WorldWideScience

Sample records for grids local scale

  1. Evaluation of sub grid scale and local wall models in Large-eddy simulations of separated flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Ali Al

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the Sub Grid Scale models is studied by simulating a separated flow over a wavy channel. The first and second order statistical moments of the resolved velocities obtained by using Large-Eddy simulations at different mesh resolutions are compared with Direct Numerical Simulations data. The effectiveness of modeling the wall stresses by using local log-law is then tested on a relatively coarse grid. The results exhibit a good agreement between highly-resolved Large Eddy Simulations and Direct Numerical Simulations data regardless the Sub Grid Scale models. However, the agreement is less satisfactory with relatively coarse grid without using any wall models and the differences between Sub Grid Scale models are distinguishable. Using local wall model retuned the basic flow topology and reduced significantly the differences between the coarse meshed Large-Eddy Simulations and Direct Numerical Simulations data. The results show that the ability of local wall model to predict the separation zone depends strongly on its implementation way.

  2. Evaluation of sub grid scale and local wall models in Large-eddy simulations of separated flow

    OpenAIRE

    Sam Ali Al; Szasz Robert; Revstedt Johan

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the Sub Grid Scale models is studied by simulating a separated flow over a wavy channel. The first and second order statistical moments of the resolved velocities obtained by using Large-Eddy simulations at different mesh resolutions are compared with Direct Numerical Simulations data. The effectiveness of modeling the wall stresses by using local log-law is then tested on a relatively coarse grid. The results exhibit a good agreement between highly-resolved Large Eddy Simu...

  3. Prospects for investment in large-scale, grid-connected solar power in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ulrich Elmer; Nygaard, Ivan; Pedersen, Mathilde Brix

    since the 1990s have changed the competiveness of solar PV in all markets, ranging from individual households via institutions to mini-grids and grid-connected installations. In volume and investment, the market for large-scale grid-connected solar power plants is by far the most important......-scale investments in grid-connected solar power plants and local assembly facilities for PV panels, have exceeded even optimistic scenarios. Finally, therefore, there seem to be bright prospects for investment in large-scale grid-connected solar power in Africa....

  4. Smart grid technologies in local electric grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezhniuk, Petro D.; Pijarski, Paweł; Buslavets, Olga A.

    2017-08-01

    The research is devoted to the creation of favorable conditions for the integration of renewable sources of energy into electric grids, which were designed to be supplied from centralized generation at large electric power stations. Development of distributed generation in electric grids influences the conditions of their operation - conflict of interests arises. The possibility of optimal functioning of electric grids and renewable sources of energy, when complex criterion of the optimality is balance reliability of electric energy in local electric system and minimum losses of electric energy in it. Multilevel automated system for power flows control in electric grids by means of change of distributed generation of power is developed. Optimization of power flows is performed by local systems of automatic control of small hydropower stations and, if possible, solar power plants.

  5. Biogas infrastructure from farm-scale to regional scale, line-pack storage in biogas grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, Evert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Biogas infrastructure from farm-scale to regional scale, line-pack storage in biogas grids. The number of local and regional initiatives encouraging the production and use of regional produced energy grows. In these new developments biogas can play a role, as a producer of energy, but also in

  6. Implementation of Grid-computing Framework for Simulation in Multi-scale Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Data Iranata

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new grid-computing framework for simulation in multi-scale structural analysis is presented. Two levels of parallel processing will be involved in this framework: multiple local distributed computing environments connected by local network to form a grid-based cluster-to-cluster distributed computing environment. To successfully perform the simulation, a large-scale structural system task is decomposed into the simulations of a simplified global model and several detailed component models using various scales. These correlated multi-scale structural system tasks are distributed among clusters and connected together in a multi-level hierarchy and then coordinated over the internet. The software framework for supporting the multi-scale structural simulation approach is also presented. The program architecture design allows the integration of several multi-scale models as clients and servers under a single platform. To check its feasibility, a prototype software system has been designed and implemented to perform the proposed concept. The simulation results show that the software framework can increase the speedup performance of the structural analysis. Based on this result, the proposed grid-computing framework is suitable to perform the simulation of the multi-scale structural analysis.

  7. Initial results of local grid control using wind farms with grid support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, Poul; Hansen, Anca D.; Iov, F.; Blaabjerg, F.

    2005-09-01

    This report describes initial results with simulation of local grid control using wind farms with grid support. The focus is on simulation of the behaviour of the wind farms when they are isolated from the main grid and establish a local grid together with a few other grid components. The isolated subsystems used in the work presented in this report do not intend to simulate a specific subsystem, but they are extremely simplified single bus bar systems using only a few more components than the wind farm. This approach has been applied to make it easier to understand the dynamics of the subsystem. The main observation is that the fast dynamics of the wind turbines seem to be able to contribute significantly to the grid control, which can be useful where the wind farm is isolated with a subsystem from the main grid with surplus of generation. Thus, the fast down regulation of the wind farm using automatic frequency control can keep the subsystem in operation and thereby improve the reliability of the grid. (LN)

  8. Effect of wettability on scale-up of multiphase flow from core-scale to reservoir fine-grid-scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.C.; Mani, V.; Mohanty, K.K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Typical field simulation grid-blocks are internally heterogeneous. The objective of this work is to study how the wettability of the rock affects its scale-up of multiphase flow properties from core-scale to fine-grid reservoir simulation scale ({approximately} 10{prime} x 10{prime} x 5{prime}). Reservoir models need another level of upscaling to coarse-grid simulation scale, which is not addressed here. Heterogeneity is modeled here as a correlated random field parameterized in terms of its variance and two-point variogram. Variogram models of both finite (spherical) and infinite (fractal) correlation length are included as special cases. Local core-scale porosity, permeability, capillary pressure function, relative permeability functions, and initial water saturation are assumed to be correlated. Water injection is simulated and effective flow properties and flow equations are calculated. For strongly water-wet media, capillarity has a stabilizing/homogenizing effect on multiphase flow. For small variance in permeability, and for small correlation length, effective relative permeability can be described by capillary equilibrium models. At higher variance and moderate correlation length, the average flow can be described by a dynamic relative permeability. As the oil wettability increases, the capillary stabilizing effect decreases and the deviation from this average flow increases. For fractal fields with large variance in permeability, effective relative permeability is not adequate in describing the flow.

  9. Local grid refinement for free-surface flow simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The principal goal of the current study is to explore and investigate the potential of local grid refinement for increasing the numerical efficiency of free-surface flow simulations in a practical context. In this thesis we propose a method for local grid refinement in the free-surface flow model

  10. Large-eddy simulation of wind turbine wake interactions on locally refined Cartesian grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-11-01

    Performing high-fidelity numerical simulations of turbulent flow in wind farms remains a challenging issue mainly because of the large computational resources required to accurately simulate the turbine wakes and turbine/turbine interactions. The discretization of the governing equations on structured grids for mesoscale calculations may not be the most efficient approach for resolving the large disparity of spatial scales. A 3D Cartesian grid refinement method enabling the efficient coupling of the Actuator Line Model (ALM) with locally refined unstructured Cartesian grids adapted to accurately resolve tip vortices and multi-turbine interactions, is presented. Second order schemes are employed for the discretization of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in a hybrid staggered/non-staggered formulation coupled with a fractional step method that ensures the satisfaction of local mass conservation to machine zero. The current approach enables multi-resolution LES of turbulent flow in multi-turbine wind farms. The numerical simulations are in good agreement with experimental measurements and are able to resolve the rich dynamics of turbine wakes on grids containing only a small fraction of the grid nodes that would be required in simulations without local mesh refinement. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0005482 and the National Science Foundation under Award number NSF PFI:BIC 1318201.

  11. Multi-hop localization algorithm based on grid-scanning for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiangwen; Guo, Xiaolei; Yu, Ning; Wu, Yinfeng; Feng, Renjian

    2011-01-01

    For large-scale wireless sensor networks (WSNs) with a minority of anchor nodes, multi-hop localization is a popular scheme for determining the geographical positions of the normal nodes. However, in practice existing multi-hop localization methods suffer from various kinds of problems, such as poor adaptability to irregular topology, high computational complexity, low positioning accuracy, etc. To address these issues in this paper, we propose a novel Multi-hop Localization algorithm based on Grid-Scanning (MLGS). First, the factors that influence the multi-hop distance estimation are studied and a more realistic multi-hop localization model is constructed. Then, the feasible regions of the normal nodes are determined according to the intersection of bounding square rings. Finally, a verifiably good approximation scheme based on grid-scanning is developed to estimate the coordinates of the normal nodes. Additionally, the positioning accuracy of the normal nodes can be improved through neighbors' collaboration. Extensive simulations are performed in isotropic and anisotropic networks. The comparisons with some typical algorithms of node localization confirm the effectiveness and efficiency of our algorithm.

  12. Food Self-Sufficiency across scales: How local can we go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Prajal; Lüdeke, Matthias K. B.; Reusser, Dominik E.; Kropp, Jürgen P.

    2013-04-01

    "Think global, act local" is a phrase often used in sustainability debates. Here, we explore the potential of regions to go for local supply in context of sustainable food consumption considering both the present state and the plausible future scenarios. We analyze data on the gridded crop calories production, the gridded livestock calories production, the gridded feed calories use and the gridded food calories consumption in 5' resolution. We derived these gridded data from various sources: Global Agro-ecological Zone (GAEZ v3.0), Gridded Livestock of the World (GLW), FAOSTAT, and Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project (GRUMP). For scenarios analysis, we considered changes in population, dietary patterns and possibility of obtaining the maximum potential yield. We investigate the food self-sufficiency multiple spatial scales. We start from the 5' resolution (i.e. around 10 km x 10 km in the equator) and look at 8 levels of aggregation ranging from the plausible lowest administrative level to the continental level. Results for the different spatial scales show that about 1.9 billion people live in the area of 5' resolution where enough calories can be produced to sustain their food consumption and the feed used. On the country level, about 4.4 billion population can be sustained without international food trade. For about 1 billion population from Asia and Africa, there is a need for cross-continental food trade. However, if we were able to achieve the maximum potential crop yield, about 2.6 billion population can be sustained within their living area of 5' resolution. Furthermore, Africa and Asia could be food self-sufficient by achieving their maximum potential crop yield and only round 630 million populations would be dependent on the international food trade. However, the food self-sufficiency status might differ under consideration of the future change in population, dietary patterns and climatic conditions. We provide an initial approach for investigating the

  13. Integration of cloud, grid and local cluster resources with DIRAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifield, Tom; Sevior, Martin; Carmona, Ana; Casajús, Adrián; Graciani, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Grid computing was developed to provide users with uniform access to large-scale distributed resources. This has worked well, however there are significant resources available to the scientific community that do not follow this paradigm - those on cloud infrastructure providers, HPC supercomputers or local clusters. DIRAC (Distributed Infrastructure with Remote Agent Control) was originally designed to support direct submission to the Local Resource Management Systems (LRMS) of such clusters for LHCb, matured to support grid workflows and has recently been updated to support Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud. This raises a number of new possibilities - by opening avenues to new resources, virtual organisations can change their resources with usage patterns and use these dedicated facilities for a given time. For example, user communities such as High Energy Physics experiments, have computing tasks with a wide variety of requirements in terms of CPU, data access or memory consumption, and their usage profile is never constant throughout the year. Having the possibility to transparently absorb peaks on the demand for these kinds of tasks using Cloud resources could allow a reduction in the overall cost of the system. This paper investigates interoperability by following a recent large-scale production exercise utilising resources from these three different paradigms, during the 2010 Belle Monte Carlo run. Through this, it discusses the challenges and opportunities of such a model.

  14. Calculating Soil Wetness, Evapotranspiration and Carbon Cycle Processes Over Large Grid Areas Using a New Scaling Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Piers

    2012-01-01

    Soil wetness typically shows great spatial variability over the length scales of general circulation model (GCM) grid areas (approx 100 km ), and the functions relating evapotranspiration and photosynthetic rate to local-scale (approx 1 m) soil wetness are highly non-linear. Soil respiration is also highly dependent on very small-scale variations in soil wetness. We therefore expect significant inaccuracies whenever we insert a single grid area-average soil wetness value into a function to calculate any of these rates for the grid area. For the particular case of evapotranspiration., this method - use of a grid-averaged soil wetness value - can also provoke severe oscillations in the evapotranspiration rate and soil wetness under some conditions. A method is presented whereby the probability distribution timction(pdf) for soil wetness within a grid area is represented by binning. and numerical integration of the binned pdf is performed to provide a spatially-integrated wetness stress term for the whole grid area, which then permits calculation of grid area fluxes in a single operation. The method is very accurate when 10 or more bins are used, can deal realistically with spatially variable precipitation, conserves moisture exactly and allows for precise modification of the soil wetness pdf after every time step. The method could also be applied to other ecological problems where small-scale processes must be area-integrated, or upscaled, to estimate fluxes over large areas, for example in treatments of the terrestrial carbon budget or trace gas generation.

  15. Application of GRID to Foreign Atom Localization in Single Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmann, A; Wesch, W; Weber, B; Börner, H G; Jentschel, M

    2000-01-01

    The application of GRID (Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening) spectroscopy to the localization of foreign atoms in single crystals is demonstrated on erbium in YAP. By the investigation of the Doppler broadened secondary γ line for two crystalline directions, the Er was determined to be localized on the Y site. Conditions for the nuclear parameters of the impurity atoms used for the application of GRID spectroscopy are discussed.

  16. Mixing in 3D Sparse Multi-Scale Grid Generated Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usama, Syed; Kopec, Jacek; Tellez, Jackson; Kwiatkowski, Kamil; Redondo, Jose; Malik, Nadeem

    2017-04-01

    Flat 2D fractal grids are known to alter turbulence characteristics downstream of the grid as compared to the regular grids with the same blockage ratio and the same mass inflow rates [1]. This has excited interest in the turbulence community for possible exploitation for enhanced mixing and related applications. Recently, a new 3D multi-scale grid design has been proposed [2] such that each generation of length scale of turbulence grid elements is held in its own frame, the overall effect is a 3D co-planar arrangement of grid elements. This produces a 'sparse' grid system whereby each generation of grid elements produces a turbulent wake pattern that interacts with the other wake patterns downstream. A critical motivation here is that the effective blockage ratio in the 3D Sparse Grid Turbulence (3DSGT) design is significantly lower than in the flat 2D counterpart - typically the blockage ratio could be reduced from say 20% in 2D down to 4% in the 3DSGT. If this idea can be realized in practice, it could potentially greatly enhance the efficiency of turbulent mixing and transfer processes clearly having many possible applications. Work has begun on the 3DSGT experimentally using Surface Flow Image Velocimetry (SFIV) [3] at the European facility in the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization located in Gottingen, Germany and also at the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) in Spain, and numerically using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) at King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (KFUPM) in Saudi Arabia and in University of Warsaw in Poland. DNS is the most useful method to compare the experimental results with, and we are studying different types of codes such as Imcompact3d, and OpenFoam. Many variables will eventually be investigated for optimal mixing conditions. For example, the number of scale generations, the spacing between frames, the size ratio of grid elements, inflow conditions, etc. We will report upon the first set of findings

  17. Improving SCADA security of a local process with a power grid model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chromik, Justyna Joanna; Remke, Anne Katharina Ingrid; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    Security of networks controlling smart grids is an important subject. The shift of the power grid towards a smart grid results in more distributed control functions, while intrusion detection of the control network mostly remains centrally based. Moreover, existing local (host-based) intrusion

  18. Optimal Wind Energy Integration in Large-Scale Electric Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaijat, Mohammad H.

    The major concern in electric grid operation is operating under the most economical and reliable fashion to ensure affordability and continuity of electricity supply. This dissertation investigates the effects of such challenges, which affect electric grid reliability and economic operations. These challenges are: 1. Congestion of transmission lines, 2. Transmission lines expansion, 3. Large-scale wind energy integration, and 4. Phaser Measurement Units (PMUs) optimal placement for highest electric grid observability. Performing congestion analysis aids in evaluating the required increase of transmission line capacity in electric grids. However, it is necessary to evaluate expansion of transmission line capacity on methods to ensure optimal electric grid operation. Therefore, the expansion of transmission line capacity must enable grid operators to provide low-cost electricity while maintaining reliable operation of the electric grid. Because congestion affects the reliability of delivering power and increases its cost, the congestion analysis in electric grid networks is an important subject. Consequently, next-generation electric grids require novel methodologies for studying and managing congestion in electric grids. We suggest a novel method of long-term congestion management in large-scale electric grids. Owing to the complication and size of transmission line systems and the competitive nature of current grid operation, it is important for electric grid operators to determine how many transmission lines capacity to add. Traditional questions requiring answers are "Where" to add, "How much of transmission line capacity" to add, and "Which voltage level". Because of electric grid deregulation, transmission lines expansion is more complicated as it is now open to investors, whose main interest is to generate revenue, to build new transmission lines. Adding a new transmission capacity will help the system to relieve the transmission system congestion, create

  19. Grid-connected photovoltaic system design for local government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grid-connected photovoltaic system design for local government offices in Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Technology. Journal Home ... It is neat, silent and elegant process of generating electric power in environmentally friendly manner. In this ...

  20. Numerical solution of plasma fluid equations using locally refined grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colella, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical method for the solution of plasma fluid equations on block-structured, locally refined grids. The plasma under consideration is typical of those used for the processing of semiconductors. The governing equations consist of a drift-diffusion model of the electrons and an isothermal model of the ions coupled by Poisson's equation. A discretization of the equations is given for a uniform spatial grid, and a time-split integration scheme is developed. The algorithm is then extended to accommodate locally refined grids. This extension involves the advancement of the discrete system on a hierarchy of levels, each of which represents a degree of refinement, together with synchronization steps to ensure consistency across levels. A brief discussion of a software implementation is followed by a presentation of numerical results

  1. Small-Scale Smart Grid Construction and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface, Nicholas James

    The smart grid (SG) is a commonly used catch-phrase in the energy industry yet there is no universally accepted definition. The objectives and most useful concepts have been investigated extensively in economic, environmental and engineering research by applying statistical knowledge and established theories to develop simulations without constructing physical models. In this study, a small-scale version (SSSG) is constructed to physically represent these ideas so they can be evaluated. Results of construction show data acquisition three times more expensive than the grid itself although mainly due to the incapability to downsize 70% of data acquisition costs to small-scale. Experimentation on the fully assembled grid exposes the limitations of low cost modified sine wave power, significant enough to recommend pure sine wave investment in future SSSG iterations. Findings can be projected to full-size SG at a ratio of 1:10, based on the appliance representing average US household peak daily load. However this exposes disproportionalities in the SSSG compared with previous SG investigations and recommended changes for future iterations are established to remedy this issue. Also discussed are other ideas investigated in the literature and their suitability for SSSG incorporation. It is highly recommended to develop a user-friendly bidirectional charger to more accurately represent vehicle-to-grid (V2G) infrastructure. Smart homes, BEV swap stations and pumped hydroelectric storage can also be researched on future iterations of the SSSG.

  2. H1 Grid production tool for large scale Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobodzinski, B; Wissing, Ch [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Bystritskaya, E; Vorobiew, M [ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation); Karbach, T M [University of Dortmund (Germany); Mitsyn, S [JINR, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mudrinic, M, E-mail: bogdan.lobodzinski@desy.d [VINS, Belgrad (Serbia)

    2010-04-01

    The H1 Collaboration at HERA has entered the period of high precision analyses based on the final data sample. These analyses require a massive production of simulated Monte Carlo (MC) events. The H1 MC framework (H1MC) is a software for mass MC production on the LCG Grid infrastructure and on a local batch system created by H1 Collaboration. The aim of the tool is a full automatisation of the MC production workflow including management of the MC jobs on the Grid down to copying of the resulting files from the Grid to the H1 mass storage tape device. The H1 MC framework has modular structure, delegating a specific task to each module, including task specific to the H1 experiment: Automatic building of steer and input files, simulation of the H1 detector, reconstruction of particle tracks and post processing calculation. Each module provides data or functionality needed by other modules via a local database. The Grid jobs created for detector simulation and reconstruction from generated MC input files are fully independent and fault-tolerant for 32 and 64-bit LCG Grid architecture and in Grid running state they can be continuously monitored using Relational Grid Monitoring Architecture (R-GMA) service. To monitor the full production chain and detect potential problems, regular checks of the job state are performed using the local database and the Service Availability Monitoring (SAM) framework. The improved stability of the system has resulted in a dramatic increase in the production rate, which exceeded two billion MC events in 2008.

  3. Improving mobile robot localization: grid-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Junchi

    2012-02-01

    Autonomous mobile robots have been widely studied not only as advanced facilities for industrial and daily life automation, but also as a testbed in robotics competitions for extending the frontier of current artificial intelligence. In many of such contests, the robot is supposed to navigate on the ground with a grid layout. Based on this observation, we present a localization error correction method by exploring the geometric feature of the tile patterns. On top of the classical inertia-based positioning, our approach employs three fiber-optic sensors that are assembled under the bottom of the robot, presenting an equilateral triangle layout. The sensor apparatus, together with the proposed supporting algorithm, are designed to detect a line's direction (vertical or horizontal) by monitoring the grid crossing events. As a result, the line coordinate information can be fused to rectify the cumulative localization deviation from inertia positioning. The proposed method is analyzed theoretically in terms of its error bound and also has been implemented and tested on a customary developed two-wheel autonomous mobile robot.

  4. A Systematic Multi-Time Scale Solution for Regional Power Grid Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W. J.; Liu, Z. G.; Cheng, T.; Hu, B. Q.; Liu, X. Z.; Zhou, Y. F.

    2017-10-01

    Many aspects need to be taken into consideration in a regional grid while making schedule plans. In this paper, a systematic multi-time scale solution for regional power grid operation considering large scale renewable energy integration and Ultra High Voltage (UHV) power transmission is proposed. In the time scale aspect, we discuss the problem from month, week, day-ahead, within-day to day-behind, and the system also contains multiple generator types including thermal units, hydro-plants, wind turbines and pumped storage stations. The 9 subsystems of the scheduling system are described, and their functions and relationships are elaborated. The proposed system has been constructed in a provincial power grid in Central China, and the operation results further verified the effectiveness of the system.

  5. Simulation-Based Approach for Studying the Balancing of Local Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhani Latvakoski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern society is facing great challenges due to pollution and increased carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions. As part of solving these challenges, the use of renewable energy sources and electric vehicles (EVs is rapidly increasing. However, increased dynamics have triggered problems in balancing energy supply and consumption demand in the power systems. The resulting uncertainty and unpredictability of energy production, consumption, and management of peak loads has caused an increase in costs for energy market actors. Therefore, the means for studying the balancing of local smart grids with EVs is a starting point for this paper. The main contribution is a simulation-based approach which was developed to enable the study of the balancing of local distribution grids with EV batteries in a cost-efficient manner. The simulation-based approach is applied to enable the execution of a distributed system with the simulation of a local distribution grid, including a number of charging stations and EVs. A simulation system has been constructed to support the simulation-based approach. The evaluation has been carried out by executing the scenario related to balancing local distribution grids with EV batteries in a step-by-step manner. The evaluation results indicate that the simulation-based approach is able to facilitate the evaluation of smart grid– and EV-related communication protocols, control algorithms for charging, and functionalities of local distribution grids as part of a complex, critical cyber-physical system. In addition, the simulation system is able to incorporate advanced methods for monitoring, controlling, tracking, and modeling behavior. The simulation model of the local distribution grid can be executed with the smart control of charging and discharging powers of the EVs according to the load situation in the local distribution grid. The resulting simulation system can be applied to the study of balancing local smart grids with EV

  6. Evolutionary Hierarchical Multi-Criteria Metaheuristics for Scheduling in Large-Scale Grid Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kołodziej, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues in modelling today's large-scale computational systems is to effectively manage highly parametrised distributed environments such as computational grids, clouds, ad hoc networks and P2P networks. Next-generation computational grids must provide a wide range of services and high performance computing infrastructures. Various types of information and data processed in the large-scale dynamic grid environment may be incomplete, imprecise, and fragmented, which complicates the specification of proper evaluation criteria and which affects both the availability of resources and the final collective decisions of users. The complexity of grid architectures and grid management may also contribute towards higher energy consumption. All of these issues necessitate the development of intelligent resource management techniques, which are capable of capturing all of this complexity and optimising meaningful metrics for a wide range of grid applications.   This book covers hot topics in t...

  7. Grid scale energy storage in salt caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crotogino, Fritz; Donadei, Sabine [KBB Underground Technologies GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Fossil energy sources require some 20% of the annual consumption to be stored to secure emergency cover, peak shaving, seasonal balancing, etc. Today the electric power industry benefits from the extreme high energy density of fossil fuels. This is one important reason why the German utilities are able to provide highly reliable grid operation at a electric power storage capacity at their pumped hydro power stations of less then 1 hour (40 GWh) related to the total load in the grid - i.e. only 0,06% related to natural gas. Along with the changeover to renewable wind based electricity production this ''outsourcing'' of storage services to fossil fuels will decline. One important way out will be grid scale energy storage. The present discussion for balancing short term wind and solar power fluctuations focuses primarily on the installation of Compressed Air Energy Storages (CAES) in addition to existing pumped hydro plants. Because of their small energy density, these storage options are, however, generally not suitable for balancing for longer term fluctuations in case of larger amounts of excess wind power or even seasonal fluctuations. Underground hydrogen storages, however, provide a much higher energy density because of chemical energy bond - standard practice since many years. The first part of the article describes the present status and performance of grid scale energy storages in geological formations, mainly salt caverns. It is followed by a compilation of generally suitable locations in Europe and particularly Germany. The second part deals with first results of preliminary investigations in possibilities and limits of offshore CAES power stations. (orig.)

  8. Voltage stability issues in a distribution grid with large scale PV plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Alvaro Ruiz; Marinopoulos, Antonios; Reza, Muhamad; Srivastava, Kailash [ABB AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden). Corporate Research Center; Hertem, Dirk van [Katholieke Univ. Leuven, Heverlee (Belgium). ESAT-ELECTA

    2011-07-01

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) has become a competitive renewable energy source. The production of solar PV cells and panels has increased significantly, while the cost is reduced due to economics of scale and technological achievements in the field. At the same time, the increase in efficiency of PV power systems and high energy prices are expected to lead PV systems to grid parity in the coming decade. This is expected to boost even more the large scale implementation of PV power plants (utility scale PV) and therefore the impact of such large scale PV plants to power system needs to be studies. This paper investigates the voltage stability issues arising from the connection of a large PV power plant to the power grid. For this purpose, a 15 MW PV power plant was implemented into a distribution grid, modeled and simulated using DIgSILENT Power Factory. Two scenarios were developed: in the first scenario, active power injected into the grid by the PV power plants was varied and the resulted U-Q curve was analyzed. In the second scenario, the impact of connecting PV power plants to different points in the grid - resulting in different strength of the connection - was investigated. (orig.)

  9. OffshoreDC DC grids for integration of large scale wind power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeni, Lorenzo; Endegnanew, Atsede Gualu; Stamatiou, Georgios

    The present report summarizes the main findings of the Nordic Energy Research project “DC grids for large scale integration of offshore wind power – OffshoreDC”. The project is been funded by Nordic Energy Research through the TFI programme and was active between 2011 and 2016. The overall...... objective of the project was to drive the development of the VSC based HVDC technology for future large scale offshore grids, supporting a standardised and commercial development of the technology, and improving the opportunities for the technology to support power system integration of large scale offshore...

  10. Turbulence Enhancement by Fractal Square Grids: Effects of the Number of Fractal Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omilion, Alexis; Ibrahim, Mounir; Zhang, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Fractal square grids offer a unique solution for passive flow control as they can produce wakes with a distinct turbulence intensity peak and a prolonged turbulence decay region at the expense of only minimal pressure drop. While previous studies have solidified this characteristic of fractal square grids, how the number of scales (or fractal iterations N) affect turbulence production and decay of the induced wake is still not well understood. The focus of this research is to determine the relationship between the fractal iteration N and the turbulence produced in the wake flow using well-controlled water-tunnel experiments. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is used to measure the instantaneous velocity fields downstream of four different fractal grids with increasing number of scales (N = 1, 2, 3, and 4) and a conventional single-scale grid. By comparing the turbulent scales and statistics of the wake, we are able to determine how each iteration affects the peak turbulence intensity and the production/decay of turbulence from the grid. In light of the ability of these fractal grids to increase turbulence intensity with low pressure drop, this work can potentially benefit a wide variety of applications where energy efficient mixing or convective heat transfer is a key process.

  11. Modelling and optimization of a local smart grid for an agro-industrial site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Fabrizio

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A smart grid is defined where different elements are interconnected between them and with the public utility grid. The development of smart grids is considered a strategic goal at both national and international levels and has been funded by many research programs. Within the BEE (Building Energy Ecosystems project, funded by the Piedmont Region under the European POR FESR 2007-13 scheme, the creation of an electricity smart grid at a local level in a small agroindustry was done. This industry is one of the so-called prosumer, that is both a producer and a consumer of energy. The energy production is done by means of solar photovoltaic and biomass. In this local smart grid, the elements were subdivided in two main groups: loads (process machineries in the case study and generators (PV and biomass in the case study. The loads may be further subdivided into permanent loads, mandatory loads and shiftable loads. The objective of the smart grid is the minimization of the exchanges between the local grid and the public utility grid. Even though no financial savings occur, this is important for the community grid. The problem is therefore to find the conditions that let the net exported energy going to zero at each time step, so arriving close to a self-sufficient system by modifying the shiftable loads. In a first phase of the study, the consumers were studied and, according to some characteristics of the machineries employed and the production requirements, grouped into production lines that can or not be switched off for intervals of time in order to compensate the smart grid fluctuations. The smart grid balancing may be done on an instantaneous basis, or in a predictive way considering the future weather forecasts and the future production requirements. The demo site was equipped with measurement instrumentation, data acquisition tools and a user interface that may be used to visualize all the quantities that are measured but also to perform the

  12. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  13. Methodology to determine the technical performance and value proposition for grid-scale energy storage systems :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Loose, Verne William; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Trudnowski, Daniel J.

    2012-12-01

    As the amount of renewable generation increases, the inherent variability of wind and photovoltaic systems must be addressed in order to ensure the continued safe and reliable operation of the nation's electricity grid. Grid-scale energy storage systems are uniquely suited to address the variability of renewable generation and to provide other valuable grid services. The goal of this report is to quantify the technical performance required to provide di erent grid bene ts and to specify the proper techniques for estimating the value of grid-scale energy storage systems.

  14. Accident of Large-scale Wind Turbines Disconnecting from Power Grid and Its Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    There were many accidents of large-scale wind turbines disconnecting from power grid in 2011. As single- phase-to-ground fault cannot be correctly detected, single-phase-to-ground fault evolved to phase-to-phase fault. Phase-to-phase fault was isolated slowly, thus leading to low voltage. And wind turbines without enough low voltage ride-through capacity had to be disconnected from the grid. After some wind turbines being disconnected from the grid, overvoltage caused by reactive power surplus made more wind turbines disconnect from the grid. Based on the accident analysis, this paper presents solutions to above problems, including travelling waves based single-phase-to-ground protection, adaptive low voltage protection, integrated protection and control, and high impedance fault detection. The solutions lay foundations in theory and technology to prevent large-scale wind turbines disconnecting from the operating power grid.

  15. Local-Scale Simulations of Nucleate Boiling on Micrometer-Featured Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Moreno, Gilberto [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Narumanchi, Sreekant V [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dede, Ercan M. [Toyota Research Institute of North America; Joshi, Shailesh N. [Toyota Research Institute of North America; Zhou, Feng [Toyota Research Institute of North America

    2017-07-12

    A high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based model for bubble nucleation of the refrigerant HFE7100 on micrometer-featured surfaces is presented in this work. The single-fluid incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, along with energy transport and natural convection effects are solved on a featured surface resolved grid. An a priori cavity detection method is employed to convert raw profilometer data of a surface into well-defined cavities. The cavity information and surface morphology are represented in the CFD model by geometric mesh deformations. Surface morphology is observed to initiate buoyancy-driven convection in the liquid phase, which in turn results in faster nucleation of cavities. Simulations pertaining to a generic rough surface show a trend where smaller size cavities nucleate with higher wall superheat. This local-scale model will serve as a self-consistent connection to larger device scale continuum models where local feature representation is not possible.

  16. Local DER Driven Grid Support by Coordinated Operation of Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmer, C.J.; Kamphuis, I.G.

    2009-01-01

    In the traditional operation of electricity networks the system operator has a number of ancillary services available for preservation of system balance. These services are called upon near real-time, after the planning phase. Ancillary services consist of regulating power, reserve capacity and emergency capacity, each with their own characteristics. Regulating power is deployed via load frequency control. Reserve capacity is used to release regulating power and can be called upon to maintain a balance or to counterbalance or resolve transmission restrictions. Both are traded at the Dutch energy market under an auction model with a single buyer (TenneT). Emergency capacity is rewarded on the basis of accessibility/availability within 15 minutes. In local electricity networks neither planning nor ancillary services exist. Planning is done by aggregation into large customer groups. For ancillary services one relies on the system operation as sketched above. In local electricity networks with a large share of distributed generation the costs of keeping the electricity system reliable and stable will increase further and technical problems may arise. The European SmartGrids initiative responds to these challenges in their strategic research agenda. One of the issues addressed in this agenda is the changing role of the distribution grid in which users get a more active role. One opportunity is the introduction of ancillary-type services at the distribution level, utilizing different types of producing and consuming devices in the local network, in order to make the total system more dependable. Distributed generation has a number of characteristics that are similar to characteristics of consumption. Part of it is intermittent / variable, although to a large extent predictable (PV, wind versus lighting, electronic devices). Another part is task-driven (micro-CHP versus electrical heating). Yet another part is controllable or shiftable in time. And storage can behave both

  17. Planet-Scale grid A particle collier leads data grid developers to unprecedented dimensions

    CERN Multimedia

    Thibodeau, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    In 2007, scientists will begin smashing protons and ions together in a massive, multinational experiment to understand what the universe looked like tiny fractions of a second after the Big Bang. The particle accelerator used in this test will release a vast flood of data on a scale unlike anything seen before, and for that scientists will need a computing grid of equally great capability

  18. Local-Scale Simulations of Nucleate Boiling on Micrometer Featured Surfaces: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Moreno, Gilberto [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Narumanchi, Sreekant V [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dede, Ercan M. [Toyota Research Institute of North America; Joshi, Shailesh N. [Toyota Research Institute of North America; Zhou, Feng [Toyota Research Institute of North America

    2017-08-03

    A high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based model for bubble nucleation of the refrigerant HFE7100 on micrometer-featured surfaces is presented in this work. The single-fluid incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, along with energy transport and natural convection effects are solved on a featured surface resolved grid. An a priori cavity detection method is employed to convert raw profilometer data of a surface into well-defined cavities. The cavity information and surface morphology are represented in the CFD model by geometric mesh deformations. Surface morphology is observed to initiate buoyancy-driven convection in the liquid phase, which in turn results in faster nucleation of cavities. Simulations pertaining to a generic rough surface show a trend where smaller size cavities nucleate with higher wall superheat. This local-scale model will serve as a self-consistent connection to larger device scale continuum models where local feature representation is not possible.

  19. Large-scale visualization system for grid environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    Center for Computational Science and E-systems of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA) has been conducting R and Ds of distributed computing (grid computing) environments: Seamless Thinking Aid (STA), Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL) and Atomic Energy Grid InfraStructure (AEGIS). In these R and Ds, we have developed the visualization technology suitable for the distributed computing environment. As one of the visualization tools, we have developed the Parallel Support Toolkit (PST) which can execute the visualization process parallely on a computer. Now, we improve PST to be executable simultaneously on multiple heterogeneous computers using Seamless Thinking Aid Message Passing Interface (STAMPI). STAMPI, we have developed in these R and Ds, is the MPI library executable on a heterogeneous computing environment. The improvement realizes the visualization of extremely large-scale data and enables more efficient visualization processes in a distributed computing environment. (author)

  20. Grid computing in high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischof, R.; Kuhn, D.; Kneringer, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The future high energy physics experiments are characterized by an enormous amount of data delivered by the large detectors presently under construction e.g. at the Large Hadron Collider and by a large number of scientists (several thousands) requiring simultaneous access to the resulting experimental data. Since it seems unrealistic to provide the necessary computing and storage resources at one single place, (e.g. CERN), the concept of grid computing i.e. the use of distributed resources, will be chosen. The DataGrid project (under the leadership of CERN) develops, based on the Globus toolkit, the software necessary for computation and analysis of shared large-scale databases in a grid structure. The high energy physics group Innsbruck participates with several resources in the DataGrid test bed. In this presentation our experience as grid users and resource provider is summarized. In cooperation with the local IT-center (ZID) we installed a flexible grid system which uses PCs (at the moment 162) in student's labs during nights, weekends and holidays, which is especially used to compare different systems (local resource managers, other grid software e.g. from the Nordugrid project) and to supply a test bed for the future Austrian Grid (AGrid). (author)

  1. Biogas infrastructure from farm-scale to regional scale, line-pack storage in biogas grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evert Jan Hengeveld

    2016-01-01

    The number of local and regional initiatives encouraging the production and use of regional produced energy grows. In these new developments biogas can play a role, as a producer of energy, but also in balancing the electricity grid. Collection of biogas from several digesters to a hub supports the

  2. A Development of Lightweight Grid Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, G; Kawai, Y; Sasaki, T; Watase, Y

    2011-01-01

    In order to help a rapid development of Grid/Cloud aware applications, we have developed API to abstract the distributed computing infrastructures based on SAGA (A Simple API for Grid Applications). SAGA, which is standardized in the OGF (Open Grid Forum), defines API specifications to access distributed computing infrastructures, such as Grid, Cloud and local computing resources. The Universal Grid API (UGAPI), which is a set of command line interfaces (CLI) and APIs, aims to offer simpler API to combine several SAGA interfaces with richer functionalities. These CLIs of the UGAPI offer typical functionalities required by end users for job management and file access to the different distributed computing infrastructures as well as local computing resources. We have also built a web interface for the particle therapy simulation and demonstrated the large scale calculation using the different infrastructures at the same time. In this paper, we would like to present how the web interface based on UGAPI and SAGA achieve more efficient utilization of computing resources over the different infrastructures with technical details and practical experiences.

  3. Local versus national

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milan, Christian; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Bojesen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    of individual energy supply systems based on on-site weather and building conditions, as well as considering the expected energy consumption profile. However, local planning processes are problematic if they do not take regional or national impacts into account. Given the grid connection, the local building...... solution also has an impact on a national scale by exchanging electricity. Therefore it is important to implement respective grid loads into the planning process in order to avoid technology choices, which might counteract grid stability or cost inefficiencies at other sites. The aim of this paper...

  4. Local Fitting of the Kohn-Sham Density in a Gaussian and Plane Waves Scheme for Large-Scale Density Functional Theory Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golze, Dorothea; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Hutter, Jürg

    2017-05-09

    A local resolution-of-the-identity (LRI) approach is introduced in combination with the Gaussian and plane waves (GPW) scheme to enable large-scale Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations. In GPW, the computational bottleneck is typically the description of the total charge density on real-space grids. Introducing the LRI approximation, the linear scaling of the GPW approach with respect to system size is retained, while the prefactor for the grid operations is reduced. The density fitting is an O(N) scaling process implemented by approximating the atomic pair densities by an expansion in one-center fit functions. The computational cost for the grid-based operations becomes negligible in LRIGPW. The self-consistent field iteration is up to 30 times faster for periodic systems dependent on the symmetry of the simulation cell and on the density of grid points. However, due to the overhead introduced by the local density fitting, single point calculations and complete molecular dynamics steps, including the calculation of the forces, are effectively accelerated by up to a factor of ∼10. The accuracy of LRIGPW is assessed for different systems and properties, showing that total energies, reaction energies, intramolecular and intermolecular structure parameters are well reproduced. LRIGPW yields also high quality results for extended condensed phase systems such as liquid water, ice XV, and molecular crystals.

  5. Matching soil grid unit resolutions with polygon unit scales for DNDC modelling of regional SOC pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. D.; Yu, D. S.; Ni, Y. L.; Zhang, L. M.; Shi, X. Z.

    2015-03-01

    Matching soil grid unit resolution with polygon unit map scale is important to minimize uncertainty of regional soil organic carbon (SOC) pool simulation as their strong influences on the uncertainty. A series of soil grid units at varying cell sizes were derived from soil polygon units at the six map scales of 1:50 000 (C5), 1:200 000 (D2), 1:500 000 (P5), 1:1 000 000 (N1), 1:4 000 000 (N4) and 1:14 000 000 (N14), respectively, in the Tai lake region of China. Both format soil units were used for regional SOC pool simulation with DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) process-based model, which runs span the time period 1982 to 2000 at the six map scales, respectively. Four indices, soil type number (STN) and area (AREA), average SOC density (ASOCD) and total SOC stocks (SOCS) of surface paddy soils simulated with the DNDC, were attributed from all these soil polygon and grid units, respectively. Subjecting to the four index values (IV) from the parent polygon units, the variation of an index value (VIV, %) from the grid units was used to assess its dataset accuracy and redundancy, which reflects uncertainty in the simulation of SOC. Optimal soil grid unit resolutions were generated and suggested for the DNDC simulation of regional SOC pool, matching with soil polygon units map scales, respectively. With the optimal raster resolution the soil grid units dataset can hold the same accuracy as its parent polygon units dataset without any redundancy, when VIV indices was assumed as criteria to the assessment. An quadratic curve regression model y = -8.0 × 10-6x2 + 0.228x + 0.211 (R2 = 0.9994, p < 0.05) was revealed, which describes the relationship between optimal soil grid unit resolution (y, km) and soil polygon unit map scale (1:x). The knowledge may serve for grid partitioning of regions focused on the investigation and simulation of SOC pool dynamics at certain map scale.

  6. Suggested Grid Code Modifications to Ensure Wide-Scale Adoption of Photovoltaic Energy in Distributed Power Generation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Enjeti, Prasad; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    Current grid standards seem to largely require low power (e.g. several kilowatts) single-phase photovoltaic (PV) systems to operate at unity power factor with maximum power point tracking, and disconnect from the grid under grid faults. However, in case of a wide-scale penetration of single......-phase PV systems in the distributed grid, the disconnection under grid faults can contribute to: a) voltage flickers, b) power outages, and c) system instability. In this paper, grid code modifications are explored for wide-scale adoption of PV systems in the distribution grid. More recently, Italy...... and Japan, have undertaken a major review of standards for PV power conversion systems connected to low voltage networks. In view of this, the importance of low voltage ride-through for single-phase PV power systems under grid faults along with reactive power injection is studied in this paper. Three...

  7. Stability of synchrony against local intermittent fluctuations in tree-like power grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Sabine; Hellmann, Frank; Krause, Marie; Kurths, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    90% of all Renewable Energy Power in Germany is installed in tree-like distribution grids. Intermittent power fluctuations from such sources introduce new dynamics into the lower grid layers. At the same time, distributed resources will have to contribute to stabilize the grid against these fluctuations in the future. In this paper, we model a system of distributed resources as oscillators on a tree-like, lossy power grid and its ability to withstand desynchronization from localized intermittent renewable infeed. We find a remarkable interplay of the network structure and the position of the node at which the fluctuations are fed in. An important precondition for our findings is the presence of losses in distribution grids. Then, the most network central node splits the network into branches with different influence on network stability. Troublemakers, i.e., nodes at which fluctuations are especially exciting the grid, tend to be downstream branches with high net power outflow. For low coupling strength, we also find branches of nodes vulnerable to fluctuations anywhere in the network. These network regions can be predicted at high confidence using an eigenvector based network measure taking the turbulent nature of perturbations into account. While we focus here on tree-like networks, the observed effects also appear, albeit less pronounced, for weakly meshed grids. On the other hand, the observed effects disappear for lossless power grids often studied in the complex system literature.

  8. Output Control Technologies for a Large-scale PV System Considering Impacts on a Power Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwayama, Akira

    The mega-solar demonstration project named “Verification of Grid Stabilization with Large-scale PV Power Generation systems” had been completed in March 2011 at Wakkanai, the northernmost city of Japan. The major objectives of this project were to evaluate adverse impacts of large-scale PV power generation systems connected to the power grid and develop output control technologies with integrated battery storage system. This paper describes the outline and results of this project. These results show the effectiveness of battery storage system and also proposed output control methods for a large-scale PV system to ensure stable operation of power grids. NEDO, New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan conducted this project and HEPCO, Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc managed the overall project.

  9. Geo-spatial Cognition on Human's Social Activity Space Based on Multi-scale Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAI Weixin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Widely applied location aware devices, including mobile phones and GPS receivers, have provided great convenience for collecting large volume individuals' geographical information. The researches on the human's society behavior space has attracts an increasingly number of researchers. In our research, based on location-based Flickr data From 2004 to May, 2014 in China, we choose five levels of spatial grids to form the multi-scale frame for investigate the correlation between the scale and the geo-spatial cognition on human's social activity space. The HT-index is selected as the fractal inspired by Alexander to estimate the maturity of the society activity on different scales. The results indicate that that the scale characteristics are related to the spatial cognition to a certain extent. It is favorable to use the spatial grid as a tool to control scales for geo-spatial cognition on human's social activity space.

  10. Screening wells by multi-scale grids for multi-stage Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Hani; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2018-01-01

    /production wells, aiming at accurate breakthrough capturing as well as above mentioned efficiency goals. However this short time simulation needs fine-scale structure of the geological model around wells and running a fine-scale model is not as cheap as necessary for screening steps. On the other hand applying...... it on a coarse-scale model declines important data around wells and causes inaccurate results, particularly accurate breakthrough capturing which is important for prediction applications. Therefore we propose a multi-scale grid which preserves the fine-scale model around wells (as well as high permeable regions...... and fractures) and coarsens rest of the field and keeps efficiency and accuracy for the screening well stage and coarse-scale simulation, as well. A discrete wavelet transform is used as a powerful tool to generate the desired unstructured multi-scale grid efficiently. Finally an accepted proposal on coarse...

  11. New power distribution challenges at the local scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, Marion; Cadoux, Florent; Petit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Distribution grids are facing the connection of both more and more variable distributed generation sources and new loads such as electric vehicles. Then distribution grid operators evolve to distribution system operators (DSOs) with new flexibilities (power control of distributed energy sources) to complete their traditional planning and operation tools. In the future, additional distributed resources could be used, such as demand response and storage. DSOs are becoming actors of a global electrical system where power balancing must be ensured at the European level with local constraints (congestion and voltage), and with power flows from transmission to distribution grids but also inside the distribution grid or from distribution to transmission. Sensors and data availability are key issues to enable these transformations. This paper defines some general concerns and present European issues with illustrations from the French electrical system. (authors)

  12. A Bubble-Based Drag Model at the Local-Grid Level for Eulerian Simulation of Bubbling Fluidized Beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A bubble-based drag model at the local-grid level is proposed to simulate gas-solid flows in bubbling fluidized beds of Geldart A particles. In this model, five balance equations are derived from the mass and the momentum conservation. This set of equations along with necessary correlations for bubble diameter and voidage of emulsion phase is solved to obtain seven local structural parameters (uge, upe, εe, δb, ub, db, and ab which describe heterogeneous flows of bubbling fluidized beds. The modified drag coefficient obtained from the above-mentioned structural parameters is then incorporated into the two-fluid model to simulate the hydrodynamics of Geldart A particles in a lab-scale bubbling fluidized bed. The comparison between experimental and simulation results for the axial and radial solids concentration profiles is promising.

  13. A Numerical Analysis on the Local Deformation of a Spacer Grid Structure for Nuclear Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Myung-Geun; Na, Geum Ju; Kim, Jong-Bong; Shin, Hyunho

    2016-01-01

    The result of a preliminary numerical investigation on local deformation characteristics of a multi-layered spacer-grid structure with five guide tubes is reported based on implicit finite element analysis. For the numerical analysis, displacements of top and bottom cross sections of each guide tube in a single-layer model were constrained while a lateral displacement was imposed on the single layer. Unlike the impact hammer test that is generally employed to characterize the deformation characteristics of the space-grid structure, the buckling phenomenon occurs locally in this study; it takes place at the inner grids around each tube and the degree of bucking is more apparent for tubes near the lateral surface where the lateral displacement was imposed. (paper)

  14. Mesoscale and Local Scale Evaluations of Quantitative Precipitation Estimates by Weather Radar Products during a Heavy Rainfall Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basile Pauthier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-hour heavy rainfall event occurred in northeastern France from November 3 to 4, 2014. The accuracy of the quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE by PANTHERE and ANTILOPE radar-based gridded products during this particular event, is examined at both mesoscale and local scale, in comparison with two reference rain-gauge networks. Mesoscale accuracy was assessed for the total rainfall accumulated during the 24-hour event, using the Météo France operational rain-gauge network. Local scale accuracy was assessed for both total event rainfall and hourly rainfall accumulations, using the recently developed HydraVitis high-resolution rain gauge network Evaluation shows that (1 PANTHERE radar-based QPE underestimates rainfall fields at mesoscale and local scale; (2 both PANTHERE and ANTILOPE successfully reproduced the spatial variability of rainfall at local scale; (3 PANTHERE underestimates can be significantly improved at local scale by merging these data with rain gauge data interpolation (i.e., ANTILOPE. This study provides a preliminary evaluation of radar-based QPE at local scale, suggesting that merged products are invaluable for applications at very high resolution. The results obtained underline the importance of using high-density rain-gauge networks to obtain information at high spatial and temporal resolution, for better understanding of local rainfall variation, to calibrate remotely sensed rainfall products.

  15. Grid Support in Large Scale PV Power Plants using Active Power Reserves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craciun, Bogdan-Ionut

    to validate the performance of the frequency support functions, a flexible grid model with IEEE 12 bus system characteristics has been developed and implemented in RTDS. A power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) system composed by 20 kW plant (2 x 10 kW inverters and PV linear simulator) and grid simulator (RTDS......Photovoltaic (PV) systems are in the 3rd place in the renewable energy market, after hydro and wind power. The increased penetration of PV within the electrical power system has led to stability issues of the entire grid in terms of its reliability, availability and security of the supply....... As a consequence, Large scale PV Power Plants (LPVPPs) operating in Maximum Power Point (MPP) are not supporting the electrical network, since several grid triggering events or the increased number of downward regulation procedures have forced European Network of Transmission System Operators for Electricity...

  16. Scaling of spectra in grid turbulence with a mean cross-stream temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Carla; Arwatz, Gilad; Mueller, Michael E.; George, William K.; Hultmark, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    Scaling of grid turbulence with a constant mean cross-stream temperature gradient is investigated using a combination of theoretical predictions, DNS, and experimental data. Conditions for self-similarity of the governing equations and the scalar spectrum are investigated, which reveals necessary conditions for self-similarity to exist. These conditions provide a theoretical framework for scaling of the temperature spectrum as well as the temperature flux spectrum. One necessary condition, predicted by the theory, is that the characteristic length scale describing the scalar spectrum must vary as √{ t} for a self-similar solution to exist. In order to investigate this, T-NSTAP sensors, specially designed for temperature measurements at high frequencies, were deployed in a heated passive grid turbulence setup together with conventional cold-wires, and complementary DNS calculations were performed to complement and complete the experimental data. These data are used to compare the behavior of different length scales and validate the theoretical predictions.

  17. Grid scale energy storage in salt caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crotogino, F.; Donadei, S.

    2011-05-15

    Fossil energy sources require some 20% of the annual consumption to be stored to secure emergency cover, cold winter supply, peak shaving, seasonal swing, load management and energy trading. Today the electric power industry benefits from the extreme high energy density of fossil and nuclear fuels. This is one important reason why e.g. the German utilities are able to provide highly reliable grid operation at a electric power storage capacity at their pumped hydro power stations of less then 1 hour (40 GWh) related to the total load in the grid - i.e. only 0,06% compared to 20% for natural gas. Along with the changeover to renewable wind-and to a lesser extent PV-based electricity production this 'outsourcing' of storage services to fossil and nuclear fuels will decline. One important way out will be grid scale energy storage in geological formations. The present discussion, research projects and plans for balancing short term wind and solar power fluctuations focus primarily on the installation of Compressed Air Energy Storages (CAES) if the capacity of existing pumped hydro plants cannot be expanded, e.g. because of environmental issues or lack of suitable topography. Because of their small energy density, these storage options are, however, generally less suitable for balancing for longer term fluctuations in case of larger amounts of excess wind power, wind flaws or even seasonal fluctuations. One important way out are large underground hydrogen storages which provide a much higher energy density because of chemical energy bond. Underground hydrogen storage is state of the art since many years in Great Britain and in the USA for the (petro-) chemical industry. (Author)

  18. The footprint of atmospheric turbulence in power grid frequency measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haehne, H.; Schottler, J.; Waechter, M.; Peinke, J.; Kamps, O.

    2018-02-01

    Fluctuating wind energy makes a stable grid operation challenging. Due to the direct contact with atmospheric turbulence, intermittent short-term variations in the wind speed are converted to power fluctuations that cause transient imbalances in the grid. We investigate the impact of wind energy feed-in on short-term fluctuations in the frequency of the public power grid, which we have measured in our local distribution grid. By conditioning on wind power production data, provided by the ENTSO-E transparency platform, we demonstrate that wind energy feed-in has a measurable effect on frequency increment statistics for short time scales (renewable generation.

  19. Accurate Locally Conservative Discretizations for Modeling Multiphase Flow in Porous Media on General Hexahedra Grids

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, M.F.

    2010-09-06

    For many years there have been formulations considered for modeling single phase ow on general hexahedra grids. These include the extended mixed nite element method, and families of mimetic nite di erence methods. In most of these schemes either no rate of convergence of the algorithm has been demonstrated both theoret- ically and computationally or a more complicated saddle point system needs to be solved for an accurate solution. Here we describe a multipoint ux mixed nite element (MFMFE) method [5, 2, 3]. This method is motivated from the multipoint ux approximation (MPFA) method [1]. The MFMFE method is locally conservative with continuous ux approximations and is a cell-centered scheme for the pressure. Compared to the MPFA method, the MFMFE has a variational formulation, since it can be viewed as a mixed nite element with special approximating spaces and quadrature rules. The framework allows han- dling of hexahedral grids with non-planar faces by applying trilinear mappings from physical elements to reference cubic elements. In addition, there are several multi- scale and multiphysics extensions such as the mortar mixed nite element method that allows the treatment of non-matching grids [4]. Extensions to the two-phase oil-water ow are considered. We reformulate the two- phase model in terms of total velocity, capillary velocity, water pressure, and water saturation. We choose water pressure and water saturation as primary variables. The total velocity is driven by the gradient of the water pressure and total mobility. Iterative coupling scheme is employed for the coupled system. This scheme allows treatments of di erent time scales for the water pressure and water saturation. In each time step, we rst solve the pressure equation using the MFMFE method; we then Center for Subsurface Modeling, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712; mfw@ices.utexas.edu. yCenter for Subsurface Modeling, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712; gxue

  20. SuperGrid or SmartGrid: Competing strategies for large-scale integration of intermittent renewables?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blarke, Morten B.; Jenkins, Bryan M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper defines and compares two strategies for integrating intermittent renewables: SuperGrid and SmartGrid. While conventional energy policy suggests that these strategies may be implemented alongside each other, the paper identifies significant technological and socio-economic conflicts of interest between the two. The article identifies differences between a domestic strategy for the integration of intermittent renewables, vis-à-vis the SmartGrid, and a cross-system strategy, vis-à-vis the SuperGrid. Policy makers and transmission system operators must understand the need for both strategies to evolve in parallel, but in different territories, or with strategic integration, avoiding for one strategy to undermine the feasibility of the other. A strategic zoning strategy is introduced from which attentive societies as well as the global community stand to benefit. The analysis includes a paradigmatic case study from West Denmark which supports the hypothesis that these strategies are mutually exclusive. The case study shows that increasing cross-system transmission capacity jeopardizes the feasibility of SmartGrid technology investments. A political effort is required for establishing dedicated SmartGrid innovation zones, while also redefining infrastructure to avoid the narrow focus on grids and cables. SmartGrid Investment Trusts could be supported from reallocation of planned transmission grid investments to provide for the equitable development of SmartGrid strategies. - Highlights: • Compares SuperGrid and SmartGrid strategies for integrating intermittent renewables. • Identifies technological and socio-economic conflicts of interest between the two. • Proposes a strategic zoning strategy allowing for both strategies to evolve. • Presents a paradigmatic case study showing that strategies are mutually exclusive. • Proposes dedicated SmartGrid innovation zones and SmartGrid investment trusts

  1. A grid-independent EMMS/bubbling drag model for bubbling and turbulent fluidization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Hao; Lu, Bona; Zhang, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    The EMMS/bubbling drag model takes the effects of meso-scale structures (i.e. bubbles) into modeling of drag coefficient and thus improves coarse-grid simulation of bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds. However, its dependence on grid size has not been fully investigated. In this article, we adopt...... a two-step scheme to extend the EMMS/bubbling model to the sub-grid level. Thus the heterogeneity index, HD, which accounts for the hydrodynamic disparity between homogeneous and heterogeneous fluidization, can be correlated as a function of both local voidage and slip velocity. Simulations over...... a periodic domain show the new drag model is less sensitive to grid size because of the additional dependence on local slip velocity. When applying the new drag model to simulations of realistic bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds, we find grid-independent results are easier to obtain for high...

  2. Spatio-temporal variability of soil water content on the local scale in a Mediterranean mountain area (Vallcebre, North Eastern Spain). How different spatio-temporal scales reflect mean soil water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Antonio J.; Latron, Jérôme; Rubio, Carles M.; Gallart, Francesc; Llorens, Pilar

    2014-08-01

    As a result of complex human-land interactions and topographic variability, many Mediterranean mountain catchments are covered by agricultural terraces that have locally modified the soil water content dynamic. Understanding these local-scale dynamics helps us grasp better how hydrology behaves on the catchment scale. Thus, this study examined soil water content variability in the upper 30 cm of the soil on a Mediterranean abandoned terrace in north-east Spain. Using a dataset of high spatial (regular grid of 128 automatic TDR probes at 2.5 m intervals) and temporal (20-min time step) resolution, gathered throughout a 84-day period, the spatio-temporal variability of soil water content at the local scale and the way that different spatio-temporal scales reflect the mean soil water content were investigated. Soil water content spatial variability and its relation to wetness conditions were examined, along with the spatial structuring of the soil water content within the terrace. Then, the ability of single probes and of different combinations of spatial measurements (transects and grids) to provide a good estimate of mean soil water content on the terrace scale was explored by means of temporal stability analyses. Finally, the effect of monitoring frequency on the magnitude of detectable daily soil water content variations was studied. Results showed that soil water content spatial variability followed a bimodal pattern of increasing absolute variability with increasing soil water content. In addition, a linear trend of decreasing soil water content as the distance from the inner part of the terrace increased was identified. Once this trend was subtracted, resulting semi-variograms suggested that the spatial resolution examined was too high to appreciate spatial structuring in the data. Thus, the spatial pattern should be considered as random. Of all the spatial designs tested, the 10 × 10 m mesh grid (9 probes) was considered the most suitable option for a good

  3. Job scheduling in a heterogenous grid environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Shan, Hongzhang; Smith, Warren

    2004-02-11

    Computational grids have the potential for solving large-scale scientific problems using heterogeneous and geographically distributed resources. However, a number of major technical hurdles must be overcome before this potential can be realized. One problem that is critical to effective utilization of computational grids is the efficient scheduling of jobs. This work addresses this problem by describing and evaluating a grid scheduling architecture and three job migration algorithms. The architecture is scalable and does not assume control of local site resources. The job migration policies use the availability and performance of computer systems, the network bandwidth available between systems, and the volume of input and output data associated with each job. An extensive performance comparison is presented using real workloads from leading computational centers. The results, based on several key metrics, demonstrate that the performance of our distributed migration algorithms is significantly greater than that of a local scheduling framework and comparable to a non-scalable global scheduling approach.

  4. Research on the impacts of large-scale electric vehicles integration into power grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chuankun; Zhang, Jian

    2018-06-01

    Because of its special energy driving mode, electric vehicles can improve the efficiency of energy utilization and reduce the pollution to the environment, which is being paid more and more attention. But the charging behavior of electric vehicles is random and intermittent. If the electric vehicle is disordered charging in a large scale, it causes great pressure on the structure and operation of the power grid and affects the safety and economic operation of the power grid. With the development of V2G technology in electric vehicle, the study of the charging and discharging characteristics of electric vehicles is of great significance for improving the safe operation of the power grid and the efficiency of energy utilization.

  5. Urban micro-grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, Maeva; Salmon, Martin; El Fadili, Safae; Payen, Luc; Kerlero, Guillaume; Banner, Arnaud; Ehinger, Andreas; Illouz, Sebastien; Picot, Roland; Jolivet, Veronique; Michon Savarit, Jeanne; Strang, Karl Axel

    2017-02-01

    ENEA Consulting published the results of a study on urban micro-grids conducted in partnership with the Group ADP, the Group Caisse des Depots, ENEDIS, Omexom, Total and the Tuck Foundation. This study offers a vision of the definition of an urban micro-grid, the value brought by a micro-grid in different contexts based on real case studies, and the upcoming challenges that micro-grid stakeholders will face (regulation, business models, technology). The electric production and distribution system, as the backbone of an increasingly urbanized and energy dependent society, is urged to shift towards a more resilient, efficient and environment-friendly infrastructure. Decentralisation of electricity production into densely populated areas is a promising opportunity to achieve this transition. A micro-grid enhances local production through clustering electricity producers and consumers within a delimited electricity network; it has the ability to disconnect from the main grid for a limited period of time, offering an energy security service to its customers during grid outages for example. However: The islanding capability is an inherent feature of the micro-grid concept that leads to a significant premium on electricity cost, especially in a system highly reliant on intermittent electricity production. In this case, a smart grid, with local energy production and no islanding capability, can be customized to meet relevant sustainability and cost savings goals at lower costs For industrials, urban micro-grids can be economically profitable in presence of high share of reliable energy production and thermal energy demand micro-grids face strong regulatory challenges that should be overcome for further development Whether islanding is or is not implemented into the system, end-user demand for a greener, more local, cheaper and more reliable energy, as well as additional services to the grid, are strong drivers for local production and consumption. In some specific cases

  6. Comparison tomography relocation hypocenter grid search and guided grid search method in Java island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurdian, S. W.; Adu, N.; Palupi, I. R.; Raharjo, W.

    2016-01-01

    The main data in this research is earthquake data recorded from 1952 to 2012 with 9162 P wave and 2426 events are recorded by 30 stations located around Java island. Relocation hypocenter processed using grid search and guidded grid search method. Then the result of relocation hypocenter become input for tomography pseudo bending inversion process. It can be used to identification the velocity distribution in subsurface. The result of relocation hypocenter by grid search and guided grid search method after tomography process shown in locally and globally. In locally area grid search method result is better than guided grid search according to geological reseach area. But in globally area the result of guided grid search method is better for a broad area because the velocity variation is more diverse than the other one and in accordance with local geological research conditions. (paper)

  7. The first neighborhood micro-grid of shared energy, RennesGrid: A harbinger of the energy transition at the local level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djahel, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    To develop a concrete policy for saving energy and for the energy transition, the Rennes metropolitan area and Schneider Electric have launched RennesGrid, a 20-year experiment with managing energy consumption at Ker Lann, an urban development zone located in Bruz township, 12 kilometers southwest of Rennes, France. Covering more than 160 hectares, Ker Lann groups: approximately sixty companies specialized in high technology; seventeen establishments of higher education, research and training; and residential units and dormitories for students. RennesGrid will make it less dependent on carbon energy thanks to the production of local, renewable sources using photovoltaic installations. For consumers, the objective is to reduce their energy needs and consume a renewable form of energy produced locally. Planned for operation at the end of 2017 and endowed with a global investment budget of Euro 5.8 million, this experiment is a private business with a hold over three hectares of land under a 20-year concession. Its business model is, however, mainly based on a cooperative approach (in particular with residents of the zone) and on innovative arrangements for participatory funding

  8. A WTG system for local grid supply substitution: stages to implementation and monitoring. Report on the institutional aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The demonstration project consisted of installing one 50 kW wind turbine generator in a rural area of Scotland to supply electricity both locally and for sale of surplus to the existing grid network. The paper reports on the difficulties encountered at the local planning application stage and in negotiating a connection to the UK national grid. Technical difficulties encountered with respect to equipment specification and suitability for connection to the grid network should serve as a warning to other potential contractors. The difficulties encountered were of sufficient magnitude that it became necessary to involve the National Engineering Laboratory as facilitator. The paper should be useful to anyone considering installing wind turbines in the UK

  9. A WTG system for local grid supply substitution: stages to implementation and monitoring. Report on the institutional aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The demonstration project consisted of installing one 50 kW wind turbine generator in a rural area of Scotland to supply electricity both locally and for sale of surplus to the existing grid network. The paper reports on the difficulties encountered at the local planning application stage and in negotiating a connection to the UK national grid. Technical difficulties encountered with respect to equipment specification and suitability for connection to the grid network should serve as a warning to other potential contractors. The difficulties encountered were of sufficient magnitude that it became necessary to involve the National Engineering Laboratory as facilitator. The paper should be useful to anyone considering installing wind turbines in the UK.

  10. Cosmos++: relativistic magnetohydrodynamics on unstructured grids with local adaptive refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmonson, Jay D; Anninos, Peter; Fragile, P Chris; Camarda, Karen

    2007-01-01

    A code and methodology are introduced for solving the fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) equations using time-explicit, finite-volume discretization. The code has options for solving the GRMHD equations using traditional artificial-viscosity (AV) or non-oscillatory central difference (NOCD) methods, or a new extended AV (eAV) scheme using artificial-viscosity together with a dual energy-flux-conserving formulation. The dual energy approach allows for accurate modeling of highly relativistic flows at boost factors well beyond what has been achieved to date by standard artificial viscosity methods. It provides the benefit of Godunov methods in capturing high Lorentz boosted flows but without complicated Riemann solvers, and the advantages of traditional artificial viscosity methods in their speed and flexibility. Additionally, the GRMHD equations are solved on an unstructured grid that supports local adaptive mesh refinement using a fully threaded oct-tree (in three dimensions) network to traverse the grid hierarchy across levels and immediate neighbors. Some recent studies will be summarized

  11. Security and VO management capabilities in a large-scale Grid operating system

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, Benjamin; Sporea, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a number of security and VO management capabilities in a large-scale distributed Grid operating system. The capabilities formed the basis of the design and implementation of a number of security and VO management services in the system. The main aim of the paper is to provide some idea of the various functionality cases that need to be considered when designing similar large-scale systems in the future.

  12. Coordinated learning of grid cell and place cell spatial and temporal properties: multiple scales, attention and oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, Stephen; Pilly, Praveen K

    2014-02-05

    A neural model proposes how entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells may develop as spatial categories in a hierarchy of self-organizing maps (SOMs). The model responds to realistic rat navigational trajectories by learning both grid cells with hexagonal grid firing fields of multiple spatial scales, and place cells with one or more firing fields, that match neurophysiological data about their development in juvenile rats. Both grid and place cells can develop by detecting, learning and remembering the most frequent and energetic co-occurrences of their inputs. The model's parsimonious properties include: similar ring attractor mechanisms process linear and angular path integration inputs that drive map learning; the same SOM mechanisms can learn grid cell and place cell receptive fields; and the learning of the dorsoventral organization of multiple spatial scale modules through medial entorhinal cortex to hippocampus (HC) may use mechanisms homologous to those for temporal learning through lateral entorhinal cortex to HC ('neural relativity'). The model clarifies how top-down HC-to-entorhinal attentional mechanisms may stabilize map learning, simulates how hippocampal inactivation may disrupt grid cells, and explains data about theta, beta and gamma oscillations. The article also compares the three main types of grid cell models in the light of recent data.

  13. A manganese-hydrogen battery with potential for grid-scale energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Guodong; Pei, Allen; Li, Yuzhang; Liao, Lei; Wang, Hongxia; Wan, Jiayu; Liang, Zheng; Chen, Guangxu; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Jiangyan; Cui, Yi

    2018-05-01

    Batteries including lithium-ion, lead-acid, redox-flow and liquid-metal batteries show promise for grid-scale storage, but they are still far from meeting the grid's storage needs such as low cost, long cycle life, reliable safety and reasonable energy density for cost and footprint reduction. Here, we report a rechargeable manganese-hydrogen battery, where the cathode is cycled between soluble Mn2+ and solid MnO2 with a two-electron reaction, and the anode is cycled between H2 gas and H2O through well-known catalytic reactions of hydrogen evolution and oxidation. This battery chemistry exhibits a discharge voltage of 1.3 V, a rate capability of 100 mA cm-2 (36 s of discharge) and a lifetime of more than 10,000 cycles without decay. We achieve a gravimetric energy density of 139 Wh kg-1 (volumetric energy density of 210 Wh l-1), with the theoretical gravimetric energy density of 174 Wh kg-1 (volumetric energy density of 263 Wh l-1) in a 4 M MnSO4 electrolyte. The manganese-hydrogen battery involves low-cost abundant materials and has the potential to be scaled up for large-scale energy storage.

  14. Operation strategy for a lab-scale grid-connected photovoltaic generation system integrated with battery energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jou, Hurng-Liahng; Chang, Yi-Hao; Wu, Jinn-Chang; Wu, Kuen-Der

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The operation strategy for grid-connected PV generation system integrated with battery energy storage is proposed. • The PV system is composed of an inverter and two DC-DC converter. • The negative impact of grid-connected PV generation systems on the grid can be alleviated by integrating a battery. • The operation of the developed system can be divided into nine modes. - Abstract: The operation strategy for a lab-scale grid-connected photovoltaic generation system integrated with battery energy storage is proposed in this paper. The photovoltaic generation system is composed of a full-bridge inverter, a DC–DC boost converter, an isolated bidirectional DC–DC converter, a solar cell array and a battery set. Since the battery set acts as an energy buffer to adjust the power generation of the solar cell array, the negative impact on power quality caused by the intermittent and unstable output power from a solar cell array is alleviated, so the penetration rate of the grid-connected photovoltaic generation system is increased. A lab-scale prototype is developed to verify the performance of the system. The experimental results show that it achieves the expected performance

  15. Wingridder - an interactive grid generator for TOUGH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Lehua

    2003-01-01

    The TOUGH (Transport Of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat) family of codes has great flexibility in handling the variety of grid information required to describe a complex subsurface system. However, designing and generating such a grid can be a tedious and error-prone process. This is especially true when the number of cells and connections is very large. As a user-friendly, efficient, and effective grid generating software, WinGridder has been developed for designing, generating, and visualizing (at various spatial scales) numerical grids used in reservoir simulations and groundwater modeling studies. It can save mesh files for TOUGH family codes. It can also output additional grid information for various purposes in either graphic format or plain text format. It has user-friendly graphical user interfaces, along with an easy-to-use interactive design and plot tools. Many important features, such as inclined faults and offset, layering structure, local refinements, and embedded engineering structures, can be represented in the grid

  16. Using a Virtual Experiment to Analyze Infiltration Process from Point to Grid-cell Size Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrological science requires the emergence of a consistent theoretical corpus driving the relationships between dominant physical processes at different spatial and temporal scales. However, the strong spatial heterogeneities and non-linearities of these processes make difficult the development of multiscale conceptualizations. Therefore, scaling understanding is a key issue to advance this science. This work is focused on the use of virtual experiments to address the scaling of vertical infiltration from a physically based model at point scale to a simplified physically meaningful modeling approach at grid-cell scale. Numerical simulations have the advantage of deal with a wide range of boundary and initial conditions against field experimentation. The aim of the work was to show the utility of numerical simulations to discover relationships between the hydrological parameters at both scales, and to use this synthetic experience as a media to teach the complex nature of this hydrological process. The Green-Ampt model was used to represent vertical infiltration at point scale; and a conceptual storage model was employed to simulate the infiltration process at the grid-cell scale. Lognormal and beta probability distribution functions were assumed to represent the heterogeneity of soil hydraulic parameters at point scale. The linkages between point scale parameters and the grid-cell scale parameters were established by inverse simulations based on the mass balance equation and the averaging of the flow at the point scale. Results have shown numerical stability issues for particular conditions and have revealed the complex nature of the non-linear relationships between models' parameters at both scales and indicate that the parameterization of point scale processes at the coarser scale is governed by the amplification of non-linear effects. The findings of these simulations have been used by the students to identify potential research questions on scale issues

  17. ARC Cache: A solution for lightweight Grid sites in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Garonne, Vincent; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Many Grid sites have the need to reduce operational manpower, and running a storage element consumes a large amount of effort. In addition, setting up a new Grid site including a storage element involves a steep learning curve and large investment of time. For these reasons so-called storage-less sites are becoming more popular as a way to provide Grid computing resources with less operational overhead. ARC CE is a widely-used and mature Grid middleware which was designed from the start to be used on sites with no persistent storage element. Instead, it maintains a local self-managing cache of data which retains popular data for future jobs. As the cache is simply an area on a local posix shared filesystem with no external-facing service, it requires no extra maintenance. The cache can be scaled up as required by increasing the size of the filesystem or adding new filesystems. This paper describes how ARC CE and its cache are an ideal solution for lightweight Grid sites in the ATLAS experiment, and the integr...

  18. How entorhinal grid cells may learn multiple spatial scales from a dorsoventral gradient of cell response rates in a self-organizing map.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Grossberg

    Full Text Available Place cells in the hippocampus of higher mammals are critical for spatial navigation. Recent modeling clarifies how this may be achieved by how grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC input to place cells. Grid cells exhibit hexagonal grid firing patterns across space in multiple spatial scales along the MEC dorsoventral axis. Signals from grid cells of multiple scales combine adaptively to activate place cells that represent much larger spaces than grid cells. But how do grid cells learn to fire at multiple positions that form a hexagonal grid, and with spatial scales that increase along the dorsoventral axis? In vitro recordings of medial entorhinal layer II stellate cells have revealed subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs whose temporal periods, and time constants of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs, both increase along this axis. Slower (faster subthreshold MPOs and slower (faster EPSPs correlate with larger (smaller grid spacings and field widths. A self-organizing map neural model explains how the anatomical gradient of grid spatial scales can be learned by cells that respond more slowly along the gradient to their inputs from stripe cells of multiple scales, which perform linear velocity path integration. The model cells also exhibit MPO frequencies that covary with their response rates. The gradient in intrinsic rhythmicity is thus not compelling evidence for oscillatory interference as a mechanism of grid cell firing. A response rate gradient combined with input stripe cells that have normalized receptive fields can reproduce all known spatial and temporal properties of grid cells along the MEC dorsoventral axis. This spatial gradient mechanism is homologous to a gradient mechanism for temporal learning in the lateral entorhinal cortex and its hippocampal projections. Spatial and temporal representations may hereby arise from homologous mechanisms, thereby embodying a mechanistic "neural relativity" that

  19. ImmunoGrid: towards agent-based simulations of the human immune system at a natural scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Brown, M.; Pappalardo, F.; Rapin, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    , such as the European Virtual Physiological Human initiative. Finally, we ask a key question: How long will it take us to resolve these challenges and when can we expect to have fully functional models that will deliver health-care benefits in the form of personalized care solutions and improved disease prevention?......The ultimate aim of the EU-funded ImmunoGrid project is to develop a natural-scale model of the human immune system-that is, one that reflects both the diversity and the relative proportions of the molecules and cells that comprise it-together with the grid infrastructure necessary to apply...... this model to specific applications in the field of immunology. These objectives present the ImmunoGrid Consortium with formidable challenges in terms of complexity of the immune system, our partial understanding about how the immune system works, the lack of reliable data and the scale of computational...

  20. Simulating multi-scale oceanic processes around Taiwan on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao-Cheng; Zhang, Yinglong J.; Yu, Jason C. S.; Terng, C.; Sun, Weiling; Ye, Fei; Wang, Harry V.; Wang, Zhengui; Huang, Hai

    2017-11-01

    We validate a 3D unstructured-grid (UG) model for simulating multi-scale processes as occurred in Northwestern Pacific around Taiwan using recently developed new techniques (Zhang et al., Ocean Modeling, 102, 64-81, 2016) that require no bathymetry smoothing even for this region with prevalent steep bottom slopes and many islands. The focus is on short-term forecast for several months instead of long-term variability. Compared with satellite products, the errors for the simulated Sea-surface Height (SSH) and Sea-surface Temperature (SST) are similar to a reference data-assimilated global model. In the nearshore region, comparison with 34 tide gauges located around Taiwan indicates an average RMSE of 13 cm for the tidal elevation. The average RMSE for SST at 6 coastal buoys is 1.2 °C. The mean transport and eddy kinetic energy compare reasonably with previously published values and the reference model used to provide boundary and initial conditions. The model suggests ∼2-day interruption of Kuroshio east of Taiwan during a typhoon period. The effect of tidal mixing is shown to be significant nearshore. The multi-scale model is easily extendable to target regions of interest due to its UG framework and a flexible vertical gridding system, which is shown to be superior to terrain-following coordinates.

  1. TopoSCALE v.1.0: downscaling gridded climate data in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiddes, J.; Gruber, S.

    2014-02-01

    Simulation of land surface processes is problematic in heterogeneous terrain due to the the high resolution required of model grids to capture strong lateral variability caused by, for example, topography, and the lack of accurate meteorological forcing data at the site or scale it is required. Gridded data products produced by atmospheric models can fill this gap, however, often not at an appropriate spatial resolution to drive land-surface simulations. In this study we describe a method that uses the well-resolved description of the atmospheric column provided by climate models, together with high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs), to downscale coarse-grid climate variables to a fine-scale subgrid. The main aim of this approach is to provide high-resolution driving data for a land-surface model (LSM). The method makes use of an interpolation of pressure-level data according to topographic height of the subgrid. An elevation and topography correction is used to downscale short-wave radiation. Long-wave radiation is downscaled by deriving a cloud-component of all-sky emissivity at grid level and using downscaled temperature and relative humidity fields to describe variability with elevation. Precipitation is downscaled with a simple non-linear lapse and optionally disaggregated using a climatology approach. We test the method in comparison with unscaled grid-level data and a set of reference methods, against a large evaluation dataset (up to 210 stations per variable) in the Swiss Alps. We demonstrate that the method can be used to derive meteorological inputs in complex terrain, with most significant improvements (with respect to reference methods) seen in variables derived from pressure levels: air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and incoming long-wave radiation. This method may be of use in improving inputs to numerical simulations in heterogeneous and/or remote terrain, especially when statistical methods are not possible, due to lack of

  2. Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery: Hydrogen Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid Scale Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: LBNL is designing a flow battery for grid storage that relies on a hydrogen-bromine chemistry which could be more efficient, last longer and cost less than today’s lead-acid batteries. Flow batteries are fundamentally different from traditional lead-acid batteries because the chemical reactants that provide their energy are stored in external tanks instead of inside the battery. A flow battery can provide more energy because all that is required to increase its storage capacity is to increase the size of the external tanks. The hydrogen-bromine reactants used by LBNL in its flow battery are inexpensive, long lasting, and provide power quickly. The cost of the design could be well below $100 per kilowatt hour, which would rival conventional grid-scale battery technologies.

  3. Phenomenology of local scale invariance: from conformal invariance to dynamical scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, Malte

    2002-01-01

    Statistical systems displaying a strongly anisotropic or dynamical scaling behaviour are characterized by an anisotropy exponent θ or a dynamical exponent z. For a given value of θ (or z), we construct local scale transformations, which can be viewed as scale transformations with a space-time-dependent dilatation factor. Two distinct types of local scale transformations are found. The first type may describe strongly anisotropic scaling of static systems with a given value of θ, whereas the second type may describe dynamical scaling with a dynamical exponent z. Local scale transformations act as a dynamical symmetry group of certain non-local free-field theories. Known special cases of local scale invariance are conformal invariance for θ=1 and Schroedinger invariance for θ=2. The hypothesis of local scale invariance implies that two-point functions of quasi primary operators satisfy certain linear fractional differential equations, which are constructed from commuting fractional derivatives. The explicit solution of these yields exact expressions for two-point correlators at equilibrium and for two-point response functions out of equilibrium. A particularly simple and general form is found for the two-time auto response function. These predictions are explicitly confirmed at the uniaxial Lifshitz points in the ANNNI and ANNNS models and in the aging behaviour of simple ferromagnets such as the kinetic Glauber-Ising model and the kinetic spherical model with a non-conserved order parameter undergoing either phase-ordering kinetics or non-equilibrium critical dynamics

  4. Local-scale high-resolution atmospheric dispersion model using large-eddy simulation. LOHDIM-LES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hiromasa; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2016-03-01

    We developed LOcal-scale High-resolution atmospheric DIspersion Model using Large-Eddy Simulation (LOHDIM-LES). This dispersion model is designed based on LES which is effective to reproduce unsteady behaviors of turbulent flows and plume dispersion. The basic equations are the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equation, and the scalar conservation equation. Buildings and local terrain variability are resolved by high-resolution grids with a few meters and these turbulent effects are represented by immersed boundary method. In simulating atmospheric turbulence, boundary layer flows are generated by a recycling turbulent inflow technique in a driver region set up at the upstream of the main analysis region. This turbulent inflow data are imposed at the inlet of the main analysis region. By this approach, the LOHDIM-LES can provide detailed information on wind velocities and plume concentration in the investigated area. (author)

  5. Coarse grid simulation of bed expansion characteristics of industrial-scale gas–solid bubbling fluidized beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; van der Hoef, Martin Anton; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Two-fluid modeling of the hydrodynamics of industrial-scale gas-fluidized beds proves a long-standing challenge for both engineers and scientists. In this study, we suggest a simple method to modify currently available drag correlations to allow for the effect of unresolved sub-grid scale

  6. SuperGrid or SmartGrid: Competing strategies for large-scale integration of intermittent renewables?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blarke, Morten; M. Jenkins, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    This paper defines and compares two strategies for integrating intermittent renewables: SuperGrid and SmartGrid. While conventional energy policy suggests that these strategies may be implemented alongside each other, the paper identifies significant technological and socio-economic conflicts...... of interest between the two. The article identifies differences between a domestic strategy for the integration of intermittent renewables, vis-à-vis the SmartGrid, and a cross-system strategy, vis-à-vis the SuperGrid. Policy makers and transmission system operators must understand the need for both...... a paradigmatic case study from West Denmark which supports the hypothesis that these strategies are mutually exclusive. The case study shows that increasing cross-system transmission capacity jeopardizes the feasibility of SmartGrid technology investments. A political effort is required for establishing...

  7. Analysis for Large Scale Integration of Electric Vehicles into Power Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Weihao; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Xiaoru

    2011-01-01

    Electric Vehicles (EVs) provide a significant opportunity for reducing the consumption of fossil energies and the emission of carbon dioxide. With more and more electric vehicles integrated in the power systems, it becomes important to study the effects of EV integration on the power systems......, especially the low and middle voltage level networks. In the paper, the basic structure and characteristics of the electric vehicles are introduced. The possible impacts of large scale integration of electric vehicles on the power systems especially the advantage to the integration of the renewable energies...... are discussed. Finally, the research projects related to the large scale integration of electric vehicles into the power systems are introduced, it will provide reference for large scale integration of Electric Vehicles into power grids....

  8. Scaling Up Renewable Energy Generation: Aligning Targets and Incentives with Grid Integration Considerations, Greening The Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Jessica; Cochran, Jaquelin

    2015-05-27

    Greening the Grid provides technical assistance to energy system planners, regulators, and grid operators to overcome challenges associated with integrating variable renewable energy into the grid. This document, part of a Greening the Grid toolkit, provides power system planners with tips to help secure and sustain investment in new renewable energy generation by aligning renewable energy policy targets and incentives with grid integration considerations.

  9. Review of DC System Technologies for Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy Systems with Electricity Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Jie Shao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The ever increasing development and availability of power electronic systems is the underpinning technology that enables large scale integration of wind generation plants with the electricity grid. As the size and power capacity of the wind turbine continues to increase, so is the need to place these significantly large structures at off-shore locations. DC grids and associated power transmission technologies provide opportunities for cost reduction and electricity grid impact minimization as the bulk power is concentrated at single point of entry. As a result, planning, optimization and impact can be studied and carefully controlled minimizing the risk of the investment as well as power system stability issues. This paper discusses the key technologies associated with DC grids for offshore wind farm applications.

  10. New grid-planning and certification approaches for the large-scale offshore-wind farm grid-connection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heising, C.; Bartelt, R. [Avasition GmbH, Dortmund (Germany); Zadeh, M. Koochack; Lebioda, T.J.; Jung, J. [TenneT Offshore GmbH, Bayreuth (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Stable operation of the offshore-wind farms (OWF) and stable grid connection under stationary and dynamic conditions are essential to achieve a stable public power supply. To reach this aim, adequate grid-planning and certification approaches are a major advantage. Within this paper, the fundamental characteristics of the offshore-wind farms and their grid-connection systems are given. The main goal of this research project is to study the stability of the offshore grid especially in terms of subharmonic stability for the likely future extension stage of the offshore grids i.e. having parallel connection of two or more HVDC links and for certain operating scenarios e.g. overload scenario. The current requirements according to the grid code are not the focus of this research project. The goal is to study and define potential additional grid code requirements, simulations, tests and grid planning methods for the future. (orig.)

  11. Review of Strategies and Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Meg [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This review provides an overview of strategies and currently available technologies used for demandside management (DSM) on mini-grids throughout the world. For the purposes of this review, mini-grids are defined as village-scale electricity distribution systems powered by small local generation sources and not connected to a main grid.1 Mini-grids range in size from less than 1 kW to several hundred kW of installed generation capacity and may utilize different generation technologies, such as micro-hydro, biomass gasification, solar, wind, diesel generators, or a hybrid combination of any of these. This review will primarily refer to AC mini-grids, though much of the discussion could apply to DC grids as well. Many mini-grids include energy storage, though some rely solely on real-time generation.

  12. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, Erik L.; Scannapieco, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, ρ i u di = ρ i (u i -u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  13. Bio-Inspired Cyber Security for Smart Grid Deployments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinnon, Archibald D.; Thompson, Seth R.; Doroshchuk, Ruslan A.; Fink, Glenn A.; Fulp, Errin W.

    2013-05-01

    mart grid technologies are transforming the electric power grid into a grid with bi-directional flows of both power and information. Operating millions of new smart meters and smart appliances will significantly impact electric distribution systems resulting in greater efficiency. However, the scale of the grid and the new types of information transmitted will potentially introduce several security risks that cannot be addressed by traditional, centralized security techniques. We propose a new bio-inspired cyber security approach. Social insects, such as ants and bees, have developed complex-adaptive systems that emerge from the collective application of simple, light-weight behaviors. The Digital Ants framework is a bio-inspired framework that uses mobile light-weight agents. Sensors within the framework use digital pheromones to communicate with each other and to alert each other of possible cyber security issues. All communication and coordination is both localized and decentralized thereby allowing the framework to scale across the large numbers of devices that will exist in the smart grid. Furthermore, the sensors are light-weight and therefore suitable for implementation on devices with limited computational resources. This paper will provide a brief overview of the Digital Ants framework and then present results from test bed-based demonstrations that show that Digital Ants can identify a cyber attack scenario against smart meter deployments.

  14. Scheduling in Heterogeneous Grid Environments: The Effects of DataMigration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Shan, Hongzhang; Smith, Warren

    2004-01-01

    Computational grids have the potential for solving large-scale scientific problems using heterogeneous and geographically distributed resources. However, a number of major technical hurdles must be overcome before this goal can be fully realized. One problem critical to the effective utilization of computational grids is efficient job scheduling. Our prior work addressed this challenge by defining a grid scheduling architecture and several job migration strategies. The focus of this study is to explore the impact of data migration under a variety of demanding grid conditions. We evaluate our grid scheduling algorithms by simulating compute servers, various groupings of servers into sites, and inter-server networks, using real workloads obtained from leading supercomputing centers. Several key performance metrics are used to compare the behavior of our algorithms against reference local and centralized scheduling schemes. Results show the tremendous benefits of grid scheduling, even in the presence of input/output data migration - while highlighting the importance of utilizing communication-aware scheduling schemes.

  15. Power grid complex network evolutions for the smart grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagani, Giuliano Andrea; Aiello, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The shift towards an energy grid dominated by prosumers (consumers and producers of energy) will inevitably have repercussions on the electricity distribution infrastructure. Today the grid is a hierarchical one delivering energy from large scale facilities to end-users. Tomorrow it will be a

  16. Unstructured grid modelling of offshore wind farm impacts on seasonally stratified shelf seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazenave, Pierre William; Torres, Ricardo; Allen, J. Icarus

    2016-06-01

    Shelf seas comprise approximately 7% of the world's oceans and host enormous economic activity. Development of energy installations (e.g. Offshore Wind Farms (OWFs), tidal turbines) in response to increased demand for renewable energy requires a careful analysis of potential impacts. Recent remote sensing observations have identified kilometre-scale impacts from OWFs. Existing modelling evaluating monopile impacts has fallen into two camps: small-scale models with individually resolved turbines looking at local effects; and large-scale analyses but with sub-grid scale turbine parameterisations. This work straddles both scales through a 3D unstructured grid model (FVCOM): wind turbine monopiles in the eastern Irish Sea are explicitly described in the grid whilst the overall grid domain covers the south-western UK shelf. Localised regions of decreased velocity extend up to 250 times the monopile diameter away from the monopile. Shelf-wide, the amplitude of the M2 tidal constituent increases by up to 7%. The turbines enhance localised vertical mixing which decreases seasonal stratification. The spatial extent of this extends well beyond the turbines into the surrounding seas. With significant expansion of OWFs on continental shelves, this work highlights the importance of how OWFs may impact coastal (e.g. increased flooding risk) and offshore (e.g. stratification and nutrient cycling) areas.

  17. Transcultural Adaptation of GRID Hamilton Rating Scale For Depression (GRID-HAMD) to Brazilian Portuguese and Evaluation of the Impact of Training Upon Inter-Rater Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrique-Araújo, Ricardo; Osório, Flávia L; Gonçalves Ribeiro, Mônica; Soares Monteiro, Ivandro; Williams, Janet B W; Kalali, Amir; Alexandre Crippa, José; Oliveira, Irismar Reis De

    2014-07-01

    GRID-HAMD is a semi-structured interview guide developed to overcome flaws in HAM-D, and has been incorporated into an increasing number of studies. Carry out the transcultural adaptation of GRID-HAMD into the Brazilian Portuguese language, evaluate the inter-rater reliability of this instrument and the training impact upon this measure, and verify the raters' opinions of said instrument. The transcultural adaptation was conducted by appropriate methodology. The measurement of inter-rater reliability was done by way of videos that were evaluated by 85 professionals before and after training for the use of this instrument. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) remained between 0.76 and 0.90 for GRID-HAMD-21 and between 0.72 and 0.91 for GRID-HAMD-17. The training did not have an impact on the ICC, except for a few groups of participants with a lower level of experience. Most of the participants showed high acceptance of GRID-HAMD, when compared to other versions of HAM-D. The scale presented adequate inter-rater reliability even before training began. Training did not have an impact on this measure, except for a few groups with less experience. GRID-HAMD received favorable opinions from most of the participants.

  18. Evaluating the Impact of Localized GCM Grid Refinement on Regional Tropical Cyclone Climatology and Synoptic Variability using Variable-Resolution CAM-SE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, C.; Jablonowski, C.

    2013-12-01

    Using General Circulation Models (GCMs) to resolve sub-synoptic features in climate simulations has traditionally been difficult due to a multitude of atmospheric processes operating at subgrid scales requiring significant parameterization. For example, at traditional GCM horizontal grid resolutions of 50-300 km, tropical cyclones are generally under-resolved. This paper explores a novel variable-resolution global modeling approach that allows for high spatial resolutions in areas of interest, such as low-latitude ocean basins where tropical cyclogenesis occurs. Such multi-resolution GCM designs allow for targeted use of computing resources at the regional level while maintaining a globally-continuous model domain and may serve to bridge the gap between GCMs with uniform grids and boundary-forced limited area models. A statically-nested, variable-resolution option has recently been introduced into the Community Atmosphere Model's (CAM) Spectral Element (SE) dynamical core. A 110 km CAM-SE grid with a 28 km nest over the Atlantic Ocean has been coupled to land, ocean, and ice components within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We present the results of a multi-decadal climate simulation using Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) protocols, which force the model with historical sea surface temperatures and airborne chemical species. To investigate whether refinement improves the representation of tropical cyclones, we compare Atlantic storm statistics to observations with specific focus paid to intensity profiles and track densities. The resolution dependance of both cyclone structure and objective detection between refined and unrefined basins is explored. In addition, we discuss the potential impact of using variable-resolution grids on the large-scale synoptic interannual variability by comparing refined grid simulations to reanalysis data as well as an unrefined, globally-uniform CAM-SE simulation with identical forcing. We also evaluate the

  19. A comparative analysis of dynamic grids vs. virtual grids using the A3pviGrid framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaranarayanan, Avinas; Amaldas, Christine

    2010-11-01

    With the proliferation of Quad/Multi-core micro-processors in mainstream platforms such as desktops and workstations; a large number of unused CPU cycles can be utilized for running virtual machines (VMs) as dynamic nodes in distributed environments. Grid services and its service oriented business broker now termed cloud computing could deploy image based virtualization platforms enabling agent based resource management and dynamic fault management. In this paper we present an efficient way of utilizing heterogeneous virtual machines on idle desktops as an environment for consumption of high performance grid services. Spurious and exponential increases in the size of the datasets are constant concerns in medical and pharmaceutical industries due to the constant discovery and publication of large sequence databases. Traditional algorithms are not modeled at handing large data sizes under sudden and dynamic changes in the execution environment as previously discussed. This research was undertaken to compare our previous results with running the same test dataset with that of a virtual Grid platform using virtual machines (Virtualization). The implemented architecture, A3pviGrid utilizes game theoretic optimization and agent based team formation (Coalition) algorithms to improve upon scalability with respect to team formation. Due to the dynamic nature of distributed systems (as discussed in our previous work) all interactions were made local within a team transparently. This paper is a proof of concept of an experimental mini-Grid test-bed compared to running the platform on local virtual machines on a local test cluster. This was done to give every agent its own execution platform enabling anonymity and better control of the dynamic environmental parameters. We also analyze performance and scalability of Blast in a multiple virtual node setup and present our findings. This paper is an extension of our previous research on improving the BLAST application framework

  20. Integration of Large-scale Consumers in Smart Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Rahnama, Samira

    2015-01-01

    A prominent feature of the smart grid is to involve the consumer side in balancing effort, rather than placing the entire burden of maintaining this balance on the producers. This thesis investigates the utilization of flexible consumers in the future smart grid. The focus of this work is on industrial consumers. We propose a three-level hierarchical control framework, in which a so-called “Aggregator” is located between a number of flexible industrial demands and a grid operator. The aggrega...

  1. Additional Security Considerations for Grid Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidson, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    The use of Grid computing environments is growing in popularity. A Grid computing environment is primarily a wide area network that encompasses multiple local area networks, where some of the local area networks are managed by different organizations. A Grid computing environment also includes common interfaces for distributed computing software so that the heterogeneous set of machines that make up the Grid can be used more easily. The other key feature of a Grid is that the distributed computing software includes appropriate security technology. The focus of most Grid software is on the security involved with application execution, file transfers, and other remote computing procedures. However, there are other important security issues related to the management of a Grid and the users who use that Grid. This note discusses these additional security issues and makes several suggestions as how they can be managed.

  2. Advanced Grid-Friendly Controls Demonstration Project for Utility-Scale PV Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgian, Vahan; O' Neill, Barbara

    2016-01-21

    A typical photovoltaic (PV) power plant consists of multiple power electronic inverters and can contribute to grid stability and reliability through sophisticated 'grid-friendly' controls. The availability and dissemination of actual test data showing the viability of advanced utility-scale PV controls among all industry stakeholders can leverage PV's value from being simply an energy resource to providing additional ancillary services that range from variability smoothing and frequency regulation to power quality. Strategically partnering with a selected utility and/or PV power plant operator is a key condition for a successful demonstration project. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Office selected the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to be a principal investigator in a two-year project with goals to (1) identify a potential partner(s), (2) develop a detailed scope of work and test plan for a field project to demonstrate the gird-friendly capabilities of utility-scale PV power plants, (3) facilitate conducting actual demonstration tests, and (4) disseminate test results among industry stakeholders via a joint NREL/DOE publication and participation in relevant technical conferences. The project implementation took place in FY 2014 and FY 2015. In FY14, NREL established collaborations with AES and First Solar Electric, LLC, to conduct demonstration testing on their utility-scale PV power plants in Puerto Rico and Texas, respectively, and developed test plans for each partner. Both Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas expressed interest in this project because of the importance of such advanced controls for the reliable operation of their power systems under high penetration levels of variable renewable generation. During FY15, testing was completed on both plants, and a large amount of test data was produced and analyzed that demonstrates the ability of

  3. Next generation molten NaI batteries for grid scale energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Leo J.; Eccleston, Alexis; Lamb, Joshua; Read, Andrew C.; Robins, Matthew; Meaders, Thomas; Ingersoll, David; Clem, Paul G.; Bhavaraju, Sai; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2017-08-01

    Robust, safe, and reliable grid-scale energy storage continues to be a priority for improved energy surety, expanded integration of renewable energy, and greater system agility required to meet modern dynamic and evolving electrical energy demands. We describe here a new sodium-based battery based on a molten sodium anode, a sodium iodide/aluminum chloride (NaI/AlCl3) cathode, and a high conductivity NaSICON (Na1+xZr2SixP3-xO12) ceramic separator. This NaI battery operates at intermediate temperatures (120-180 °C) and boasts an energy density of >150 Wh kg-1. The energy-dense NaI-AlCl3 ionic liquid catholyte avoids lifetime-limiting plating and intercalation reactions, and the use of earth-abundant elements minimizes materials costs and eliminates economic uncertainties associated with lithium metal. Moreover, the inherent safety of this system under internal mechanical failure is characterized by negligible heat or gas production and benign reaction products (Al, NaCl). Scalability in design is exemplified through evolution from 0.85 to 10 Ah (28 Wh) form factors, displaying lifetime average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.45% and energy efficiencies of 81.96% over dynamic testing lasting >3000 h. This demonstration promises a safe, cost-effective, and long-lifetime technology as an attractive candidate for grid scale storage.

  4. Vehicle-to-grid power implementation: From stabilizing the grid to supporting large-scale renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Willett; Tomić, Jasna

    Vehicle-to-grid power (V2G) uses electric-drive vehicles (battery, fuel cell, or hybrid) to provide power for specific electric markets. This article examines the systems and processes needed to tap energy in vehicles and implement V2G. It quantitatively compares today's light vehicle fleet with the electric power system. The vehicle fleet has 20 times the power capacity, less than one-tenth the utilization, and one-tenth the capital cost per prime mover kW. Conversely, utility generators have 10-50 times longer operating life and lower operating costs per kWh. To tap V2G is to synergistically use these complementary strengths and to reconcile the complementary needs of the driver and grid manager. This article suggests strategies and business models for doing so, and the steps necessary for the implementation of V2G. After the initial high-value, V2G markets saturate and production costs drop, V2G can provide storage for renewable energy generation. Our calculations suggest that V2G could stabilize large-scale (one-half of US electricity) wind power with 3% of the fleet dedicated to regulation for wind, plus 8-38% of the fleet providing operating reserves or storage for wind. Jurisdictions more likely to take the lead in adopting V2G are identified.

  5. Grid computing for LHC and methods for W boson mass measurement at CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Two methods for measuring the W boson mass with the CMS detector have been presented in this thesis. Both methods use similarities between W boson and Z boson decays. Their statistical and systematic precisions have been determined for W → μν; the statistics corresponds to one inverse femtobarn of data. A large number of events needed to be simulated for this analysis; it was not possible to use the full simulation software because of the enormous computing time which would have been needed. Instead, a fast simulation tool for the CMS detector was used. Still, the computing requirements for the fast simulation exceeded the capacity of the local compute cluster. Since the data taken and processed at the LHC will be extremely large, the LHC experiments rely on the emerging grid computing tools. The computing capabilities of the grid have been used for simulating all physics events needed for this thesis. To achieve this, the local compute cluster had to be integrated into the grid and the administration of the grid components had to be secured. As this was the first installation of its kind, several contributions to grid training events could be made: courses on grid installation, administration and grid-enabled applications were given. The two methods for the W mass measurement are the morphing method and the scaling method. The morphing method relies on an analytical transformation of Z boson events into W boson events and determines the W boson mass by comparing the transverse mass distributions; the scaling method relies on scaled observables from W boson and Z boson events, e.g. the transverse muon momentum as studied in this thesis. In both cases, a re-weighting technique applied to Monte Carlo generated events is used to take into account different selection cuts, detector acceptances, and differences in production and decay of W boson and Z boson events. (orig.)

  6. Grid computing for LHC and methods for W boson mass measurement at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Christopher

    2007-12-14

    Two methods for measuring the W boson mass with the CMS detector have been presented in this thesis. Both methods use similarities between W boson and Z boson decays. Their statistical and systematic precisions have been determined for W {yields} {mu}{nu}; the statistics corresponds to one inverse femtobarn of data. A large number of events needed to be simulated for this analysis; it was not possible to use the full simulation software because of the enormous computing time which would have been needed. Instead, a fast simulation tool for the CMS detector was used. Still, the computing requirements for the fast simulation exceeded the capacity of the local compute cluster. Since the data taken and processed at the LHC will be extremely large, the LHC experiments rely on the emerging grid computing tools. The computing capabilities of the grid have been used for simulating all physics events needed for this thesis. To achieve this, the local compute cluster had to be integrated into the grid and the administration of the grid components had to be secured. As this was the first installation of its kind, several contributions to grid training events could be made: courses on grid installation, administration and grid-enabled applications were given. The two methods for the W mass measurement are the morphing method and the scaling method. The morphing method relies on an analytical transformation of Z boson events into W boson events and determines the W boson mass by comparing the transverse mass distributions; the scaling method relies on scaled observables from W boson and Z boson events, e.g. the transverse muon momentum as studied in this thesis. In both cases, a re-weighting technique applied to Monte Carlo generated events is used to take into account different selection cuts, detector acceptances, and differences in production and decay of W boson and Z boson events. (orig.)

  7. Grid generation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Liseikin, Vladimir D

    2010-01-01

    This book is an introduction to structured and unstructured grid methods in scientific computing, addressing graduate students, scientists as well as practitioners. Basic local and integral grid quality measures are formulated and new approaches to mesh generation are reviewed. In addition to the content of the successful first edition, a more detailed and practice oriented description of monitor metrics in Beltrami and diffusion equations is given for generating adaptive numerical grids. Also, new techniques developed by the author are presented, in particular a technique based on the inverted form of Beltrami’s partial differential equations with respect to control metrics. This technique allows the generation of adaptive grids for a wide variety of computational physics problems, including grid clustering to given function values and gradients, grid alignment with given vector fields, and combinations thereof. Applications of geometric methods to the analysis of numerical grid behavior as well as grid ge...

  8. AIRS Observations Based Evaluation of Relative Climate Feedback Strengths on a GCM Grid-Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, G. I.; Susskind, J.

    2012-12-01

    Climate feedback strengths, especially those associated with moist processes, still have a rather wide range in GCMs, the primary tools to predict future climate changes associated with man's ever increasing influences on our planet. Here, we make use of the first 10 years of AIRS observations to evaluate interrelationships/correlations of atmospheric moist parameter anomalies computed from AIRS Version 5 Level-3 products, and demonstrate their usefulness to assess relative feedback strengths. Although one may argue about the possible usability of shorter-term, observed climate parameter anomalies for estimating the strength of various (mostly moist processes related) feedbacks, recent works, in particular analyses by Dessler [2008, 2010], have demonstrated their usefulness in assessing global water vapor and cloud feedbacks. First, we create AIRS-observed monthly anomaly time-series (ATs) of outgoing longwave radiation, water vapor, clouds and temperature profile over a 10-year long (Sept. 2002 through Aug. 2012) period using 1x1 degree resolution (a common GCM grid-scale). Next, we evaluate the interrelationships of ATs of the above parameters with the corresponding 1x1 degree, as well as global surface temperature ATs. The latter provides insight comparable with more traditional climate feedback definitions (e. g., Zelinka and Hartmann, 2012) whilst the former is related to a new definition of "local (in surface temperature too) feedback strengths" on a GCM grid-scale. Comparing the correlation maps generated provides valuable new information on the spatial distribution of relative climate feedback strengths. We argue that for GCMs to be trusted for predicting longer-term climate variability, they should be able to reproduce these observed relationships/metrics as closely as possible. For this time period the main climate "forcing" was associated with the El Niño/La Niña variability (e. g., Dessler, 2010), so these assessments may not be descriptive of longer

  9. Smart Grid: Network simulator for smart grid test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, L C; Ong, H S; Che, Y X; Do, N Q; Ong, X J

    2013-01-01

    Smart Grid become more popular, a smaller scale of smart grid test-bed is set up at UNITEN to investigate the performance and to find out future enhancement of smart grid in Malaysia. The fundamental requirement in this project is design a network with low delay, no packet drop and with high data rate. Different type of traffic has its own characteristic and is suitable for different type of network and requirement. However no one understands the natural of traffic in smart grid. This paper presents the comparison between different types of traffic to find out the most suitable traffic for the optimal network performance.

  10. Steady-state, local temperature fields with turbulent liquid sodium flow in nominal and disturbed bundle geometries with spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.; Tschoeke, H.

    1980-01-01

    The operating reliability of nuclear reactors calls for a reliable strength analysis of the highly loaded core elements, one of its prerequisites being the reliable determination of the three-dimensional velocity and temperature fields. To verify thermohydraulics computer programs, extensive local temperature measurements in the rod claddings of the critical bundle zone were performed on a heated 19-rod bundle model with sodium flow and provided with spacer grids (P/D = 1.30; W/D = 1.19). The essential results are: - Outside the spacer grids, the azimuthal temperature variations of the side and corner rods are approximately 10-fold those of rods in the central bundle zone. - The spacer grids investigated give rise to great local temperature peaks and correspondingly great temperature gradients in the axial and azimuthal directions immediately around the support points. - Continuous reduction of a subchannel by rod bowing results in substantial rises of temperature which, however, are limited to adjacent cladding tubes. (orig.)

  11. Steady-state, local temperature fields with turbulent sodium flow in nominal and disturbed bundle geometries with spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.; Tschoeke, H.; Kolodziej, M.

    1980-12-01

    The operating reliability of nuclear reactors calls for a reliable strength analysis of the highly loaded core elements, one of its prerequisites being the reliable determination of the three-dimensional velocity and temperature fields. To verify thermohydraulics computer programs, extensive local temperature measurements in the rod claddings of the critical bundle zone were performed on a heated 19-rod bundle model with sodium flow and provided with spacer grids (P/D = 1.30; W/D = 1.19). These are the essential results obtained: Outside the spacer grids the azimuthal temperature variations of the side and corner rods are greater by approximately the factor 10 in the bundle geometry under consideration as compared to rods in the central bundle zone. The spacer grids investigated give rise to great local temperature peaks and correspondingly great temperature gradients in the axial and azimuthal directions immediately around the support points. Continuous reduction of a subchannel by rod bowing results in substantial rises of temperature which, however, are limited to the adjacent cladding tube zones. (orig.) [de

  12. Calculation approaches for grid usage fees to influence the load curve in the distribution grid level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illing, Bjoern

    2014-01-01

    Dominated by the energy policy the decentralized German energy market is changing. One mature target of the government is to increase the contribution of renewable generation to the gross electricity consumption. In order to achieve this target disadvantages like an increased need for capacity management occurs. Load reduction and variable grid fees offer the grid operator solutions to realize capacity management by influencing the load profile. The evolution of the current grid fees towards more causality is required to adapt these approaches. Two calculation approaches are developed in this assignment. On the one hand multivariable grid fees keeping the current components demand and energy charge. Additional to the grid costs grid load dependent parameters like the amount of decentralized feed-ins, time and local circumstances as well as grid capacities are considered. On the other hand the grid fee flat-rate which represents a demand based model on a monthly level. Both approaches are designed to meet the criteria for future grid fees. By means of a case study the effects of the grid fees on the load profile at the low voltage grid is simulated. Thereby the consumption is represented by different behaviour models and the results are scaled at the benchmark grid area. The resulting load curve is analyzed concerning the effects of peak load reduction as well as the integration of renewable energy sources. Additionally the combined effect of grid fees and electricity tariffs is evaluated. Finally the work discusses the launching of grid fees in the tense atmosphere of politics, legislation and grid operation. Results of this work are two calculation approaches designed for grid operators to define the grid fees. Multivariable grid fees are based on the current calculation scheme. Hereby demand and energy charges are weighted by time, locational and load related dependencies. The grid fee flat-rate defines a limitation in demand extraction. Different demand levels

  13. 77 FR 58416 - Large Scale Networking (LSN); Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ..., Grid, and cloud projects. The MAGIC Team reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group... Coordination (MAGIC) Team AGENCY: The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD.... Dates/Location: The MAGIC Team meetings are held on the first Wednesday of each month, 2:00-4:00pm, at...

  14. Gridded National Inventory of U.S. Methane Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasakkers, Joannes D.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; Turner, Alexander J.; Weitz, Melissa; Wirth, Tom; Hight, Cate; DeFigueiredo, Mark; Desai, Mausami; Schmeltz, Rachel; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a gridded inventory of US anthropogenic methane emissions with 0.1 deg x 0.1 deg spatial resolution, monthly temporal resolution, and detailed scale dependent error characterization. The inventory is designed to be onsistent with the 2016 US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Inventory of US Greenhouse Gas Emissionsand Sinks (GHGI) for 2012. The EPA inventory is available only as national totals for different source types. We use a widerange of databases at the state, county, local, and point source level to disaggregate the inventory and allocate the spatial and temporal distribution of emissions for individual source types. Results show large differences with the EDGAR v4.2 global gridded inventory commonly used as a priori estimate in inversions of atmospheric methane observations. We derive grid-dependent error statistics for individual source types from comparison with the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) regional inventory for Northeast Texas. These error statistics are independently verified by comparison with the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) grid-resolved emission inventory. Our gridded, time-resolved inventory provides an improved basis for inversion of atmospheric methane observations to estimate US methane emissions and interpret the results in terms of the underlying processes.

  15. On logarithmic extensions of local scale-invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, Malte

    2013-01-01

    Ageing phenomena far from equilibrium naturally present dynamical scaling and in many situations this may be generalised to local scale-invariance. Generically, the absence of time-translation-invariance implies that each scaling operator is characterised by two independent scaling dimensions. Building on analogies with logarithmic conformal invariance and logarithmic Schrödinger-invariance, this work proposes a logarithmic extension of local scale-invariance, without time-translation-invariance. Carrying this out requires in general to replace both scaling dimensions of each scaling operator by Jordan cells. Co-variant two-point functions are derived for the most simple case of a two-dimensional logarithmic extension. Their form is compared to simulational data for autoresponse functions in several universality classes of non-equilibrium ageing phenomena

  16. Design of an Internal Model Control strategy for single-phase grid-connected PWM inverters and its performance analysis with a non-linear local load and weak grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Eric N; Coelho, Ernane A A; Carvalho, Henrique T M; Freitas, Luiz C G; Júnior, João B V; Freitas, Luiz C

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a controller based on Internal Model Control (IMC) applied to a grid-connected single-phase PWM inverter. The mathematical modeling of the inverter and the LCL output filter, used to project the 1-DOF IMC controller, is presented and the decoupling of grid voltage by a Feedforward strategy is analyzed. A Proportional - Resonant Controller (P+Res) was used for the control of the same plant in the running of experimental results, thus moving towards the discussion of differences regarding IMC and P+Res performances, which arrived at the evaluation of the proposed control strategy. The results are presented for typical conditions, for weak-grid and for non-linear local load, in order to verify the behavior of the controller against such situations. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Demonstration of Active Power Controls by Utility-Scale PV Power Plant in an Island Grid: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgian, Vahan; O' Neill, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), AES, and the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority conducted a demonstration project on a utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) plant to test the viability of providing important ancillary services from this facility. As solar generation increases globally, there is a need for innovation and increased operational flexibility. A typical PV power plant consists of multiple power electronic inverters and can contribute to grid stability and reliability through sophisticated 'grid-friendly' controls. In this way, it may mitigate the impact of its variability on the grid and contribute to important system requirements more like traditional generators. In 2015, testing was completed on a 20-MW AES plant in Puerto Rico, and a large amount of test data was produced and analyzed that demonstrates the ability of PV power plants to provide various types of new grid-friendly controls. This data showed how active power controls can leverage PV's value from being simply an intermittent energy resource to providing additional ancillary services for an isolated island grid. Specifically, the tests conducted included PV plant participation in automatic generation control, provision of droop response, and fast frequency response.

  18. Characteristic length scale of input data in distributed models: implications for modeling grid size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artan, G. A.; Neale, C. M. U.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2000-01-01

    The appropriate spatial scale for a distributed energy balance model was investigated by: (a) determining the scale of variability associated with the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data; and (b) examining the effects of input data spatial aggregation on model response. The semi-variogram and the characteristic length calculated from the spatial autocorrelation were used to determine the scale of variability of the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data. The data were collected from two hillsides at Upper Sheep Creek, a sub-basin of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, in southwest Idaho. The data were analyzed in terms of the semivariance and the integral of the autocorrelation. The minimum characteristic length associated with the variability of the data used in the analysis was 15 m. Simulated and observed radiometric surface temperature fields at different spatial resolutions were compared. The correlation between agreement simulated and observed fields sharply declined after a 10×10 m2 modeling grid size. A modeling grid size of about 10×10 m2 was deemed to be the best compromise to achieve: (a) reduction of computation time and the size of the support data; and (b) a reproduction of the observed radiometric surface temperature.

  19. Integration of Large-scale Consumers in Smart Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahnama, Samira

    A prominent feature of the smart grid is to involve the consumer side in balancing effort, rather than placing the entire burden of maintaining this balance on the producers. This thesis investigates the utilization of flexible consumers in the future smart grid. The focus of this work is on indu......A prominent feature of the smart grid is to involve the consumer side in balancing effort, rather than placing the entire burden of maintaining this balance on the producers. This thesis investigates the utilization of flexible consumers in the future smart grid. The focus of this work...... the demand that these consumers represent. The exact responsibility of the aggregator, however, can vary depending on several factors such as control strategies, demand types, provided services etc. This thesis addresses the aggregator design for a specific class of consumers. The work involves selecting...... an appropriate control scenario, formulating the optimal objective function at the aggregator, modeling the flexibility of our specific case studies and determining the required information flow. This thesis also investigates different types of aggregation, when we have different types of consumers...

  20. A global data set of soil hydraulic properties and sub-grid variability of soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montzka, Carsten; Herbst, Michael; Weihermüller, Lutz; Verhoef, Anne; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-07-01

    Agroecosystem models, regional and global climate models, and numerical weather prediction models require adequate parameterization of soil hydraulic properties. These properties are fundamental for describing and predicting water and energy exchange processes at the transition zone between solid earth and atmosphere, and regulate evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff generation. Hydraulic parameters describing the soil water retention (WRC) and hydraulic conductivity (HCC) curves are typically derived from soil texture via pedotransfer functions (PTFs). Resampling of those parameters for specific model grids is typically performed by different aggregation approaches such a spatial averaging and the use of dominant textural properties or soil classes. These aggregation approaches introduce uncertainty, bias and parameter inconsistencies throughout spatial scales due to nonlinear relationships between hydraulic parameters and soil texture. Therefore, we present a method to scale hydraulic parameters to individual model grids and provide a global data set that overcomes the mentioned problems. The approach is based on Miller-Miller scaling in the relaxed form by Warrick, that fits the parameters of the WRC through all sub-grid WRCs to provide an effective parameterization for the grid cell at model resolution; at the same time it preserves the information of sub-grid variability of the water retention curve by deriving local scaling parameters. Based on the Mualem-van Genuchten approach we also derive the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from the water retention functions, thereby assuming that the local parameters are also valid for this function. In addition, via the Warrick scaling parameter λ, information on global sub-grid scaling variance is given that enables modellers to improve dynamical downscaling of (regional) climate models or to perturb hydraulic parameters for model ensemble output generation. The present analysis is based on the ROSETTA PTF

  1. Wafer scale oblique angle plasma etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Jarecki, Jr., Robert L.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean

    2017-05-23

    Wafer scale oblique angle etching of a semiconductor substrate is performed in a conventional plasma etch chamber by using a fixture that supports a multiple number of separate Faraday cages. Each cage is formed to include an angled grid surface and is positioned such that it will be positioned over a separate one of the die locations on the wafer surface when the fixture is placed over the wafer. The presence of the Faraday cages influences the local electric field surrounding each wafer die, re-shaping the local field to be disposed in alignment with the angled grid surface. The re-shaped plasma causes the reactive ions to follow a linear trajectory through the plasma sheath and angled grid surface, ultimately impinging the wafer surface at an angle. The selected geometry of the Faraday cage angled grid surface thus determines the angle at with the reactive ions will impinge the wafer.

  2. Optimizing Electric Vehicle Coordination Over a Heterogeneous Mesh Network in a Scaled-Down Smart Grid Testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattarai, Bishnu Prasad; Lévesque, Martin; Maier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    High penetration of renewable energy sources and electric vehicles (EVs) create power imbalance and congestion in the existing power network, and hence causes significant problems in the control and operation. Despite investing huge efforts from the electric utilities, governments, and researchers......, smart grid (SG) is still at the developmental stage to address those issues. In this regard, a smart grid testbed (SGT) is desirable to develop, analyze, and demonstrate various novel SG solutions, namely demand response, real-time pricing, and congestion management. In this paper, a novel SGT...... is developed in a laboratory by scaling a 250 kVA, 0.4 kV real low-voltage distribution feeder down to 1 kVA, 0.22 kV. Information and communication technology is integrated in the scaled-down network to establish real-time monitoring and control. The novelty of the developed testbed is demonstrated...

  3. A Grid Voltage Measurement Method for Wind Power Systems during Grid Fault Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Cheol-Hee; Chung, Il-Yop; Yoo, Hyun-Jae; Hong, Sung-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Grid codes in many countries require low-voltage ride-through (LVRT) capability to maintain power system stability and reliability during grid fault conditions. To meet the LVRT requirement, wind power systems must stay connected to the grid and also supply reactive currents to the grid to support the recovery from fault voltages. This paper presents a new fault detection method and inverter control scheme to improve the LVRT capability for full-scale permanent magnet synchronous generator (P...

  4. Developing a grid infrastructure in Cuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Aldama, D.; Dominguez, M.; Ricardo, H.; Gonzalez, A.; Nolasco, E.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez, M.; Sanchez, M.; Suarez, F.; Nodarse, F.; Moreno, N.; Aguilera, L.

    2007-07-01

    A grid infrastructure was deployed at Centro de Gestion de la Informacion y Desarrollo de la Energia (CUBAENERGIA) in the frame of EELA project and of a national initiative for developing a Cuban Network for Science. A stand-alone model was adopted to overcome connectivity limitations. The e-infrastructure is based on gLite-3.0 middleware and is fully compatible with EELA-infrastructure. Afterwards, the work was focused on grid applications. The application GATE was deployed from the early beginning for biomedical users. Further, two applications were deployed on the local grid infrastructure: MOODLE for e-learning and AERMOD for assessment of local dispersion of atmospheric pollutants. Additionally, our local grid infrastructure was made interoperable with a Java based distributed system for bioinformatics calculations. This experience could be considered as a suitable approach for national networks with weak Internet connections. (Author)

  5. Challenges facing production grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

  6. Managing Dynamic User Communities in a Grid of Autonomous Resources

    CERN Document Server

    Alfieri, R; Gianoli, A; Spataro, F; Ciaschini, Vincenzo; dell'Agnello, L; Bonnassieux, F; Broadfoot, P; Lowe, G; Cornwall, L; Jensen, J; Kelsey, D; Frohner, A; Groep, DL; Som de Cerff, W; Steenbakkers, M; Venekamp, G; Kouril, D; McNab, A; Mulmo, O; Silander, M; Hahkala, J; Lhorentey, K

    2003-01-01

    One of the fundamental concepts in Grid computing is the creation of Virtual Organizations (VO's): a set of resource consumers and providers that join forces to solve a common problem. Typical examples of Virtual Organizations include collaborations formed around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. To date, Grid computing has been applied on a relatively small scale, linking dozens of users to a dozen resources, and management of these VO's was a largely manual operation. With the advance of large collaboration, linking more than 10000 users with a 1000 sites in 150 counties, a comprehensive, automated management system is required. It should be simple enough not to deter users, while at the same time ensuring local site autonomy. The VO Management Service (VOMS), developed by the EU DataGrid and DataTAG projects[1, 2], is a secured system for managing authorization for users and resources in virtual organizations. It extends the existing Grid Security Infrastructure[3] architecture with embedded VO ...

  7. Scaling Off Grid Power In Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    storage, digital revolution and especially, the current job deficit in Nigeria led by ... or is self-employed. .... (RESIP), so from that perspective the legal ... and solar home systems or stand-alone grids ... REAN is also driving self-regulatory.

  8. Integrated Multi-Scale Data Analytics and Machine Learning for the Distribution Grid and Building-to-Grid Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Emma M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hendrix, Val [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Deka, Deepjyoti [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-16

    This white paper introduces the application of advanced data analytics to the modernized grid. In particular, we consider the field of machine learning and where it is both useful, and not useful, for the particular field of the distribution grid and buildings interface. While analytics, in general, is a growing field of interest, and often seen as the golden goose in the burgeoning distribution grid industry, its application is often limited by communications infrastructure, or lack of a focused technical application. Overall, the linkage of analytics to purposeful application in the grid space has been limited. In this paper we consider the field of machine learning as a subset of analytical techniques, and discuss its ability and limitations to enable the future distribution grid and the building-to-grid interface. To that end, we also consider the potential for mixing distributed and centralized analytics and the pros and cons of these approaches. Machine learning is a subfield of computer science that studies and constructs algorithms that can learn from data and make predictions and improve forecasts. Incorporation of machine learning in grid monitoring and analysis tools may have the potential to solve data and operational challenges that result from increasing penetration of distributed and behind-the-meter energy resources. There is an exponentially expanding volume of measured data being generated on the distribution grid, which, with appropriate application of analytics, may be transformed into intelligible, actionable information that can be provided to the right actors – such as grid and building operators, at the appropriate time to enhance grid or building resilience, efficiency, and operations against various metrics or goals – such as total carbon reduction or other economic benefit to customers. While some basic analysis into these data streams can provide a wealth of information, computational and human boundaries on performing the analysis

  9. On temperature spectra in grid turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayesh; Tong, C.; Warhaft, Z.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports wind tunnel measurements of passive temperature spectra in decaying grid generated turbulence both with and without a mean transverse temperature gradient. The measurements cover a turbulence Reynolds number range 60 l 3/4 l . The remarkably low Reynolds number onset (Re l ∼70) of Kolmogorov--Obukhov--Corrsin scaling in isotropic grid turbulence is contrasted to the case of scalars in (anisotropic) shear flows where KOC scaling only appears at very high-Reynolds numbers (Re l ∼10 5 ). It is also shown that when the temperature fluctuations are inserted very close to the grid in the absence of a gradient (by means of a mandoline), the temperature spectrum behaves in a similar way to the linear gradient case, i.e., a spectrum with a scaling exponent close to -5/3 is observed, a result noted earlier in heated grid experiments. However, when the scalar is inserted farther downstream of the grid (in the fully developed turbulence), the spectrum has a scaling region of -1.3 and its dilation with Re is less well defined than for the other cases. The velocity spectrum is also shown to have a scaling region, of slope -1.3, and its onset occurs at higher Reynolds number than for the case of the scalar experiments that exhibit the KOC scaling

  10. Power grid operation risk management: V2G deployment for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadian, Ghazale J.

    The production, transmission, and delivery of cost--efficient energy to supply ever-increasing peak loads along with a quest for developing a low-carbon economy require significant evolutions in the power grid operations. Lower prices of vast natural gas resources in the United States, Fukushima nuclear disaster, higher and more intense energy consumptions in China and India, issues related to energy security, and recent Middle East conflicts, have urged decisions makers throughout the world to look into other means of generating electricity locally. As the world look to combat climate changes, a shift from carbon-based fuels to non-carbon based fuels is inevitable. However, the variability of distributed generation assets in the electricity grid has introduced major reliability challenges for power grid operators. While spearheading sustainable and reliable power grid operations, this dissertation develops a multi-stakeholder approach to power grid operation design; aiming to address economic, security, and environmental challenges of the constrained electricity generation. It investigates the role of Electric Vehicle (EV) fleets integration, as distributed and mobile storage assets to support high penetrations of renewable energy sources, in the power grid. The vehicle-to-grid (V2G) concept is considered to demonstrate the bidirectional role of EV fleets both as a provider and consumer of energy in securing a sustainable power grid operation. The proposed optimization modeling is the application of Mixed-Integer Linear Programing (MILP) to large-scale systems to solve the hourly security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) -- an optimal scheduling concept in the economic operation of electric power systems. The Monte Carlo scenario-based approach is utilized to evaluate different scenarios concerning the uncertainties in the operation of power grid system. Further, in order to expedite the real-time solution of the proposed approach for large-scale power systems

  11. Explaining local-scale species distributions: relative contributions of spatial autocorrelation and landscape heterogeneity for an avian assemblage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady J Mattsson

    Full Text Available Understanding interactions between mobile species distributions and landcover characteristics remains an outstanding challenge in ecology. Multiple factors could explain species distributions including endogenous evolutionary traits leading to conspecific clustering and endogenous habitat features that support life history requirements. Birds are a useful taxon for examining hypotheses about the relative importance of these factors among species in a community. We developed a hierarchical Bayes approach to model the relationships between bird species occupancy and local landcover variables accounting for spatial autocorrelation, species similarities, and partial observability. We fit alternative occupancy models to detections of 90 bird species observed during repeat visits to 316 point-counts forming a 400-m grid throughout the Patuxent Wildlife Research Refuge in Maryland, USA. Models with landcover variables performed significantly better than our autologistic and null models, supporting the hypothesis that local landcover heterogeneity is important as an exogenous driver for species distributions. Conspecific clustering alone was a comparatively poor descriptor of local community composition, but there was evidence for spatial autocorrelation in all species. Considerable uncertainty remains whether landcover combined with spatial autocorrelation is most parsimonious for describing bird species distributions at a local scale. Spatial structuring may be weaker at intermediate scales within which dispersal is less frequent, information flows are localized, and landcover types become spatially diversified and therefore exhibit little aggregation. Examining such hypotheses across species assemblages contributes to our understanding of community-level associations with conspecifics and landscape composition.

  12. Solution of free-boundary problems using finite-element/Newton methods and locally refined grids - Application to analysis of solidification microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiveriotis, K.; Brown, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    A new method is presented for the solution of free-boundary problems using Lagrangian finite element approximations defined on locally refined grids. The formulation allows for direct transition from coarse to fine grids without introducing non-conforming basis functions. The calculation of elemental stiffness matrices and residual vectors are unaffected by changes in the refinement level, which are accounted for in the loading of elemental data to the global stiffness matrix and residual vector. This technique for local mesh refinement is combined with recently developed mapping methods and Newton's method to form an efficient algorithm for the solution of free-boundary problems, as demonstrated here by sample calculations of cellular interfacial microstructure during directional solidification of a binary alloy.

  13. The open science grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pordes, R.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. LHC Tier-1 and Tier-2 laboratories and universities are developing production Grids to support LHC applications running across a worldwide Grid computing system. Together with partners in computer science, physics grid projects and active experiments, we will build a common national production grid infrastructure which is open in its architecture, implementation and use. The Open Science Grid (OSG) model builds upon the successful approach of last year's joint Grid2003 project. The Grid3 shared infrastructure has for over eight months provided significant computational resources and throughput to a range of applications, including ATLAS and CMS data challenges, SDSS, LIGO, and biology analyses, and computer science demonstrators and experiments. To move towards LHC-scale data management, access and analysis capabilities, we must increase the scale, services, and sustainability of the current infrastructure by an order of magnitude or more. Thus, we must achieve a significant upgrade in its functionalities and technologies. The initial OSG partners will build upon a fully usable, sustainable and robust grid. Initial partners include the US LHC collaborations, DOE and NSF Laboratories and Universities and Trillium Grid projects. The approach is to federate with other application communities in the U.S. to build a shared infrastructure open to other sciences and capable of being modified and improved to respond to needs of other applications, including CDF, D0, BaBar, and RHIC experiments. We describe the application-driven, engineered services of the OSG, short term plans and status, and the roadmap for a consortium, its partnerships and national focus

  14. Are small-scale grid-connected photovoltaic systems a cost-effective policy for lowering electricity bills and reducing carbon emissions? A technical, economic, and carbon emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHenry, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    This research discusses findings from technical simulations and economic models of 1 kW p and 3 kW p grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems supplying a rural home electricity load in parallel with the electricity network in Western Australia (WA). The technical simulations are based on electricity billing, consumption monitoring, an energy audit data, combined with 15 min interval load and PV system performance for commercially available technologies and balance of system components, using long-term meteorological input data. The economic modelling uses 2010 market prices for capital costs, operational costs, electricity tariffs, subsidies, and is based on discounted cash flow analyses which generate a final net present value (NPV) for each system against network electricity costs (in Australian dollars, AUD) over a 15 year investment horizon. The results suggest that current market prices generate a negative NPV (a net private loss), even with the current government subsidies, which lead to higher home electricity costs than conventional network electricity use. Additionally, the private costs of carbon emission mitigation (AUD tCO 2 -e −1 ) for the grid-connected PV system simulations and models were around AUD 600-700 tCO 2 -e −1 , a particularly expensive option when compared to existing large-scale renewable energy mitigation activities. - Highlights: ► Subsidised small-scale grid-connected PV systems can increase home electricity costs. ► Subsidies for private PV systems are provided by those who do not receive a benefit. ► Small-scale grid-connected PV systems result in very high costs of mitigation. ► Verifying actual mitigation from grid-connected small-scale systems is problematic. ► Maintain medium/large-scale grid-connected or small-scale off-grid system subsidies.

  15. Exploration of potential of Smart Grids at the scale of the University campus in Provence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-09-01

    This study notably aimed at determining how strategies provided by smart grid technologies operate in an existing area where electric equipment and infrastructures are already largely developed, which perspectives of evolution these technologies offer for the power demand curve of the electric power distribution network, and how to assess benefits associated with the implementation of these technologies at the scale of an existing area. After a presentation of various concepts, the report presents a simplified model of the electric power consumption structure for the studied area (a university campus). The next part proposes an assessment of potentials related to smart grid technologies by using six scenarios and by modelling their effect. The different possible strategies are then analysed

  16. Micro grids toward the smart grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, J.

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide electrical grids are expecting to become smarter in the near future, with interest in Microgrids likely to grow. A microgrid can be defined as a part of the grid with elements of prime energy movers, power electronics converters, distributed energy storage systems and local loads, that can operate autonomously but also interacting with main grid. Thus, the ability of intelligent Microgrids to operate in island mode or connected to the grid will be a keypoint to cope with new functionalities and the integration of renewable energy resources. The functionalities expected for these small grids are: black start operation, frequency and voltage stability, active and reactive power flow control, active power filter capabilities, and storage energy management. In this presentation, a review of the main concepts related to flexible Microgrids will be introduced, with examples of real Microgrids. AC and DC Microgrids to integrate renewable and distributed energy resources will also be presented, as well as distributed energy storage systems, and standardization issues of these Microgrids. Finally, Microgrid hierarchical control will be analyzed looking at three different levels: i) a primary control based on the droop method, including an output impedance virtual loop; ii) a secondary control, which enables restoring any deviations produced by the primary control; and iii) a tertiary control to manage the power flow between the microgrid and the external electrical distribution system.

  17. A new ghost-node method for linking different models and initial investigations of heterogeneity and nonmatching grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, J.E.; James, S.C.; Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.; Leake, S.A.; Zyvoloski, G.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Eddebbarh, A.-A.

    2007-01-01

    A flexible, robust method for linking parent (regional-scale) and child (local-scale) grids of locally refined models that use different numerical methods is developed based on a new, iterative ghost-node method. Tests are presented for two-dimensional and three-dimensional pumped systems that are homogeneous or that have simple heterogeneity. The parent and child grids are simulated using the block-centered finite-difference MODFLOW and control-volume finite-element FEHM models, respectively. The models are solved iteratively through head-dependent (child model) and specified-flow (parent model) boundary conditions. Boundary conditions for models with nonmatching grids or zones of different hydraulic conductivity are derived and tested against heads and flows from analytical or globally-refined models. Results indicate that for homogeneous two- and three-dimensional models with matched grids (integer number of child cells per parent cell), the new method is nearly as accurate as the coupling of two MODFLOW models using the shared-node method and, surprisingly, errors are slightly lower for nonmatching grids (noninteger number of child cells per parent cell). For heterogeneous three-dimensional systems, this paper compares two methods for each of the two sets of boundary conditions: external heads at head-dependent boundary conditions for the child model are calculated using bilinear interpolation or a Darcy-weighted interpolation; specified-flow boundary conditions for the parent model are calculated using model-grid or hydrogeologic-unit hydraulic conductivities. Results suggest that significantly more accurate heads and flows are produced when both Darcy-weighted interpolation and hydrogeologic-unit hydraulic conductivities are used, while the other methods produce larger errors at the boundary between the regional and local models. The tests suggest that, if posed correctly, the ghost-node method performs well. Additional testing is needed for highly

  18. Current Grid operation and future role of the Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, O.

    2012-12-01

    Grid-like technologies and approaches became an integral part of HEP experiments. Some other scientific communities also use similar technologies for data-intensive computations. The distinct feature of Grid computing is the ability to federate heterogeneous resources of different ownership into a seamless infrastructure, accessible via a single log-on. Like other infrastructures of similar nature, Grid functioning requires not only technologically sound basis, but also reliable operation procedures, monitoring and accounting. The two aspects, technological and operational, are closely related: weaker is the technology, more burden is on operations, and other way around. As of today, Grid technologies are still evolving: at CERN alone, every LHC experiment uses an own Grid-like system. This inevitably creates a heavy load on operations. Infrastructure maintenance, monitoring and incident response are done on several levels, from local system administrators to large international organisations, involving massive human effort worldwide. The necessity to commit substantial resources is one of the obstacles faced by smaller research communities when moving computing to the Grid. Moreover, most current Grid solutions were developed under significant influence of HEP use cases, and thus need additional effort to adapt them to other applications. Reluctance of many non-HEP researchers to use Grid negatively affects the outlook for national Grid organisations, which strive to provide multi-science services. We started from the situation where Grid organisations were fused with HEP laboratories and national HEP research programmes; we hope to move towards the world where Grid will ultimately reach the status of generic public computing and storage service provider and permanent national and international Grid infrastructures will be established. How far will we be able to advance along this path, depends on us. If no standardisation and convergence efforts will take place

  19. Current Grid operation and future role of the Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, O

    2012-01-01

    Grid-like technologies and approaches became an integral part of HEP experiments. Some other scientific communities also use similar technologies for data-intensive computations. The distinct feature of Grid computing is the ability to federate heterogeneous resources of different ownership into a seamless infrastructure, accessible via a single log-on. Like other infrastructures of similar nature, Grid functioning requires not only technologically sound basis, but also reliable operation procedures, monitoring and accounting. The two aspects, technological and operational, are closely related: weaker is the technology, more burden is on operations, and other way around. As of today, Grid technologies are still evolving: at CERN alone, every LHC experiment uses an own Grid-like system. This inevitably creates a heavy load on operations. Infrastructure maintenance, monitoring and incident response are done on several levels, from local system administrators to large international organisations, involving massive human effort worldwide. The necessity to commit substantial resources is one of the obstacles faced by smaller research communities when moving computing to the Grid. Moreover, most current Grid solutions were developed under significant influence of HEP use cases, and thus need additional effort to adapt them to other applications. Reluctance of many non-HEP researchers to use Grid negatively affects the outlook for national Grid organisations, which strive to provide multi-science services. We started from the situation where Grid organisations were fused with HEP laboratories and national HEP research programmes; we hope to move towards the world where Grid will ultimately reach the status of generic public computing and storage service provider and permanent national and international Grid infrastructures will be established. How far will we be able to advance along this path, depends on us. If no standardisation and convergence efforts will take place

  20. International Off-grid Renewable Energy Conference 2012: Key Findings and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    IRENA co-organised the International Off-grid Renewable Energy Conference (IOREC) along with the ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) and the Alliance for Rural Electrification (ARE), in Accra, Ghana, on 1-2 November 2012. This report presents the key findings and recommendations that emerged from the roundtable discussions during IOREC. The report highlights that off-grid renewable energy systems, stand-alone and mini-grids, have the potential to play a significant role in achieving the goal of universal electricity access. In recognition of this role, their development needs to be integrated into the mainstream rural electrification strategies. While several successful deployment approaches exist, there is a need to scale up. What is required is a shift from the prevalent project-by-project approach, to one that focusses on the creation of a sustainable environment that facilitates large-scale deployment. Involvement of the private sector, and in particular of local enterprises, will be instrumental in extending electricity access in rural areas, rapidly and sustainably, and hence needs to be promoted. Off-grid renewable energy technologies produce striking synergies with sectors critical for human development, and play an important role in improving access to water supply while also extending healthcare and telecommunication services in rural areas.

  1. Greenlys, the smart energy of the future. The first full-scale Smart Grid demonstrator in France. Press file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-05-01

    In its first part, this document presents the main characteristics of Greenlys: its role in the evolution towards a new energetic model, an ambitious project which benefits to all types of consumers, is based on two complementary demonstration platforms (in the two metropolitan areas of Lyons and Grenoble). It also discusses its several objectives: assessment of economic viability, identification of benefits for consumers, implementation of a right sizing for tomorrow's grid, exploitation of a communicating infrastructure, anticipation of the deployment of electric vehicles, definition of the aggregative function, development of user participation, experimentation of advanced grid control functions, equipment test and installation. The second part comments the first returns on experience in terms of grid quality and safety, of grid self-healing, of use of the communicating counter, of impact of decentralised production and new usages on the grid, of transformation of the consumer into an aware and responsible actor, of equipment and installations in housing, of services proposed to residential tester-customers, of flexibility aggregation. The third part proposes an overview of future fields of experiment: cost-benefit analysis, innovating solutions for the grid, massive integration of decentralised resources and new usages related to electric vehicles, local experiment in Grenoble and Lyons. The various partners are presented in appendix

  2. NASA's Information Power Grid: Large Scale Distributed Computing and Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, William E.; Vaziri, Arsi; Hinke, Tom; Tanner, Leigh Ann; Feiereisen, William J.; Thigpen, William; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large-scale science and engineering are done through the interaction of people, heterogeneous computing resources, information systems, and instruments, all of which are geographically and organizationally dispersed. The overall motivation for Grids is to facilitate the routine interactions of these resources in order to support large-scale science and engineering. Multi-disciplinary simulations provide a good example of a class of applications that are very likely to require aggregation of widely distributed computing, data, and intellectual resources. Such simulations - e.g. whole system aircraft simulation and whole system living cell simulation - require integrating applications and data that are developed by different teams of researchers frequently in different locations. The research team's are the only ones that have the expertise to maintain and improve the simulation code and/or the body of experimental data that drives the simulations. This results in an inherently distributed computing and data management environment.

  3. Performance and scaling of locally-structured grid methods forpartial differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colella, Phillip; Bell, John; Keen, Noel; Ligocki, Terry; Lijewski, Michael; Van Straalen, Brian

    2007-07-19

    In this paper, we discuss some of the issues in obtaining high performance for block-structured adaptive mesh refinement software for partial differential equations. We show examples in which AMR scales to thousands of processors. We also discuss a number of metrics for performance and scalability that can provide a basis for understanding the advantages and disadvantages of this approach.

  4. Scaling properties of localized quantum chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izrailev, F.M.

    1991-01-01

    Statistical properties of spectra and eigenfunctions are studied for the model of quantum chaos in the presence of dynamical localization. The main attention is paid to the scaling properties of localization length and level spacing distribution in the intermediate region between Poissonian and Wigner-Dyson statistics. It is shown that main features of such localized quantum chaos are well described by the introduced ensemble of band random matrices. 28 refs.; 7 figs

  5. A novel method for the extraction of local gravity wave parameters from gridded three-dimensional data: description, validation, and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Schoon

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available For the local diagnosis of wave properties, we develop, validate, and apply a novel method which is based on the Hilbert transform. It is called Unified Wave Diagnostics (UWaDi. It provides the wave amplitude and three-dimensional wave number at any grid point for gridded three-dimensional data. UWaDi is validated for a synthetic test case comprising two different wave packets. In comparison with other methods, the performance of UWaDi is very good with respect to wave properties and their location. For a first practical application of UWaDi, a minor sudden stratospheric warming on 30 January 2016 is chosen. Specifying the diagnostics for hydrostatic inertia–gravity waves in analyses from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, we detect the local occurrence of gravity waves throughout the middle atmosphere. The local wave characteristics are discussed in terms of vertical propagation using the diagnosed local amplitudes and wave numbers. We also note some hints on local inertia–gravity wave generation by the stratospheric jet from the detection of shallow slow waves in the vicinity of its exit region.

  6. A Theorem on Grid Access Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU ZhiWei(徐志伟); BU GuanYing(卜冠英)

    2003-01-01

    The current grid security research is mainly focused on the authentication of grid systems. A problem to be solved by grid systems is to ensure consistent access control. This problem is complicated because the hosts in a grid computing environment usually span multiple autonomous administrative domains. This paper presents a grid access control model, based on asynchronous automata theory and the classic Bell-LaPadula model. This model is useful to formally study the confidentiality and integrity problems in a grid computing environment. A theorem is proved, which gives the necessary and sufficient conditions to a grid to maintain confidentiality.These conditions are the formalized descriptions of local (node) relations or relationship between grid subjects and node subjects.

  7. Regulatory potential for increasing small scale grid connected photovoltaic (PV) deployment in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaraman, Deepak; Horne, Ralph E.

    2011-01-01

    The last decade has seen significant innovation and change in regulatory incentives to support photovoltaic deployment globally. With high fossil fuel dependency and abundant solar resource availability in Australia, grid connected photovoltaics are a viable low carbon technology option in existing electricity grids. Drawing on international examples, the potential to increase grid PV deployment through government response and regulation is explored. For each renewable energy certificate (REC) earned by small scale photovoltaics until 2012, the market provides four additional certificates under the current banded renewable targets. Our analysis indicates that REC eligibility is not accurately estimated currently, and an energy model is developed to calculate the variance. The energy model estimates as much as 26% additional REC's to be obtained by a 3 kWp PV system, when compared to the currently used regulatory method. Moreover, the provision of REC's increases benefits to PV technologies, in the process distorting CO 2 abatement (0.21 tonne/REC) by 68%, when PV displaces peaking natural gas plants. Consideration of the secondary effects of a banded structure on emissions trading market is important in the context of designing a range of initiatives intended to support a transition to a low carbon electricity sector. - Research Highlights: →Grid connected photovoltaics hedge spikes in peak demand summer electricity prices. →Nationwide feed in tariff and new building regulations needed to increase PV deployment. →Australia has transitioned from a solar rebate to a banded solar credit structure. →The currently used regulatory deeming method underestimates REC eligibility by 27%. →The banded structure can potentially distort CO 2 abatement by as much as 68%.

  8. Scale-adaptive Local Patches for Robust Visual Object Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Sun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problem of robustly tracking objects which undergo rapid and dramatic scale changes. To remove the weakness of global appearance models, we present a novel scheme that combines object’s global and local appearance features. The local feature is a set of local patches that geometrically constrain the changes in the target’s appearance. In order to adapt to the object’s geometric deformation, the local patches could be removed and added online. The addition of these patches is constrained by the global features such as color, texture and motion. The global visual features are updated via the stable local patches during tracking. To deal with scale changes, we adapt the scale of patches in addition to adapting the object bound box. We evaluate our method by comparing it to several state-of-the-art trackers on publicly available datasets. The experimental results on challenging sequences confirm that, by using this scale-adaptive local patches and global properties, our tracker outperforms the related trackers in many cases by having smaller failure rate as well as better accuracy.

  9. Integrating PEVs with Renewables and the Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meintz, Andrew; Markel, Tony; Jun, Myungsoo; Zhang, Jiucai

    2016-06-29

    This presentation is an overview of NREL's Electric Vehicle Grid Integration (EVGI) efforts toward integrating Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) with renewable energy and the grid. Efforts include managed charging, local power quality, emergency backup power, and bi-directional power flow. Discussion of future vehicle-related activities under the Grid Modernization Initiative by the Multi-Lab EV Smart Grid Working Group.

  10. Grid resilience governance of the future: analyzing the role of associations in experimental smart grid projects in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Imke; Vasenev, Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    Local generation decentralizes urban grids. Soon new actors, such as associations, might enter the traditional energy domain. As electrical grids are critical for society, new actors will need to collaborate with other city-level stakeholders to ensure proper grid functioning in times of crisis.

  11. Study of the integration of distributed generation systems in the grid: application in micro-grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaztanaga Arantzamendi, H.

    2006-12-01

    The present PhD deals with an original micro-grid concept and its application as a Renewable Energy Source's (RES) grid integration scheme. This micro-grid is composed of RES generators as well as support systems that incorporate additional functionalities in order to improve RES integration into the grid. According to this concept, two practical micro-grid applications have been studied in detail: a residential micro-grid and a wind farm supported by DFACTS systems (STATCOM and DVR). In both applications, the control structures which are implemented at different levels and applied to the different micro-grid elements have been developed, analyzed by means of off-line simulations and finally validated in real-time conditions with physical reduced-scale prototypes. (author)

  12. Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics 2007 : Implementations and Experiences on Large Scale and Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    At the 19th Annual Conference on Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics held in Antalya, Turkey, in May 2007, the most recent developments and implementations of large-scale and grid computing were presented. This book, comprised of the invited and selected papers of this conference, details those advances, which are of particular interest to CFD and CFD-related communities. It also offers the results related to applications of various scientific and engineering problems involving flows and flow-related topics. Intended for CFD researchers and graduate students, this book is a state-of-the-art presentation of the relevant methodology and implementation techniques of large-scale computing.

  13. Methods and apparatus of analyzing electrical power grid data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, Ryan P.; Critchlow, Terence J.; Gibson, Tara D.

    2017-09-05

    Apparatus and methods of processing large-scale data regarding an electrical power grid are described. According to one aspect, a method of processing large-scale data regarding an electrical power grid includes accessing a large-scale data set comprising information regarding an electrical power grid; processing data of the large-scale data set to identify a filter which is configured to remove erroneous data from the large-scale data set; using the filter, removing erroneous data from the large-scale data set; and after the removing, processing data of the large-scale data set to identify an event detector which is configured to identify events of interest in the large-scale data set.

  14. Multidimensional Scaling Localization Algorithm in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dongyang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the localization algorithm in large-scale wireless sensor network exists shortcomings both in positioning accuracy and time complexity compared to traditional localization algorithm, this paper presents a fast multidimensional scaling location algorithm. By positioning algorithm for fast multidimensional scaling, fast mapping initialization, fast mapping and coordinate transform can get schematic coordinates of node, coordinates Initialize of MDS algorithm, an accurate estimate of the node coordinates and using the PRORUSTES to analysis alignment of the coordinate and final position coordinates of nodes etc. There are four steps, and the thesis gives specific implementation steps of the algorithm. Finally, compared with stochastic algorithms and classical MDS algorithm experiment, the thesis takes application of specific examples. Experimental results show that: the proposed localization algorithm has fast multidimensional scaling positioning accuracy in ensuring certain circumstances, but also greatly improves the speed of operation.

  15. Climate analysis at local scale in the context of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenol, H.

    2013-01-01

    Issues related to climate change increasingly concern the functioning of local scale geo-systems. A global change will necessarily affect local climates. In this context, the potential impacts of climate change lead to numerous inter rogations concerning adaptation. Despite numerous studies on the impact of projected global warming on different regions global atmospheric models (GCM) are not adapted to local scales and, as a result, impacts at local scales are still approximate. Although real progress in meso-scale atmospheric modeling was realized over the past years, no operative model is in use yet to simulate climate at local scales (ten or so meters). (author)

  16. Power grid reliability and security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Anjan [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Venkatasubramanian, Vaithianathan [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Hauser, Carl [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Bakken, David [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Anderson, David [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Zhao, Chuanlin [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Liu, Dong [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Yang, Tao [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Meng, Ming [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Zhang, Lin [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Ning, Jiawei [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Tashman, Zaid [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This project has led to the development of a real-time simulation platform for electric power grids called Grid Simulator or GridSim for simulating the dynamic and information network interactions of large- scale power systems. The platform consists of physical models of power system components including synchronous generators, loads and control, which are simulated using a modified commercial power simulator namely Transient Stability Analysis Tool (TSAT) [1] together with data cleanup components, as well as an emulated substation level and wide-area power analysis components. The platform also includes realistic representations of communication network middleware that can emulate the real-time information flow back and forth between substations and control centers in wide-area power systems. The platform has been validated on a realistic 6000-bus model of the western American power system. The simulator GridSim developed in this project is the first of its kind in its ability to simulate real-time response of large-scale power grids, and serves as a cost effective real-time stability and control simulation platform for power industry.

  17. The Dynamics of Population, Built-up Areas and their Evolving Associations in Gridded Population across Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, F. R.; Gaughan, A. E.; Tatem, A. J.; Linard, C.; Sorichetta, A.; Nieves, J. J.; Reed, P.

    2017-12-01

    Gridded population data is commonly used to understand the `now' of hazard risk and mitigation management, health and disease modelling, and global change-, economic-, environmental-, and sustainability-related research. But to understand how human population change at local to global scales influences and is influenced by environmental changes requires novel ways of treating data and statistically describing associations of measured population counts with associated covariates. One of the most critical components in such gridded estimates is the relationship between built-up areas and population located in these areas. This relationship is rarely static and accurately estimating changes in built-areas through time and the changing human population around them is critical when applying gridded population datasets in studies of other environmental change. The research presented here discusses these issues in the context of multitemporal, gridded population data, using new technologies and sources of remotely-sensed and modeled built-up areas. We discuss applications of these data in environmental analyses and intercomparisons with other such data across scales.

  18. Visualization system for grid environment in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsumoto, Nobuko; Idomura, Yasuhiro; Tani, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    An innovative scientific visualization system is needed to integratedly visualize large amount of data which are distributedly generated in remote locations as a result of a large-scale numerical simulation using a grid environment. One of the important functions in such a visualization system is a parallel visualization which enables to visualize data using multiple CPUs of a supercomputer. The other is a distributed visualization which enables to execute visualization processes using a local client computer and remote computers. We have developed a toolkit including these functions in cooperation with the commercial visualization software AVS/Express, called Parallel Support Toolkit (PST). PST can execute visualization processes with three kinds of parallelism (data parallelism, task parallelism and pipeline parallelism) using local and remote computers. We have evaluated PST for large amount of data generated by a nuclear fusion simulation. Here, two supercomputers Altix3700Bx2 and Prism installed in JAEA are used. From the evaluation, it can be seen that PST has a potential to efficiently visualize large amount of data in a grid environment. (author)

  19. Robust Two Degrees-of-freedom Single-current Control Strategy for LCL-type Grid-Connected DG System under Grid-Frequency Fluctuation and Grid-impedance Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Leming; Chen, Yandong; Luo, An

    2016-01-01

    -of-freedom single-current control (RTDOF-SCC) strategy is proposed, which mainly includes the synchronous reference frame quasi-proportional-integral (SRFQPI) control and robust grid-current-feedback active damping (RGCFAD) control. The proposed SRFQPI control can compensate the local-loads reactive power......, and regulate the instantaneous grid current without steady-state error regardless of the fundamental frequency fluctuation. Simultaneously, the proposed RGCFAD control effectively damps the LCL-resonance peak regardless of the grid-impedance variation, and further improves both transient and steady...

  20. An efficient grid layout algorithm for biological networks utilizing various biological attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato Mitsuru

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clearly visualized biopathways provide a great help in understanding biological systems. However, manual drawing of large-scale biopathways is time consuming. We proposed a grid layout algorithm that can handle gene-regulatory networks and signal transduction pathways by considering edge-edge crossing, node-edge crossing, distance measure between nodes, and subcellular localization information from Gene Ontology. Consequently, the layout algorithm succeeded in drastically reducing these crossings in the apoptosis model. However, for larger-scale networks, we encountered three problems: (i the initial layout is often very far from any local optimum because nodes are initially placed at random, (ii from a biological viewpoint, human layouts still exceed automatic layouts in understanding because except subcellular localization, it does not fully utilize biological information of pathways, and (iii it employs a local search strategy in which the neighborhood is obtained by moving one node at each step, and automatic layouts suggest that simultaneous movements of multiple nodes are necessary for better layouts, while such extension may face worsening the time complexity. Results We propose a new grid layout algorithm. To address problem (i, we devised a new force-directed algorithm whose output is suitable as the initial layout. For (ii, we considered that an appropriate alignment of nodes having the same biological attribute is one of the most important factors of the comprehension, and we defined a new score function that gives an advantage to such configurations. For solving problem (iii, we developed a search strategy that considers swapping nodes as well as moving a node, while keeping the order of the time complexity. Though a naïve implementation increases by one order, the time complexity, we solved this difficulty by devising a method that caches differences between scores of a layout and its possible updates

  1. Local-scale and watershed-scale determinants of summertime urban stream temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derek B. Booth; Kristin A. Kraseski; C. Rhett. Jackson

    2014-01-01

    The influence of urbanization on the temperature of small streams is widely recognized, but these effects are confounded by the great natural variety of their contributing watersheds. To evaluate the relative importance of local-scale and watershed-scale factors on summer temperatures in urban streams, hundreds of near-instantaneous temperature measurements throughout...

  2. Smart grid. Research project of EON Bayern. Research project ''Grid of the future''; Smart-Grid. Forschungsprojekt der Eon Bayern. Forschungsprojekt ''Netz der Zukunft''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garhamer, Michael [Eon Bayern AG, Regensburg (Germany). Bereich Grundsatzaufgaben, Assetmanagement

    2012-03-12

    In February 2010, several smart-grid investigations were initiated by EON's regional utility companies and the EON Energie AG (Munich, Federal Republic of Germany). The focal points of research were: (1) Integration of an enhanced wind energy supply in the medium and high voltage grids; (2) Intelligent local power station; (3) Longitudinal voltage regulator / voltage conditioner and controllable local power transformers; (4) Configuration and investigation of a district with modern building technology, photovoltaic systems and electric vehicles; (5) Integration of an enhanced solar feeding in low and medium voltage grids. The findings relating to the purchase behaviour and supply behaviour of the grids enable customers to optimize the existing planning fundamentals. Future technical and legal innovations are explored previously in the project area and implemented.

  3. MODFLOW–LGR—Documentation of ghost node local grid refinement (LGR2) for multiple areas and the boundary flow and head (BFH2) package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Steffen W.; Hill, Mary C.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the addition of ghost node Local Grid Refinement (LGR2) to MODFLOW-2005, the U.S. Geological Survey modular, transient, three-dimensional, finite-difference groundwater flow model. LGR2 provides the capability to simulate groundwater flow using multiple block-shaped higher-resolution local grids (a child model) within a coarser-grid parent model. LGR2 accomplishes this by iteratively coupling separate MODFLOW-2005 models such that heads and fluxes are balanced across the grid-refinement interface boundary. LGR2 can be used in two-and three-dimensional, steady-state and transient simulations and for simulations of confined and unconfined groundwater systems. Traditional one-way coupled telescopic mesh refinement methods can have large, often undetected, inconsistencies in heads and fluxes across the interface between two model grids. The iteratively coupled ghost-node method of LGR2 provides a more rigorous coupling in which the solution accuracy is controlled by convergence criteria defined by the user. In realistic problems, this can result in substantially more accurate solutions and require an increase in computer processing time. The rigorous coupling enables sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, and uncertainty analysis that reflects conditions in both model grids. This report describes the method used by LGR2, evaluates accuracy and performance for two-and three-dimensional test cases, provides input instructions, and lists selected input and output files for an example problem. It also presents the Boundary Flow and Head (BFH2) Package, which allows the child and parent models to be simulated independently using the boundary conditions obtained through the iterative process of LGR2.

  4. Technology Roadmaps: Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The development of Technology Roadmaps: Smart Grids -- which the IEA defines as an electricity network that uses digital and other advanced technologies to monitor and manage the transport of electricity from all generation sources to meet the varying electricity demands of end users -- is essential if the global community is to achieve shared goals for energy security, economic development and climate change mitigation. Unfortunately, existing misunderstandings of exactly what smart grids are and the physical and institutional complexity of electricity systems make it difficult to implement smart grids on the scale that is needed. This roadmap sets out specific steps needed over the coming years to achieve milestones that will allow smart grids to deliver a clean energy future.

  5. Delta-Connected Cascaded H-Bridge Multilevel Converters for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Grid Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Yifan; Konstantinou, Georgios; Townsend, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    The cascaded H-bridge (CHB) converter is becoming a promising candidate for use in next generation large-scale photovoltaic (PV) power plants. However, solar power generation in the three converter phase-legs can be significantly unbalanced, especially in a large geographically-dispersed plant....... The power imbalance between the three phases defines a limit for the injection of balanced three-phase currents to the grid. This paper quantifies the performance of, and experimentally confirms, the recently proposed delta-connected CHB converter for PV applications as an alternative configuration...... for large-scale PV power plants. The required voltage and current overrating for the converter is analytically developed and compared against the star-connected counterpart. It is shown that the delta-connected CHB converter extends the balancing capabilities of the star-connected CHB and can accommodate...

  6. AGIS: The ATLAS Grid Information System

    CERN Document Server

    Anisenkov, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, A; Senchenko, A

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Computing model embraces the Grid paradigm and a high degree of decentralization and computing resources able to meet ATLAS requirements of petabytes scale data operations. In this paper we present ATLAS Grid Information System (AGIS) designed to integrate configuration and status information about resources, services and topology of whole ATLAS Grid needed by ATLAS Distributed Computing applications and services.

  7. Cloud feedback studies with a physics grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dipankar, Anurag [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Hamburg; Stevens, Bjorn [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Hamburg

    2013-02-07

    During this project the investigators implemented a fully parallel version of dual-grid approach in main frame code ICON, implemented a fully conservative first-order interpolation scheme for horizontal remapping, integrated UCLA-LES micro-scale model into ICON to run parallely in selected columns, and did cloud feedback studies on aqua-planet setup to evaluate the classical parameterization on a small domain. The micro-scale model may be run in parallel with the classical parameterization, or it may be run on a "physics grid" independent of the dynamics grid.

  8. The GridShare solution: a smart grid approach to improve service provision on a renewable energy mini-grid in Bhutan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quetchenbach, T G; Harper, M J; Jacobson, A E; Robinson IV, J; Hervin, K K; Chase, N A; Dorji, C

    2013-01-01

    This letter reports on the design and pilot installation of GridShares, devices intended to alleviate brownouts caused by peak power use on isolated, village-scale mini-grids. A team consisting of the authors and partner organizations designed, built and field-tested GridShares in the village of Rukubji, Bhutan. The GridShare takes an innovative approach to reducing brownouts by using a low cost device that communicates the state of the grid to its users and regulates usage before severe brownouts occur. This demand-side solution encourages users to distribute the use of large appliances more evenly throughout the day, allowing power-limited systems to provide reliable, long-term renewable electricity to these communities. In the summer of 2011, GridShares were installed in every household and business connected to the Rukubji micro-hydro mini-grid, which serves approximately 90 households with a 40 kW nominal capacity micro-hydro system. The installation was accompanied by an extensive education program. Following the installation of the GridShares, the occurrence and average length of severe brownouts, which had been caused primarily by the use of electric cooking appliances during meal preparation, decreased by over 92%. Additionally, the majority of residents surveyed stated that now they are more certain that their rice will cook well and that they would recommend installing GridShares in other villages facing similar problems. (letter)

  9. Potential of vehicle-to-grid ancillary services considering the uncertainties in plug-in electric vehicle availability and service/localization limitations in distribution grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabi, Siyamak; Davigny, Arnaud; Courtecuisse, Vincent; Riffonneau, Yann; Robyns, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The availability uncertainty of PEVs are modelled using Gaussian mixture model. • Interdependency of stochastic variables are modelled using copula function. • V2G bidding capacity is calculated using Free Pattern search optimization method. • Localization limitation is considered for V2G service potential assessment. • Competitive services for fleet of V2G-enabled PEVs are identified using fuzzy sets. - Abstract: The aim of the paper is to propose an approach for statistical assessment of the potential of plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) for vehicle-to-grid (V2G) ancillary services, where it focuses on PEVs doing daily home-work commuting. In this approach, the possible ancillary services (A/S) for each PEV fleet in terms of its available V2G power (AVP) and flexible intervals are identified. The flexible interval is calculated using a powerful stochastic global optimization technique so-called “Free Pattern Search” (FPS). A probabilistic method is also proposed to quantify the impacts of PEV’s availability uncertainty using the Gaussian mixture model (GMM), and interdependency of stochastic variables on AVP of each fleet thanks to a multivariate modeling with Copula function. Each fleet is analyzed based on its aggregated PEV numbers at different level of distribution grid, in order to satisfy the ancillary services localization limitation. A case study using the proposed approach evaluates the real potential in Niort, a city in west of France. In fact, by using the proposed approach an aggregator can analyze the V2G potential of PEVs under its contract.

  10. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  11. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Kure Atoll, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  12. Making distributed ALICE analysis simple using the GRID plug-in

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheata, A; Gheata, M

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an interface within the ALICE analysis framework that allows transparent usage of the experiment's distributed resources. This analysis plug-in makes it possible to configure back-end specific parameters from a single interface and to run with no change the same custom user analysis in many computing environments, from local workstations to PROOF clusters or GRID resources. The tool is used now extensively in the ALICE collaboration for both end-user analysis and large scale productions.

  13. Decentral Smart Grid Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Benjamin; Matthiae, Moritz; Timme, Marc; Witthaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Stable operation of complex flow and transportation networks requires balanced supply and demand. For the operation of electric power grids—due to their increasing fraction of renewable energy sources—a pressing challenge is to fit the fluctuations in decentralized supply to the distributed and temporally varying demands. To achieve this goal, common smart grid concepts suggest to collect consumer demand data, centrally evaluate them given current supply and send price information back to customers for them to decide about usage. Besides restrictions regarding cyber security, privacy protection and large required investments, it remains unclear how such central smart grid options guarantee overall stability. Here we propose a Decentral Smart Grid Control, where the price is directly linked to the local grid frequency at each customer. The grid frequency provides all necessary information about the current power balance such that it is sufficient to match supply and demand without the need for a centralized IT infrastructure. We analyze the performance and the dynamical stability of the power grid with such a control system. Our results suggest that the proposed Decentral Smart Grid Control is feasible independent of effective measurement delays, if frequencies are averaged over sufficiently large time intervals.

  14. Decentral Smart Grid Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schäfer, Benjamin; Matthiae, Moritz; Timme, Marc; Witthaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Stable operation of complex flow and transportation networks requires balanced supply and demand. For the operation of electric power grids—due to their increasing fraction of renewable energy sources—a pressing challenge is to fit the fluctuations in decentralized supply to the distributed and temporally varying demands. To achieve this goal, common smart grid concepts suggest to collect consumer demand data, centrally evaluate them given current supply and send price information back to customers for them to decide about usage. Besides restrictions regarding cyber security, privacy protection and large required investments, it remains unclear how such central smart grid options guarantee overall stability. Here we propose a Decentral Smart Grid Control, where the price is directly linked to the local grid frequency at each customer. The grid frequency provides all necessary information about the current power balance such that it is sufficient to match supply and demand without the need for a centralized IT infrastructure. We analyze the performance and the dynamical stability of the power grid with such a control system. Our results suggest that the proposed Decentral Smart Grid Control is feasible independent of effective measurement delays, if frequencies are averaged over sufficiently large time intervals. (paper)

  15. Smart grids are advancing, light and supple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitot, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    While indicating some innovations produced by the Greenlys laboratory (SmartScan to localize losses by means of smart counters, a system for grid self-healing, Sequoia to manage a low voltage network, a tool for the prediction of photovoltaic production in real time), and also the main smart grid projects in France (Nice Grid, Solenn, SoGrid, Smart Electric Lyon, Poste intelligent, Greenlys, Smart Grids Vendee, BienVEnu), this article comments the emergence of several experiments on smart grids in France, the first drawn conclusions and recommendations. Some issues for this new architecture are discussed: the active demand management, cut-offs and flexibility, and the search for profitability

  16. Workshop on Future Generation Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Laforenza, Domenico; Reinefeld, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    The Internet and the Web continue to have a major impact on society. By allowing us to discover and access information on a global scale, they have created entirely new businesses and brought new meaning to the term surf. In addition, however, we want processing, and increasingly, we want collaborative processing within distributed teams. This need has led to the creation of the Grid - an infrastructure that enables us to share capabilities, and integrate services and resources within and across enterprises. "Future Generation Grids" is the second in the "CoreGRID" series. This edited volume brings together contributed articles by scientists and researchers in the Grid community in an attempt to draw a clearer picture of the future generation Grids. This book also identifies some of the most challenging problems on the way to achieving the invisible Grid ideas

  17. Bus.py: A GridLAB-D Communication Interface for Smart Distribution Grid Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Timothy M.; Palmintier, Bryan; Suryanarayanan, Siddharth; Maciejewski, Anthony A.; Siegel, Howard Jay

    2015-07-03

    As more Smart Grid technologies (e.g., distributed photovoltaic, spatially distributed electric vehicle charging) are integrated into distribution grids, static distribution simulations are no longer sufficient for performing modeling and analysis. GridLAB-D is an agent-based distribution system simulation environment that allows fine-grained end-user models, including geospatial and network topology detail. A problem exists in that, without outside intervention, once the GridLAB-D simulation begins execution, it will run to completion without allowing the real-time interaction of Smart Grid controls, such as home energy management systems and aggregator control. We address this lack of runtime interaction by designing a flexible communication interface, Bus.py (pronounced bus-dot-pie), that uses Python to pass messages between one or more GridLAB-D instances and a Smart Grid simulator. This work describes the design and implementation of Bus.py, discusses its usefulness in terms of some Smart Grid scenarios, and provides an example of an aggregator-based residential demand response system interacting with GridLAB-D through Bus.py. The small scale example demonstrates the validity of the interface and shows that an aggregator using said interface is able to control residential loads in GridLAB-D during runtime to cause a reduction in the peak load on the distribution system in (a) peak reduction and (b) time-of-use pricing cases.

  18. grid-connected photovoltaic system design for local government

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    wind power and has durability of more than twenty five years with a very minimal .... enhance energy yield of grid connected PV power plant by naturally catching .... cause it to operate at maximum power point irrespective of changing weather ...

  19. The DataGrid Project

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggieri, F

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the objectives and status of the DataGrid Project is presented, together with a brief introduction to the Grid metaphor and some references to the Grid activities and initiatives related to DataGrid. High energy physics experiments have always requested state of the art computing facilities to efficiently perform several computing activities related with the handling of large amounts of data and fairly large computing resources. Some of the ideas born inside the community to enhance the user friendliness of all the steps in the computing chain have been, sometimes, successfully applied also in other contexts: one bright example is the World Wide Web. The LHC computing challenge has triggered inside the high energy physics community, the start of the DataGrid Project. The objective of the project is to enable next generation scientific exploration requiring intensive computation and analysis of shared large-scale databases. (12 refs).

  20. A Review of Distributed Control Techniques for Power Quality Improvement in Micro-grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeshan, Hafiz Muhammad Ali; Nisar, Fatima; Hassan, Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    Micro-grid is typically visualized as a small scale local power supply network dependent on distributed energy resources (DERs) that can operate simultaneously with grid as well as in standalone manner. The distributed generator of a micro-grid system is usually a converter-inverter type topology acting as a non-linear load, and injecting harmonics into the distribution feeder. Hence, the negative effects on power quality by the usage of distributed generation sources and components are clearly witnessed. In this paper, a review of distributed control approaches for power quality improvement is presented which encompasses harmonic compensation, loss mitigation and optimum power sharing in multi-source-load distributed power network. The decentralized subsystems for harmonic compensation and active-reactive power sharing accuracy have been analysed in detail. Results have been validated to be consistent with IEEE standards.

  1. European electricity grid. Status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    There is no doubt about the need to expand and modernize the European electricity grid, especially in order to allow renewable energies to be fed stochastically into existing systems. As it is hardly possible at the present time and also in the near future to store electricity on a major scale and at adequate prices, electricity must be transmitted from the point of generation to the point of consumption directly and in real time. The development of grid systems, including cross-border transmission systems, is still behind expectations. This is not due to a shortage of projects or a lack of interest on the part of grid operators; the necessary political support is available as well, and investments at present are covered by the feed tariffs. The problem is the lack of acceptance. It is difficult to obtain new permits or commission new grids. This problem of the licensing authorities often results in considerable delays. Consequently, it is up to the grid operators to handle this situation and promote new, intelligent grid systems in an effort to achieve acceptance of a technical-scale infrastructure. This includes transparency in grid expansion, exchange with the public in order to reach mutual understanding and trust and also find compromises as well as the willingness to discuss various approaches to solutions (underground routing, upgrading of existing grid systems, smart systems, and intelligent designs) so as to optimize the use of the existing infrastructure. (orig.)

  2. How Does the Modular Organization of Entorhinal Grid Cells Develop?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eGrossberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal-hippocampal system plays a crucial role in spatial cognition and navigation. Since the discovery of grid cells in layer II of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC, several types of models have been proposed to explain their development and operation; namely, continuous attractor network models, oscillatory interference models, and self-organizing map (SOM models. Recent experiments revealing the in vivo intracellular signatures of grid cells (Domnisoru et al., 2013; Schmidt-Heiber & Hausser, 2013, the primarily inhibitory recurrent connectivity of grid cells (Couey et al., 2013; Pastoll et al., 2013, and the topographic organization of grid cells within anatomically overlapping modules of multiple spatial scales along the dorsoventral axis of MEC (Stensola et al., 2012 provide strong constraints and challenges to existing grid cell models. This article provides a computational explanation for how MEC cells can emerge through learning with grid cell properties in modular structures. Within this SOM model, grid cells with different rates of temporal integration learn modular properties with different spatial scales. Model grid cells learn in response to inputs from multiple scales of directionally-selective stripe cells (Krupic et al., 2012; Mhatre et al., 2012 that perform path integration of the linear velocities that are experienced during navigation. Slower rates of grid cell temporal integration support learned associations with stripe cells of larger scales. The explanatory and predictive capabilities of the three types of grid cell models are comparatively analyzed in light of recent data to illustrate how the SOM model overcomes problems that other types of models have not yet handled.

  3. Modelling noise propagation using Grid Resources. Progress within GDI-Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehle, Christian; Mayer, Christian; Padberg, Alexander; Stapelfeld, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    Modelling noise propagation using Grid Resources. Progress within GDI-Grid. GDI-Grid (english: SDI-Grid) is a research project funded by the German Ministry for Science and Education (BMBF). It aims at bridging the gaps between OGC Web Services (OWS) and Grid infrastructures and identifying the potential of utilizing the superior storage capacities and computational power of grid infrastructures for geospatial applications while keeping the well-known service interfaces specified by the OGC. The project considers all major OGC webservice interfaces for Web Mapping (WMS), Feature access (Web Feature Service), Coverage access (Web Coverage Service) and processing (Web Processing Service). The major challenge within GDI-Grid is the harmonization of diverging standards as defined by standardization bodies for Grid computing and spatial information exchange. The project started in 2007 and will continue until June 2010. The concept for the gridification of OWS developed by lat/lon GmbH and the Department of Geography of the University of Bonn is applied to three real-world scenarios in order to check its practicability: a flood simulation, a scenario for emergency routing and a noise propagation simulation. The latter scenario is addressed by the Stapelfeldt Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH located in Dortmund adapting their LimA software to utilize grid resources. Noise mapping of e.g. traffic noise in urban agglomerates and along major trunk roads is a reoccurring demand of the EU Noise Directive. Input data requires road net and traffic, terrain, buildings and noise protection screens as well as population distribution. Noise impact levels are generally calculated in 10 m grid and along relevant building facades. For each receiver position sources within a typical range of 2000 m are split down into small segments, depending on local geometry. For each of the segments propagation analysis includes diffraction effects caused by all obstacles on the path of sound propagation

  4. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  5. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ni'ihau Island, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  6. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 60 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (60 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  7. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of French Frigate Shoals, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  8. A new subgrid characteristic length for turbulence simulations on anisotropic grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trias, F. X.; Gorobets, A.; Silvis, M. H.; Verstappen, R. W. C. P.; Oliva, A.

    2017-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are not feasible yet for most practical turbulent flows. Therefore, dynamically less complex mathematical formulations are necessary for coarse-grained simulations. In this regard, eddy-viscosity models for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) are probably the most popular example thereof. This type of models requires the calculation of a subgrid characteristic length which is usually associated with the local grid size. For isotropic grids, this is equal to the mesh step. However, for anisotropic or unstructured grids, such as the pancake-like meshes that are often used to resolve near-wall turbulence or shear layers, a consensus on defining the subgrid characteristic length has not been reached yet despite the fact that it can strongly affect the performance of LES models. In this context, a new definition of the subgrid characteristic length is presented in this work. This flow-dependent length scale is based on the turbulent, or subgrid stress, tensor and its representations on different grids. The simplicity and mathematical properties suggest that it can be a robust definition that minimizes the effects of mesh anisotropies on simulation results. The performance of the proposed subgrid characteristic length is successfully tested for decaying isotropic turbulence and a turbulent channel flow using artificially refined grids. Finally, a simple extension of the method for unstructured meshes is proposed and tested for a turbulent flow around a square cylinder. Comparisons with existing subgrid characteristic length scales show that the proposed definition is much more robust with respect to mesh anisotropies and has a great potential to be used in complex geometries where highly skewed (unstructured) meshes are present.

  9. Electric vehicle charging algorithms for coordination of the grid and distribution transformer levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos Muñoz, Edgar; Razeghi, Ghazal; Zhang, Li; Jabbari, Faryar

    2016-01-01

    The need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel consumption has increased the popularity of plug-in electric vehicles. However, a large penetration of plug-in electric vehicles can pose challenges at the grid and local distribution levels. Various charging strategies have been proposed to address such challenges, often separately. In this paper, it is shown that, with uncoordinated charging, distribution transformers and the grid can operate under highly undesirable conditions. Next, several strategies that require modest communication efforts are proposed to mitigate the burden created by high concentrations of plug-in electric vehicles, at the grid and local levels. Existing transformer and battery electric vehicle characteristics are used along with the National Household Travel Survey to simulate various charging strategies. It is shown through the analysis of hot spot temperature and equivalent aging factor that the coordinated strategies proposed here reduce the chances of transformer failure with the addition of plug-in electric vehicle loads, even for an under-designed transformer while uncontrolled and uncoordinated plug-in electric vehicle charging results in increased risk of transformer failure. - Highlights: • Charging algorithm for battery electric vehicles, for high penetration levels. • Algorithm reduces transformer overloading, for grid level valley filling. • Computation and communication requirements are minimal. • The distributed algorithm is implemented without large scale iterations. • Hot spot temperature and loss of life for transformers are evaluated.

  10. ATLAS off-Grid sites (Tier 3) monitoring. From local fabric monitoring to global overview of the VO computing activities

    CERN Document Server

    PETROSYAN, A; The ATLAS collaboration; BELOV, S; ANDREEVA, J; KADOCHNIKOV, I

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing activities have so far concentrated in the "central" part of the experiment computing system, namely the first 3 tiers (the CERN Tier0, 10 Tier1 centers and over 60 Tier2 sites). Many ATLAS Institutes and National Communities have deployed (or intend to) deploy Tier-3 facilities. Tier-3 centers consist of non-pledged resources, which are usually dedicated to data analysis tasks by the geographically close or local scientific groups, and which usually comprise a range of architectures without Grid middleware. Therefore a substantial part of the ATLAS monitoring tools which make use of Grid middleware, cannot be used for a large fraction of Tier3 sites. The presentation will describe the T3mon project, which aims to develop a software suite for monitoring the Tier3 sites, both from the perspective of the local site administrator and that of the ATLAS VO, thereby enabling the global view of the contribution from Tier3 sites to the ATLAS computing activities. Special attention in p...

  11. Importance of Grid Center Arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasaogullari, O.; Usul, N.

    2012-12-01

    In Digital Elevation Modeling, grid size is accepted to be the most important parameter. Despite the point density and/or scale of the source data, it is freely decided by the user. Most of the time, arrangement of the grid centers are ignored, even most GIS packages omit the choice of grid center coordinate selection. In our study; importance of the arrangement of grid centers is investigated. Using the analogy between "Raster Grid DEM" and "Bitmap Image", importance of placement of grid centers in DEMs are measured. The study has been conducted on four different grid DEMs obtained from a half ellipsoid. These grid DEMs are obtained in such a way that they are half grid size apart from each other. Resulting grid DEMs are investigated through similarity measures. Image processing scientists use different measures to investigate the dis/similarity between the images and the amount of different information they carry. Grid DEMs are projected to a finer grid in order to co-center. Similarity measures are then applied to each grid DEM pairs. These similarity measures are adapted to DEM with band reduction and real number operation. One of the measures gives function graph and the others give measure matrices. Application of similarity measures to six grid DEM pairs shows interesting results. These four different grid DEMs are created with the same method for the same area, surprisingly; thirteen out of 14 measures state that, the half grid size apart grid DEMs are different from each other. The results indicated that although grid DEMs carry mutual information, they have also additional individual information. In other words, half grid size apart constructed grid DEMs have non-redundant information.; Joint Probability Distributions Function Graphs

  12. Urban runoff (URO) process for MODFLOW 2005: simulation of sub-grid scale urban hydrologic processes in Broward County, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Jeremy D.; Hughes, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change and sea-level rise could cause substantial changes in urban runoff and flooding in low-lying coast landscapes. A major challenge for local government officials and decision makers is to translate the potential global effects of climate change into actionable and cost-effective adaptation and mitigation strategies at county and municipal scales. A MODFLOW process is used to represent sub-grid scale hydrology in urban settings to help address these issues. Coupled interception, surface water, depression, and unsaturated zone storage are represented. A two-dimensional diffusive wave approximation is used to represent overland flow. Three different options for representing infiltration and recharge are presented. Additional features include structure, barrier, and culvert flow between adjacent cells, specified stage boundaries, critical flow boundaries, source/sink surface-water terms, and the bi-directional runoff to MODFLOW Surface-Water Routing process. Some abilities of the Urban RunOff (URO) process are demonstrated with a synthetic problem using four land uses and varying cell coverages. Precipitation from a hypothetical storm was applied and cell by cell surface-water depth, groundwater level, infiltration rate, and groundwater recharge rate are shown. Results indicate the URO process has the ability to produce time-varying, water-content dependent infiltration and leakage, and successfully interacts with MODFLOW.

  13. Characterization of Slosh Damping for Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid Internal Tank Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Sansone, Marco D.; Eberhart, Chad J.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Grid stiffened tank structures such as Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid are widely used in cryogenic tanks for providing stiffening to the tank while reducing mass, compared to tank walls of constant cross-section. If the structure is internal to the tank, it will positively affect the fluid dynamic behavior of the liquid propellant, in regard to fluid slosh damping. As NASA and commercial companies endeavor to explore the solar system, vehicles will by necessity become more mass efficient, and design margin will be reduced where possible. Therefore, if the damping characteristics of the Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structure is understood, their positive damping effect can be taken into account in the systems design process. Historically, damping by internal structures has been characterized by rules of thumb and for Ortho-Grid, empirical design tools intended for slosh baffles of much larger cross-section have been used. There is little or no information available to characterize the slosh behavior of Iso-Grid internal structure. Therefore, to take advantage of these structures for their positive damping effects, there is much need for obtaining additional data and tools to characterize them. Recently, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted both sub-scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of slosh damping for Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid tanks for cylindrical tanks containing water. Enhanced grid meshing techniques were applied to the geometrically detailed and complex Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structures. The Loci-STREAM CFD program with the Volume of Fluid Method module for tracking and locating the water-air fluid interface was used to conduct the simulations. The CFD simulations were validated with the test data and new empirical models for predicting damping and frequency of Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structures were generated.

  14. Demagnifying electron projection with grid masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politycki, A.; Meyer, A.

    1978-01-01

    Tightly toleranced micro- and submicrostructures with smooth edges were realized by using transmission masks with an improved supporting grid (width of traverses 0.8 μm). Local edge shift due to the proximity effect is kept at a minimum. Supporting grids with stil narrower traverses (0.5 μm) were prepared by generating the grid pattern by electron beam writing. Masks of this kind allow projection at a demagnification ratio of 1:4, resulting in large image fields. (orig.) [de

  15. Challenges in Upscaling Geomorphic Transport Laws: Scale-dependence of Local vs. Non-local Formalisms and Derivation of Closures (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Ganti, V. K.; Passalacqua, P.

    2010-12-01

    Nonlinear geomorphic transport laws are often derived from mechanistic considerations at a point, and yet they are implemented on 90m or 30 m DEMs, presenting a mismatch in the scales of derivation and application of the flux laws. Since estimates of local slopes and curvatures are known to depend on the scale of the DEM used in their computation, two questions arise: (1) how to meaningfully compensate for the scale dependence, if any, of local transport laws? and (2) how to formally derive, via upscaling, constitutive laws that are applicable at larger scales? Recently, non-local geomorphic transport laws for sediment transport on hillslopes have been introduced using the concept of an integral flux that depends on topographic attributes in the vicinity of a point of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate the scale dependence of local nonlinear hillslope sediment transport laws and derive a closure term via upscaling (Reynolds averaging). We also show that the non-local hillslope transport laws are inherently scale independent owing to their non-local, scale-free nature. These concepts are demonstrated via an application to a small subbasin of the Oregon Coast Range using 2m LiDAR topographic data.

  16. Energy transfers in large-scale and small-scale dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samtaney, Ravi; Kumar, Rohit; Verma, Mahendra

    2015-11-01

    We present the energy transfers, mainly energy fluxes and shell-to-shell energy transfers in small-scale dynamo (SSD) and large-scale dynamo (LSD) using numerical simulations of MHD turbulence for Pm = 20 (SSD) and for Pm = 0.2 on 10243 grid. For SSD, we demonstrate that the magnetic energy growth is caused by nonlocal energy transfers from the large-scale or forcing-scale velocity field to small-scale magnetic field. The peak of these energy transfers move towards lower wavenumbers as dynamo evolves, which is the reason for the growth of the magnetic fields at the large scales. The energy transfers U2U (velocity to velocity) and B2B (magnetic to magnetic) are forward and local. For LSD, we show that the magnetic energy growth takes place via energy transfers from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field. We observe forward U2U and B2B energy flux, similar to SSD.

  17. Acorn: A grid computing system for constraint based modeling and visualization of the genome scale metabolic reaction networks via a web interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushell Michael E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constraint-based approaches facilitate the prediction of cellular metabolic capabilities, based, in turn on predictions of the repertoire of enzymes encoded in the genome. Recently, genome annotations have been used to reconstruct genome scale metabolic reaction networks for numerous species, including Homo sapiens, which allow simulations that provide valuable insights into topics, including predictions of gene essentiality of pathogens, interpretation of genetic polymorphism in metabolic disease syndromes and suggestions for novel approaches to microbial metabolic engineering. These constraint-based simulations are being integrated with the functional genomics portals, an activity that requires efficient implementation of the constraint-based simulations in the web-based environment. Results Here, we present Acorn, an open source (GNU GPL grid computing system for constraint-based simulations of genome scale metabolic reaction networks within an interactive web environment. The grid-based architecture allows efficient execution of computationally intensive, iterative protocols such as Flux Variability Analysis, which can be readily scaled up as the numbers of models (and users increase. The web interface uses AJAX, which facilitates efficient model browsing and other search functions, and intuitive implementation of appropriate simulation conditions. Research groups can install Acorn locally and create user accounts. Users can also import models in the familiar SBML format and link reaction formulas to major functional genomics portals of choice. Selected models and simulation results can be shared between different users and made publically available. Users can construct pathway map layouts and import them into the server using a desktop editor integrated within the system. Pathway maps are then used to visualise numerical results within the web environment. To illustrate these features we have deployed Acorn and created a

  18. Expanding access to off-grid rural electrification in Africa: An analysis of community-based micro-grids in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirubi, Charles Gathu

    Community micro-grids have played a central role in increasing access to off-grid rural electrification (RE) in many regions of the developing world, notably South Asia. However, the promise of community micro-grids in sub-Sahara Africa remains largely unexplored. My study explores the potential and limits of community micro-grids as options for increasing access to off-grid RE in sub-Sahara Africa. Contextualized in five community micro-grids in rural Kenya, my study is framed through theories of collective action and combines qualitative and quantitative methods, including household surveys, electronic data logging and regression analysis. The main contribution of my research is demonstrating the circumstances under which community micro-grids can contribute to rural development and the conditions under which individuals are likely to initiate and participate in such projects collectively. With regard to rural development, I demonstrate that access to electricity enables the use of electric equipment and tools by small and micro-enterprises, resulting in significant improvement in productivity per worker (100--200% depending on the task at hand) and a corresponding growth in income levels in the order of 20--70%, depending on the product made. Access to electricity simultaneously enables and improves delivery of social and business services from a wide range of village-level infrastructure (e.g. schools, markets, water pumps) while improving the productivity of agricultural activities. Moreover, when local electricity users have an ability to charge and enforce cost-reflective tariffs and electricity consumption is closely linked to productive uses that generate incomes, cost recovery is feasible. By their nature---a new technology delivering highly valued services by the elites and other members, limited local experience and expertise, high capital costs---community micro-grids are good candidates for elite-domination. Even so, elite control does not necessarily

  19. Compounded effects of heat waves and droughts over the Western Electricity Grid: spatio-temporal scales of impacts and predictability toward mitigation and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, N.; Kintner-Meyer, M.; Skaggs, R.; Xie, Y.; Wu, D.; Nguyen, T. B.; Fu, T.; Zhou, T.

    2016-12-01

    Heat waves and droughts are projected to be more frequent and intense. We have seen in the past the effects of each of those extreme climate events on electricity demand and constrained electricity generation, challenging power system operations. Our aim here is to understand the compounding effects under historical conditions. We present a benchmark of Western US grid performance under 55 years of historical climate, and including droughts, using 2010-level of water demand and water management infrastructure, and 2010-level of electricity grid infrastructure and operations. We leverage CMIP5 historical hydrology simulations and force a large scale river routing- reservoir model with 2010-level sectoral water demands. The regulated flow at each water-dependent generating plants is processed to adjust water-dependent electricity generation parameterization in a production cost model, that represents 2010-level power system operations with hourly energy demand of 2010. The resulting benchmark includes a risk distribution of several grid performance metrics (unserved energy, production cost, carbon emission) as a function of inter-annual variability in regional water availability and predictability using large scale climate oscillations. In the second part of the presentation, we describe an approach to map historical heat waves onto this benchmark grid performance using a building energy demand model. The impact of the heat waves, combined with the impact of droughts, is explored at multiple scales to understand the compounding effects. Vulnerabilities of the power generation and transmission systems are highlighted to guide future adaptation.

  20. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  1. Fast Grid Frequency Support from Distributed Inverter-Based Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoke, Anderson F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-05-04

    This presentation summarizes power hardware-in-the-loop testing performed to evaluate the ability of distributed inverter-coupled generation to support grid frequency on the fastest time scales. The research found that distributed PV inverters and other DERs can effectively support the grid on sub-second time scales.

  2. Controllable Grid Interface for Testing Ancillary Service Controls and Fault Performance of Utility-Scale Wind Power Generation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgian, Vahan; Koralewicz, Przemyslaw; Wallen, Robb; Muljadi, Eduard

    2017-02-01

    The rapid expansion of wind power has led many transmission system operators to demand modern wind power plants to comply with strict interconnection requirements. Such requirements involve various aspects of wind power plant operation, including fault ride-through and power quality performance as well as the provision of ancillary services to enhance grid reliability. During recent years, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of the U.S. Department of Energy has developed a new, groundbreaking testing apparatus and methodology to test and demonstrate many existing and future advanced controls for wind generation (and other renewable generation technologies) on the multimegawatt scale and medium-voltage levels. This paper describes the capabilities and control features of NREL's 7-MVA power electronic grid simulator (also called a controllable grid interface, or CGI) that enables testing many active and reactive power control features of modern wind turbine generators -- including inertial response, primary and secondary frequency responses, and voltage regulation -- under a controlled, medium-voltage grid environment. In particular, this paper focuses on the specifics of testing the balanced and unbalanced fault ride-through characteristics of wind turbine generators under simulated strong and weak medium-voltage grid conditions. In addition, this paper provides insights on the power hardware-in-the-loop feature implemented in the CGI to emulate (in real time) the conditions that might exist in various types of electric power systems under normal operations and/or contingency scenarios. Using actual test examples and simulation results, this paper describes the value of CGI as an ultimate modeling validation tool for all types of 'grid-friendly' controls by wind generation.

  3. To what extent does wind power deployment affect vested interests? A case study of the Northeast China Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhang, Sufang; Zou, Yasheng; Yao, Jin

    2013-01-01

    China's wind power is in an embarrassing state. Along with its dramatic development since 2005, its curtailment ratio has been rising. Although this could be attributed to both physical and institutional factors, it is the institutional obstacles, mainly resulting from the adjustment difficulties of interests distribution, that have exercised a greater impact. The stakeholders relating to wind power integration are thermal power companies, grid companies and local governments. The extent to which wind power deployment affects these vested interests determines the core institutional obstacles to be addressed. Mainly based on quantitative and case analyses, we argue that currently wind deployment in China has a little impact on the interests of thermal companies, moderate impact on the interests of grid companies and great impact on local governments. We recommend that it is crucial to elevate the role of environmental protection and renewable energy increase while de-emphasize the role of economic growth in the evaluation of local governments’ performance, as well as provide incentives for grid companies to attend more to their social responsibilities rather than their scale expansion and revenue growth. - highlights: • China's wind deployment has little impact on the interests of thermal plants. • Wind deployment has limited impact on the interests of grid companies. • The taxation per year from a thermal plant is higher than from a wind farm. • Local economic growth is comparatively greatly affected by wind power. • It is crucial to induce local governments to be concerned about renewable energy increase

  4. Modern Grid Initiative Distribution Taxonomy Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Chen, Yousu; Chassin, David P.; Pratt, Robert G.; Engel, David W.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2008-11-01

    This is the final report for the development of a toxonomy of prototypical electrical distribution feeders. Two of the primary goals of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Modern Grid Initiative (MGI) are 'to accelerate the modernization of our nation's electricity grid' and to 'support demonstrations of systems of key technologies that can serve as the foundation for an integrated, modern power grid'. A key component to the realization of these goals is the effective implementation of new, as well as existing, 'smart grid technologies'. Possibly the largest barrier that has been identified in the deployment of smart grid technologies is the inability to evaluate how their deployment will affect the electricity infrastructure, both locally and on a regional scale. The inability to evaluate the impacts of these technologies is primarily due to the lack of detailed electrical distribution feeder information. While detailed distribution feeder information does reside with the various distribution utilities, there is no central repository of information that can be openly accessed. The role of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the MGI for FY08 was to collect distribution feeder models, in the SynerGEE{reg_sign} format, from electric utilities around the nation so that they could be analyzed to identify regional differences in feeder design and operation. Based on this analysis PNNL developed a taxonomy of 24 prototypical feeder models in the GridLAB-D simulations environment that contain the fundamental characteristics of non-urban core, radial distribution feeders from the various regions of the U.S. Weighting factors for these feeders are also presented so that they can be used to generate a representative sample for various regions within the United States. The final product presented in this report is a toolset that enables the evaluation of new smart grid technologies, with the ability to aggregate their effects

  5. Application of a Steady Meandering River with Piers Using a Lattice Boltzmann Sub-Grid Model in Curvilinear Coordinate Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Chen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A sub-grid multiple relaxation time (MRT lattice Boltzmann model with curvilinear coordinates is applied to simulate an artificial meandering river. The method is based on the D2Q9 model and standard Smagorinsky sub-grid scale (SGS model is introduced to simulate meandering flows. The interpolation supplemented lattice Boltzmann method (ISLBM and the non-equilibrium extrapolation method are used for second-order accuracy and boundary conditions. The proposed model was validated by a meandering channel with a 180° bend and applied to a steady curved river with piers. Excellent agreement between the simulated results and previous computational and experimental data was found, showing that MRT-LBM (MRT lattice Boltzmann method coupled with a Smagorinsky sub-grid scale (SGS model in a curvilinear coordinates grid is capable of simulating practical meandering flows.

  6. Analytical Assessment of the Relationship between 100MWp Large-scale Grid-connected Photovoltaic Plant Performance and Meteorological Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jie; Zhu, Qiaoming; Cao, Shijie; You, Yang

    2017-05-01

    This paper helps in study of the relationship between the photovoltaic power generation of large scale “fishing and PV complementary” grid-tied photovoltaic system and meteorological parameters, with multi-time scale power data from the photovoltaic power station and meteorological data over the same period of a whole year. The result indicates that, the PV power generation has the most significant correlation with global solar irradiation, followed by diurnal temperature range, sunshine hours, daily maximum temperature and daily average temperature. In different months, the maximum monthly average power generation appears in August, which related to the more global solar irradiation and longer sunshine hours in this month. However, the maximum daily average power generation appears in October, this is due to the drop in temperature brings about the improvement of the efficiency of PV panels. Through the contrast of monthly average performance ratio (PR) and monthly average temperature, it is shown that, the larger values of monthly average PR appears in April and October, while it is smaller in summer with higher temperature. The results concluded that temperature has a great influence on the performance ratio of large scale grid-tied PV power system, and it is important to adopt effective measures to decrease the temperature of PV plant properly.

  7. Collective action and technology development: up-scaling of innovation in rice farming communities in Northern Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limnirankul, B.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords:small-scale rice farmers, collective action, community rice seed, local innovations, green manure crop, contract farming, participatory technology development, up-scaling, technological configuration, grid-group theory,

  8. Flow Battery Solution for Smart Grid Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-30

    To address future grid requirements, a U.S. Department of Energy ARRA Storage Demonstration program was launched in 2009 to commercialize promising technologies needed for stronger and more renewables-intensive grids. Raytheon Ktech and EnerVault received a cost-share grant award from the U.S. Department of Energy to develop a grid-scale storage system based on EnerVault’s iron-chromium redox flow battery technology.

  9. Smart Energy Management and Control for Fuel Cell Based Micro-Grid Connected Neighborhoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohammad S. Alam

    2006-03-15

    Fuel cell power generation promises to be an efficient, pollution-free, reliable power source in both large scale and small scale, remote applications. DOE formed the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance with the intention of breaking one of the last barriers remaining for cost effective fuel cell power generation. The Alliance’s goal is to produce a core solid-state fuel cell module at a cost of no more than $400 per kilowatt and ready for commercial application by 2010. With their inherently high, 60-70% conversion efficiencies, significantly reduced carbon dioxide emissions, and negligible emissions of other pollutants, fuel cells will be the obvious choice for a broad variety of commercial and residential applications when their cost effectiveness is improved. In a research program funded by the Department of Energy, the research team has been investigating smart fuel cell-operated residential micro-grid communities. This research has focused on using smart control systems in conjunction with fuel cell power plants, with the goal to reduce energy consumption, reduce demand peaks and still meet the energy requirements of any household in a micro-grid community environment. In Phases I and II, a SEMaC was developed and extended to a micro-grid community. In addition, an optimal configuration was determined for a single fuel cell power plant supplying power to a ten-home micro-grid community. In Phase III, the plan is to expand this work to fuel cell based micro-grid connected neighborhoods (mini-grid). The economic implications of hydrogen cogeneration will be investigated. These efforts are consistent with DOE’s mission to decentralize domestic electric power generation and to accelerate the onset of the hydrogen economy. A major challenge facing the routine implementation and use of a fuel cell based mini-grid is the varying electrical demand of the individual micro-grids, and, therefore, analyzing these issues is vital. Efforts are needed to determine

  10. A non-conformal finite element/finite volume scheme for the non-structured grid-based approximation of low Mach number flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansanay-Alex, G.

    2009-01-01

    The development of simulation codes aimed at a precise simulation of fires requires a precise approach of flame front phenomena by using very fine grids. The need to take different spatial scale into consideration leads to a local grid refinement and to a discretization with homogeneous grid for computing time and memory purposes. The author reports the approximation of the non-linear convection term, the scalar advection-diffusion in finite volumes, numerical simulations of a flow in a bent tube, of a three-dimensional laminar flame and of a low Mach number an-isotherm flow. Non conformal finite elements are also presented (Rannacher-Turek and Crouzeix-Raviart elements)

  11. Fractal Characteristics Analysis of Blackouts in Interconnected Power Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Feng; Li, Lijuan; Li, Canbing

    2018-01-01

    The power failure models are a key to understand the mechanism of large scale blackouts. In this letter, the similarity of blackouts in interconnected power grids (IPGs) and their sub-grids is discovered by the fractal characteristics analysis to simplify the failure models of the IPG. The distri......The power failure models are a key to understand the mechanism of large scale blackouts. In this letter, the similarity of blackouts in interconnected power grids (IPGs) and their sub-grids is discovered by the fractal characteristics analysis to simplify the failure models of the IPG....... The distribution characteristics of blackouts in various sub-grids are demonstrated based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test. The fractal dimensions (FDs) of the IPG and its sub-grids are then obtained by using the KS test and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). The blackouts data in China were used...

  12. Research on wind power grid-connected operation and dispatching strategies of Liaoning power grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qiu; Qu, Zhi; Zhou, Zhi; He, Xiaoyang; Li, Tie; Jin, Xiaoming; Li, Jinze; Ling, Zhaowei

    2018-02-01

    As a kind of clean energy, wind power has gained rapid development in recent years. Liaoning Province has abundant wind resources and the total installed capacity of wind power is in the forefront. With the large-scale wind power grid-connected operation, the contradiction between wind power utilization and peak load regulation of power grid has been more prominent. To this point, starting with the power structure and power grid installation situation of Liaoning power grid, the distribution and the space-time output characteristics of wind farm, the prediction accuracy, the curtailment and the off-grid situation of wind power are analyzed. Based on the deep analysis of the seasonal characteristics of power network load, the composition and distribution of main load are presented. Aiming at the problem between the acceptance of wind power and power grid adjustment, the scheduling strategies are given, including unit maintenance scheduling, spinning reserve, energy storage equipment settings by the analysis of the operation characteristics and the response time of thermal power units and hydroelectric units, which can meet the demand of wind power acceptance and provide a solution to improve the level of power grid dispatching.

  13. Grid computing in pakistan and: opening to large hadron collider experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batool, N.; Osman, A.; Mahmood, A.; Rana, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    A grid computing facility was developed at sister institutes Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) and Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS) in collaboration with Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Computing Grid during early years of the present decade. The Grid facility PAKGRID-LCG2 as one of the grid node in Pakistan was developed employing mainly local means and is capable of supporting local and international research and computational tasks in the domain of LHC Computing Grid. Functional status of the facility is presented in terms of number of jobs performed. The facility developed provides a forum to local researchers in the field of high energy physics to participate in the LHC experiments and related activities at European particle physics research laboratory (CERN), which is one of the best physics laboratories in the world. It also provides a platform of an emerging computing technology (CT). (author)

  14. A Grid Voltage Measurement Method for Wind Power Systems during Grid Fault Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol-Hee Yoo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Grid codes in many countries require low-voltage ride-through (LVRT capability to maintain power system stability and reliability during grid fault conditions. To meet the LVRT requirement, wind power systems must stay connected to the grid and also supply reactive currents to the grid to support the recovery from fault voltages. This paper presents a new fault detection method and inverter control scheme to improve the LVRT capability for full-scale permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG wind power systems. Fast fault detection can help the wind power systems maintain the DC-link voltage in a safe region. The proposed fault detection method is based on on-line adaptive parameter estimation. The performance of the proposed method is verified in comparison to the conventional voltage measurement method defined in the IEC 61400-21 standard.

  15. The eGo grid model: An open-source and open-data based synthetic medium-voltage grid model for distribution power supply systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amme, J.; Pleßmann, G.; Bühler, J.; Hülk, L.; Kötter, E.; Schwaegerl, P.

    2018-02-01

    The increasing integration of renewable energy into the electricity supply system creates new challenges for distribution grids. The planning and operation of distribution systems requires appropriate grid models that consider the heterogeneity of existing grids. In this paper, we describe a novel method to generate synthetic medium-voltage (MV) grids, which we applied in our DIstribution Network GeneratOr (DINGO). DINGO is open-source software and uses freely available data. Medium-voltage grid topologies are synthesized based on location and electricity demand in defined demand areas. For this purpose, we use GIS data containing demand areas with high-resolution spatial data on physical properties, land use, energy, and demography. The grid topology is treated as a capacitated vehicle routing problem (CVRP) combined with a local search metaheuristics. We also consider the current planning principles for MV distribution networks, paying special attention to line congestion and voltage limit violations. In the modelling process, we included power flow calculations for validation. The resulting grid model datasets contain 3608 synthetic MV grids in high resolution, covering all of Germany and taking local characteristics into account. We compared the modelled networks with real network data. In terms of number of transformers and total cable length, we conclude that the method presented in this paper generates realistic grids that could be used to implement a cost-optimised electrical energy system.

  16. Local Refinement of the Super Element Model of Oil Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Mazo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a two-stage method for petroleum reservoir simulation. The method uses two models with different degrees of detailing to describe hydrodynamic processes of different space-time scales. At the first stage, the global dynamics of the energy state of the deposit and reserves is modeled (characteristic scale of such changes is km / year. The two-phase flow equations in the model of global dynamics operate with smooth averaged pressure and saturation fields, and they are solved numerically on a large computational grid of super-elements with a characteristic cell size of 200-500 m. The tensor coefficients of the super-element model are calculated using special procedures of upscaling of absolute and relative phase permeabilities. At the second stage, a local refinement of the super-element model is constructed for calculating small-scale processes (with a scale of m / day, which take place, for example, during various geological and technical measures aimed at increasing the oil recovery of a reservoir. Then we solve the two-phase flow problem in the selected area of the measure exposure on a detailed three-dimensional grid, which resolves the geological structure of the reservoir, and with a time step sufficient for describing fast-flowing processes. The initial and boundary conditions of the local problem are formulated on the basis of the super-element solution. This approach allows us to reduce the computational costs in order to solve the problems of designing and monitoring the oil reservoir. To demonstrate the proposed approach, we give an example of the two-stage modeling of the development of a layered reservoir with a local refinement of the model during the isolation of a water-saturated high-permeability interlayer. We show a good compliance between the locally refined solution of the super-element model in the area of measure exposure and the results of numerical modeling of the whole history of reservoir

  17. Distribution Grid Integration of Photovoltaic Systems in Germany – Implications on Grid Planning and Grid Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stetz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Photovoltaic is the most dispersed renewable energy source in Germany, typically interconnected to low and medium voltage systems. In recent years, cost-intensive grid reinforcements had to be undertaken all across Germany’s distribution grids in order to increase their hosting capacity for these photovoltaic installations. This paper presents an overview on research results which show that photovoltaic itself can provide ancillary services to reduce its cost of interconnection. Especially the provision of reactive power turned out to be a technically effective and economically efficient method to increase a grid’s hosting capacity for photovoltaic capacity. Different reactive power control methods were investigated, revealing significant differences with regards to their grid operation implications. Business cases for residential-scale photovoltaic applications have shifted from feed-in-tariff based active power feed-in to self-consumption. However, increasing the photovoltaic self-consumption by additional battery-storage systems is still not economically reliable in Germany. (author)

  18. A novel method for automated grid generation of ice shapes for local-flow analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogretim, Egemen; Huebsch, Wade W.

    2004-02-01

    Modelling a complex geometry, such as ice roughness, plays a key role for the computational flow analysis over rough surfaces. This paper presents two enhancement ideas in modelling roughness geometry for local flow analysis over an aerodynamic surface. The first enhancement is use of the leading-edge region of an airfoil as a perturbation to the parabola surface. The reasons for using a parabola as the base geometry are: it resembles the airfoil leading edge in the vicinity of its apex and it allows the use of a lower apparent Reynolds number. The second enhancement makes use of the Fourier analysis for modelling complex ice roughness on the leading edge of airfoils. This method of modelling provides an analytical expression, which describes the roughness geometry and the corresponding derivatives. The factors affecting the performance of the Fourier analysis were also investigated. It was shown that the number of sine-cosine terms and the number of control points are of importance. Finally, these enhancements are incorporated into an automated grid generation method over the airfoil ice accretion surface. The validations for both enhancements demonstrate that they can improve the current capability of grid generation and computational flow field analysis around airfoils with ice roughness.

  19. Benchmarking set for domestic smart grid management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, M.G.C.; Bakker, Vincent; Molderink, Albert; Hurink, Johann L.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose a benchmark for domestic smart grid management. It consists of an in-depth description of a domestic smart grid, in which local energy consumers, producers and buffers can be controlled. First, from this description a general benchmark framework is derived, which can be used

  20. Greenhouse gas emission factors of purchased electricity from interconnected grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Ling; Liang, Sai; Qu, Shen; Zhang, Yanxia; Xu, Ming; Jia, Xiaoping; Jia, Yingtao; Niu, Dongxiao; Yuan, Jiahai; Hou, Yong; Wang, Haikun; Chiu, Anthony S.F.; Hu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new accounting framework is proposed for GHG emission factors of power grids. • Three cases are used to demonstrate the proposed framework. • Comparisons with previous system boundaries approve the necessity. - Abstract: Electricity trade among power grids leads to difficulties in measuring greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors of purchased electricity. Traditional methods assume either electricity purchased from a grid is entirely produced locally (Boundary I) or imported electricity is entirely produced by the exporting grid (Boundary II) (in fact a blend of electricity produced by many grids). Both methods ignore the fact that electricity can be indirectly traded between grids. Failing to capture such indirect electricity trade can underestimate or overestimate GHG emissions of purchased electricity in interconnected grid networks, potentially leading to incorrectly accounting for the effects of emission reduction policies involving purchased electricity. We propose a “Boundary III” framework to account for emissions both directly and indirectly caused by purchased electricity in interconnected gird networks. We use three case studies on a national grid network, an Eurasian Continent grid network, and North Europe grid network to demonstrate the proposed Boundary III emission factors. We found that the difference on GHG emissions of purchased electricity estimated using different emission factors can be considerably large. We suggest to standardize the choice of different emission factors based on how interconnected the local grid is with other grids.

  1. Integration of Electric Vehicles in Low Voltage Danish Distribution Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna; Thøgersen, Paul; Møller, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Electric Vehicles (EVs) are considered as one of the important components of the future intelligent grids. Their role as energy storages in the electricity grid could provide local sustainable solutions to support more renewable energy. In order to estimate the extent of interaction of EVs...... in the electricity grid operation, a careful examination in the local electricity system is essential. This paper investigates the degree of EV penetration and its key influence on the low voltage distribution grids. Three detailed models of residential grids in Denmark are considered as test cases in this study...... it is shown that there is enough head-space on the transformer capacity which can be used to charge many EVs during a day. The overall transformer capability of handling EV loads varies between 6-40% for peak and minimum demand hours, which is dependent on the robustness of the grids. The voltage drops...

  2. A scenario of vehicle-to-grid implementation and its double-layer optimal charging strategy for minimizing load variance within regional smart grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian, Linni; Zhu, Xinyu; Shao, Ziyun; Niu, Shuangxia; Chan, C.C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A scenario of vehicle-to-grid implementation within regional smart grid is discussed and mathematically formulated. • A double-layer optimal charging strategy for plug-in electric vehicles is proposed. • The proposed double-layer optimal charging algorithm aims to minimize power grid’s load variance. • The performance of proposed double-layer optimal charging algorithm is evaluated through comparative study. - Abstract: As an emerging new electrical load, plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs)’ impact on the power grid has drawn increasing attention worldwide. An optimal scenario is that by digging the potential of PEVs as a moveable energy storage device, they may not harm the power grid by, for example, triggering extreme surges in demand at rush hours, conversely, the large-scale penetration of PEVs could benefit the grid through flattening the power load curve, hence, increase the stability, security and operating economy of the grid. This has become a hot issue which is known as vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology within the framework of smart grid. In this paper, a scenario of V2G implementation within regional smart grids is discussed. Then, the problem is mathematically formulated. It is essentially an optimization problem, and the objective is to minimize the overall load variance. With the increase of the scale of PEVs and charging posts involved, the computational complexity will become tremendously high. Therefore, a double-layer optimal charging (DLOC) strategy is proposed to solve this problem. The comparative study demonstrates that the proposed DLOC algorithm can effectively solve the problem of tremendously high computational complexity arising from the large-scaled PEVs and charging posts involved

  3. Calculation approaches for grid usage fees to influence the load curve in the distribution grid level; Berechnungsansaetze fuer Netznutzungsentgelte zur Beeinflussung des Lastverlaufs in der Verteilernetzebene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illing, Bjoern

    2014-09-08

    Dominated by the energy policy the decentralized German energy market is changing. One mature target of the government is to increase the contribution of renewable generation to the gross electricity consumption. In order to achieve this target disadvantages like an increased need for capacity management occurs. Load reduction and variable grid fees offer the grid operator solutions to realize capacity management by influencing the load profile. The evolution of the current grid fees towards more causality is required to adapt these approaches. Two calculation approaches are developed in this assignment. On the one hand multivariable grid fees keeping the current components demand and energy charge. Additional to the grid costs grid load dependent parameters like the amount of decentralized feed-ins, time and local circumstances as well as grid capacities are considered. On the other hand the grid fee flat-rate which represents a demand based model on a monthly level. Both approaches are designed to meet the criteria for future grid fees. By means of a case study the effects of the grid fees on the load profile at the low voltage grid is simulated. Thereby the consumption is represented by different behaviour models and the results are scaled at the benchmark grid area. The resulting load curve is analyzed concerning the effects of peak load reduction as well as the integration of renewable energy sources. Additionally the combined effect of grid fees and electricity tariffs is evaluated. Finally the work discusses the launching of grid fees in the tense atmosphere of politics, legislation and grid operation. Results of this work are two calculation approaches designed for grid operators to define the grid fees. Multivariable grid fees are based on the current calculation scheme. Hereby demand and energy charges are weighted by time, locational and load related dependencies. The grid fee flat-rate defines a limitation in demand extraction. Different demand levels

  4. Enhanced Local Grid Voltage Support Method for High Penetration of Distributed Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirok, Erhan; Sera, Dezso; Rodriguez, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Grid voltage rise and thermal loading of network components are the most remarkable barriers to allow high number of distributed generator (DG) connections on the medium voltage (MV) and low voltage (LV) electricity networks. The other barriers such as grid power quality (harmonics, voltage...

  5. Low-cost wireless voltage & current grid monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hines, Jacqueline [SenSanna Inc., Arnold, MD (United States)

    2016-12-31

    This report describes the development and demonstration of a novel low-cost wireless power distribution line monitoring system. This system measures voltage, current, and relative phase on power lines of up to 35 kV-class. The line units operate without any batteries, and without harvesting energy from the power line. Thus, data on grid condition is provided even in outage conditions, when line current is zero. This enhances worker safety by detecting the presence of voltage and current that may appear from stray sources on nominally isolated lines. Availability of low-cost power line monitoring systems will enable widespread monitoring of the distribution grid. Real-time data on local grid operating conditions will enable grid operators to optimize grid operation, implement grid automation, and understand the impact of solar and other distributed sources on grid stability. The latter will enable utilities to implement eneygy storage and control systems to enable greater penetration of solar into the grid.

  6. Using System Dynamics to Define, Study, and Implement Smart Control Strategies on the Electric Power Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle G. Roybal; Robert F Jeffers

    2013-07-01

    The United States electric power grid is the most complex and expansive control system in the world. Local generation control occurs at individual units based on response time and unit economics, larger regional control coordinates unit response to error conditions, and high level large-area regional control is ultimately administered by a network of humans guided by economic and resiliency related factors. Under normal operating conditions, the grid is a relatively slow moving entity that exhibits high inertia to outside stimuli, and behaves along repeatable diurnal and seasonal patterns. However, that paradigm is quickly changing because of the increasing implementation of renewable generation sources. Renewable generators by nature cannot be tightly controlled or scheduled. They appear like a negative load to the system with all of the variability associated with load on a larger scale. Also, grid-reactive loads (i.e. smart devices) can alter their consumption based on price or demand rules adding more variability to system behavior. This paper demonstrates how a systems dynamic modeling approach capable of operating over multiple time scales, can provide valuable insight into developing new “smart-grid” control strategies and devices needed to accommodate renewable generation and regulate the frequency of the grid.

  7. Real-Time Market Concept Architecture for EcoGrid EU—A Prototype for European Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yi; Pineda Morente, Salvador; Nyeng, Preben

    2014-01-01

    Industrialized countries are increasingly committed to move towards a low carbon generating mix by increasing the penetration of renewable generation. Additionally, the Development in communication technologies will allow small end-consumers and small-scale distributed energy resources (DER......) to participate in electricity markets. Current electricity markets need to be tailored to incorporate these changes regarding how electricity will be generated and consumed in the future. The EcoGrid EU is a large-scale EU-funded project, which establishes the first prototype of the future European intelligent...... grids. In this project, small-scale DERs and small end-consumers can actively participate in a new real-time electricity market by responding to 5-min real time electricity prices. In this way, the market operator will also obtain additional balancing power to cancel out the production variation...

  8. Spatial-Scale Characteristics of Precipitation Simulated by Regional Climate Models and the Implications for Hydrological Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S.H.; Christensen, J. H.; Drews, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation simulated by regional climate models (RCMs) is generally biased with respect to observations, especially at the local scale of a few tens of kilometers. This study investigates how well two different RCMs are able to reproduce the spatial correlation patterns of observed summer...... length scales on the order of 130 km are found in both observed data and RCM simulations. When simulations and observations are aggregated to different grid sizes, the pattern correlation significantly decreases when the aggregation length is less than roughly 100 km. Furthermore, the intermodel standard......, reflecting larger predictive certainty of the RCMs at larger scales. The findings on aggregated grid scales are shown to be largely independent of the underlying RCMs grid resolutions but not of the overall size of RCM domain. With regard to hydrological modeling applications, these findings indicate...

  9. Islands Climatology at Local Scale. Downscaling with CIELO model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Eduardo; Reis, Francisco; Tomé, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Conceição

    2016-04-01

    Islands with horizontal scales of the order of tens of km, as is the case of the Atlantic Islands of Macaronesia, are subscale orographic features for Global Climate Models (GCMs) since the horizontal scales of these models are too coarse to give a detailed representation of the islands' topography. Even the Regional Climate Models (RCMs) reveals limitations when they are forced to reproduce the climate of small islands mainly by the way they flat and lowers the elevation of the islands, reducing the capacity of the model to reproduce important local mechanisms that lead to a very deep local climate differentiation. Important local thermodynamics mechanisms like Foehn effect, or the influence of topography on radiation balance, have a prominent role in the climatic spatial differentiation. Advective transport of air - and the consequent induced adiabatic cooling due to orography - lead to transformations of the state parameters of the air that leads to the spatial configuration of the fields of pressure, temperature and humidity. The same mechanism is in the origin of the orographic clouds cover that, besides the direct role as water source by the reinforcement of precipitation, act like a filter to direct solar radiation and as a source of long-wave radiation that affect the local balance of energy. Also, the saturation (or near saturation) conditions that they provide constitute a barrier to water vapour diffusion in the mechanisms of evapotranspiration. Topographic factors like slope, aspect and orographic mask have also significant importance in the local energy balance. Therefore, the simulation of the local scale climate (past, present and future) in these archipelagos requires the use of downscaling techniques to adjust locally outputs obtained at upper scales. This presentation will discuss and analyse the evolution of the CIELO model (acronym for Clima Insular à Escala LOcal) a statistical/dynamical technique developed at the University of the Azores

  10. REVIEW ON GRID INTERFACING OF MULTIMEGAWATT PHOTOVOLTAIC INVERTERS

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. Vilas S. Solanke*; Mr. Naveen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents review on the latest development of control of grid connected photovoltaic energy conversion system. Also this paper present existing systems control algorithm for three-phase and single phase grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system. This paper focuses on one aspect of solar energy, namely grid interfacing of large-scale PV farms. This Grid-connected photovoltaic i.e. PV systems can provide a number of benefits to electric utilities, such as power loss reduction, improve...

  11. Developing survey grids to substantiate freedom from exotic pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Coulston; Frank H. Koch; William D. Smith

    2009-01-01

    Systematic, hierarchical intensification of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program hexagon for North America yields a simple procedure for developing national-scale survey grids. In this article, we describe the steps to create a national-scale survey grid using a risk map as the starting point. We illustrate the steps using an exotic pest example in which...

  12. Performance Analysis of 14 MW Grid-Connected Photovoltaic System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagilik, Ahmed S.; Tawel, Abduraouf M.

    2015-01-01

    Many Libyan authorities proposed to investigate the possibility of utilizing a suitable terrain in Libya to add generation capacity of large-scale photovoltaic power plants. In this paper, the first grid-connected PV plant of 14 MWp which will be executed in Hoon city and supported by the Renewable Energy Authority of Libya (REAOL) is presented. To understand and improve the operational behavior of PV system, a comprehensive study including the plant design and detailed performance analysis under a local climate conditions is performed. Using polycrystalline silicon technology, the first year energy yield is estimated and the monthly system output for this plant is calculated. The performance ratio and various power losses (temperature, irradiance, power electronics, interconnection, etc.) are determined. The PV system supplied 24964 MWh to the grid during the first year giving an average annual overall yield factor 1783 kWh/kWp and average annual performance ratio of the system of 76.9%.(author)

  13. Error-measure for anisotropic grid-adaptation in turbulence-resolving simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toosi, Siavash; Larsson, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Grid-adaptation requires an error-measure that identifies where the grid should be refined. In the case of turbulence-resolving simulations (DES, LES, DNS), a simple error-measure is the small-scale resolved energy, which scales with both the modeled subgrid-stresses and the numerical truncation errors in many situations. Since this is a scalar measure, it does not carry any information on the anisotropy of the optimal grid-refinement. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new error-measure for turbulence-resolving simulations that is capable of predicting nearly-optimal anisotropic grids. Turbulent channel flow at Reτ ~ 300 is used to assess the performance of the proposed error-measure. The formulation is geometrically general, applicable to any type of unstructured grid.

  14. Coherent density fluctuation model as a local-scale limit to ATDHF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.N.; Petkov, I.Zh.; Stoitsov, M.V.

    1985-04-01

    The local scale transformation method is used for the construction of an Adiabatic Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock approach in terms of the local density distribution. The coherent density fluctuation relations of the model result in a particular case when the ''flucton'' local density is connected with the plane wave determinant model function be means of the local-scale coordinate transformation. The collective potential energy expression is obtained and its relation to the nuclear matter energy saturation curve is revealed. (author)

  15. Electromobility and renewable energies. Locally optimized use of grid-connected vehicles; Elektromobilitaet und erneuerbare Energien. Lokal optimierter Einsatz von netzgekoppelten Fahrzeugen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, Jochen

    2012-07-01

    To reach significant CO{sub 2} emission reduction with electric vehicles, electricity production based on renewable energies is required. The aim of this study is to determine different options for linking the charging times of electric vehicles with fluctuating local renewable energy production. Energy demand profiles for electric cars were generated on the basis of statistic mobility data for Germany. The impact of different charging strategies for a high market penetration of electric vehicles is analyzed considering the renewable energy production and the distribution grid of the city of Freiburg. If all cars were substituted by electric vehicles, the electrical energy demand would increase by a third. Load peaks and the capacity usage of electric installations depend strongly on the amount of power and the simultaneity of the charging process. Decentralized electric vehicle charging based on tariff incentives is one option to influence the charging behavior. In the Freiburg area the residual grid load was adjusted by shifting the charging time to periods with high renewable energy production or low electric energy consumption. Another important aspect of this study is the development and realization of a pilot system for tariff incentive based load shifting. The so called ''mobile Dispatcher'' is principally used for the determination of the optimal charging strategy considering all relevant factors (e.g. user input data, time variable feed-in tariffs, energy consumption tariffs and battery degradation costs), the communication and data exchange with the charging station, as well as with the energy providers. Prior to the development of the ''mobile Dispatcher'', concepts to connect the electric vehicle to the grid were evaluated, and necessary modifications of the electricity marked structure were discussed. Based on the goals of the German national development plan, different grid integration strategies, such as mobile

  16. Modelling grid losses and the geographic distribution of electricity generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2005-01-01

    In Denmark more than 40% of the electricity consumption is covered by geographically scattered electricity sources namely wind power and local CHP (cogeneration of heat and power) plants. This causes problems in regard to load balancing and possible grid overloads. The potential grid problems...... and methods for solving these are analysed in this article on the basis of energy systems analyses, geographic distribution of consumption and production and grid load-flow analyses. It is concluded that by introducing scattered load balancing using local CHP plants actively and using interruptible loads...

  17. TOMS/Earth Probe UV-B Erythemal Local Noon Irradiance Monthly L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Earth Probe UV-B Erythemal Local Noon Irradiance Monthly L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. (The...

  18. Simulating space-time uncertainty in continental-scale gridded precipitation fields for agrometeorological modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de A.J.W.; Bruin, de S.

    2006-01-01

    Previous analyses of the effects of uncertainty in precipitation fields on the output of EU Crop Growth Monitoring System (CGMS) demonstrated that the influence on simulated crop yield was limited at national scale, but considerable at local and regional scales. We aim to propagate uncertainty due

  19. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 40 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  20. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  1. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  2. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ta'u Island, Territory of American Samoa, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  3. Ecogrid EU: a large scale smart grids demonstration of real time market-based integration of numerous small der and DR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Y.; Nyeng, P.; Ostergaard, J.; Trong, M.D.; Pineda, S.; Kok, K.; Huitema, G.B.; Grande, O.S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Ecogrid EU project, which is a large-scale demonstration project on the Danish island Bornholm. It provides Europe a fast track evolution towards smart grid dissemination and deployment in the distribution network. Objective of Ecogrid EU is to illustrate that

  4. Local magnitude scale for Valle Medio del Magdalena region, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londoño, John Makario; Romero, Jaime A.

    2017-12-01

    A local Magnitude (ML) scale for Valle Medio del Magdalena (VMM) region was defined by using 514 high quality earthquakes located at VMM area and inversion of 2797 amplitude values of horizontal components of 17 stations seismic broad band stations, simulated in a Wood-Anderson seismograph. The derived local magnitude scale for VMM region was: ML =log(A) + 1.3744 ∗ log(r) + 0.0014776 ∗ r - 2.397 + S Where A is the zero-to-peak amplitude in nm in horizontal components, r is the hypocentral distance in km, and S is the station correction. Higher values of ML were obtained for VMM region compared with those obtained with the current formula used for ML determination, and with California formula. With this new scale ML values are adjusted to local conditions beneath VMM region leading to more realistic ML values. Moreover, with this new ML scale the seismicity caused by tectonic or fracking activity at VMM region can be monitored more accurately.

  5. AGIS: The ATLAS Grid Information System

    CERN Document Server

    Anisenkov, Alexey; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Gayazov, Stavro; Klimentov, Alexei; Oleynik, Danila; Senchenko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The experiment produces petabytes of data annually through simulation production and tens petabytes of data per year from the detector itself. The ATLAS Computing model embraces the Grid paradigm and a high degree of decentralization and computing resources able to meet ATLAS requirements of petabytes scale data operations. In this paper we present ATLAS Grid Information System (AGIS) designed to integrate configuration and status information about resources, services and topology of whole ATLAS Grid needed by ATLAS Distributed Computing applications and services.

  6. Quality Assurance Framework for Mini-Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, Ian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burman, Kari [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Singh, Mohit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Esterly, Sean [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mutiso, Rose [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); McGregor, Caroline [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    will drive investment and scale-up in this sector. The QAF implementation process also defines a set of implementation guidelines that help the deployment of mini-grids on a regional or national scale, helping to insure successful rapid deployment of these relatively new remote energy options. Note that the QAF is technology agnostic, addressing both alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) mini-grids, and is also applicable to renewable, fossil-fuel, and hybrid systems.

  7. Optimal variable-grid finite-difference modeling for porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xinxin; Yin, Xingyao; Li, Haishan

    2014-01-01

    Numerical modeling of poroelastic waves by the finite-difference (FD) method is more expensive than that of acoustic or elastic waves. To improve the accuracy and computational efficiency of seismic modeling, variable-grid FD methods have been developed. In this paper, we derived optimal staggered-grid finite difference schemes with variable grid-spacing and time-step for seismic modeling in porous media. FD operators with small grid-spacing and time-step are adopted for low-velocity or small-scale geological bodies, while FD operators with big grid-spacing and time-step are adopted for high-velocity or large-scale regions. The dispersion relations of FD schemes were derived based on the plane wave theory, then the FD coefficients were obtained using the Taylor expansion. Dispersion analysis and modeling results demonstrated that the proposed method has higher accuracy with lower computational cost for poroelastic wave simulation in heterogeneous reservoirs. (paper)

  8. Trends in life science grid: from computing grid to knowledge grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konagaya Akihiko

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grid computing has great potential to become a standard cyberinfrastructure for life sciences which often require high-performance computing and large data handling which exceeds the computing capacity of a single institution. Results This survey reviews the latest grid technologies from the viewpoints of computing grid, data grid and knowledge grid. Computing grid technologies have been matured enough to solve high-throughput real-world life scientific problems. Data grid technologies are strong candidates for realizing "resourceome" for bioinformatics. Knowledge grids should be designed not only from sharing explicit knowledge on computers but also from community formulation for sharing tacit knowledge among a community. Conclusion Extending the concept of grid from computing grid to knowledge grid, it is possible to make use of a grid as not only sharable computing resources, but also as time and place in which people work together, create knowledge, and share knowledge and experiences in a community.

  9. TOMS/Nimbus-7 UV-B Erythemal Local Noon Irradiance Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Nimbus-7 UV-B Erythemal Local Noon Irradiance Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. The Total Ozone...

  10. Thermal analysis of two-level wind power converter under symmetrical grid fault

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the case of symmetrical grid fault when using the multi-MW wind turbine of partial-scale and full-scale two-level power converter are designed and investigated. Firstly, the different operation behaviors of the relevant power converters under the voltage dip will be described......) condition as well as the junction temperature. For the full-scale wind turbine system, the most thermal stressed power device in the grid-side converter will appear at the grid voltage below 0.5 pu, and for the partial-scale wind turbine system, the most thermal stressed power device in the rotor...

  11. Literature Review on Reasons and Countermeasures on Large-scale Off-grid of Wind Turbine Generator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Jun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the present situation of the application of wind turbines generator system(WTGS at home and abroad, describes the strategic significance and the value of sustainable development of the wind power in the country, illustrates the problems, a variety of reasons and responses on large-scale off-grid of WTGS, compares the advantages and disadvantages of various methods, gives full consideration to the actual demand for WTGS works and characteristics and points out the further research.

  12. The CrossGrid project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, M.

    2003-01-01

    There are many large-scale problems that require new approaches to computing, such as earth observation, environmental management, biomedicine, industrial and scientific modeling. The CrossGrid project addresses realistic problems in medicine, environmental protection, flood prediction, and physics analysis and is oriented towards specific end-users: Medical doctors, who could obtain new tools to help them to obtain correct diagnoses and to guide them during operations; industries, that could be advised on the best timing for some critical operations involving risk of pollution; flood crisis teams, that could predict the risk of a flood on the basis of historical records and actual hydrological and meteorological data; physicists, who could optimize the analysis of massive volumes of data distributed across countries and continents. Corresponding applications will be based on Grid technology and could be complex and difficult to use: the CrossGrid project aims at developing several tools that will make the Grid more friendly for average users. Portals for specific applications will be designed, that should allow for easy connection to the Grid, create a customized work environment, and provide users with all necessary information to get their job done

  13. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  14. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER

  15. Security on the US fusion grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burruss, J.R.; Fredian, T.W.; Thompson, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This has led to the development of the U.S. fusion grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large U.S. fusion research facilities and with users both in the U.S. and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER

  16. Grid interoperability: joining grid information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechl, M; Field, L

    2008-01-01

    A grid is defined as being 'coordinated resource sharing and problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations'. Over recent years a number of grid projects, many of which have a strong regional presence, have emerged to help coordinate institutions and enable grids. Today, we face a situation where a number of grid projects exist, most of which are using slightly different middleware. Grid interoperation is trying to bridge these differences and enable Virtual Organizations to access resources at the institutions independent of their grid project affiliation. Grid interoperation is usually a bilateral activity between two grid infrastructures. Recently within the Open Grid Forum, the Grid Interoperability Now (GIN) Community Group is trying to build upon these bilateral activities. The GIN group is a focal point where all the infrastructures can come together to share ideas and experiences on grid interoperation. It is hoped that each bilateral activity will bring us one step closer to the overall goal of a uniform grid landscape. A fundamental aspect of a grid is the information system, which is used to find available grid services. As different grids use different information systems, interoperation between these systems is crucial for grid interoperability. This paper describes the work carried out to overcome these differences between a number of grid projects and the experiences gained. It focuses on the different techniques used and highlights the important areas for future standardization

  17. Phase space properties of local observables and structure of scaling limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, D.

    1995-05-01

    For any given algebra of local observables in relativistic quantum field theory there exists an associated scaling algebra which permits one to introduce renormalization group transformations and to construct the scaling (short distance) limit of the theory. On the basis of this result it is discussed how the phase space properties of a theory determine the structure of its scaling limit. Bounds on the number of local degrees of freedom appearing in the scaling limit are given which allow one to distinguish between theories with classical and quantum scaling limits. The results can also be used to establish physically significant algebraic properties of the scaling limit theories, such as the split property. (orig.)

  18. Grids, Clouds and Virtualization

    CERN Document Server

    Cafaro, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Research into grid computing has been driven by the need to solve large-scale, increasingly complex problems for scientific applications. Yet the applications of grid computing for business and casual users did not begin to emerge until the development of the concept of cloud computing, fueled by advances in virtualization techniques, coupled with the increased availability of ever-greater Internet bandwidth. The appeal of this new paradigm is mainly based on its simplicity, and the affordable price for seamless access to both computational and storage resources. This timely text/reference int

  19. Current Electric Distribution Network Operation and Grid Tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiuwei

    2012-01-01

    The aim of EcoGridEU task 1.4 is to extend the real‐time price approach with an integrated optimization of the distribution system operation. This will be achieved by extending the basic real‐time market concept with local location‐dependant prices that reflect the grid operation, especially...

  20. A novel algorithm for incompressible flow using only a coarse grid projection

    KAUST Repository

    Lentine, Michael

    2010-07-26

    Large scale fluid simulation can be difficult using existing techniques due to the high computational cost of using large grids. We present a novel technique for simulating detailed fluids quickly. Our technique coarsens the Eulerian fluid grid during the pressure solve, allowing for a fast implicit update but still maintaining the resolution obtained with a large grid. This allows our simulations to run at a fraction of the cost of existing techniques while still providing the fine scale structure and details obtained with a full projection. Our algorithm scales well to very large grids and large numbers of processors, allowing for high fidelity simulations that would otherwise be intractable. © 2010 ACM.

  1. Performance Analysis of Information Services in a Grid Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Aloisio

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The Information Service is a fundamental component in a grid environment. It has to meet a lot of requirements such as access to static and dynamic information related to grid resources, efficient and secure access to dynamic data, decentralized maintenance, fault tolerance etc., in order to achieve better performance, scalability, security and extensibility. Currently there are two different major approaches. One is based on a directory infrastructure and another one on a novel approach that exploits a relational DBMS. In this paper we present a performance comparison analysis between Grid Resource Information Service (GRIS and Local Dynamic Grid Catalog relational information service (LDGC, providing also information about two projects (iGrid and Grid Relational Catalog in the grid data management area.

  2. Recent Trends in Local-Scale Marine Biodiversity Reflect Community Structure and Human Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Robin; O'Connor, Mary I; Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Dunic, Jillian; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Hensel, Marc J S; Kearns, Patrick J

    2015-07-20

    The modern biodiversity crisis reflects global extinctions and local introductions. Human activities have dramatically altered rates and scales of processes that regulate biodiversity at local scales. Reconciling the threat of global biodiversity loss with recent evidence of stability at fine spatial scales is a major challenge and requires a nuanced approach to biodiversity change that integrates ecological understanding. With a new dataset of 471 diversity time series spanning from 1962 to 2015 from marine coastal ecosystems, we tested (1) whether biodiversity changed at local scales in recent decades, and (2) whether we can ignore ecological context (e.g., proximate human impacts, trophic level, spatial scale) and still make informative inferences regarding local change. We detected a predominant signal of increasing species richness in coastal systems since 1962 in our dataset, though net species loss was associated with localized effects of anthropogenic impacts. Our geographically extensive dataset is unlikely to be a random sample of marine coastal habitats; impacted sites (3% of our time series) were underrepresented relative to their global presence. These local-scale patterns do not contradict the prospect of accelerating global extinctions but are consistent with local species loss in areas with direct human impacts and increases in diversity due to invasions and range expansions in lower impact areas. Attempts to detect and understand local biodiversity trends are incomplete without information on local human activities and ecological context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ofu and Olosega Islands, Territory of American Samoa, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  4. GRID : unlimited computing power on your desktop Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Computational GRID is an analogy to the electrical power grid for computing resources. It decouples the provision of computing, data, and networking from its use, it allows large-scale pooling and sharing of resources distributed world-wide. Every computer, from a desktop to a mainframe or supercomputer, can provide computing power or data for the GRID. The final objective is to plug your computer into the wall and have direct access to huge computing resources immediately, just like plugging-in a lamp to get instant light. The GRID will facilitate world-wide scientific collaborations on an unprecedented scale. It will provide transparent access to major distributed resources of computer power, data, information, and collaborations.

  5. Grid Integration Issues for Large Scale Wind Power Plants (WPPs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiuwei; Xu, Zhao; Østergaard, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    transmission system operators (TSOs) over the world have come up the grid codes to request the wind power plants (WPPs) to have more or less the same operating capability as the conventional power plants. The grid codes requirements from other TSOs are under development. This paper covers the steady state......The penetration level of wind power into the power system over the world have been increasing very fast in the last few years and is still keeping the fast growth rate. It is just a matter of time that the wind power will be comparable to the conventional power generation. Therefore, many...

  6. Micro Grid: A Smart Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Naveenkumar, M; Ratnakar, N

    2012-01-01

    Distributed Generation (DG) is an approach that employs small-scale technologies to produce electricity close to the end users of power. Todays DG technologies often consist of renewable generators, and offer a number of potential benefits. This paper presents a design of micro grid as part of Smart grid technologies with renewable energy resources like solar, wind and Diesel generator. The design of the microgrid with integration of Renewable energy sources are done in PSCAD/EMTDC.This paper...

  7. Smart Grids. First results from French demonstrators - Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertholon, Marion; Kerouedan, Anne-Fleur; Regner, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Since 2009, ADEME has played a key role in supporting the structuring of the smart grid sector. The Agency has helped to fund the first large-scale projects through the Investments for the Future Programme (PIA) steered by the General Commissariat for Investment (GCI). This summary tackles four fundamental themes based on the experience from the 12 smart grid projects the most mature end 2015: - promote demand-side management and load shedding; - favour the insertion of renewable energy; - anticipate the evolution of existing grids; - prefigure business models of smart grids solutions

  8. Solar activity and economic fundamentals: Evidence from 12 geographically disparate power grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Kevin F.; St. Cyr, O. C.

    2008-10-01

    This study uses local (ground-based) magnetometer data as a proxy for geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) to address whether there is a space weather/electricity market relationship in 12 geographically disparate power grids: Eirgrid, the power grid that serves the Republic of Ireland; Scottish and Southern Electricity, the power grid that served northern Scotland until April 2005; Scottish Power, the power grid that served southern Scotland until April 2005; the power grid that serves the Czech Republic; E.ON Netz, the transmission system operator in central Germany; the power grid in England and Wales; the power grid in New Zealand; the power grid that serves the vast proportion of the population in Australia; ISO New England, the power grid that serves New England; PJM, a power grid that over the sample period served all or parts of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia; NYISO, the power grid that serves New York State; and the power grid in the Netherlands. This study tests the hypothesis that GIC levels (proxied by the time variation of local magnetic field measurements (dH/dt)) and electricity grid conditions are related using Pearson's chi-squared statistic. The metrics of power grid conditions include measures of electricity market imbalances, energy losses, congestion costs, and actions by system operators to restore grid stability. The results of the analysis indicate that real-time market conditions in these power grids are statistically related with the GIC proxy.

  9. Conference on grid integration of renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, Pierre; Goeke, Berthold; Mignon, Herve; Brakelmann, Heinrich; Huebner, Gundula; Tanja Schmedes; Remy Garaude Verdier; Pierre-Guy Therond; Werner Diwald

    2012-01-01

    The French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a conference on grid integration of renewable energies. In the framework of this French-German exchange of experience, about a hundred of participants exchanged views on the similarities and differences between the French and German approaches of renewable energies integration to grids. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - Power grid development - Policy and challenges (Pierre Fontaine); 2 - Grid Development: German Strategy (Berthold Goeke); 3 - Power grids development: situational analysis (Herve Mignon); 4 - Traditional Power Lines, Partial Underground Cabling and HVDC lines: Costs, Benefits and Acceptance (Heinrich Brakelmann); 5 - Transmission Lines - Local Acceptance (Gundula Huebner); 6 - eTelligence- energy meets Intelligence: experience feedback from the grid operator EWe on smart grids and the integration of renewable energies (Tanja Schmedes); 7 - Nice Grid, The French Smart Grid Project within Grid4eU (Remy Garaude Verdier); 8 - Economical Analysis Of energy Storage For Renewable energy Farms - experience of EDF en on the basis of 3 call for tender issued by the French Government in 01/2010, 11/2010, and 09/2011: what conditions for a real deployment (Pierre-Guy Therond); 9 - Hydrogen as a renewable energies storage mean (Werner Diwald)

  10. Large-scale grid management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langdal, Bjoern Inge; Eggen, Arnt Ove

    2003-01-01

    The network companies in the Norwegian electricity industry now have to establish a large-scale network management, a concept essentially characterized by (1) broader focus (Broad Band, Multi Utility,...) and (2) bigger units with large networks and more customers. Research done by SINTEF Energy Research shows so far that the approaches within large-scale network management may be structured according to three main challenges: centralization, decentralization and out sourcing. The article is part of a planned series

  11. Generating clustered scale-free networks using Poisson based localization of edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, İlker

    2018-05-01

    We introduce a variety of network models using a Poisson-based edge localization strategy, which result in clustered scale-free topologies. We first verify the success of our localization strategy by realizing a variant of the well-known Watts-Strogatz model with an inverse approach, implying a small-world regime of rewiring from a random network through a regular one. We then apply the rewiring strategy to a pure Barabasi-Albert model and successfully achieve a small-world regime, with a limited capacity of scale-free property. To imitate the high clustering property of scale-free networks with higher accuracy, we adapted the Poisson-based wiring strategy to a growing network with the ingredients of both preferential attachment and local connectivity. To achieve the collocation of these properties, we used a routine of flattening the edges array, sorting it, and applying a mixing procedure to assemble both global connections with preferential attachment and local clusters. As a result, we achieved clustered scale-free networks with a computational fashion, diverging from the recent studies by following a simple but efficient approach.

  12. Flexible Control of Small Wind Turbines With Grid Failure Detection Operating in Stand-Alone and Grid-Connected Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2004-01-01

    nonlinear load and excess or deficit of generated power. Grid-connection mode with current control is also enabled for the case of isolated local grid involving other dispersed power generators such as other wind turbines or diesel generators. A novel automatic mode switch method based on a phase......-to-back power conversion configuration is chosen where the generator converter uses a built-in standard flux vector control to control the speed of the turbine shaft while the grid-side converter uses a standard pulse-width modulation active rectifier control strategy implemented in a DSP controller. The design...

  13. A login shell interface for INFN-GRID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardi, S [INFN - Sezione di Napoli, Complesso di Monte S.Angelo - Via Cintia 80126 Napoli (Italy); Calloni, E; Rosa, R De; Garufi, F; Milano, L; Russo, G [Universita degli Studi di Napoli ' Federico M' , Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Complesso di Monte S.Angelo - Via Cintia 80126 Napoli (Italy)], E-mail: silvio.pardi@na.infn.it

    2008-12-15

    The user interface is a crucial service to guarantee the Grid accessibility. The goal to achieve, is the implementation of an environment able to hide the grid complexity and offer a familiar interface to the final user. Currently many graphical interfaces have been proposed to simplify the grid access, but the GUI approach appears not very congenital to UNIX developers and users accustomed to work with command line interface. In 2004 the GridShell project proposed an extension of popular UNIX shells such as TCSH and BASH with features supporting Grid computing. Starting from the ideas included in GridShell, we propose IGSH (INFN-GRID SHELL) a new login shell for the INFN-GRID middleware, that interact with the Resource Broker services and integrates in a 'naturally way' the grid functionality with a familiar interface. The architecture of IGSH is very simple, it consist of a software layer on the top of the INFN-GRID middleware layer. When some operation is performed by the user, IGSH takes in charge to parse the syntax and translate it in the correspondents INFN-GRID commands according to some semantic rules specified in the next sections. The final user interacts with the underlying distributed infrastructure by using IGSH instead of his default login shell, with the sensation to work on a local machine.

  14. A login shell interface for INFN-GRID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardi, S; Calloni, E; Rosa, R De; Garufi, F; Milano, L; Russo, G

    2008-01-01

    The user interface is a crucial service to guarantee the Grid accessibility. The goal to achieve, is the implementation of an environment able to hide the grid complexity and offer a familiar interface to the final user. Currently many graphical interfaces have been proposed to simplify the grid access, but the GUI approach appears not very congenital to UNIX developers and users accustomed to work with command line interface. In 2004 the GridShell project proposed an extension of popular UNIX shells such as TCSH and BASH with features supporting Grid computing. Starting from the ideas included in GridShell, we propose IGSH (INFN-GRID SHELL) a new login shell for the INFN-GRID middleware, that interact with the Resource Broker services and integrates in a 'naturally way' the grid functionality with a familiar interface. The architecture of IGSH is very simple, it consist of a software layer on the top of the INFN-GRID middleware layer. When some operation is performed by the user, IGSH takes in charge to parse the syntax and translate it in the correspondents INFN-GRID commands according to some semantic rules specified in the next sections. The final user interacts with the underlying distributed infrastructure by using IGSH instead of his default login shell, with the sensation to work on a local machine.

  15. Socioeconomic assessment of smart grids. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-07-01

    In September of 2013, the President of France identified smart grids as an important part of the country's industrial strategy, given the opportunities and advantages they can offer French industry, and asked the Chairman of the RTE Management Board to prepare a road-map outlining ways to support and accelerate smart grid development. This road-map, prepared in cooperation with stakeholders from the power and smart grids industries, identifies ten actions that can be taken in priority to consolidate the smart grids sector and help French firms play a leading role in the segment. These priorities were presented to the President of France on 7 May 2014. Action items 5 and 6 of the road-map on smart grid development relate, respectively, to the quantification of the value of smart grid functions from an economic, environmental and social (impact on employment) standpoint and to the large-scale deployment of some of the functions. Two tasks were set out in the 'Smart Grids' plan for action item 5: - Create a methodological framework that, for all advanced functions, allows the quantification of benefits and costs from an economic, environmental and social (effect on jobs) standpoint; - Quantify, based on this methodological framework, the potential benefits of a set of smart grid functions considered sufficiently mature to be deployed on a large scale in the near future. Having a methodology that can be applied in the same manner to all solutions, taking into account their impacts on the environment and employment in France, will considerably add to and complement the information drawn from demonstration projects. It will notably enable comparisons of benefits provided by smart grid functions and thus help give rise to a French smart grids industry that is competitive. At first, the smart grids industry was organised around demonstration projects testing different advanced functions within specific geographic areas. These projects covered a wide enough

  16. Socioeconomic assessment of smart grids - Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, Tanguy

    2015-07-01

    In September of 2013, the President of France identified smart grids as an important part of the country's industrial strategy, given the opportunities and advantages they can offer French industry, and asked the Chairman of the RTE Management Board to prepare a road-map outlining ways to support and accelerate smart grid development. This road-map, prepared in cooperation with stakeholders from the power and smart grids industries, identifies ten actions that can be taken in priority to consolidate the smart grids sector and help French firms play a leading role in the segment. These priorities were presented to the President of France on 7 May 2014. Action items 5 and 6 of the road-map on smart grid development relate, respectively, to the quantification of the value of smart grid functions from an economic, environmental and social (impact on employment) standpoint and to the large-scale deployment of some of the functions. Two tasks were set out in the 'Smart Grids' plan for action item 5: - Create a methodological framework that, for all advanced functions, allows the quantification of benefits and costs from an economic, environmental and social (effect on jobs) standpoint; - Quantify, based on this methodological framework, the potential benefits of a set of smart grid functions considered sufficiently mature to be deployed on a large scale in the near future. Having a methodology that can be applied in the same manner to all solutions, taking into account their impacts on the environment and employment in France, will considerably add to and complement the information drawn from demonstration projects. It will notably enable comparisons of benefits provided by smart grid functions and thus help give rise to a French smart grids industry that is competitive. At first, the smart grids industry was organised around demonstration projects testing different advanced functions within specific geographic areas. These projects covered a wide enough

  17. Smart grids and e-mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Within the third European Conference at 17th-18th October, 2011 in Munich (Federal Republic of Germany) the following lectures and posters were presented: (1) Market and billing models for electric mobility (M. Bolczek); (2) Optimal pooling of electric vehicles for ancillary markets under consideration of uncertain parameters (T. Pollok); (3) Introducing human factors psychology to vehicle-to-grid technologies (U. Hahnel); (4) The role of smart sensor networks for voltage monitoring in smart grids (P. Stoea); (5) Evaluating the impacts of electric vehicles and micro-generation in distribution networks (F. Soares); (6) Electric cars as energy storages - case study from Nordic Country (J. Lussia); (7) Are battery electric vehicles competitive? - The development of a customer value-based model (R. Colmon); (8) Technical and commercial protocol for different bidirectional integration topologies (P. Benoit); (9) The use of electric vehicles in Greece: A case study (C. Ioakimidis); (10) Fast charging station business analysis (J. Borges); (11) Power distribution networks: Intelligent substations (S2G) (M.E. Hervas); (12) Optimal design and energy management of decentralized PV-power supply units with short-term and long-term energy storage path (T. Bocklisch); (13) Easy grid analysis method for a central observing and controlling system in the low voltage grid for E-Mobility and renewable integration (A. Schuser); (14) Smart grids and EU data protection law - What is the legal framework? (J. Hladjk); (15) Smart integration of electric vehicles (A. Niesse); (16) Smart standards for smart grid devices (G. Kaestle); (17) Driving ambition: Bridging the gap between electric vehicles and smart metering (A. Galdos); (18) Analysis of an electric vehicle agent based management model (P. Papadopoulos); (19) Assessing the potential of electric vehicles and photovoltaics in a smart-grid environment in Brazil (R. Ruether); (20) Opportunities and challenges with large scale

  18. Connection and disconnection transients for micro-grids under unbalance load condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocabert, J.; Azevedo, Gustavo M.S.; Candela, I.

    2011-01-01

    in connection and disconnection transients. This paper focuses on the design of a method oriented to carry out a stable intentional disconnection, and later re-connection, of local grids from the main distribution grid in an intentional way; also under unbalance load condition. Seamless transfer between grid-connected......The recent grid integration of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) possibility the formation of intentional islands in the case of a grid fault conditions. For such island formation is required an active agent capable of governing the micro-grid connection state in a safe mode, especially...

  19. Development of a large scale Chimera grid system for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Daniel G.; Stanley, Scott A.; Martin, Fred W., Jr.; Gomez, Ray J.; Le Beau, Gerald J.; Buning, Pieter G.; Chan, William M.; Chiu, Ing-Tsau; Wulf, Armin; Akdag, Vedat

    1993-01-01

    The application of CFD techniques to large problems has dictated the need for large team efforts. This paper offers an opportunity to examine the motivations, goals, needs, problems, as well as the methods, tools, and constraints that defined NASA's development of a 111 grid/16 million point grid system model for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle. The Chimera approach used for domain decomposition encouraged separation of the complex geometry into several major components each of which was modeled by an autonomous team. ICEM-CFD, a CAD based grid generation package, simplified the geometry and grid topology definition by provoding mature CAD tools and patch independent meshing. The resulting grid system has, on average, a four inch resolution along the surface.

  20. Grid attacks avian flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During April, a collaboration of Asian and European laboratories analysed 300,000 possible drug components against the avian flu virus H5N1 using the EGEE Grid infrastructure. Schematic presentation of the avian flu virus.The distribution of the EGEE sites in the world on which the avian flu scan was performed. The goal was to find potential compounds that can inhibit the activities of an enzyme on the surface of the influenza virus, the so-called neuraminidase, subtype N1. Using the Grid to identify the most promising leads for biological tests could speed up the development process for drugs against the influenza virus. Co-ordinated by CERN and funded by the European Commission, the EGEE project (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE) aims to set up a worldwide grid infrastructure for science. The challenge of the in silico drug discovery application is to identify those molecules which can dock on the active sites of the virus in order to inhibit its action. To study the impact of small scale mutations on drug r...

  1. Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale forcing properties: 2. Scale awareness and application to single-column model experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sha; Li, Zhijin; Liu, Yangang; Lin, Wuyin; Zhang, Minghua; Toto, Tami; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Endo, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    three-dimensional fields have been produced using the Community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system for the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains region. The GSI system is implemented in a multiscale data assimilation framework using the Weather Research and Forecasting model at a cloud-resolving resolution of 2 km. From the fine-resolution three-dimensional fields, large-scale forcing is derived explicitly at grid-scale resolution; a subgrid-scale dynamic component is derived separately, representing subgrid-scale horizontal dynamic processes. Analyses show that the subgrid-scale dynamic component is often a major component over the large-scale forcing for grid scales larger than 200 km. The single-column model (SCM) of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 is used to examine the impact of the grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components on simulated precipitation and cloud fields associated with a mesoscale convective system. It is found that grid-scale size impacts simulated precipitation, resulting in an overestimation for grid scales of about 200 km but an underestimation for smaller grids. The subgrid-scale dynamic component has an appreciable impact on the simulations, suggesting that grid-scale and subgrid-scale dynamic components should be considered in the interpretation of SCM simulations.

  2. Toward a Grid Work flow Formal Composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlaoui, Y. B.; BenAyed, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper exposes a new approach for the composition of grid work flow models. This approach proposes an abstract syntax for the UML Activity Diagrams (UML-AD) and a formal foundation for grid work flow composition in form of a work flow algebra based on UML-AD. This composition fulfils the need for collaborative model development particularly the specification and the reduction of the complexity of grid work flow model verification. This complexity has arisen with the increase in scale of grid work flow applications such as science and e-business applications since large amounts of computational resources are required and multiple parties could be involved in the development process and in the use of grid work flows. Furthermore, the proposed algebra allows the definition of work flow views which are useful to limit the access to predefined users in order to ensure the security of grid work flow applications. (Author)

  3. Five hundred years of gridded high-resolution precipitation reconstructions over Europe and the connection to large-scale circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauling, Andreas [University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Bern (Switzerland); Luterbacher, Juerg; Wanner, Heinz [University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Bern (Switzerland); National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) in Climate, Bern (Switzerland); Casty, Carlo [University of Bern, Climate and Environmental Physics Institute, Bern (Switzerland)

    2006-03-15

    We present seasonal precipitation reconstructions for European land areas (30 W to 40 E/30-71 N; given on a 0.5 x 0.5 resolved grid) covering the period 1500-1900 together with gridded reanalysis from 1901 to 2000 (Mitchell and Jones 2005). Principal component regression techniques were applied to develop this dataset. A large variety of long instrumental precipitation series, precipitation indices based on documentary evidence and natural proxies (tree-ring chronologies, ice cores, corals and a speleothem) that are sensitive to precipitation signals were used as predictors. Transfer functions were derived over the 1901-1983 calibration period and applied to 1500-1900 in order to reconstruct the large-scale precipitation fields over Europe. The performance (quality estimation based on unresolved variance within the calibration period) of the reconstructions varies over centuries, seasons and space. Highest reconstructive skill was found for winter over central Europe and the Iberian Peninsula. Precipitation variability over the last half millennium reveals both large interannual and decadal fluctuations. Applying running correlations, we found major non-stationarities in the relation between large-scale circulation and regional precipitation. For several periods during the last 500 years, we identified key atmospheric modes for southern Spain/northern Morocco and central Europe as representations of two precipitation regimes. Using scaled composite analysis, we show that precipitation extremes over central Europe and southern Spain are linked to distinct pressure patterns. Due to its high spatial and temporal resolution, this dataset allows detailed studies of regional precipitation variability for all seasons, impact studies on different time and space scales, comparisons with high-resolution climate models as well as analysis of connections with regional temperature reconstructions. (orig.)

  4. Grid support of a wind farm with active stall wind turbines and AC grid connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anca Daniela; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Iov, F.

    2006-01-01

    grid connection. The designed control system has the task of enabling such a wind farm to provide the best grid support. It is based on two control levels: a supervisory control level, which controls the power production of the whole farm by sending out reference signals to each individual wind turbine......One of the main concerns in the grid integration of large wind farms is their ability to behave as active controllable components in the power system. This article presents the design of a new integrated power control system for a wind farm made up exclusively of active stall wind turbines with AC......, and a local control level, which ensures that the reference power signals at the wind turbine level are reached. The ability of active stall wind farms with AC grid connection to control the power production to the reference power ordered by the operators is assessed and discussed by means of simulations....

  5. Development of large scale fusion plasma simulation and storage grid on JAERI Origin3800 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idomura, Yasuhiro; Wang, Xin

    2003-01-01

    Under the Numerical EXperiment of Tokamak (NEXT) research project, various fluid, particle, and hybrid codes have been developed. These codes require a computational environment which consists of high performance processors, high speed storage system, and high speed parallelized visualization system. In this paper, the performance of the JAERI Origin3800 system is examined from a point of view of these requests. In the performance tests, it is shown that the representative particle and fluid codes operate with 15 - 40% of processing efficiency up to 512 processors. A storage area network (SAN) provides high speed parallel data transfer. A parallel visualization system enables order to magnitude faster visualization of a large scale simulation data compared with the previous graphic workstations. Accordingly, an extremely advanced simulation environment is realized on the JAERI Origin3800 system. Recently, development of a storage grid is underway in order to improve a computational environment of remote users. The storage grid is constructed by a combination of SAN and a wavelength division multiplexer (WDM). The preliminary tests show that compared with the existing data transfer methods, it enables dramatically high speed data transfer ∼100 Gbps over a wide area network. (author)

  6. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Supply Reef, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  7. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Maug Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  8. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Alamagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  9. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Rota Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  10. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Guguan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  11. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Pagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  12. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Asuncion Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry...

  13. Construction method of pre assembled unit of bolt sphere grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L. W.; Guo, F. L.; Wang, J. L.; Bu, F. M.

    2018-03-01

    The traditional construction of bolt sphere grid has many disadvantages, such as high cost, large amount of work at high altitude and long construction period, in order to make up for these shortcomings, in this paper, a new and applicable construction method is explored: setting up local scaffolding, installing the bolt sphere grid starting frame on the local scaffolding, then the pre assembled unit of bolt sphere grid is assembled on the ground, using small hoisting equipment to lift pre assembled unit to high altitude and install. Compared with the traditional installation method, the construction method has strong practicability and high economic efficiency, and has achieved good social and economic benefits.

  14. Optimal charging scheduling for large-scale EV (electric vehicle) deployment based on the interaction of the smart-grid and intelligent-transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Yugong; Zhu, Tao; Wan, Shuang; Zhang, Shuwei; Li, Keqiang

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of electric vehicles (EVs) is becoming an imminent trend. Research has been done on the scheduling of EVs from the perspective of the charging characteristic, improvement in the safety and economy of the power grid, or the traffic jams in the transport system caused by a large number of EVs driven to charging stations. There is a lack of systematic studies considering EVs, the power grid, and the transport system all together. In this paper, a novel optimal charging scheduling strategy for different types of EVs is proposed based on not only transport system information, such as road length, vehicle velocity and waiting time, but also grid system information, such as load deviation and node voltage. In addition, a charging scheduling simulation platform suitable for large-scale EV deployment is developed based on actual charging scenarios. The simulation results show that the improvements in both the transport system efficiency and the grid system operation can be obtained by using the optimal strategy, such as the node voltage drop is decreased, the power loss is reduced, and the load curve is optimized. - Highlights: • A novel optimal charging scheduling strategy is proposed for different electric vehicles (EVs). • A simulation platform suitable for large-scale EV deployment is established. • The traffic congestion near the charging and battery-switch stations is relieved. • The safety and economy problems of the distribution network are solved. • The peak-to-valley load of the distribution system is reduced.

  15. Steering the Smart Grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molderink, Albert; Bakker, Vincent; Bosman, M.G.C.; Hurink, Johann L.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2010-01-01

    Increasing energy prices and the greenhouse effect lead to more awareness of energy efficiency of electricity supply. During the last years, a lot of technologies and optimization methodologies were developed to increase the efficiency, maintain the grid stability and support large scale

  16. Adapting AC Lines to DC Grids for Large-Scale Renewable Power Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Marene Larruskain

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available All over the world, governments of different countries are nowadays promoting the use of clean energies in order to achieve sustainable energy systems. In this scenario, since the installed capacity is continuously increasing, renewable sources can play an important role. Notwithstanding that, some important problems may appear when connecting these sources to the grid, being the overload of distribution lines one of the most relevant. In fact, renewable generation is usually connected to the nearest AC grid, although this HV system may not have been designed considering distributed generation. In the particular case of large wind farms, the electrical grid has to transmit all the power generated by wind energy and, as a consequence, the AC system may get overloaded. It is therefore necessary to determine the impact of wind power transmission so that appropriate measures can be taken. Not only are these measures influenced by the amount of power transmitted, but also by the quality of the transmitted power, due to the output voltage fluctuation caused by the highly variable nature of wind. When designing a power grid, although AC systems are usually the most economical solution because of its highly proven technology, HVDC may arise in some cases (e.g. offshore wind farms as an interesting alternative, offering some added values such as lower losses and better controllability. This way, HVDC technology can solve most of the aforementioned problems and has a good potential for future use. Additionally, the fast development of power electronics based on new and powerful semiconductor devices allow the spread of innovative technologies, such as VSC-HVDC, which can be applied to create DC grids. This paper focuses on the main aspects involved in adapting the existing overhead AC lines to DC grids, with the objective of improving the transmission of distributed renewable energy to the centers of consumption.

  17. Adaptive grid generation in a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodis, Simona; Kallmes, David F.; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2013-11-01

    Adapting grid density to flow behavior provides the advantage of increasing solution accuracy while decreasing the number of grid elements in the simulation domain, therefore reducing the computational time. One method for grid adaptation requires successive refinement of grid density based on observed solution behavior until the numerical errors between successive grids are negligible. However, such an approach is time consuming and it is often neglected by the researchers. We present a technique to calculate the grid size distribution of an adaptive grid for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in a complex cerebral aneurysm geometry based on the kinematic curvature and torsion calculated from the velocity field. The relationship between the kinematic characteristics of the flow and the element size of the adaptive grid leads to a mathematical equation to calculate the grid size in different regions of the flow. The adaptive grid density is obtained such that it captures the more complex details of the flow with locally smaller grid size, while less complex flow characteristics are calculated on locally larger grid size. The current study shows that kinematic curvature and torsion calculated from the velocity field in a cerebral aneurysm can be used to find the locations of complex flow where the computational grid needs to be refined in order to obtain an accurate solution. We found that the complexity of the flow can be adequately described by velocity and vorticity and the angle between the two vectors. For example, inside the aneurysm bleb, at the bifurcation, and at the major arterial turns the element size in the lumen needs to be less than 10% of the artery radius, while at the boundary layer, the element size should be smaller than 1% of the artery radius, for accurate results within a 0.5% relative approximation error. This technique of quantifying flow complexity and adaptive remeshing has the potential to improve results accuracy and reduce

  18. Buckling Analysis of Grid-Stiffened Composite Shells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, D.; Abdalla, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in grid-stiffened composite structures; they are not only competitive with conventional stiffened constructions and sandwich shells in terms of weight but also enjoy superior damage tolerance properties. In this paper, both global and local structural instabilities are investigated for grid-stiffened composite panels using homogenization theory. Characteristic cell configurations with periodic boundary constraints are employed for orthogrid- and isogrid-stiffened s...

  19. A Scalable proxy cache for Grid Data Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristian Cirstea, Traian; Just Keijser, Jan; Arthur Koeroo, Oscar; Starink, Ronald; Alan Templon, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We describe a prototype grid proxy cache system developed at Nikhef, motivated by a desire to construct the first building block of a future https-based Content Delivery Network for grid infrastructures. Two goals drove the project: firstly to provide a “native view” of the grid for desktop-type users, and secondly to improve performance for physics-analysis type use cases, where multiple passes are made over the same set of data (residing on the grid). We further constrained the design by requiring that the system should be made of standard components wherever possible. The prototype that emerged from this exercise is a horizontally-scalable, cooperating system of web server / cache nodes, fronted by a customized webDAV server. The webDAV server is custom only in the sense that it supports http redirects (providing horizontal scaling) and that the authentication module has, as back end, a proxy delegation chain that can be used by the cache nodes to retrieve files from the grid. The prototype was deployed at Nikhef and tested at a scale of several terabytes of data and approximately one hundred fast cores of computing. Both small and large files were tested, in a number of scenarios, and with various numbers of cache nodes, in order to understand the scaling properties of the system. For properly-dimensioned cache-node hardware, the system showed speedup of several integer factors for the analysis-type use cases. These results and others are presented and discussed.

  20. Maturity grids as tools for change management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Anja; Moultrie, James; Clarkson, P John

    2011-01-01

    A maturity grid is a change management tool. Levels of maturity are assigned against aspects of an area under study, thus creating a grid. Text descriptions at the resulting intersections describe the typical behaviour exhibited by a firm for each area under study and from the basis...... for the assessment scale. It is a flexible assessment technique that is used by practitioners in industry, consultants and researchers in academia for diagnostic, reflective and improvement purposes. A large number of maturity grids have been proposed to assess a range of capabilities including quality management...

  1. Many-body localization transition: Schmidt gap, entanglement length, and scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Johnnie; Bose, Sougato; Bayat, Abolfazl

    2018-05-01

    Many-body localization has become an important phenomenon for illuminating a potential rift between nonequilibrium quantum systems and statistical mechanics. However, the nature of the transition between ergodic and localized phases in models displaying many-body localization is not yet well understood. Assuming that this is a continuous transition, analytic results show that the length scale should diverge with a critical exponent ν ≥2 in one-dimensional systems. Interestingly, this is in stark contrast with all exact numerical studies which find ν ˜1 . We introduce the Schmidt gap, new in this context, which scales near the transition with an exponent ν >2 compatible with the analytical bound. We attribute this to an insensitivity to certain finite-size fluctuations, which remain significant in other quantities at the sizes accessible to exact numerical methods. Additionally, we find that a physical manifestation of the diverging length scale is apparent in the entanglement length computed using the logarithmic negativity between disjoint blocks.

  2. GridWise Standards Mapping Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosquet, Mia L.

    2004-04-01

    ''GridWise'' is a concept of how advanced communications, information and controls technology can transform the nation's energy system--across the spectrum of large scale, central generation to common consumer appliances and equipment--into a collaborative network, rich in the exchange of decision making information and an abundance of market-based opportunities (Widergren and Bosquet 2003) accompanying the electric transmission and distribution system fully into the information and telecommunication age. This report summarizes a broad review of standards efforts which are related to GridWise--those which could ultimately contribute significantly to advancements toward the GridWise vision, or those which represent today's current technological basis upon which this vision must build.

  3. Analysis gets on the starting Grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Roger Jones

    It is vital for ATLAS to have a functioning distributed analysis system to analyse its data. There are three major Grid deployments in ATLAS (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE, EGEE; the US Open Science Grid, OSG; and the Nordic DataGrid Facility, NGDF), and our data and jobs need to work across all of them, as well as on local machines and batch systems. Users must also be able to locate the data they want and register new small datasets so they can be used later. ATLAS has a suite of products to meet these needs, and a series of Distributed Analysis tutorials are training an increasing number of brave early adopters to use the system. Real users are vital to make sure that the tools are fit for their purpose and to refine our computing model. One such tutorial happened on the 1st and 2nd February at the National eScience Centre in Edinburgh, UK, sponsored by the GridPP Collaboration. The first day introduced an international set of tutees to the basic tools for Grid-based distributed analysis. The architecture...

  4. Does Your Domestic Photovoltaic Energy System Survive Grid Outages?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn R. Jongerden

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Domestic renewable energy systems, including photovoltaic energy generation, as well as local storage, are becoming increasingly popular and economically feasible, but do come with a wide range of options. Hence, it can be difficult to match their specification to specific customer’s needs. Next to the usage-specific demand profiles and location-specific production profiles, local energy storage through the use of batteries is becoming increasingly important, since it allows one to balance variations in production and demand, either locally or via the grid. Moreover, local storage can also help to ensure a continuous energy supply in the presence of grid outages, at least for a while. Hybrid Petri net (HPN models allow one to analyze the effect of different battery management strategies on the continuity of such energy systems in the case of grid outages. The current paper focuses on one of these strategies, the so-called smart strategy, that reserves a certain percentage of the battery capacity to be only used in case of grid outages. Additionally, we introduce a new strategy that makes better use of the reserved backup capacity, by reducing the demand in the presence of a grid outage through a prioritization mechanism. This new strategy, called power-save, only allows the essential (high-priority demand to draw from the battery during power outages. We show that this new strategy outperforms previously-proposed strategies through a careful analysis of a number of scenarios and for a selection of survivability measures, such as minimum survivability per day, number of survivable hours per day, minimum survivability per year and various survivability quantiles.

  5. The Grid-Enabled NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawenda, M.; Meyer, N.; Stroinski, M.; Popenda, L.; Gdaniec, Z.; Adamiak, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    The laboratory equipment used for experimental work is very expensive and unique as well. Only big regional or national centers could afford to purchase and use it, but on a very limited scale. That is a real problem that disqualifies all other research groups not having direct access to these instruments. Therefore the proposed framework plays a crucial role in equalizing the chances of all research groups. The Virtual Laboratory (VLab) project focuses its activity on embedding laboratory equipments in grid environments (handling HPC and visualization), touching some crucial issues not solved yet. In general the issues concern the standardization of the laboratory equipment definition to treat it as a simple grid resource, supporting the end user under the term of the workflow definition, introducing the accounting issues and prioritizing jobs which follow experiments on equipments. Nowadays, we have a lot of various equipments, which can be accessed remotely via network, but only on the way allowing the local management console/display to move through the network to make a simpler access. To manage an experimental and post-processing data as well as store them in a organized way, a special Digital Science Library was developed. The project delivers a framework to enable the usage of many different scientific facilities. The physical layer of the architecture includes the existing high-speed network like PIONIER in Poland, and the HPC and visualization infrastructure. The application, in fact the framework, can be used in all experimental disciplines, where access to physical equipments are crucial, e.g., chemistry (spectrometer), radio astronomy (radio telescope), and medicine (CAT scanner). The poster presentation will show how we deployed the concept in chemistry, supporting these disciplines with grid environment and embedding the Bruker Avance 600 MHz and Varian 300 MHz spectrometers. (author)

  6. AGIS: The ATLAS Grid Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Anisenkov, Alexey; Belov, Sergey; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Gayazov, Stavro; Klimentov, Alexei; Oleynik, Danila; Senchenko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The experiment produces petabytes of data annually through simulation production and tens petabytes of data per year from the detector itself. The ATLAS Computing model embraces the Grid paradigm and a high degree of decentralization and computing resources able to meet ATLAS requirements of petabytes scale data operations. In this paper we present ATLAS Grid Information System (AGIS) designed to integrate configurat...

  7. Investigation of thick grid plasma switches for thermionic system output voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, N.I.; Kaplan, V.B.; Martsinovski, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Plasma switches (Cs and Cs-Ba tacitrons PS) with thick grid have grid with thickness more than mesh aperture size. These grids have some advantages as compared with small-scale/1.2/ones. For instance, much more electrical strength. This paper contains the thick-grid investigation results: the grid controls efficiency, the plasma parameters, probe researches of these parameters at conductive state and their variety during the process of quenching. The results showed the thick-grid PS plasma differed from the thin-grid PS significantly at the stationary state as well as by quenching dynamic features

  8. Data security on the national fusion grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  9. Data security on the national fusion grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER

  10. Smart design rules for smart grids : analysing local smart grid development through an empirico-legal institutional lens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Imke; Heldeweg, Michiel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This article entails an innovative approach to smart grid technology implementation, as it connects governance research with legal analysis. We apply the empirico-legal ‘ILTIAD framework’, which combines Elinor Ostrom’s Institutional Analysis and Development (IAD) framework with

  11. Adaptive local routing strategy on a scale-free network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Liu; Han, Zhao; Ming, Li; Yan-Bo, Zhu; Feng-Yuan, Ren

    2010-01-01

    Due to the heterogeneity of the structure on a scale-free network, making the betweennesses of all nodes become homogeneous by reassigning the weights of nodes or edges is very difficult. In order to take advantage of the important effect of high degree nodes on the shortest path communication and preferentially deliver packets by them to increase the probability to destination, an adaptive local routing strategy on a scale-free network is proposed, in which the node adjusts the forwarding probability with the dynamical traffic load (packet queue length) and the degree distribution of neighbouring nodes. The critical queue length of a node is set to be proportional to its degree, and the node with high degree has a larger critical queue length to store and forward more packets. When the queue length of a high degree node is shorter than its critical queue length, it has a higher probability to forward packets. After higher degree nodes are saturated (whose queue lengths are longer than their critical queue lengths), more packets will be delivered by the lower degree nodes around them. The adaptive local routing strategy increases the probability of a packet finding its destination quickly, and improves the transmission capacity on the scale-free network by reducing routing hops. The simulation results show that the transmission capacity of the adaptive local routing strategy is larger than that of three previous local routing strategies. (general)

  12. SHAPE FROM TEXTURE USING LOCALLY SCALED POINT PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Maria Didden

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Shape from texture refers to the extraction of 3D information from 2D images with irregular texture. This paper introduces a statistical framework to learn shape from texture where convex texture elements in a 2D image are represented through a point process. In a first step, the 2D image is preprocessed to generate a probability map corresponding to an estimate of the unnormalized intensity of the latent point process underlying the texture elements. The latent point process is subsequently inferred from the probability map in a non-parametric, model free manner. Finally, the 3D information is extracted from the point pattern by applying a locally scaled point process model where the local scaling function represents the deformation caused by the projection of a 3D surface onto a 2D image.

  13. Vehicle-to-Grid Automatic Load Sharing with Driver Preference in Micro-Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yubo; Nazaripouya, Hamidreza; Chu, Chi-Cheng; Gadh, Rajit; Pota, Hemanshu R.

    2014-10-15

    Integration of Electrical Vehicles (EVs) with power grid not only brings new challenges for load management, but also opportunities for distributed storage and generation. This paper comprehensively models and analyzes distributed Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) for automatic load sharing with driver preference. In a micro-grid with limited communications, V2G EVs need to decide load sharing based on their own power and voltage profile. A droop based controller taking into account driver preference is proposed in this paper to address the distributed control of EVs. Simulations are designed for three fundamental V2G automatic load sharing scenarios that include all system dynamics of such applications. Simulation results demonstrate that active power sharing is achieved proportionally among V2G EVs with consideration of driver preference. In additional, the results also verify the system stability and reactive power sharing analysis in system modelling, which sheds light on large scale V2G automatic load sharing in more complicated cases.

  14. Power Quality Experimental Analysis on Rural Home Grid-Connected PV Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Jorge Cerqueira Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgeneration is the small-scale generation of heat or electric power or both, by individuals or buildings to meet their own needs. Recently, microgeneration is being regarded as a means to decentralize the power production of renewable energies, reducing the impacts on the grid caused by unexpected energy demands. Given the increase in microgeneration facilities, determining the quantity of energy produced and the power quality assumes growing importance in low, medium, or high voltage facilities. This paper presents a power quality analysis of two different facilities with photovoltaic generation localized in a rural area of Portugal, describing the voltage and frequency behaviour, the harmonic contents, and the total harmonic distortion. Statistical data are presented regarding the number of voltage events and occurrence of dips and swells in both facilities as a percentage of rated voltage. We conclude that some PV systems can severely affect voltage quality, forcing the grid to work at and even above the maximum voltage standard limit.

  15. Smart grids - French Expertise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-11-01

    particular by working to develop storage solutions at all levels within the grid, and by preparing to introduce electric vehicles. Developing solutions for tomorrow: strong willingness of public authorities in France to develop Smart Grids has notably led to the creation of support mechanisms for innovation and for demonstration projects, and to a strategic business sector plan dedicated to Smart Grids. Related competencies have also emerged, in the development of market design, and cyber security. The French Smart Grid vision focuses on mastering complexity, on large scale deployments, and on the development of systems showing a high degree of dependability and reliable functioning. World leaders, mid-cap companies and small businesses specialized in the full range of Smart Grid technologies: operators of electrical and telecommunications networks, equipment and component manufacturers, software engineering companies, data centre managers etc. Over 100 Smart Grid projects are currently underway in France. Strong R and D and innovation capacity: some 20 demonstration projects have started up under the Smart Grids segment of the Investments for the Future programme. France ranks first in Europe for Smart Grid investments

  16. Simulations of mixing in Inertial Confinement Fusion with front tracking and sub-grid scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Verinder; Lim, Hyunkyung; Melvin, Jeremy; Cheng, Baolian; Glimm, James; Sharp, David

    2015-11-01

    We present two related results. The first discusses the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) and their evolution in Inertial Confinement Fusion simulations. We show the evolution of the RMI to the late time RTI under transport effects and tracking. The role of the sub-grid scales helps capture the interaction of turbulence with diffusive processes. The second assesses the effects of concentration on the physics model and examines the mixing properties in the low Reynolds number hot spot. We discuss the effect of concentration on the Schmidt number. The simulation results are produced using the University of Chicago code FLASH and Stony Brook University's front tracking algorithm.

  17. Development of a three-dimensional local scale atmospheric model with turbulence closure model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazawa, Hiromi

    1989-05-01

    Through the study to improve SPEEDI's capability, a three-dimensional numerical atmospheric model PHYSIC (Prognostic HYdroStatic model Including turbulence Closure model) was developed to apply it to the transport and diffusion evaluation over complex terrains. The detailed description of the atmospheric model was given. This model consists of five prognostic equations; the momentum equations of horizontal components with the so-called Boussinesq and hydrostatic assumptions, the conservation equations of heat, turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence length scale. The coordinate system used is the terrain following z * coordinate system which allows the existence of complex terrain. The minute formula of the turbulence closure calculation, the surface layer process, the ground surface heat budget, and the atmospheric and solar radiation were also presented. The time integration method used in this model is the Alternating Direction Implicit (A.D.I.) method with a vertically and horizontally staggered grid system. The memory storage needed to execute this model with 31 x 31 x 16 grid points, five layers in soil and double precision variables is about 5.3 MBytes. The CPU time is about 2.2 x 10 -5 s per one step per one grid point with a vector processor FACOM VP-100. (author)

  18. Near-Body Grid Adaption for Overset Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    A solution adaption capability for curvilinear near-body grids has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid computational fluid dynamics code. The approach follows closely that used for the Cartesian off-body grids, but inserts refined grids in the computational space of original near-body grids. Refined curvilinear grids are generated using parametric cubic interpolation, with one-sided biasing based on curvature and stretching ratio of the original grid. Sensor functions, grid marking, and solution interpolation tasks are implemented in the same fashion as for off-body grids. A goal-oriented procedure, based on largest error first, is included for controlling growth rate and maximum size of the adapted grid system. The adaption process is almost entirely parallelized using MPI, resulting in a capability suitable for viscous, moving body simulations. Two- and three-dimensional examples are presented.

  19. Development of a gridded meteorological dataset over Java island, Indonesia 1985-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanto; Livneh, Ben; Rajagopalan, Balaji

    2017-05-23

    We describe a gridded daily meteorology dataset consisting of precipitation, minimum and maximum temperature over Java Island, Indonesia at 0.125°×0.125° (~14 km) resolution spanning 30 years from 1985-2014. Importantly, this data set represents a marked improvement from existing gridded data sets over Java with higher spatial resolution, derived exclusively from ground-based observations unlike existing satellite or reanalysis-based products. Gap-infilling and gridding were performed via the Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) interpolation method (radius, r, of 25 km and power of influence, α, of 3 as optimal parameters) restricted to only those stations including at least 3,650 days (~10 years) of valid data. We employed MSWEP and CHIRPS rainfall products in the cross-validation. It shows that the gridded rainfall presented here produces the most reasonable performance. Visual inspection reveals an increasing performance of gridded precipitation from grid, watershed to island scale. The data set, stored in a network common data form (NetCDF), is intended to support watershed-scale and island-scale studies of short-term and long-term climate, hydrology and ecology.

  20. Parallel Implementation and Scaling of an Adaptive Mesh Discrete Ordinates Algorithm for Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, L H

    2004-01-01

    Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) uses a mesh structure built up out of locally-uniform rectangular grids. In the BoxLib parallel framework used by the Raptor code, each processor operates on one or more of these grids at each refinement level. The decomposition of the mesh into grids and the distribution of these grids among processors may change every few timesteps as a calculation proceeds. Finer grids use smaller timesteps than coarser grids, requiring additional work to keep the system synchronized and ensure conservation between different refinement levels. In a paper for NECDC 2002 I presented preliminary results on implementation of parallel transport sweeps on the AMR mesh, conjugate gradient acceleration, accuracy of the AMR solution, and scalar speedup of the AMR algorithm compared to a uniform fully-refined mesh. This paper continues with a more in-depth examination of the parallel scaling properties of the scheme, both in single-level and multi-level calculations. Both sweeping and setup costs are considered. The algorithm scales with acceptable performance to several hundred processors. Trends suggest, however, that this is the limit for efficient calculations with traditional transport sweeps, and that modifications to the sweep algorithm will be increasingly needed as job sizes in the thousands of processors become common

  1. Occurrence and countermeasures of urban power grid accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wang; Tao, Zhang

    2018-03-01

    With the advance of technology, the development of network communication and the extensive use of power grids, people can get to know power grid accidents around the world through the network timely. Power grid accidents occur frequently. Large-scale power system blackout and casualty accidents caused by electric shock are also fairly commonplace. All of those accidents have seriously endangered the property and personal safety of the country and people, and the development of society and economy is severely affected by power grid accidents. Through the researches on several typical cases of power grid accidents at home and abroad in recent years and taking these accident cases as the research object, this paper will analyze the three major factors that cause power grid accidents at present. At the same time, combining with various factors and impacts caused by power grid accidents, the paper will put forward corresponding solutions and suggestions to prevent the occurrence of the accident and lower the impact of the accident.

  2. Water-safety strategies and local-scale spatial quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nillesen, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Delta regions throughout the world are subject to increasing flood risks. For protection, regional water safety strategies are being developed. Local-scale spatial qualities should be included in their evaluation. An experimental methodology has been developed for this purpose. This paper

  3. GridiLoc: A Backtracking Grid Filter for Fusing the Grid Model with PDR Using Smartphone Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianga Shang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although map filtering-aided Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR is capable of largely improving indoor localization accuracy, it becomes less efficient when coping with highly complex indoor spaces. For instance, indoor spaces with a few close corners or neighboring passages can lead to particles entering erroneous passages, which can further cause the failure of subsequent tracking. To address this problem, we propose GridiLoc, a reliable and accurate pedestrian indoor localization method through the fusion of smartphone sensors and a grid model. The key novelty of GridiLoc is the utilization of a backtracking grid filter for improving localization accuracy and for handling dead ending issues. In order to reduce the time consumption of backtracking, a topological graph is introduced for representing candidate backtracking points, which are the expected locations at the starting time of the dead ending. Furthermore, when the dead ending is caused by the erroneous step length model of PDR, our solution can automatically calibrate the model by using the historical tracking data. Our experimental results show that GridiLoc achieves a higher localization accuracy and reliability compared with the commonly-used map filtering approach. Meanwhile, it maintains an acceptable computational complexity.

  4. Costs of the grid connection of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siden, G [Halmstad Univ. (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    The costs of the grid connection of wind turbines in Sweden have until now been about 5 % of the total investments, provided that the distance of the connection cable is limited. Now the grid will soon be filled locally and it will be necessary to strengthen it. The costs for this can also be about 5 %, and the total cost about 10 %. Improvements in the electrical systems of the wind turbines and the connection technique can give less disturbance in the grid and diminish the costs. It is important to agree on how to share the costs for strengthening the grid. Otherwise, it can become an obstacle when building new wind turbines. (author)

  5. Costs of the grid connection of wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siden, G.

    1995-01-01

    The costs of the grid connection of wind turbines in Sweden have until now been about 5 % of the total investments, provided that the distance of the connection cable is limited. Now the grid will soon be filled locally and it will be necessary to strengthen it. The costs for this can also be about 5 %, and the total cost about 10 %. Improvements in the electrical systems of the wind turbines and the connection technique can give less disturbance in the grid and diminish the costs. It is important to agree on how to share the costs for strengthening the grid. Otherwise, it can become an obstacle when building new wind turbines. (author)

  6. Costs of the grid connection of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siden, G. [Halmstad Univ. (Sweden)

    1995-12-31

    The costs of the grid connection of wind turbines in Sweden have until now been about 5 % of the total investments, provided that the distance of the connection cable is limited. Now the grid will soon be filled locally and it will be necessary to strengthen it. The costs for this can also be about 5 %, and the total cost about 10 %. Improvements in the electrical systems of the wind turbines and the connection technique can give less disturbance in the grid and diminish the costs. It is important to agree on how to share the costs for strengthening the grid. Otherwise, it can become an obstacle when building new wind turbines. (author)

  7. Applying 4-regular grid structures in large-scale access networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Knudsen, Thomas P.; Patel, Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    4-Regular grid structures have been used in multiprocessor systems for decades due to a number of nice properties with regard to routing, protection, and restoration, together with a straightforward planar layout. These qualities are to an increasing extent demanded also in largescale access...... networks, but concerning protection and restoration these demands have been met only to a limited extent by the commonly used ring and tree structures. To deal with the fact that classical 4-regular grid structures are not directly applicable in such networks, this paper proposes a number of extensions...... concerning restoration, protection, scalability, embeddability, flexibility, and cost. The extensions are presented as a tool case, which can be used for implementing semi-automatic and in the longer term full automatic network planning tools....

  8. Accounting for spatially heterogeneous conditions in local-scale surveillance strategies: case study of the biosecurity insect pest, grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae (Fitch)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triska, Maggie D; Powell, Kevin S; Collins, Cassandra; Pearce, Inca; Renton, Michael

    2018-04-29

    Surveillance strategies are often standardized and completed on grid patterns to detect pest incursions quickly; however, it may be possible to improve surveillance through more targeted surveillance that accounts for landscape heterogeneity, dispersal and the habitat requirements of the invading organism. We simulated pest spread at a local-scale, using grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae (Fitch)) as a case study, and assessed the influence of incorporating spatial heterogeneity into surveillance strategies compared to current, standard surveillance strategies. Time to detection, spread within and spread beyond the vineyard were reduced by conducting surveys that target sampling effort in soil that is highly suitable to the invading pest in comparison to standard surveillance strategies. However, these outcomes were dependent on the virulence level of phylloxera as phylloxera is a complex pest with multiple genotypes that influence spread and detectability. Targeting surveillance strategies based on local-scale spatial heterogeneity can decrease the time to detection without increasing the survey cost and surveillance that targets highly suitable soil is the most efficient strategy for detecting new incursions. Additionally, combining targeted surveillance strategies with buffer zones and hygiene procedures, and updating surveillance strategies as additional species information becomes available, will further decrease the risk of pest spread. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Autonomous Energy Grids: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, Benjamin D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dall-Anese, Emiliano [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bernstein, Andrey [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Yingchen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hodge, Brian S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-04

    With much higher levels of distributed energy resources - variable generation, energy storage, and controllable loads just to mention a few - being deployed into power systems, the data deluge from pervasive metering of energy grids, and the shaping of multi-level ancillary-service markets, current frameworks to monitoring, controlling, and optimizing large-scale energy systems are becoming increasingly inadequate. This position paper outlines the concept of 'Autonomous Energy Grids' (AEGs) - systems that are supported by a scalable, reconfigurable, and self-organizing information and control infrastructure, can be extremely secure and resilient (self-healing), and self-optimize themselves in real-time for economic and reliable performance while systematically integrating energy in all forms. AEGs rely on scalable, self-configuring cellular building blocks that ensure that each 'cell' can self-optimize when isolated from a larger grid as well as partaking in the optimal operation of a larger grid when interconnected. To realize this vision, this paper describes the concepts and key research directions in the broad domains of optimization theory, control theory, big-data analytics, and complex system modeling that will be necessary to realize the AEG vision.

  10. Local Reactive Power Control Methods for Overvoltage Prevention of Distributed Solar Inverters in Low-Voltage Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirok, Erhan; Gonzalez, Pablo Casado; Frederiksen, Kenn H. B.

    2011-01-01

    on sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity analysis shows that the same amount of reactive power becomes more effective for grid voltage support if the solar inverter is located at the end of a feeder. Based on this fundamental knowledge, a location-dependent power factor set value can be assigned to each inverter......voltage (LV) grids by means of solar inverters with reactive power control capability. This paper underlines weak points of standard reactive power strategies which are already imposed by certain grid codes, and then, the study introduces a new reactive power control method that is based......, and the grid voltage support can be achieved with less total reactive power consumption. In order to prevent unnecessary reactive power absorption from the grid during admissible voltage range or to increase reactive power contribution from the inverters that are closest to the transformer during grid...

  11. Application of epidemic algorithms for smart grids control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krkoleva, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Smart Grids are a new concept for electricity networks development, aiming to provide economically efficient and sustainable power system by integrating effectively the actions and needs of the network users. The thesis addresses the Smart Grids concept, with emphasis on the control strategies developed on the basis of epidemic algorithms, more specifically, gossip algorithms. The thesis is developed around three Smart grid aspects: the changed role of consumers in terms of taking part in providing services within Smart Grids; the possibilities to implement decentralized control strategies based on distributed algorithms; and information exchange and benefits emerging from implementation of information and communication technologies. More specifically, the thesis presents a novel approach for providing ancillary services by implementing gossip algorithms. In a decentralized manner, by exchange of information between the consumers and by making decisions on local level, based on the received information and local parameters, the group achieves its global objective, i. e. providing ancillary services. The thesis presents an overview of the Smart Grids control strategies with emphasises on new strategies developed for the most promising Smart Grids concepts, as Micro grids and Virtual power plants. The thesis also presents the characteristics of epidemic algorithms and possibilities for their implementation in Smart Grids. Based on the research on epidemic algorithms, two applications have been developed. These applications are the main outcome of the research. The first application enables consumers, represented by their commercial aggregators, to participate in load reduction and consequently, to participate in balancing market or reduce the balancing costs of the group. In this context, the gossip algorithms are used for aggregator's message dissemination for load reduction and households and small commercial and industrial consumers to participate in maintaining

  12. A novel convective-scale regional reanalysis COSMO-REA2: Improving the representation of precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Wahl

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric reanalyses are a state-of-the-art tool to generate consistent and realistic state estimates of the atmospheric system. They provide a synthesis of various heterogeneous observational systems and model simulations using a physical model together with a data assimilation scheme. Current reanalyses are mainly global, while regional reanalyses are emerging for North America, the polar region, and most recently for Europe. However, deep convection is still parameterized even in the regional reanalyses. A novel convective-scale regional reanalysis system for Central Europe (COSMO-REA2 has been developed by the Hans-Ertel Center for Weather Research – Climate Monitoring Branch. The system is based on the COSMO model and uses observational nudging for regional data assimilation. In addition to conventional observations, radar-derived rain rates are assimilated using latent heat nudging. With a horizontal grid-spacing of 2 km, the model runs without parameterization of deep moist convection. COSMO-REA2 produces horizontal wind fields that represent a realistic energy spectrum for horizontal scales above 14 km. COSMO-REA2 is currently available for seven years from 2007 to 2013.This study illustrates the improved representation of local precipitation over Germany by the convective-scale reanalysis COSMO-REA2 compared to coarser gridded European and global reanalyses. A systematic verification using rain gauge data reveals the added value of high-resolution regional atmospheric reanalyses on different time scales. On monthly to annual time scales, regional reanalyses yield better estimates of the spatial variability of precipitation patterns which can not be provided by coarser gridded global models. On hourly to daily time scales, the convective-scale reanalysis substantially improves the representation of local precipitation in two ways. On the one hand, COSMO-REA2 shows an enhanced representation of observed frequencies of local

  13. The MammoGrid Project Grids Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    McClatchey, Richard; Hauer, Tamas; Estrella, Florida; Saiz, Pablo; Rogulin, Dmitri; Buncic, Predrag; Clatchey, Richard Mc; Buncic, Predrag; Manset, David; Hauer, Tamas; Estrella, Florida; Saiz, Pablo; Rogulin, Dmitri

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the recently EU-funded MammoGrid project is, in the light of emerging Grid technology, to develop a European-wide database of mammograms that will be used to develop a set of important healthcare applications and investigate the potential of this Grid to support effective co-working between healthcare professionals throughout the EU. The MammoGrid consortium intends to use a Grid model to enable distributed computing that spans national borders. This Grid infrastructure will be used for deploying novel algorithms as software directly developed or enhanced within the project. Using the MammoGrid clinicians will be able to harness the use of massive amounts of medical image data to perform epidemiological studies, advanced image processing, radiographic education and ultimately, tele-diagnosis over communities of medical "virtual organisations". This is achieved through the use of Grid-compliant services [1] for managing (versions of) massively distributed files of mammograms, for handling the distri...

  14. High Performance Hydrogen/Bromine Redox Flow Battery for Grid-Scale Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, KT; Ridgway, P; Weber, AZ; Haussener, S; Battaglia, V; Srinivasan, V

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of a promising hydrogen/bromine redox flow battery is investigated for grid-scale energy-storage application with some of the best redox-flow-battery performance results to date, including a peak power of 1.4 W/cm(2) and a 91% voltaic efficiency at 0.4 W/cm(2) constant-power operation. The kinetics of bromine on various materials is discussed, with both rotating-disk-electrode and cell studies demonstrating that a carbon porous electrode for the bromine reaction can conduct platinum-comparable performance as long as sufficient surface area is realized. The effect of flow-cell designs and operating temperature is examined, and ohmic and mass-transfer losses are decreased by utilizing a flow-through electrode design and increasing cell temperature. Charge/discharge and discharge-rate tests also reveal that this system has highly reversible behavior and good rate capability. (C) 2012 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.018211jes] All rights reserved.

  15. Time scales of tunneling decay of a localized state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Yue; Muga, J. G.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Buettiker, M.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by recent time-domain experiments on ultrafast atom ionization, we analyze the transients and time scales that characterize, aside from the relatively long lifetime, the decay of a localized state by tunneling. While the tunneling starts immediately, some time is required for the outgoing flux to develop. This short-term behavior depends strongly on the initial state. For the initial state, tightly localized so that the initial transients are dominated by over-the-barrier motion, the time scale for flux propagation through the barrier is close to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time. Then a quasistationary, slow-decay process follows, which sets ideal conditions for observing diffraction in time at longer times and distances. To define operationally a tunneling time at the barrier edge, we extrapolate backward the propagation of the wave packet that escaped from the potential. This extrapolated time is considerably longer than the time scale of the flux and density buildup at the barrier edge.

  16. Turbulent premixed flames on fractal-grid-generated turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulopoulos, N; Kerl, J; Sponfeldner, T; Beyrau, F; Hardalupas, Y; Taylor, A M K P [Mechanical Engineering Department, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Vassilicos, J C, E-mail: ns6@ic.ac.uk [Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    A space-filling, low blockage fractal grid is used as a novel turbulence generator in a premixed turbulent flame stabilized by a rod. The study compares the flame behaviour with a fractal grid to the behaviour when a standard square mesh grid with the same effective mesh size and solidity as the fractal grid is used. The isothermal gas flow turbulence characteristics, including mean flow velocity and rms of velocity fluctuations and Taylor length, were evaluated from hot-wire measurements. The behaviour of the flames was assessed with direct chemiluminescence emission from the flame and high-speed OH-laser-induced fluorescence. The characteristics of the two flames are considered in terms of turbulent flame thickness, local flame curvature and turbulent flame speed. It is found that, for the same flow rate and stoichiometry and at the same distance downstream of the location of the grid, fractal-grid-generated turbulence leads to a more turbulent flame with enhanced burning rate and increased flame surface area. (paper)

  17. A new science infrastruture: the grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Gongxing

    2003-01-01

    As the depth and scale of science reserch growing, it's requirement of computing power will become bigger and bigger, as well as the global collaboration is being enhanced. therefore, integration and sharing of all available resources among the participating organizations is required, including computing, storage, networks, even human resource and intelligant instruments. Grid technology is developed for the goal mentioned above, and could become an infrastructure the future science research and engineering. As a global computing technology, there are a lot of key technologies to be addressed. In the paper, grid architecture and secure infrastructure and application domains and tools will be described, at last we will give the grid prospect in the future. (authors)

  18. Surface temperature and evapotranspiration: application of local scale methods to regional scales using satellite data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguin, B.; Courault, D.; Guerif, M.

    1994-01-01

    Remotely sensed surface temperatures have proven useful for monitoring evapotranspiration (ET) rates and crop water use because of their direct relationship with sensible and latent energy exchange processes. Procedures for using the thermal infrared (IR) obtained with hand-held radiometers deployed at ground level are now well established and even routine for many agricultural research and management purposes. The availability of IR from meteorological satellites at scales from 1 km (NOAA-AVHRR) to 5 km (METEOSAT) permits extension of local, ground-based approaches to larger scale crop monitoring programs. Regional observations of surface minus air temperature (i.e., the stress degree day) and remote estimates of daily ET were derived from satellite data over sites in France, the Sahel, and North Africa and summarized here. Results confirm that similar approaches can be applied at local and regional scales despite differences in pixel size and heterogeneity. This article analyzes methods for obtaining these data and outlines the potential utility of satellite data for operational use at the regional scale. (author)

  19. Large Scale Monte Carlo Simulation of Neutrino Interactions Using the Open Science Grid and Commercial Clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, A.; Boyd, J.; Davies, G.; Flumerfelt, E.; Herner, K.; Mayer, N.; Mhashilhar, P.; Tamsett, M.; Timm, S.

    2015-01-01

    Modern long baseline neutrino experiments like the NOvA experiment at Fermilab, require large scale, compute intensive simulations of their neutrino beam fluxes and backgrounds induced by cosmic rays. The amount of simulation required to keep the systematic uncertainties in the simulation from dominating the final physics results is often 10x to 100x that of the actual detector exposure. For the first physics results from NOvA this has meant the simulation of more than 2 billion cosmic ray events in the far detector and more than 200 million NuMI beam spill simulations. Performing these high statistics levels of simulation have been made possible for NOvA through the use of the Open Science Grid and through large scale runs on commercial clouds like Amazon EC2. We details the challenges in performing large scale simulation in these environments and how the computing infrastructure for the NOvA experiment has been adapted to seamlessly support the running of different simulation and data processing tasks on these resources. (paper)

  20. The Anatomy of a Grid portal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licari, Daniele; Calzolari, Federico

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new way to deal with Grid portals referring to our implementation. L-GRID is a light portal to access the EGEE/EGI Grid infrastructure via Web, allowing users to submit their jobs from a common Web browser in a few minutes, without any knowledge about the Grid infrastructure. It provides the control over the complete lifecycle of a Grid Job, from its submission and status monitoring, to the output retrieval. The system, implemented as client-server architecture, is based on the Globus Grid middleware. The client side application is based on a java applet; the server relies on a Globus User Interface. There is no need of user registration on the server side, and the user needs only his own X.509 personal certificate. The system is user-friendly, secure (it uses SSL protocol, mechanism for dynamic delegation and identity creation in public key infrastructures), highly customizable, open source, and easy to install. The X.509 personal certificate does not get out from the local machine. It allows to reduce the time spent for the job submission, granting at the same time a higher efficiency and a better security level in proxy delegation and management.

  1. The Anatomy of a Grid portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Daniele; Calzolari, Federico

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we introduce a new way to deal with Grid portals referring to our implementation. L-GRID is a light portal to access the EGEE/EGI Grid infrastructure via Web, allowing users to submit their jobs from a common Web browser in a few minutes, without any knowledge about the Grid infrastructure. It provides the control over the complete lifecycle of a Grid Job, from its submission and status monitoring, to the output retrieval. The system, implemented as client-server architecture, is based on the Globus Grid middleware. The client side application is based on a java applet; the server relies on a Globus User Interface. There is no need of user registration on the server side, and the user needs only his own X.509 personal certificate. The system is user-friendly, secure (it uses SSL protocol, mechanism for dynamic delegation and identity creation in public key infrastructures), highly customizable, open source, and easy to install. The X.509 personal certificate does not get out from the local machine. It allows to reduce the time spent for the job submission, granting at the same time a higher efficiency and a better security level in proxy delegation and management.

  2. Harmonic currents Compensator Grid-Connected Inverter at the Microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asuhaimi Mohd Zin, A.; Naderipour, A.; Habibuddin, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    The main challenge associated with the grid-connected inverter in distributed generation (DG) systems is to maintain the harmonic contents in output current below the specified values and compensates for unbalanced loads even when the grid is subject to disturbances such as harmonic distortion...... and unbalanced loads. To overcome these challenges, a current control strategy for a three-phase grid-connected inverter under unbalanced and nonlinear load conditions is presented. It enables grid-connected inverter by the proposed control method to inject balanced clean currents to the grid even when the local...... loads are unbalanced and/or nonlinear and also compensate of the harmonic currents and control the active and reactive power. The main advantage and objective of this method is to effectively compensate for the harmonic currents content of the grid current and microgrid without using any compensation...

  3. Analysis of Information Quality in event triggered Smart Grid Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas le Fevre; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl

    2015-01-01

    The integration of renewable energy sources into the power grid requires added control intelligence which imposes new communication requirements onto the future power grid. Since large scale implementation of new communication infrastructure is infeasible, we consider methods of increasing...

  4. A scaling analysis of electronic localization in two-dimensional random media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhen

    2003-01-01

    By an improved scaling analysis, we suggest that there may appear two possibilities concerning the electronic localization in two-dimensional random media. The first is that all electronic states are localized in two dimensions, as conjectured previously. The second possibility is that electronic behaviors in two- and three-dimensional random systems are similar, in agreement with a recent calculation based on a direct calculation of the conductance with the use of the Kubo formula. In this case, non-localized states are possible in two dimensions, and have some peculiar properties. A few predictions are proposed. Moreover, the present analysis accommodates results from the previous scaling analysis

  5. Electric vehicles in low voltage residential grid: a danish case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna; Huang, Shaojun; Thøgersen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Electric Vehicles (EVs) have gained large interest in the energy sector as a carrier to support clean transportation and green electricity. The potential to use battery storages of electric vehicles as a sink for excess electricity that may result from large integration of wind power, especially...... in countries like Denmark, is widely discussed and promoted. However, the wide-spread adoption of EVs requires the provision of intelligent grid and EV charging infrastructure. To analyse and understand the amount of EVs that could be integrated in the local distribution grids, within its existing capabilities......, is absolutely essential for the system operators to plan and implement the levels of grid reinforcement and intelligence required. This paper investigates the local grid limitations to accommodate large amount of EVs of sizable power ratings in residential areas. The case study applied in this paper uses...

  6. Local-scaling density-functional method: Intraorbit and interorbit density optimizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Ludena, E.V.

    1991-01-01

    The recently proposed local-scaling density-functional theory provides us with a practical method for the direct variational determination of the electron density function ρ(r). The structure of ''orbits,'' which ensures the one-to-one correspondence between the electron density ρ(r) and the N-electron wave function Ψ({r k }), is studied in detail. For the realization of the local-scaling density-functional calculations, procedures for intraorbit and interorbit optimizations of the electron density function are proposed. These procedures are numerically illustrated for the helium atom in its ground state at the beyond-Hartree-Fock level

  7. Uniformity on the grid via a configuration framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor V Terekhov et al.

    2003-01-01

    As Grid permeates modern computing, Grid solutions continue to emerge and take shape. The actual Grid development projects continue to provide higher-level services that evolve in functionality and operate with application-level concepts which are often specific to the virtual organizations that use them. Physically, however, grids are comprised of sites whose resources are diverse and seldom project readily onto a grid's set of concepts. In practice, this also creates problems for site administrators who actually instantiate grid services. In this paper, we present a flexible, uniform framework to configure a grid site and its facilities, and otherwise describe the resources and services it offers. We start from a site configuration and instantiate services for resource advertisement, monitoring and data handling; we also apply our framework to hosting environment creation. We use our ideas in the Information Management part of the SAM-Grid project, a grid system which will deliver petabyte-scale data to the hundreds of users. Our users are High Energy Physics experimenters who are scattered worldwide across dozens of institutions and always use facilities that are shared with other experiments as well as other grids. Our implementation represents information in the XML format and includes tools written in XQuery and XSLT

  8. Recent trends in local-scale marine biodiversity reflect community structure and human impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elahi, Robin; O'Connor, Mary I; Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Dunic, Jillian; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Hensel, Marc J S; Kearns, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    The modern biodiversity crisis reflects global extinctions and local introductions. Human activities have dramatically altered rates and scales of processes that regulate biodiversity at local scales [1-7]. Reconciling the threat of global biodiversity loss [2, 4, 6-9] with recent evidence of

  9. On Scalability and Replicability of Smart Grid Projects—A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Sigrist

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the scalability and replicability of smart grid projects. Currently, most smart grid projects are still in the R&D or demonstration phases. The full roll-out of the tested solutions requires a suitable degree of scalability and replicability to prevent project demonstrators from remaining local experimental exercises. Scalability and replicability are the preliminary requisites to perform scaling-up and replication successfully; therefore, scalability and replicability allow for or at least reduce barriers for the growth and reuse of the results of project demonstrators. The paper proposes factors that influence and condition a project’s scalability and replicability. These factors involve technical, economic, regulatory and stakeholder acceptance related aspects, and they describe requirements for scalability and replicability. In order to assess and evaluate the identified scalability and replicability factors, data has been collected from European and national smart grid projects by means of a survey, reflecting the projects’ view and results. The evaluation of the factors allows quantifying the status quo of on-going projects with respect to the scalability and replicability, i.e., they provide a feedback on to what extent projects take into account these factors and on whether the projects’ results and solutions are actually scalable and replicable.

  10. Integration of HTS Cables in the Future Grid of the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Zuijderduin, R.; Chevchenko, O.; Smit, J.J.; Aanhaanen, G.; Melnik, I.; Geschiere, A.

    2012-01-01

    ue to increasing power demand, the electricity grid of the Netherlands is changing. The future transmission grid will obtain electrical power generated by decentralized renewable sources, together with large scale generation units located at the coastal region. In this way electrical power has to be distributed and transmitted over longer distances from generation to end user. Potential grid issues like: amount of distributed power, grid stability and electrical loss dissipation merit particu...

  11. SAGE - MULTIDIMENSIONAL SELF-ADAPTIVE GRID CODE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    SAGE, Self Adaptive Grid codE, is a flexible tool for adapting and restructuring both 2D and 3D grids. Solution-adaptive grid methods are useful tools for efficient and accurate flow predictions. In supersonic and hypersonic flows, strong gradient regions such as shocks, contact discontinuities, shear layers, etc., require careful distribution of grid points to minimize grid error and produce accurate flow-field predictions. SAGE helps the user obtain more accurate solutions by intelligently redistributing (i.e. adapting) the original grid points based on an initial or interim flow-field solution. The user then computes a new solution using the adapted grid as input to the flow solver. The adaptive-grid methodology poses the problem in an algebraic, unidirectional manner for multi-dimensional adaptations. The procedure is analogous to applying tension and torsion spring forces proportional to the local flow gradient at every grid point and finding the equilibrium position of the resulting system of grid points. The multi-dimensional problem of grid adaption is split into a series of one-dimensional problems along the computational coordinate lines. The reduced one dimensional problem then requires a tridiagonal solver to find the location of grid points along a coordinate line. Multi-directional adaption is achieved by the sequential application of the method in each coordinate direction. The tension forces direct the redistribution of points to the strong gradient region. To maintain smoothness and a measure of orthogonality of grid lines, torsional forces are introduced that relate information between the family of lines adjacent to one another. The smoothness and orthogonality constraints are direction-dependent, since they relate only the coordinate lines that are being adapted to the neighboring lines that have already been adapted. Therefore the solutions are non-unique and depend on the order and direction of adaption. Non-uniqueness of the adapted grid is

  12. The functional micro-organization of grid cells revealed by cellular-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heys, James G; Rangarajan, Krsna V; Dombeck, Daniel A

    2014-12-03

    Establishing how grid cells are anatomically arranged, on a microscopic scale, in relation to their firing patterns in the environment would facilitate a greater microcircuit-level understanding of the brain's representation of space. However, all previous grid cell recordings used electrode techniques that provide limited descriptions of fine-scale organization. We therefore developed a technique for cellular-resolution functional imaging of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) neurons in mice navigating a virtual linear track, enabling a new experimental approach to study MEC. Using these methods, we show that grid cells are physically clustered in MEC compared to nongrid cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that grid cells are functionally micro-organized: the similarity between the environment firing locations of grid cell pairs varies as a function of the distance between them according to a "Mexican hat"-shaped profile. This suggests that, on average, nearby grid cells have more similar spatial firing phases than those further apart. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Grid-scale Indirect Radiative Forcing of Climate due to aerosols over the northern hemisphere simulated by the integrated WRF-CMAQ model: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, indirect aerosol effects on grid-scale clouds were implemented in the integrated WRF3.3-CMAQ5.0 modeling system by including parameterizations for both cloud droplet and ice number concentrations calculated from the CMAQ-predicted aerosol particles. The resulting c...

  14. OpenMP parallelization of a gridded SWAT (SWATG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Hou, Jinliang; Cao, Yongpan; Gu, Juan; Huang, Chunlin

    2017-12-01

    Large-scale, long-term and high spatial resolution simulation is a common issue in environmental modeling. A Gridded Hydrologic Response Unit (HRU)-based Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWATG) that integrates grid modeling scheme with different spatial representations also presents such problems. The time-consuming problem affects applications of very high resolution large-scale watershed modeling. The OpenMP (Open Multi-Processing) parallel application interface is integrated with SWATG (called SWATGP) to accelerate grid modeling based on the HRU level. Such parallel implementation takes better advantage of the computational power of a shared memory computer system. We conducted two experiments at multiple temporal and spatial scales of hydrological modeling using SWATG and SWATGP on a high-end server. At 500-m resolution, SWATGP was found to be up to nine times faster than SWATG in modeling over a roughly 2000 km2 watershed with 1 CPU and a 15 thread configuration. The study results demonstrate that parallel models save considerable time relative to traditional sequential simulation runs. Parallel computations of environmental models are beneficial for model applications, especially at large spatial and temporal scales and at high resolutions. The proposed SWATGP model is thus a promising tool for large-scale and high-resolution water resources research and management in addition to offering data fusion and model coupling ability.

  15. [Analysis on difference of richness of traditional Chinese medicine resources in Chongqing based on grid technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Qu, Xian-You; Li, Meng; Wang, Hui; Jing, Zhi-Xian; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Guo, Lan-Ping; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2017-11-01

    After the end of the national and local medicine resources census work, a large number of Chinese medicine resources and distribution of data will be summarized. The species richness between the regions is a valid indicator for objective reflection of inter-regional resources of Chinese medicine. Due to the large difference in the size of the county area, the assessment of the intercropping of the resources of the traditional Chinese medicine by the county as a statistical unit will lead to the deviation of the regional abundance statistics. Based on the rule grid or grid statistical methods, the size of the statistical unit due to different can be reduced, the differences in the richness of traditional Chinese medicine resources are caused. Taking Chongqing as an example, based on the existing survey data, the difference of richness of traditional Chinese medicine resources under different grid scale were compared and analyzed. The results showed that the 30 km grid could be selected and the richness of Chinese medicine resources in Chongqing could reflect the objective situation of intercropping resources richness in traditional Chinese medicine better. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  16. Grid-Tied Photovoltaic Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2011-01-01

    A grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) power system is connected directly to the utility distribution grid. Facility power can be obtained from the utility system as normal. The PV system is synchronized with the utility system to provide power for the facility, and excess power is provided to the utility. Operating costs of a PV power system are low compared to conventional power technologies. This method can displace the highest-cost electricity during times of peak demand in most climatic regions, and thus reduce grid loading. Net metering is often used, in which independent power producers such as PV power systems are connected to the utility grid via the customers main service panels and meters. When the PV power system is generating more power than required at that location, the excess power is provided to the utility grid. The customer pays the net of the power purchased when the on-site power demand is greater than the onsite power production, and the excess power is returned to the utility grid. Power generated by the PV system reduces utility demand, and the surplus power aids the community. Modern PV panels are readily available, reliable, efficient, and economical, with a life expectancy of at least 25 years. Modern electronics have been the enabling technology behind grid-tied power systems, making them safe, reliable, efficient, and economical with a life expectancy equal to the modern PV panels. The grid-tied PV power system was successfully designed and developed, and this served to validate the basic principles developed, and the theoretical work that was performed. Grid-tied PV power systems are reliable, maintenance- free, long-life power systems, and are of significant value to NASA and the community. Of particular value are the analytical tools and capabilities that have been successfully developed. Performance predictions can be made confidently for grid-tied PV systems of various scales. The work was done under the NASA Hybrid Power Management (HPM

  17. Investigating the Impact of Shading Effect on the Characteristics of a Large-Scale Grid-Connected PV Power Plant in Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlin Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Northwest China is an ideal region for large-scale grid-connected PV system installation due to its abundant solar radiation and vast areas. For grid-connected PV systems in this region, one of the key issues is how to reduce the shading effect as much as possible to maximize their power generation. In this paper, a shading simulation model for PV modules is established and its reliability is verified under the standard testing condition (STC in laboratory. Based on the investigation result of a 20 MWp grid-connected PV plant in northwest China, the typical shading phenomena are classified and analyzed individually, such as power distribution buildings shading and wire poles shading, plants and birds droppings shading, and front-row PV arrays shading. A series of experiments is also conducted on-site to evaluate and compare the impacts of different typical shading forms. Finally, some feasible solutions are proposed to avoid or reduce the shading effect of PV system during operation in such region.

  18. A Reduced Wind Power Grid Model for Research and Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhmatov, Vladislav; Lund, Torsten; Hansen, Anca Daniela

    2007-01-01

    A reduced grid model of a transmission system with a number of central power plants, consumption centers, local wind turbines and a large offshore wind farm is developed and implemented in the simulation tool PowerFactory (DIgSILENT). The reduced grid model is given by Energinet.dk, Transmission...

  19. The AgMIP GRIDded Crop Modeling Initiative (AgGRID) and the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison (GGCMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Joshua; Muller, Christoff

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is a significant risk for agricultural production. Even under optimistic scenarios for climate mitigation action, present-day agricultural areas are likely to face significant increases in temperatures in the coming decades, in addition to changes in precipitation, cloud cover, and the frequency and duration of extreme heat, drought, and flood events (IPCC, 2013). These factors will affect the agricultural system at the global scale by impacting cultivation regimes, prices, trade, and food security (Nelson et al., 2014a). Global-scale evaluation of crop productivity is a major challenge for climate impact and adaptation assessment. Rigorous global assessments that are able to inform planning and policy will benefit from consistent use of models, input data, and assumptions across regions and time that use mutually agreed protocols designed by the modeling community. To ensure this consistency, large-scale assessments are typically performed on uniform spatial grids, with spatial resolution of typically 10 to 50 km, over specified time-periods. Many distinct crop models and model types have been applied on the global scale to assess productivity and climate impacts, often with very different results (Rosenzweig et al., 2014). These models are based to a large extent on field-scale crop process or ecosystems models and they typically require resolved data on weather, environmental, and farm management conditions that are lacking in many regions (Bondeau et al., 2007; Drewniak et al., 2013; Elliott et al., 2014b; Gueneau et al., 2012; Jones et al., 2003; Liu et al., 2007; M¨uller and Robertson, 2014; Van den Hoof et al., 2011;Waha et al., 2012; Xiong et al., 2014). Due to data limitations, the requirements of consistency, and the computational and practical limitations of running models on a large scale, a variety of simplifying assumptions must generally be made regarding prevailing management strategies on the grid scale in both the baseline and

  20. Implementation of grid-connected to/from off-grid transference for micro-grid inverters

    OpenAIRE

    Heredero Peris, Daniel; Chillón Antón, Cristian; Pages Gimenez, Marc; Gross, Gabriel Igor; Montesinos Miracle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the transfer of a microgrid converter from/to on-grid to/from off-grid when the converter is working in two different modes. In the first transfer presented method, the converter operates as a Current Source Inverter (CSI) when on-grid and as a Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) when off-grid. In the second transfer method, the converter is operated as a VSI both, when operated on-grid and off-grid. The two methods are implemented successfully in a real pla...

  1. MaGate Simulator: A Simulation Environment for a Decentralized Grid Scheduler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ye; Brocco, Amos; Courant, Michele; Hirsbrunner, Beat; Kuonen, Pierre

    This paper presents a simulator for of a decentralized modular grid scheduler named MaGate. MaGate’s design emphasizes scheduler interoperability by providing intelligent scheduling serving the grid community as a whole. Each MaGate scheduler instance is able to deal with dynamic scheduling conditions, with continuously arriving grid jobs. Received jobs are either allocated on local resources, or delegated to other MaGates for remote execution. The proposed MaGate simulator is based on GridSim toolkit and Alea simulator, and abstracts the features and behaviors of complex fundamental grid elements, such as grid jobs, grid resources, and grid users. Simulation of scheduling tasks is supported by a grid network overlay simulator executing distributed ant-based swarm intelligence algorithms to provide services such as group communication and resource discovery. For evaluation, a comparison of behaviors of different collaborative policies among a community of MaGates is provided. Results support the use of the proposed approach as a functional ready grid scheduler simulator.

  2. The small length scale effect for a non-local cantilever beam: a paradox solved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challamel, N; Wang, C M

    2008-08-27

    Non-local continuum mechanics allows one to account for the small length scale effect that becomes significant when dealing with microstructures or nanostructures. This paper presents some simplified non-local elastic beam models, for the bending analyses of small scale rods. Integral-type or gradient non-local models abandon the classical assumption of locality, and admit that stress depends not only on the strain value at that point but also on the strain values of all points on the body. There is a paradox still unresolved at this stage: some bending solutions of integral-based non-local elastic beams have been found to be identical to the classical (local) solution, i.e. the small scale effect is not present at all. One example is the Euler-Bernoulli cantilever nanobeam model with a point load which has application in microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems as an actuator. In this paper, it will be shown that this paradox may be overcome with a gradient elastic model as well as an integral non-local elastic model that is based on combining the local and the non-local curvatures in the constitutive elastic relation. The latter model comprises the classical gradient model and Eringen's integral model, and its application produces small length scale terms in the non-local elastic cantilever beam solution.

  3. Evaluation of Smart Grid Technologies Employed for System Reliability Improvement: Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agalgaonkar, Yashodhan P.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2017-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration (PNWSGD) was a smart grid technology performance evaluation project that included multiple U.S. states and cooperation from multiple electric utilities in the northwest region. One of the local objectives for the project was to achieve improved distribution system reliability. Toward this end, some PNWSGD utilities automated their distribution systems, including the application of fault detection, isolation, and restoration and advanced metering infrastructure. In light of this investment, a major challenge was to establish a correlation between implementation of these smart grid technologies and actual improvements of distribution system reliability. This paper proposes using Welch’s t-test to objectively determine and quantify whether distribution system reliability is improving over time. The proposed methodology is generic, and it can be implemented by any utility after calculation of the standard reliability indices. The effectiveness of the proposed hypothesis testing approach is demonstrated through comprehensive practical results. It is believed that wider adoption of the proposed approach can help utilities to evaluate a realistic long-term performance of smart grid technologies.

  4. Building Grid applications using Web Services

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    There has been a lot of discussion within the Grid community about the use of Web Services technologies in building large-scale, loosely-coupled, cross-organisation applications. In this talk we are going to explore the principles that govern Service-Oriented Architectures and the promise of Web Services technologies for integrating applications that span administrative domains. We are going to see how existing Web Services specifications and practices could provide the necessary infrastructure for implementing Grid applications. Biography Dr. Savas Parastatidis is a Principal Research Associate at the School of Computing Science, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. Savas is one of the authors of the "Grid Application Framework based on Web Services Specifications and Practices" document that was influential in the convergence between Grid and Web Services and the move away from OGSI (more information can be found at http://www.neresc.ac.uk/ws-gaf). He has done research on runtime support for distributed-m...

  5. Utility-based Reinforcement Learning for Reactive Grids

    OpenAIRE

    Perez , Julien; Germain-Renaud , Cécile; Kégl , Balázs; Loomis , C.

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Large scale production grids are an important case for autonomic computing. They follow a mutualization paradigm: decision-making (human or automatic) is distributed and largely independent, and, at the same time, it must implement the highlevel goals of the grid management. This paper deals with the scheduling problem with two partially conflicting goals: fairshare and Quality of Service (QoS). Fair sharing is a wellknown issue motivated by return on investment for pa...

  6. Linear-scaling evaluation of the local energy in quantum Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, Brian; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Lester, William A. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    For atomic and molecular quantum Monte Carlo calculations, most of the computational effort is spent in the evaluation of the local energy. We describe a scheme for reducing the computational cost of the evaluation of the Slater determinants and correlation function for the correlated molecular orbital (CMO) ansatz. A sparse representation of the Slater determinants makes possible efficient evaluation of molecular orbitals. A modification to the scaled distance function facilitates a linear scaling implementation of the Schmidt-Moskowitz-Boys-Handy (SMBH) correlation function that preserves the efficient matrix multiplication structure of the SMBH function. For the evaluation of the local energy, these two methods lead to asymptotic linear scaling with respect to the molecule size

  7. Extension of local front reconstruction method with controlled coalescence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkotwala, A. H.; Mirsandi, H.; Peters, E. A. J. F.; Baltussen, M. W.; van der Geld, C. W. M.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2018-02-01

    The physics of droplet collisions involves a wide range of length scales. This poses a challenge to accurately simulate such flows with standard fixed grid methods due to their inability to resolve all relevant scales with an affordable number of computational grid cells. A solution is to couple a fixed grid method with subgrid models that account for microscale effects. In this paper, we improved and extended the Local Front Reconstruction Method (LFRM) with a film drainage model of Zang and Law [Phys. Fluids 23, 042102 (2011)]. The new framework is first validated by (near) head-on collision of two equal tetradecane droplets using experimental film drainage times. When the experimental film drainage times are used, the LFRM method is better in predicting the droplet collisions, especially at high velocity in comparison with other fixed grid methods (i.e., the front tracking method and the coupled level set and volume of fluid method). When the film drainage model is invoked, the method shows a good qualitative match with experiments, but a quantitative correspondence of the predicted film drainage time with the experimental drainage time is not obtained indicating that further development of film drainage model is required. However, it can be safely concluded that the LFRM coupled with film drainage models is much better in predicting the collision dynamics than the traditional methods.

  8. A local freshwater impact – proposing a groundwater indicator AGWaRe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Ryle Nørskov; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Rasmussen, Jens

    on the water resource. Furthermore a local water stress indicator is necessary for benchmarking regional water supplies against each other. AWaRe is the freshwater impact recommended by the Lifecycle Initiative (developed by WULCA). It is defined as the inverse function of Availability Minus Demand (AMD) which......Currently there are several world maps showing the water stress in regions or nations. They give a good indication of water stress on a larger scale, but do not have information on a local scale that may assist a water utility in their prioritization of well fields to lower the overall pressure...... is compared to the world average AMD. The AMD represents the water remaining after human consumption and environmental requirements. This is done for a grid of 50x50km worldwide, but it does not give sufficient information on a local scale. Therefore we modified the AWaRe indicator so that it can account...

  9. Detecting Local Drivers of Fire Cycle Heterogeneity in Boreal Forests: A Scale Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Claude Bélisle

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Severe crown fires are determining disturbances for the composition and structure of boreal forests in North America. Fire cycle (FC associations with continental climate gradients are well known, but smaller scale controls remain poorly documented. Using a time since fire map (time scale of 300 years, the study aims to assess the relative contributions of local and regional controls on FC and to describe the relationship between FC heterogeneity and vegetation patterns. The study area, located in boreal eastern North America, was partitioned into watersheds according to five scales going from local (3 km2 to landscape (2800 km2 scales. Using survival analysis, we observed that dry surficial deposits and hydrography density better predict FC when measured at the local scale, while terrain complexity and slope position perform better when measured at the middle and landscape scales. The most parsimonious model was selected according to the Akaike information criterion to predict FC throughout the study area. We detected two FC zones, one short (159 years and one long (303 years, with specific age structures and tree compositions. We argue that the local heterogeneity of the fire regime contributes to ecosystem diversity and must be considered in ecosystem management.

  10. A Structured Grid Based Solution-Adaptive Technique for Complex Separated Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburg, Hugh; Soni, Bharat K.; Kishore, Boyalakuntla; Yu, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was to enhance the predictive capability of widely used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes through the use of solution adaptive gridding. Most problems of engineering interest involve multi-block grids and widely disparate length scales. Hence, it is desirable that the adaptive grid feature detection algorithm be developed to recognize flow structures of different type as well as differing intensity, and adequately address scaling and normalization across blocks. In order to study the accuracy and efficiency improvements due to the grid adaptation, it is necessary to quantify grid size and distribution requirements as well as computational times of non-adapted solutions. Flow fields about launch vehicles of practical interest often involve supersonic freestream conditions at angle of attack exhibiting large scale separate vortical flow, vortex-vortex and vortex-surface interactions, separated shear layers and multiple shocks of different intensity. In this work, a weight function and an associated mesh redistribution procedure is presented which detects and resolves these features without user intervention. Particular emphasis has been placed upon accurate resolution of expansion regions and boundary layers. Flow past a wedge at Mach=2.0 is used to illustrate the enhanced detection capabilities of this newly developed weight function.

  11. Getting Smart? Climate Change and the Electric Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Meadowcroft

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the potential of smart grid to transform the way societies generate, distribute, and use electricity has increased dramatically over the past decade. A smarter grid could contribute to both climate change mitigation and adaptation by increasing low-carbon electricity production and enhancing system reliability and resilience. However, climate goals are not necessarily essential for smart grid. Climate change is only one of many considerations motivating innovation in electricity systems, and depending on the path of grid modernization, a future smart grid might do little to reduce, or could even exacerbate, risks associated with climate change. This paper identifies tensions within a shared smart grid vision and illustrates how competing societal priorities are influencing electricity system innovation. Co-existing but divergent priorities among key actors’ are mapped across two critical dimensions: centralized versus decentralized energy systems and radical versus incremental change. Understanding these tensions provides insights on how climate change objectives can be integrated to shape smart grid development. Electricity system change is context-specific and path-dependent, so specific strategies linking smart grid and climate change need to be developed at local, regional, and national levels. And while incremental improvements may bring short term gains, a radical transformation is needed to realize climate objectives.

  12. Large-scale data analysis of power grid resilience across multiple US service regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chuanyi; Wei, Yun; Mei, Henry; Calzada, Jorge; Carey, Matthew; Church, Steve; Hayes, Timothy; Nugent, Brian; Stella, Gregory; Wallace, Matthew; White, Joe; Wilcox, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Severe weather events frequently result in large-scale power failures, affecting millions of people for extended durations. However, the lack of comprehensive, detailed failure and recovery data has impeded large-scale resilience studies. Here, we analyse data from four major service regions representing Upstate New York during Super Storm Sandy and daily operations. Using non-stationary spatiotemporal random processes that relate infrastructural failures to recoveries and cost, our data analysis shows that local power failures have a disproportionally large non-local impact on people (that is, the top 20% of failures interrupted 84% of services to customers). A large number (89%) of small failures, represented by the bottom 34% of customers and commonplace devices, resulted in 56% of the total cost of 28 million customer interruption hours. Our study shows that extreme weather does not cause, but rather exacerbates, existing vulnerabilities, which are obscured in daily operations.

  13. Smart grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Bae

    2001-11-01

    This book describes press smart grid from basics to recent trend. It is divided into ten chapters, which deals with smart grid as green revolution in energy with introduction, history, the fields, application and needed technique for smart grid, Trend of smart grid in foreign such as a model business of smart grid in foreign, policy for smart grid in U.S.A, Trend of smart grid in domestic with international standard of smart grid and strategy and rood map, smart power grid as infrastructure of smart business with EMS development, SAS, SCADA, DAS and PQMS, smart grid for smart consumer, smart renewable like Desertec project, convergence IT with network and PLC, application of an electric car, smart electro service for realtime of electrical pricing system, arrangement of smart grid.

  14. Smart grids in the Grenoble area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-04-01

    Grenoble-Isere combines a long history of leadership in the energy industry with world-class scientific research in the fields of hydropower, nuclear energy, hydrogen and fuel cells, making it an international hub for developments in new energy technologies. Grenoble-Isere is also home to unrivalled expertise in IT, with: - Industry-leading expertise in software (from embedded software to networks); - A strong track record in the fabrication of sophisticated electronic components to regulate energy production and consumption. A Chair for Industrial Excellence in Smart Grids was established in 2012 in Grenoble in recognition of the city's academic and research programs in this exciting field. This document presents: 1 - Smart grids: specificities, challenges, context (What exactly are we talking about? Smart grids, keystone of the energy transition. A very propitious context. The French context: strong public sector support); 2 - Smart grids in the Grenoble area (A local ecosystem favorable to the smart grids dynamic. Expertise in energy and digital technologies at the serving smart grids. New Energy Technologies: a strong positioning in hydroelectricity and the hydrogen energy vector); 3 - Unique to the Grenoble area: scientific and partnership expertise (Electrical and digital engineering: two essential disciplines. Numerous public/private partnerships for the research and experimentation phase. Moving from experimental stages into true industrialization); Appendix 1: Fact sheet on high profile corporations; Appendix 2: Company lists

  15. The Impact of the Topology on Cascading Failures in a Power Grid Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koç, Y.; Warnier, M.; Mieghem, P. van; Kooij, R.E.; Brazier, F.M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Cascading failures are one of the main reasons for large scale blackouts in power transmission grids. Secure electrical power supply requires, together with careful operation, a robust design of the electrical power grid topology. Currently, the impact of the topology on grid robustness is mainly

  16. GridCom, Grid Commander: graphical interface for Grid jobs and data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaktionov, V.V.

    2011-01-01

    GridCom - the software package for maintenance of automation of access to means of distributed system Grid (jobs and data). The client part, executed in the form of Java-applets, realises the Web-interface access to Grid through standard browsers. The executive part Lexor (LCG Executor) is started by the user in UI (User Interface) machine providing performance of Grid operations

  17. Local load management system and intermittent power on the grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The project relates to the UK's obligations on renewable energy sources. The objectives were (i) to identify contractual requirements and commercial benefits of load management under the UK's Renewable Obligation and electric power trading arrangements (ii) through modelling, demonstrate the benefits of load management to major customers operating on-site wind generators; (iii) to develop a low-cost load management system incorporating communication technologies and switching devices and (iv) to identify the social and psychological aspects of load management. The demonstration of the load management system was conducted on the Findhorn Foundation's low voltage electric power distribution network and a 75kw wind turbine. The project demonstrated suitable technology for distributed load management on a grid-connected system in order to optimize the renewable energy generated on site, and the analyses identified several areas where grid-connected management can provide financial benefits. There is much scope for exploitation of commercial opportunities. The work was conducted by Econnect Ltd under contract to the DTI.

  18. Equation Chapter 1 Section 1Cross Layer Design for Localization in Large-Scale Underwater Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng ZHANG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There are many technical challenges for designing large-scale underwater sensor networks, especially the sensor node localization. Although many papers studied for large-scale sensor node localization, previous studies mainly study the location algorithm without the cross layer design for localization. In this paper, by utilizing the network hierarchical structure of underwater sensor networks, we propose a new large-scale underwater acoustic localization scheme based on cross layer design. In this scheme, localization is performed in a hierarchical way, and the whole localization process focused on the physical layer, data link layer and application layer. We increase the pipeline parameters which matched the acoustic channel, added in MAC protocol to increase the authenticity of the large-scale underwater sensor networks, and made analysis of different location algorithm. We conduct extensive simulations, and our results show that MAC layer protocol and the localization algorithm all would affect the result of localization which can balance the trade-off between localization accuracy, localization coverage, and communication cost.

  19. Information Power Grid: Distributed High-Performance Computing and Large-Scale Data Management for Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, William E.; Gannon, Dennis; Nitzberg, Bill

    2000-01-01

    We use the term "Grid" to refer to distributed, high performance computing and data handling infrastructure that incorporates geographically and organizationally dispersed, heterogeneous resources that are persistent and supported. This infrastructure includes: (1) Tools for constructing collaborative, application oriented Problem Solving Environments / Frameworks (the primary user interfaces for Grids); (2) Programming environments, tools, and services providing various approaches for building applications that use aggregated computing and storage resources, and federated data sources; (3) Comprehensive and consistent set of location independent tools and services for accessing and managing dynamic collections of widely distributed resources: heterogeneous computing systems, storage systems, real-time data sources and instruments, human collaborators, and communications systems; (4) Operational infrastructure including management tools for distributed systems and distributed resources, user services, accounting and auditing, strong and location independent user authentication and authorization, and overall system security services The vision for NASA's Information Power Grid - a computing and data Grid - is that it will provide significant new capabilities to scientists and engineers by facilitating routine construction of information based problem solving environments / frameworks. Such Grids will knit together widely distributed computing, data, instrument, and human resources into just-in-time systems that can address complex and large-scale computing and data analysis problems. Examples of these problems include: (1) Coupled, multidisciplinary simulations too large for single systems (e.g., multi-component NPSS turbomachine simulation); (2) Use of widely distributed, federated data archives (e.g., simultaneous access to metrological, topological, aircraft performance, and flight path scheduling databases supporting a National Air Space Simulation systems}; (3

  20. Local supersymmetry and the problem of the mass scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilles, H.P.

    1983-02-01

    Spontaneously broken supergravity might help us to understand the puzzle of the mass scales in grand unified models. We describe the general mechanism and point out the remaining problems. Some new results on local supercolor are presented

  1. Local, distributed topology control for large-scale wireless ad-hoc networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieberg, T.; Hurink, Johann L.

    In this document, topology control of a large-scale, wireless network by a distributed algorithm that uses only locally available information is presented. Topology control algorithms adjust the transmission power of wireless nodes to create a desired topology. The algorithm, named local power

  2. Large-scale deployment of electric vehicles in Germany by 2030: An analysis of grid-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-grid concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loisel, Rodica; Pasaoglu, Guzay; Thiel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study analyses battery electric vehicles (BEVs) in the future German power system and makes projections of the BEVs hourly load profile by car size (‘mini’, ‘small’, ‘compact’ and ‘large’). By means of a power plant dispatching optimisation model, the study assesses the optimal BEV charging/discharging strategies in grid-to-vehicle (G2V) and vehicle-to-grid (V2G) schemes. The results show that the 2% rise in power demand required to power these BEVs does not hamper system stability provided an optimal G2V scheme is applied. Moreover, such BEV deployment can contribute to further integrating wind and solar power generation. Applying a V2G scheme would increase the capacity factors of base and mid-load power plants, leading to a higher integration of intermittent renewables and resulting in a decrease in system costs. However, the evaluation of the profitability of BEVs shows that applying a V2G scheme is not a viable economic option due to the high cost of investing in batteries. Some BEV owners would make modest profits (€6 a year), but a higher number would sustain losses, for reasons of scale. For BEVs to become part of the power system, further incentives are necessary to make the business model attractive to car owners. - Highlights: • Optimal strategies for charging/discharging battery electric vehicles are assessed. • G2V scheme improves the stability of the future German power system. • V2G scheme would increase the capacity factors of base and mid-load power plants. • V2G scheme is not a viable economic option due to high batteries investment cost. • Further incentives are necessary to make the business model attractive to car owners

  3. ATLAS Grid Workflow Performance Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Elmsheuser, Johannes; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The CERN ATLAS experiment grid workflow system manages routinely 250 to 500 thousand concurrently running production and analysis jobs to process simulation and detector data. In total more than 300 PB of data is distributed over more than 150 sites in the WLCG. At this scale small improvements in the software and computing performance and workflows can lead to significant resource usage gains. ATLAS is reviewing together with CERN IT experts several typical simulation and data processing workloads for potential performance improvements in terms of memory and CPU usage, disk and network I/O. All ATLAS production and analysis grid jobs are instrumented to collect many performance metrics for detailed statistical studies using modern data analytics tools like ElasticSearch and Kibana. This presentation will review and explain the performance gains of several ATLAS simulation and data processing workflows and present analytics studies of the ATLAS grid workflows.

  4. Using Grid for the BABAR Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzi, C.

    2005-01-01

    The BaBar experiment has been taking data since 1999. In 2001 the computing group started to evaluate the possibility to evolve toward a distributed computing model in a grid environment. We built a prototype system, based on the European Data Grid (EDG), to submit full-scale analysis and Monte Carlo simulation jobs. Computing elements, storage elements, and worker nodes have been installed at SLAC and at various European sites. A BaBar virtual organization (VO) and a test replica catalog (RC) are maintained in Manchester, U.K., and the experiment is using three EDG testbed resource brokers in the U.K. and in Italy. First analysis tests were performed under the assumption that a standard BaBar software release was available at the grid target sites, using RC to register information about the executable and the produced n-tuples. Hundreds of analysis jobs accessing either Objectivity or Root data files ran on the grid. We tested the Monte Carlo production using a farm of the INFN-grid testbed customized to install an Objectivity database and run BaBar simulation software. First simulation production tests were performed using standard Job Description Language commands and the output files were written on the closest storage element. A package that can be officially distributed to grid sites not specifically customized for BaBar has been prepared. We are studying the possibility to add a user friendly interface to access grid services for BaBar

  5. Comparison of Large eddy dynamo simulation using dynamic sub-grid scale (SGS) model with a fully resolved direct simulation in a rotating spherical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H.; Buffett, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    The flow in the Earth's outer core is expected to have vast length scale from the geometry of the outer core to the thickness of the boundary layer. Because of the limitation of the spatial resolution in the numerical simulations, sub-grid scale (SGS) modeling is required to model the effects of the unresolved field on the large-scale fields. We model the effects of sub-grid scale flow and magnetic field using a dynamic scale similarity model. Four terms are introduced for the momentum flux, heat flux, Lorentz force and magnetic induction. The model was previously used in the convection-driven dynamo in a rotating plane layer and spherical shell using the Finite Element Methods. In the present study, we perform large eddy simulations (LES) using the dynamic scale similarity model. The scale similarity model is implement in Calypso, which is a numerical dynamo model using spherical harmonics expansion. To obtain the SGS terms, the spatial filtering in the horizontal directions is done by taking the convolution of a Gaussian filter expressed in terms of a spherical harmonic expansion, following Jekeli (1981). A Gaussian field is also applied in the radial direction. To verify the present model, we perform a fully resolved direct numerical simulation (DNS) with the truncation of the spherical harmonics L = 255 as a reference. And, we perform unresolved DNS and LES with SGS model on coarser resolution (L= 127, 84, and 63) using the same control parameter as the resolved DNS. We will discuss the verification results by comparison among these simulations and role of small scale fields to large scale fields through the role of the SGS terms in LES.

  6. CheckDen, a program to compute quantum molecular properties on spatial grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacios, Luis F; Fernandez, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    CheckDen, a program to compute quantum molecular properties on a variety of spatial grids is presented. The program reads as unique input wavefunction files written by standard quantum packages and calculates the electron density rho(r), promolecule and density difference function, gradient of rho(r), Laplacian of rho(r), information entropy, electrostatic potential, kinetic energy densities G(r) and K(r), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL) function. These properties can be calculated on a wide range of one-, two-, and three-dimensional grids that can be processed by widely used graphics programs to render high-resolution images. CheckDen offers also other options as extracting separate atom contributions to the property computed, converting grid output data into CUBE and OpenDX volumetric data formats, and perform arithmetic combinations with grid files in all the recognized formats.

  7. AGIS: The ATLAS Grid Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisenkov, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Klimentov, A.; Oleynik, D.; Petrosyan, A.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ATLAS, a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, produced petabytes of data annually through simulation production and tens of petabytes of data per year from the detector itself. The ATLAS computing model embraces the Grid paradigm and a high degree of decentralization and computing resources able to meet ATLAS requirements of petabytes scale data operations. In this paper we describe the ATLAS Grid Information System (AGIS), designed to integrate configuration and status information about resources, services and topology of the computing infrastructure used by the ATLAS Distributed Computing applications and services.

  8. Cognitive Radio for Smart Grid with Security Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Shuaib

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate how Cognitive Radio as a means of communication can be utilized to serve a smart grid deployment end to end, from a home area network to power generation. We show how Cognitive Radio can be mapped to integrate the possible different communication networks within a smart grid large scale deployment. In addition, various applications in smart grid are defined and discussed showing how Cognitive Radio can be used to fulfill their communication requirements. Moreover, information security issues pertained to the use of Cognitive Radio in a smart grid environment at different levels and layers are discussed and mitigation techniques are suggested. Finally, the well-known Role-Based Access Control (RBAC is integrated with the Cognitive Radio part of a smart grid communication network to protect against unauthorized access to customer’s data and to the network at large.

  9. Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project Technology Performance Report Volume 1: Technology Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melton, Ron [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration (PNWSGD), a $179 million project that was co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in late 2009, was one of the largest and most comprehensive demonstrations of electricity grid modernization ever completed. The project was one of 16 regional smart grid demonstrations funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. It was the only demonstration that included multiple states and cooperation from multiple electric utilities, including rural electric co-ops, investor-owned, municipal, and other public utilities. No fewer than 55 unique instantiations of distinct smart grid systems were demonstrated at the projects’ sites. The local objectives for these systems included improved reliability, energy conservation, improved efficiency, and demand responsiveness. The demonstration developed and deployed an innovative transactive system, unique in the world, that coordinated many of the project’s distributed energy resources and demand-responsive components. With the transactive system, additional regional objectives were also addressed, including the mitigation of renewable energy intermittency and the flattening of system load. Using the transactive system, the project coordinated a regional response across the 11 utilities. This region-wide connection from the transmission system down to individual premises equipment was one of the major successes of the project. The project showed that this can be done and assets at the end points can respond dynamically on a wide scale. In principle, a transactive system of this type might eventually help coordinate electricity supply, transmission, distribution, and end uses by distributing mostly automated control responsibilities among the many distributed smart grid domain members and their smart devices.

  10. Local-scale analysis of temperature patterns over Poland during heatwave events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyżewska, Agnieszka; Dyer, Jamie

    2018-01-01

    Heatwaves are predicted to increase in frequency, duration, and severity in the future, including over Central Europe where populations are sensitive to extreme temperature. This paper studies six recent major heatwave events over Poland from 2006 through 2015 using regional-scale simulations (10-km grid spacing, hourly frequency) from the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model to define local-scale 2-m temperature patterns. For this purpose, a heatwave is defined as at least three consecutive days with maximum 2-m air temperature exceeding 30 °C. The WRF simulations were validated using maximum daily 2-m temperature observations from 12 meteorological stations in select Polish cities, which were selected to have even spatial coverage across the study area. Synoptic analysis of the six study events shows that the inflow of tropical air masses from the south is the primary driver of heatwave onset and maintenance, the highest temperatures (and most vulnerable areas) occur over arable land and artificial surfaces in central and western Poland, while coastal areas in the north, mountain areas in the south, and forested and mosaic areas of smaller fields and pastures of the northwest, northeast, and southeast are less affected by prolonged periods of elevated temperatures. In general, regional differences in 2-m temperature between the hottest and coolest areas is about 2-4 °C. Large urban areas like Warsaw, or the large complex of artificial areas in the conurbation of Silesian cities, are also generally warmer than surrounding areas by roughly 2-4 °C, and even up to 6 °C, especially during the night. Additionally, hot air from the south of Poland flows through a low-lying area between two mountain ranges (Sudetes and Carpathian Mountains)—the so-called Moravian Gate—hitting densely populated urban areas (Silesian cities) and Cracow. These patterns occur only during high-pressure synoptic conditions with low cloudiness and wind and without any active fronts

  11. Building capacity for in-situ phenological observation data to support integrated biodiversity information at local to national scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Earth observations from a variety of platforms and across a range of scales are required to support research, natural resource management, and policy- and decision-making in a changing world. Integrated earth observation data provides multi-faceted information critical to decision support, vulnerability and change detection, risk assessments, early warning and modeling, simulation and forecasting in the natural resource societal benefit area. The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN; www.usanpn.org) is a national-scale science and monitoring initiative focused on phenology - the study of seasonal life-cycle events such as leafing, flowering, reproduction, and migration - as a tool to understand the response of biodiversity to environmental variation and change. USA-NPN provides a hierarchical, national monitoring framework that enables other organizations to leverage the capacity of the Network for their own applications - minimizing investment and duplication of effort - while promoting interoperability and sustainability. Over the last decade, the network has focused on the development of a centralized database for in-situ (ground based) observations of plants and animals, now with 8 M records for the period 1954-present. More recently, we have developed a workflow for the production and validation of spatially gridded phenology products based on models that couple the organismal data with climatological and meteorological data at daily time-steps and relatively fine spatial resolutions ( 2.5 km to 4 km). These gridded data are now ripe for integration with other modeled or earth observation gridded data, e.g., indices of drought impact or land surface reflectance. This greatly broadens capacity to scale organismal observational data to landscapes and regions, and enables novel investigations of biophysical interactions at unprecedented scales, e.g., continental-scale migrations. Sustainability emerges from identification of stakeholder needs, segmentation of

  12. Large-scale weakly supervised object localization via latent category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong Wang; Kaiqi Huang; Weiqiang Ren; Junge Zhang; Maybank, Steve

    2015-04-01

    Localizing objects in cluttered backgrounds is challenging under large-scale weakly supervised conditions. Due to the cluttered image condition, objects usually have large ambiguity with backgrounds. Besides, there is also a lack of effective algorithm for large-scale weakly supervised localization in cluttered backgrounds. However, backgrounds contain useful latent information, e.g., the sky in the aeroplane class. If this latent information can be learned, object-background ambiguity can be largely reduced and background can be suppressed effectively. In this paper, we propose the latent category learning (LCL) in large-scale cluttered conditions. LCL is an unsupervised learning method which requires only image-level class labels. First, we use the latent semantic analysis with semantic object representation to learn the latent categories, which represent objects, object parts or backgrounds. Second, to determine which category contains the target object, we propose a category selection strategy by evaluating each category's discrimination. Finally, we propose the online LCL for use in large-scale conditions. Evaluation on the challenging PASCAL Visual Object Class (VOC) 2007 and the large-scale imagenet large-scale visual recognition challenge 2013 detection data sets shows that the method can improve the annotation precision by 10% over previous methods. More importantly, we achieve the detection precision which outperforms previous results by a large margin and can be competitive to the supervised deformable part model 5.0 baseline on both data sets.

  13. Uniform competency-based local feature extraction for remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, Amin; Mohammadi, Nazila

    2018-01-01

    Local feature detectors are widely used in many photogrammetry and remote sensing applications. The quantity and distribution of the local features play a critical role in the quality of the image matching process, particularly for multi-sensor high resolution remote sensing image registration. However, conventional local feature detectors cannot extract desirable matched features either in terms of the number of correct matches or the spatial and scale distribution in multi-sensor remote sensing images. To address this problem, this paper proposes a novel method for uniform and robust local feature extraction for remote sensing images, which is based on a novel competency criterion and scale and location distribution constraints. The proposed method, called uniform competency (UC) local feature extraction, can be easily applied to any local feature detector for various kinds of applications. The proposed competency criterion is based on a weighted ranking process using three quality measures, including robustness, spatial saliency and scale parameters, which is performed in a multi-layer gridding schema. For evaluation, five state-of-the-art local feature detector approaches, namely, scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT), speeded up robust features (SURF), scale-invariant feature operator (SFOP), maximally stable extremal region (MSER) and hessian-affine, are used. The proposed UC-based feature extraction algorithms were successfully applied to match various synthetic and real satellite image pairs, and the results demonstrate its capability to increase matching performance and to improve the spatial distribution. The code to carry out the UC feature extraction is available from href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/317956777_UC-Feature_Extraction.

  14. Capability of DFIG WTS to ride through recurring asymmetrical grid faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wenjie; Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Min

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Turbine Systems (WTS) are required to ride through recurring grid faults in some countries. In this paper, the capability of Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) WTS to ride through recurring asymmetrical grid faults is evaluated and compared with the ride through capability under single...... asymmetrical grid fault. A mathematical model of the DFIG under recurring asymmetrical grid faults is represented. The analysis are verified by simulations on a 1.5MW DFIG model and by experiments on a reduced-scale DFIG test system....

  15. Renewable Energy Zones: Delivering Clean Power to Meet Demand, Greening the Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurlbut, David; Chernyakhovskiy, Ilya; Cochran, Jaquelin

    2016-05-01

    Greening the Grid provides technical assistance to energy system planners, regulators, and grid operators to overcome challenges associated with integrating variable renewable energy into the grid. This document describes the renewable energy zone concept that has emerged as a transmission planning tool to help scale up the penetration of solar, wind, and other resources on the power system.

  16. Parallel Monte Carlo simulations on an ARC-enabled computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, Jon K; Samset, Bjørn H

    2011-01-01

    Grid computing opens new possibilities for running heavy Monte Carlo simulations of physical systems in parallel. The presentation gives an overview of GaMPI, a system for running an MPI-based random walker simulation on grid resources. Integrating the ARC middleware and the new storage system Chelonia with the Ganga grid job submission and control system, we show that MPI jobs can be run on a world-wide computing grid with good performance and promising scaling properties. Results for relatively communication-heavy Monte Carlo simulations run on multiple heterogeneous, ARC-enabled computing clusters in several countries are presented.

  17. Enabling Campus Grids with Open Science Grid Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzel, Derek; Fraser, Dan; Pordes, Ruth; Bockelman, Brian; Swanson, David

    2011-01-01

    The Open Science Grid is a recognized key component of the US national cyber-infrastructure enabling scientific discovery through advanced high throughput computing. The principles and techniques that underlie the Open Science Grid can also be applied to Campus Grids since many of the requirements are the same, even if the implementation technologies differ. We find five requirements for a campus grid: trust relationships, job submission, resource independence, accounting, and data management. The Holland Computing Center's campus grid at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was designed to fulfill the requirements of a campus grid. A bridging daemon was designed to bring non-Condor clusters into a grid managed by Condor. Condor features which make it possible to bridge Condor sites into a multi-campus grid have been exploited at the Holland Computing Center as well.

  18. On the use of Schwarz-Christoffel conformal mappings to the grid generation for global ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Wang, B.; Liu, J.

    2015-10-01

    In this article we propose two grid generation methods for global ocean general circulation models. Contrary to conventional dipolar or tripolar grids, the proposed methods are based on Schwarz-Christoffel conformal mappings that map areas with user-prescribed, irregular boundaries to those with regular boundaries (i.e., disks, slits, etc.). The first method aims at improving existing dipolar grids. Compared with existing grids, the sample grid achieves a better trade-off between the enlargement of the latitudinal-longitudinal portion and the overall smooth grid cell size transition. The second method addresses more modern and advanced grid design requirements arising from high-resolution and multi-scale ocean modeling. The generated grids could potentially achieve the alignment of grid lines to the large-scale coastlines, enhanced spatial resolution in coastal regions, and easier computational load balance. Since the grids are orthogonal curvilinear, they can be easily utilized by the majority of ocean general circulation models that are based on finite difference and require grid orthogonality. The proposed grid generation algorithms can also be applied to the grid generation for regional ocean modeling where complex land-sea distribution is present.

  19. Failure probability analysis of optical grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yaoquan; Guo, Wei; Sun, Weiqiang; Jin, Yaohui; Hu, Weisheng

    2008-11-01

    Optical grid, the integrated computing environment based on optical network, is expected to be an efficient infrastructure to support advanced data-intensive grid applications. In optical grid, the faults of both computational and network resources are inevitable due to the large scale and high complexity of the system. With the optical network based distributed computing systems extensive applied in the processing of data, the requirement of the application failure probability have been an important indicator of the quality of application and an important aspect the operators consider. This paper will present a task-based analysis method of the application failure probability in optical grid. Then the failure probability of the entire application can be quantified, and the performance of reducing application failure probability in different backup strategies can be compared, so that the different requirements of different clients can be satisfied according to the application failure probability respectively. In optical grid, when the application based DAG (directed acyclic graph) is executed in different backup strategies, the application failure probability and the application complete time is different. This paper will propose new multi-objective differentiated services algorithm (MDSA). New application scheduling algorithm can guarantee the requirement of the failure probability and improve the network resource utilization, realize a compromise between the network operator and the application submission. Then differentiated services can be achieved in optical grid.

  20. Mini-grid for sustainable integrated coastal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bala, B.K.; Islam, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Power grid cannot reach everywhere. Yet there are alternatives. Renewable energy can offer an ideal source of electricity for the communities far from a grid- on an island, or other isolated situations. Design and economics of a solar-diesel hybrid mini-grid system for 132 families in an isolated island-Sandwip are presented. The electrical load is considered based on the local needs and the electrical load demand is 20 kWh. The sizing of the hybrid system consists of 31 solar modules, 10 number of 24 V batteries, 2 Inverters having a total capacity of 24 kW, 24 V DC/220 V AC. A diesel generator set of 10 kW capacity is selected for back up during shortfall. The life cycle cost (LCC) is estimated and LCC is found to be Tk.15.51 / kWh compared to electricity price of Tk.4.00/kWh. Finally, the sustainability of solar-diesel hybrid mini-grid for an isolated island -Sandwip is discussed. (author)

  1. Considerations on the modeling of photovoltaic systems for grid impact studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuk, V.; Ribeiro, P.F.; Cobben, J.F.G.; Kling, W.L.; Isleifsson, F.R.; Bindner, H.W.; Martensen, N.; Samadi, A.; Söder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Photovoltaic systems continue to be deployed at increasing levels and their impact on the electric grid needs to be evaluated more accurately. This includes the impact both in the local grid where they are connected and the impact on the operation of the whole system. As a consequence, adequate

  2. Assessment of grid optimisation measures for the German transmission grid using open source grid data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böing, F.; Murmann, A.; Pellinger, C.; Bruckmeier, A.; Kern, T.; Mongin, T.

    2018-02-01

    The expansion of capacities in the German transmission grid is a necessity for further integration of renewable energy sources into the electricity sector. In this paper, the grid optimisation measures ‘Overhead Line Monitoring’, ‘Power-to-Heat’ and ‘Demand Response in the Industry’ are evaluated and compared against conventional grid expansion for the year 2030. Initially, the methodical approach of the simulation model is presented and detailed descriptions of the grid model and the used grid data, which partly originates from open-source platforms, are provided. Further, this paper explains how ‘Curtailment’ and ‘Redispatch’ can be reduced by implementing grid optimisation measures and how the depreciation of economic costs can be determined considering construction costs. The developed simulations show that the conventional grid expansion is more efficient and implies more grid relieving effects than the evaluated grid optimisation measures.

  3. Wide-Scale Adoption of Photovoltaic Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Enjeti, Prasad; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    Current grid standards largely require that low-power (e.g., several kilowatts) single-phase photovoltaic (PV) systems operate at unity power factor (PF) with maximum power point tracking (MPPT), and disconnect from the grid under grid faults by means of islanding detection. However, in the case...... of wide-scale penetration of single-phase PV systems in the distributed grid, disconnection under grid faults can contribute to 1) voltage flickers, 2) power outages, and 3) system instability. This article explores grid code modifications for a wide-scale adoption of PV systems in the distribution grid....... In addition, based on the fact that Italy and Japan have recently undertaken a major review of standards for PV power conversion systems connected to low-voltage networks, the importance of low voltage ride-through (LVRT) for single-phase PV power systems under grid faults is considered, along with three...

  4. Nesting, Subsidiarity, and Community-based environmental Governance beyond the Local Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Marshall

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Community-based approaches to environmental management have become widely adopted over the last two decades. From their origins in grassroots frustrations with governmental inabilities to solve local environmental problems, these approaches are now sponsored frequently by governments as a way of dealing with such problems at much higher spatial levels. However, this 'up-scaling' of community-based approaches has run well ahead of knowledge about how they might work. This article explores how Elinor Ostrom's 'nesting principle' for robust common property governance of large-scale common-pool resources might inform future up-scaling efforts. In particular, I consider how the design of nested governance systems for large-scale environmental problems might be guided by the principle of subsidiarity. The challenges of applying this principle are illustrated by Australia's experience in up-scaling community-based natural resource management from local groups comprising 20-30 members to regional bodies representing hundreds of thousands of people. Seven lessons are distilled for fostering community-based environmental governance as a multi-level system of nested enterprises.

  5. Downscaling RCP8.5 daily temperatures and precipitation in Ontario using localized ensemble optimal interpolation (EnOI) and bias correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ziwang; Liu, Jinliang; Qiu, Xin; Zhou, Xiaolan; Zhu, Huaiping

    2017-10-01

    A novel method for daily temperature and precipitation downscaling is proposed in this study which combines the Ensemble Optimal Interpolation (EnOI) and bias correction techniques. For downscaling temperature, the day to day seasonal cycle of high resolution temperature of the NCEP climate forecast system reanalysis (CFSR) is used as background state. An enlarged ensemble of daily temperature anomaly relative to this seasonal cycle and information from global climate models (GCMs) are used to construct a gain matrix for each calendar day. Consequently, the relationship between large and local-scale processes represented by the gain matrix will change accordingly. The gain matrix contains information of realistic spatial correlation of temperature between different CFSR grid points, between CFSR grid points and GCM grid points, and between different GCM grid points. Therefore, this downscaling method keeps spatial consistency and reflects the interaction between local geographic and atmospheric conditions. Maximum and minimum temperatures are downscaled using the same method. For precipitation, because of the non-Gaussianity issue, a logarithmic transformation is used to daily total precipitation prior to conducting downscaling. Cross validation and independent data validation are used to evaluate this algorithm. Finally, data from a 29-member ensemble of phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) GCMs are downscaled to CFSR grid points in Ontario for the period from 1981 to 2100. The results show that this method is capable of generating high resolution details without changing large scale characteristics. It results in much lower absolute errors in local scale details at most grid points than simple spatial downscaling methods. Biases in the downscaled data inherited from GCMs are corrected with a linear method for temperatures and distribution mapping for precipitation. The downscaled ensemble projects significant warming with amplitudes of 3

  6. A hybrid downscaling procedure for estimating the vertical distribution of ambient temperature in local scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannikopoulou, I.; Philippopoulos, K.; Deligiorgi, D.

    2012-04-01

    The vertical thermal structure of the atmosphere is defined by a combination of dynamic and radiation transfer processes and plays an important role in describing the meteorological conditions at local scales. The scope of this work is to develop and quantify the predictive ability of a hybrid dynamic-statistical downscaling procedure to estimate the vertical profile of ambient temperature at finer spatial scales. The study focuses on the warm period of the year (June - August) and the method is applied to an urban coastal site (Hellinikon), located in eastern Mediterranean. The two-step methodology initially involves the dynamic downscaling of coarse resolution climate data via the RegCM4.0 regional climate model and subsequently the statistical downscaling of the modeled outputs by developing and training site-specific artificial neural networks (ANN). The 2.5ox2.5o gridded NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2 dataset is used as initial and boundary conditions for the dynamic downscaling element of the methodology, which enhances the regional representivity of the dataset to 20km and provides modeled fields in 18 vertical levels. The regional climate modeling results are compared versus the upper-air Hellinikon radiosonde observations and the mean absolute error (MAE) is calculated between the four grid point values nearest to the station and the ambient temperature at the standard and significant pressure levels. The statistical downscaling element of the methodology consists of an ensemble of ANN models, one for each pressure level, which are trained separately and employ the regional scale RegCM4.0 output. The ANN models are theoretically capable of estimating any measurable input-output function to any desired degree of accuracy. In this study they are used as non-linear function approximators for identifying the relationship between a number of predictor variables and the ambient temperature at the various vertical levels. An insight of the statistically derived input

  7. ATLAS grid compute cluster with virtualized service nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, J; Stonjek, S; Kluth, S

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Computing Grid consists of several hundred compute clusters distributed around the world as part of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). The Grid middleware and the ATLAS software which has to be installed on each site, often require a certain Linux distribution and sometimes even specific version thereof. On the other hand, mostly due to maintenance reasons, computer centres install the same operating system and version on all computers. This might lead to problems with the Grid middleware if the local version is different from the one for which it has been developed. At RZG we partly solved this conflict by using virtualization technology for the service nodes. We will present the setup used at RZG and show how it helped to solve the problems described above. In addition we will illustrate the additional advantages gained by the above setup.

  8. Grid computing the European Data Grid Project

    CERN Document Server

    Segal, B; Gagliardi, F; Carminati, F

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project is the development of a novel environment to support globally distributed scientific exploration involving multi- PetaByte datasets. The project will devise and develop middleware solutions and testbeds capable of scaling to handle many PetaBytes of distributed data, tens of thousands of resources (processors, disks, etc.), and thousands of simultaneous users. The scale of the problem and the distribution of the resources and user community preclude straightforward replication of the data at different sites, while the aim of providing a general purpose application environment precludes distributing the data using static policies. We will construct this environment by combining and extending newly emerging "Grid" technologies to manage large distributed datasets in addition to computational elements. A consequence of this project will be the emergence of fundamental new modes of scientific exploration, as access to fundamental scientific data is no longer constrained to the producer of...

  9. Securing Metering Infrastructure of Smart Grid: A Machine Learning and Localization Based Key Management Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz Parvez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In smart cities, advanced metering infrastructure (AMI of the smart grid facilitates automated metering, control and monitoring of power distribution by employing a wireless network. Due to this wireless nature of communication, there exist potential threats to the data privacy in AMI. Decoding the energy consumption reading, injecting false data/command signals and jamming the networks are some hazardous measures against this technology. Since a smart meter possesses limited memory and computational capability, AMI demands a light, but robust security scheme. In this paper, we propose a localization-based key management system for meter data encryption. Data are encrypted by the key associated with the coordinate of the meter and a random key index. The encryption keys are managed and distributed by a trusted third party (TTP. Localization of the meter is proposed by a method based on received signal strength (RSS using the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE. The received packets are decrypted at the control center with the key mapped with the key index and the meter’s coordinates. Additionally, we propose the k-nearest neighbors (kNN algorithm for node/meter authentication, capitalizing further on data transmission security. Finally, we evaluate the security strength of a data packet numerically for our method.

  10. Experimental study on local resistance of two-phase flow through spacer grid with rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Chaoxing; Yan Changqi; Sun Licheng; Tian Qiwei

    2015-01-01

    The experimental study on local resistance of single-phase and two-phase flows through a spacer grid in a vertical channel with 3 × 3 rod bundle was carried out under the normal temperature and pressure. For the case of single-phase flow, the liquid Reynolds number covered the range of 290-18 007. For the case of two-phase flow, the ranges of gas and liquid superficial velocities were 0.013-3.763 m/s and 0.076-1.792 m/s, respectively. A correlation for predicting local resistance of single-phase flow was given based on experimental results. Eight classical two-phase viscosity formulae for homogeneous model were evaluated against the experimental data of two-phase flow. The results show that Dukler model predicts the experimental data well in the range of Re 1 < 9000 while McAdams correlation is the best one for Re 1 ≥ 9000. For all experimental data, Dukler model provides the best prediction with the mean relative error of 29.03%. A new correlation is fitted for the range of Re 1 < 9000 by considering mass quality, two- phase Reynolds number and liquid and gas densities, resulting in a good agreement with the experimental data. (authors)

  11. Enabling campus grids with open science grid technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzel, Derek [Nebraska U.; Bockelman, Brian [Nebraska U.; Swanson, David [Nebraska U.; Fraser, Dan [Argonne; Pordes, Ruth [Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The Open Science Grid is a recognized key component of the US national cyber-infrastructure enabling scientific discovery through advanced high throughput computing. The principles and techniques that underlie the Open Science Grid can also be applied to Campus Grids since many of the requirements are the same, even if the implementation technologies differ. We find five requirements for a campus grid: trust relationships, job submission, resource independence, accounting, and data management. The Holland Computing Center's campus grid at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was designed to fulfill the requirements of a campus grid. A bridging daemon was designed to bring non-Condor clusters into a grid managed by Condor. Condor features which make it possible to bridge Condor sites into a multi-campus grid have been exploited at the Holland Computing Center as well.

  12. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF SOLAR SYSTEM PROCESSES ON GEODESIC GRIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florinski, V. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Guo, X. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Balsara, D. S.; Meyer, C. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    This report describes a new magnetohydrodynamic numerical model based on a hexagonal spherical geodesic grid. The model is designed to simulate astrophysical flows of partially ionized plasmas around a central compact object, such as a star or a planet with a magnetic field. The geodesic grid, produced by a recursive subdivision of a base platonic solid (an icosahedron), is free from control volume singularities inherent in spherical polar grids. Multiple populations of plasma and neutral particles, coupled via charge-exchange interactions, can be simulated simultaneously with this model. Our numerical scheme uses piecewise linear reconstruction on a surface of a sphere in a local two-dimensional 'Cartesian' frame. The code employs Haarten-Lax-van-Leer-type approximate Riemann solvers and includes facilities to control the divergence of the magnetic field and maintain pressure positivity. Several test solutions are discussed, including a problem of an interaction between the solar wind and the local interstellar medium, and a simulation of Earth's magnetosphere.

  13. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF SOLAR SYSTEM PROCESSES ON GEODESIC GRIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florinski, V.; Guo, X.; Balsara, D. S.; Meyer, C.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a new magnetohydrodynamic numerical model based on a hexagonal spherical geodesic grid. The model is designed to simulate astrophysical flows of partially ionized plasmas around a central compact object, such as a star or a planet with a magnetic field. The geodesic grid, produced by a recursive subdivision of a base platonic solid (an icosahedron), is free from control volume singularities inherent in spherical polar grids. Multiple populations of plasma and neutral particles, coupled via charge-exchange interactions, can be simulated simultaneously with this model. Our numerical scheme uses piecewise linear reconstruction on a surface of a sphere in a local two-dimensional 'Cartesian' frame. The code employs Haarten-Lax-van-Leer-type approximate Riemann solvers and includes facilities to control the divergence of the magnetic field and maintain pressure positivity. Several test solutions are discussed, including a problem of an interaction between the solar wind and the local interstellar medium, and a simulation of Earth's magnetosphere.

  14. Enabling Technologies for Smart Grid Integration and Interoperability of Electric Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenas, Sergejus

    Conventional, centralized power plants are being replaced by intermittent, distributed renewable energy sources, thus raising the concern about the stability of the power grid in its current state. All the while, electrification of all forms of transportation is increasing the load...... for successful EV integration into the smart grid, as a smart, mobile distributed energy resource. The work is split into three key topics: enabling technologies, grid service applications and interoperability issues. The current state of e-mobility technologies is surveyed. Technologies and protocols...... EVs to not only mitigate their own effects on the grid, but also provide value to grid operators, locally as well as system wide. Finally, it is shown that active integration of EVs into the smart grid, is not only achievable, but is well on its way to becoming a reality....

  15. Improved scaling of temperature-accelerated dynamics using localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Yunsic; Amar, Jacques G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    While temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) is a powerful method for carrying out non-equilibrium simulations of systems over extended time scales, the computational cost of serial TAD increases approximately as N{sup 3} where N is the number of atoms. In addition, although a parallel TAD method based on domain decomposition [Y. Shim et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 205439 (2007)] has been shown to provide significantly improved scaling, the dynamics in such an approach is only approximate while the size of activated events is limited by the spatial decomposition size. Accordingly, it is of interest to develop methods to improve the scaling of serial TAD. As a first step in understanding the factors which determine the scaling behavior, we first present results for the overall scaling of serial TAD and its components, which were obtained from simulations of Ag/Ag(100) growth and Ag/Ag(100) annealing, and compare with theoretical predictions. We then discuss two methods based on localization which may be used to address two of the primary “bottlenecks” to the scaling of serial TAD with system size. By implementing both of these methods, we find that for intermediate system-sizes, the scaling is improved by almost a factor of N{sup 1/2}. Some additional possible methods to improve the scaling of TAD are also discussed.

  16. Improved scaling of temperature-accelerated dynamics using localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Yunsic; Amar, Jacques G.

    2016-01-01

    While temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) is a powerful method for carrying out non-equilibrium simulations of systems over extended time scales, the computational cost of serial TAD increases approximately as N 3 where N is the number of atoms. In addition, although a parallel TAD method based on domain decomposition [Y. Shim et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 205439 (2007)] has been shown to provide significantly improved scaling, the dynamics in such an approach is only approximate while the size of activated events is limited by the spatial decomposition size. Accordingly, it is of interest to develop methods to improve the scaling of serial TAD. As a first step in understanding the factors which determine the scaling behavior, we first present results for the overall scaling of serial TAD and its components, which were obtained from simulations of Ag/Ag(100) growth and Ag/Ag(100) annealing, and compare with theoretical predictions. We then discuss two methods based on localization which may be used to address two of the primary “bottlenecks” to the scaling of serial TAD with system size. By implementing both of these methods, we find that for intermediate system-sizes, the scaling is improved by almost a factor of N 1/2 . Some additional possible methods to improve the scaling of TAD are also discussed.

  17. Towards Adaptive Grids for Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, J. Antoon; Popinet, Stéphane; van Heerwaarden, Chiel C.; van der Linden, Steven J. A.; de Roode, Stephan R.; van de Wiel, Bas J. H.

    2018-02-01

    We present a proof-of-concept for the adaptive mesh refinement method applied to atmospheric boundary-layer simulations. Such a method may form an attractive alternative to static grids for studies on atmospheric flows that have a high degree of scale separation in space and/or time. Examples include the diurnal cycle and a convective boundary layer capped by a strong inversion. For such cases, large-eddy simulations using regular grids often have to rely on a subgrid-scale closure for the most challenging regions in the spatial and/or temporal domain. Here we analyze a flow configuration that describes the growth and subsequent decay of a convective boundary layer using direct numerical simulation (DNS). We validate the obtained results and benchmark the performance of the adaptive solver against two runs using fixed regular grids. It appears that the adaptive-mesh algorithm is able to coarsen and refine the grid dynamically whilst maintaining an accurate solution. In particular, during the initial growth of the convective boundary layer a high resolution is required compared to the subsequent stage of decaying turbulence. More specifically, the number of grid cells varies by two orders of magnitude over the course of the simulation. For this specific DNS case, the adaptive solver was not yet more efficient than the more traditional solver that is dedicated to these types of flows. However, the overall analysis shows that the method has a clear potential for numerical investigations of the most challenging atmospheric cases.

  18. Local and Nonlocal Parallel Heat Transport in General Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Chacon, L.

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the study of parallel transport in magnetized plasmas is presented. The method avoids numerical pollution issues of grid-based formulations and applies to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields with local or nonlocal parallel closures. In weakly chaotic fields, the method gives the fractal structure of the devil's staircase radial temperature profile. In fully chaotic fields, the temperature exhibits self-similar spatiotemporal evolution with a stretched-exponential scaling function for local closures and an algebraically decaying one for nonlocal closures. It is shown that, for both closures, the effective radial heat transport is incompatible with the quasilinear diffusion model.

  19. Large Scale Flood Risk Analysis using a New Hyper-resolution Population Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.; Neal, J. C.; Bates, P. D.; Quinn, N.; Wing, O.

    2017-12-01

    Here we present the first national scale flood risk analyses, using high resolution Facebook Connectivity Lab population data and data from a hyper resolution flood hazard model. In recent years the field of large scale hydraulic modelling has been transformed by new remotely sensed datasets, improved process representation, highly efficient flow algorithms and increases in computational power. These developments have allowed flood risk analysis to be undertaken in previously unmodeled territories and from continental to global scales. Flood risk analyses are typically conducted via the integration of modelled water depths with an exposure dataset. Over large scales and in data poor areas, these exposure data typically take the form of a gridded population dataset, estimating population density using remotely sensed data and/or locally available census data. The local nature of flooding dictates that for robust flood risk analysis to be undertaken both hazard and exposure data should sufficiently resolve local scale features. Global flood frameworks are enabling flood hazard data to produced at 90m resolution, resulting in a mis-match with available population datasets which are typically more coarsely resolved. Moreover, these exposure data are typically focused on urban areas and struggle to represent rural populations. In this study we integrate a new population dataset with a global flood hazard model. The population dataset was produced by the Connectivity Lab at Facebook, providing gridded population data at 5m resolution, representing a resolution increase over previous countrywide data sets of multiple orders of magnitude. Flood risk analysis undertaken over a number of developing countries are presented, along with a comparison of flood risk analyses undertaken using pre-existing population datasets.

  20. GridPix detectors: Production and beam test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppert, W.J.C.; Bakel, N. van; Bilevych, Y.; Colas, P.; Desch, K.; Fransen, M.; Graaf, H. van der; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N.P.; Kaminski, J.; Schmitz, J.; Schön, R.; Zappon, F.

    2013-01-01

    The innovative GridPix detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) that is read out with a Timepix-1 pixel chip. By using wafer post-processing techniques an aluminium grid is placed on top of the chip. When operated, the electric field between the grid and the chip is sufficient to create electron induced avalanches which are detected by the pixels. The time-to-digital converter (TDC) records the drift time enabling the reconstruction of high precision 3D track segments. Recently GridPixes were produced on full wafer scale, to meet the demand for more reliable and cheaper devices in large quantities. In a recent beam test the contribution of both diffusion and time walk to the spatial and angular resolutions of a GridPix detector with a 1.2 mm drift gap are studied in detail. In addition long term tests show that in a significant fraction of the chips the protection layer successfully quenches discharges, preventing harm to the chip

  1. GridPix detectors: Production and beam test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppert, W. J. C.; van Bakel, N.; Bilevych, Y.; Colas, P.; Desch, K.; Fransen, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N. P.; Kaminski, J.; Schmitz, J.; Schön, R.; Zappon, F.

    2013-12-01

    The innovative GridPix detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) that is read out with a Timepix-1 pixel chip. By using wafer post-processing techniques an aluminium grid is placed on top of the chip. When operated, the electric field between the grid and the chip is sufficient to create electron induced avalanches which are detected by the pixels. The time-to-digital converter (TDC) records the drift time enabling the reconstruction of high precision 3D track segments. Recently GridPixes were produced on full wafer scale, to meet the demand for more reliable and cheaper devices in large quantities. In a recent beam test the contribution of both diffusion and time walk to the spatial and angular resolutions of a GridPix detector with a 1.2 mm drift gap are studied in detail. In addition long term tests show that in a significant fraction of the chips the protection layer successfully quenches discharges, preventing harm to the chip.

  2. Transmission Technologies and Operational Characteristic Analysis of Hybrid UHV AC/DC Power Grids in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhang; Yanfeng, Gong

    2017-05-01

    In order to solve the contradiction between demand and distribution range of primary energy resource, Ultra High Voltage (UHV) power grids should be developed rapidly to meet development of energy bases and accessing of large-scale renewable energy. This paper reviewed the latest research processes of AC/DC transmission technologies, summarized the characteristics of AC/DC power grids, concluded that China’s power grids certainly enter a new period of large -scale hybrid UHV AC/DC power grids and characteristics of “strong DC and weak AC” becomes increasingly pro minent; possible problems in operation of AC/DC power grids was discussed, and interaction or effect between AC/DC power grids was made an intensive study of; according to above problems in operation of power grids, preliminary scheme is summarized as fo llows: strengthening backbone structures, enhancing AC/DC transmission technologies, promoting protection measures of clean energ y accessing grids, and taking actions to solve stability problems of voltage and frequency etc. It’s valuable for making hybrid UHV AC/DC power grids adapt to operating mode of large power grids, thus guaranteeing security and stability of power system.

  3. Evaluation of Aggregators for Integration of Large-scale Consumers in Smart Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahnama, Samira; Shafiei, Seyed Ehsan; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of consumers to mitigate the impact of increasing renewable resources on power systems is one of the visions of future smart grids. Flexible consumers are consumers who can change their consumption patterns in such a way as to help the grid to tackle the balancing problem. In previous...... will evaluate the proposed set-up to understand to what extent the utilization of simplified models can lead to reasonable results. To this end, we will connect the aggregator to a complex and verified model of an actual supermarket refrigeration system which enables us to investigate the closed-loop behavior...

  4. Robust Droop Control of Grid-Connected Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkayam, Moria; Kuperman, Alon; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of distributed generation in microgrid systems is becoming a popular way to provide a reliable source of electricity to critical loads. Droop control techniques are used in power systems for the synchronization of grid-connected inverters by local measurements of active and reactive powers....... Despite the benefits of distributed generation, the drawback is that large grid-side impedance steps can cause a system to become unstable. A robust control method based on disturbance observer is proposed in this paper. When the proposed robust controller is utilized, closed loop performance remains...

  5. The power of the offshore (super-) grid in advancing marine regionalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jay, S.A.; Toonen, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Large scale and transnational electricity grids facilitate balancing capacity across the areas that they serve and increase potential for energy trading. Offshore grids and the more ambitious notion of supergrids are beginning to play a significant part, especially in Europe, in the realization

  6. Parallel processing and non-uniform grids in global air quality modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Bochev, Mikhail A.

    2002-01-01

    A large-scale global air quality model, running efficiently on a single vector processor, is enhanced to make more realistic and more long-term simulations feasible. Two strategies are combined: non-uniform grids and parallel processing. The communication through the hierarchy of non-uniform grids

  7. Integration of HTS Cables in the Future Grid of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuijderduin, R.; Chevchenko, O.; Smit, J.J.; Aanhaanen, G.; Melnik, I.; Geschiere, A.

    2012-01-01

    ue to increasing power demand, the electricity grid of the Netherlands is changing. The future transmission grid will obtain electrical power generated by decentralized renewable sources, together with large scale generation units located at the coastal region. In this way electrical power has to be

  8. Financial Derivatives Market for Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, David; Lindset, Snorre; Huuse, Henning

    2007-01-01

    This Master thesis studies the feasibility and properties of a financial derivatives market on Grid computing, a service for sharing computing resources over a network such as the Internet. For the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) to perform research with the world's largest and most complex machine, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), Grid computing was developed to handle the information created. In accordance with the mandate of CERN Technology Transfer (TT) group, this thesis is a part of CERN's dissemination of the Grid technology. The thesis gives a brief overview of the use of the Grid technology and where it is heading. IT trend analysts and large-scale IT vendors see this technology as key in transforming the world of IT. They predict that in a matter of years, IT will be bought as a service, instead of a good. Commoditization of IT, delivered as a service, is a paradigm shift that will have a broad impact on all parts of the IT market, as well as on the society as a whole. Political, e...

  9. A novel algorithm for incompressible flow using only a coarse grid projection

    KAUST Repository

    Lentine, Michael; Zheng, Wen; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Large scale fluid simulation can be difficult using existing techniques due to the high computational cost of using large grids. We present a novel technique for simulating detailed fluids quickly. Our technique coarsens the Eulerian fluid grid

  10. CFD application to advanced design for high efficiency spacer grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new LDV was developed to investigate the local velocity in a rod bundle and inside a spacer grid. • The design information that utilizes for high efficiency spacer grid has been obtained. • CFD methodology that predicts flow field in a PWR fuel has been developed. • The high efficiency spacer grid was designed using the CFD methodology. - Abstract: Pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuels have been developed to meet the needs of the market. A spacer grid is a key component to improve thermal hydraulic performance of a PWR fuel assembly. Mixing structures (vanes) of a spacer grid promote coolant mixing and enhance heat removal from fuel rods. A larger mixing vane would improve mixing effect, which would increase the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) benefit for fuel. However, the increased pressure loss at large mixing vanes would reduce the coolant flow at the mixed fuel core, which would reduce the DNB margin. The solution is to develop a spacer grid whose pressure loss is equal to or less than the current spacer grid and that has higher critical heat flux (CHF) performance. For this reason, a requirement of design tool for predicting the pressure loss and CHF performance of spacer grids has been increased. The author and co-workers have been worked for development of high efficiency spacer grid using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for nearly 20 years. A new laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), which is miniaturized with fiber optics embedded in a fuel cladding, was developed to investigate the local velocity profile in a rod bundle and inside a spacer grid. The rod-embedded fiber LDV (rod LDV) can be inserted in an arbitrary grid cell instead of a fuel rod, and has the advantage of not disturbing the flow field since it is the same shape as a fuel rod. The probe volume of the rod LDV is small enough to measure spatial velocity profile in a rod gap and inside a spacer grid. According to benchmark experiments such as flow velocity

  11. CFD application to advanced design for high efficiency spacer grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Kazuo, E-mail: kazuo3_ikeda@ndc.mhi.co.jp

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A new LDV was developed to investigate the local velocity in a rod bundle and inside a spacer grid. • The design information that utilizes for high efficiency spacer grid has been obtained. • CFD methodology that predicts flow field in a PWR fuel has been developed. • The high efficiency spacer grid was designed using the CFD methodology. - Abstract: Pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuels have been developed to meet the needs of the market. A spacer grid is a key component to improve thermal hydraulic performance of a PWR fuel assembly. Mixing structures (vanes) of a spacer grid promote coolant mixing and enhance heat removal from fuel rods. A larger mixing vane would improve mixing effect, which would increase the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) benefit for fuel. However, the increased pressure loss at large mixing vanes would reduce the coolant flow at the mixed fuel core, which would reduce the DNB margin. The solution is to develop a spacer grid whose pressure loss is equal to or less than the current spacer grid and that has higher critical heat flux (CHF) performance. For this reason, a requirement of design tool for predicting the pressure loss and CHF performance of spacer grids has been increased. The author and co-workers have been worked for development of high efficiency spacer grid using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for nearly 20 years. A new laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), which is miniaturized with fiber optics embedded in a fuel cladding, was developed to investigate the local velocity profile in a rod bundle and inside a spacer grid. The rod-embedded fiber LDV (rod LDV) can be inserted in an arbitrary grid cell instead of a fuel rod, and has the advantage of not disturbing the flow field since it is the same shape as a fuel rod. The probe volume of the rod LDV is small enough to measure spatial velocity profile in a rod gap and inside a spacer grid. According to benchmark experiments such as flow velocity

  12. Local Adaptive Control of Solar Photovoltaics and Electric Water Heaters for Real-time Grid Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattarai, Bishnu Prasad; Mendaza, Iker Diaz de Cerio; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Overvoltage (OV) in a low voltage distribution network is one of the foremost issues observed even under moderate penetration of rooftop solar photovoltaics (PVs). Similarly, grid under-voltage (UV) is foreseen as a potential issue resulting from increased integration of large flexible loads......, such as electric vehicles, electric water heaters (EWHs) etc. An adaptive control using only local measurements for the EWHs and PVs is proposed in this study to alleviate OV as well as UV issues. The adaptive control is designed such that it monitors the voltage at the point of connection and adjusts active...... and reactive power injection/consumptions of the EWHs and PVs following the voltage violations. To effectively support the network in real-time, the controller allows EWHs to operate prior to PVs in OV and after the PVs in UV violations. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy is demonstrated...

  13. Carbon footprint reductions via grid energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Trevor S. [Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, 1100 23rd Avenue, Port Huenem, CA 93043 (United States); Department of Management, Marketing, and Business Administration, University of Houston - Downtown, Houston, Texas (United States); Weeks, Kelly [Department of Maritime Administration, Texas A and M University at Galveston, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Tucker, Coleman [Department of Management, Marketing, and Business Administration, University of Houston - Downtown, Houston, Texas 77002 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This effort presents a framework for reducing carbon emissions through the use of large-scale grid-energy-storage (GES) systems. The specific questions under investigation herein are as follows: Is it economically sound to invest in a GES system and is the system at least carbon footprint neutral? This research will show the answer to both questions is in the affirmative. Scilicet, when utilized judiciously, grid energy storage systems can be both net present value positive as well as be total carbon footprint negative. The significant contribution herein is a necessary and sufficient condition for achieving carbon footprint reductions via grid energy storage systems.

  14. Analysis of Grid-Scored Sandwich Structures of Different Curvatures and Grid Sizes For Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Steffen; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Lund, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The stress and strain field developed locally in-situ the core of grid-scored sandwich structures in wind turbine blades is investigated. Due to the many singularities occurring from the “tri-material corners”, a full 3D analysis of the sandwich structure in terms of the Finite Element Method is ...

  15. Distributed Secondary Control for Islanded MicroGrids - A Novel Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafiee, Qobad; Guerrero, Josep M.; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to conceive the secondary control in droop-controlled MicroGrids. The conventional approach is based on restoring the frequency and amplitude deviations produced by the local droop controllers by using a MicroGrid Central Controller (MGCC). A distributed...... networked control system is used in order to implement a distributed secondary control (DSC) thus avoiding its implementation in MGCC. The proposed approach is not only able to restore frequency and voltage of the MicroGrid but also ensures reactive power sharing. The distributed secondary control does...

  16. Distributed asynchronous supply coordination for energy producers embedded in the energy grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkano, Desti; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Cao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the congestion control and energy flow allocation of renewable energy producers equipped with local energy storage devices and energy converters. The producers are embedded in the existing energy grids. Based on the producers’ own measurements and some coordination with the grid

  17. Elementary dispersion analysis of some mimetic discretizations on triangular C-grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korn, P., E-mail: peter.korn@mpimet.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Danilov, S. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-01

    Spurious modes supported by triangular C-grids limit their application for modeling large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows. Their behavior can be modified within a mimetic approach that generalizes the scalar product underlying the triangular C-grid discretization. The mimetic approach provides a discrete continuity equation which operates on an averaged combination of normal edge velocities instead of normal edge velocities proper. An elementary analysis of the wave dispersion of the new discretization for Poincaré, Rossby and Kelvin waves shows that, although spurious Poincaré modes are preserved, their frequency tends to zero in the limit of small wavenumbers, which removes the divergence noise in this limit. However, the frequencies of spurious and physical modes become close on shorter scales indicating that spurious modes can be excited unless high-frequency short-scale motions are effectively filtered in numerical codes. We argue that filtering by viscous dissipation is more efficient in the mimetic approach than in the standard C-grid discretization. Lumping of mass matrices appearing with the velocity time derivative in the mimetic discretization only slightly reduces the accuracy of the wave dispersion and can be used in practice. Thus, the mimetic approach cures some difficulties of the traditional triangular C-grid discretization but may still need appropriately tuned viscosity to filter small scales and high frequencies in solutions of full primitive equations when these are excited by nonlinear dynamics.

  18. Structural Emergency Control for Power Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu, Thanh Long; Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Chiang, Hsiao-Dong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a structural emergency control to render post-fault dynamics of power systems from the critical fault-cleared state to a stable equilibrium point (EP). Theoretically, this is a new control paradigm that does not rely on any continuous measurement or load shedding......, as in the classical setup. Instead, the grid is made stable by intentionally changing the power network structure, and thereby, discretely relocating the EP and its stability region such that the system is consecutively driven from fault-cleared state through a set of EPs to the desired EP. The proposed control...... is designed by solving convex optimization problems, making it possibly scalable to large-scale power grids. In the practical side, the proposed control can be implemented by exploiting the FACTS devices that will be widely available on the grids, and hence, requiring minor investment....

  19. Integrating renewables in distribution grids. Storage, regulation and the interaction of different stakeholders in future grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nykamp, S.

    2013-10-18

    point of view when not taking local grid restrictions into account. Furthermore, it is investigated in this thesis whether or not innovative investments from a grid operators' perspective are incentivized by the grid regulation method. As shown, the regulation of grids needs to be adjusted to incentivize innovations.

  20. AC HTS Transmission Cable for Integration into the Future EHV Grid of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuijderduin, R.; Chevtchenko, O.; Smit, J.J.; Aanhaanen, G.; Melnik, I.; Geschiere, A.

    2012-01-01

    Due to increasing power demand, the electricity grid of the Netherlands is changing. The future grid must be capable to transmit all the connected power. Power generation will be more decentralized like for instance wind parks connected to the grid. Furthermore, future large scale production units

  1. Localization Algorithm Based on a Spring Model (LASM for Large Scale Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A navigation method for a lunar rover based on large scale wireless sensornetworks is proposed. To obtain high navigation accuracy and large exploration area, highnode localization accuracy and large network scale are required. However, thecomputational and communication complexity and time consumption are greatly increasedwith the increase of the network scales. A localization algorithm based on a spring model(LASM method is proposed to reduce the computational complexity, while maintainingthe localization accuracy in large scale sensor networks. The algorithm simulates thedynamics of physical spring system to estimate the positions of nodes. The sensor nodesare set as particles with masses and connected with neighbor nodes by virtual springs. Thevirtual springs will force the particles move to the original positions, the node positionscorrespondingly, from the randomly set positions. Therefore, a blind node position can bedetermined from the LASM algorithm by calculating the related forces with the neighbornodes. The computational and communication complexity are O(1 for each node, since thenumber of the neighbor nodes does not increase proportionally with the network scale size.Three patches are proposed to avoid local optimization, kick out bad nodes and deal withnode variation. Simulation results show that the computational and communicationcomplexity are almost constant despite of the increase of the network scale size. The time consumption has also been proven to remain almost constant since the calculation steps arealmost unrelated with the network scale size.

  2. Multilevel local refinement and multigrid methods for 3-D turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, C.; Liu, C. [UCD, Denver, CO (United States); Sung, C.H.; Huang, T.T. [David Taylor Model Basin, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A numerical approach based on multigrid, multilevel local refinement, and preconditioning methods for solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is presented. 3-D turbulent flow around an underwater vehicle is computed. 3 multigrid levels and 2 local refinement grid levels are used. The global grid is 24 x 8 x 12. The first patch is 40 x 16 x 20 and the second patch is 72 x 32 x 36. 4th order artificial dissipation are used for numerical stability. The conservative artificial compressibility method are used for further improvement of convergence. To improve the accuracy of coarse/fine grid interface of local refinement, flux interpolation method for refined grid boundary is used. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data. The local refinement can improve the prediction accuracy significantly. The flux interpolation method for local refinement can keep conservation for a composite grid, therefore further modify the prediction accuracy.

  3. ISOGA: Integrated Services Optical Grid Architecture for Emerging E-Science Collaborative Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver Yu

    2008-11-28

    This final report describes the accomplishments in the ISOGA (Integrated Services Optical Grid Architecture) project. ISOGA enables efficient deployment of existing and emerging collaborative grid applications with increasingly diverse multimedia communication requirements over a wide-area multi-domain optical network grid; and enables collaborative scientists with fast retrieval and seamless browsing of distributed scientific multimedia datasets over a wide-area optical network grid. The project focuses on research and development in the following areas: the polymorphic optical network control planes to enable multiple switching and communication services simultaneously; the intelligent optical grid user-network interface to enable user-centric network control and monitoring; and the seamless optical grid dataset browsing interface to enable fast retrieval of local/remote dataset for visualization and manipulation.

  4. The Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway, a TeraGrid Science Gateway to Support the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, John W.; Geist, Al; Kohl, James Arthur; Miller, Stephen D; Peterson, Peter F.; Pike, Gregory; Reuter, Michael A; Swain, William; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S.; Vijayakumar, Nithya N.

    2006-01-01

    The National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Extensible Terascale Facility (ETF), or TeraGrid (1) is entering its operational phase. An ETF science gateway effort is the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway (NSTG.) The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resource provider effort (ORNL-RP) during construction and now in operations is bridging a large scale experimental community and the TeraGrid as a large-scale national cyberinfrastructure. Of particular emphasis is collaboration with the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at ORNL. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) SNS (2) at ORNL will be commissioned in spring of 2006 as the world's brightest source of neutrons. Neutron science users can run experiments, generate datasets, perform data reduction, analysis, visualize results; collaborate with remotes users; and archive long term data in repositories with curation services. The ORNL-RP and the SNS data analysis group have spent 18 months developing and exploring user requirements, including the creation of prototypical services such as facility portal, data, and application execution services. We describe results from these efforts and discuss implications for science gateway creation. Finally, we show incorporation into implementation planning for the NSTG and SNS architectures. The plan is for a primarily portal-based user interaction supported by a service oriented architecture for functional implementation

  5. Study of the integration of distributed generation systems in the grid: application in micro-grids; Etude de structures d'integration des systemes de generation decentralisee: application aux microreseaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaztanaga Arantzamendi, H

    2006-12-15

    The present PhD deals with an original micro-grid concept and its application as a Renewable Energy Source's (RES) grid integration scheme. This micro-grid is composed of RES generators as well as support systems that incorporate additional functionalities in order to improve RES integration into the grid. According to this concept, two practical micro-grid applications have been studied in detail: a residential micro-grid and a wind farm supported by DFACTS systems (STATCOM and DVR). In both applications, the control structures which are implemented at different levels and applied to the different micro-grid elements have been developed, analyzed by means of off-line simulations and finally validated in real-time conditions with physical reduced-scale prototypes. (author)

  6. Local curvature entropy-based 3D terrain representation using a comprehensive Quadtree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiyu; Liu, Gang; Ma, Xiaogang; Mariethoz, Gregoire; He, Zhenwen; Tian, Yiping; Weng, Zhengping

    2018-05-01

    Large scale 3D digital terrain modeling is a crucial part of many real-time applications in geoinformatics. In recent years, the improved speed and precision in spatial data collection make the original terrain data more complex and bigger, which poses challenges for data management, visualization and analysis. In this work, we presented an effective and comprehensive 3D terrain representation based on local curvature entropy and a dynamic Quadtree. The Level-of-detail (LOD) models of significant terrain features were employed to generate hierarchical terrain surfaces. In order to reduce the radical changes of grid density between adjacent LODs, local entropy of terrain curvature was regarded as a measure of subdividing terrain grid cells. Then, an efficient approach was presented to eliminate the cracks among the different LODs by directly updating the Quadtree due to an edge-based structure proposed in this work. Furthermore, we utilized a threshold of local entropy stored in each parent node of this Quadtree to flexibly control the depth of the Quadtree and dynamically schedule large-scale LOD terrain. Several experiments were implemented to test the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrate that our method can be applied to construct LOD 3D terrain models with good performance in terms of computational cost and the maintenance of terrain features. Our method has already been deployed in a geographic information system (GIS) for practical uses, and it is able to support the real-time dynamic scheduling of large scale terrain models more easily and efficiently.

  7. Grid matching of large-scale wind energy conversion systems, alone and in tandem with large-scale photovoltaic systems: An Israeli case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, A.A.; Faiman, D.; Meron, G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a grid matching analysis of wind energy conversion systems (WECSs) and photovoltaic (PV)-WECS hybrid systems. The study was carried out using hourly load data of the Israel Electric Corporation (IEC) for the year 2006 and the corresponding simulated hourly performance of large PV and WECS plants in the Negev Desert. Our major objective was to compare the grid-matching capabilities of wind with those of our previously published PV results, and to assess the extent to which the combined employment of WECS and PV can improve the grid matching capability of either technology when used on its own. We find that, due to the differences in diurnal and seasonal output profiles of WECS and PV, their tandem employment significantly improves grid penetration compared to their use individually.

  8. Sensor network based solar forecasting using a local vector autoregressive ridge framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Yoo, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Heiser, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kalb, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-04

    The significant improvements and falling costs of photovoltaic (PV) technology make solar energy a promising resource, yet the cloud induced variability of surface solar irradiance inhibits its effective use in grid-tied PV generation. Short-term irradiance forecasting, especially on the minute scale, is critically important for grid system stability and auxiliary power source management. Compared to the trending sky imaging devices, irradiance sensors are inexpensive and easy to deploy but related forecasting methods have not been well researched. The prominent challenge of applying classic time series models on a network of irradiance sensors is to address their varying spatio-temporal correlations due to local changes in cloud conditions. We propose a local vector autoregressive framework with ridge regularization to forecast irradiance without explicitly determining the wind field or cloud movement. By using local training data, our learned forecast model is adaptive to local cloud conditions and by using regularization, we overcome the risk of overfitting from the limited training data. Our systematic experimental results showed an average of 19.7% RMSE and 20.2% MAE improvement over the benchmark Persistent Model for 1-5 minute forecasts on a comprehensive 25-day dataset.

  9. AC HTS Transmission Cable for Integration into the Future EHV Grid of the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Zuijderduin, R.; Chevtchenko, O.; Smit, J.J.; Aanhaanen, G.; Melnik, I.; Geschiere, A.

    2012-01-01

    Due to increasing power demand, the electricity grid of the Netherlands is changing. The future grid must be capable to transmit all the connected power. Power generation will be more decentralized like for instance wind parks connected to the grid. Furthermore, future large scale production units are expected to be installed near coastal regions. This creates some potential grid issues, such as: large power amounts to be transmitted to consumers from west to east and grid stability. High tem...

  10. GridCom, Grid Commander: graphical interface for Grid jobs and data management; GridCom, Grid Commander: graficheskij interfejs dlya raboty s zadachami i dannymi v gride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galaktionov, V V

    2011-07-01

    GridCom - the software package for maintenance of automation of access to means of distributed system Grid (jobs and data). The client part, executed in the form of Java-applets, realises the Web-interface access to Grid through standard browsers. The executive part Lexor (LCG Executor) is started by the user in UI (User Interface) machine providing performance of Grid operations

  11. Energy modeling and analysis for optimal grid integration of large-scale variable renewables using hydrogen storage in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, Ryoichi; Otsuki, Takashi; Fujii, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although the extensive introduction of VRs (variable renewables) will play an essential role to resolve energy and environmental issues in Japan after the Fukushima nuclear accident, its large-scale integration would pose a technical challenge in the grid management; as one of technical countermeasures, hydrogen storage receives much attention, as well as rechargeable battery, for controlling the intermittency of VR power output. For properly planning renewable energy policies, energy system modeling is important to quantify and qualitatively understand its potential benefits and impacts. This paper analyzes the optimal grid integration of large-scale VRs using hydrogen storage in Japan by developing a high time-resolution optimal power generation mix model. Simulation results suggest that the installation of hydrogen storage is promoted by both its cost reduction and CO 2 regulation policy. In addition, hydrogen storage turns out to be suitable for storing VR energy in a long period of time. Finally, through a sensitivity analysis of rechargeable battery cost, hydrogen storage is economically competitive with rechargeable battery; the cost of both technologies should be more elaborately recognized for formulating effective energy policies to integrate massive VRs into the country's power system in an economical manner. - Highlights: • Authors analyze hydrogen storage coupled with VRs (variable renewables). • Simulation analysis is done by developing an optimal power generation mix model. • Hydrogen storage installation is promoted by its cost decline and CO 2 regulation. • Hydrogen storage is suitable for storing VR energy in a long period of time. • Hydrogen storage is economically competitive with rechargeable battery

  12. Progress in Grid Generation: From Chimera to DRAGON Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Kao, Kai-Hsiung

    1994-01-01

    Hybrid grids, composed of structured and unstructured grids, combines the best features of both. The chimera method is a major stepstone toward a hybrid grid from which the present approach is evolved. The chimera grid composes a set of overlapped structured grids which are independently generated and body-fitted, yielding a high quality grid readily accessible for efficient solution schemes. The chimera method has been shown to be efficient to generate a grid about complex geometries and has been demonstrated to deliver accurate aerodynamic prediction of complex flows. While its geometrical flexibility is attractive, interpolation of data in the overlapped regions - which in today's practice in 3D is done in a nonconservative fashion, is not. In the present paper we propose a hybrid grid scheme that maximizes the advantages of the chimera scheme and adapts the strengths of the unstructured grid while at the same time keeps its weaknesses minimal. Like the chimera method, we first divide up the physical domain by a set of structured body-fitted grids which are separately generated and overlaid throughout a complex configuration. To eliminate any pure data manipulation which does not necessarily follow governing equations, we use non-structured grids only to directly replace the region of the arbitrarily overlapped grids. This new adaptation to the chimera thinking is coined the DRAGON grid. The nonstructured grid region sandwiched between the structured grids is limited in size, resulting in only a small increase in memory and computational effort. The DRAGON method has three important advantages: (1) preserving strengths of the chimera grid; (2) eliminating difficulties sometimes encountered in the chimera scheme, such as the orphan points and bad quality of interpolation stencils; and (3) making grid communication in a fully conservative and consistent manner insofar as the governing equations are concerned. To demonstrate its use, the governing equations are

  13. gLExec: gluing grid computing to the Unix world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groep, D.; Koeroo, O.; Venekamp, G.

    2008-07-01

    The majority of compute resources in todays scientific grids are based on Unix and Unix-like operating systems. In this world, user and user-group management are based around the concepts of a numeric 'user ID' and 'group ID' that are local to the resource. In contrast, grid concepts of user and group management are centered around globally assigned identifiers and VO membership, structures that are independent of any specific resource. At the fabric boundary, these 'grid identities' have to be translated to Unix user IDs. New job submission methodologies, such as job-execution web services, community-deployed local schedulers, and the late binding of user jobs in a grid-wide overlay network of 'pilot jobs', push this fabric boundary ever further down into the resource. gLExec, a light-weight (and thereby auditable) credential mapping and authorization system, addresses these issues. It can be run both on fabric boundary, as part of an execution web service, and on the worker node in a late-binding scenario. In this contribution we describe the rationale for gLExec, how it interacts with the site authorization and credential mapping frameworks such as LCAS, LCMAPS and GUMS, and how it can be used to improve site control and traceability in a pilot-job system.

  14. gLExec: gluing grid computing to the Unix world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groep, D; Koeroo, O; Venekamp, G

    2008-01-01

    The majority of compute resources in todays scientific grids are based on Unix and Unix-like operating systems. In this world, user and user-group management are based around the concepts of a numeric 'user ID' and 'group ID' that are local to the resource. In contrast, grid concepts of user and group management are centered around globally assigned identifiers and VO membership, structures that are independent of any specific resource. At the fabric boundary, these 'grid identities' have to be translated to Unix user IDs. New job submission methodologies, such as job-execution web services, community-deployed local schedulers, and the late binding of user jobs in a grid-wide overlay network of 'pilot jobs', push this fabric boundary ever further down into the resource. gLExec, a light-weight (and thereby auditable) credential mapping and authorization system, addresses these issues. It can be run both on fabric boundary, as part of an execution web service, and on the worker node in a late-binding scenario. In this contribution we describe the rationale for gLExec, how it interacts with the site authorization and credential mapping frameworks such as LCAS, LCMAPS and GUMS, and how it can be used to improve site control and traceability in a pilot-job system

  15. An Improved Scale-Adaptive Simulation Model for Massively Separated Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new hybrid modelling method termed improved scale-adaptive simulation (ISAS is proposed by introducing the von Karman operator into the dissipation term of the turbulence scale equation, proper derivation as well as constant calibration of which is presented, and the typical circular cylinder flow at Re = 3900 is selected for validation. As expected, the proposed ISAS approach with the concept of scale-adaptive appears more efficient than the original SAS method in obtaining a convergent resolution, meanwhile, comparable with DES in visually capturing the fine-scale unsteadiness. Furthermore, the grid sensitivity issue of DES is encouragingly remedied benefiting from the local-adjusted limiter. The ISAS simulation turns out to attractively represent the development of the shear layers and the flow profiles of the recirculation region, and thus, the focused statistical quantities such as the recirculation length and drag coefficient are closer to the available measurements than DES and SAS outputs. In general, the new modelling method, combining the features of DES and SAS concepts, is capable to simulate turbulent structures down to the grid limit in a simple and effective way, which is practically valuable for engineering flows.

  16. Differences between downscaling with spectral and grid nudging using WRF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Liu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamical downscaling has been extensively used to study regional climate forced by large-scale global climate models. During the downscaling process, however, the simulation of regional climate models (RCMs tends to drift away from the driving fields. Developing a solution that addresses this issue, by retaining the large scale features (from the large-scale fields and the small-scale features (from the RCMs has led to the development of "nudging" techniques. Here, we examine the performance of two nudging techniques, grid and spectral nudging, in the downscaling of NCEP/NCAR data with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF Model. The simulations are compared against the results with North America Regional Reanalysis (NARR data set at different scales of interest using the concept of similarity. We show that with the appropriate choice of wave numbers, spectral nudging outperforms grid nudging in the capacity of balancing the performance of simulation at the large and small scales.

  17. The CMS integration grid testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Gregory E.

    2004-08-26

    The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distribution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuous two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. In this paper, we describe the process that led to one of the world's first continuously available, functioning grids.

  18. High-Performance Secure Database Access Technologies for HEP Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew Vranicar; John Weicher

    2006-04-17

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN Laboratory will become the largest scientific instrument in the world when it starts operations in 2007. Large Scale Analysis Computer Systems (computational grids) are required to extract rare signals of new physics from petabytes of LHC detector data. In addition to file-based event data, LHC data processing applications require access to large amounts of data in relational databases: detector conditions, calibrations, etc. U.S. high energy physicists demand efficient performance of grid computing applications in LHC physics research where world-wide remote participation is vital to their success. To empower physicists with data-intensive analysis capabilities a whole hyperinfrastructure of distributed databases cross-cuts a multi-tier hierarchy of computational grids. The crosscutting allows separation of concerns across both the global environment of a federation of computational grids and the local environment of a physicist’s computer used for analysis. Very few efforts are on-going in the area of database and grid integration research. Most of these are outside of the U.S. and rely on traditional approaches to secure database access via an extraneous security layer separate from the database system core, preventing efficient data transfers. Our findings are shared by the Database Access and Integration Services Working Group of the Global Grid Forum, who states that "Research and development activities relating to the Grid have generally focused on applications where data is stored in files. However, in many scientific and commercial domains, database management systems have a central role in data storage, access, organization, authorization, etc, for numerous applications.” There is a clear opportunity for a technological breakthrough, requiring innovative steps to provide high-performance secure database access technologies for grid computing. We believe that an innovative database architecture where the

  19. High-Performance Secure Database Access Technologies for HEP Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranicar, Matthew; Weicher, John

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN Laboratory will become the largest scientific instrument in the world when it starts operations in 2007. Large Scale Analysis Computer Systems (computational grids) are required to extract rare signals of new physics from petabytes of LHC detector data. In addition to file-based event data, LHC data processing applications require access to large amounts of data in relational databases: detector conditions, calibrations, etc. U.S. high energy physicists demand efficient performance of grid computing applications in LHC physics research where world-wide remote participation is vital to their success. To empower physicists with data-intensive analysis capabilities a whole hyperinfrastructure of distributed databases cross-cuts a multi-tier hierarchy of computational grids. The crosscutting allows separation of concerns across both the global environment of a federation of computational grids and the local environment of a physicist's computer used for analysis. Very few efforts are on-going in the area of database and grid integration research. Most of these are outside of the U.S. and rely on traditional approaches to secure database access via an extraneous security layer separate from the database system core, preventing efficient data transfers. Our findings are shared by the Database Access and Integration Services Working Group of the Global Grid Forum, who states that 'Research and development activities relating to the Grid have generally focused on applications where data is stored in files. However, in many scientific and commercial domains, database management systems have a central role in data storage, access, organization, authorization, etc, for numerous applications'. There is a clear opportunity for a technological breakthrough, requiring innovative steps to provide high-performance secure database access technologies for grid computing. We believe that an innovative database architecture where the secure

  20. Buckling behavior analysis of spacer grid by lateral impact load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kyung Ho; Kang, Heung Seok; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Song, Kee Nam

    2000-05-01

    The spacer grid is one of the main structural components in the fuel assembly, Which supports the fuel rods, guides cooling water, and protects the system from an external impact load, such as earthquakes. Therefore, the mechanical and structural properties of the spacer grids must be extensively examined while designing it. In this report, free fall type shock tests on the several kinds of the specimens of the spacer grids were also carried out in order to compare the results among the candidate grids. A free fall carriage on the specimen accomplishes the test. In addition to this, a finite element method for predicting the critical impact strength of the spacer grids is described. FE method on the buckling behavior of the spacer grids are performed for a various array of sizes of the grids considering that the spacer grid is an assembled structure with thin-walled plates and imposing proper boundary conditions by nonlinear dynamic impact analysis using ABAQUS/explicit code. The simulated results results also similarly predicted the local buckling phenomena and were found to give good correspondence with the shock test results

  1. Connections beyond the margins of the power grid Information technology and the evolution of off-grid solar electricity in the developing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstone, Peter Michael

    This work explores the intersections of information technology and off-grid electricity deployment in the developing world with focus on a key instance: the emergence of pay-as-you-go (PAYG) solar household-scale energy systems. It is grounded in detailed field study by my research team in Kenya between 2013-2014 that included primary data collection across the solar supply chain from global businesses through national and local distribution and to the end-users. We supplement the information with business process and national survey data to develop a detailed view of the markets, technology systems, and individuals who interact within those frameworks. The findings are presented in this dissertation as a series of four chapters with introductory, bridging, and synthesis material between them. The first chapter, Decentralized Energy Systems for Clean Electricity Access, presents a global view of the emerging off-grid power sector. Long-run trends in technology create "a unique moment in history" for closing the gap between global population and access to electricity, which has stubbornly held at 1-2 billion people without power since the initiation of the electric utility business model in the late 1800's. We show the potential for widespread near-term adoption of off-grid solar, which could lead to ten times less inequality in access and also ten times lower household-level climate impacts. Decentralized power systems that replace fuel-based incumbent lighting can advance the causes of climate stabilization, economic and social freedom and human health. Chapters two and three are focused on market and institutional dynamics present circa 2014 in for off-grid solar with a focus on the Kenya market. Chapter 2, "Off-grid Power and Connectivity", presents our findings related to the widespread influence of information technology across the supply chain for solar and in PAYG approaches. Using digital financing and embedded payment verification technology, PAYG

  2. Energy transfers and magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit Raj

    2013-12-01

    In this letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic energy growth in small-scale dynamo by studying energy transfers, mainly energy fluxes and shell-to-shell energy transfers. We perform dynamo simulations for the magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 20 on 10243 grid using the pseudospectral method. We demonstrate that the magnetic energy growth is caused by nonlocal energy transfers from the large-scale or forcing-scale velocity field to small-scale magnetic field. The peak of these energy transfers moves towards lower wave numbers as dynamo evolves, which is the reason why the integral scale of the magnetic field increases with time. The energy transfers U2U (velocity to velocity) and B2B (magnetic to magnetic) are forward and local. Copyright © EPLA, 2013.

  3. MICROARRAY IMAGE GRIDDING USING GRID LINE REFINEMENT TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Biju

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An important stage in microarray image analysis is gridding. Microarray image gridding is done to locate sub arrays in a microarray image and find co-ordinates of spots within each sub array. For accurate identification of spots, most of the proposed gridding methods require human intervention. In this paper a fully automatic gridding method which enhances spot intensity in the preprocessing step as per a histogram based threshold method is used. The gridding step finds co-ordinates of spots from horizontal and vertical profile of the image. To correct errors due to the grid line placement, a grid line refinement technique is proposed. The algorithm is applied on different image databases and results are compared based on spot detection accuracy and time. An average spot detection accuracy of 95.06% depicts the proposed method’s flexibility and accuracy in finding the spot co-ordinates for different database images.

  4. SOMAR-LES: A framework for multi-scale modeling of turbulent stratified oceanic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalamalla, Vamsi K.; Santilli, Edward; Scotti, Alberto; Jalali, Masoud; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2017-12-01

    A new multi-scale modeling technique, SOMAR-LES, is presented in this paper. Localized grid refinement gives SOMAR (the Stratified Ocean Model with Adaptive Resolution) access to small scales of the flow which are normally inaccessible to general circulation models (GCMs). SOMAR-LES drives a LES (Large Eddy Simulation) on SOMAR's finest grids, forced with large scale forcing from the coarser grids. Three-dimensional simulations of internal tide generation, propagation and scattering are performed to demonstrate this multi-scale modeling technique. In the case of internal tide generation at a two-dimensional bathymetry, SOMAR-LES is able to balance the baroclinic energy budget and accurately model turbulence losses at only 10% of the computational cost required by a non-adaptive solver running at SOMAR-LES's fine grid resolution. This relative cost is significantly reduced in situations with intermittent turbulence or where the location of the turbulence is not known a priori because SOMAR-LES does not require persistent, global, high resolution. To illustrate this point, we consider a three-dimensional bathymetry with grids adaptively refined along the tidally generated internal waves to capture remote mixing in regions of wave focusing. The computational cost in this case is found to be nearly 25 times smaller than that of a non-adaptive solver at comparable resolution. In the final test case, we consider the scattering of a mode-1 internal wave at an isolated two-dimensional and three-dimensional topography, and we compare the results with Legg (2014) numerical experiments. We find good agreement with theoretical estimates. SOMAR-LES is less dissipative than the closure scheme employed by Legg (2014) near the bathymetry. Depending on the flow configuration and resolution employed, a reduction of more than an order of magnitude in computational costs is expected, relative to traditional existing solvers.

  5. Local-scale dynamics and local drivers of bushmeat trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaki, Angela; Gray, Steven A; Lepczyk, Christopher A; Skibins, Jeffrey C; Rentsch, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    Bushmeat management policies are often developed outside the communities in which they are to be implemented. These policies are also routinely designed to be applied uniformly across communities with little regard for variation in social or ecological conditions. We used fuzzy-logic cognitive mapping, a form of participatory modeling, to compare the assumptions driving externally generated bushmeat management policies with perceptions of bushmeat trade dynamics collected from local community members who admitted to being recently engaged in bushmeat trading (e.g., hunters, sellers, consumers). Data were collected during 9 workshops in 4 Tanzanian villages bordering Serengeti National Park. Specifically, we evaluated 9 community-generated models for the presence of the central factors that comprise and drive the bushmeat trade and whether or not models included the same core concepts, relationships, and logical chains of reasoning on which bushmeat conservation policies are commonly based. Across local communities, there was agreement about the most central factors important to understanding the bushmeat trade (e.g., animal recruitment, low income, and scarcity of food crops). These matched policy assumptions. However, the factors perceived to drive social-ecological bushmeat trade dynamics were more diverse and varied considerably across communities (e.g., presence or absence of collaborative law enforcement, increasing human population, market demand, cultural preference). Sensitive conservation issues, such as the bushmeat trade, that require cooperation between communities and outside conservation organizations can benefit from participatory modeling approaches that make local-scale dynamics and conservation policy assumptions explicit. Further, communities' and conservation organizations' perceptions need to be aligned. This can improve success by allowing context appropriate policies to be developed, monitored, and appropriately adapted as new evidence is

  6. Non-Galerkin Coarse Grids for Algebraic Multigrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falgout, Robert D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schroder, Jacob B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-26

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a popular and effective solver for systems of linear equations that arise from discretized partial differential equations. And while AMG has been effectively implemented on large scale parallel machines, challenges remain, especially when moving to exascale. Particularly, stencil sizes (the number of nonzeros in a row) tend to increase further down in the coarse grid hierarchy, and this growth leads to more communication. Therefore, as problem size increases and the number of levels in the hierarchy grows, the overall efficiency of the parallel AMG method decreases, sometimes dramatically. This growth in stencil size is due to the standard Galerkin coarse grid operator, $P^T A P$, where $P$ is the prolongation (i.e., interpolation) operator. For example, the coarse grid stencil size for a simple three-dimensional (3D) seven-point finite differencing approximation to diffusion can increase into the thousands on present day machines, causing an associated increase in communication costs. We therefore consider algebraically truncating coarse grid stencils to obtain a non-Galerkin coarse grid. First, the sparsity pattern of the non-Galerkin coarse grid is determined by employing a heuristic minimal “safe” pattern together with strength-of-connection ideas. Second, the nonzero entries are determined by collapsing the stencils in the Galerkin operator using traditional AMG techniques. The result is a reduction in coarse grid stencil size, overall operator complexity, and parallel AMG solve phase times.

  7. Low-cost multi-vehicle air temperature measurements for heat load assessment in local-scale climate applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuvela-Aloise, Maja; Weyss, Gernot; Aloise, Giulliano; Mifka, Boris; Löffelmann, Philemon; Hollosi, Brigitta; Nemec, Johana; Vucetic, Visnja

    2014-05-01

    radiation protection. Duration of each measurement tour lasted approximately 2 hours covering the distances in radius of about 10-30 km, logging the air temperature and geographical positioning in intervals of 1-5 seconds. The collected data were aggregated on a 100 m horizontal resolution grid and compared with the local-scale climate modelling simulations with the urban climate model MUKLIMO3 initialized with the atmospheric conditions for a given day. Both measurement and modelling results show similar features for distinct local climate zones (built-up area, near water environment, forest, parks, agricultural area, etc). The spatial gradients in temperature can be assigned to different orographical and land use characteristics. Even if many ambiguities remain in both modelling and the measurement approach, the collected data provide useful information for local-scale heat assessment and can serve as a base to increase the model reliability, especially in areas with low data coverage.

  8. Buckling Analysis of Grid-Stiffened Composite Shells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, D.; Abdalla, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in grid-stiffened composite structures; they are not only competitive with conventional stiffened constructions and sandwich shells in terms of weight but also enjoy superior damage tolerance properties. In this paper, both global and local structural instabilities are

  9. Sensor Fusion - Sonar and Stereo Vision, Using Occupancy Grids and SIFT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plascencia, Alfredo; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2006-01-01

    to the occupied and empty regions. SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) feature descriptors are  interpreted using gaussian probabilistic error models. The use of occupancy grids is proposed for representing the sonar  as well as the features descriptors readings. The Bayesian estimation approach is applied...... to update the sonar and the SIFT descriptors' uncertainty grids. The sensor fusion yields a significant reduction in the uncertainty of the occupancy grid compared to the individual sensor readings....

  10. Operation and thermal loading of three-level Neutral-Point-Clamped wind power converter under various grid faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede; Liserre, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In order to fulfill the continuous growing grid-side demands, the full-scale power converters are becoming more and more popular in the wind power application. Nevertheless, the more severe loading of the power semiconductor devices in the full-scale power converters, especially during Low Voltage...... Ride Through (LVRT) operation under grid faults, may compromise the reliability of the system and consequently further increase its cost. In this paper, the impact of various grid faults on a three-level Neutral-Point-Clamped (3L-NPC) grid-converter in terms of thermal loading of power semiconductor...

  11. Grid3: An Application Grid Laboratory for Science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    level services required by the participating experiments. The deployed infrastructure has been operating since November 2003 with 27 sites, a peak of 2800 processors, work loads from 10 different applications exceeding 1300 simultaneous jobs, and data transfers among sites of greater than 2 TB/day. The Grid3 infrastructure was deployed from grid level services provided by groups and applications within the collaboration. The services were organized into four distinct "grid level services" including: Grid3 Packaging, Monitoring and Information systems, User Authentication and the iGOC Grid Operatio...

  12. LES of Internal Combustion Engine Flows Using Cartesian Overset Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkenstein Tobias

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate computations of turbulent flows using the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES technique with an appropriate SubFilter Scale (SFS model require low artificial dissipation such that the physical energy cascade process is not perturbed by numerical artifacts. To realize this in practical simulations, energy-conserving numerical schemes and high-quality computational grids are needed. If unstructured meshes are used, the latter requirement often makes grid generation for complex geometries very difficult. Structured Cartesian grids offer the advantage that uncertainties in mesh quality are reduced to choosing appropriate resolution. However, two intrinsic challenges of the structured approach are local mesh refinement and representation of complex geometries. In this work, the effectiveness of numerical methods which can be expected to reduce both drawbacks is assessed in engine flows, using a multi-physics inhouse code. The overset grid approach is utilized to arbitrarily combine grid patches of different spacing to a flow domain of complex shape during mesh generation. Walls are handled by an Immersed Boundary (IB method, which is combined with a wall function to treat underresolved boundary layers. A statistically stationary Spark Ignition (SI engine port flow is simulated at Reynolds numbers typical for engine operation. Good agreement of computed and measured integral flow quantities like overall pressure loss and tumble number is found. A comparison of simulated velocity fields to Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV measurement data concludes the validation of the enhanced numerical framework for both mean velocity and turbulent fluctuations. The performance of two SFS models, the dynamic Smagorinsky model with Lagrangian averaging along pathlines and the coherent structure model, is tested on different grids. Sensitivity of pressure loss and tumble ratio to the wall treatment and mesh refinement is presented. It is shown that increased wall

  13. A Family of Multipoint Flux Mixed Finite Element Methods for Elliptic Problems on General Grids

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary F.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a family of multipoint flux mixed finite element (MFMFE) methods on simplicial, quadrilateral, hexahedral, and triangular-prismatic grids. The MFMFE methods are locally conservative with continuous normal fluxes, since they are developed within a variational framework as mixed finite element methods with special approximating spaces and quadrature rules. The latter allows for local flux elimination giving a cell-centered system for the scalar variable. We study two versions of the method: with a symmetric quadrature rule on smooth grids and a non-symmetric quadrature rule on rough grids. Theoretical and numerical results demonstrate first order convergence for problems with full-tensor coefficients. Second order superconvergence is observed on smooth grids. © 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Grid-connected to/from off-grid transference for micro-grid inverters

    OpenAIRE

    Heredero Peris, Daniel; Chillón Antón, Cristian; Pages Gimenez, Marc; Gross, Gabriel Igor; Montesinos Miracle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares two methods for controlling the on-line transference from connected to stand-alone mode and vice versa in converters for micro-grids. The first proposes a method where the converter changes from CSI (Current Source Inverter) in grid-connected mode to VSI (Voltage Source Inverter) in off-grid. In the second method, the inverter always works as a non-ideal voltage source, acting as VSI, using AC droop control strategy.

  15. The GridSite Web/Grid security system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNab, Andrew; Li Yibiao

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of the current status of the GridSite toolkit, describing the security model for interactive and programmatic uses introduced in the last year. We discuss our experiences of implementing these internal changes and how they and previous rounds of improvements have been prompted by requirements from users and wider security trends in Grids (such as CSRF). Finally, we explain how these have improved the user experience of GridSite-based websites, and wider implications for portals and similar web/grid sites.

  16. PV-HYBRID and MINI-GRID. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Within the 3rd European Conference at the Centre de Congres in Aix en Provence (France) between 11th and 12th May, 2006, the following lessons were held: (1) Small electric networks: European drivers and projects for the integration of RES and DG into the electricity grids of the future (Manuel Sanchez-Jimenez); (2) PV hybrid system within mini grids - IEA PVPS programme (Meuch Konraf); (3) Renewables for the developing world (Alvaro Ponce Plaza); (4) Rural electicity supply using photovoltaic / - Diesel hybrid systems: Attractive for investors in the renewable energy sector? (Andreas Hahn); (5) Economic analysis of stand-alone and grid-connected photovoltaic systems under current tariff structure of Taiwan (Yaw-Juen Wang); (6) Using wind-PV-diesel hybrid system for electrification of remote village in Western Libya (N.M. Kreama); (7) Venezuela's renewable energy program for small towns and rural areas ''Sembrando Luz'' (Jorge Torres); (8) AeroSmart5, the professional, sysem-compatible small-scale wind energy converter will be tested in field tests (Fabian Jochem); (9) Lifetime, test procedures and recommendations for optimal operating strategies for lead-acid-batteries in renewable energy systems - A survey on results from European projects from the 5th framework programme (Rudi Kaiser); (10) Prototype of a reversible fuel cell system for autonomous power supplies (Tom Smolinska); (11) Interconnection management in microgrids (Michel Vandenbergh); (12) Control strategy for a small-scale stand-alone power system based on renewable energy and hydrogen (Harald Miland); (13) Standard renewable electricity supply for people in rural areas - mini-grids in western provinces of China (Michael Wollny); (14) The Brava island a ''100% renewable energy'' project (Jean-Christian Marcel); (15) Breakthrough to a new era of PV-hybrid systems with the help of standardised components communication? (Michael Mueller); (16) Standardized

  17. Formation of Virtual Organizations in Grids: A Game-Theoretic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Thomas E.; Grosu, Daniel

    The execution of large scale grid applications requires the use of several computational resources owned by various Grid Service Providers (GSPs). GSPs must form Virtual Organizations (VOs) to be able to provide the composite resource to these applications. We consider grids as self-organizing systems composed of autonomous, self-interested GSPs that will organize themselves into VOs with every GSP having the objective of maximizing its profit. We formulate the resource composition among GSPs as a coalition formation problem and propose a game-theoretic framework based on cooperation structures to model it. Using this framework, we design a resource management system that supports the VO formation among GSPs in a grid computing system.

  18. Control strategies for gas turbine generators for grid connected and islanding operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahat, Pukar; Chen, Zhe; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    fine while a DG is connected to a grid, might not work as desired while it is islanded and vise versa. This paper presents a strategy to operate distribution systems with a small gas turbine generator (GTG), which is capable of supplying local loads, in both islanding and grid connected conditions...

  19. Decoupling local mechanics from large-scale structure in modular metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; Silverberg, Jesse L.

    2017-04-01

    A defining feature of mechanical metamaterials is that their properties are determined by the organization of internal structure instead of the raw fabrication materials. This shift of attention to engineering internal degrees of freedom has coaxed relatively simple materials into exhibiting a wide range of remarkable mechanical properties. For practical applications to be realized, however, this nascent understanding of metamaterial design must be translated into a capacity for engineering large-scale structures with prescribed mechanical functionality. Thus, the challenge is to systematically map desired functionality of large-scale structures backward into a design scheme while using finite parameter domains. Such “inverse design” is often complicated by the deep coupling between large-scale structure and local mechanical function, which limits the available design space. Here, we introduce a design strategy for constructing 1D, 2D, and 3D mechanical metamaterials inspired by modular origami and kirigami. Our approach is to assemble a number of modules into a voxelized large-scale structure, where the module’s design has a greater number of mechanical design parameters than the number of constraints imposed by bulk assembly. This inequality allows each voxel in the bulk structure to be uniquely assigned mechanical properties independent from its ability to connect and deform with its neighbors. In studying specific examples of large-scale metamaterial structures we show that a decoupling of global structure from local mechanical function allows for a variety of mechanically and topologically complex designs.

  20. Model of interaction in Smart Grid on the basis of multi-agent system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, E. A.; Kovalev, I. V.; Engel, N. E.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents model of interaction in Smart Grid on the basis of multi-agent system. The use of travelling waves in the multi-agent system describes the behavior of the Smart Grid from the local point, which is being the complement of the conventional approach. The simulation results show that the absorption of the wave in the distributed multi-agent systems is effectively simulated the interaction in Smart Grid.

  1. Schwarz-Christoffel Conformal Mapping based Grid Generation for Global Oceanic Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiming

    2015-04-01

    We propose new grid generation algorithms for global ocean general circulation models (OGCMs). Contrary to conventional, analytical forms based dipolar or tripolar grids, the new algorithm are based on Schwarz-Christoffel (SC) conformal mapping with prescribed boundary information. While dealing with the conventional grid design problem of pole relocation, it also addresses more advanced issues of computational efficiency and the new requirements on OGCM grids arisen from the recent trend of high-resolution and multi-scale modeling. The proposed grid generation algorithm could potentially achieve the alignment of grid lines to coastlines, enhanced spatial resolution in coastal regions, and easier computational load balance. Since the generated grids are still orthogonal curvilinear, they can be readily 10 utilized in existing Bryan-Cox-Semtner type ocean models. The proposed methodology can also be applied to the grid generation task for regional ocean modeling when complex land-ocean distribution is present.

  2. Sub-grid-scale effects on short-wave instability in magnetized hall-MHD plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, H.; Nakajima, N.

    2010-11-01

    Aiming to clarify effects of short-wave modes on nonlinear evolution/saturation of the ballooning instability in the Large Helical Device, fully three-dimensional simulations of the single-fluid MHD and the Hall MHD equations are carried out. A moderate parallel heat conductivity plays an important role both in the two kinds of simulations. In the single-fluid MHD simulations, the parallel heat conduction effectively suppresses short-wave ballooning modes but it turns out that the suppression is insufficient in comparison to an experimental result. In the Hall MHD simulations, the parallel heat conduction triggers a rapid growth of the parallel flow and enhance nonlinear couplings. A comparison between single-fluid and the Hall MHD simulations reveals that the Hall MHD model does not necessarily improve the saturated pressure profile, and that we may need a further extension of the model. We also find by a comparison between two Hall MHD simulations with different numerical resolutions that sub-grid-scales of the Hall term should be modeled to mimic an inverse energy transfer in the wave number space. (author)

  3. Self-assembled large scale metal alloy grid patterns as flexible transparent conductive layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Melinda; Dombovari, Aron; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kordas, Krisztian

    2015-09-01

    The development of scalable synthesis techniques for optically transparent, electrically conductive coatings is in great demand due to the constantly increasing market price and limited resources of indium for indium tin oxide (ITO) materials currently applied in most of the optoelectronic devices. This work pioneers the scalable synthesis of transparent conductive films (TCFs) by exploiting the coffee-ring effect deposition coupled with reactive inkjet printing and subsequent chemical copper plating. Here we report two different promising alternatives to replace ITO, palladium-copper (PdCu) grid patterns and silver-copper (AgCu) fish scale like structures printed on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates, achieving sheet resistance values as low as 8.1 and 4.9 Ω/sq, with corresponding optical transmittance of 79% and 65% at 500 nm, respectively. Both films show excellent adhesion and also preserve their structural integrity and good contact with the substrate for severe bending showing less than 4% decrease of conductivity even after 105 cycles. Transparent conductive films for capacitive touch screens and pixels of microscopic resistive electrodes are demonstrated.

  4. Control and Optimization Methods for Electric Smart Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Ilić, Marija

    2012-01-01

    Control and Optimization Methods for Electric Smart Grids brings together leading experts in power, control and communication systems,and consolidates some of the most promising recent research in smart grid modeling,control and optimization in hopes of laying the foundation for future advances in this critical field of study. The contents comprise eighteen essays addressing wide varieties of control-theoretic problems for tomorrow’s power grid. Topics covered include: Control architectures for power system networks with large-scale penetration of renewable energy and plug-in vehicles Optimal demand response New modeling methods for electricity markets Control strategies for data centers Cyber-security Wide-area monitoring and control using synchronized phasor measurements. The authors present theoretical results supported by illustrative examples and practical case studies, making the material comprehensible to a wide audience. The results reflect the exponential transformation that today’s grid is going...

  5. Distributed Secondary Control for Islanded MicroGrids – A Networked Control Systems Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafiee, Qobad; Vasquez, Juan Carlos; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to conceive the secondary control in droop-controlled MicroGrids. The conventional approach is based on restoring the frequency and amplitude deviations produced by the local droop controllers by using a MicroGrid Central Controller. A distributed networked...... control system is used in order to implement a distributed secondary control thus avoiding the use of a MicroGrid Central Control. The proposed approach is not only able to restore frequency and voltage of the MicroGrid but also ensures reactive power sharing. The distributed secondary control do...

  6. PVUSA: The value of photovoltaics in the distribution system. The Kerman Grid-Support Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenger, H.J.; Hoff, T.E. [Pacific Energy Group, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    As part of the Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications Applications (PVUSA) Project Pacific Gas Electric Company (PG&E) built the Kerman 500-kW photovoltaic power plant. Located near the end of a distribution feeder in a rural section of Fresno County, the plant was not built so much to demonstrate PV technology, but to evaluate its interaction with the local distribution grid and quantify available nontraditional grid-support benefits (those other than energy and capacity). As demand for new generation began to languish in the 1980s, and siting and permitting of power plants and transmission lines became more involved, utilities began considering smaller, distributed power sources. Potential benefits include shorter construction lead time, less capital outlay, and better utilization of existing assets. The results of a PG&E study in 1990/1991 of the benefits from a PV system to the distribution grid prompted the PVUSA Project to construct a plant at Kerman. Completed in 1993, the plant is believed to be the first one specifically built to evaluate the multiple benefits to the grid of a strategically sited plant. Each of nine discrete benefits were evaluated in detail by first establishing the technical impact, then translating the results into present economic value. Benefits span the entire system from distribution feeder to the generation fleet. This work breaks new ground in evaluation of distributed resources, and suggests that resource planning practices be expanded to account for these non-traditional benefits.

  7. OGC and Grid Interoperability in enviroGRIDS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgan, Dorian; Rodila, Denisa; Bacu, Victor; Giuliani, Gregory; Ray, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    EnviroGRIDS (Black Sea Catchment Observation and Assessment System supporting Sustainable Development) [1] is a 4-years FP7 Project aiming to address the subjects of ecologically unsustainable development and inadequate resource management. The project develops a Spatial Data Infrastructure of the Black Sea Catchment region. The geospatial technologies offer very specialized functionality for Earth Science oriented applications as well as the Grid oriented technology that is able to support distributed and parallel processing. One challenge of the enviroGRIDS project is the interoperability between geospatial and Grid infrastructures by providing the basic and the extended features of the both technologies. The geospatial interoperability technology has been promoted as a way of dealing with large volumes of geospatial data in distributed environments through the development of interoperable Web service specifications proposed by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), with applications spread across multiple fields but especially in Earth observation research. Due to the huge volumes of data available in the geospatial domain and the additional introduced issues (data management, secure data transfer, data distribution and data computation), the need for an infrastructure capable to manage all those problems becomes an important aspect. The Grid promotes and facilitates the secure interoperations of geospatial heterogeneous distributed data within a distributed environment, the creation and management of large distributed computational jobs and assures a security level for communication and transfer of messages based on certificates. This presentation analysis and discusses the most significant use cases for enabling the OGC Web services interoperability with the Grid environment and focuses on the description and implementation of the most promising one. In these use cases we give a special attention to issues such as: the relations between computational grid and

  8. Reinforcement Learning Based Novel Adaptive Learning Framework for Smart Grid Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Smart grid is a potential infrastructure to supply electricity demand for end users in a safe and reliable manner. With the rapid increase of the share of renewable energy and controllable loads in smart grid, the operation uncertainty of smart grid has increased briskly during recent years. The forecast is responsible for the safety and economic operation of the smart grid. However, most existing forecast methods cannot account for the smart grid due to the disabilities to adapt to the varying operational conditions. In this paper, reinforcement learning is firstly exploited to develop an online learning framework for the smart grid. With the capability of multitime scale resolution, wavelet neural network has been adopted in the online learning framework to yield reinforcement learning and wavelet neural network (RLWNN based adaptive learning scheme. The simulations on two typical prediction problems in smart grid, including wind power prediction and load forecast, validate the effectiveness and the scalability of the proposed RLWNN based learning framework and algorithm.

  9. CMS Monte Carlo production in the WLCG computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J M; Kreuzer, P; Hof, C; Khomitch, A; Mohapatra, A; Filippis, N D; Pompili, A; My, S; Abbrescia, M; Maggi, G; Donvito, G; Weirdt, S D; Maes, J; Mulders, P v; Villella, I; Wakefield, S; Guan, W; Fanfani, A; Evans, D; Flossdorf, A

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo production in CMS has received a major boost in performance and scale since the past CHEP06 conference. The production system has been re-engineered in order to incorporate the experience gained in running the previous system and to integrate production with the new CMS event data model, data management system and data processing framework. The system is interfaced to the two major computing Grids used by CMS, the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) and the Open Science Grid (OSG). Operational experience and integration aspects of the new CMS Monte Carlo production system is presented together with an analysis of production statistics. The new system automatically handles job submission, resource monitoring, job queuing, job distribution according to the available resources, data merging, registration of data into the data bookkeeping, data location, data transfer and placement systems. Compared to the previous production system automation, reliability and performance have been considerably improved. A more efficient use of computing resources and a better handling of the inherent Grid unreliability have resulted in an increase of production scale by about an order of magnitude, capable of running in parallel at the order of ten thousand jobs and yielding more than two million events per day

  10. On Hierarchical Extensions of Large-Scale 4-regular Grid Network Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Patel, A.; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip

    It is studied how the introduction of ordered hierarchies in 4-regular grid network structures decreses distances remarkably, while at the same time allowing for simple topological routing schemes. Both meshes and tori are considered; in both cases non-hierarchical structures have power law depen...

  11. Improving Energy Efficiency of Micro-Networks Connected to a Smart Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Błajszczak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Technological development of distribution and transmission grids and building a so called smart grid also enable improving the efficiency of microgrids and microgenerators. Better coordination and scheduling of microgenerators operation make more effective adjustment to local conditions and achieving better overall energy efficiency possible. Due to smart communication interfaces the microgrids and microgenerators can also contribute to ancillary services.

  12. Grid-system element of LCG-2 in DLNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolbilov, A.G.; Ivanov, Yu.P.

    2008-01-01

    We present here the description of the computer cluster at the Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems of JINR, where the second Grid note at JINR was realized. The configuration of the system, which allows effective joint usage of cluster resources both for local users and for others within the framework of the ATLAS collaboration is examined. Examples are given for basic stages of preparing and running ordinary cluster jobs and with the Grid usages, starting from obtaining CA certificates, submitting jobs and retrieving the results. Perspectives of the cluster upgrade are discussed

  13. caGrid 1.0: a Grid enterprise architecture for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Scott; Langella, Stephen; Hastings, Shannon; Ervin, David; Madduri, Ravi; Kurc, Tahsin; Siebenlist, Frank; Covitz, Peter; Shanbhag, Krishnakant; Foster, Ian; Saltz, Joel

    2007-10-11

    caGrid is the core Grid architecture of the NCI-sponsored cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG) program. The current release, caGrid version 1.0, is developed as the production Grid software infrastructure of caBIG. Based on feedback from adopters of the previous version (caGrid 0.5), it has been significantly enhanced with new features and improvements to existing components. This paper presents an overview of caGrid 1.0, its main components, and enhancements over caGrid 0.5.

  14. Mini-grid based off-grid electrification to enhance electricity access in developing countries: What policies may be required?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Subhes C.; Palit, Debajit

    2016-01-01

    With 1.2 billion people still lacking electricity access by 2013, electricity access remains a major global challenge. Although mini-grid based electrification has received attention in recent times, their full exploitation requires policy support covering a range of areas. Distilling the experience from a five year research project, OASYS South Asia, this paper presents the summary of research findings and shares the experience from four demonstration activities. It suggests that cost-effective universal electricity service remains a challenge and reaching the universal electrification target by 2030 will remain a challenge for the less developed countries. The financial, organisational and governance weaknesses hinder successful implementation of projects in many countries. The paper then provides 10 policy recommendations to promote mini-grids as a complementary route to grid extension to promote electricity access for successful outcomes. - Highlights: •The academic and action research activities undertaken through OASYS South Asia Project are reported. •Evidence produced through a multi-dimensional participatory framework supplemented by four demonstration projects. •Funding and regulatory challenges militate against universal electrification objectives by 2030. •Innovative business approaches linking local mini-grids and livelihood opportunities exist. •Enabling policies are suggested to exploit such options.

  15. seNorge2 daily precipitation, an observational gridded dataset over Norway from 1957 to the present day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussana, Cristian; Saloranta, Tuomo; Skaugen, Thomas; Magnusson, Jan; Tveito, Ole Einar; Andersen, Jess

    2018-02-01

    The conventional climate gridded datasets based on observations only are widely used in atmospheric sciences; our focus in this paper is on climate and hydrology. On the Norwegian mainland, seNorge2 provides high-resolution fields of daily total precipitation for applications requiring long-term datasets at regional or national level, where the challenge is to simulate small-scale processes often taking place in complex terrain. The dataset constitutes a valuable meteorological input for snow and hydrological simulations; it is updated daily and presented on a high-resolution grid (1 km of grid spacing). The climate archive goes back to 1957. The spatial interpolation scheme builds upon classical methods, such as optimal interpolation and successive-correction schemes. An original approach based on (spatial) scale-separation concepts has been implemented which uses geographical coordinates and elevation as complementary information in the interpolation. seNorge2 daily precipitation fields represent local precipitation features at spatial scales of a few kilometers, depending on the station network density. In the surroundings of a station or in dense station areas, the predictions are quite accurate even for intense precipitation. For most of the grid points, the performances are comparable to or better than a state-of-the-art pan-European dataset (E-OBS), because of the higher effective resolution of seNorge2. However, in very data-sparse areas, such as in the mountainous region of southern Norway, seNorge2 underestimates precipitation because it does not make use of enough geographical information to compensate for the lack of observations. The evaluation of seNorge2 as the meteorological forcing for the seNorge snow model and the DDD (Distance Distribution Dynamics) rainfall-runoff model shows that both models have been able to make profitable use of seNorge2, partly because of the automatic calibration procedure they incorporate for precipitation. The seNorge2

  16. Tariff Considerations for Micro-Grids in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reber, Timothy J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Booth, Samuel S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cutler, Dylan S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Li, Xiangkun [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Salasovich, James A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-16

    This report examines some of the key drivers and considerations policymakers and decision makers face when deciding if and how to regulate electricity tariffs for micro-grids. Presenting a range of tariff options, from mandating some variety of national (uniform) tariff to allowing micro-grid developers and operators to set fully cost-reflective tariffs, it examines various benefits and drawbacks of each. In addition, the report and explores various types of cross-subsidies and other transitional forms of regulation that may offer a regulatory middle ground that can help balance the often competing goals of providing price control on electricity service in the name of social good while still providing a means for investors to ensure high enough returns on their investment to attract the necessary capital financing to the market. Using the REopt tool developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to inform their study, the authors modeled a few representative micro-grid systems and the resultant levelized cost of electricity, lending context and scale to the consideration of these tariff questions. This simple analysis provides an estimate of the gap between current tariff regimes and the tariffs that would be necessary for developers to recover costs and attract investment, offering further insight into the potential scale of subsidies or other grants that may be required to enable micro-grid development under current regulatory structures. It explores potential options for addressing this gap while trying to balance This report examines some of the key drivers and considerations policymakers and decision makers face when deciding if and how to regulate electricity tariffs for micro-grids. Presenting a range of tariff options, from mandating some variety of national (uniform) tariff to allowing micro-grid developers and operators to set fully cost-reflective tariffs, it examines various benefits and drawbacks of each. In

  17. A General-Purpose Spatial Survey Design for Collaborative Science and Monitoring of Global Environmental Change: The Global Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Theobald

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent guidance on environmental modeling and global land-cover validation stresses the need for a probability-based design. Additionally, spatial balance has also been recommended as it ensures more efficient sampling, which is particularly relevant for understanding land use change. In this paper I describe a global sample design and database called the Global Grid (GG that has both of these statistical characteristics, as well as being flexible, multi-scale, and globally comprehensive. The GG is intended to facilitate collaborative science and monitoring of land changes among local, regional, and national groups of scientists and citizens, and it is provided in a variety of open source formats to promote collaborative and citizen science. Since the GG sample grid is provided at multiple scales and is globally comprehensive, it provides a universal, readily-available sample. It also supports uneven probability sample designs through filtering sample locations by user-defined strata. The GG is not appropriate for use at locations above ±85° because the shape and topological distortion of quadrants becomes extreme near the poles. Additionally, the file sizes of the GG datasets are very large at fine scale (resolution ~600 m × 600 m and require a 64-bit integer representation.

  18. Gridding Global δ 18Owater and Interpreting Core Top δ 18Oforam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrande, A. N.; Schmidt, G.

    2004-05-01

    Estimations of the oxygen isotope ratio in seawater (δ 18O water) traditionally have relied on regional δ 18O water to salinity relationships to convert seawater salinity into δ 18O water. This indirect method of determining δ 18O water is necessary since ?18Owater measurements are relatively sparse. We improve upon this process by constructing local δ 18O water to salinity curves using the Schmidt et al. (1999) global database of δ 18O water and salinity. We calculate local δ 18O water to salinity relationship on a 1x1 grid based on the closest database points to each grid box. Each ocean basin is analyzed separately, and each curve is processed to exclude outliers. These local relationships in combination with seawater salinity (Levitus, 1994) allow us to construct a global map of δ 18O water on a 1x1 grid. We combine seawater temperature (Levitus, 1994) with this dataset to predict δ 18O calcite on a 1x1 grid. These predicted values are then compared to previous compilations of core top δ 18O foram data for individual species of foraminifera. This comparison provides insight into the calcification habitats (as inferred by seawater temperature and salinity) of these species. Additionally, we compare the 1x1 grid of δ 18O water to preliminary output from the latest GISS coupled Atmosphere/Ocean GCM that tracks water isotopes through the hydrologic cycle. This comparison provides insight into possible model applications as a tool to aid in interpreting paleo-isotope data.

  19. Hierarchical Data Replication and Service Monitoring Methods in a Scientific Data Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhong Lu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In a grid and distributed computing environment, data replication is an effective way to improve data accessibility and data accessing efficiency. It is also significant in developing a real-time service monitoring system for a Chinese Scientific Data Grid to guarantee the system stability and data availability. Hierarchical data replication and service monitoring methods are proposed in this paper. The hierarchical data replication method divides the network into different domains and replicates data in local domains. The nodes in a local domain are classified into hierarchies to improve data accessibility according to bandwidth and storage memory space. An extensible agent-based prototype of a hierarchical service monitoring system is presented. The status information of services in the Chinese Scientific Data Grid is collected from the grid nodes based on agent technology and then is transformed into real-time operational pictures for management needs. This paper presents frameworks of the hierarchical data replication and service monitoring methods and gives detailed resolutions. Simulation analyses have demonstrated improved data accessing efficiency and verified the effectiveness of the methods at the same time.

  20. ReSS: Resource Selection Service for National and Campus Grid Infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhashilkar, Parag; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Levshina, Tanya; Timm, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) offers access to around hundred Compute elements (CE) and storage elements (SE) via standard Grid interfaces. The Resource Selection Service (ReSS) is a push-based workload management system that is integrated with the OSG information systems and resources. ReSS integrates standard Grid tools such as Condor, as a brokering service and the gLite CEMon, for gathering and publishing resource information in GLUE Schema format. ReSS is used in OSG by Virtual Organizations (VO) such as Dark Energy Survey (DES), DZero and Engagement VO. ReSS is also used as a Resource Selection Service for Campus Grids, such as FermiGrid. VOs use ReSS to automate the resource selection in their workload management system to run jobs over the grid. In the past year, the system has been enhanced to enable publication and selection of storage resources and of any special software or software libraries (like MPI libraries) installed at computing resources. In this paper, we discuss the Resource Selection Service, its typical usage on the two scales of a National Cyber Infrastructure Grid, such as OSG, and of a campus Grid, such as FermiGrid.