cromosoma "X" es de tamaño medio submetacéntrico y el "Y" es metacéntrico, y de los más pequeños del genoma. Finalmente, se propone un idiograma con bandas R- Replicativa con base en mitosis en estadio III de replicación.Abstract. Colombia is considered a mega-biodiverse country, boasting several endemic species such as Saguinus leucopus. The Marmoset gray, as is commonly called, inhabits tropical forests, is omnivorous and diurnal, and stands as seed

  16. Greenland ice sheet melt from MODIS and associated atmospheric variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häkkinen, Sirpa; Hall, Dorothy K; Shuman, Christopher A; Worthen, Denise L; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E

    2014-03-16

    Daily June-July melt fraction variations over the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (2000-2013) are associated with atmospheric blocking forming an omega-shape ridge over the GIS at 500 hPa height. Blocking activity with a range of time scales, from synoptic waves breaking poleward (days) to full-fledged blocks (≥5 days), brings warm subtropical air masses over the GIS controlling daily surface temperatures and melt. The temperature anomaly of these subtropical air mass intrusions is also important for melting. Based on the years with the greatest melt (2002 and 2012) during the MODIS era, the area-average temperature anomaly of 2 standard deviations above the 14 year June-July mean results in a melt fraction of 40% or more. Though the summer of 2007 had the most blocking days, atmospheric temperature anomalies were too small to instigate extreme melting. Short-term atmospheric blocking over Greenland contributes to melt episodesAssociated temperature anomalies are equally important for the meltDuration and strength of blocking events contribute to surface melt intensity.

  17. MELT-IIIB: an updated version of the melt code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabb, K.K.; Lewis, C.H.; O'Dell, L.D.; Padilla, A. Jr.; Smith, D.E.; Wilburn, N.P.

    1979-04-01

    The MELT series is a reactor modeling code designed to investigate a wide variety of hypothetical accident conditions, particularly the transient overpower sequence. MELT-IIIB is the latest in the series

  18. Chemical decontamination and melt densification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, R.L.; Griggs, B.; Kemper, R.S.; Nelson, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary studies on the chemical decontamination and densification of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel undissolved residues remaining after dissolution of the UO 2 --PuO 2 spent fuel material from sheared fuel bundles are reported. The studies were made on cold or very small samples to demonstrate the feasibility of the processes developed before proceeding to hot cell demonstrations with kg level of the sources. A promising aqueous decontamination method for Zr alloy cladding was developed in which oxidized surfaces are conditioned with HF prior to leaching with ammonium oxalate, ammonium citrate, ammonium fluoride, and hydrogen peroxide. Feasibility of molten salt decontamination of oxidized Zircaloy was demonstrated. A low melting alloy of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel was obtained in induction heated graphite crucibles. Segregated Zircaloy cladding sections were directly melted by the inductoslag process to yield a metal ingot suitable for storage. Both Zircaloy and Zircaloy--stainless steel--Inconel alloys proved to be highly satisfactory getters and sinks for recovered tritium

  19. A multi-component evaporation model for beam melting processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Alexander; Forster, Vera E.; Körner, Carolin

    2017-02-01

    In additive manufacturing using laser or electron beam melting technologies, evaporation losses and changes in chemical composition are known issues when processing alloys with volatile elements. In this paper, a recently described numerical model based on a two-dimensional free surface lattice Boltzmann method is further developed to incorporate the effects of multi-component evaporation. The model takes into account the local melt pool composition during heating and fusion of metal powder. For validation, the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V is melted by selective electron beam melting and analysed using mass loss measurements and high-resolution microprobe imaging. Numerically determined evaporation losses and spatial distributions of aluminium compare well with experimental data. Predictions of the melt pool formation in bulk samples provide insight into the competition between the loss of volatile alloying elements from the irradiated surface and their advective redistribution within the molten region.

  20. Melting of polydisperse hard disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The melting of a polydisperse hard-disk system is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the semigrand canonical ensemble. This is done in the context of possible continuous melting by a dislocation-unbinding mechanism, as an extension of the two-dimensional hard-disk melting problem. We find

  1. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  2. Pavement Snow Melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    2005-01-01

    The design of pavement snow melting systems is presented based on criteria established by ASHRAE. The heating requirements depends on rate of snow fall, air temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity. Piping materials are either metal or plastic, however, due to corrosion problems, cross-linked polyethylene pipe is now generally used instead of iron. Geothermal energy is supplied to systems through the use of heat pipes, directly from circulating pipes, through a heat exchanger or by allowing water to flow directly over the pavement, by using solar thermal storage. Examples of systems in New Jersey, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Switzerland and Oregon are presented. Key words: pavement snow melting, geothermal heating, heat pipes, solar storage, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Klamath Falls.

  3. Transient fuel melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, L.; Schmitz, F.

    1982-10-01

    The observation of micrographic documents from fuel after a CABRI test leads to postulate a specific mode of transient fuel melting during a rapid nuclear power excursion. When reaching the melt threshold, the bands which are characteristic for the solid state are broken statistically over a macroscopic region. The time of maintaining the fuel at the critical enthalpy level between solid and liquid is too short to lead to a phase separation. A significant life-time (approximately 1 second) of this intermediate ''unsolide'' state would have consequences on the variation of physical properties linked to the phase transition solid/liquid: viscosity, specific volume and (for the irradiated fuel) fission gas release [fr

  4. Un modelo de gestión de la calidad y cantidad de agua con lógica difusa gris para el Río Aburrá.

    OpenAIRE

    Carvajal Serna, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Este artículo presenta un modelo de lógica difusa gris para la gestión de la calidad y cantidad del agua en el río Aburrá, el cual permite tener en cuenta la incertidumbre de los parámetros ambientales, que por lo general hacen que la toma de decisiones para las autoridades ambientales presente conflictos con los descargadores o contaminadores de los cuerpos de agua. La aplicación del modelo se hizo a una campaña del río Aburrá tomando como datos el caudal, el oxígeno disuelto y la demanda bi...

  5. Electric melting furnace of solidifying radioactive waste by utilizing magnetic field and melting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hiroshi.

    1990-01-01

    An electric melting furnace for solidification of radioactive wastes utilizing magnetic fields in accordance with the present invention comprises a plurality of electrodes supplying AC current to molten glass in a glass melting furnace and a plurality of magnetic poles for generating AC magnetic fields. Interactions between the current and the magnetic field, generated forces in the identical direction in view of time in the molten glass. That is, forces for promoting the flow of molten glass in the melting furnace are resulted due to the Fleming's left-hand rule. As a result, the following effects can be obtained. (1) The amount of heat ransferred from the molten glass to the starting material layer on the molten surface is increased to improve the melting performance. (2) For an identical melting performance, the size and the weight of the melting furnace can be reduced to decrease the amount of secondary wastes when the apparatus-life is exhausted. (3) Bottom deposits can be suppressed and prevented from settling and depositing to the reactor bottom by the promoted flow in the layer. (4) Further, the size of auxiliary electrodes for directly supplying electric current to heat the molten glass near the reactor bottom can be decreased. (I.S.)

  6. Induction melting of simulated transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenaglia, R.D.; McCall, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Coreless induction melting was investigated as a method to melt and consolidate waste material representative of the transuranic waste (TRU) stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Waste material was introduced onto the surface of a molten cast iron bath in a coreless induction furnace. Waste metallics were incorporated into the bath. Noncombustibles formed a slag which was poured or skimmed from the bath surface. Stack sampling was performed to characterize the off-gas and particulate matter evolved. Experimental melting tests were performed for a variety of types of wastes including metallics, chemical sludge, soil, concrete, and glass. Each test also included a representative level of combustible materials consisting of paper, wood, cloth, polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene. Metallic wastes were readily processed by induction melting with a minimum of slag production. Test waste consisting primarily of chemical sludge provided fluid slags which could be poured from the bath surface. Processing of wastes consisting of soil, concrete, or glass was limited by the inability to achieve fluid slags. It appears from test results that coreless induction melting is a feasible method to process INEL-type waste materials if two problems can be resolved. First, slag fluidity must be improved to facilitate the collection of slags formed from soil, concrete, or glass containing wastes. Secondly, refractory life must be further optimized to permit prolonged processing of the waste materials. The use of a chrome-bearing high-alumina refractory was found to resist slag line attach much better than a magnesia refractory, although some attack was still noted

  7. The extreme melt across the Greenland ice sheet in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Mote, T. L.; Tedesco, M.; Albert, M. R.; Keegan, K.; Shuman, C. A.; DiGirolamo, N. E.; Neumann, G.

    2012-10-01

    The discovery of the 2012 extreme melt event across almost the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet is presented. Data from three different satellite sensors - including the Oceansat-2 scatterometer, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder - are combined to obtain composite melt maps, representing the most complete melt conditions detectable across the ice sheet. Satellite observations reveal that melt occurred at or near the surface of the Greenland ice sheet across 98.6% of its entire extent on 12 July 2012, including the usually cold polar areas at high altitudes like Summit in the dry snow facies of the ice sheet. This melt event coincided with an anomalous ridge of warm air that became stagnant over Greenland. As seen in melt occurrences from multiple ice core records at Summit reported in the published literature, such a melt event is rare with the last significant one occurring in 1889 and the next previous one around seven centuries earlier in the Medieval Warm Period. Given its rarity, the 2012 extreme melt across Greenland provides an exceptional opportunity for new studies in broad interdisciplinary geophysical research.

  8. Differential melt scaling for oblique impacts on terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Oleg; Wong, Stephanie M. Wong; Kring, David A. Kring

    2012-01-01

    Analytical estimates of melt volumes produced by a given projectile and contained in a given impact crater are derived as a function of impact velocity, impact angle, planetary gravity, target and projectile densities, and specific internal energy of melting. Applications to impact events and impact craters on the Earth, Moon, and Mars are demonstrated and discussed. The most probable oblique impact (45°) produces ∼1.6 times less melt volume than a vertical impact, and ∼1.6 and 3.7 times more melt volume than impacts with 30° and 15° trajectories, respectively. The melt volume for a particular crater diameter increases with planetary gravity, so a crater on Earth should have more melt than similar-size craters on Mars and the Moon. The melt volume for a particular projectile diameter does not depend on gravity, but has a strong dependence on impact velocity, so the melt generated by a given projectile on the Moon is significantly larger than on Mars. Higher surface temperatures and geothermal gradients increase melt production, as do lower energies of melting. Collectively, the results imply thinner central melt sheets and a smaller proportion of melt particles in impact breccias on the Moon and Mars than on Earth. These effects are illustrated in a comparison of the Chicxulub crater on Earth, linked to the Cretaceous–Tertiary mass extinction, Gusev crater on Mars, where the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit landed, and Tsiolkovsky crater on the Moon. The results are comparable to those obtained from field and spacecraft observations, other analytical expressions, and hydrocode simulations.

  9. The Role of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on Recent Greenland Surface Mass Loss and Mass Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, M.; Alexander, P.; Porter, D. F.; Fettweis, X.; Luthcke, S. B.; Mote, T. L.; Rennermalm, A.; Hanna, E.

    2017-12-01

    Despite recent changes in Greenland surface mass losses and atmospheric circulation over the Arctic, little attention has been given to the potential role of large-scale atmospheric processes on the spatial and temporal variability of mass loss and partitioning of the GrIS mass loss. Using a combination of satellite gravimetry measurements, outputs of the MAR regional climate model and reanalysis data, we show that changes in atmospheric patterns since 2013 over the North Atlantic region of the Arctic (NAA) modulate total mass loss trends over Greenland together with the spatial and temporal distribution of mass loss partitioning. For example, during the 2002 - 2012 period, melting persistently increased, especially along the west coast, as a consequence of increased insulation and negative NAO conditions characterizing that period. Starting in 2013, runoff along the west coast decreased while snowfall increased substantially, when NAO turned to a more neutral/positive state. Modeled surface mass balance terms since 1950 indicate that part of the GRACE-period, specifically the period between 2002 and 2012, was exceptional in terms of snowfall over the east and northeast regions. During that period snowfall trend decreased to almost 0 Gt/yr from a long-term increasing trend, which presumed again in 2013. To identify the potential impact of atmospheric patterns on mass balance and its partitioning, we studied the spatial and temporal correlations between NAO and snowfall/runoff. Our results indicate that the correlation between summer snowfall and NAO is not stable during the 1950 - 2015 period. We further looked at changes in patterns of circulation using self organizing maps (SOMs) to identify the atmospheric patterns characterizing snowfall during different periods. We discuss potential implications for past changes and future GCM and RCM simulations.

  10. Melt layer erosion of metallic armour targets during off-normal events in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylev, B.; Wuerz, H.

    2002-01-01

    Melt layer erosion by melt motion is the dominating erosion mechanism for metallic armours under high heat loads. A 1-D fluid dynamics simulation model for calculation of melt motion was developed and validated against experimental results for tungsten from the e-beam facility JEBIS and beryllium from the e-beam facility JUDITH. The driving force in each case is the gradient of the surface tension. Due to the high velocity which develops in the Be melt considerable droplet splashing occurs

  11. Melt layer erosion of metallic armour targets during off-normal events in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazylev, B.; Wuerz, H.

    2002-12-01

    Melt layer erosion by melt motion is the dominating erosion mechanism for metallic armours under high heat loads. A 1-D fluid dynamics simulation model for calculation of melt motion was developed and validated against experimental results for tungsten from the e-beam facility JEBIS and beryllium from the e-beam facility JUDITH. The driving force in each case is the gradient of the surface tension. Due to the high velocity which develops in the Be melt considerable droplet splashing occurs.

  12. Emerging melt quality control solution technologies for aluminium melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Pascual, Jr

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed “MTS 1500” Melt Treatment System is performing the specifi cally required melt treatment operations like degassing, cleaning, modification and/or grain refinement by an automated process in one step and at the same location. This linked process is saving time, energy and metal losses allowing - by automated dosage of the melt treatment agents - the production of a consistent melt quality batch after batch. By linking the MTS Metal Treatment System with sensors operating on-line in the melt, i.e., with a hydrogen sensor “Alspek H”, a fully automated control of parts of the process chain like degassing is possible. This technology does guarantee a pre-specifi ed and documented melt quality in each melt treatment batch. Furthermore, to ensure that castings are consistent and predictable there is a growing realization that critical parameters such as metal cleanliness must be measured prior to casting. There exists accepted methods for measuring the cleanliness of an aluminum melt but these can be both slow and costly. A simple, rapid and meaningful method of measuring and bench marking the cleanliness of an aluminum melt has been developed to offer the foundry a practical method of measuring melt cleanliness. This paper shows the structure and performance of the integrated MTS melt treatment process and documents achieved melt quality standards after degassing, cleaning, modifi cation and grain refi nement operations under real foundry conditions. It also provides an insight on a melt cleanliness measuring device “Alspek MQ” to provide foundry men better tools in meeting the increasing quality and tighter specifi cation demand from the industry.

  13. Modeling of velocity field for vacuum induction melting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bo; JIANG Zhi-guo; LIU Kui; LI Yi-yi

    2005-01-01

    The numerical simulation for the recirculating flow of melting of an electromagnetically stirred alloy in a cylindrical induction furnace crucible was presented. Inductive currents and electromagnetic body forces in the alloy under three different solenoid frequencies and three different melting powers were calculated, and then the forces were adopted in the fluid flow equations to simulate the flow of the alloy and the behavior of the free surface. The relationship between the height of the electromagnetic stirring meniscus, melting power, and solenoid frequency was derived based on the law of mass conservation. The results show that the inductive currents and the electromagnetic forces vary with the frequency, melting power, and the physical properties of metal. The velocity and the height of the meniscus increase with the increase of the melting power and the decrease of the solenoid frequency.

  14. The Laser Damage Threshold for Materials and the Relation Between Solid-Melt and Melt-Vapor Interface Velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Osama Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    Numerous experiments have demonstrated and analytic theories have predicted that there is a threshold for pulsed laser ablation of a wide range of materials. Optical surface damage threshold is a very complex and important application of high-power lasers. Optical damage may also be considered to be the initial phase of laser ablation. In this work it was determined the time required and the threshold energy of a layer of thickness to heat up. We used the Finite Difference method to simulate the process of laser-target interaction in three cases. Namely, the case before melting begins using a continuous wave (c.w) laser source and a pulsed laser source, the case after the first change of state (from solid to melt), and the case after the second change of state (from melt to vapor). And also study the relation between the solid-melt and melt-vapor interface velocities to have a commonsense of the laser ablation process.

  15. Models and observations of Arctic melt ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    During the Arctic melt season, the sea ice surface undergoes a striking transformation from vast expanses of snow covered ice to complex mosaics of ice and melt ponds. Sea ice albedo, a key parameter in climate modeling, is largely determined by the complex evolution of melt pond configurations. In fact, ice-albedo feedback has played a significant role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding melt pond evolution remains a challenge to improving climate projections. It has been found that as the ponds grow and coalesce, the fractal dimension of their boundaries undergoes a transition from 1 to about 2, around a critical length scale of 100 square meters in area. As the ponds evolve they take complex, self-similar shapes with boundaries resembling space-filling curves. I will outline how mathematical models of composite materials and statistical physics, such as percolation and Ising models, are being used to describe this evolution and predict key geometrical parameters that agree very closely with observations.

  16. Method of melting solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuka, Katsuyuki; Mizuno, Ryokichi; Kuwana, Katsumi; Sawada, Yoshihisa; Komatsu, Fumiaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the volume reduction treatment of a HEPA filter containing various solid wastes, particularly acid digestion residue, or an asbestos separator at a relatively low temperature range. Method: Solid waste to be heated and molten is high melting point material treated by ''acid digestion treatment'' for treating solid waste, e.g. a HEPA filter or polyvinyl chloride, etc. of an atomic power facility treated with nitric acid or the like. When this material is heated and molten by an electric furnace, microwave melting furnace, etc., boron oxide, sodium boride, sodium carbonate, etc. is added as a melting point lowering agent. When it is molten in this state, its melting point is lowered, and it becomes remarkably fluid, and the melting treatment is facilitated. Solidified material thus obtained through the melting step has excellent denseness and further large volume reduction rate of the solidified material. (Yoshihara, H.)

  17. Petrological Geodynamics of Mantle Melting II. AlphaMELTS + Multiphase Flow: Dynamic Fractional Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirone, Massimiliano

    2018-03-01

    In this second installment of a series that aims to investigate the dynamic interaction between the composition and abundance of the solid mantle and its melt products, the classic interpretation of fractional melting is extended to account for the dynamic nature of the process. A multiphase numerical flow model is coupled with the program AlphaMELTS, which provides at the moment possibly the most accurate petrological description of melting based on thermodynamic principles. The conceptual idea of this study is based on a description of the melting process taking place along a 1-D vertical ideal column where chemical equilibrium is assumed to apply in two local sub-systems separately on some spatial and temporal scale. The solid mantle belongs to a local sub-system (ss1) that does not interact chemically with the melt reservoir which forms a second sub-system (ss2). The local melt products are transferred in the melt sub-system ss2 where the melt phase eventually can also crystallize into a different solid assemblage and will evolve dynamically. The main difference with the usual interpretation of fractional melting is that melt is not arbitrarily and instantaneously extracted from the mantle, but instead remains a dynamic component of the model, hence the process is named dynamic fractional melting (DFM). Some of the conditions that may affect the DFM model are investigated in this study, in particular the effect of temperature, mantle velocity at the boundary of the mantle column. A comparison is made with the dynamic equilibrium melting (DEM) model discussed in the first installment. The implications of assuming passive flow or active flow are also considered to some extent. Complete data files of most of the DFM simulations, four animations and two new DEM simulations (passive/active flow) are available following the instructions in the supplementary material.

  18. Logistics Reduction: Heat Melt Compactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction (LR) project Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) technology is a waste management technology. Currently, there are...

  19. Melting in trivalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboungi, M.L.; Price, D.L.; Scamehorn, C.; Tosi, M.P.

    1990-11-01

    We report a neutron diffraction study of the liquid structure of YCl 3 and combine the structural data with macroscopic melting and transport data to contrast the behaviour of this molten salt with those of SrCl 2 , ZnCl 2 and AlCl 3 as prototypes of different melting mechanisms for ionic materials. A novel melting mechanism for trivalent metal chlorides, leading to a loose disordered network of edge-sharing octahedral units in the liquid phase, is thereby established. The various melting behaviours are related to bonding character with the help of Pettifor's phenomenological chemical scale. (author). 25 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  20. Melting of contaminated metallic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.-S.; Cheng, S.-Y.; Kung, H.-T.; Lin, L.-F.

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 100 tons of contaminated metallic wastes were produced each year due to maintenance for each TPC's nuclear power reactor and it was roughly estimated that there will be 10,000 tons of metallic scraps resulted from decommissioning of each reactor in the future. One means of handling the contaminated metal is to melt it. Melting process owns not only volume reduction which saves the high cost of final disposal but also resource conservation and recycling benefits. Melting contaminated copper and aluminum scraps in the laboratory scale have been conducted at INER. A total of 546 kg copper condenser tubes with a specific activity of about 2.7 Bq/g was melted in a vacuum induction melting facility. Three types of products, ingot, slag and dust were derived from the melting process, with average activities of 0.10 Bq/g, 2.33 Bq/g and 84.3 Bq/g respectively. After the laboratory melting stage, a pilot plant with a 500 kg induction furnace is being designed to melt the increasingly produced contaminated metallic scraps from nuclear facilities and to investigate the behavior of different radionuclides during melting. (author)

  1. Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakov, I.; Vakulenko, S. A.; Golden, K. M.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo - a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a conceptual sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point - an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a bifurcation analysis of the energy balance climate model with ice-albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to bifurcation points.

  2. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1994-01-01

    Three simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentru Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. The behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied. 2 refs., 8 tabs

  3. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C--1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied

  4. Melt Adsorption as a Manufacturing Method for Fine Particles of Wax Matrices without Any Agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiino, Kai; Fujinami, Yukari; Kimura, Shin-Ichiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    We have focused on melt adsorption as manufacture method of wax matrices to control particles size of granules more easily than melt granulation. The purpose of present study was to investigate the possibility of identifying a hydrophobic material with a low melting point, currently used as a meltable binder of melt granulation, to apply as a novel carrier in melt adsorption. Glyceryl monostearate (GM) and stearic acid (SA) were selected as candidate hydrophobic materials with low melting points. Neusilin US2 (US2), with a particle diameter of around 100 µm was selected as a surface adsorbent, while dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), was used as a non-adsorbent control to prepare melting granules as a standard for comparison. We prepared granules containing ibuprofen (IBU) by melt adsorption or melt granulation and evaluated the particle size, physical properties and crystallinity of granules. Compared with melt granulation using DCPD, melt adsorption can be performed over a wide range of 14 to 70% for the ratio of molten components. Moreover, the particle size; d50 of obtained granules was 100-200 µm, and these physical properties showed good flowability and roundness. The process of melt adsorption did not affect the crystalline form of IBU. Therefore, the present study has demonstrated for the first time that melt adsorption using a hydrophobic material, GM or SA, has the potential capability to control the particle size of granules and offers the possibility of application as a novel controlled release technique.

  5. Fragmentation of low-melting metals by collapsing steam bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, R.

    1979-08-01

    When a hot melt meets a vaporable liquid of lower temperature, explosive vaporisation of the cooler liquid may be the result. This is called a steam explosion if a substantial amount of thermal energy is converted into mechanical energy. One important step in understanding about steam explosions is to explain the surface increase of the hot melt. There are several competing fragmentation hypotheses, but so far there has been no model to describe fragmentation criteria as well as the time curve of surface increase on the basis of physical processes. An overall model is now given for one of the possible fragmentation mechanisms, i.e. the division of the melt by collapsing steam bubbles. The model estimates the surface increase of the melt on the basis of heavy supercooled boiling, the heat transfer connected with it, the transfer of mechanical energy during steam bubble collapse, and the solidification of the melt. The results of the calculations have shown that basic experimental observations, e.g. time and extent of fragmentation, are well presented in the model with regard to their order of magnitude. The model presents a qualitatively correct description of the effects of important influencing factors, e.g. supercooling of the coolant or initial temperature of the melt. (orig.) [de

  6. Rhenium corrosion in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.D.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.; Vetyukov, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The results investigating rhenium corrosion in chloride melts containing sodium, potassium and chromium ions by a gravimetry potentials in argon atmosphere in a sealing quarth cell are described. Rhenium corrosion is shown to be rather considerable in melts containing CrCl 2 . The value of corrosion rate depending on temperature is determined

  7. UNCONSTRAINED MELTING AND SOLIDIFICATION INSIDE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... There is a large number of experimental and numerical works on melting and solidification of PCM[6-10], and also its usage as thermal management in building [11-14], electronic devices [15-16] and solar energy. [17-20].Most investigated geometries in melting and freezing process are sphere (spherical.

  8. Continuous Estimates of Surface Density and Annual Snow Accumulation with Multi-Channel Snow/Firn Penetrating Radar in the Percolation Zone, Western Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, T.; Marshall, H. P.; Bradford, J.; Hawley, R. L.; Osterberg, E. C.; McCarthy, F.; Lewis, G.; Graeter, K.

    2017-12-01

    A priority of ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB) prediction is ascertaining the surface density and annual snow accumulation. These forcing data can be supplied into firn compaction models and used to tune Regional Climate Models (RCM). RCMs do not accurately capture subtle changes in the snow accumulation gradient. Additionally, leading RCMs disagree among each other and with accumulation studies in regions of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) over large distances and temporal scales. RCMs tend to yield inconsistencies over GrIS because of sparse and outdated validation data in the reanalysis pool. Greenland Traverse for Accumulation and Climate Studies (GreenTrACS) implemented multi-channel 500 MHz Radar in multi-offset configuration throughout two traverse campaigns totaling greater than 3500 km along the western percolation zone of GrIS. The multi-channel radar has the capability of continuously estimating snow depth, average density, and annual snow accumulation, expressed at 95% confidence (+-) 0.15 m, (+-) 17 kgm-3, (+-) 0.04 m w.e. respectively, by examination of the primary reflection return from the previous year's summer surface.

  9. Controllable irregular melting induced by atomic segregation in bimetallic clusters with fabricating different initial configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guojian; Liu Tie; Wang Qiang; Lue Xiao; Wang Kai; He Jicheng

    2010-01-01

    The melting process of Co, Co-Cu and Co-Ni clusters with different initial configurations is studied in molecular dynamics by a general embedded atom method. An irregular melting, at which energy decreases as the temperature increase near the melting point, is found in the onion-like Co-Cu-Co clusters, but not in the mixed Co-Cu and onion-like Co-Ni-Co clusters. From the analysis of atomic distributions and energy variation, the results indicate the irregular melting is induced by Cu atomic segregation. Furthermore, this melting can be controlled by doping hetero atoms with different surface energies and controlling their distributions.

  10. Transient induced tungsten melting at the Joint European Torus (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, J. W.; Matthews, G. F.; Krieger, K.; Iglesias, D.; Bunting, P.; Corre, Y.; Silburn, S.; Balboa, I.; Bazylev, B.; Conway, N.; Coffey, I.; Dejarnac, R.; Gauthier, E.; Gaspar, J.; Jachmich, S.; Jepu, I.; Makepeace, C.; Scannell, R.; Stamp, M.; Petersson, P.; Pitts, R. A.; Wiesen, S.; Widdowson, A.; Heinola, K.; Baron-Wiechec, A.; Contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    Melting is one of the major risks associated with tungsten (W) plasma-facing components (PFCs) in tokamaks like JET or ITER. These components are designed such that leading edges and hence excessive plasma heat loads deposited at near normal incidence are avoided. Due to the high stored energies in ITER discharges, shallow surface melting can occur under insufficiently mitigated plasma disruption and so-called edge localised modes—power load transients. A dedicated program was carried out at the JET to study the physics and consequences of W transient melting. Following initial exposures in 2013 (ILW-1) of a W-lamella with leading edge, new experiments have been performed on a sloped surface (15{}\\circ slope) during the 2015/2016 (ILW-3) campaign. This new experiment allows significantly improved infrared thermography measurements and thus resolved important issue of power loading in the context of the previous leading edge exposures. The new lamella was monitored by local diagnostics: spectroscopy, thermography and high-resolution photography in between discharges. No impact on the main plasma was observed despite a strong increase of the local W source consistent with evaporation. In contrast to the earlier exposure, no droplet emission was observed from the sloped surface. Topological modifications resulting from the melting are clearly visible between discharges on the photographic images. Melt damage can be clearly linked to the infrared measurements: the emissivity drops in zones where melting occurs. In comparison with the previous leading edge experiment, no runaway melt motion is observed, consistent with the hypothesis that the escape of thermionic electrons emitted from the melt zone is largely suppressed in this geometry, where the magnetic field intersects the surface at lower angles than in the case of perpendicular impact on a leading edge. Utilising both exposures allows us to further test the model of the forces driving melt motion that

  11. Experiments on melt droplets falling into a water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data and analysis related to melt droplets falling into a water pool. A binary CaO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt mixture is used to study the influence of melt superheat and water subcooling on droplet deformation and fragmentation. For the conditions studied (We {<=} 1000), the surface tension of the melt droplet and the film boiling stability greatly affect the fragmentation behaviour. If the melt temperature is between the liquidus and solidus point (mushy zone) or if the film boiling is stable due to a relatively low subcooling, the droplet deformation and fragmentation are mitigated. This behaviour can be related to the effective Weber number (We) of the melt droplet upon entry into the water pool. Similar phenomena can be expected also for interactions of corium (UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}) and water, which are characterized by a potentially fast transformation of melt into the mushy zone and by particularly stable film boiling. (author)

  12. Transition in the fractal geometry of Arctic melt ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the Arctic melt season, the sea ice surface undergoes a remarkable transformation from vast expanses of snow covered ice to complex mosaics of ice and melt ponds. Sea ice albedo, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by the complex evolution of melt pond configurations. In fact, ice–albedo feedback has played a major role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding melt pond evolution remains a significant challenge to improving climate projections. By analyzing area–perimeter data from hundreds of thousands of melt ponds, we find here an unexpected separation of scales, where pond fractal dimension D transitions from 1 to 2 around a critical length scale of 100 m2 in area. Pond complexity increases rapidly through the transition as smaller ponds coalesce to form large connected regions, and reaches a maximum for ponds larger than 1000 m2, whose boundaries resemble space-filling curves, with D ≈ 2. These universal features of Arctic melt pond evolution are similar to phase transitions in statistical physics. The results impact sea ice albedo, the transmitted radiation fields under melting sea ice, the heat balance of sea ice and the upper ocean, and biological productivity such as under ice phytoplankton blooms.

  13. Crust behavior and erosion rate prediction of EPR sacrificial material impinged by core melt jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gen; Liu, Ming, E-mail: ming.liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Jinshi; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A numerical code was developed to analyze melt jet-concrete interaction in the frame of MPS method. • Crust and ablated concrete layer at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface periodically developed and collapsed. • Concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. • Concrete erosion by Fe-Zr melt jet was significantly faster than that by UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt jet. - Abstract: Sacrificial material is a special ferro-siliceous concrete, designed in the ex-vessel core melt stabilization system of European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR). Given a localized break of RPV lower head, the melt directly impinges onto the dry concrete in form of compact jet. The concrete erosion behavior influences the failure of melt plug, and further affects melt spreading. In this study, a numerical code was developed in the frame of Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method, to analyze the crust behavior and erosion rate of sacrificial concrete, impinged by prototypic melt jet. In validation of numerical modeling, the time-dependent erosion depth and erosion configuration matched well with the experimental data. Sensitivity study of sacrificial concrete erosion indicates that the crust and ablated concrete layer presented at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface, whereas no crust could be found in the interaction of Fe-Zr melt with concrete. The crust went through stabilization-fracture-reformation periodic process, accompanied with accumulating and collapsing of molten concrete layer. The concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. It increased as the concrete surface layer was heated to melting, and dropped down when the cold concrete was revealed. The erosion progression was fast in the conditions of small jet diameter and large concrete inclination angle, and it was significantly faster in the erosion by metallic melt jet than by oxidic melt jet.

  14. Numerical simulations of the melting behavior of bulk and nanometer-sized Cu systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manai, G.; Delogu, F.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to investigate the melting mechanisms of four different Cu systems consisting of a surface-free crystalline bulk, a semi-crystal terminating with a free surface and two unsupported particles with a radius of about 4 and 8 nm, respectively. Starting from a relaxed configuration at 300 K, the systems were gradually heated up to the characteristic melting points. The surface-free bulk system underwent homogeneous melting at the limit of superheating, whereas the melting of the semi-crystal and of the nanometer-sized particles occurred with heterogeneous features. In these latter cases, the structural and energetic properties revealed a two-state character with a definite difference between disordered surface layers and bulk-like interiors. In addition, the melting point and the latent heat of fusion of the nanometer-sized particles were significantly depressed with respect to the ones of the semi-crystal, approximately corresponding to the equilibrium values. Pre-melting phenomena took place at the free surfaces at temperatures significantly below the melting point, determining the formation of a solid-liquid interface. Numerical findings indicate that in all the cases the onset of melting is connected with the proliferation and migration of lattice defects and that an intimate relationship exists between homogeneous and heterogeneous melting mechanisms

  15. Research of Snow-Melt Process on a Heated Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilyev Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article has shown the results of experimental researches of the snow-melt on a heated platform-near building heat-pump snow-melt platform. The near-building (yard heat pump platforms for snow melt with the area up to 10-15 m2 are a basis of the new ideology of organization of the street cleaning of Moscow from snow in the winter period which supposes the creation in the megalopolis of the «distributed snow-melt system» (DSMS using non-traditional energy sources. The results of natural experimental researches are presented for the estimation of efficiency of application in the climatic conditions of Moscow of heat pumps in the snow-melt systems. The researches were conducted on a model sample of the near-building heat-pump platform which uses the low-potential thermal energy of atmospheric air. The conducted researches have confirmed experimentally in the natural conditions the possibility and efficiency of using of atmospheric air as a source of low-potential thermal energy for evaporation of the snow-melt heat pump systems in the climatic conditions of Moscow. The results of laboratory researches of snow-melt process on a heated horizontal platform are presented. The researches have revealed a considerable dependence of efficiency of the snow-melt process on its piling mode (form-building and the organization of the process of its piling mode (form-building and the organization of the process of its (snow mass heat exchange with the surface of the heated platform. In the process of researches the effect of formation of an «ice dome» under the melting snow mass called by the fact that in case of the thickness of snow loaded on the platform more than 10 cm the water formed from the melting snow while the contact with the heating surface don’t spread on it, but soaks into the snow, wets it due to capillary effect and freezes. The formation of «ice dome» leads to a sharp increase of snow-melt period and decreases the operating

  16. El PRT-La Verdad entre los trabajadores de la carne de Berisso: La agrupación El Activista de la Carne y la Lista Gris [1967-1972

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Carlos Hernán Castillo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of a research about the working class and students struggles and the strategies of the left parties in La Plata city and Gran La Plata between 1966 and 1973. This work is focused on the study of the political activity of the PRT-La Verdad during this period. At the beginning of 1968 the Partido Revolucionario de los Trabajadores -PRT split in two fractions. The fraction led by Nahuel Moreno -named PRT-La Verdad [PRT- The Truth]- was the largest of the two in La Plata y Gran La Plata. In this area the PRT had many members among the students and in the workers movement. This article studies the political activity of the PRT, and the PRT-LV after the split- in the Sindicato de Obreros y Empleados de la Industria de la Carne y Afines de Berisso [Meat Processing Plants Workers Union], between 1967 and 1972 at the Swift and Armour meat processing plants. During the period analyzed in the article, the members and supporters of the PRT-LV were organized in a rank and file union group named El Activista de la Carne - Lista Gris [The Activist-Gray List]. The sources of this research are the bulletins and leaflets edited by El Activista de la Carne. We also consulted the files of DIPBA as well as the bibliography on the subject

  17. The «C» campanian and grey seudocampanian pottery in the province of Seville | La cerámica campaniense «C» y seudocampaniense de pasta gris en la provincia de Sevilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Ventura Martínez

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available We want to make a contribution to the study of the Campanian pottery in the Iberian Peninsula. We analyse a lot of this pottery from various sites of the province of Seville, and carry out the study of the C Campanian pottery, and of the grey-paste pottery connected with it, in this area. | El presente estudio pretende ser una contribución al conocimiento de la cerámica campaniense en el ámbito de la Península Ibérica. En base al material reunido, procedente de diversos yacimientos de la provincia de Sevilla, el planteamiento del trabajo ha girado en torno a la documentación efectiva en dicho ámbito provincial tanto de la cerámica campaniense de tipo C como de una serie de cerámicas caracterizadas básicamente por su pasta gris y que en ocasiones, por sus características técnicas, formales o decorativas apuntan a una inspiración más o menos directa en las producciones propiamente campanienses.

  18. Melt cooling by bottom flooding: The experiment CometPC-H3. Ex-vessel core melt stabilization research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmeyer, H.; Cron, T.; Merkel, G.; Schmidt-Stiefel, S.; Tromm, W.; Wenz, T.

    2003-03-01

    The CometPC-H3 experiment was performed to investigate melt cooling by water addition to the bottom of the melt. The experiment was performed with a melt mass of 800 kg, 50% metal and 50% oxide, and 300 kW typical decay heat were simulated in the melt. As this was the first experiment after repair of the induction coil, attention was given to avoid overload of the induction coil and to keep the inductor voltage below critical values. Therefore, the height of the sacrificial concrete layer was reduced to 5 cm only, and the height of the porous concrete layers was also minimized to have a small distance and good coupling between heated melt and induction coil. After quite homogeneous erosion of the upper sacrificial concrete layer, passive bottom flooding started from the porous concrete after 220 s with 1.3 liter water/s. The melt was safely stopped, arrested and cooled. The porous, water filled concrete was only slightly attacked by the hot melt in the upper 25 mm of one sector of the coolant device. The peak cooling rate in the early contact phase of coolant water and melt was 4 MW/m 2 , and exceeded the decay heat by one order of magnitude. The cooling rate remarkably dropped, when the melt was covered by the penetrating water and a surface crust was formed. Volcanic eruptions from the melt during the solidification process were observed from 360 - 510 s and created a volcanic dome some 25 cm high, but had only minor effect on the generation of a porous structure, as the expelled melt solidified mostly with low porosity. Unfortunately, decay heat simulation in the melt was interrupted at 720 s by an incorrect safety signal, which excluded further investigation of the long term cooling processes. At that time, the melt was massively flooded by a layer of water, about 80 cm thick, and coolant water inflow was still 1 l/s. The melt had reached a stable situation: Downward erosion was stopped by the cooling process from the water filled, porous concrete layer. Top

  19. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming

  20. Investigation of the stability of melt flow in gating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Larsen, Per

    2011-01-01

    Melt flow in four different gating systems designed for production of brake discs was analysed experimentally and by numerical modelling. In the experiments moulds were fitted with glass fronts and melt flow was recorded on video. The video recordings were compared with modelling of melt flow...... in the gating systems. Particular emphasis was on analysing local pressure and formation of pressure waves in the gating system. It was possible to compare melt flow patterns in experiments directly to modelled flow patterns. Generally there was good agreement between flow patterns and filling times. However...... description of free liquid surfaces proved to be incorrect in the numerical model. Modelled pressure fields served to explain how specific parts of the gating systems cause instability and are a good tool to describe the quality of a gating system. The results shows clearly that sharp changes in the geometry...

  1. Laser melt injection of hard ceramic particles into Al and Ti alloys - processing, microstructure and mechanical behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V; Nijman, S.; van Ingen, R; Oliveira, U; De Hosson, J Th M

    2003-01-01

    The conditions for a successful Laser Melt Injection (LMI) of SiC and WC particles into the melt pool of Al8Si and Ti6Al4V alloys were studied exptl. and theor. by FEM calcns. The laser employed is a high power Nd:YAG. The formation of a relatively thick aluminum oxide layer on the Al melt surface

  2. Electric melting furnace for waste solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Toshio.

    1990-01-01

    To avoid electric troubles or reduction of waste processing performance even when platinum group elements are contained in wastes to be applied with glass solidification. For this purpose, a side electrode is disposed to the side wall of a melting vessel and a central electrode serving as a counter electrode is disposed about at the center inside the melting vessel. With such a constitution, if conductive materials are deposited at the bottom of the furnace or the bottom of the melting vessel, heating currents flow selectively between the side electrode and the central electrode. Accordingly, no electric currents flow through the conductive deposits thereby enabling to prevent abnormal heating in the bottom of the furnace. Further, heat generated by electric supply between the side electrode and the central electrode is supplied efficiently to raw material on the surface of the molten glass liquid to improve the processing performance. Further, disposition of the bottom electrode at the bottom of the furnace enables current supply between the central electrode and the bottom electrode to facilitate the temperature control for the molten glass in the furnace than in the conventional structure. (I.S.)

  3. The Intensity, Directionality, and Statistics of Underwater Noise From Melting Icebergs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Oskar; Deane, Grant B.; Moskalik, Mateusz

    2018-05-01

    Freshwater fluxes from melting icebergs and glaciers are important contributors to both sea level rise and anomalies of seawater salinity in polar regions. However, the hazards encountered close to icebergs and glaciers make it difficult to quantify their melt rates directly, motivating the development of cryoacoustics as a remote sensing technique. Recent studies have shown a qualitative link between ice melting and the accompanying underwater noise, but the properties of this signal remain poorly understood. Here we examine the intensity, directionality, and temporal statistics of the underwater noise radiated by melting icebergs in Hornsund Fjord, Svalbard, using a three-element acoustic array. We present the first estimate of noise energy per unit area associated with iceberg melt and demonstrate its qualitative dependence on exposure to surface current. Finally, we show that the analysis of noise directionality and statistics makes it possible to distinguish iceberg melt from the glacier terminus melt.

  4. Nitrogen Control in VIM Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, P. D.; Hawk, J. A.

    NETL has developed a design and control philosophy for the addition of nitrogen to austenitic and ferritic steels. The design approach uses CALPHAD as the centerpiece to predict the level to which nitrogen is soluble in both the melt and the solid. Applications of this technique have revealed regions of "exclusion" in which the alloy, while within specification limits of prescribed, cannot be made by conventional melt processing. Furthermore, other investigations have found that substantial retrograde solubility of nitrogen exists, which can become problematic during subsequent melt processing and/or other finishing operations such as welding. Additionally, the CALPHAD method has been used to adjust primary melt conditions. To that end, nitrogen additions have been made using chrome nitride, silicon nitride, high-nitrogen ferrochrome as well as nitrogen gas. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach will be discussed and NETL experience in this area will be summarized with respect to steel structure.

  5. Theoretical melting curve of caesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simozar, S.; Girifalco, L.A.; Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia

    1983-01-01

    A statistical-mechanical model is developed to account for the complex melting curve of caesium. The model assumes the existence of three different species of caesium defined by three different electronic states. On the basis of this model, the free energy of melting and the melting curve are computed up to 60 kbar, using the solid-state data and the initial slope of the fusion curve as input parameters. The calculated phase diagram agrees with experiment to within the experimental error. Other thermodynamic properties including the entropy and volume of melting were also computed, and they agree with experiment. Since the theory requires only one adjustable constant, this is taken as strong evidence that the three-species model is satisfactory for caesium. (author)

  6. Melting curves of gammairradiated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, H.; Altmann, H.; Kehrer, M.

    1978-08-01

    Melting curves of gammairradiated DNA and data derived of them, are reported. The diminished stability is explained by basedestruction. DNA denatures completely at room temperature, if at least every fifth basepair is broken or weakened by irradiation. (author)

  7. Pressure melting and ice skating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbeck, S. C.

    1995-10-01

    Pressure melting cannot be responsible for the low friction of ice. The pressure needed to reach the melting temperature is above the compressive failure stress and, if it did occur, high squeeze losses would result in very thin films. Pure liquid water cannot coexist with ice much below -20 °C at any pressure and friction does not increase suddenly in that range. If frictional heating and pressure melting contribute equally, the length of the wetted contact could not exceed 15 μm at a speed of 5 m/s, which seems much too short. If pressure melting is the dominant process, the water films are less than 0.08 μm thick because of the high pressures.

  8. Hardfacing of duplex stainless steel using melting and diffusion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lailatul, H.; Maleque, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a material with high potential successes in many new applications such as rail car manufacturing, automotive and chemical industries. Although DSS is widely used in various industries, this material has faced wear and hardness problems which obstruct a wider capability of this material and causes problems in current application. Therefore, development of surface modification has been introduced to produce hard protective layer or coating on DSS. The main aim of this work is to brief review on hard surface layer formation on DSS using melting and diffusion processes. Melting technique using tungsten inert gas (TIG) torch and diffusion technique using gas nitriding are the effective process to meet this requirement. The processing route plays a significant role in developing the hard surface layer for any application with effective cost and environmental factors. The good understanding and careful selection of processing route to form products are very important factors to decide the suitable techniques for surface engineering treatment. In this paper, an attempt is also made to consolidate the important research works done on melting and diffusion techniques of DSS in the past. The advantages and disadvantages between melting and diffusion technique are presented for better understanding on the feasibility of hard surface formation on DSS. Finally, it can be concluded that this work will open an avenue for further research on the application of suitable process for hard surface formation on DSS.

  9. Observed runoff, jokulhlaups and suspended sediment load from the Greenland ice at Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland, 2007 and 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hasholt, Bent [UNIV OF COPENHAGEN

    2009-01-01

    This study fills the gap in hydrologic measurements of runoff exiting a part of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), the Kangerlussuaq drainage area, West Greenland. The observations are of value for obtaining knowledge about the terrestrial freshwater and sediment output from part of the GrIS and the strip of land between the GrIS and the ocean, in the context of varying ice sheet surface melt and influx entering the ocean. High-resolution stage, discharge and suspended sediment load show a decrease in runoff of {approx} 25% and in sediment load of {approx} 40% from 2007 to 2008 in response to a decrease in the summer accumulated number of positive degree days. During the 2007 and 2008 runoff season, joekulhlaups are observed at Kangerlussuaq, drained from an ice-dammed lake at the margin of the GrIS.

  10. Temperature fluctuations in a LiNbO 3 melt during crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2004-10-01

    Variations in temperature induced by forced convection on the surface of a LiNbO3 melt during crystal growth have been studied. Temperature measurements on the melt surface of single crystals growing (∅ 50 mm) at rotation rates of 15-40 rpm on an RF-heated Czochralski puller has revealed that the melt surface continuously alternates between a steady and unsteady state of flow. This was attributed to the intermittently turbulent flow mode at intermediate rotation rates. The fluctuation period is thought to depend on the thickness of its boundary layer. The boundary layer varies in thickness due to the melt flow, which stops as the interface moves toward the crystal and resumes once the interface reverts to its former position. By contrast, at above 60 rpm, the melt surface temperature drops without fluctuation, indicating that turbulent flow is dominant at faster rotation rates.

  11. The study of some physico-chemical properties of melt KCl - NaCl mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtech Špeťuch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to examine the surface tension of the melt mixture of salts NaCl and KCl at temperatures 750, 800 and 850 °C by maximum bubble pressure method. Some difference between measured values of the surface tension as dependence on the method of calculation was observed. This difference results from the diameter of used capillary and does not depend on the temperature. The differences between experimentally measured values of surface tension and literary sources are trivial. The experimental results are in accordance with the literature data confirming unsuitability of maximum bubble pressure method for measurement of the melt density. The experimental result will be used as a base for the study of melt salts ternary systems. On the other side maximum bubble pressure method is the most suitable method for measurement of surface tension of melt salts, but it is unsuitable for measurement of the melt density.

  12. Melting the vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafelski, J.

    1998-01-01

    Results presented at the Quark Matter 97 conference, held in December in Tsukuba, Japan, have provided new insights into the confinement of quarks in matter. The current physics paradigm is that the inertial masses of protons and neutrons, and hence of practically all of the matter around us, originate in the zero-point energy caused by the confinement of quarks inside the small volume of the nucleon. Today, 25 years after Harald Fritzsch, Heinrich Leutwyler and Murray Gell-Mann proposed quantum chromodynamics (QCD) as a means for understanding strongly interacting particles such as nucleons and mesons, our understanding of strong interactions and quark confinement remains incomplete. Quarks and the gluons that bind them together have a ''colour'' charge that may be red, green or blue. But quarks are seen in particles that are white: baryons such as protons and neutrons consist of three quarks with different colour charges, while mesons consist of a quark and an antiquark, and again the colour charge cancels out. To prove that confinement arises from quark-gluon fluctuations in the vacuum that quantum theories dictate exists today, we need to find a way of freeing the colour charge of quarks. Experiments must therefore ''melt'' the vacuum to deconfine quarks and the colour charge. By colliding nuclei at high energies, we hope to produce regions of space filled with free quarks and gluons. This deconfined phase is known as the quark-gluon plasma. At the Tsukuba meeting, Scott Pratt of Michigan State University in the US discussed measurements that show that the hot dense state of matter created in these collisions exists for only 2x10 -23 s. So does the quark gluon plasma exist? No-one doubts that it did at one time, before the vacuum froze into its current state about 20 into the life of the universe, causing the nucleons to form as we know them today. The issue is whether we can recreate this early stage of the universe in laboratory experiments. And if we did

  13. Glacial melting in Himalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Tariyal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mountains are amongst the most flimsy environments on Earth. They are prosperous repositories of biodiversity, water and providers of ecosystem goods and services on which downstream communities, both regional and global, rely. The transport of atmospheric pollutants and climate-altering substances can significantly impact high mountain areas, which are generally considered “clean” regions. The snow glaciers of the Himalayas, considered the “third pole”, one of the largest stores of water on the planet and accelerated melting could have far-reaching effects, such as flooding in the short-term and water shortages in the long-term as the glaciers shrink. The data available on temperature in Himalayas indicate that warming during last 3-4 decades has been more than the global average over the last century. Some of the values indicate that the Himalayas are warming 5-6 times more than the global average. Mountain systems are seen globally as the prime sufferers from climate change. There is a severe gap in the knowledge of the short and long-term implications of the impact of climate change on water and hazards in the Himalayas, and their downstream river basins. Most studies have excluded the Himalayan region because of its extreme and complex topography and the lack of adequate rain gauge data. There is an urgent need to close the knowledge gap by establishing monitoring schemes for snow, ice and water; downscaling climate models; applying hydrological models to predict water availability; and developing basin wide scenarios, which also take water demand and socioeconomic development into account. Climate change induced hazards such as floods, landslides and droughts will impose considerable stresses on the livelihoods of mountain people and downstream populations. Enhancing resilience and promoting adaptation in mountain areas have thus become among the most important priorities of this decade. It is important to strengthen local

  14. How Greenland melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Broeke M.R.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Satellite altimetry and gravimetry show that the Greenland ice sheet has been losing volume and mass since the beginning of this century. However, from these short time series of direct measurements we cannot infer what the causes of the mass loss are, i.e. ice dynamics or surface processes, or that maybe the ice sheet returns to normal after a period of volume increase and mass gain. By modelling and observing the individual components of the ice sheet mass balance, i.e. snowfall, meltwater runoff and iceberg production, we are able to identify the processes that led to the recent mass loss. We conclude that the Greenland ice sheet is significantly out of balance. Acceleration of outlet glaciers and increased runoff have contributed equally to recent Greenland mass loss. The potential for mass loss by surface processes, however, was three times greater than actually observed, due to refreezing and enhanced snowfall.

  15. Stochastic dynamics of melt ponds and sea ice-albedo climate feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakov, Ivan

    Evolution of melt ponds on the Arctic sea surface is a complicated stochastic process. We suggest a low-order model with ice-albedo feedback which describes stochastic dynamics of melt ponds geometrical characteristics. The model is a stochastic dynamical system model of energy balance in the climate system. We describe the equilibria in this model. We conclude the transition in fractal dimension of melt ponds affects the shape of the sea ice albedo curve.

  16. A model for the latent heat of melting in free standing metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jeong-Heon; Deinert, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles of many metals are known to exhibit scale dependent latent heats of melting. Analytical models for this phenomenon have so far failed to completely capture the observed phenomena. Here we present a thermodynamic analysis for the melting of metal nanoparticles in terms of their internal energy and a scale dependent surface tension proposed by Tolman. The resulting model predicts the scale dependence of the latent heat of melting and is confirmed using published data for tin and aluminum

  17. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  18. Cold-crucible melting of hulls and structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouan, A.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Puyou, M.; Piccinato, R.

    1990-01-01

    The method currently implemented at the La Hague UP3 reprocessing plant for conditioning of PWR zircaloy hulls is cement embedding. Another promising method, mainly for reducing the waste volume and the available exchange surface area, is melting. A cold-crucible melting process has therefore been developed by the CEA at Marcoule (France) over the last decade. Development work first concentrated on cladding hulls from fast breeder reactors, then from pressurized water reactors. The process can be used for both types of cladding wastes. Subassembly head and foot end-caps are sheared off and should be suitable for surface storage after α decontamination by successive rinsing. If necessary because of their α activity, they could be melted in a larger furnace

  19. Oxidation effects during corium melt in-vessel retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almyashev, V.I.; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Vitol, S.A. [Alexandrov Scientific-Research Institute of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V.V. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bechta, S. [Royal Institute of Technology (KHT), Stockholm (Sweden); Barrachin, M.; Fichot, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), St Paul lez Durance (France); Bottomley, P.D., E-mail: paul.bottomley@ec.europa.eu [Joint Research Centre, Institut für Transurane (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [CEA Cadarache-DEN/DTN/STRI (France)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Corium–steel interaction tests were re-examined particularly for transient processes. • Oxidation of corium melt was sensitive to oxidant supply and surface characteristics. • Consequences for vessel steel corrosion rates in severe accidents were discussed. - Abstract: In the in-vessel corium retention studies conducted on the Rasplav-3 test facility within the ISTC METCOR-P project and OECD MASCA program, experiments were made to investigate transient processes taking place during the oxidation of prototypic molten corium. Qualitative and quantitative data have been produced on the sensitivity of melt oxidation rate to the type of oxidant, melt composition, molten pool surface characteristics. The oxidation rate is a governing factor for additional heat generation and hydrogen release; also for the time of secondary inversion of oxidic and metallic layers of corium molten pool.

  20. Oscillatory convection in low aspect ratio Czochralski melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, A.; Prasad, V.; Koziol, J.; Gupta, K. P.

    1993-11-01

    Modeling of the crucible in bulk crystal growth simulations as a right circular cylinder may be adequate for high aspect ratio melts but this may be unrealistic when the melt height is low. Low melt height is a unique feature of a solid feed continuous Czochralski growth process for silicon single crystals currently under investigation. At low melt heights, the crucible bottom curvature has a dampening effect on the buoyancy-induced oscillations, a source of inhomogeneities in the grown crystal. The numerical results demonstrate how the mode of convection changes from vertical wall-dominated recirculating flows to Benard convection as the aspect ratio is lowered. This phenomenon is strongly dependent on the boundary condition at the free surface of the melt, which has been generally considered to be either adiabatic or radiatively cooled. A comparison of the flow oscillations in crucibles with and without curved bottoms at aspect ratios in the range of 0.25 to 0.50, and at realistic Grashof numbers (10 7 < Gr < 10 8) illustrate that changing the shape of the crucible may be an effective means of suppressing oscillations and controlling the melt flow.

  1. The effect of Ti and Nb on nitrogen dissolution reaction in stainless steel melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Min Whan; Hong, In Kook; Pak, Jong Jin; Song, Hyo Seok; Lee, Yong Deuk

    2002-01-01

    A kinetic study of nitrogen dissolution in STS304 stainless steel melt containing Ti and Nb has been carried out at 1500 degree C using an induction furnace and a levitation melting furnace. At low O and S levels, the nitrogen dissolution rate showed the first-order kinetics being controlled by the mass transfer of nitrogen in the melt. Ti addition to STS304 stainless melt significantly retarded the nitrogen dissolution rate by the formation of solid Ti oxide layer adhered on the melt surface. Nb did not affect the rate of nitrogen dissolution. In the levitation melting experiment where the oxide layer was removed from the melt surface, Ti did not retard the nitrogen dissolution rate. Simultaneous addition of Ti and Al increased the dissolution rate by the formation of non-wetting Al 2 O 3 on the melt surface. A small addition of CaO-Al 2 O 3 synthetic flux to Ti containing melt was very effective to remove the oxide layer, hence to increase the nitrogen dissolution rate

  2. The effect of Ti and Nb on nitrogen dissolution reaction in stainless steel melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Min Whan; Hong, In Kook; Pak, Jong Jin [Hanyang Univ., Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hyo Seok; Lee, Yong Deuk [POSCO, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    A kinetic study of nitrogen dissolution in STS304 stainless steel melt containing Ti and Nb has been carried out at 1500 degree C using an induction furnace and a levitation melting furnace. At low O and S levels, the nitrogen dissolution rate showed the first-order kinetics being controlled by the mass transfer of nitrogen in the melt. Ti addition to STS304 stainless melt significantly retarded the nitrogen dissolution rate by the formation of solid Ti oxide layer adhered on the melt surface. Nb did not affect the rate of nitrogen dissolution. In the levitation melting experiment where the oxide layer was removed from the melt surface, Ti did not retard the nitrogen dissolution rate. Simultaneous addition of Ti and Al increased the dissolution rate by the formation of non-wetting Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the melt surface. A small addition of CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} synthetic flux to Ti containing melt was very effective to remove the oxide layer, hence to increase the nitrogen dissolution rate.

  3. Surface morphology of laser superheated Pb(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.H.; Lin, B.; Elsayed-Ali, H.E.

    1999-11-01

    The change in the surface vacancy density after heating of Pb(100) with {approximately}100 ps laser pulses is investigated using reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The surface vacancy density remains unchanged when the surface is superheated without melting. However, when the laser fluence is high enough to cause surface melting, the surface vacancy density increases. This increase in vacancy density is attributed to fast diffusion of atoms in the liquid film formed on Pb(100) during laser melting.

  4. Improved capacitive melting curve measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebedash, Alexander; Tuoriniemi, Juha; Pentti, Elias; Salmela, Anssi

    2009-01-01

    Sensitivity of the capacitive method for determining the melting pressure of helium can be enhanced by loading the empty side of the capacitor with helium at a pressure nearly equal to that desired to be measured and by using a relatively thin and flexible membrane in between. This way one can achieve a nanobar resolution at the level of 30 bar, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the best gauges with vacuum reference. This extends the applicability of melting curve thermometry to lower temperatures and would allow detecting tiny anomalies in the melting pressure, which must be associated with any phenomena contributing to the entropy of the liquid or solid phases. We demonstrated this principle in measurements of the crystallization pressure of isotopic helium mixtures at millikelvin temperatures by using partly solid pure 4 He as the reference substance providing the best possible universal reference pressure. The achieved sensitivity was good enough for melting curve thermometry on mixtures down to 100 μK. Similar system can be used on pure isotopes by virtue of a blocked capillary giving a stable reference condition with liquid slightly below the melting pressure in the reference volume. This was tested with pure 4 He at temperatures 0.08-0.3 K. To avoid spurious heating effects, one must carefully choose and arrange any dielectric materials close to the active capacitor. We observed some 100 pW loading at moderate excitation voltages.

  5. Automatic Control of Silicon Melt Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Stickel, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    A new circuit, when combined with melt-replenishment system and melt level sensor, offers continuous closed-loop automatic control of melt-level during web growth. Installed on silicon-web furnace, circuit controls melt-level to within 0.1 mm for as long as 8 hours. Circuit affords greater area growth rate and higher web quality, automatic melt-level control also allows semiautomatic growth of web over long periods which can greatly reduce costs.

  6. Molecular thermodynamics of polymer melts at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorou, D.N.

    1988-09-01

    A lattice model is developed for the prediction of structure and thermodynamic properties at free polymer melt surfaces and polymer melt/solid interfaces. Density variations in the interfacial region are taken into account by introducing voids in the lattice, in the spirit of the equation of state theory of Sanchez and Lacombe. Intramolecular energy (chain stiffness) effects are explicitly incorporated. The model is derived through a rigorous statistical mechanical and thermodynamic analysis, which is based on the concept of availability. Two cases are considered: ''full equilibrium,'' whereby the interfacial polymer is taken as free to exchange heat, work and mass with a bulk polymer phase at given temperature and pressure; and ''restricted equilibrium,'' whereby a thin polymer film is allowed to equilibrate locally in response to ambient temperature and pressure, but in which chains do not necessarily have the same chemical potential as in the unconstrained bulk. Techniques are developed for calculating surface tension, adhesion tension, density profiles, chain shape, bond orientation, as well as the distribution of segments of various orders in the interfacial region. 28 refs., 6 figs

  7. The impact of melt ponds on summertime microwave brightness temperatures and sea-ice concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kern, Stefan; Rösel, Anja; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2016-01-01

    % sea-ice concentration. None of the algorithms investigated performs best based on our investigation of data from summer 2009. We suggest that those algorithms which are more sensitive to melt ponds could be optimized more easily because the influence of unknown snow and sea-ice surface property...... of eight sea-ice concentration retrieval algorithms to melt ponds by comparing sea-ice concentration with the melt-pond fraction. We derive gridded daily sea-ice concentrations from microwave brightness temperatures of summer 2009. We derive the daily fraction of melt ponds, open water between ice floes......, and the ice-surface fraction from contemporary Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data. We only use grid cells where the MODIS sea ice concentration, which is the melt-pond fraction plus the ice-surface fraction, exceeds 90 %. For one group of algorithms, e.g., Bristol and Comiso...

  8. Deep and persistent melt layer in the Archaean mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrault, Denis; Pesce, Giacomo; Manthilake, Geeth; Monteux, Julien; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Chantel, Julien; Novella, Davide; Guignot, Nicolas; King, Andrew; Itié, Jean-Paul; Hennet, Louis

    2018-02-01

    The transition from the Archaean to the Proterozoic eon ended a period of great instability at the Earth's surface. The origin of this transition could be a change in the dynamic regime of the Earth's interior. Here we use laboratory experiments to investigate the solidus of samples representative of the Archaean upper mantle. Our two complementary in situ measurements of the melting curve reveal a solidus that is 200-250 K lower than previously reported at depths higher than about 100 km. Such a lower solidus temperature makes partial melting today easier than previously thought, particularly in the presence of volatiles (H2O and CO2). A lower solidus could also account for the early high production of melts such as komatiites. For an Archaean mantle that was 200-300 K hotter than today, significant melting is expected at depths from 100-150 km to more than 400 km. Thus, a persistent layer of melt may have existed in the Archaean upper mantle. This shell of molten material may have progressively disappeared because of secular cooling of the mantle. Crystallization would have increased the upper mantle viscosity and could have enhanced mechanical coupling between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere. Such a change might explain the transition from surface dynamics dominated by a stagnant lid on the early Earth to modern-like plate tectonics with deep slab subduction.

  9. The refreezing of melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocco, Daniela; Feltham, Daniel L.; Bailey, Eleanor; Schroeder, David

    2015-02-01

    The presence of melt ponds on the surface of Arctic sea ice significantly reduces its albedo, inducing a positive feedback leading to sea ice thinning. While the role of melt ponds in enhancing the summer melt of sea ice is well known, their impact on suppressing winter freezing of sea ice has, hitherto, received less attention. Melt ponds freeze by forming an ice lid at the upper surface, which insulates them from the atmosphere and traps pond water between the underlying sea ice and the ice lid. The pond water is a store of latent heat, which is released during refreezing. Until a pond freezes completely, there can be minimal ice growth at the base of the underlying sea ice. In this work, we present a model of the refreezing of a melt pond that includes the heat and salt balances in the ice lid, trapped pond, and underlying sea ice. The model uses a two-stream radiation model to account for radiative scattering at phase boundaries. Simulations and related sensitivity studies suggest that trapped pond water may survive for over a month. We focus on the role that pond salinity has on delaying the refreezing process and retarding basal sea ice growth. We estimate that for a typical sea ice pond coverage in autumn, excluding the impact of trapped ponds in models overestimates ice growth by up to 265 million km3, an overestimate of 26%.

  10. Microstructure analysis of magnesium alloy melted by laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S.Y.; Hu, J.D.; Yang, Y.; Guo, Z.X.; Wang, H.Y.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of laser surface melting (LSM) on microstructure of magnesium alloy containing Al8.57%, Zn 0.68%, Mn0.15%, Ce0.52% were investigated. In the present work, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to melt and rapidly solidify the surface of the magnesium alloy with the objective of changing microstructure and improving the corrosion resistance. The results indicate that laser-melted layer contains the finer dendrites and behaviors good resistance corrosion compared with the untreated layer. Furthermore, the absorption coefficient of the magnesium alloy has been estimated according to the numeral simulation of the thermal conditions. The formation process of fine microstructure in melted layers was investigated based on the experimental observation and the theoretical analysis. Some simulation results such as the re-solidification velocities are obtained. The phase constitutions of the melted layers determined by X-ray diffraction were β-Mg 17 Al 12 and α-Mg as well as some phases unidentified

  11. Numerical simulation of fragmentation of hot metal and oxide melts with the computer code IVA3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussa, S.; Tromm, W.

    1994-01-01

    The phenomena of fragmentation of melts caused by water-inlet from the bottom with the computer code IVA3/11,12,13/ are investigated. With the computer code IVA3 three-component-multiphase flows can be numerically simulated. Two geometrical models are used. Both consist of a cylindrical vessel for water lying beneath a cylindrical vessel for melt. The vessels are connected to each other through a hole. Steel and UO 2 melts are. The following parameters were varied: the type of the melt (steel,UO 2 ), the water supply pressure and the geometry of the hole in the bottom plate through which the water and melt vessels are connected. As results of the numerical simulations temperature and pressure versus time curves are plotted. Additionally the volume flow rates and the volume fractions of the various phases in the vessels and the increase in surface and enthalpy of the melt during the time of simulation are depicted. With steel melts the rate of fragmentation increases with increasing water pressure and melt temperature, whereby stable channels are formed in the melt layer showing a very low flow resistance for steam. With UO 2 the formations of channels are also observed. However, these channels are not so stable that they eventually break apart and lead to the fragmentation of the UO 2 melt in drops. The fragmentation of the steel melt in water vessel is less than that of UO 2 . No essential solidification of the melt is observed in the respective duration of the simulations. However, a small drop in the melt temperature is observed. With a slight or no water pressure the melt flows from the upper vessel into the water vessel via the connecting hole. The processes take place in a very slow manner and with such a low steam production so that despite the occuring pressure peaks no sign of steam explosions could be observed. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Experiments and analyses on melt-structure-water interactions during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seghal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Okkonen, T.O.; Dinh, A.T.

    1998-04-01

    This report is the final report for the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI). It describes results of analytical and experimental studies concerning MSWI during the course of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in a LWR. Emphasis has been placed on phenomena which govern vessel failure mode and timing and the mechanisms and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets. It was found that: 2-D effects significantly diminished the focusing effect of an overlying metallic layer on top of an oxide melt pool. This result improves the feasibility of in-vessel retention of a melt pool through external cooling of the lower head; phenomena related to hole ablation and melt discharge, in the event of vessel failure, are affected significantly by crust formation; the jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from liquid to solid temperature; film boiling was investigated by developing a two-phase flow model and inserting it in a multi-D fluid dynamics code. It was concluded that the thickness of the film on the surface of a melt jet would be small and that the effects of the film on the process should not be large. This conclusion is contrary to the modeling employed in some other codes. The computer codes were developed and validated against the data obtained in the MSWI Project. The melt vessel interaction thermal analysis code describes the process of melt pool formation and convection and the resulting vessel thermal loadings. In addition, several innovative models were developed to describe the melt-water interaction process. The code MELT-3D treats the melt jet as a collection of particles whose movement is described with a three-dimensional Eulerian formulation. The model (SIPHRA) tracks the melt jet with an additional equation, using the

  13. Magnetic susceptibility of semiconductor melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutvitskij, V.A.; Shurygin, P.M.

    1975-01-01

    The temperature dependences chi of various alloys confirm the existence of cluster formations in molten semiconductors, the stability of these formations in melts being considerably affected by the anion nature. The concentrational dependences of the magnetic susceptibility for all the investigated systems exhibit the diamagnetism maxima corresponding to the compound compositions. Heating the melt causes ''smearing'' the maxima, which is related with the cluster structure dissociation. The existence of the maxima concentrational dependence chi corresponding to BiTe and BiSe is found in the isotherms. The non-linear dependence of chi on the composition shows the absence of a single-valued relation between the phase diagram and the chi-diagram for melts

  14. Melting mechanism in monolayers of flexible rod-shaped molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Taub, H.

    1992-01-01

    The melting of butane and hexane monolayers adsorbed on a graphite basal-plane surface has been studied by molecular-dynamics simulations and experimentally by neutron diffraction. The simulation results are qualitatively consistent with the observed diffraction patterns and suggest a general...

  15. High-temperature oxidation of tungsten covered by layer of glass-enamel melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasnetsova, V.B.; Shardakov, N.T.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Deryabin, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion losses of tungsten covered by the layer of glass-enamel melt were determined at 800, 850, 900, 950 deg C. It is shown that the rate of high-temperature oxidation of tungsten decreases after application of glass-enamel melt on its surface. This is probably conditioned by reduction of area of metal interaction with oxidizing atmosphere

  16. Melting of short 1-alcohol monolayers on water: Thermodynamics and x-ray scattering studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berge, B.; Konovalov, O.; Lajzerowicz, J.

    1994-01-01

    From surface tension measurements we extract the melting entropy Delta S-2D of fatty-alcohol monolayers on water. Delta S-2D is found to be 4(kB)/mol lower than in the bulk. Because of the role of the conformational entropy, the melting transition is discontinuous for long chains, but tends to be...

  17. Criteria for the spreading of oxide melts: Test series miniKATS-1 to -5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppinger, B.; Fieg, G.; Massier, H.; Schuetz, W.; Stegmaier, U.; Stern, G.

    2001-09-01

    In a long series of larger spreading tests with high temperature oxide melts (KATS tests) many parameters have been varied which are influencing the spreading behaviour (viscosity, pouring rate, substratum of spreading surface, presence of water). In spite of an extensive instrumentation using different thermocouples, an infrared camera and several video cameras, only in very few cases the behaviour of the melt front at the very moment of immobilization could be detected in detail. Therefore in the additional miniKATS series five small scale (5 kg) spreading tests with oxide melts have been conducted to investigate the mechanical properties of the spreading front in the moment of immobilization. It turned out that in all cases the bulk of the melt at this moment was still liquid at a temperature close to the initial one. Depending on the initial melt properties two distinct phenomena have been observed which control the immobilization of the melt: the first phenomena is the crust formation at the surface, the crusts at the bottom combined with the crust at the surface of the melt. In the other case the whole melt front was still above the liquid temperature at the moment of immobilization. Here the surface tension was controlling the spreading, it was in balance with the driving gravitational force. In none of the test bulk freezing has been detected. (orig.)

  18. On the rapid melt quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usatyuk, I.I.; Novokhatskij, I.A.; Kaverin, Yu.F.

    1994-01-01

    Specific features of instrumentation of traditionally employed method of melt spinning (rapid quenching), its disadvantages being discussed, were analyzed. The necessity of the method upgrading as applied to the problems of studying fine structure of molten metals and glasses was substantiated. The principle flowsheet of experimental facility for extremely rapid quenching of the melts of metals is described, specificity of its original functional units being considered. The sequence and character of all the principal stages of the method developed were discussed. 18 refs.; 3 figs

  19. Mechanism of anodic oxidation of molybdenum and tungsten in nitrate-nitrite melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurkinskij, V.P.; Firsova, E.G.; Morachevskij, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of anode oxidation of tungsten and molybdenum in NaNO 3 -KNO 3 (50 mass %) nitrate-nitrite melts with NaNO 2 -KNO 2 (0.5-50 mass %) addition and in NaNO 2 -KNO 2 (35 mole %) nitrite melt in the 516-580 K temperature range is studied. It is supposed that the process of anode dissloving of the mentioned metals in nitrite melt and nitrate-nitrite mixtures is two-electron. Formation of oxide passivating film is possible under electrolysis on the anode surface, the film is then dissolved in nitrate-nitrite melt with formation of molybdates or tungstates

  20. Heat and mass transfer in semiconductor melts during single-crystal growth processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Koichi

    1995-03-01

    The quality of large semiconductor crystals grown from melts is significantly affected by the heat and mass transfer in the melts. The current understanding of the phenomena, especially melt convection, is reviewed starting from the results of visualization using model fluids or silicon melt, and continuing to the detailed numerical calculations needed for quantitative modeling of processing with solidification. The characteristics of silicon flows are also reviewed by focusing on the Coriolis force in the rotating melt. Descriptions of flow instabilities are included that show the level of understanding of melt convection with a low Prandtl number. Based on hydrodynamics, the origin of the silicon flow structure is reviewed, and it is discussed whether silicon flow is completely turbulent or has an ordered structure. The phase transition from axisymmetric to nonaxisymmetric flow is discussed using different geometries. Additionally, surface-tension-driven flow is reviewed for Czochralski crystal growth systems.

  1. Postaccident heat removal. II. Heat transfer from an internally heated liquid to a melting solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faw, R.E.; Baker, L. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Microwave heating has been used in studies of heat transfer from a horizontal layer of internally heated liquid to a melting solid. Experiments were designed to simulate heat transfer and meltthrough processes of importance in the analysis of postaccident heat removal capabilities of nuclear reactors. Glycerin, heated by 2.45-GHz microwave radiation, was used to simulate molten fuel. Paraffin wax was used to simulate a melting barrier confining the fuel. Experimentally measured heat fluxes and melting rates were consistent with a model based on downward heat transfer by conduction through a stagnant liquid layer and upward heat transfer augmented by natural convection. Melting and displacement of the barrier material occurred by upward-moving droplets randomly distributed across the melting surface. Results indicated that the melting and displacement process had no effect on the heat transfer process

  2. Run-off of strontium with melting snow in spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenild, C.; Tveten, U.

    1986-09-01

    When assessing the consequences of atmospheric releases caused by a large reactor accident, one usually finds that the major contributions to the dose are via nutrition and from exposure to radiation from radioactive materials deposited on ground. The experiment described is concerned with run-off from agricultural surface which has been contaminated with strontiom while covered with snow. Migration experiments show a significant difference between summer and winter conditions. Roughly 54% of the strontium with which the experimental area was contaminated, ran off with the melt-water. Under winter conditions, portions of the contaminant will flow with the melt-water without coming in contact with the soil

  3. Acoustic detection of melt particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costley, R.D. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Research Department at Sandia National Laboratories is investigating a type of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). In this particular type of accident, core meltdown occurs while the pressure within the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is high. If one of the instrument tube penetrations in the lower head fails, melt particles stream through the cavity and into the containment vessel. This experiment, which simulates this type accident, was performed in the Surtsev Direct Heating Test Facility which is approximately a 1:10 linear scaling of a large dry containment volume. A 1:10 linear scale model of the reactor cavity was placed near the bottom of the Surtsey vessel so that the exit of the cavity was at the vertical centerline of the vessel. A pressure vessel used to create the simulated molten core debris was located at the scaled height of the RPV. In order to better understand how the melt leaves the cavity and streams into the containment an array of five acoustic sensors was placed directly in the path of the melt particles about 30 feet from the exit of the sealed cavity. Highly damped, broadband sensors were chosen to minimize ringing so that individual particle hits could be detected. The goal was to count the signals produced by the individual particle hits to get some idea of how the melt particles left the cavity. This document presents some of the results of the experiment. 9 figs

  4. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio...

  5. Sorption of radionuclides from Pb-Bi melt. Report 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalov, Eh.E.; Il'icheva, N.S.; Trifonova, O.E.

    2015-01-01

    Results of laboratory investigations of sorption and interfacial distribution of 54 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 137 Cs, 144 Ce, 154,155 Eu and 235,238 U radionuclides in the system Pb-Bi melt - steel surface are analyzed. It is shown that 106 Ru and 125 Sb are concentrated in Pb-Bi melt and other radionuclides with higher oxygen affinity are sorbed on oxide deposits on structural materials. Temperature dependences of sorption efficiency of radionuclides are studied. It is shown that there is sharp increase of this value for all radionuclides near the temperature range 350-400 deg C. Recommendations are given on the use of 106 Ru and 125 Sb as a reference for fuel element rupture detection system with radiometric monitoring of coolant melt samples and 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 134m Cs with radiometric monitoring of sorbing samples [ru

  6. Reconstructing surface elevation changes for the Greenland Ice Sheet (1993-2013) and analysis of Zachariae Isstrom, northeast Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kyle

    Previous studies investigating the velocity and elevation change records of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) revealed rapid and complex changes. It is therefore imperative to determine changes with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. By fusing multiple laser altimetry data sets, the Surface Elevation Reconstruction and Change (SERAC) program is capable of reconstructing surface elevation changes with high spatial and temporal resolution over the entire GrIS. The input data include observations from NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission (2003-2009) as well as data collected by NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) (1993-2013) and Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS) (2007-2012) airborne laser altimetry systems. This study extends the record of surface elevation changes over the GrIS by adding 2012 and 2013 laser altimetry data to the previous 1993-2011 record. Extending the record leads to a new, more accurate and detailed altimetry record for 1993-2013. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are fused with laser altimetry data over Zachariae Isstrom, northeast Greenland to analyze surface elevation changes and associated thinning rates during 1978-2014. Little to no elevation change occurred over Zachariae Isstrom from 1978-1999, however, from 1999-2014 elevation changes near the calving front became increasingly negative and accelerated. Calving front position showed steady retreat and grounding line position has been retreating towards the interior of the ice sheet at an increasing rate from 2010-2014 when compared to the 1996-2010 period. The measured elevation changes near the calving front have brought a large portion of the glacier close to the height of flotation. If the current thinning trend continues this portion of the glacier will reach flotation within the next 2-5 years allowing for further retreat and increased vulnerability to retreat for sections of

  7. Melt layer behavior of metal targets irradiatead by powerful plasma streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandura, A.N.; Byrka, O.V.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Garkusha, I.E.; Makhlaj, V.A.; Solyakov, D.G.; Tereshin, V.I.; Wuerz, H.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper melt layer erosion of metal targets under pulsed high-heat loads is studied. Experiments with steel, copper, aluminum and titanium samples were carried out in two plasma accelerator devices with different time durations of the heat load. The surfaces of the resolidified melt layers show a considerable roughness with microcraters and ridge like relief on the surface. For each material the mass loss was determined. Melt layer erosion by melt motion was clearly identified. However it is masked by boiling, bubble expansion and bubble collapse and by formation of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The experimental results can be used for validation of numerical codes which model melt layer erosion of metallic armour materials in off-normal events, in tokamaks

  8. Melt layer behavior of metal targets irradiatead by powerful plasma streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, A.N.; Byrka, O.V.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Garkusha, I.E. E-mail: garkusha@ipp.kharkov.ua; Makhlaj, V.A.; Solyakov, D.G.; Tereshin, V.I.; Wuerz, H

    2002-12-01

    In this paper melt layer erosion of metal targets under pulsed high-heat loads is studied. Experiments with steel, copper, aluminum and titanium samples were carried out in two plasma accelerator devices with different time durations of the heat load. The surfaces of the resolidified melt layers show a considerable roughness with microcraters and ridge like relief on the surface. For each material the mass loss was determined. Melt layer erosion by melt motion was clearly identified. However it is masked by boiling, bubble expansion and bubble collapse and by formation of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The experimental results can be used for validation of numerical codes which model melt layer erosion of metallic armour materials in off-normal events, in tokamaks.

  9. Melting of Pb clusters encapsulated in large fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delogu, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Encapsulation significantly increases the melting point of nanometer-sized Pb particles with respect to the corresponding unsupported ones. Highlights: → Nanometer-sized Pb particles are encapsulated in fullerene cages. → Their thermal behavior is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. → Encapsulated particles undergo a pressure rise as temperature increases. → Encapsulated particles melt at temperatures higher than unsupported ones. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to explore the melting behavior of nanometer-sized Pb particles encapsulated in spherical and polyhedral fullerene cages of suitable size. The encapsulated particles, as well as the corresponding unsupported ones for comparison, were submitted to a gradual temperature rise. Encapsulation is shown to severely affect the thermodynamic behavior of Pb particles due to the different thermal expansion coefficients of particles and cages. This determines a volume constraint that induces a rise of pressure inside the fullerene cages, which operate for particles as rigid confinement systems. The result is that surface pre-melting and melting processes occur in encapsulated particles at temperatures higher than in unsupported ones.

  10. On high-pressure melting of tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sheng-Nian; Swift, Damian C.

    2007-01-01

    The issues related to high-pressure melting of Ta are discussed within the context of diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave experiments, theoretical calculations and common melting models. The discrepancies between the extrapolations of the DAC melting curve and the melting point inferred from shock wave experiments, cannot be reconciled either by superheating or solid-solid phase transition. The failure to reproduce low-pressure DAC melting curve by melting models such as dislocation-mediated melting and the Lindemann law, and molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics-based calculations, undermines their predictions at moderate and high pressures. Despite claims to the contrary, the melting curve of Ta (as well as Mo and W) remains inconclusive at high pressures.

  11. On melting of boron phosphide under pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Solozhenko, Vladimir; Mukhanov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Melting of cubic boron phosphide, BP, has been studied at pressures to 9 GPa using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and electrical resistivity measurements. It has been found that above 2.6 GPa BP melts congruently, and the melting curve exhibits negative slope (–60 ± 7 K/GPa), which is indicative of a higher density of the melt as compared to the solid phase.

  12. Petrological Geodynamics of Mantle Melting I. AlphaMELTS + Multiphase Flow: Dynamic Equilibrium Melting, Method and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Tirone

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The complex process of melting in the Earth's interior is studied by combining a multiphase numerical flow model with the program AlphaMELTS which provides a petrological description based on thermodynamic principles. The objective is to address the fundamental question of the effect of the mantle and melt dynamics on the composition and abundance of the melt and the residual solid. The conceptual idea is based on a 1-D description of the melting process that develops along an ideal vertical column where local chemical equilibrium is assumed to apply at some level in space and time. By coupling together the transport model and the chemical thermodynamic model, the evolution of the melting process can be described in terms of melt distribution, temperature, pressure and solid and melt velocities but also variation of melt and residual solid composition and mineralogical abundance at any depth over time. In this first installment of a series of three contributions, a two-phase flow model (melt and solid assemblage is developed under the assumption of complete local equilibrium between melt and a peridotitic mantle (dynamic equilibrium melting, DEM. The solid mantle is also assumed to be completely dry. The present study addresses some but not all the potential factors affecting the melting process. The influence of permeability and viscosity of the solid matrix are considered in some detail. The essential features of the dynamic model and how it is interfaced with AlphaMELTS are clearly outlined. A detailed and explicit description of the numerical procedure should make this type of numerical models less obscure. The general observation that can be made from the outcome of several simulations carried out for this work is that the melt composition varies with depth, however the melt abundance not necessarily always increases moving upwards. When a quasi-steady state condition is achieved, that is when melt abundance does not varies significantly

  13. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  14. ERKÜ Esinduskogu aastakoosolek õnnestus / Gris Livieri

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Livieri, Gris

    2009-01-01

    Eesti Rahvuskomitee Ühendriikides Esinduskogu koosolekust 2. mail 2009, kus kõneldi Eesti julgeolekust, Ülemaailmse Eesti Kesknõukogu tegevusest, Ühendatud Balti Ameerika Komitee lähenevast konverentsist ja ERKÜ tegevusest ning arutati põhjalikult ERKÜ 2009. a. tegevuse plaane

  15. Supercoil Formation During DNA Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Mehmet; Avsaroglu, Baris; Kabakcioglu, Alkan

    2009-03-01

    Supercoil formation plays a key role in determining the structure-function relationship in DNA. Biological and technological processes, such as protein synthesis, polymerase chain reaction, and microarrays relys on separation of the two strands in DNA, which is coupled to the unwinding of the supercoiled structure. This problem has been studied theoretically via Peyrard-Bishop and Poland-Scheraga type models, which include a simple representation of the DNA structural properties. In recent years, computational models, which provide a more realtistic representaion of DNA molecule, have been used to study the melting behavior of short DNA chains. Here, we will present a new coarse-grained model of DNA which is capable of simulating sufficiently long DNA chains for studying the supercoil formation during melting, without sacrificing the local structural properties. Our coarse-grained model successfully reproduces the local geometry of the DNA molecule, such as the 3'-5' directionality, major-minor groove structure, and the helical pitch. We will present our initial results on the dynamics of supercoiling during DNA melting.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of UO2 nanocrystals melting under isolated and periodic boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarchenkov, A.S.; Potashnikov, S.I.; Nekrasov, K.A.; Kupryazhkin, A.Ya.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We perform MD simulation of UO 2 nanocrystals melting (in range of 768–49 152 ions). ► T(P) melting curves intersect zero near −20 GPa and saturate near 25 GPa. ► Reciprocal size dependences of nanocrystal melting point decrease nonlinearly. ► Linear and parabolic extrapolations to macroscopic values are considered. ► Melting point and density jump are reproduced, but heat of fusion is underestimated. - Abstract: Melting of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) nanocrystals has been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Ten recent and widely used sets of pair potentials were assessed in the rigid ion approximation. Both isolated (in vacuum) and periodic boundary conditions (PBC) were explored. Using barostat under PBC the pressure dependences of melting point were obtained. These curves intersected zero near −20 GPa, saturated near 25 GPa and increased nonlinearly in between. Using simulation of surface under isolated boundary conditions (IBC) recommended melting temperature and density jump were successfully reproduced. However, the heat of fusion is still underestimated. These melting characteristics were calculated for nanocrystals of cubic shape in the range of 768–49 152 particles (volume range of 10–1000 nm 3 ). The obtained reciprocal size dependences decreased nonlinearly. Linear and parabolic extrapolations to macroscopic values are considered. The parabolic one is found to be better suited for analysis of the data on temperature and heat of melting.

  17. Modeling the impact of melt on seismic properties during mountain building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amicia L.; Walker, Andrew M.; Lloyd, Geoffrey E.; Torvela, Taija

    2017-03-01

    Initiation of partial melting in the mid/lower crust causes a decrease in P wave and S wave velocities; recent studies imply that the relationship between these velocities and melt is not simple. We have developed a modeling approach to assess the combined impact of various melt and solid phase properties on seismic velocities and anisotropy. The modeling is based on crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) data measured from migmatite samples, allowing quantification of the variation of seismic velocities with varying melt volumes, shapes, orientations, and matrix anisotropy. The results show nonlinear behavior of seismic properties as a result of the interaction of all of these physical properties, which in turn depend on lithology, stress regime, strain rate, preexisting rock fabrics, and pressure-temperature conditions. This nonlinear behavior is evident when applied to a suite of samples from a traverse across a migmatitic shear zone in the Seiland Igneous Province, Northern Norway. Critically, changes in solid phase composition and CPO, and melt shape and orientation with respect to the wave propagation direction can result in huge variations in the same seismic property even if the melt fraction remains the same. A comparison with surface wave interpretations from tectonically active regions highlights the issues in current models used to predict melt percentages or partially molten regions. Interpretation of seismic data to infer melt percentages or extent of melting should, therefore, always be underpinned by robust modeling of the underlying geological parameters combined with examination of multiple seismic properties in order to reduce uncertainty of the interpretation.

  18. Accurate thermodynamic relations of the melting temperature of nanocrystals with different shapes and pure theoretical calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jinhua; Fu, Qingshan; Xue, Yongqiang, E-mail: xyqlw@126.com; Cui, Zixiang

    2017-05-01

    Based on the surface pre-melting model, accurate thermodynamic relations of the melting temperature of nanocrystals with different shapes (tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, dodecahedron, icosahedron, nanowire) were derived. The theoretically calculated melting temperatures are in relative good agreements with experimental, molecular dynamic simulation and other theoretical results for nanometer Au, Ag, Al, In and Pb. It is found that the particle size and shape have notable effects on the melting temperature of nanocrystals, and the smaller the particle size, the greater the effect of shape. Furthermore, at the same equivalent radius, the more the shape deviates from sphere, the lower the melting temperature is. The value of melting temperature depression of cylindrical nanowire is just half of that of spherical nanoparticle with an identical radius. The theoretical relations enable one to quantitatively describe the influence regularities of size and shape on the melting temperature and to provide an effective way to predict and interpret the melting temperature of nanocrystals with different sizes and shapes. - Highlights: • Accurate relations of T{sub m} of nanocrystals with various shapes are derived. • Calculated T{sub m} agree with literature results for nano Au, Ag, Al, In and Pb. • ΔT{sub m} (nanowire) = 0.5ΔT{sub m} (spherical nanocrystal). • The relations apply to predict and interpret the melting behaviors of nanocrystals.

  19. Water jet intrusion into hot melt concomitant with direct-contact boiling of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibamoto, Yasuteru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai Research Establishment, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    Boiling of water poured on surface of high-temperature melt (molten metal or metal oxide) provides an efficient means for heat exchange or cooling of melt. The heat transfer surface area can be extended by forcing water into melt. Objectives of the present study are to elucidate key factors of the thermal and hydrodynamic interactions for the water jet injection into melt (Coolant Injection mode). Proposed applications include in in-vessel heat exchangers for liquid metal reactor and emergency measures for cooling of molten core debris in severe accidents of light water reactor. Water penetration into melt may occurs also as a result of fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) in modes other than CI, it is anticipated that the present study contributes to understand the fundamental mechanism of the FCI process. The previous works have been limited on understanding the melt-water interaction phenomena in the water-injection mode because of difficulty in experimental measurement where boiling occurs in opaque invisible hot melt unlike the melt-injection mode. We conducted visualization and measurement of melt-water-vapor multiphase flow phenomena by using a high-frame-rate neutron radiography technique and newly-developed probes. Although limited knowledge, however, has been gained even such an approach, the experimental data were analyzed deeply by comparing with the knowledge obtained from relevant matters. As a result, we succeeded in revealing several key phenomena and validity in the conditions under which stable heat transfer is established. Moreover, a non-intrusive technique for measurement of the velocity and pressure fields adjacent to a moving free surface is developed. The technique is based on the measurement of fluid surface profile, which is useful for elucidation of flow mechanism accompanied by a free surface like the present phenomena. (author)

  20. Surface mass balance and runoff modeling using HIRHAM4 RCM at Kangerlussuaq (Søndre Strømfjord), West Greenland, 1950-2080

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Liston, Glen E.; Hiemstra, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    A regional atmospheric model, the HIRHAM4 regional climate model (RCM) using boundary conditions from the ECHAM5 atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM), was downscaled to a 500-m gridcell increment using SnowModel to simulate 131 yr (1950-2080) of hydrologic cycle evolution in west...... Greenland's Kangerlussuaq drainage. Projected changes in the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface mass balance (SMB) and runoff are relevant for potential hydropower production and prediction of ecosystem changes in sensitive Kangerlussuaq Fjord systems. Mean annual surface air temperatures and precipitation...

  1. Industrial opportunities of controlled melt flow during glass melting, part 1: Melt flow evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyrčíková, Petra; Hrbek, Lukáš; Němec, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2014), s. 111-117 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melting * controlled flow * space utilization Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.435, year: 2014 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2014/pdf/2014_02_111.pdf

  2. Reduction of Oxidative Melt Loss of Aluminum and Its Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Subodh K. Das; Shridas Ningileri

    2006-03-17

    This project led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms of dross formation. The microstructural evolution in industrial dross samples was determined. Results suggested that dross that forms in layers with structure and composition determined by the local magnesium concentration alone. This finding is supported by fundamental studies of molten metal surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data revealed that only magnesium segregates to the molten aluminum alloy surface and reacts to form a growing oxide layer. X-ray diffraction techniques that were using to investigate an oxidizing molten aluminum alloy surface confirmed for the first time that magnesium oxide is the initial crystalline phase that forms during metal oxidation. The analytical techniques developed in this project are now available to investigate other molten metal surfaces. Based on the improved understanding of dross initiation, formation and growth, technology was developed to minimize melt loss. The concept is based on covering the molten metal surface with a reusable physical barrier. Tests in a laboratory-scale reverberatory furnace confirmed the results of bench-scale tests. The main highlights of the work done include: A clear understanding of the kinetics of dross formation and the effect of different alloying elements on dross formation was obtained. It was determined that the dross evolves in similar ways regardless of the aluminum alloy being melted and the results showed that amorphous aluminum nitride forms first, followed by amorphous magnesium oxide and crystalline magnesium oxide in all alloys that contain magnesium. Evaluation of the molten aluminum alloy surface during melting and holding indicated that magnesium oxide is the first crystalline phase to form during oxidation of a clean aluminum alloy surface. Based on dross evaluation and melt tests it became clear that the major contributing factor to aluminum alloy dross was in the alloys with Mg content. Mg was

  3. Timing and origin of recent regional ice-mass loss in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasgen, Ingo; van den Broeke, Michiel; Bamber, J.L.Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    and Kanagaratnam, 2006) together with output of the regional atmospheric climate modelling (RACMO2/GR; Ettema et al., 2009), and surface-elevation changes from the Ice, cloud and land elevation satellite (ICESat; Sørensen et al., 2011). We show that changing ice discharge (D), surface melting and subsequent run-off...... (M/R) and precipitation (P) all contribute, in a complex and regionally variable interplay, to the increasingly negative mass balance of the GrIS observed within the last decade. Interannual variability in P along the northwest and west coasts of the GrIS largely explains the apparent regional mass...

  4. Three-dimensional model of heat transport during In Situ Vitrification with melting and cool down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    A potential technology for permanent remediation of buried wastes is the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process. This process uses electrical resistance heating to melt waste and contaminated soil in place to produce a durable, glasslike material that encapsulates and immobilizes buried wastes. The magnitude of the resulting electrical resistance heating is sufficient to cause soil melting. As the molten region grows, surface heat losses cause the soil near the surface to re solidify. This paper presents numerical results obtained by considering heat transport and melting when solving the conservation of mass and energy equations using finite element methods. A local heat source is calculated by solving the electric field equation and calculating a Joule Heat source term. The model considered is a three-dimensional model of the electrodes and surrounding soil. Also included in the model is subsidence; where the surface of the melted soil subsides due to the change in density when the soil melts. A power vs. time profile is implemented for typical ISV experiments. The model agrees well with experimental data for melt volume and melt shape

  5. Heat transfer in melt ponds with convection and radiative heating: observationally-inspired modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, A.; Langton, T.; Rees Jones, D. W.; Moon, W.; Kim, J. H.; Wilkinson, J.

    2016-12-01

    Melt ponds have key impacts on the evolution of Arctic sea ice and summer ice melt. Small changes to the energy budget can have significant consequences, with a net heat-flux perturbation of only a few Watts per square metre sufficient to explain the thinning of sea ice over recent decades. Whilst parameterisations of melt-pond thermodynamics often assume that pond temperatures remain close to the freezing point, recent in-situ observations show more complex thermal structure with significant diurnal and synoptic variability. We here consider the energy budget of melt ponds and explore the role of internal convective heat transfer in determining the thermal structure within the pond in relatively calm conditions with low winds. We quantify the energy fluxes and temperature variability using two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of convective turbulence within a melt pond, driven by internal radiative heating and surface fluxes. Our results show that the convective flow dynamics are modulated by changes to the incoming radiative flux and sensible heat flux at the pond surface. The evolving pond surface temperature controls the outgoing longwave emissions from the pond. Hence the convective flow modifies the net energy balance of a melt pond, modulating the relative fractions of the incoming heat flux that is re-emitted to the atmosphere or transferred downward into the sea ice to drive melt.

  6. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Kaitlin M; Albert, Mary R; McConnell, Joseph R; Baker, Ian

    2014-06-03

    In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. Analysis of six Greenland shallow firn cores from the dry snow region confirms that the most recent prior widespread melt occurred in 1889. A firn core from the center of the ice sheet demonstrated that exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold in the dry snow region, and caused the melting events in both 1889 and 2012. We use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century. These events are likely to alter the surface mass balance of the ice sheet, leaving the surface susceptible to further melting.

  7. Melting of Cu nanoclusters by molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Yanning; Bian, Xiufang; Chen, Ying

    2003-04-14

    We present a detailed molecular dynamics study of the melting of copper nanoclusters with up to 8628 atoms within the framework of the embedded-atom method. The finding indicates that there exists an intermediate nanocrystal regime above 456 atoms. The linear relation between the cluster size and its thermodynamics properties is obeyed in this regime. Melting first occurs at the surface of the clusters, leading to T{sub m,N}=T{sub m,Bulk}-{alpha}N{sup -1/3}, dropping from T{sub m,Bulk}=1360 K to T{sub m,456}=990 K. In addition, the size, surface energy as well as the root mean square displacement (RMSD) of the clusters in the intermediate regime have been investigated.

  8. Melt and vapor characteristics in an electron beam evaporator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenfeld, L.; Fleche, J.L.; Gonella, C.; Soubbaramayer

    1994-12-31

    Two different approaches have been compared for the calculation of the free surface temperature Ts in cerium or copper evaporation experiments: the first method considers properties of the melt: an empirical law is used to take into account turbulent thermal convection, instabilities and characterization of the free surface. The second method considers the vapor flow expansion and connects Ts to the measured terminal temperature and terminal mean parallel velocity of the vapor jet, by direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations including an atom-atom inelastic collision algorithm. The agreement between the two approaches is better for cerium than for copper in the high characterization case. The analysis, from the point of view of the properties of the melt, of the terminal parameters of the vapor jet for the high beam powers shows that Ts and the Knudsen number at the vapour source reach a threshold when the beam power increases. (author). 12 figs., 1 tab., 21 refs.

  9. Influence of plasma pressure gradient on melt layer macroscopic erosion of metal targets in disruption simulation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tereshin, V.I.; Garkusha, I.E. E-mail: garkusha@ipp.kharkov.ua; Bandura, A.N.; Byrka, O.V.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Makhlaj, V.A.; Solyakov, D.G.; Wuerz, H

    2003-03-01

    Melt layer erosion of metal targets under pulsed high heat loads is discussed. Tungsten, copper, aluminum, and titanium targets were exposed to perpendicular and inclined plasma impact in the quasi-steady-state plasma accelerator QSPA Kh-50. Melt layer motion results in erosion crater formation with rather large mountains of the resolidified material at the crater edge. It is shown that macroscopic motion of the melt layer and surface cracking are the main factors responsible for tungsten erosion.

  10. Influence of plasma pressure gradient on melt layer macroscopic erosion of metal targets in disruption simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tereshin, V.I.; Garkusha, I.E.; Bandura, A.N.; Byrka, O.V.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Makhlaj, V.A.; Solyakov, D.G.; Wuerz, H.

    2003-01-01

    Melt layer erosion of metal targets under pulsed high heat loads is discussed. Tungsten, copper, aluminum, and titanium targets were exposed to perpendicular and inclined plasma impact in the quasi-steady-state plasma accelerator QSPA Kh-50. Melt layer motion results in erosion crater formation with rather large mountains of the resolidified material at the crater edge. It is shown that macroscopic motion of the melt layer and surface cracking are the main factors responsible for tungsten erosion

  11. Mechanism of interaction of Co-B and Fe-B melts with ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filonov, M.R.; Anikin, D.Yu.; Pecherkin, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Stability of ceramic materials has been studied in the medium of melts being rendered amorphous. Measurements of limiting wetting angle for these materials were carried out on the ceramic surface. Two conclusions were made from the results of the experiments: melt-ceramics interaction takes place mainly through the slag phase; boron nitride is the most stable ceramics for melting and pouring of melts being rendered amorphous in the air. Materials on the basis of BN were synthesized by the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. Other refractory compounds were introduced in the ceramics composition for the purpose of improving such service properties as fire resistance, thermal resistance, mechanical strength, stability of compounds to the effect of reaction-active melts. The most promising refractory compositions were determined from the results of the studies [ru

  12. Controlled localised melting in silicon by high dose germanium implantation and flash lamp annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelskow, Matthias; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Pezoldt, Joerg; Kups, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    High intensity light pulse irradiation of monocrystalline silicon wafers is usually accompanied by inhomogeneous surface melting. The aim of the present work is to induce homogeneous buried melting in silicon by germanium implantation and subsequent flash lamp annealing. For this purpose high dose, high energy germanium implantation has been employed to lower the melting temperature of silicon in a predetermined depth region. Subsequent flash lamp irradiation at high energy densities leads to local melting of the germanium rich buried layer, whereby the thickness of the molten layer depends on the irradiation energy density. During the cooling down epitaxial crystallization takes place resulting in a largely defect-free layer. The combination of buried melting and dopant segregation has the potential to produce unusually buried doping profiles or to create strained silicon structures.

  13. Orthogonal cutting of laser beam melted parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Elisa; Zanger, Frederik; Schulze, Volker

    2018-05-01

    The finishing process of parts manufactured by laser beam melting is of high concern due to the lack of surface accuracy. Therefore, the focus of this work lies on the influence of the build-up direction of the parts and their effect on the finishing process. The orthogonal cutting reveals findings in the fields of chip formation, involved forces and temperatures appearing during machining. In the investigations, the cutting depth was varied between 0.05 and 0.15 mm representing a finishing process and the cutting velocity ranges from 30 to 200 m/min depending on the material. The experiments contain the materials stainless steel (AISI 316L), titanium (Ti6Al4V) and nickel-base alloy (IN718). The two materials named latter are of high interest in the aerospace sector and at the same time titanium is used in the medical field due to its biocompatibility. For the materials IN718 and Ti6Al4V a negative rake angle of -7.5° and for stainless steel a rake angle of 12.5° are chosen for the cutting experiments. The results provide the base for processing strategies. Therefore, the specimens were solely laser beam melted without post-processing like heat treatment. The evaluation of the experiments shows that an increase in cutting speed has different effects depending on the material. For stainless steel the measured forces regarding the machining direction to the layers approach the same values. In contrast, the influence of the layers regarding the forces appearing during orthogonal cutting of the materials IN718 and Ti6Al4V differ for lower cutting speeds.

  14. ELM-induced transient tungsten melting in the JET divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, J. W.; Arnoux, G.; Bazylev, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Autricque, A.; Balboa, I.; Clever, M.; Dejarnac, R.; Coffey, I.; Corre, Y.; Devaux, S.; Frassinetti, L.; Gauthier, E.; Horacek, J.; Jachmich, S.; Komm, M.; Knaup, M.; Krieger, K.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Pitts, R. A.; Puetterich, T.; Rack, M.; Stamp, M.; Sergienko, G.; Tamain, P.; Thompson, V.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2015-02-01

    The original goals of the JET ITER-like wall included the study of the impact of an all W divertor on plasma operation (Coenen et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 073043) and fuel retention (Brezinsek et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 083023). ITER has recently decided to install a full-tungsten (W) divertor from the start of operations. One of the key inputs required in support of this decision was the study of the possibility of W melting and melt splashing during transients. Damage of this type can lead to modifications of surface topology which could lead to higher disruption frequency or compromise subsequent plasma operation. Although every effort will be made to avoid leading edges, ITER plasma stored energies are sufficient that transients can drive shallow melting on the top surfaces of components. JET is able to produce ELMs large enough to allow access to transient melting in a regime of relevance to ITER. Transient W melt experiments were performed in JET using a dedicated divertor module and a sequence of IP = 3.0 MA/BT = 2.9 T H-mode pulses with an input power of PIN = 23 MW, a stored energy of ˜6 MJ and regular type I ELMs at ΔWELM = 0.3 MJ and fELM ˜ 30 Hz. By moving the outer strike point onto a dedicated leading edge in the W divertor the base temperature was raised within ˜1 s to a level allowing transient, ELM-driven melting during the subsequent 0.5 s. Such ELMs (δW ˜ 300 kJ per ELM) are comparable to mitigated ELMs expected in ITER (Pitts et al 2011 J. Nucl. Mater. 415 (Suppl.) S957-64). Although significant material losses in terms of ejections into the plasma were not observed, there is indirect evidence that some small droplets (˜80 µm) were released. Almost 1 mm (˜6 mm3) of W was moved by ˜150 ELMs within 7 subsequent discharges. The impact on the main plasma parameters was minor and no disruptions occurred. The W-melt gradually moved along the leading edge towards the high-field side, driven by j × B forces. The evaporation rate determined

  15. ELM-induced transient tungsten melting in the JET divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenen, J.W.; Clever, M.; Knaup, M.; Arnoux, G.; Matthews, G.F.; Balboa, I.; Meigs, A.; Bazylev, B.; Autricque, A.; Dejarnac, R.; Horacek, J.; Komm, M.; Coffey, I.; Corre, Y.; Gauthier, E.; Devaux, S.; Krieger, K.; Frassinetti, L.; Jachmich, S.; Marsen, S.

    2015-01-01

    The original goals of the JET ITER-like wall included the study of the impact of an all W divertor on plasma operation (Coenen et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 073043) and fuel retention (Brezinsek et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 083023). ITER has recently decided to install a full-tungsten (W) divertor from the start of operations. One of the key inputs required in support of this decision was the study of the possibility of W melting and melt splashing during transients. Damage of this type can lead to modifications of surface topology which could lead to higher disruption frequency or compromise subsequent plasma operation. Although every effort will be made to avoid leading edges, ITER plasma stored energies are sufficient that transients can drive shallow melting on the top surfaces of components. JET is able to produce ELMs large enough to allow access to transient melting in a regime of relevance to ITER. Transient W melt experiments were performed in JET using a dedicated divertor module and a sequence of I P  = 3.0 MA/B T  = 2.9 T H-mode pulses with an input power of P IN  = 23 MW, a stored energy of ∼6 MJ and regular type I ELMs at ΔW ELM  = 0.3 MJ and f ELM  ∼ 30 Hz. By moving the outer strike point onto a dedicated leading edge in the W divertor the base temperature was raised within ∼1 s to a level allowing transient, ELM-driven melting during the subsequent 0.5 s. Such ELMs (δW ∼ 300 kJ per ELM) are comparable to mitigated ELMs expected in ITER (Pitts et al 2011 J. Nucl. Mater. 415 (Suppl.) S957–64). Although significant material losses in terms of ejections into the plasma were not observed, there is indirect evidence that some small droplets (∼80 µm) were released. Almost 1 mm (∼6 mm 3 ) of W was moved by ∼150 ELMs within 7 subsequent discharges. The impact on the main plasma parameters was minor and no disruptions occurred. The W-melt gradually moved along the leading edge towards the high-field side, driven by j

  16. Assessing modeled Greenland surface mass balance in the GISS Model E2 and its sensitivity to surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patrick; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tedesco, Marco; Moustafa, Samiah E.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Fischer, Robert P.; Fettweis, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays an important role in global sea level change. Regional Climate Models (RCMs) such as the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) have been employed at high spatial resolution with relatively complex physics to simulate ice sheet SMB. Global climate models (GCMs) incorporate less sophisticated physical schemes and provide outputs at a lower spatial resolution, but have the advantage of modeling the interaction between different components of the earth's oceans, climate, and land surface at a global scale. Improving the ability of GCMs to represent ice sheet SMB is important for making predictions of future changes in global sea level. With the ultimate goal of improving SMB simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Model E2 GCM, we compare simulated GrIS SMB against the outputs of the MAR model and radar-derived estimates of snow accumulation. In order to reproduce present-day climate variability in the Model E2 simulation, winds are constrained to match the reanalysis datasets used to force MAR at the lateral boundaries. We conduct a preliminary assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated Model E2 SMB to surface albedo, a parameter that is known to strongly influence SMB. Model E2 albedo is set to a fixed value of 0.8 over the entire ice sheet in the initial configuration of the model (control case). We adjust this fixed value in an ensemble of simulations over a range of 0.4 to 0.8 (roughly the range of observed summer GrIS albedo values) to examine the sensitivity of ice-sheet-wide SMB to albedo. We prescribe albedo from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MCD43A3 v6 to examine the impact of a more realistic spatial and temporal variations in albedo. An age-dependent snow albedo parameterization is applied, and its impact on SMB relative to observations and the RCM is assessed.

  17. Double melting in polytetrafluoroethylene γ-irradiated above its melting point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serov, S.A.; Khatipov, S.A.; Sadovskaya, N.V.; Tereshenkov, A.V.; Chukov, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► PTFE irradiation leads to formation of double melting peaks in DSC curves. ► This is connected to dual crystalline morphology typical for PTFE. ► Two crystalline types exist in the PTFE irradiated in the melt. - Abstract: PTFE irradiation above its melting point leads to formation of double melting and crystallization peaks in DSC curves. Splitting of melting peaks is connected to dual crystalline morphology typical for PTFE irradiated in the melt. According to electron microscopy, two crystalline types with different size and packing density exist in the irradiated PTFE.

  18. Tin in granitic melts: The role of melting temperature and protolith composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Mathias; Romer, Rolf L.; Franz, Leander; López-Moro, Francisco Javier

    2018-06-01

    Granite bound tin mineralization typically is seen as the result of extreme magmatic fractionation and late exsolution of magmatic fluids. Mineralization, however, also could be obtained at considerably less fractionation if initial melts already had enhanced Sn contents. We present chemical data and results from phase diagram modeling that illustrate the dominant roles of protolith composition, melting conditions, and melt extraction/evolution for the distribution of Sn between melt and restite and, thus, the Sn content of melts. We compare the element partitioning between leucosome and restite of low-temperature and high-temperature migmatites. During low-temperature melting, trace elements partition preferentially into the restite with the possible exception of Sr, Cd, Bi, and Pb, that may be enriched in the melt. In high-temperature melts, Ga, Y, Cd, Sn, REE, Pb, Bi, and U partition preferentially into the melt whereas Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Mo, and Ba stay in the restite. This contrasting behavior is attributed to the stability of trace element sequestering minerals during melt generation. In particular muscovite, biotite, titanite, and rutile act as host phases for Sn and, therefore prevent Sn enrichment in the melt as long as they are stable phases in the restite. As protolith composition controls both the mineral assemblage and modal contents of the various minerals, protolith composition eventually also controls the fertility of a rock during anatexis, restite mineralogy, and partitioning behavior of trace metals. If a particular trace element is sequestered in a phase that is stable during partial melting, the resulting melt is depleted in this element whereas the restite becomes enriched. Melt generation at high temperature may release Sn when Sn-hosts become unstable. If melt has not been lost before the breakdown of Sn-hosts, Sn contents in the melt will increase but never will be high. In contrast, if melt has been lost before the decomposition of Sn

  19. Monitoring of polymer melt processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alig, Ingo; Steinhoff, Bernd; Lellinger, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The paper reviews the state-of-the-art of in-line and on-line monitoring during polymer melt processing by compounding, extrusion and injection moulding. Different spectroscopic and scattering techniques as well as conductivity and viscosity measurements are reviewed and compared concerning their potential for different process applications. In addition to information on chemical composition and state of the process, the in situ detection of morphology, which is of specific interest for multiphase polymer systems such as polymer composites and polymer blends, is described in detail. For these systems, the product properties strongly depend on the phase or filler morphology created during processing. Examples for optical (UV/vis, NIR) and ultrasonic attenuation spectra recorded during extrusion are given, which were found to be sensitive to the chemical composition as well as to size and degree of dispersion of micro or nanofillers in the polymer matrix. By small-angle light scattering experiments, process-induced structures were detected in blends of incompatible polymers during compounding. Using conductivity measurements during extrusion, the influence of processing conditions on the electrical conductivity of polymer melts with conductive fillers (carbon black or carbon nanotubes) was monitored. (topical review)

  20. Dating Howardite Melt Clasts: Evidence for an Extended Vestan Bombardment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Hodges, K. V.; Wadhwa, M.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Howardites are polymict breccias that, together with eucrites and diogenites (HED), likely originate from the vestan surface (regolith/ megaregolith), and display a heterogeneous distribution of eucritic and diogenitic material. Melt clasts are also present alongside other regolithic features within howardites, and are noteworthy for their compositional variability and appearance. Melt clasts formed by impact events provide a snapshot of the timings and conditions of surface gardening and bombardment on the vestan surface. By dating such clasts, we aim to better constrain the timings of impact events on Vesta, and to establish whether the impact flux in the asteroid belt was similar to that on the Moon. As the Moon is used as the basis for characterising impact models of the inner solar system, it is necessary to verify that apparent wide-scale events are seen in other planetary bodies. In particular, the observed clustering of Apollo melt clast ages between 3.8-4.0 Ga has led to two hypotheses: 1) The Moon was subjected to a sudden event - 'Lunar Cataclysm' or period of 'Late Heavy Bombardment' (LHB), 2) The age cluster represents the end of an epoch of declining bombardment or 'Heavy Bombardment. No consensus has emerged regarding one or other hypothesis. We are testing these hypotheses by seeking evidence for such events in materials other than those derived from the Moon.

  1. Melt damage simulation of W-macrobrush and divertor gaps after multiple transient events in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazylev, B.N. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: bazylev@ihm.fzk.de; Janeschitz, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Fusion, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Landman, I.S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Loarte, A. [EFDA-CSU, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pestchanyi, S.E. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    Tungsten in the form of macrobrush structure is foreseen as one of two candidate materials for the ITER divertor and dome. In ITER, even for moderate and weak ELMs when a thin shielding layer does not protect the armour surface from the dumped plasma, the main mechanisms of metallic target damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion, which determines the lifetime of the plasma facing components. The melt erosion of W-macrobrush targets with different geometry of brush surface under the heat loads caused by weak ELMs is numerically investigated using the modified code MEMOS. The optimal angle of brush surface inclination that provides a minimum of surface roughness is estimated for given inclination angles of impacting plasma stream and given parameters of the macrobrush target. For multiple disruptions the damage of the dome gaps and the gaps between divertor cassettes caused by the radiation impact is estimated.

  2. Melt damage simulation of W-macrobrush and divertor gaps after multiple transient events in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazylev, B. N.; Janeschitz, G.; Landman, I. S.; Loarte, A.; Pestchanyi, S. E.

    2007-06-01

    Tungsten in the form of macrobrush structure is foreseen as one of two candidate materials for the ITER divertor and dome. In ITER, even for moderate and weak ELMs when a thin shielding layer does not protect the armour surface from the dumped plasma, the main mechanisms of metallic target damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion, which determines the lifetime of the plasma facing components. The melt erosion of W-macrobrush targets with different geometry of brush surface under the heat loads caused by weak ELMs is numerically investigated using the modified code MEMOS. The optimal angle of brush surface inclination that provides a minimum of surface roughness is estimated for given inclination angles of impacting plasma stream and given parameters of the macrobrush target. For multiple disruptions the damage of the dome gaps and the gaps between divertor cassettes caused by the radiation impact is estimated.

  3. Melt damage simulation of W-macrobrush and divertor gaps after multiple transient events in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylev, B.N.; Janeschitz, G.; Landman, I.S.; Loarte, A.; Pestchanyi, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten in the form of macrobrush structure is foreseen as one of two candidate materials for the ITER divertor and dome. In ITER, even for moderate and weak ELMs when a thin shielding layer does not protect the armour surface from the dumped plasma, the main mechanisms of metallic target damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion, which determines the lifetime of the plasma facing components. The melt erosion of W-macrobrush targets with different geometry of brush surface under the heat loads caused by weak ELMs is numerically investigated using the modified code MEMOS. The optimal angle of brush surface inclination that provides a minimum of surface roughness is estimated for given inclination angles of impacting plasma stream and given parameters of the macrobrush target. For multiple disruptions the damage of the dome gaps and the gaps between divertor cassettes caused by the radiation impact is estimated

  4. Validation of the THIRMAL-1 melt-water interaction code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, C.C.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The THIRMAL-1 computer code has been used to calculate nonexplosive LWR melt-water interactions both in-vessel and ex-vessel. To support the application of the code and enhance its acceptability, THIRMAL-1 has been compared with available data from two of the ongoing FARO experiments at Ispra and two of the Corium Coolant Mixing (CCM) experiments performed at Argonne. THIRMAL-1 calculations for the FARO Scoping Test and Quenching Test 2 as well as the CCM-5 and -6 experiments were found to be in excellent agreement with the experiment results. This lends confidence to the modeling that has been incorporated in the code describing melt stream breakup due to the growth of both Kelvin-Helmholtz and large wave instabilities, the sizes of droplets formed, multiphase flow and heat transfer in the mixing zone surrounding and below the melt metallic phase. As part of the analysis of the FARO tests, a mechanistic model was developed to calculate the prefragmentation as it may have occurred when melt relocated from the release vessel to the water surface and the model was compared with the relevant data from FARO.

  5. Experiments and analyses on melt jet impingement during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Green, J.A.; Dinh, T.N.; Dong, W.

    1997-01-01

    Relocation of melt from the core region, during a nuclear reactor severe accident, presents the potential for erosion of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall as a result of melt jet impingement. The extent of vessel erosion will depend upon a variety of parameters, including jet diameter, velocity, composition, superheat, angle of inclination, and the presence of an overlying water or melt pool. Experiments have been conducted at the Royal Institute of Technology Division of Nuclear Power Safety (RIT/NPS) which employ a variety of melt and pressure vessel simulant materials, such as water, salt-ice, Cerrobend alloy and molten salt. These experiments have revealed that the erosion depth of the vessel simulant in the jet stagnation zone can be adequately predicted by the Saito correlation, which is based on turbulent heat transfer, while initial erosion rates are seen to be in line with the laminar-stagnation-zone model. A transition between the laminar and turbulent regimes was realized in most cases and is attributed to the roughness of the surface in the eroded cavity formed

  6. Studies of pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification using amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.; Wood, R.F.

    1984-06-01

    Pulsed-laser melting of ion implantation-amorphized silicon layers, and subsequent solidification were studied. Measurements of the onset of melting of amorphous silicon layers and of the duration of melting, and modified melting model calculations demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, K/sub a/, of amorphous silicon is very low (K/sub a/ approx. = 0.02 W/cm-K). K/sub a/ is also the dominant parameter determining the dynamical response of amorphous silicon to pulsed laser radiation. TEM indicates that bulk (volume) nucleation occurs directly from the highly undercooled liquid silicon that can be prepared by pulsed laser melting of amorphous silicon layers at low laser energy densities. A modified thermal melting model is presented. The model calculations demonstrate that the release of latent heat by bulk nucleation occurring during the melt-in process is essential to obtaining agreement with observed depths of melting. These calculations also show that this release of latent heat accompanying bulk nucleation can result in the existence of buried molten layers of silicon in the interior of the sample after the surface has solidified. The bulk nucleation implies that the liquid-to-amorphous phase transition (produced using picosecond or uv nanosecond laser pulses) cannot be explained using purely thermodynamic considerations

  7. Effect of grain size on the melting point of confined thin aluminum films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wejrzanowski, Tomasz; Lewandowska, Malgorzata; Sikorski, Krzysztof; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J. [Materials Design Division, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-28

    The melting of aluminum thin film was studied by a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique. The effect of the grain size and type of confinement was investigated for aluminum film with a constant thickness of 4 nm. The results show that coherent intercrystalline interface suppress the transition of solid aluminum into liquid, while free-surface gives melting point depression. The mechanism of melting of polycrystalline aluminum thin film was investigated. It was found that melting starts at grain boundaries and propagates to grain interiors. The melting point was calculated from the Lindemann index criterion, taking into account only atoms near to grain boundaries. This made it possible to extend melting point calculations to bigger grains, which require a long time (in the MD scale) to be fully molten. The results show that 4 nm thick film of aluminum melts at a temperature lower than the melting point of bulk aluminum (933 K) only when the grain size is reduced to 6 nm.

  8. SAXS study of transient pre-melting in chain-folded alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungar, G.; Wills, H.H.

    1990-01-01

    A pronounced pre-melting effect is observed in chain-folded crystals of pure monodisperse n-alkane C 246 H 494 . The effect is reversible on a short time scale, but at longer times the once-folded chain crystals are irreversibly lost as slow chain extension proceeds by solid diffusion well below the melting point. The melting process is thus monitored by rapid time-resolved small-angle X-ray (SAXS) measurements, using synchrotron radiation. The results show that the observed pronounced broadening of the DSC melting endotherm for chain-folded crystals is entirely due to genuine pre-melting of lamellar surfaces. Although a significant portion of material is already molten below the final melting point of chain-folded crystals T F , no recrystallization in the chain-extended form can occur until the cores of the crystalline lamellae melt at T F . Pre-melting of extended chain crystals is significantly less pronounced than that of folded chain crystals

  9. Investigation on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Yang, Z.L.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Haraldsson, H.O.; Li, H.X.; Konovakhin, M.; Paladino, D.; Leung, W.H [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1999-08-01

    This report is the final report for the work performed in 1998 in the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI), under the auspices of the APRI Project, jointly funded by SKI, HSK, USNRC and the Swedish and Finnish power companies. The present report describes results of advanced analytical and experimental studies concerning melt-water-structure interactions during the course of a hypothetical severe core meltdown accident in a light water reactor (LWR). Emphasis has been placed on phenomena and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets, melt spreading and coolability, and thermal and mechanical loadings of a pressure vessel during melt-vessel interaction. Many of the investigations performed in support of this project have produced papers which have been published in the proceedings of technical meetings. A short summary of the results achieved in these papers is provided in this overview. Both experimental and analytical studies were performed to improve knowledge about phenomena of melt-structure-water interactions. We believe that significant technical advances have been achieved during the course of these studies. It was found that: the solidification has a strong effect on the drop deformation and breakup. Initially appearing at the drop surface and, later, thickening inwards, the solid crust layer dampens the instability waves on the drop surface and, therefore, hinders drop deformation and breakup. The drop thermal properties also affect the thermal behavior of the drop and, therefore, have impact on its deformation behavior. The jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters, e.g. the Weber number, but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from the liquidus to the solidus temperature. Additionally, the crust formed on the surface of the melt jet will also reduce the propensity

  10. Investigation on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Yang, Z.L.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Haraldsson, H.O.; Li, H.X.; Konovakhin, M.; Paladino, D.; Leung, W.H

    1999-08-01

    This report is the final report for the work performed in 1998 in the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI), under the auspices of the APRI Project, jointly funded by SKI, HSK, USNRC and the Swedish and Finnish power companies. The present report describes results of advanced analytical and experimental studies concerning melt-water-structure interactions during the course of a hypothetical severe core meltdown accident in a light water reactor (LWR). Emphasis has been placed on phenomena and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets, melt spreading and coolability, and thermal and mechanical loadings of a pressure vessel during melt-vessel interaction. Many of the investigations performed in support of this project have produced papers which have been published in the proceedings of technical meetings. A short summary of the results achieved in these papers is provided in this overview. Both experimental and analytical studies were performed to improve knowledge about phenomena of melt-structure-water interactions. We believe that significant technical advances have been achieved during the course of these studies. It was found that: the solidification has a strong effect on the drop deformation and breakup. Initially appearing at the drop surface and, later, thickening inwards, the solid crust layer dampens the instability waves on the drop surface and, therefore, hinders drop deformation and breakup. The drop thermal properties also affect the thermal behavior of the drop and, therefore, have impact on its deformation behavior. The jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters, e.g. the Weber number, but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from the liquidus to the solidus temperature. Additionally, the crust formed on the surface of the melt jet will also reduce the propensity

  11. Variability of Basal Melt Beneath the Pine Island Glacier Ice Shelf, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Robert; Vaughan, David G.; Vornberger, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Observations from satellite and airborne platforms are combined with model calculations to infer the nature and efficiency of basal melting of the Pine Island Glacier ice shelf, West Antarctica, by ocean waters. Satellite imagery shows surface features that suggest ice-shelf-wide changes to the ocean s influence on the ice shelf as the grounding line retreated. Longitudinal profiles of ice surface and bottom elevations are analyzed to reveal a spatially dependent pattern of basal melt with an annual melt flux of 40.5 Gt/a. One profile captures a persistent set of surface waves that correlates with quasi-annual variations of atmospheric forcing of Amundsen Sea circulation patterns, establishing a direct connection between atmospheric variability and sub-ice-shelf melting. Ice surface troughs are hydrostatically compensated by ice-bottom voids up to 150m deep. Voids form dynamically at the grounding line, triggered by enhanced melting when warmer-than-average water arrives. Subsequent enlargement of the voids is thermally inefficient (4% or less) compared with an overall melting efficiency beneath the ice shelf of 22%. Residual warm water is believed to cause three persistent polynyas at the ice-shelf front seen in Landsat imagery. Landsat thermal imagery confirms the occurrence of warm water at the same locations.

  12. Features of melting of indium monohalides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitriev, V S; Smirniv, V A [AN SSSR, Chernogolovka. Inst. Fiziki Tverdogo Tela

    1980-12-01

    The character of InCl, InBr and InI melting is investigated by the methods of DTA, calorimetry, conductometry and chemical analysis. Partial decomposition of monohalogenides during melting according to the reactions of disproportionation is shown. The presence of disproportionation products (In/sup 0/ and In/sup 3 +/) is manifested in the properties of solid monohalogenides, prepared by the crystallization from melt, in their photosensitivity and electroconductivity.

  13. Multiscale Models of Melting Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Sea ice reflectance or albedo , a key parameter in climate modeling, is primarily determined by melt pond and ice floe configurations. Ice - albedo ...determine their albedo - a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a conceptual sea ice climate model passing through a...bifurcation points. Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Y. Ma, I. Sudakov, and K. M. Golden Abstract: The albedo of melting

  14. Analytical model based on cohesive energy to indicate the edge and corner effects on melting temperature of metallic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shidpour, Reza; Hamid, Delavari H.; Vossoughi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The effect of edge and corner atoms of nanoparticle (solid line) cause melting temperature drops more compared to considering them as same as only surface atoms (dash line). This reduction is significant especially when the size of nanoparticle is below 10 nm. - Abstract: An analytical model based on cohesive energy has been conducted to study the effects of edge, corner, and inward surface relaxation as varying parameters on melting temperature of nanoparticles. It is shown that taking into account the edge and corner (EC) atoms of nanoparticle, causes to drop melting temperature more, when compared to consider them the same as only surface atoms. This reduction is significant especially when the size of nanoparticle is below 10 nm. The results are supported by available experimental results of tin, lead and gold melting temperature (T m ). Finally, it is shown that inward relaxation increases melting temperature slightly.

  15. Reaction- and melting behaviour of LWR-core components UO2, Zircaloy and steel during the meltdown period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1976-07-01

    The reaction behaviour of the UO 2 , Zircaloy-4 and austenitic steel core components was investigated as a function of temperature (till melting temperatures) under inert and oxidizing conditions. Component concentrations varied between that of Corium-A (65 wt.% UO 2 , 18% Zry, 17% steel) and that of Corium-E (35 wt.% UO 2 , 10% Zry, 55% steel). In addition, Zircaloy and stainless steel were used with different degrees of oxidation. The paper describes systematically the phases that arise during heating and melting. The integral composition of the melts and the qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of the phases present in solidified corium are given. In some cases melting points have been determined. The reaction and melting behaviour of the corium specimens strongly depends on the concentration and on the degree of oxidation of the core components. First liquid phases are formed at the Zry-steel interface at about 1,350 0 C. The maximum temperatures of about 2,500 0 C for the complete melting of the corium-specimens are well below the UO 2 melting point. Depending on the steel content and/or degree of oxidation of Zry and steel, a homogeneous metallic or oxide melt or two immiscible melts - one oxide and the other metallic - are obtained. During the melting experiments performed under inert gas conditions the chemical composition of the molten specimens generally change by evaporation losses of single elements, especially of uranium, zirconium and oxygen. The total weight losses go up to 30%; under oxidizing conditions they are substantially smaller due to the occurrence of different phases. In air or water vapor, the occurrence of the phases and the melting behaviour of the core components are strongly influenced by the oxidation rate and the oxygen supply to the surface of the melt. In the case of the hypothetical core melting accident, a heterogeneous melt (oxide and metallic) is probable after the meltdown period. (orig./RW) [de

  16. Calculation of melting points of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobkova, O.S.; Voskobojnikov, V.G.; Kozin, A.I.

    1975-01-01

    The correlation between the melting point and thermodynamic parameters characterizing the strength of oxides and compounds is given. Such thermodynamic paramters include the energy and antropy of atomization

  17. Warm winds from the Pacific caused extensive Arctic sea-ice melt in summer 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graversen, Rune G.; Drijfhout, Sybren [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt (Netherlands); Mauritsen, Thorsten [Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Tjernstroem, Michael; Maartensson, Sebastian [Stockholm University, Department of Meteorology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-06-15

    During summer 2007 the Arctic sea-ice shrank to the lowest extent ever observed. The role of the atmospheric energy transport in this extreme melt event is explored using the state-of-the-art ERA-Interim reanalysis data. We find that in summer 2007 there was an anomalous atmospheric flow of warm and humid air into the region that suffered severe melt. This anomaly was larger than during any other year in the data (1989-2008). Convergence of the atmospheric energy transport over this area led to positive anomalies of the downward longwave radiation and turbulent fluxes. In the region that experienced unusual ice melt, the net anomaly of the surface fluxes provided enough extra energy to melt roughly one meter of ice during the melting season. When the ocean successively became ice-free, the surface-albedo decreased causing additional absorption of shortwave radiation, despite the fact that the downwelling solar radiation was smaller than average. We argue that the positive anomalies of net downward longwave radiation and turbulent fluxes played a key role in initiating the 2007 extreme ice melt, whereas the shortwave-radiation changes acted as an amplifying feedback mechanism in response to the melt. (orig.)

  18. Simulation experiment on the flooding behaviour of core melts: KATS-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.; Massier, H.; Schuetz, W.; Stegmaier, U.; Stern, G.

    2000-11-01

    For future Light Water Reactors special devices (core catchers) are being developed to prevent containment failure by basement erosion after reactor pressure vessel meltthrough during a core meltdown accident. Quick freezing of the molten core masses is desirable to reduce release of radioactivity. Several concepts of core catcher devices have been proposed based on the spreading of corium melt onto flat surfaces with subsequent water cooling. A KATS-experiment has been performed to investigate the flooding behaviour of high temperature melts using alumina-iron thermite melts as a simulant. The oxidic thermite melt is conditioned by adding other oxides to simulate a realistic corium melt as close as possible in terms of liquidus and solidus temperatures. Before flooding with water, spreading of the separate oxidic and metallic melts has been done in one-dimensional channels with a silicate concrete as the substrate. The flooding rate was, in relation to the melt surface, identical to the flooding rate in EPR. (orig.) [de

  19. Holographic measurement of distortion during laser melting: Additive distortion from overlapping pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Peter; Frostevarg, Jan; Powell, John; Eriksson, Ingemar; Kaplan, Alexander F. H.

    2018-03-01

    Laser - material interactions such as welding, heat treatment and thermal bending generate thermal gradients which give rise to thermal stresses and strains which often result in a permanent distortion of the heated object. This paper investigates the thermal distortion response which results from pulsed laser surface melting of a stainless steel sheet. Pulsed holography has been used to accurately monitor, in real time, the out-of-plane distortion of stainless steel samples melted on one face by with both single and multiple laser pulses. It has been shown that surface melting by additional laser pulses increases the out of plane distortion of the sample without significantly increasing the melt depth. The distortion differences between the primary pulse and subsequent pulses has also been analysed for fully and partially overlapping laser pulses.

  20. Study of ultrasonic melt treatment on the quality of horizontal continuously cast Al-1%Si alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Tao; Li, Ting-Ju; Li, Xi-Meng; Jin, Jun-Ze

    2006-02-01

    The fluctuation of the melt temperature in a tundish was measured during casting and experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of ultrasonic melt treatment on the surface quality and solidification structures of Al-1%Si ingots. The results show that the uniformity of melt temperature was enhanced with the application of ultrasonic melt treatment. When the ultrasonic power is 1,000W, the surface quality was evidently improved and grains of cast ingots were refined. Moreover, EPMA analysis was adopted to study the relationship between the ultrasonic power and boundary segregation of Si element. The result shows that boundary segregation is suppressed with the increase of ultrasonic power and the phenomenon was theoretically interpreted.

  1. Melting experiment on concrete waste using a hollow type plasma torch mounted on furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Y. P.; Kim, T. W.; Kim, H. S.; Shin, S. U.; Lee, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    A furnace coupled with a hollow type plasma torch was manufactured and installed in order to develop a volume reduction technology for non-combustible radioactive waste using plasma. A melting test with 10kg of concrete waste was carried out for the evaluation of melting characteristics in the non-transferred operation mode for 20 minutes with the melter. Feeded concrete was completely melted. However, the molten bath was not easily discharged because of its high viscosity. It was found that some molten slag spat from the molten bath was coated on the surface of torch which was mounted vertically inside furnace

  2. Atomistic simulation of the premelting of iron and aluminum : Implications for high-pressure melting-curve measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starikov, Sergey V.; Stegailov, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    Using atomistic simulations we show the importance of the surface premelting phenomenon for the melting-curve measurements at high pressures. The model under consideration mimics the experimental conditions deployed for melting studies with diamond-anvil cells. The iron is considered in this work

  3. Evolution of Shock Melt Compositions in Lunar Regoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, A. M.; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Noble, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Space weathering processes - driven primarily by solar wind ion and micrometeorite bombardment, are constantly changing the surface regoliths of airless bodies, such as the Moon. It is essential to study lunar soils in order to fully under-stand the processes of space weathering, and how they alter the optical reflectance spectral properties of the lunar surface relative to bedrock. Lunar agglutinates are aggregates of regolith grains fused together in a glassy matrix of shock melt produced during micrometeorite impacts into the lunar regolith. The formation of the shock melt component in agglutinates involves reduction of Fe in the target material to generate nm-scale spherules of metallic Fe (nanophase Fe0 or npFe0). The ratio of elemental Fe, in the form of npFe0, to FeO in a given bulk soil indicates its maturity, which increases with length of surface exposure as well as being typically higher in the finer-size fraction of soils. The melting and mixing process in agglutinate formation remain poorly understood. This includes incomplete knowledge regarding how the homogeneity and overall compositional trends of the agglutinate glass portions (agglutinitic glass) evolve with maturity. The aim of this study is to use sub-micrometer scale X-ray compositional mapping and image analysis to quantify the chemical homogeneity of agglutinitic glass, correlate its homogeneity to its parent soil maturity, and identify the principal chemical components contributing to the shock melt composition variations. An additional focus is to see if agglutinitic glass contains anomalously high Fe sub-micron scale compositional domains similar to those recently reported in glassy patina coatings on lunar rocks.

  4. Comparative Study on Two Melting Simulation Methods: Melting Curve of Gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhong-Li; Li Rui; Sun Jun-Sheng; Zhang Xiu-Lu; Cai Ling-Cang

    2016-01-01

    Melting simulation methods are of crucial importance to determining melting temperature of materials efficiently. A high-efficiency melting simulation method saves much simulation time and computational resources. To compare the efficiency of our newly developed shock melting (SM) method with that of the well-established two-phase (TP) method, we calculate the high-pressure melting curve of Au using the two methods based on the optimally selected interatomic potentials. Although we only use 640 atoms to determine the melting temperature of Au in the SM method, the resulting melting curve accords very well with the results from the TP method using much more atoms. Thus, this shows that a much smaller system size in SM method can still achieve a fully converged melting curve compared with the TP method, implying the robustness and efficiency of the SM method. (paper)

  5. Modelling of the controlled melt flow in a glass melting space – Its melting performance and heat losses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jebavá, Marcela; Dyrčíková, Petra; Němec, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 430, DEC 15 (2015), s. 52-63 ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt flow * mathematical modelling * energy distribution * space utilizatios * melting performance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.825, year: 2015

  6. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    -1300°C, and a trend of higher fusion temperatures with increasing contents of Al-silicates and quartz was found.c) Fly ashes, bottom ashes and deposits from coal/straw co-firing were all found to consist mainly of metal-alumina and alumina-silicates. These ashes all melt in the temperature range 1000......The thesis contains an experimental study of the fusion and sintering of ashes collected during straw and coal/straw co-firing.A laboratory technique for quantitative determination of ash fusion has been developed based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). By means of this method the fraction......, the biggest deviations being found for salt rich (i.e. straw derived) ashes.A simple model assuming proportionality between fly ash fusion and deposit formation was found to be capable of ranking deposition rates for the different straw derived fly ashes, whereas for the fly ashes from coal/straw co-firing...

  7. Two-dimensional model of laser alloying of binary alloy powder with interval of melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyzeva, A. G.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.

    2017-10-01

    The paper contains two-dimensional model of laser beam melting of powders from binary alloy. The model takes into consideration the melting of alloy in some temperature interval between solidus and liquidus temperatures. The external source corresponds to laser beam with energy density distributed by Gauss law. The source moves along the treated surface according to given trajectory. The model allows investigating the temperature distribution and thickness of powder layer depending on technological parameters.

  8. Arctic sea ice melt pond fractal dimension - explained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Predrag

    As Arctic sea ice starts to melt in the summer, pools of melt water quickly form on its surface, significantly changing its albedo, and impacting its subsequent evolution. These melt ponds often form complex geometric shapes. One characteristic of their shape, the fractal dimension of the pond boundaries, D, when plotted as a function of pond size, has been shown to transition between the two fundamental limits of D = 1 and D = 2 at some critical pond size. Here, we provide an explanation for this behavior. First, using aerial photographs, we show how this fractal transition curve changes with time, and show that there is a qualitative difference in the pond shape as ice transitions from impermeable to permeable. Namely, while ice is impermeable, maximum fractal dimension is less than 2, whereas after it becomes permeable, maximum fractal dimension becomes very close to 2. We then show how the fractal dimension of a collection of overlapping circles placed randomly on a plane also transitions from D = 1 to D = 2 at a size equal to the average size of a single circle. We, therefore, conclude that this transition is a simple geometric consequence of regular shapes connecting. The one physical parameter that can be extracted from the fractal transition curve is the length scale at which transition occurs. We provide a possible explanation for this length scale by noting that the flexural wavelength of the ice poses a fundamental limit on the size of melt ponds on permeable ice. If this is true, melt ponds could be used as a proxy for ice thickness.

  9. Reaction of soda-lime-silica glass melt with water vapour at melting temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vernerová, Miroslava; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Němec, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 416, MAY 15 (2015), s. 21-30 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt * sulfate * water vapour * bubble nucleation * melt foaming * glass melting Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.825, year: 2015

  10. High-pressure melting curve of KCl: Evidence against lattice-instability theories of melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.; Wolf, G.

    1986-01-01

    We show that the large curvature in the T-P melting curve of KCl is the result of a reordering of the liquid to a more densely packed arrangement. As a result theories of melting, such as the instability model, which do not take into account the structure of the liquid fail to predict the correct pressure dependence of the melting curve

  11. Experiments on transient melting of tungsten by ELMs in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, K.; Balden, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Laggner, F.; Matthews, G. F.; Nille, D.; Rohde, V.; Sieglin, B.; Giannone, L.; Göths, B.; Herrmann, A.; de Marne, P.; Pitts, R. A.; Potzel, S.; Vondracek, P.; ASDEX-Upgrade Team; EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2018-02-01

    Repetitive melting of tungsten by power transients originating from edge localized modes (ELMs) has been studied in ASDEX Upgrade. Tungsten samples were exposed to H-mode discharges at the outer divertor target plate using the divertor manipulator II (DIM-II) system (Herrmann et al 2015 Fusion Eng. Des. 98-9 1496-9). Designed as near replicas of the geometries used also in separate experiments on the JET tokamak (Coenen et al 2015 J. Nucl. Mater. 463 78-84 Coenen et al 2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 023010; Matthews et al 2016 Phys. Scr. T167 7), the samples featured a misaligned leading edge and a sloped ridge respectively. Both structures protrude above the default target plate surface thus receiving an increased fraction of the parallel power flux. Transient melting by ELMs was induced by moving the outer strike point to the sample location. The temporal evolution of the measured current flow from the samples to vessel potential confirmed transient melting. Current magnitude and dependency from surface temperature provided strong evidence for thermionic electron emission as main origin of the replacement current driving the melt motion. The different melt patterns observed after exposures at the two sample geometries support the thermionic electron emission model used in the MEMOS melt motion code, which assumes a strong decrease of the thermionic net current at shallow magnetic field to surface angles (Pitts et al 2017 Nucl. Mater. Energy 12 60-74). Post exposure ex situ analysis of the retrieved samples show recrystallization of tungsten at the exposed surface areas to a depth of up to several mm. The melt layer transport to less exposed surface areas leads to ratcheting pile up of re-solidified debris with zonal growth extending from the already enlarged grains at the surface.

  12. Permeability and 3-D melt geometry in shear-induced high melt fraction conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Cordonnier, B.; Qi, C.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of dunite channels in ophiolites and uranium-series disequilibria in mid-ocean ridge basalt suggest that melt transport in the upper mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is strongly channelized. Formation of high melt fraction conduits could result from mechanical shear, pyroxene dissolution, and lithological partitioning. Deformation experiments (e.g. Holtzman et al., 2003) demonstrate that shear stress causes initially homogeneously distributed melt to segregate into an array of melt-rich bands, flanked by melt-depleted regions. At the same average melt fraction, the permeability of high melt fraction conduits could be orders of magnitude higher than that of their homogenous counterparts. However, it is difficult to determine the permeability of melt-rich bands. Using X-ray synchrotron microtomography, we obtained high-resolution images of 3-dimensional (3-D) melt distribution in a partially molten rock containing shear-induced high melt fraction conduits. Sample CQ0705, an olivine-alkali basalt aggregate with a nominal melt fraction of 4%, was deformed in torsion at a temperature of 1473 K and a confining pressure of 300 MPa to a shear strain of 13.3. A sub-volume of CQ0705 encompassing 3-4 melt-rich bands was imaged. Microtomography data were reduced to binary form so that solid olivine is distinguishable from basalt glass. At a spatial resolution of 160 nm, the 3-D images reveal the shape and connectedness of melt pockets in the melt-rich bands. Thin melt channels formed at grain edges are connected at large melt nodes at grain corners. Initial data analysis shows a clear preferred orientation of melt pockets alignment subparallel to the melt-rich band. We use the experimentally determined geometrical parameters of melt topology to create a digital rock with identical 3-D microstructures. Stokes flow simulations are conducted on the digital rock to obtain the permeability tensor. Using this digital rock physics approach, we determine how deformation

  13. Phenomenological Studies on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during Postulated Severe Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Park, H.S.; Giri, A.; Karbojian, A.; Jasiulevicius, A.; Hansson, R.C.; Chikkanagoudar, U.; Shiferaw, D.; Stepanyan, A.

    2004-01-01

    pressure generation and associated melt fragmentation. Approximately 70% of a melt drop was fragmented until the second bubble collapses during the steam explosion process. The quenching experiments employing a hot sphere, which dropped into coolant were performed to investigate the thermal behavior, e.g., direct contact boiling heat transfer, film boiling heat transfer etc., of the melt droplet prior to the triggering of steam explosion and consequently to provide the database to develop a theoretical model for the quenching boiling heat transfer. The POMECO experiments revealed the significant additional cooling capability in the debris bed when the control rod guide tubes were used to inject cooling water, showing the enhancement of the dryout heat flux and quenching rates. The COMECO tests showed that the presence of downcomers enhanced the quenching of the molten pool, decreasing the solidification time. Between the top and bottom addition of water, the bottom cooling dominates the cooling process. In the case of cooling with no downcomer, a strong effect of the injected gas velocity on the quenching (solidification) process was obtained. The effect of the downcomer was not as significant as that indicated in the POMECO tests. The SIMECO experiments were restarted to investigate the melt pool convection in multi-layer configuration which has metallic melt layers on the top and bottom and oxidic melt layer in the middle of the melt pool. The experimental results were compared to those from the previous SIMECO experiments with the uniform and two/layer melt pool configuration. The FOREVER-EC6 test in which water was injected on the top of the melt pool during the vessel creep was analyzed to investigate the important heat transfer parameters using the RELAP code. The analysis showed that the melt top and surface heat flux decreases with time due to the crust formation and that it is not possible to quench the melt pool with water flooding from top

  14. Recent Changes in the Arctic Melt Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, Julienne; Markus, Thorsten; Meier, Walter N.; Miller, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Melt-season duration, melt-onset and freeze-up dates are derived from satellite passive microwave data and analyzed from 1979 to 2005 over Arctic sea ice. Results indicate a shift towards a longer melt season, particularly north of Alaska and Siberia, corresponding to large retreats of sea ice observed in these regions. Although there is large interannual and regional variability in the length of the melt season, the Arctic is experiencing an overall lengthening of the melt season at a rate of about 2 weeks decade(sup -1). In fact, all regions in the Arctic (except for the central Arctic) have statistically significant (at the 99% level or higher) longer melt seasons by greater than 1 week decade(sup -1). The central Arctic shows a statistically significant trend (at the 98% level) of 5.4 days decade(sup -1). In 2005 the Arctic experienced its longest melt season, corresponding with the least amount of sea ice since 1979 and the warmest temperatures since the 1880s. Overall, the length of the melt season is inversely correlated with the lack of sea ice seen in September north of Alaska and Siberia, with a mean correlation of -0.8.

  15. Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Kuznetsova, S.V.

    1996-01-01

    Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melt NaCl-KCl-K 2 CO 3 (5 mass %) in the temperature range of 973-1123 K has been studied. The products and niobium corrosion rate have been ascertained, depending on the temperature of melt and time of allowance. Potentials of niobium corrosion have been measured. Refs. 11, figs. 3, tabs. 2

  16. Attenuation in Melting Layer of Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    1988-01-01

    A model of the melting layer is employed on radar measurements to simulate the attenuation of radio waves at 12, 20 and 30GHz. The attenuation in the melting layer is simulated to be slightly larger than that of rain with the same path length and precipitation intensity. The result appears to depend

  17. Multiscale approach to equilibrating model polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Ali Karimi-Varzaneh, Hossein; Hojdis, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present an effective and simple multiscale method for equilibrating Kremer Grest model polymer melts of varying stiffness. In our approach, we progressively equilibrate the melt structure above the tube scale, inside the tube and finally at the monomeric scale. We make use of models designed...

  18. The corrosion of steels by hot sodium melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, R.

    1996-01-01

    Considerable research has been performed by AEA Technology on the corrosion of steels by hot sodium melts containing sodium hydroxide and sodium oxide. This research has principally been in support of understanding the effects of sodium-water reactions on the internals of fast reactor steam generators. The results however have relevance to sodium fires. It has been determined that the rate of corrosion of steels by melts of pure NaOH can be significantly increased by the addition of Na 2 O. In the case of a sodium-water reaction jet created by a leak of steam into sodium, the composition of the jet varies from 100% sodium through to 100% steam, with a full range of concentrations of NaOH and Na 2 O, depending on axial and radial position. The temperature in the jet also varies with position, ranging from bulk sodium temperature on one boundary to expanded steam temperature on the other boundary, with internal temperatures ranging up to 1300 deg. C, depending on the local pre-reaction mole ratio of steam to sodium. In the case of sodium-water reaction jets, it has been possible to develop a model which predicts the composition of the reaction jet and then, using the data generated on the corrosivity of sodium melts, predict the rate of corrosion of a steel target in the path of the jet. In the case of a spray sodium fire, the sodium will initially contain a concentration of NaOH and the combustion process will generate Na 2 O. If there is sufficient humidity, conversion of some of the Na 2 O to NaOH will also occur. There is therefore the potential for aggressive mixtures of NaOH and Na 2 O to exist on the surface of the sodium droplets. It is therefore possible that the rate of corrosion of steels in the path of the spray may be higher than expected on the basis of assuming that only Na and Na 2 O were present. In the case of a pool sodium fire, potentially corrosive mixtures of NaOH and Na 2 O may be formed at some locations on the surface. This could lead to

  19. Melting Can Hinder Impact-Induced Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani-Gangaraj, Mostafa; Veysset, David; Nelson, Keith A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2017-10-01

    Melting has long been used to join metallic materials, from welding to selective laser melting in additive manufacturing. In the same school of thought, localized melting has been generally perceived as an advantage, if not the main mechanism, for the adhesion of metallic microparticles to substrates during a supersonic impact. Here, we conduct the first in situ supersonic impact observations of individual metallic microparticles aimed at the explicit study of melting effects. Counterintuitively, we find that under at least some conditions melting is disadvantageous and hinders impact-induced adhesion. In the parameter space explored, i.e., ˜10 μ m particle size and ˜1 km /s particle velocity, we argue that the solidification time is much longer than the residence time of the particle on the substrate, so that resolidification cannot be a significant factor in adhesion.

  20. Volatile diffusion in silicate melts and its effects on melt inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Scarlato

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A compendium of diffusion measurements and their Arrhenius equations for water, carbon dioxide, sulfur, fluorine, and chlorine in silicate melts similar in composition to natural igneous rocks is presented. Water diffusion in silicic melts is well studied and understood, however little data exists for melts of intermediate to basic compositions. The data demonstrate that both the water concentration and the anhydrous melt composition affect the diffusion coefficient of water. Carbon dioxide diffusion appears only weakly dependent, at most, on the volatilefree melt composition and no effect of carbon dioxide concentration has been observed, although few experiments have been performed. Based upon one study, the addition of water to rhyolitic melts increases carbon dioxide diffusion by orders of magnitude to values similar to that of 6 wt% water. Sulfur diffusion in intermediate to silicic melts depends upon the anhydrous melt composition and the water concentration. In water-bearing silicic melts sulfur diffuses 2 to 3 orders of magnitude slower than water. Chlorine diffusion is affected by both water concentration and anhydrous melt composition; its values are typically between those of water and sulfur. Information on fluorine diffusion is rare, but the volatile-free melt composition exerts a strong control on its diffusion. At the present time the diffusion of water, carbon dioxide, sulfur and chlorine can be estimated in silicic melts at magmatic temperatures. The diffusion of water and carbon dioxide in basic to intermediate melts is only known at a limited set of temperatures and compositions. The diffusion data for rhyolitic melts at 800°C together with a standard model for the enrichment of incompatible elements in front of growing crystals demonstrate that rapid crystal growth, greater than 10-10 ms-1, can significantly increase the volatile concentrations at the crystal-melt interface and that any of that melt trapped

  1. Experimental results for TiO2 melting and release using cold crucible melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S. W.; Min, B. T.; Park, I. G.; Kim, H. D.

    2000-01-01

    To simulate the severe accident phenomena using the real reactor material which melting point is about 2,800K, the melting and release method for materials with high melting point should be developed. This paper discusses the test results for TiO 2 materials using the cold crucible melting method to study the melting and release method of actual corium. To melt and release of few kg of TiO2, the experimental facility is manufactured through proper selection of design parameters such as frequency and capacity of R.F generator, crucible size and capacity of coolant. The melting and release of TiO 2 has been successfully performed in the cold crucible of 15cm in inner diameter and 30cm in height with 30kW RF power generator of 370 KHz. In the melt delivery experiment, about 2.6kg of molten TiO2, 60% of initial charged mass, is released. Rest of it is remained in the watercage in form of the rubble crust formed at the top of crucible and melt crust formed at the interface between the water-cage and melt. Especially, in the melt release test, the location of the working coil is important to make the thin crust at the bottom of the crucible

  2. Surface freezing of water

    OpenAIRE

    P?rez-D?az, J. L.; ?lvarez-Valenzuela, M. A.; Rodr?guez-Celis, F.

    2016-01-01

    Freezing, melting, evaporation and condensation of water are essential ingredients for climate and eventually life on Earth. In the present work, we show how surface freezing of supercooled water in an open container is conditioned and triggered?exclusively?by humidity in air. Additionally, a change of phase is demonstrated to be triggered on the water surface forming surface ice crystals prior to freezing of bulk. The symmetry of the surface crystal, as well as the freezing point, depend on ...

  3. Laser post-processing of Inconel 625 made by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkin, David; Helvajian, Henry; Steffeney, Lee; Hansen, William

    2016-04-01

    The effect of laser remelting of surfaces of as-built Selective Laser Melted (SLM) Inconel 625 was evaluated for its potential to improve the surface roughness of SLM parts. Many alloys made by SLM have properties similar to their wrought counterparts, but surface roughness of SLM-made parts is much higher than found in standard machine shop operations. This has implications for mechanical properties of SLM materials, such as a large debit in fatigue properties, and in applications of SLM, where surface roughness can alter fluid flow characteristics. Because complexity and netshape fabrication are fundamental advantages of Additive Manufacturing (AM), post-processing by mechanical means to reduce surface roughness detracts from the potential utility of AM. Use of a laser to improve surface roughness by targeted remelting or annealing offers the possibility of in-situ surface polishing of AM surfaces- the same laser used to melt the powder could be amplitude modulated to smooth the part during the build. The effects of remelting the surfaces of SLM Inconel 625 were demonstrated using a CW fiber laser (IPG: 1064 nm, 2-50 W) that is amplitude modulated with a pulse profile to induce remelting without spallation or ablation. The process achieved uniform depth of melting and improved surface roughness. The results show that with an appropriate pulse profile that meters the heat-load, surface features such as partially sintered powder particles and surface connected porosity can be mitigated via a secondary remelting/annealing event.

  4. Optical Benson: Following the Impact of Melt Season Progression Using Landsat and Sentinel 2 - Snow Zone Formation Imaged

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahnestock, M. A.; Shuman, C. A.; Alley, K. E.

    2017-12-01

    Snow pit observations on a glaciologically-focussed surface traverse in Greenland allowed Benson [1962, SIPRE (now CRREL) Research Report 70] to define a series of snow zones based on the extent of post-depositional diagenesis of the snowpack. At high elevations, Benson found fine-grained "dry snow" where melt (at that time) was absent year-round, followed down-elevation by a "percolation zone" where surface melt penetrated the snowpack, then a "wet snow zone" where firn became saturated during the peak of the melt season, and finally "superimposed ice" and "bare ice" zones where refrozen surface melt and glacier ice were exposed in the melt season. These snow zones can be discriminated in winter synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery of the ice sheet (e.g. Fahnestock et al. 2001), but summer melt reduces radar backscatter and makes it difficult to follow the progression of diagenesis beyond the initial indications of surface melting. While some of the impacts of surface melt (especially bands of blue water-saturated firn) are observed from time to time in optical satellite imagery, it has only become possible to map effects of melt over the course of a summer season with the advent of large-data analysis tools such as Google Earth Engine and the inclusion of Landsat and Sentinel-2 data streams in these tools. A map of the maximum extent of this blue saturated zone through the 2016 melt season is shown in the figure. This image is a true color (RGB) composite, but each pixel in the image shows the color of the surface when the "blueness" of the pixel was at a maximum. This means each pixel can be from a different satellite image acquisition than adjacent pixels - but it also means that the maximum extent of the saturated firn (Benson's wet snow zone) is visible. Also visible are percolation, superimposed and bare ice zones. This analysis, using Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager data, was performed using Google Earth Engine to access and analyze the entire melt

  5. Evaluation of Melt Behavior with initial Melt Velocity under SFR Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyo; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In the current Korean sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) program, early dispersion of the molten metallic fuel within a subchannel is suggested as one of the inherent safety strategies for the initiating phase of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. Thus, it could be worthwhile to study the horizontal melt injections at lower temperature as a preliminary study in order to identify the melt dispersion phenomena. For this reason, it is required to clarify whether the coolant vapor pressure is the driving force of the melt dispersion with the core region. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition. As the results, the following results are remarked: 1. The upward melt dispersion did not occur for a given melt and coolant temperature in the nonboiling range. Over current range of conditions

  6. Evaluation of Melt Behavior with initial Melt Velocity under SFR Severe Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Hyo; Bang, In Cheol; Jerng, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    In the current Korean sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) program, early dispersion of the molten metallic fuel within a subchannel is suggested as one of the inherent safety strategies for the initiating phase of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. Thus, it could be worthwhile to study the horizontal melt injections at lower temperature as a preliminary study in order to identify the melt dispersion phenomena. For this reason, it is required to clarify whether the coolant vapor pressure is the driving force of the melt dispersion with the core region. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition. As the results, the following results are remarked: 1. The upward melt dispersion did not occur for a given melt and coolant temperature in the nonboiling range. Over current range of conditions

  7. An innovative energy-saving in-flight melting technology and its application to glass production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaochun Yao et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method used for glass melting is air-fuel firing, which is inefficient, energy-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, an innovative in-flight melting technology was developed and applied to glass production for the purposes of energy conservation and environmental protection. Three types of heating sources, radio-frequency (RF plasma, a 12-phase alternating current (ac arc and an oxygen burner, were used to investigate the in-flight melting behavior of granulated powders. Results show that the melted particles are spherical with a smooth surface and compact structure. The diameter of the melted particles is about 50% of that of the original powders. The decomposition and vitrification degrees of the prepared powders decrease in the order of powders prepared by RF plasma, the 12-phase ac arc and the oxygen burner. The largest heat transfer is from RF plasma to particles, which results in the highest particle temperature (1810 °C and the greatest vitrification degree of the raw material. The high decomposition and vitrification degrees, which are achieved in milliseconds, shorten the melting and fining times of the glass considerably. Our results indicate that the proposed in-flight melting technology is a promising method for use in the glass industry.

  8. A 400-year ice core melt layer record of summertime warming in the Alaska Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winski, D.; Osterberg, E. C.; Kreutz, K. J.; Wake, C. P.; Ferris, D. G.; Campbell, S. W.; Baum, M.; Raudzens Bailey, A.; Birkel, S. D.; Introne, D.; Handley, M.

    2017-12-01

    Warming in high-elevation regions has socially relevant impacts on glacier mass balance, water resources, and sensitive alpine ecosystems, yet very few high-elevation temperature records exist from the middle or high latitudes. While many terrestrial paleoclimate records provide critical temperature records from low elevations over recent centuries, melt layers preserved in alpine glaciers present an opportunity to develop calibrated, annually-resolved temperature records from high elevations. We present a 400-year temperature record based on the melt-layer stratigraphy in two ice cores collected from Mt. Hunter in the Central Alaska Range. The ice core record shows a 60-fold increase in melt frequency and water equivalent melt thickness between the pre-industrial period (before 1850) and present day. We calibrate the melt record to summer temperatures based on local and regional weather station analyses, and find that the increase in melt production represents a summer warming of at least 2° C, exceeding rates of temperature increase at most low elevation sites in Alaska. The Mt. Hunter melt layer record is significantly (p<0.05) correlated with surface temperatures in the central tropical Pacific through a Rossby-wave like pattern that induces high temperatures over Alaska. Our results show that rapid alpine warming has taken place in the Alaska Range for at least a century, and that conditions in the tropical oceans contribute to this warming.

  9. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana; Vasilakopoulos, Thodoris C.; Jeong, Youncheol; Lee, Hyojoon; Rogers, Simon A.; Sakellariou, Georgios; Allgaier, Jü rgen B.; Takano, Atsushi; Brá s, Ana Rita E; Chang, Taihyun; Gooß en, Sebastian; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Wischnewski, Andreas; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos; Richter, Dieter R.; Rubinstein, Michael H.; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  11. Dynamics of Melting and Melt Migration as Inferred from Incompatible Trace Element Abundance in Abyssal Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Q.; Liang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    To better understand the melting processes beneath the mid-ocean ridge, we developed a simple model for trace element fractionation during concurrent melting and melt migration in an upwelling steady-state mantle column. Based on petrologic considerations, we divided the upwelling mantle into two regions: a double- lithology upper region where high permeability dunite channels are embedded in a lherzolite/harzburgite matrix, and a single-lithology lower region that consists of partially molten lherzolite. Melt generated in the single lithology region migrates upward through grain-scale diffuse porous flow, whereas melt in the lherzolite/harzburgite matrix in the double-lithology region is allowed to flow both vertically through the overlying matrix and horizontally into its neighboring dunite channels. There are three key dynamic parameters in our model: degree of melting experienced by the single lithology column (Fd), degree of melting experienced by the double lithology column (F), and a dimensionless melt suction rate (R) that measures the accumulated rate of melt extraction from the matrix to the channel relative to the accumulated rate of matrix melting. In terms of trace element fractionation, upwelling and melting in the single lithology column is equivalent to non-modal batch melting (R = 0), whereas melting and melt migration in the double lithology region is equivalent to a nonlinear combination of non-modal batch and fractional melting (0 abyssal peridotite, we showed, with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, that it is difficult to invert for all three dynamic parameters from a set of incompatible trace element data with confidence. However, given Fd, it is quite possible to constrain F and R from incompatible trace element abundances in residual peridotite. As an illustrative example, we used the simple melting model developed in this study and selected REE and Y abundance in diopside from abyssal peridotites to infer their melting and melt migration

  12. Argon Diffusion Measured in Rhyolite Melt at 100 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, N.; Edwards, P. M.; Watkins, J. M.; Lesher, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    Argon diffusivity (D_{Ar} ) controls the rate and length scale of argon exchange between melt and gas phases and is used as a parameter to model noble gas fractionation during magma degassing. D_{Ar} may also be useful in geochronology to estimate the distribution of excess (non-radiogenic) atmospheric argon in lavas. Our measurements of D_{Ar} in molten anhydrous rhyolite near 1000 °C and 100 MPa add to the existing dataset. Using a rapid-quench cold seal pressure apparatus we exposed cylindrical charges drilled from a Miocene rhyolite flow near Buck Mtn., CA to a pure argon atmosphere resulting in a gradually lengthening argon concentration gradient between the saturated surface and the argon poor interior. Argon concentration was measured by electron microprobe along radial transects from the center to the surface of bisected samples. D_{Ar} was calculated for each transect by fitting relative argon concentration (as a function of distance from the surface) to Green's function (given each experiment's specific temperature, pressure and runtime). Variability (σ = 1.202{μm }^{2} /s) was smaller than in previous studies, but still greater than what is likely due to analytical or experimental uncertainty. We observed a symmetric geometric bias in the distribution of argon in our samples, possibly related to advective redistribution of argon accompanying the deformation of cylindrical charges into spheroids driven by surface tension. Average diffusivity, D_{Ar} = 4.791{μm }^{2} /s, is close to the predicted value, D_{Ar} = {μm }^{2} /s ( σ_{ \\bar{x} } = 1.576 {μm }^{2} /s), suggesting that Behrens and Zhang's (2001) empirical model is valid for anhydrous rhyolite melts to relatively higher temperatures and lower pressures. Behrens, H. and Y. Zhang (2001). "Ar diffusion in hydrous silicic melts: implications for volatile diffusion mechanisms and fractionation." Earth and Planetary Science Letters 192: 363-376.

  13. Laser melting of groove defect repair on high thermal conductivity steel (HTCS-150)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhafzan, B.; Aqida, S. N.; Fazliana, F.; Reza, M. S.; Ismail, I.; Khairil, C. M.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents laser melting repair of groove defect on HTCS-150 surface using Nd:YAG laser system. Laser melting process was conducted using JK300HPS Nd:YAG twin lamp laser source with 1064 nm wavelength and pulsed mode. The parameters are pulse repetition frequency (PRF) that is set from 70 to 100 Hz, average power ( P A) of 50-70 W, and laser spot size of 0.7 mm. HTCS-150 samples were prepared with groove dimension of 0.3 mm width and depths of 0.5 mm using EDM wire cut. Groove defect repaired using laser melting process on groove surface area with various parameters' process. The melted surface within the groove was characterized for subsurface hardness profile, roughness, phase identification, chemical composition, and metallographic study. The roughness analysis indicates high PRF at large spot size caused high surface roughness and low surface hardness. Grain refinement of repaired layer was analyzed within the groove as a result of rapid heating and cooling. The hardness properties of modified HTCS inside the groove and the bulk surface increased two times from as received HTCS due to grain refinement which is in agreement with Hall-Petch equation. These findings are significant to parameter design of die repair for optimum surface integrity and potential for repairing crack depth and width of less than 0.5 and 0.3 mm, respectively.

  14. Investigation of transient melting of tungsten by ELMs in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, K; Sieglin, B; Balden, M; De Marne, P; Nille, D; Rohde, V; Faitsch, M; Giannone, L; Herrmann, A; Coenen, J W; Göths, B; Laggner, F; Matthews, G F; Dejarnac, R; Horacek, J; Komm, M; Pitts, R A; Ratynskaia, S; Thoren, E; Tolias, P

    2017-01-01

    Repetitive melting of tungsten by power transients originating from edge localized modes (ELMs) has been studied in the tokamak experiment ASDEX Upgrade. Tungsten samples were exposed to H-mode discharges at the outer divertor target plate using the Divertor Manipulator II system. The exposed sample was designed with an elevated sloped surface inclined against the incident magnetic field to increase the projected parallel power flux to a level were transient melting by ELMs would occur. Sample exposure was controlled by moving the outer strike point to the sample location. As extension to previous melt studies in the new experiment both the current flow from the sample to vessel potential and the local surface temperature were measured with sufficient time resolution to resolve individual ELMs. The experiment provided for the first time a direct link of current flow and surface temperature during transient ELM events. This allows to further constrain the MEMOS melt motion code predictions and to improve the validation of its underlying model assumptions. Post exposure ex situ analysis of the retrieved samples confirms the decreased melt motion observed at shallower magnetic field line to surface angles compared to that at leading edges exposed to the parallel power flux. (paper)

  15. Modeling and simulation of melt-layer erosion during a plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Belan, V.; Konkashbaev, I.; Nikandrov, L.; Safronov, V.; Zhitlukhin, A.; Litunovsky, V.

    1997-01-01

    Metallic plasma-facing components (PFCs) e.g. beryllium and tungsten, will be subjected to severe melting during plasma instabilities such as disruptions, edge-localized modes and high power excursions. Because of the greater thickness of the resulting melt layers relative to that of the surface vaporization, the potential loss of the developing melt-layer can significantly shorten PFC lifetime, severely contaminate the plasma and potentially prevent successful operation of the tokamak reactor. Mechanisms responsible for melt-layer loss during plasma instabilities are being modeled and evaluated. Of particular importance are hydrodynamic instabilities developed in the liquid layer due to various forces such as those from magnetic fields, plasma impact momentum, vapor recoil and surface tension. Another mechanism found to contribute to melt-layer splashing loss is volume bubble boiling, which can result from overheating of the liquid layer. To benchmark these models, several new experiments were designed and performed in different laboratory devices for this work; the SPLASH codes) are generally in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of in-reactor disruption conditions, which do not exist in simulation experiments, on melt-layer erosion is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Isotope effect and deuterium excess parameter revolution in ice and snow melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Guan; Ni Shijun; Fan Xiao; Wu Hao

    2003-01-01

    The change of water isotope composition actually is a integrated reaction depending on the change of environment. The ice and snow melt of different seasons in high mountain can obviously influence the change of isotope composition and deuterium excess parameter of surface flow and shallow groundwater. To know the isotopic fractionation caused by this special natural background, explore its forming and evolvement, is unusually important for estimating, the relationship between the environment, climate and water resources in an area. Taking the example of isotope composition of surface flow and shallow groundwater in Daocheng, Sichuan, this paper mainly introduced the changing law of isotope composition and deuterium excess parameter of surface flow and hot-spring on conditions of ice and snow melt with different seasons in high mountain; emphatically discussed the isotope effect and deuterium excess parameter revolution in the process of ice and snow melting and its reason. (authors)

  17. Corium melt researches at VESTA test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan Yeol Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available VESTA (Verification of Ex-vessel corium STAbilization and VESTA-S (-small test facilities were constructed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute in 2010 to perform various corium melt experiments. Since then, several tests have been performed for the verification of an ex-vessel core catcher design for the EU-APR1400. Ablation tests of an impinging ZrO2 melt jet on a sacrificial material were performed to investigate the ablation characteristics. ZrO2 melt in an amount of 65–70 kg was discharged onto a sacrificial material through a well-designed nozzle, after which the ablation depths were measured. Interaction tests between the metallic melt and sacrificial material were performed to investigate the interaction kinetics of the sacrificial material. Two types of melt were used: one is a metallic corium melt with Fe 46%, U 31%, Zr 16%, and Cr 7% (maximum possible content of U and Zr for C-40, and the other is a stainless steel (SUS304 melt. Metallic melt in an amount of 1.5–2.0 kg was delivered onto the sacrificial material, and the ablation depths were measured. Penetration tube failure tests were performed for an APR1400 equipped with 61 in-core instrumentation penetration nozzles and extended tubes at the reactor lower vessel. ZrO2 melt was generated in a melting crucible and delivered down into an interaction crucible where the test specimen is installed. To evaluate the tube ejection mechanism, temperature distributions of the reactor bottom head and in-core instrumentation penetration were measured by a series of thermocouples embedded along the specimen. In addition, lower vessel failure tests for the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are being performed. As a first step, the configuration of the molten core in the plant was investigated by a melting and solidification experiment. Approximately 5 kg of a mixture, whose composition in terms of weight is UO2 60%, Zr 10%, ZrO2 15%, SUS304 14%, and B4C 1%, was melted in a

  18. Melting technique for vanadium containing steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishanov, M P; Gutovskij, I B; Vakhrushev, A S

    1980-04-28

    To descrease cost price of high-quality vanadium steels a method of their melting in open-hearth furnaces with acid lining using slag-metal fraction of vanadium, which is loaded in the content of 2.1-4.7% of melting mass, is suggested. Introduction of slag-metal fraction of vanadium ensures the formation of slag with composition that guarantees the necessary content of vanadium in steel and does not require introduction of expensive vanadium-containing ferroalloys into the melt.

  19. Melt processed high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The achievement of large critical currents is critical to the applications of high-temperature superconductors. Recent developments have shown that melt processing is suitable for producing high J c oxide superconductors. Using magnetic forces between such high J c oxide superconductors and magnets, a person could be levitated.This book has grown largely out of research works on melt processing of high-temperature superconductors conducted at ISTEC Superconductivity Research Laboratory. The chapters build on melt processing, microstructural characterization, fundamentals of flux pinning, criti

  20. Technological properties and structure of titanate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    Power substantiation of existence of tough stream of complex anion ([TiO 6 ] 8- ) as a prevalent unit in titanate melts is given on the base of up-to-date knowledge about structure of metallurgical slags and results of investigations of thermophysical properties of these melts. It is shown that high crystallization ability of titanate melts at technological temperatures is determined by heterogeneity of liquid state - by presence up to 30 % of dispersed particles of solid phase solutions in matrix liquid [ru

  1. Bayesian estimation of core-melt probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    A very simple application of the canonical Bayesian algorithm is made to the problem of estimation of the probability of core melt in a commercial power reactor. An approximation to the results of the Rasmussen study on reactor safety is used as the prior distribution, and the observation that there has been no core melt yet is used as the single experiment. The result is a substantial decrease in the mean probability of core melt--factors of 2 to 4 for reasonable choices of parameters. The purpose is to illustrate the procedure, not to argue for the decrease

  2. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    and their diameter. The variation in melting temperature has little influence on the overall bubble volume. However, the size distribution of the bubbles varies with the melting temperature. When the melt is slowly cooled, the bubble volume increases, implying decreased solubility of the gaseous species. Mass...... spectroscopy analysis of gases liberated during heating of the glass reveals that small bubbles contain predominantly CH4, CO and CO2, whereas large bubbles bear N2, SO2 and H2S. The methodology utilised in this work can, besides mapping the bubbles in a glass, be applied to shed light on the sources of bubble...

  3. Nutrient availability limits biological production in Arctic sea ice melt ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Heidi Louise; Thamdrup, Bo; Jeppesen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    nutrient limitation in melt ponds. We also document that the addition of nutrients, although at relative high concentrations, can stimulate biological productivity at several trophic levels. Given the projected increase in first-year ice, increased melt pond coverage during the Arctic spring and potential......Every spring and summer melt ponds form at the surface of polar sea ice and become habitats where biological production may take place. Previous studies report a large variability in the productivity, but the causes are unknown. We investigated if nutrients limit the productivity in these first...... additional nutrient supply from, e.g. terrestrial sources imply that biological activity of melt ponds may become increasingly important for the sympagic carbon cycling in the future Arctic....

  4. Corrosion of K-3 glass-contact refractory in sodium-rich aluminosilicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, X.D.; Gan, H.; Buechele, A.C.; Pegg, I.L.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion of the glass-contact refractory Monofrax K-3 in two sodium-rich aluminosilicate melts has been studied at 1,208 and 1,283 C using a modified ASTM procedure with constant agitation of the melt by air bubbling. The results for the monolithic refractory indicate a fast initial stage involving phase dissolution and transformation and a later passivated stage in which the surface of the refractory has been substantially modified. The composition of the stable spinel phase in the altered layer on monolithic coupons of K-3 is almost identical to the equilibrium composition bracketed by the dissolution of powdered K-3 into under-saturated melts on the other. The temperature and melt shear viscosity were found to have significant effects on the rates of K-3 dissolution and transformation

  5. Movement of liquid beryllium during melt events in JET with ITER-like wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergienko, G; Huber, A; Brezinsek, S; Coenen, J W; Mertens, Ph; Philipps, V; Samm, U; Arnoux, G; Matthews, G F; Nunes, I; Riccardo, V; Sirinelli, A; Devaux, S

    2014-01-01

    The ITER-like wall recently installed in JET comprises solid beryllium limiters and a combination of bulk tungsten and tungsten-coated carbon fibre composite divertor tiles without active cooling. During a beryllium power handling qualification experiment performed in limiter configuration with 5 MW neutral beam injection input power, accidental beryllium melt events, melt layer motion and splashing were observed locally on a few beryllium limiters in the plasma contact areas. The Lorentz force is responsible for the observed melt layer movement. To move liquid beryllium against the gravity force, the current flowing from the plasma perpendicularly to the limiter surface must be higher than 6 kA m −2 . The thermo-emission current at the melting point of beryllium is much lower. The upward motion of the liquid beryllium against gravity can be due to a combination of the Lorentz force from the secondary electron emission and plasma pressure force. (paper)

  6. Infrared laser-induced chaos and conformational disorder in a model polymer crystal: Melting vs ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumpter, B.G.; Noid, D.W.; Voth, G.A.; Wunderlich, B.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular dynamics-based computer simulations are presented for the interaction of one and two infrared (IR) laser beams with a model polymer surface. When a single laser beam system is studied over a wide range of intensities, only melting of the polymer, or melting followed by bond dissociation, is observed for up to 100 picoseconds. In contrast, the two-laser simulation results exhibit a marked difference in the energy absorption behavior of the irradiated polymer which, in turn, results in multiple bond dissociations. The results for the one- and two-laser cases studied can be divided into four different classes of physical behavior: (a) the polymer remains in the solid state; (b) the polymer crystal melts; (c) the polymer ablates, but with significant melting (charring); or (d) the polymer ablates with minimal melting. Damage to the model polymer crystal from absorption of energy from either one or two lasers occurs through a mechanism that involves the competition between the absorption of energy and internal energy redistribution. The rate of energy loss from the absorption site(s) relative to the rate of absorption of energy from the radiation field determines rather the polymer melts or ablates (low absorption rates lead to melting or no change and high rates lead to ablation). A sufficiently large rate of energy absorption is only obtainable through the use of two lasers. Two lasers also significantly decrease the total laser intensity required to cause polymer crystal melting. The differences between the one- and two-laser cases are studied by adapting novel signal/subspace techniques to analyze the dynamical changes in the mode spectrum of the polymer as it melts

  7. Thermal behavior and densification mechanism during selective laser melting of copper matrix composites: Simulation and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Donghua; Gu, Dongdong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal behavior and densification activity during SLM of composites are simulated. • Temperature distributions and melt pool dimensions during SLM are disclosed. • Motion behaviors of gaseous bubbles in laser induced melt pool are elucidated. • Simulation results show good agreement with the obtained experimental results. - Abstract: Simulation of temperature distribution and densification process of selective laser melting (SLM) WC/Cu composite powder system has been performed, using a finite volume method (FVM). The transition from powder to solid, the surface tension induced by temperature gradient, and the movement of laser beam power with a Gaussian energy distribution are taken into account in the physical model. The effect of the applied linear energy density (LED) on the temperature distribution, melt pool dimensions, behaviors of gaseous bubbles and resultant densification activity has been investigated. It shows that the temperature distribution is asymmetric with respect to the laser beam scanning area. The center of the melt pool does not locate at the center of the laser beam but slightly shifts towards the side of the decreasing X-axis. The dimensions of the melt pool are in sizes of hundreds of micrometers and increase with the applied LED. For an optimized LED of 17.5 kJ/m, an enhanced efficiency of gas removal from the melt pool is realized, and the maximum relative density of laser processed powder reaches 96%. As the applied LED surpasses 20 kJ/m, Marangoni flow tends to retain the entrapped gas bubbles. The flow pattern has a tendency to deposit the gas bubbles at the melt pool bottom or to agglomerate gas bubbles by the rotating flow in the melt pool, resulting in a higher porosity in laser processed powder. The relative density and corresponding pore size and morphology are experimentally acquired, which are in a good agreement with the results predicted by simulation

  8. The impact of dissolved fluorine on bubble nucleation in hydrous rhyolite melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James E.; Hajimirza, Sahand; Webster, James D.; Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2018-04-01

    Surface tension of hydrous rhyolitic melt is high enough that large degrees of supersaturation are needed to homogeneously nucleate H2O bubbles during eruptive magma ascent. This study examines whether dissolved fluorine lowers surface tension of hydrous rhyolite, and thus lowers the supersaturation required for bubble nucleation. Fluorine was targeted because it, like H2O, changes melt properties and is highly soluble, unlike all other common magmatic volatiles. Rhyolite melts were saturated at Ps = 245 MPa with H2O fluid that contained F, generating rhyolite with 6.7 ± 0.4 wt.% H2O and 1.1-1.3 wt.% F. When these melts were decompressed rapidly to Pf = 149-202 MPa and quenched after 60 s, bubbles nucleated at supersaturations of ΔP = Ps - Pf ≥52 MPa, and reached bubble number densities of NB = 1012-13 m-3 at ΔP = 78-101 MPa. In comparison, rhyolite saturated with 6.34 ± 0.09 wt.% H2O, but only 0.25 wt.% F, did not nucleate bubbles until ΔP ≥ 100-116 MPa, and even then, at significantly lower NB (<1010 m-3). Numerical modeling of bubble nucleation and growth was used to estimate the values of surface tension required to generate the observed values of NB. Slight differences in melt compositions (i.e., alkalinity and H2O content), H2O diffusivity, or melt viscosity cannot explain the observed differences in NB. Instead, surface tension of F-rich rhyolite must be lower by approximately 4% than that of F-poor rhyolite. This difference in surface tension is significant and, for example, exceeds that found between hydrous basaltic andesite and hydrous rhyolite. These results suggest that is likely that surface tension for F-rich magmas, such as topaz rhyolite, is significantly lower than for F-poor magmas.

  9. Forced convective melting at an evolving ice-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramudu, Eshwan; Hirsh, Benjamin; Olson, Peter; Gnanadesikan, Anand

    2015-11-01

    The intrusion of warm Circumpolar Deep Water into the ocean cavity between the base of ice shelves and the sea bed in Antarctica causes melting at the ice shelves' basal surface, producing a turbulent melt plume. We conduct a series of laboratory experiments to investigate how the presence of forced convection (turbulent mixing) changes the delivery of heat to the ice-water interface. We also develop a theoretical model for the heat balance of the system that can be used to predict the change in ice thickness with time. In cases of turbulent mixing, the heat balance includes a term for turbulent heat transfer that depends on the friction velocity and an empirical coefficient. We obtain a new value for this coefficient by comparing the modeled ice thickness against measurements from a set of nine experiments covering one order of magnitude of Reynolds numbers. Our results are consistent with the altimetry-inferred melting rate under Antarctic ice shelves and can be used in climate models to predict their disintegration. This work was supported by NSF grant EAR-110371.

  10. Optical properties of melting first-year Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Bonnie; Perovich, Donald K.; Webster, Melinda A.; Polashenski, Christopher; Dadic, Ruzica

    2015-11-01

    The albedo and transmittance of melting, first-year Arctic sea ice were measured during two cruises of the Impacts of Climate on the Eco-Systems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment (ICESCAPE) project during the summers of 2010 and 2011. Spectral measurements were made for both bare and ponded ice types at a total of 19 ice stations in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. These data, along with irradiance profiles taken within boreholes, laboratory measurements of the optical properties of core samples, ice physical property observations, and radiative transfer model simulations are employed to describe representative optical properties for melting first-year Arctic sea ice. Ponded ice was found to transmit roughly 4.4 times more total energy into the ocean, relative to nearby bare ice. The ubiquitous surface-scattering layer and drained layer present on bare, melting sea ice are responsible for its relatively high albedo and relatively low transmittance. Light transmittance through ponded ice depends on the physical thickness of the ice and the magnitude of the scattering coefficient in the ice interior. Bare ice reflects nearly three-quarters of the incident sunlight, enhancing its resiliency to absorption by solar insolation. In contrast, ponded ice absorbs or transmits to the ocean more than three-quarters of the incident sunlight. Characterization of the heat balance of a summertime ice cover is largely dictated by its pond coverage, and light transmittance through ponded ice shows strong contrast between first-year and multiyear Arctic ice covers.

  11. UHMW Ziegler–Natta polyethylene: Synthesis, crystallization, and melt behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Atiqullah, Muhammad

    2017-04-26

    The fabrication of normal and UHMW PE end-products involves melting and crystallization of the polymer. Therefore, the melt behavior and crystallization of as-synthesized UHMW PE, and NMW PE and E-1-hexene copolymer have been studied using a new nonisothermal crystallization model, Flory\\'s equilibrium theory and ethylene sequence length distribution concept (SLD), Gibbs–Thompson equation, and DSC experiments. By using this approach, the effects of MW, 1-hexene incorporation, ethylene SLD, the level of undercooling θ, and crystal surface free energy D on crystallite stability, relative crystallinity α, instantaneous crystallinity χ, the crystallization kinetic triplet, crystallization entropy, and lamellar thickness distribution (LTD) have been evaluated. Consequently, this study reports insightful new results, interpretations, and explanations regarding the melting and crystallization of the aforementioned polymers. The UHMW PE results significantly differ from the NMW PE and E-1-hexene copolymer ones. Ethylene sequences shorter than the so called minimum crystallizable ethylene sequence length, irrespective of E-1-hexene copolymer MW, can also crystallize. Additionally, the polymer preparation shows that the catalyst coordination environment and symmetry, as well as achiral ethylene versus prochiral α-olefin steric encumbrance and competitive diffusion affect the synthesis of UHMW PE, particularly the corresponding UHMW copolymers.

  12. Size-dependent melting modes and behaviors of Ag nanoparticles: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tianshou; Zhou, Dejian; Wu, Zhaohua; Shi, Pengpeng

    2017-12-01

    The size-dependent melting behaviors and mechanisms of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) with diameters of 3.5-16 nm were investigated by molecular dynamics (MD). Two distinct melting modes, non-premelting and premelting with transition ranges of about 7-8 nm, for Ag NPs were demonstrated via the evolution of distribution and transition of atomic physical states during annealing. The small Ag NPs (3.5-7 nm) melt abruptly without a stable liquid shell before the melting point, which is characterized as non-premelting. A solid-solid crystal transformation is conducted through the migration of adatoms on the surface of Ag NPs with diameters of 3.5-6 nm before the initial melting, which is mainly responsible for slightly increasing the melting point of Ag NPs. On the other hand, surface premelting of Ag NPs with diameters of 8-16 nm propagates from the outer shell to the inner core with initial anisotropy and late isotropy as the temperature increases, and the close-packed facets {111} melt by a side-consumed way which is responsible for facets {111} melting in advance relative to the crystallographic plane {111}. Once a stable liquid shell is formed, its size-independent minimum thickness is obtained, and a three-layer structure of atomic physical states is set up. Lastly, the theory of point defect-pair (vacancy-interstitial) severing as the mechanism of formation and movement of the solid-liquid interface was also confirmed. Our study provides a basic understanding and theoretical guidance for the research, production and application of Ag NPs.

  13. Extraction of scandium by organic substance melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyshev, V.P.; Lobanov, F.I.; Zebreva, A.I.; Andreeva, N.N.; Manuilova, O.A.; Il'yukevich, Yu.A.

    1984-01-01

    Regularities of scandium extraction by the melts of octadecanicoic acid, n-carbonic acids of C 17 -C 20 commerical fraction and mixtures of tributylphosphate (TBP) with paraffin at (70+-1) deg C have been studied. The optimum conditions for scandium extraction in the melt of organic substances are determined. A scheme of the extraction by the melts of higher carbonic acids at ninitial metal concentrations of 10 -5 to 10 -3 mol/l has been suggested. The scandium compound has been isolated in solid form, its composition having been determined. The main advantages of extraction by melts are as follows: a possibility to attain high distribution coefficients, distinct separation of phases after extraction, the absence of emulsions, elimination of employing inflammable and toxic solvents, a possibility of rapid X-ray fluorescence determinatinon of scandium directly in solid extract

  14. Vertical melting of a stack of membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, M. E. S.; Kleinert, H.; Schakel, A. M. J.

    2001-02-01

    A stack of tensionless membranes with nonlinear curvature energy and vertical harmonic interaction is studied. At low temperatures, the system forms a lamellar phase. At a critical temperature, the stack disorders vertically in a melting-like transition.

  15. Selective Laser Ablation and Melting, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project Advratech will develop a new additive manufacturing (AM) process called Selective Laser Ablation and Melting (SLAM). The key innovation in this...

  16. On Thermocapillary Mechanism of Spatial Separation of Metal Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demin, V. A.; Mizev, A. I.; Petukhov, M. I.

    2018-02-01

    Theoretical research has been devoted to the study of binary metal melts behavior in a thin capillary. Earlier it has been found experimentally that unusually significant and quick redistribution of melts components takes place along capillary after the cooling. Numerical simulation of concentration-induced convection has been carried out to explain these experimental data. Two-component melt of both liquid metals filling vertical thin capillary with non-uniform temperature distribution on the boundaries is considered. It is assumed that the condition of absolute non-wetting is valid on the sidewalls. Because of this effect there is a free surface on vertical boundaries, where thermocapillary force is appeared due to the external longitudinal temperature gradient. It makes to move liquid elements at a big distance, compared with axial size of capillary. Effects of adsorption-desorption on the surface, thermal and concentration-capillary forces, convective motion in a volume and diffusion generate the large-scale circulation. This process includes the admixture carrying-out on the surface in the more hot higher part of the channel, its following transfer down along the boundary due to the thermocapillary force and its return in the volume over the desorption in the lower part of capillary. Intensity of motion and processes of adsorption-desorption on the free boundary have the decisive influence upon the formation of concentration fields and speed of components redistribution. Thus, one of the possible mechanisms of longitudinal division on components of liquid binary mixtures in thin channels has been demonstrated.

  17. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PI’s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

    2012-07-31

    Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

  18. Insignificant influence of the matrix on the melting of ice confined in decorated mesoporous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunbo; Zhao, Zhenyan; Wang, Lianwen

    2018-01-01

    For a critical examination of matrix effect on the melting of confined ice, mesoporous silica (SBA-15) are synthesised and decorated with n-Alkyl and aminopropyl groups to tune the surface hydrophobicity. Water contact angle to these decorated surfaces are estimated to be about 100° and 60°, respectively. By examining the melting of ice confined in these decorated samples, we find that the influence of the matrix is indeed not significant. The reported apparent matrix effect is more likely method effect in the determination of pore diameters as was demonstrated in our previous studies (Philos. Mag. 93 (2013), p. 1827).

  19. STUDIES ON WETTABILITY OF STAINLESS STEEL 316L POWDER IN LASER MELTING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KURIAN ANTONY

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser sintering is one of the techniques used in additive manufacturing processes. The main objective of the work is to study the effects of process parameters on wetting phenomenon and interfacial energy during laser melting of stainless steel powder. This paper reports wetting of laser melted powder particles and its use for the determination of surface energy of stainless steel powder under laser beam exposure. Process parameters such as laser power, scan speed and beam diameter are considered for study. This study also identifies the process parameters for better wettability which produces smooth surfaces.

  20. Luna 24 ferrobasalt as a low-Mg primary melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, M.; Ryder, G.

    1980-01-01

    Luna 24 very-low titanium (VLT) ferrobasalts, metabasalts, brown glasses and impact melts form a tight compositional cluster with no gradation to other groupings postulated for the Luna 24 core components. This suggests that the Luna 24 VLT ferrobasalt was extruded as a liquid of its own composition and was not derived by fractional crystallization from a more magnesian parent in a surface flow. Furthermore, the characteristics of the core lithologies are not easily visualized as components of such a differential flow, e.g. brown glasses. Gravitative settling models purporting to demonstrate the validity of the flow differentiation model are merely permissive. Subsurface fractionation requires that plagioclase, not olivine, be the liquidus phase. The high-Mg component in the Luna 24 core can be constrained, though not identified, chemically, and it has neither the major element, trace element, isotopic, nor mineralogical characteristics required of a possible parent to the Luna 24 VLT ferrobasalt. Thus models of fractionation lack a physical expression of the less differentiated compositions, contrary to the belief that the high-Mg component in the core is the parent material. The Luna 24 VLT ferrobasalt is probably a primary low-Mg melt from a plagioclase-bearing source region, and may have undergone little or no fractionation prior to eruption. Such a model is compatible with, and suggested by, chemical and experimental data. Caution against posulating that all Mg-poor melts are fractionated products, based on terrestrial models, is advised. The terrestrial oceanic situation of 'primary melts' with similar Mg/Fe is probably not valid for the Moon. (Auth.)