WorldWideScience

Sample records for grid computing facilities

  1. Grid Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A computing grid interconnects resources such as high performancecomputers, scientific databases, and computercontrolledscientific instruments of cooperating organizationseach of which is autonomous. It precedes and is quitedifferent from cloud computing, which provides computingresources by vendors to customers ...

  2. Grid Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    emergence of supercomputers led to the use of computer simula- tion as an .... Scientific and engineering applications (e.g., Tera grid secure gate way). Collaborative ... Encryption, privacy, protection from malicious software. Physical Layer.

  3. Investigation of Storage Options for Scientific Computing on Grid and Cloud Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzoglio, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, several new storage technologies, such as Lustre, Hadoop, OrangeFS, and BlueArc, have emerged. While several groups have run benchmarks to characterize them under a variety of configurations, more work is needed to evaluate these technologies for the use cases of scientific computing on Grid clusters and Cloud facilities. This paper discusses our evaluation of the technologies as deployed on a test bed at FermiCloud, one of the Fermilab infrastructure-as-a-service Cloud facilities. The test bed consists of 4 server-class nodes with 40 TB of disk space and up to 50 virtual machine clients, some running on the storage server nodes themselves. With this configuration, the evaluation compares the performance of some of these technologies when deployed on virtual machines and on “bare metal” nodes. In addition to running standard benchmarks such as IOZone to check the sanity of our installation, we have run I/O intensive tests using physics-analysis applications. This paper presents how the storage solutions perform in a variety of realistic use cases of scientific computing. One interesting difference among the storage systems tested is found in a decrease in total read throughput with increasing number of client processes, which occurs in some implementations but not others.

  4. [Grid computing

    CERN Multimedia

    Wolinsky, H

    2003-01-01

    "Turn on a water spigot, and it's like tapping a bottomless barrel of water. Ditto for electricity: Flip the switch, and the supply is endless. But computing is another matter. Even with the Internet revolution enabling us to connect in new ways, we are still limited to self-contained systems running locally stored software, limited by corporate, institutional and geographic boundaries" (1 page).

  5. LHC computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Full text: We give an overview of the grid computing initiatives in the Americas. High-Energy Physics has played a very important role in the development of grid computing in the world and in Latin America it has not been different. Lately, the grid concept has expanded its reach across all branches of e-Science, and we have witnessed the birth of the first nationwide infrastructures and its use in the private sector. (author)

  6. Desktop grid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Cerin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Desktop Grid Computing presents common techniques used in numerous models, algorithms, and tools developed during the last decade to implement desktop grid computing. These techniques enable the solution of many important sub-problems for middleware design, including scheduling, data management, security, load balancing, result certification, and fault tolerance. The book's first part covers the initial ideas and basic concepts of desktop grid computing. The second part explores challenging current and future problems. Each chapter presents the sub-problems, discusses theoretical and practical

  7. Resource allocation in grid computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, Ger; Righter, Rhonda

    2007-01-01

    Grid computing, in which a network of computers is integrated to create a very fast virtual computer, is becoming ever more prevalent. Examples include the TeraGrid and Planet-lab.org, as well as applications on the existing Internet that take advantage of unused computing and storage capacity of

  8. Recent trends in grid computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kenichi

    2004-01-01

    Grid computing is a technology which allows uniform and transparent access to geographically dispersed computational resources, such as computers, databases, experimental and observational equipment etc. via high-speed, high-bandwidth networking. The commonly used analogy is that of electrical power grid, whereby the household electricity is made available from outlets on the wall, and little thought need to be given to where the electricity is generated and how it is transmitted. The usage of grid also includes distributed parallel computing, high through-put computing, data intensive computing (data grid) and collaborative computing. This paper reviews the historical background, software structure, current status and on-going grid projects, including applications of grid technology to nuclear fusion research. (author)

  9. CMS computing on grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Wen; Sun Gongxing

    2007-01-01

    CMS has adopted a distributed system of services which implement CMS application view on top of Grid services. An overview of CMS services will be covered. Emphasis is on CMS data management and workload Management. (authors)

  10. Grid Computing Education Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Crumb

    2008-01-15

    The GGF Student Scholar program enabled GGF the opportunity to bring over sixty qualified graduate and under-graduate students with interests in grid technologies to its three annual events over the three-year program.

  11. Grid computing the European Data Grid Project

    CERN Document Server

    Segal, B; Gagliardi, F; Carminati, F

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project is the development of a novel environment to support globally distributed scientific exploration involving multi- PetaByte datasets. The project will devise and develop middleware solutions and testbeds capable of scaling to handle many PetaBytes of distributed data, tens of thousands of resources (processors, disks, etc.), and thousands of simultaneous users. The scale of the problem and the distribution of the resources and user community preclude straightforward replication of the data at different sites, while the aim of providing a general purpose application environment precludes distributing the data using static policies. We will construct this environment by combining and extending newly emerging "Grid" technologies to manage large distributed datasets in addition to computational elements. A consequence of this project will be the emergence of fundamental new modes of scientific exploration, as access to fundamental scientific data is no longer constrained to the producer of...

  12. Trends in life science grid: from computing grid to knowledge grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konagaya Akihiko

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grid computing has great potential to become a standard cyberinfrastructure for life sciences which often require high-performance computing and large data handling which exceeds the computing capacity of a single institution. Results This survey reviews the latest grid technologies from the viewpoints of computing grid, data grid and knowledge grid. Computing grid technologies have been matured enough to solve high-throughput real-world life scientific problems. Data grid technologies are strong candidates for realizing "resourceome" for bioinformatics. Knowledge grids should be designed not only from sharing explicit knowledge on computers but also from community formulation for sharing tacit knowledge among a community. Conclusion Extending the concept of grid from computing grid to knowledge grid, it is possible to make use of a grid as not only sharable computing resources, but also as time and place in which people work together, create knowledge, and share knowledge and experiences in a community.

  13. Incremental Trust in Grid Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkløv, Michael Hvalsøe; Sharp, Robin

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a comparative simulation study of some incremental trust and reputation algorithms for handling behavioural trust in large distributed systems. Two types of reputation algorithm (based on discrete and Bayesian evaluation of ratings) and two ways of combining direct trust and ...... of Grid computing systems....

  14. Synchrotron Imaging Computations on the Grid without the Computing Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curri, A; Pugliese, R; Borghes, R; Kourousias, G

    2011-01-01

    Besides the heavy use of the Grid in the Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SRF) Elettra, additional special requirements from the beamlines had to be satisfied through a novel solution that we present in this work. In the traditional Grid Computing paradigm the computations are performed on the Worker Nodes of the grid element known as the Computing Element. A Grid middleware extension that our team has been working on, is that of the Instrument Element. In general it is used to Grid-enable instrumentation; and it can be seen as a neighbouring concept to that of the traditional Control Systems. As a further extension we demonstrate the Instrument Element as the steering mechanism for a series of computations. In our deployment it interfaces a Control System that manages a series of computational demanding Scientific Imaging tasks in an online manner. The instrument control in Elettra is done through a suitable Distributed Control System, a common approach in the SRF community. The applications that we present are for a beamline working in medical imaging. The solution resulted to a substantial improvement of a Computed Tomography workflow. The near-real-time requirements could not have been easily satisfied from our Grid's middleware (gLite) due to the various latencies often occurred during the job submission and queuing phases. Moreover the required deployment of a set of TANGO devices could not have been done in a standard gLite WN. Besides the avoidance of certain core Grid components, the Grid Security infrastructure has been utilised in the final solution.

  15. Southampton uni's computer whizzes develop "mini" grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Sherriff, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    "In a bid to help its students explore the potential of grid computing, the University of Southampton's Computer Science department has developed what it calls a "lightweight grid". The system has been designed to allow students to experiment with grid technology without the complexity of inherent security concerns of the real thing. (1 page)

  16. High energy physics and grid computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Chuansong

    2004-01-01

    The status of the new generation computing environment of the high energy physics experiments is introduced briefly in this paper. The development of the high energy physics experiments and the new computing requirements by the experiments are presented. The blueprint of the new generation computing environment of the LHC experiments, the history of the Grid computing, the R and D status of the high energy physics grid computing technology, the network bandwidth needed by the high energy physics grid and its development are described. The grid computing research in Chinese high energy physics community is introduced at last. (authors)

  17. Proposal for grid computing for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faridah Mohamad Idris; Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan Abdullah; Zainol Abidin Ibrahim; Zukhaimira Zolkapli

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: The use of computer clusters for computational sciences including computational physics is vital as it provides computing power to crunch big numbers at a faster rate. In compute intensive applications that requires high resolution such as Monte Carlo simulation, the use of computer clusters in a grid form that supplies computational power to any nodes within the grid that needs computing power, has now become a necessity. In this paper, we described how the clusters running on a specific application could use resources within the grid, to run the applications to speed up the computing process. (author)

  18. Joint Computing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raised Floor Computer Space for High Performance ComputingThe ERDC Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) provides a robust system of IT facilities to develop and...

  19. Improved visibility computation on massive grid terrains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fishman, J.; Haverkort, H.J.; Toma, L.; Wolfson, O.; Agrawal, D.; Lu, C.-T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design and engineering of algorithms for computing visibility maps on massive grid terrains. Given a terrain T, specified by the elevations of points in a regular grid, and given a viewpoint v, the visibility map or viewshed of v is the set of grid points of T that are

  20. Cloud Computing and Smart Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina POPEANGĂ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concern about energy consumption is leading to infrastructure that supports real-time, two-way communication between utilities and consumers, and allows software systems at both ends to control and manage power use. To manage communications to millions of endpoints in a secure, scalable and highly-available environment and to achieve these twin goals of ‘energy conservation’ and ‘demand response’, utilities must extend the same communication network management processes and tools used in the data center to the field.This paper proposes that cloud computing technology, because of its low cost, flexible and redundant architecture and fast response time, has the functionality needed to provide the security, interoperability and performance required for large-scale smart grid applications.

  1. Grid computing faces IT industry test

    CERN Multimedia

    Magno, L

    2003-01-01

    Software company Oracle Corp. unveiled it's Oracle 10g grid computing platform at the annual OracleWorld user convention in San Francisco. It gave concrete examples of how grid computing can be a viable option outside the scientific community where the concept was born (1 page).

  2. Grid computing infrastructure, service, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jie, Wei; Chen, Jinjun

    2009-01-01

    Offering a comprehensive discussion of advances in grid computing, this book summarizes the concepts, methods, technologies, and applications. It covers topics such as philosophy, middleware, architecture, services, and applications. It also includes technical details to demonstrate how grid computing works in the real world

  3. The LHC Computing Grid Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Åkesson, T

    In the last ATLAS eNews I reported on the preparations for the LHC Computing Grid Project (LCGP). Significant LCGP resources were mobilized during the summer, and there have been numerous iterations on the formal paper to put forward to the CERN Council to establish the LCGP. ATLAS, and also the other LHC-experiments, has been very active in this process to maximally influence the outcome. Our main priorities were to ensure that the global aspects are properly taken into account, that the CERN non-member states are also included in the structure, that the experiments are properly involved in the LCGP execution and that the LCGP takes operative responsibility during the data challenges. A Project Launch Board (PLB) was active from the end of July until the 10th of September. It was chaired by Hans Hoffmann and had the IT division leader as secretary. Each experiment had a representative (me for ATLAS), and the large CERN member states were each represented while the smaller were represented as clusters ac...

  4. Grid computing in large pharmaceutical molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Brian L; Johnson, Stephen R

    2008-07-01

    Most major pharmaceutical companies have employed grid computing to expand their compute resources with the intention of minimizing additional financial expenditure. Historically, one of the issues restricting widespread utilization of the grid resources in molecular modeling is the limited set of suitable applications amenable to coarse-grained parallelization. Recent advances in grid infrastructure technology coupled with advances in application research and redesign will enable fine-grained parallel problems, such as quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics, which were previously inaccessible to the grid environment. This will enable new science as well as increase resource flexibility to load balance and schedule existing workloads.

  5. Adaptively detecting changes in Autonomic Grid Computing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiangliang; Germain, Cé cile; Sebag, Michè le

    2010-01-01

    Detecting the changes is the common issue in many application fields due to the non-stationary distribution of the applicative data, e.g., sensor network signals, web logs and gridrunning logs. Toward Autonomic Grid Computing, adaptively detecting

  6. EU grid computing effort takes on malaria

    CERN Multimedia

    Lawrence, Stacy

    2006-01-01

    Malaria is the world's most common parasitic infection, affecting more thatn 500 million people annually and killing more than 1 million. In order to help combat malaria, CERN has launched a grid computing effort (1 page)

  7. VIP visit of LHC Computing Grid Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Krajewski, Yann Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    VIP visit of LHC Computing Grid Project with Dr -.Ing. Tarek Kamel [Senior Advisor to the President for Government Engagement, ICANN Geneva Office] and Dr Nigel Hickson [VP, IGO Engagement, ICANN Geneva Office

  8. Grid computing in high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischof, R.; Kuhn, D.; Kneringer, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The future high energy physics experiments are characterized by an enormous amount of data delivered by the large detectors presently under construction e.g. at the Large Hadron Collider and by a large number of scientists (several thousands) requiring simultaneous access to the resulting experimental data. Since it seems unrealistic to provide the necessary computing and storage resources at one single place, (e.g. CERN), the concept of grid computing i.e. the use of distributed resources, will be chosen. The DataGrid project (under the leadership of CERN) develops, based on the Globus toolkit, the software necessary for computation and analysis of shared large-scale databases in a grid structure. The high energy physics group Innsbruck participates with several resources in the DataGrid test bed. In this presentation our experience as grid users and resource provider is summarized. In cooperation with the local IT-center (ZID) we installed a flexible grid system which uses PCs (at the moment 162) in student's labs during nights, weekends and holidays, which is especially used to compare different systems (local resource managers, other grid software e.g. from the Nordugrid project) and to supply a test bed for the future Austrian Grid (AGrid). (author)

  9. Building a cluster computer for the computing grid of tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wezel, J. van; Marten, H.

    2004-01-01

    The Grid Computing Centre Karlsruhe takes part in the development, test and deployment of hardware and cluster infrastructure, grid computing middleware, and applications for particle physics. The construction of a large cluster computer with thousands of nodes and several PB data storage capacity is a major task and focus of research. CERN based accelerator experiments will use GridKa, one of only 8 world wide Tier-1 computing centers, for its huge computer demands. Computing and storage is provided already for several other running physics experiments on the exponentially expanding cluster. (orig.)

  10. Grid computing in pakistan and: opening to large hadron collider experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batool, N.; Osman, A.; Mahmood, A.; Rana, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    A grid computing facility was developed at sister institutes Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) and Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS) in collaboration with Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Computing Grid during early years of the present decade. The Grid facility PAKGRID-LCG2 as one of the grid node in Pakistan was developed employing mainly local means and is capable of supporting local and international research and computational tasks in the domain of LHC Computing Grid. Functional status of the facility is presented in terms of number of jobs performed. The facility developed provides a forum to local researchers in the field of high energy physics to participate in the LHC experiments and related activities at European particle physics research laboratory (CERN), which is one of the best physics laboratories in the world. It also provides a platform of an emerging computing technology (CT). (author)

  11. Insightful Workflow For Grid Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Charles Earl

    2008-10-09

    We developed a workflow adaptation and scheduling system for Grid workflow. The system currently interfaces with and uses the Karajan workflow system. We developed machine learning agents that provide the planner/scheduler with information needed to make decisions about when and how to replan. The Kubrick restructures workflow at runtime, making it unique among workflow scheduling systems. The existing Kubrick system provides a platform on which to integrate additional quality of service constraints and in which to explore the use of an ensemble of scheduling and planning algorithms. This will be the principle thrust of our Phase II work.

  12. Computing Flows Using Chimera and Unstructured Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Zheng, Yao

    2006-01-01

    DRAGONFLOW is a computer program that solves the Navier-Stokes equations of flows in complexly shaped three-dimensional regions discretized by use of a direct replacement of arbitrary grid overlapping by nonstructured (DRAGON) grid. A DRAGON grid (see figure) is a combination of a chimera grid (a composite of structured subgrids) and a collection of unstructured subgrids. DRAGONFLOW incorporates modified versions of two prior Navier-Stokes-equation-solving programs: OVERFLOW, which is designed to solve on chimera grids; and USM3D, which is used to solve on unstructured grids. A master module controls the invocation of individual modules in the libraries. At each time step of a simulated flow, DRAGONFLOW is invoked on the chimera portion of the DRAGON grid in alternation with USM3D, which is invoked on the unstructured subgrids of the DRAGON grid. The USM3D and OVERFLOW modules then immediately exchange their solutions and other data. As a result, USM3D and OVERFLOW are coupled seamlessly.

  13. FAULT TOLERANCE IN MOBILE GRID COMPUTING

    OpenAIRE

    Aghila Rajagopal; M.A. Maluk Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel model for Surrogate Object based paradigm in mobile grid environment for achieving a Fault Tolerance. Basically Mobile Grid Computing Model focuses on Service Composition and Resource Sharing Process. In order to increase the performance of the system, Fault Recovery plays a vital role. In our Proposed System for Recovery point, Surrogate Object Based Checkpoint Recovery Model is introduced. This Checkpoint Recovery model depends on the Surrogate Object and the Fau...

  14. GRID computing for experimental high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloney, G.R.; Martin, L.; Seviour, E.; Taylor, G.N.; Moorhead, G.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), to be completed at the CERN laboratory in 2006, will generate 11 petabytes of data per year. The processing of this large data stream requires a large, distributed computing infrastructure. A recent innovation in high performance distributed computing, the GRID, has been identified as an important tool in data analysis for the LHC. GRID computing has actual and potential application in many fields which require computationally intensive analysis of large, shared data sets. The Australian experimental High Energy Physics community has formed partnerships with the High Performance Computing community to establish a GRID node at the University of Melbourne. Through Australian membership of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, Australian researchers have an opportunity to be involved in the European DataGRID project. This presentation will include an introduction to the GRID, and it's application to experimental High Energy Physics. We will present the results of our studies, including participation in the first LHC data challenge

  15. Discovery Mondays: 'The Grid: a universal computer'

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    How can one store and analyse the 15 million billion pieces of data that the LHC will produce each year with a computer that isn't the size of a sky-scraper? The IT experts have found the answer: the Grid, which will harness the power of tens of thousands of computers in the world by putting them together on one network and making them work like a single computer achieving a power that has not yet been matched. The Grid, inspired from the Web, already exists - in fact, several of them exist in the field of science. The European EGEE project, led by CERN, contributes not only to the study of particle physics but to medical research as well, notably in the study of malaria and avian flu. The next Discovery Monday invites you to explore this futuristic computing technology. The 'Grid Masters' of CERN have prepared lively animations to help you understand how the Grid works. Children can practice saving the planet on the Grid video game. You will also discover other applications such as UNOSAT, a United Nations...

  16. Virtual Machine Lifecycle Management in Grid and Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarzkopf, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Virtualization is the foundation for two important technologies: Virtualized Grid and Cloud Computing. Virtualized Grid Computing is an extension of the Grid Computing concept introduced to satisfy the security and isolation requirements of commercial Grid users. Applications are confined in virtual machines to isolate them from each other and the data they process from other users. Apart from these important requirements, Virtual...

  17. Grid computing techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkinson, Barry

    2009-01-01

    ''… the most outstanding aspect of this book is its excellent structure: it is as though we have been given a map to help us move around this technology from the base to the summit … I highly recommend this book …''Jose Lloret, Computing Reviews, March 2010

  18. Financial Derivatives Market for Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, David; Lindset, Snorre; Huuse, Henning

    2007-01-01

    This Master thesis studies the feasibility and properties of a financial derivatives market on Grid computing, a service for sharing computing resources over a network such as the Internet. For the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) to perform research with the world's largest and most complex machine, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), Grid computing was developed to handle the information created. In accordance with the mandate of CERN Technology Transfer (TT) group, this thesis is a part of CERN's dissemination of the Grid technology. The thesis gives a brief overview of the use of the Grid technology and where it is heading. IT trend analysts and large-scale IT vendors see this technology as key in transforming the world of IT. They predict that in a matter of years, IT will be bought as a service, instead of a good. Commoditization of IT, delivered as a service, is a paradigm shift that will have a broad impact on all parts of the IT market, as well as on the society as a whole. Political, e...

  19. Computer Simulation of the UMER Gridded Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Haber, Irving; Friedman, Alex; Grote, D P; Kishek, Rami A; Reiser, Martin; Vay, Jean-Luc; Zou, Yun

    2005-01-01

    The electron source in the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) injector employs a grid 0.15 mm from the cathode to control the current waveform. Under nominal operating conditions, the grid voltage during the current pulse is sufficiently positive relative to the cathode potential to form a virtual cathode downstream of the grid. Three-dimensional computer simulations have been performed that use the mesh refinement capability of the WARP particle-in-cell code to examine a small region near the beam center in order to illustrate some of the complexity that can result from such a gridded structure. These simulations have been found to reproduce the hollowed velocity space that is observed experimentally. The simulations also predict a complicated time-dependent response to the waveform applied to the grid during the current turn-on. This complex temporal behavior appears to result directly from the dynamics of the virtual cathode formation and may therefore be representative of the expected behavior in...

  20. Bringing Federated Identity to Grid Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teheran, Jeny [Fermilab

    2016-03-04

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is facing the challenge of providing scientific data access and grid submission to scientific collaborations that span the globe but are hosted at FNAL. Users in these collaborations are currently required to register as an FNAL user and obtain FNAL credentials to access grid resources to perform their scientific computations. These requirements burden researchers with managing additional authentication credentials, and put additional load on FNAL for managing user identities. Our design integrates the existing InCommon federated identity infrastructure, CILogon Basic CA, and MyProxy with the FNAL grid submission system to provide secure access for users from diverse experiments and collab orations without requiring each user to have authentication credentials from FNAL. The design automates the handling of certificates so users do not need to manage them manually. Although the initial implementation is for FNAL's grid submission system, the design and the core of the implementation are general and could be applied to other distributed computing systems.

  1. Grid Computing BOINC Redesign Mindmap with incentive system (gamification)

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchen, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Grid Computing BOINC Redesign Mindmap with incentive system (gamification) this is a PDF viewable of https://figshare.com/articles/Grid_Computing_BOINC_Redesign_Mindmap_with_incentive_system_gamification_/1265350

  2. Grid Computing in High Energy Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Over the next two decades, major high energy physics (HEP) experiments, particularly at the Large Hadron Collider, will face unprecedented challenges to achieving their scientific potential. These challenges arise primarily from the rapidly increasing size and complexity of HEP datasets that will be collected and the enormous computational, storage and networking resources that will be deployed by global collaborations in order to process, distribute and analyze them.Coupling such vast information technology resources to globally distributed collaborations of several thousand physicists requires extremely capable computing infrastructures supporting several key areas: (1) computing (providing sufficient computational and storage resources for all processing, simulation and analysis tasks undertaken by the collaborations); (2) networking (deploying high speed networks to transport data quickly between institutions around the world); (3) software (supporting simple and transparent access to data and software resources, regardless of location); (4) collaboration (providing tools that allow members full and fair access to all collaboration resources and enable distributed teams to work effectively, irrespective of location); and (5) education, training and outreach (providing resources and mechanisms for training students and for communicating important information to the public).It is believed that computing infrastructures based on Data Grids and optical networks can meet these challenges and can offer data intensive enterprises in high energy physics and elsewhere a comprehensive, scalable framework for collaboration and resource sharing. A number of Data Grid projects have been underway since 1999. Interestingly, the most exciting and far ranging of these projects are led by collaborations of high energy physicists, computer scientists and scientists from other disciplines in support of experiments with massive, near-term data needs. I review progress in this

  3. Distributed computing grid experiences in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, Julia; Barrass, T; Bonacorsi, D; Bunn, Julian; Capiluppi, P; Corvo, M; Darmenov, N; De Filippis, N; Donno, F; Donvito, G; Eulisse, G; Fanfani, A; Fanzago, F; Filine, A; Grandi, C; Hernández, J M; Innocente, V; Jan, A; Lacaprara, S; Legrand, I; Metson, S; Newbold, D; Newman, H; Pierro, A; Silvestris, L; Steenberg, C; Stockinger, H; Taylor, Lucas; Thomas, M; Tuura, L; Van Lingen, F; Wildish, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The CMS experiment is currently developing a computing system capable of serving, processing and archiving the large number of events that will be generated when the CMS detector starts taking data. During 2004 CMS undertook a large scale data challenge to demonstrate the ability of the CMS computing system to cope with a sustained data- taking rate equivalent to 25% of startup rate. Its goals were: to run CMS event reconstruction at CERN for a sustained period at 25 Hz input rate; to distribute the data to several regional centers; and enable data access at those centers for analysis. Grid middleware was utilized to help complete all aspects of the challenge. To continue to provide scalable access from anywhere in the world to the data, CMS is developing a layer of software that uses Grid tools to gain access to data and resources, and that aims to provide physicists with a user friendly interface for submitting their analysis jobs. This paper describes the data challenge experience with Grid infrastructure ...

  4. Java parallel secure stream for grid computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Akers, W.; Chen, Y.; Watson, W.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of high speed wide area networks makes grid computing a reality. However grid applications that need reliable data transfer still have difficulties to achieve optimal TCP performance due to network tuning of TCP window size to improve the bandwidth and to reduce latency on a high speed wide area network. The authors present a pure Java package called JPARSS (Java Parallel Secure Stream) that divides data into partitions that are sent over several parallel Java streams simultaneously and allows Java or Web applications to achieve optimal TCP performance in a gird environment without the necessity of tuning the TCP window size. Several experimental results are provided to show that using parallel stream is more effective than tuning TCP window size. In addition X.509 certificate based single sign-on mechanism and SSL based connection establishment are integrated into this package. Finally a few applications using this package will be discussed

  5. Adaptively detecting changes in Autonomic Grid Computing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-10-01

    Detecting the changes is the common issue in many application fields due to the non-stationary distribution of the applicative data, e.g., sensor network signals, web logs and gridrunning logs. Toward Autonomic Grid Computing, adaptively detecting the changes in a grid system can help to alarm the anomalies, clean the noises, and report the new patterns. In this paper, we proposed an approach of self-adaptive change detection based on the Page-Hinkley statistic test. It handles the non-stationary distribution without the assumption of data distribution and the empirical setting of parameters. We validate the approach on the EGEE streaming jobs, and report its better performance on achieving higher accuracy comparing to the other change detection methods. Meanwhile this change detection process could help to discover the device fault which was not claimed in the system logs. © 2010 IEEE.

  6. Computational Science Facility (CSF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL Institutional Computing (PIC) is focused on meeting DOE's mission needs and is part of PNNL's overarching research computing strategy. PIC supports large-scale...

  7. IBM announces global Grid computing solutions for banking, financial markets

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "IBM has announced a series of Grid projects around the world as part of its Grid computing program. They include IBM new Grid-based product offerings with business intelligence software provider SAS and other partners that address the computer-intensive needs of the banking and financial markets industry (1 page)."

  8. Mesoscale Climate Evaluation Using Grid Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Velho, H. F.; Freitas, S. R.; Souto, R. P.; Charao, A. S.; Ferraz, S.; Roberti, D. R.; Streck, N.; Navaux, P. O.; Maillard, N.; Collischonn, W.; Diniz, G.; Radin, B.

    2012-04-01

    The CLIMARS project is focused to establish an operational environment for seasonal climate prediction for the Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. The dynamical downscaling will be performed with the use of several software platforms and hardware infrastructure to carry out the investigation on mesoscale of the global change impact. The grid computing takes advantage of geographically spread out computer systems, connected by the internet, for enhancing the power of computation. The ensemble climate prediction is an appropriated application for processing on grid computing, because the integration of each ensemble member does not have a dependency on information from another ensemble members. The grid processing is employed to compute the 20-year climatology and the long range simulations under ensemble methodology. BRAMS (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Model) is a mesoscale model developed from a version of the RAMS (from the Colorado State University - CSU, USA). BRAMS model is the tool for carrying out the dynamical downscaling from the IPCC scenarios. Long range BRAMS simulations will provide data for some climate (data) analysis, and supply data for numerical integration of different models: (a) Regime of the extreme events for temperature and precipitation fields: statistical analysis will be applied on the BRAMS data, (b) CCATT-BRAMS (Coupled Chemistry Aerosol Tracer Transport - BRAMS) is an environmental prediction system that will be used to evaluate if the new standards of temperature, rain regime, and wind field have a significant impact on the pollutant dispersion in the analyzed regions, (c) MGB-IPH (Portuguese acronym for the Large Basin Model (MGB), developed by the Hydraulic Research Institute, (IPH) from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil) will be employed to simulate the alteration of the river flux under new climate patterns. Important meteorological input variables for the MGB-IPH are the precipitation (most relevant

  9. National Fusion Collaboratory: Grid Computing for Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2004-05-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory Project is creating a computational grid designed to advance scientific understanding and innovation in magnetic fusion research by facilitating collaborations, enabling more effective integration of experiments, theory and modeling and allowing more efficient use of experimental facilities. The philosophy of FusionGrid is that data, codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and communication tools should be thought of as network available services, easily used by the fusion scientist. In such an environment, access to services is stressed rather than portability. By building on a foundation of established computer science toolkits, deployment time can be minimized. These services all share the same basic infrastructure that allows for secure authentication and resource authorization which allows stakeholders to control their own resources such as computers, data and experiments. Code developers can control intellectual property, and fair use of shared resources can be demonstrated and controlled. A key goal is to shield scientific users from the implementation details such that transparency and ease-of-use are maximized. The first FusionGrid service deployed was the TRANSP code, a widely used tool for transport analysis. Tools for run preparation, submission, monitoring and management have been developed and shared among a wide user base. This approach saves user sites from the laborious effort of maintaining such a large and complex code while at the same time reducing the burden on the development team by avoiding the need to support a large number of heterogeneous installations. Shared visualization and A/V tools are being developed and deployed to enhance long-distance collaborations. These include desktop versions of the Access Grid, a highly capable multi-point remote conferencing tool and capabilities for sharing displays and analysis tools over local and wide-area networks.

  10. Integrated Electrical and Thermal Grid Facility - Testing of Future Microgrid Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar Raj Thangavelu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Experimental Power Grid Centre (EPGC microgrid test facility, which was developed to enable research, development and testing for a wide range of distributed generation and microgrid technologies. The EPGC microgrid facility comprises a integrated electrical and thermal grid with a flexible and configurable architecture, and includes various distributed energy resources and emulators, such as generators, renewable, energy storage technologies and programmable load banks. The integrated thermal grid provides an opportunity to harness waste heat produced by the generators for combined heat, power and cooling applications, and support research in optimization of combined electrical-thermal systems. Several case studies are presented to demonstrate the testing of different control and operation strategies for storage systems in grid-connected and islanded microgrids. One of the case studies also demonstrates an integrated thermal grid to convert waste heat to useful energy, which thus far resulted in a higher combined energy efficiency. Experiment results confirm that the facility enables testing and evaluation of grid technologies and practical problems that may not be apparent in a computer simulated environment.

  11. From testbed to reality grid computing steps up a gear

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "UK plans for Grid computing changed gear this week. The pioneering European DataGrid (EDG) project came to a successful conclusion at the end of March, and on 1 April a new project, known as Enabling Grids for E-Science in Europe (EGEE), begins" (1 page)

  12. TUNL computer facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, M.; Edwards, S.E.; Gould, C.R.; Roberson, N.R.; Westerfeldt, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The XSYS system has been relatively stable during the last year, and most of our efforts have involved routine software maintenance and enhancement of existing XSYS capabilities. Modifications were made in the MBD program GDAP to increase the execution speed in key GDAP routines. A package of routines has been developed to allow communication between the XSYS and the new Wien filter microprocessor. Recently the authors have upgraded their operating system from VSM V3.7 to V4.1. This required numerous modifications to XSYS, mostly in the command procedures. A new reorganized edition of the XSYS manual will be issued shortly. The TUNL High Resolution Laboratory's VAX 11/750 computer has been in operation for its first full year as a replacement for the PRIME 300 computer which was purchased in 1974 and retired nine months ago. The data acquisition system on the VAX has been in use for the past twelve months performing a number of experiments

  13. AMRITA -- A computational facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, J.E. [California Inst. of Tech., CA (US); Quirk, J.J.

    1998-02-23

    Amrita is a software system for automating numerical investigations. The system is driven using its own powerful scripting language, Amrita, which facilitates both the composition and archiving of complete numerical investigations, as distinct from isolated computations. Once archived, an Amrita investigation can later be reproduced by any interested party, and not just the original investigator, for no cost other than the raw CPU time needed to parse the archived script. In fact, this entire lecture can be reconstructed in such a fashion. To do this, the script: constructs a number of shock-capturing schemes; runs a series of test problems, generates the plots shown; outputs the LATEX to typeset the notes; performs a myriad of behind-the-scenes tasks to glue everything together. Thus Amrita has all the characteristics of an operating system and should not be mistaken for a common-or-garden code.

  14. HEP Computing Tools, Grid and Supercomputers for Genome Sequencing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, K.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Novikov, A.; Poyda, A.; Tertychnyy, I.; Wenaus, T.

    2017-10-01

    PanDA - Production and Distributed Analysis Workload Management System has been developed to address ATLAS experiment at LHC data processing and analysis challenges. Recently PanDA has been extended to run HEP scientific applications on Leadership Class Facilities and supercomputers. The success of the projects to use PanDA beyond HEP and Grid has drawn attention from other compute intensive sciences such as bioinformatics. Recent advances of Next Generation Genome Sequencing (NGS) technology led to increasing streams of sequencing data that need to be processed, analysed and made available for bioinformaticians worldwide. Analysis of genomes sequencing data using popular software pipeline PALEOMIX can take a month even running it on the powerful computer resource. In this paper we will describe the adaptation the PALEOMIX pipeline to run it on a distributed computing environment powered by PanDA. To run pipeline we split input files into chunks which are run separately on different nodes as separate inputs for PALEOMIX and finally merge output file, it is very similar to what it done by ATLAS to process and to simulate data. We dramatically decreased the total walltime because of jobs (re)submission automation and brokering within PanDA. Using software tools developed initially for HEP and Grid can reduce payload execution time for Mammoths DNA samples from weeks to days.

  15. Computation for LHC experiments: a worldwide computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairouz, Malek

    2010-01-01

    In normal operating conditions the LHC detectors are expected to record about 10 10 collisions each year. The processing of all the consequent experimental data is a real computing challenge in terms of equipment, software and organization: it requires sustaining data flows of a few 10 9 octets per second and recording capacity of a few tens of 10 15 octets each year. In order to meet this challenge a computing network implying the dispatch and share of tasks, has been set. The W-LCG grid (World wide LHC computing grid) is made up of 4 tiers. Tiers 0 is the computer center in CERN, it is responsible for collecting and recording the raw data from the LHC detectors and to dispatch it to the 11 tiers 1. The tiers 1 is typically a national center, it is responsible for making a copy of the raw data and for processing it in order to recover relevant data with a physical meaning and to transfer the results to the 150 tiers 2. The tiers 2 is at the level of the Institute or laboratory, it is in charge of the final analysis of the data and of the production of the simulations. Tiers 3 are at the level of the laboratories, they provide a complementary and local resource to tiers 2 in terms of data analysis. (A.C.)

  16. Grids in Europe - a computing infrastructure for science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranzlmueller, D.

    2008-01-01

    Grids provide sheer unlimited computing power and access to a variety of resources to todays scientists. Moving from a research topic of computer science to a commodity tool for science and research in general, grid infrastructures are built all around the world. This talk provides an overview of the developments of grids in Europe, the status of the so-called national grid initiatives as well as the efforts towards an integrated European grid infrastructure. The latter, summarized under the title of the European Grid Initiative (EGI), promises a permanent and reliable grid infrastructure and its services in a way similar to research networks today. The talk describes the status of these efforts, the plans for the setup of this pan-European e-Infrastructure, and the benefits for the application communities. (author)

  17. Techniques for grid manipulation and adaptation. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yung K.; Eisemann, Peter R.; Lee, Ki D.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches have been taken to provide systematic grid manipulation for improved grid quality. One is the control point form (CPF) of algebraic grid generation. It provides explicit control of the physical grid shape and grid spacing through the movement of the control points. It works well in the interactive computer graphics environment and hence can be a good candidate for integration with other emerging technologies. The other approach is grid adaptation using a numerical mapping between the physical space and a parametric space. Grid adaptation is achieved by modifying the mapping functions through the effects of grid control sources. The adaptation process can be repeated in a cyclic manner if satisfactory results are not achieved after a single application.

  18. GRID : unlimited computing power on your desktop Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Computational GRID is an analogy to the electrical power grid for computing resources. It decouples the provision of computing, data, and networking from its use, it allows large-scale pooling and sharing of resources distributed world-wide. Every computer, from a desktop to a mainframe or supercomputer, can provide computing power or data for the GRID. The final objective is to plug your computer into the wall and have direct access to huge computing resources immediately, just like plugging-in a lamp to get instant light. The GRID will facilitate world-wide scientific collaborations on an unprecedented scale. It will provide transparent access to major distributed resources of computer power, data, information, and collaborations.

  19. The MicroGrid: A Scientific Tool for Modeling Computational Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.J. Song

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity and dynamic nature of the Internet (and the emerging Computational Grid demand that middleware and applications adapt to the changes in configuration and availability of resources. However, to the best of our knowledge there are no simulation tools which support systematic exploration of dynamic Grid software (or Grid resource behavior. We describe our vision and initial efforts to build tools to meet these needs. Our MicroGrid simulation tools enable Globus applications to be run in arbitrary virtual grid resource environments, enabling broad experimentation. We describe the design of these tools, and their validation on micro-benchmarks, the NAS parallel benchmarks, and an entire Grid application. These validation experiments show that the MicroGrid can match actual experiments within a few percent (2% to 4%.

  20. Removal of apparent singularity in grid computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubovics, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    A self-consistency test for magnetic domain wall models was suggested by Aharoni. The test consists of evaluating the ratio S = var-epsilon wall /var-epsilon wall , where var-epsilon wall is the wall energy, and var-epsilon wall is the integral of a certain function of the direction cosines of the magnetization, α, β, γ over the volume occupied by the domain wall. If the computed configuration is a good approximation to one corresponding to an energy minimum, the ratio is close to 1. The integrand of var-epsilon wall contains terms that are inversely proportional to γ. Since γ passes through zero at the centre of the domain wall, these terms have a singularity at these points. The integral is finite and its evaluation does not usually present any problems when the direction cosines are known in terms of continuous functions. In many cases, significantly better results for magnetization configurations of domain walls can be obtained by computations using finite element methods. The direction cosines are then only known at a set of discrete points, and integration over the domain wall is replaced by summation over these points. Evaluation of var-epsilon wall becomes inaccurate if the terms in the summation are taken to be the values of the integrand at the grid points, because of the large contribution of points close to where γ changes sign. The self-consistency test has recently been generalised to a larger number of cases. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a method of improving the accuracy of the evaluation of integrals in such cases. Since the self-consistency test has so far only been applied to two-dimensional magnetization configurations, the problem and its solution will be presented for that specific case. Generalisation to three or more dimensions is straight forward

  1. Grid Computing Making the Global Infrastructure a Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Geoffrey C; Hey, Anthony J G

    2003-01-01

    Grid computing is applying the resources of many computers in a network to a single problem at the same time Grid computing appears to be a promising trend for three reasons: (1) Its ability to make more cost-effective use of a given amount of computer resources, (2) As a way to solve problems that can't be approached without an enormous amount of computing power (3) Because it suggests that the resources of many computers can be cooperatively and perhaps synergistically harnessed and managed as a collaboration toward a common objective. A number of corporations, professional groups, university consortiums, and other groups have developed or are developing frameworks and software for managing grid computing projects. The European Community (EU) is sponsoring a project for a grid for high-energy physics, earth observation, and biology applications. In the United States, the National Technology Grid is prototyping a computational grid for infrastructure and an access grid for people. Sun Microsystems offers Gri...

  2. Computer Security at Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavina, A.

    2013-01-01

    This series of slides presents the IAEA policy concerning the development of recommendations and guidelines for computer security at nuclear facilities. A document of the Nuclear Security Series dedicated to this issue is on the final stage prior to publication. This document is the the first existing IAEA document specifically addressing computer security. This document was necessary for 3 mains reasons: first not all national infrastructures have recognized and standardized computer security, secondly existing international guidance is not industry specific and fails to capture some of the key issues, and thirdly the presence of more or less connected digital systems is increasing in the design of nuclear power plants. The security of computer system must be based on a graded approach: the assignment of computer system to different levels and zones should be based on their relevance to safety and security and the risk assessment process should be allowed to feed back into and influence the graded approach

  3. LHCb Distributed Data Analysis on the Computing Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Paterson, S; Parkes, C

    2006-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments based at CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research. The LHC experiments will start taking an unprecedented amount of data when they come online in 2007. Since no single institute has the compute resources to handle this data, resources must be pooled to form the Grid. Where the Internet has made it possible to share information stored on computers across the world, Grid computing aims to provide access to computing power and storage capacity on geographically distributed systems. LHCb software applications must work seamlessly on the Grid allowing users to efficiently access distributed compute resources. It is essential to the success of the LHCb experiment that physicists can access data from the detector, stored in many heterogeneous systems, to perform distributed data analysis. This thesis describes the work performed to enable distributed data analysis for the LHCb experiment on the LHC Computing Grid.

  4. ATLAS grid compute cluster with virtualized service nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, J; Stonjek, S; Kluth, S

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Computing Grid consists of several hundred compute clusters distributed around the world as part of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). The Grid middleware and the ATLAS software which has to be installed on each site, often require a certain Linux distribution and sometimes even specific version thereof. On the other hand, mostly due to maintenance reasons, computer centres install the same operating system and version on all computers. This might lead to problems with the Grid middleware if the local version is different from the one for which it has been developed. At RZG we partly solved this conflict by using virtualization technology for the service nodes. We will present the setup used at RZG and show how it helped to solve the problems described above. In addition we will illustrate the additional advantages gained by the above setup.

  5. Grid Computing Das wahre Web 2.0?

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    'Grid-Computing ist eine Fortentwicklung des World Wide Web, sozusagen die nchste Generation', sagte (1) Franz-Josef Pfreundt (Fraunhofer-Institut fr Techno- und Wirtschaftsmathematik) schon auf der CeBIT 2003 und verwies auf die NASA als Grid-Avantgarde.

  6. Colgate one of first to build global computing grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Magno, L

    2003-01-01

    "Colgate-Palmolive Co. has become one of the first organizations in the world to build an enterprise network based on the grid computing concept. Since mid-August, the consumer products firm has been working to connect approximately 50 geographically dispersed Unix servers and storage devices in an enterprise grid network" (1 page).

  7. PNNL supercomputer to become largest computing resource on the Grid

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hewlett Packard announced that the US DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will connect a 9.3-teraflop HP supercomputer to the DOE Science Grid. This will be the largest supercomputer attached to a computer grid anywhere in the world (1 page).

  8. The Experiment Method for Manufacturing Grid Development on Single Computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Youan; ZHOU Zude

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an experiment method for the Manufacturing Grid application system development in the single personal computer environment is proposed. The characteristic of the proposed method is constructing a full prototype Manufacturing Grid application system which is hosted on a single personal computer with the virtual machine technology. Firstly, it builds all the Manufacturing Grid physical resource nodes on an abstraction layer of a single personal computer with the virtual machine technology. Secondly, all the virtual Manufacturing Grid resource nodes will be connected with virtual network and the application software will be deployed on each Manufacturing Grid nodes. Then, we can obtain a prototype Manufacturing Grid application system which is working in the single personal computer, and can carry on the experiment on this foundation. Compared with the known experiment methods for the Manufacturing Grid application system development, the proposed method has the advantages of the known methods, such as cost inexpensively, operation simple, and can get the confidence experiment result easily. The Manufacturing Grid application system constructed with the proposed method has the high scalability, stability and reliability. It is can be migrated to the real application environment rapidly.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  10. Grid computing : enabling a vision for collaborative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Laszewski, G.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the authors provide a motivation for Grid computing based on a vision to enable a collaborative research environment. The authors vision goes beyond the connection of hardware resources. They argue that with an infrastructure such as the Grid, new modalities for collaborative research are enabled. They provide an overview showing why Grid research is difficult, and they present a number of management-related issues that must be addressed to make Grids a reality. They list projects that provide solutions to subsets of these issues

  11. Fault tolerance in computational grids: perspectives, challenges, and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Sajjad; Nazir, Babar

    2016-01-01

    Computational grids are established with the intention of providing shared access to hardware and software based resources with special reference to increased computational capabilities. Fault tolerance is one of the most important issues faced by the computational grids. The main contribution of this survey is the creation of an extended classification of problems that incur in the computational grid environments. The proposed classification will help researchers, developers, and maintainers of grids to understand the types of issues to be anticipated. Moreover, different types of problems, such as omission, interaction, and timing related have been identified that need to be handled on various layers of the computational grid. In this survey, an analysis and examination is also performed pertaining to the fault tolerance and fault detection mechanisms. Our conclusion is that a dependable and reliable grid can only be established when more emphasis is on fault identification. Moreover, our survey reveals that adaptive and intelligent fault identification, and tolerance techniques can improve the dependability of grid working environments.

  12. Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.

    2001-01-01

    A Computational Grid is a collection of heterogeneous computers and resources spread across multiple administrative domains with the intent of providing users uniform access to these resources. There are many ways to access the resources of a Computational Grid, each with unique security requirements and implications for both the resource user and the resource provider. A comprehensive set of Grid usage scenarios are presented and analyzed with regard to security requirements such as authentication, authorization, integrity, and confidentiality. The main value of these scenarios and the associated security discussions are to provide a library of situations against which an application designer can match, thereby facilitating security-aware application use and development from the initial stages of the application design and invocation. A broader goal of these scenarios are to increase the awareness of security issues in Grid Computing

  13. Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.

    2001-06-05

    A Computational Grid is a collection of heterogeneous computers and resources spread across multiple administrative domains with the intent of providing users uniform access to these resources. There are many ways to access the resources of a Computational Grid, each with unique security requirements and implications for both the resource user and the resource provider. A comprehensive set of Grid usage scenarios are presented and analyzed with regard to security requirements such as authentication, authorization, integrity, and confidentiality. The main value of these scenarios and the associated security discussions are to provide a library of situations against which an application designer can match, thereby facilitating security-aware application use and development from the initial stages of the application design and invocation. A broader goal of these scenarios are to increase the awareness of security issues in Grid Computing.

  14. Taiwan links up to world's first LHC computing grid project

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Taiwan's Academia Sinica was linked up to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Computing Grid Project last week to work jointly with 12 other countries to construct the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator" (1/2 page).

  15. Performance Evaluation of a Mobile Wireless Computational Grid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... Abstract. This work developed and simulated a mathematical model for a mobile wireless computational Grid ... which mobile modes will process the tasks .... evaluation are analytical modelling, simulation ... MATLAB 7.10.0.

  16. Optimal usage of computing grid network in the fields of nuclear fusion computing task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenev, D.

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays the nuclear power becomes the main source of energy. To make its usage more efficient, the scientists created complicated simulation models, which require powerful computers. The grid computing is the answer to powerful and accessible computing resources. The article observes, and estimates the optimal configuration of the grid environment in the fields of the complicated nuclear fusion computing tasks. (author)

  17. CMS on the GRID: Toward a fully distributed computing architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocente, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    The computing systems required to collect, analyse and store the physics data at LHC would need to be distributed and global in scope. CMS is actively involved in several grid-related projects to develop and deploy a fully distributed computing architecture. We present here recent developments of tools for automating job submission and for serving data to remote analysis stations. Plans for further test and deployment of a production grid are also described

  18. The 20 Tera flop Erasmus Computing Grid (ECG).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe Set-Up of the 20 Teraflop Erasmus Computing Grid: To meet the enormous computational needs of live- science research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment the Hogeschool Rotterdam and the Erasmus Medical Center are currently setting up one of the largest desktop computing

  19. The 20 Tera flop Erasmus Computing Grid (ECG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe Set-Up of the 20 Teraflop Erasmus Computing Grid: To meet the enormous computational needs of live- science research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment the Hogeschool Rotterdam and the Erasmus Medical Center are currently setting up one of the largest desktop computing

  20. Integrating GRID tools to build a computing resource broker: activities of DataGrid WP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglano, C.; Barale, S.; Gaido, L.; Guarise, A.; Lusso, S.; Werbrouck, A.

    2001-01-01

    Resources on a computational Grid are geographically distributed, heterogeneous in nature, owned by different individuals or organizations with their own scheduling policies, have different access cost models with dynamically varying loads and availability conditions. This makes traditional approaches to workload management, load balancing and scheduling inappropriate. The first work package (WP1) of the EU-funded DataGrid project is addressing the issue of optimizing the distribution of jobs onto Grid resources based on a knowledge of the status and characteristics of these resources that is necessarily out-of-date (collected in a finite amount of time at a very loosely coupled site). The authors describe the DataGrid approach in integrating existing software components (from Condor, Globus, etc.) to build a Grid Resource Broker, and the early efforts to define a workable scheduling strategy

  1. Computer-Aided Facilities Management Systems (CAFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyros, Kreon L.

    Computer-aided facilities management (CAFM) refers to a collection of software used with increasing frequency by facilities managers. The six major CAFM components are discussed with respect to their usefulness and popularity in facilities management applications: (1) computer-aided design; (2) computer-aided engineering; (3) decision support…

  2. Distributed Supply Coordination for Power-to-Gas Facilities Embedded in Energy Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkano, Desti; Scherpen, Jacquelien M. A.

    This paper considers hydrogen and renewable electricity from power-to-gas (PtG) facilities supplied to a gas grid, a mobility sector, and a power grid. The PtG facilities are equipped with hydrogen buffers and fuel cells. The goal is to maximize the expected profit of PtG facilities without

  3. Grid Computing at GSI for ALICE and FAIR - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Kilian; Uhlig, Florian; Karabowicz, Radoslaw; Montiel-Gonzalez, Almudena; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Preuss, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The future FAIR experiments CBM and PANDA have computing requirements that fall in a category that could currently not be satisfied by one single computing centre. One needs a larger, distributed computing infrastructure to cope with the amount of data to be simulated and analysed. Since 2002, GSI operates a tier2 center for ALICE-CERN. The central component of the GSI computing facility and hence the core of the ALICE tier2 centre is a LSF/SGE batch farm, currently split into three subclusters with a total of 15000 CPU cores shared by the participating experiments, and accessible both locally and soon also completely via Grid. In terms of data storage, a 5.5 PB Lustre file system, directly accessible from all worker nodes is maintained, as well as a 300 TB xrootd-based Grid storage element. Based on this existing expertise, and utilising ALICE's middleware ‘AliEn’, the Grid infrastructure for PANDA and CBM is being built. Besides a tier0 centre at GSI, the computing Grids of the two FAIR collaborations encompass now more than 17 sites in 11 countries and are constantly expanding. The operation of the distributed FAIR computing infrastructure benefits significantly from the experience gained with the ALICE tier2 centre. A close collaboration between ALICE Offline and FAIR provides mutual advantages. The employment of a common Grid middleware as well as compatible simulation and analysis software frameworks ensure significant synergy effects.

  4. Application of essential facility doctrine to transmission grid; Sodenmo eno essential facility no hori no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    This paper arranges the essential facility doctrine in America and describes it according to each judgment example how the doctrine is applied on the access of electricity supply companies to transmission grids. By applying the result to the situation of Japan, the point at issue occurring in the range of the Anti-Monopoly Law was arranged and investigated when third parties (power generating manufacturers) access the transmission grids of electricity supply companies in the form of wholesale or self transmission in the electricity supply industry of Japan. In the judgment example of America, a transmission grid can be considered as essential facility. The refusal of essential facility application is judged to be illegal only when it aims at keeping and expanding the leading market share without a fair reason. The application of essential facility can be refused when the transmission line is insufficient in capacity, when no necessary technical conditions are satisfied during use, or when the cost generated during use cannot be collected. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Workflow Support for Advanced Grid-Enabled Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Fenglian; Eres, M.H.; Tao, Feng; Cox, Simon J.

    2004-01-01

    The Geodise project brings computer scientists and engineer's skills together to build up a service-oriented computing environmnet for engineers to perform complicated computations in a distributed system. The workflow tool is a front GUI to provide a full life cycle of workflow functions for Grid-enabled computing. The full life cycle of workflow functions have been enhanced based our initial research and development. The life cycle starts with a composition of a workflow, followed by an ins...

  6. GLOA: A New Job Scheduling Algorithm for Grid Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Pooranian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of grid computing is to produce a virtual supercomputer by using free resources available through widespread networks such as the Internet. This resource distribution, changes in resource availability, and an unreliable communication infrastructure pose a major challenge for efficient resource allocation. Because of the geographical spread of resources and their distributed management, grid scheduling is considered to be a NP-complete problem. It has been shown that evolutionary algorithms offer good performance for grid scheduling. This article uses a new evaluation (distributed algorithm inspired by the effect of leaders in social groups, the group leaders' optimization algorithm (GLOA, to solve the problem of scheduling independent tasks in a grid computing system. Simulation results comparing GLOA with several other evaluation algorithms show that GLOA produces shorter makespans.

  7. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00416173; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machin...

  8. Soil Erosion Estimation Using Grid-based Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Vlasák

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion estimation is an important part of a land consolidation process. Universal soil loss equation (USLE was presented by Wischmeier and Smith. USLE computation uses several factors, namely R – rainfall factor, K – soil erodability, L – slope length factor, S – slope gradient factor, C – cropping management factor, and P – erosion control management factor. L and S factors are usually combined to one LS factor – Topographic factor. The single factors are determined from several sources, such as DTM (Digital Terrain Model, BPEJ – soil type map, aerial and satellite images, etc. A conventional approach to the USLE computation, which is widely used in the Czech Republic, is based on the selection of characteristic profiles for which all above-mentioned factors must be determined. The result (G – annual soil loss of such computation is then applied for a whole area (slope of interest. Another approach to the USLE computation uses grids as a main data-structure. A prerequisite for a grid-based USLE computation is that each of the above-mentioned factors exists as a separate grid layer. The crucial step in this computation is a selection of appropriate grid resolution (grid cell size. A large cell size can cause an undesirable precision degradation. Too small cell size can noticeably slow down the whole computation. Provided that the cell size is derived from the source’s precision, the appropriate cell size for the Czech Republic varies from 30m to 50m. In some cases, especially when new surveying was done, grid computations can be performed with higher accuracy, i.e. with a smaller grid cell size. In such case, we have proposed a new method using the two-step computation. The first step computation uses a bigger cell size and is designed to identify higher erosion spots. The second step then uses a smaller cell size but it make the computation only the area identified in the previous step. This decomposition allows a

  9. New challenges in grid generation and adaptivity for scientific computing

    CERN Document Server

    Formaggia, Luca

    2015-01-01

    This volume collects selected contributions from the “Fourth Tetrahedron Workshop on Grid Generation for Numerical Computations”, which was held in Verbania, Italy in July 2013. The previous editions of this Workshop were hosted by the Weierstrass Institute in Berlin (2005), by INRIA Rocquencourt in Paris (2007), and by Swansea University (2010). This book covers different, though related, aspects of the field: the generation of quality grids for complex three-dimensional geometries; parallel mesh generation algorithms; mesh adaptation, including both theoretical and implementation aspects; grid generation and adaptation on surfaces – all with an interesting mix of numerical analysis, computer science and strongly application-oriented problems.

  10. Grid Integration Webinars | Energy Systems Integration Facility | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grid Integration Webinars Grid Integration Webinars Watch presentations from NREL analysts on various topics related to grid integration. Wind Curtailment and the Value of Transmission under a 2050 renewable curtailment under these high wind scenarios. Text Version Grid Integration Webinar: Exploring

  11. Dynamic grid refinement for partial differential equations on parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mccormick, S.; Quinlan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The fast adaptive composite grid method (FAC) is an algorithm that uses various levels of uniform grids to provide adaptive resolution and fast solution of PDEs. An asynchronous version of FAC, called AFAC, that completely eliminates the bottleneck to parallelism is presented. This paper describes the advantage that this algorithm has in adaptive refinement for moving singularities on multiprocessor computers. This work is applicable to the parallel solution of two- and three-dimensional shock tracking problems. 6 refs

  12. Lecture 7: Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Overview

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will introduce in an informal, but technically correct way the challenges that are linked to the needs of massively distributed computing architectures in the context of the LHC offline computing. The topics include technological and organizational aspects touching many aspects of LHC computing, from data access, to maintenance of large databases and huge collections of files, to the organization of computing farms and monitoring. Fabrizio Furano holds a Ph.D in Computer Science and has worked in the field of Computing for High Energy Physics for many years. Some of his preferred topics include application architectures, system design and project management, with focus on performance and scalability of data access. Fabrizio has experience in a wide variety of environments, from private companies to academic research in particular in object oriented methodologies, mainly using C++. He has also teaching experience at university level in Software Engineering and C++ Programming.

  13. Implementation of Grid Tier 2 and Tier 3 facilities on a Distributed OpenStack Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limosani, Antonio; Boland, Lucien; Crosby, Sean; Huang, Joanna; Sevior, Martin; Coddington, Paul; Zhang, Shunde; Wilson, Ross

    2014-01-01

    The Australian Government is making a $AUD 100 million investment in Compute and Storage for the academic community. The Compute facilities are provided in the form of 30,000 CPU cores located at 8 nodes around Australia in a distributed virtualized Infrastructure as a Service facility based on OpenStack. The storage will eventually consist of over 100 petabytes located at 6 nodes. All will be linked via a 100 Gb/s network. This proceeding describes the development of a fully connected WLCG Tier-2 grid site as well as a general purpose Tier-3 computing cluster based on this architecture. The facility employs an extension to Torque to enable dynamic allocations of virtual machine instances. A base Scientific Linux virtual machine (VM) image is deployed in the OpenStack cloud and automatically configured as required using Puppet. Custom scripts are used to launch multiple VMs, integrate them into the dynamic Torque cluster and to mount remote file systems. We report on our experience in developing this nation-wide ATLAS and Belle II Tier 2 and Tier 3 computing infrastructure using the national Research Cloud and storage facilities.

  14. Implementation of Grid Tier 2 and Tier 3 facilities on a Distributed OpenStack Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limosani, Antonio; Boland, Lucien; Coddington, Paul; Crosby, Sean; Huang, Joanna; Sevior, Martin; Wilson, Ross; Zhang, Shunde

    2014-06-01

    The Australian Government is making a AUD 100 million investment in Compute and Storage for the academic community. The Compute facilities are provided in the form of 30,000 CPU cores located at 8 nodes around Australia in a distributed virtualized Infrastructure as a Service facility based on OpenStack. The storage will eventually consist of over 100 petabytes located at 6 nodes. All will be linked via a 100 Gb/s network. This proceeding describes the development of a fully connected WLCG Tier-2 grid site as well as a general purpose Tier-3 computing cluster based on this architecture. The facility employs an extension to Torque to enable dynamic allocations of virtual machine instances. A base Scientific Linux virtual machine (VM) image is deployed in the OpenStack cloud and automatically configured as required using Puppet. Custom scripts are used to launch multiple VMs, integrate them into the dynamic Torque cluster and to mount remote file systems. We report on our experience in developing this nation-wide ATLAS and Belle II Tier 2 and Tier 3 computing infrastructure using the national Research Cloud and storage facilities.

  15. Parallel grid generation algorithm for distributed memory computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Stuti; Moitra, Anutosh

    1994-01-01

    A parallel grid-generation algorithm and its implementation on the Intel iPSC/860 computer are described. The grid-generation scheme is based on an algebraic formulation of homotopic relations. Methods for utilizing the inherent parallelism of the grid-generation scheme are described, and implementation of multiple levELs of parallelism on multiple instruction multiple data machines are indicated. The algorithm is capable of providing near orthogonality and spacing control at solid boundaries while requiring minimal interprocessor communications. Results obtained on the Intel hypercube for a blended wing-body configuration are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm. Fortran implementations bAsed on the native programming model of the iPSC/860 computer and the Express system of software tools are reported. Computational gains in execution time speed-up ratios are given.

  16. Grid computing in high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Avery, P

    2004-01-01

    Over the next two decades, major high energy physics (HEP) experiments, particularly at the Large Hadron Collider, will face unprecedented challenges to achieving their scientific potential. These challenges arise primarily from the rapidly increasing size and complexity of HEP datasets that will be collected and the enormous computational, storage and networking resources that will be deployed by global collaborations in order to process, distribute and analyze them. Coupling such vast information technology resources to globally distributed collaborations of several thousand physicists requires extremely capable computing infrastructures supporting several key areas: (1) computing (providing sufficient computational and storage resources for all processing, simulation and analysis tasks undertaken by the collaborations); (2) networking (deploying high speed networks to transport data quickly between institutions around the world); (3) software (supporting simple and transparent access to data and software r...

  17. First Experiences with LHC Grid Computing and Distributed Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Fisk, Ian

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation the experiences of the LHC experiments using grid computing were presented with a focus on experience with distributed analysis. After many years of development, preparation, exercises, and validation the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments are in operations. The computing infrastructure has been heavily utilized in the first 6 months of data collection. The general experience of exploiting the grid infrastructure for organized processing and preparation is described, as well as the successes employing the infrastructure for distributed analysis. At the end the expected evolution and future plans are outlined.

  18. Computing challenges in HEP for WLHC grid

    CERN Document Server

    Muralidharan, Servesh

    2017-01-01

    As CERN moves towards preparation for increasing the luminosity of the particle beam towards HL-LHC, predictions shows computing demand would out grow our conservative scaling estimates by over ten times. Fortunately we are talking about a time scale of roughly ten years to develop new techniques and novel solutions to address this gap in compute resources. Experiments at CERN face a unique scenario where in they need to scale both latency sensitive workloads such as data acquisition of the detectors and throughput based ones such as simulations and reconstruction of high level events and physics processes. In this talk we cover some of the ongoing research at tier-0 in CERN which investigates several aspects of throughput sensitive workloads that consume significant compute cycles.

  19. Vehicle-to-Grid Integration | Energy Systems Integration Facility | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehicle-to-Grid Integration Vehicle-to-Grid Integration NREL's research stands at the forefront of vehicle charging station Our work focuses on building the infrastructure and integration needed for benefit each other. Electric Vehicles NREL's research on electric vehicle (EV) grid integration examines

  20. 2015 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  1. 2014 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  2. Computation of Asteroid Proper Elements on the Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, B.; Balaz, A.; Knezevic, Z.; Potocnik, M.

    2009-12-01

    A procedure of gridification of the computation of asteroid proper orbital elements is described. The need to speed up the time consuming computations and make them more efficient is justified by the large increase of observational data expected from the next generation all sky surveys. We give the basic notion of proper elements and of the contemporary theories and methods used to compute them for different populations of objects. Proper elements for nearly 70,000 asteroids are derived since the beginning of use of the Grid infrastructure for the purpose. The average time for the catalogs update is significantly shortened with respect to the time needed with stand-alone workstations. We also present basics of the Grid computing, the concepts of Grid middleware and its Workload management system. The practical steps we undertook to efficiently gridify our application are described in full detail. We present the results of a comprehensive testing of the performance of different Grid sites, and offer some practical conclusions based on the benchmark results and on our experience. Finally, we propose some possibilities for the future work.

  3. Computation of Asteroid Proper Elements on the Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković, B.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A procedure of gridification of the computation of asteroid proper orbital elements is described. The need to speed up the time consuming computations and make them more efficient is justified by the large increase of observational data expected from the next generation all sky surveys. We give the basic notion of proper elements and of the contemporary theories and methods used to compute them for different populations of objects. Proper elements for nearly 70,000 asteroids are derived since the beginning of use of the Grid infrastructure for the purpose. The average time for the catalogs update is significantly shortened with respect to the time needed with stand-alone workstations. We also present basics of the Grid computing, the concepts of Grid middleware and its Workload management system. The practical steps we undertook to efficiently gridify our application are described in full detail. We present the results of a comprehensive testing of the performance of different Grid sites, and offer some practical conclusions based on the benchmark results and on our experience. Finally, we propose some possibilities for the future work.

  4. Grid computing and e-science: a view from inside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Cozzini

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available My intention is to analyze how, where and if grid computing technology is truly enabling a new way of doing science (so-called ‘e-science’. I will base my views on the experiences accumulated thus far in a number of scientific communities, which we have provided with the opportunity of using grid computing. I shall first define some basic terms and concepts and then discuss a number of specific cases in which the use of grid computing has actually made possible a new method for doing science. I will then present a case in which this did not result in a change in research methods. I will try to identify the reasons for these failures and analyze the future evolution of grid computing. I will conclude by introducing and commenting the concept of ‘cloud computing’, the approach offered and provided by major industrial actors (Google/IBM and Amazon being among the most important and what impact this technology might have on the world of research.

  5. Computation of asteroid proper elements on the Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A procedure of gridification of the computation of asteroid proper orbital elements is described. The need to speed up the time consuming computations and make them more efficient is justified by the large increase of observational data expected from the next generation all sky surveys. We give the basic notion of proper elements and of the contemporary theories and methods used to compute them for different populations of objects. Proper elements for nearly 70,000 asteroids are derived since the beginning of use of the Grid infrastructure for the purpose. The average time for the catalogs update is significantly shortened with respect to the time needed with stand-alone workstations. We also present basics of the Grid computing, the concepts of Grid middleware and its Workload management system. The practical steps we undertook to efficiently gridify our application are described in full detail. We present the results of a comprehensive testing of the performance of different Grid sites, and offer some practical conclusions based on the benchmark results and on our experience. Finally, we propose some possibilities for the future work.

  6. Performance Evaluation of a Mobile Wireless Computational Grid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work developed and simulated a mathematical model for a mobile wireless computational Grid architecture using networks of queuing theory. This was in order to evaluate the performance of theload-balancing three tier hierarchical configuration. The throughput and resource utilizationmetrics were measured and the ...

  7. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Andres; Lara, Camilo; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-12-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machine Learning approach. We plan to implement the proposed framework as a software prototype that will be tested as a component of the ALICE Grid middleware.

  8. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Andres; Lara, Camilo; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machine Learning approach. We plan to implement the proposed framework as a software prototype that will be tested as a component of the ALICE Grid middleware. (paper)

  9. WEKA-G: Parallel data mining on computational grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PIMENTA, A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Data mining is a technology that can extract useful information from large amounts of data. However, mining a database often requires a high computational power. To resolve this problem, this paper presents a tool (Weka-G, which runs in parallel algorithms used in the mining process data. As the environment for doing so, we use a computational grid by adding several features within a WAN.

  10. The LHC Computing Grid in the starting blocks

    CERN Multimedia

    Danielle Amy Venton

    2010-01-01

    As the Large Hadron Collider ramps up operations and breaks world records, it is an exciting time for everyone at CERN. To get the computing perspective, the Bulletin this week caught up with Ian Bird, leader of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). He is confident that everything is ready for the first data.   The metallic globe illustrating the Worldwide LHC Computing GRID (WLCG) in the CERN Computing Centre. The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) collaboration has been in place since 2001 and for the past several years it has continually run the workloads for the experiments as part of their preparations for LHC data taking. So far, the numerous and massive simulations of the full chain of reconstruction and analysis software could only be carried out using Monte Carlo simulated data. Now, for the first time, the system is starting to work with real data and with many simultaneous users accessing them from all around the world. “During the 2009 large-scale computing challenge (...

  11. The extended RBAC model based on grid computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-gang; WANG Ru-chuan; WANG Hai-yan

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes the extended role-based access control (RBAC) model for solving dynamic and multidomain problems in grid computing, The formulated description of the model has been provided. The introduction of context and the mapping relations of context-to-role and context-to-permission help the model adapt to dynamic property in grid environment.The multidomain role inheritance relation by the authorization agent service realizes the multidomain authorization amongst the autonomy domain. A function has been proposed for solving the role inheritance conflict during the establishment of the multidomain role inheritance relation.

  12. A portable grid-enabled computing system for a nuclear material study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujita, Yuichi; Arima, Tatsumi; Takekawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    We have built a portable grid-enabled computing system specialized for our molecular dynamics (MD) simulation program to study Pu material easily. Experimental approach to reveal properties of Pu materials is often accompanied by some difficulties such as radiotoxicity of actinides. Since a computational approach reveals new aspects to researchers without such radioactive facilities, we address an MD computation. In order to have more realistic results about e.g., melting point or thermal conductivity, we need a large scale of parallel computations. Most of application users who don't have supercomputers in their institutes should use a remote supercomputer. For such users, we have developed the portable and secured grid-enabled computing system to utilize a grid computing infrastructure provided by Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL). This system enables us to access remote supercomputers in the ITBL system seamlessly from a client PC through its graphical user interface (GUI). Typically it enables seamless file accesses on the GUI. Furthermore monitoring of standard output or standard error is available to see progress of an executed program. Since the system provides fruitful functionalities which are useful for parallel computing on a remote supercomputer, application users can concentrate on their researches. (author)

  13. CMS Monte Carlo production in the WLCG computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J M; Kreuzer, P; Hof, C; Khomitch, A; Mohapatra, A; Filippis, N D; Pompili, A; My, S; Abbrescia, M; Maggi, G; Donvito, G; Weirdt, S D; Maes, J; Mulders, P v; Villella, I; Wakefield, S; Guan, W; Fanfani, A; Evans, D; Flossdorf, A

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo production in CMS has received a major boost in performance and scale since the past CHEP06 conference. The production system has been re-engineered in order to incorporate the experience gained in running the previous system and to integrate production with the new CMS event data model, data management system and data processing framework. The system is interfaced to the two major computing Grids used by CMS, the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) and the Open Science Grid (OSG). Operational experience and integration aspects of the new CMS Monte Carlo production system is presented together with an analysis of production statistics. The new system automatically handles job submission, resource monitoring, job queuing, job distribution according to the available resources, data merging, registration of data into the data bookkeeping, data location, data transfer and placement systems. Compared to the previous production system automation, reliability and performance have been considerably improved. A more efficient use of computing resources and a better handling of the inherent Grid unreliability have resulted in an increase of production scale by about an order of magnitude, capable of running in parallel at the order of ten thousand jobs and yielding more than two million events per day

  14. Computing on the grid and in the cloud

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    "The results today are only possible because of the extraordinary performance of the accelerators, including the infrastructure, the experiments, and the Grid computing." These were the words of the CERN Director General Rolf Heuer when the observation of a new particle consistent with a Higgs Boson was revealed to the world on the 4th July 2012. The end result of the all investments made to build and operate the LHC is the data that are recorded and the knowledge that can be extracted. It is the role of the global computing infrastructure to unlock the value that is encapsulated in the data. This lecture provides a detailed overview of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid, an international collaboration to distribute and analyse the LHC data.

  15. Computing on the grid and in the cloud

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    "The results today are only possible because of the extraordinary performance of the accelerators, including the infrastructure, the experiments, and the Grid computing." These were the words of the CERN Director General Rolf Heuer when the observation of a new particle consistent with a Higgs Boson was revealed to the world on the 4th July 2012. The end result of the all investments made to build and operate the LHC is the data that are recorded and the knowledge that can be extracted. It is the role of the global computing infrastructure to unlock the value that is encapsulated in the data. This lecture provides a detailed overview of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid, an international collaboration to distribute and analyse the LHC data.

  16. DZero data-intensive computing on the Open Science Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B.; Baranovski, A.; Diesburg, M.; Garzoglio, G.; Kurca, T.; Mhashilkar, P.

    2007-01-01

    High energy physics experiments periodically reprocess data, in order to take advantage of improved understanding of the detector and the data processing code. Between February and May 2007, the DZero experiment has reprocessed a substantial fraction of its dataset. This consists of half a billion events, corresponding to about 100 TB of data, organized in 300,000 files. The activity utilized resources from sites around the world, including a dozen sites participating to the Open Science Grid consortium (OSG). About 1,500 jobs were run every day across the OSG, consuming and producing hundreds of Gigabytes of data. Access to OSG computing and storage resources was coordinated by the SAM-Grid system. This system organized job access to a complex topology of data queues and job scheduling to clusters, using a SAM-Grid to OSG job forwarding infrastructure. For the first time in the lifetime of the experiment, a data intensive production activity was managed on a general purpose grid, such as OSG. This paper describes the implications of using OSG, where all resources are granted following an opportunistic model, the challenges of operating a data intensive activity over such large computing infrastructure, and the lessons learned throughout the project

  17. DZero data-intensive computing on the Open Science Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, B; Baranovski, A; Diesburg, M; Garzoglio, G; Mhashilkar, P; Kurca, T

    2008-01-01

    High energy physics experiments periodically reprocess data, in order to take advantage of improved understanding of the detector and the data processing code. Between February and May 2007, the DZero experiment has reprocessed a substantial fraction of its dataset. This consists of half a billion events, corresponding to about 100 TB of data, organized in 300,000 files. The activity utilized resources from sites around the world, including a dozen sites participating to the Open Science Grid consortium (OSG). About 1,500 jobs were run every day across the OSG, consuming and producing hundreds of Gigabytes of data. Access to OSG computing and storage resources was coordinated by the SAM-Grid system. This system organized job access to a complex topology of data queues and job scheduling to clusters, using a SAM-Grid to OSG job forwarding infrastructure. For the first time in the lifetime of the experiment, a data intensive production activity was managed on a general purpose grid, such as OSG. This paper describes the implications of using OSG, where all resources are granted following an opportunistic model, the challenges of operating a data intensive activity over such large computing infrastructure, and the lessons learned throughout the project

  18. Conducting Computer Security Assessments at Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    Computer security is increasingly recognized as a key component in nuclear security. As technology advances, it is anticipated that computer and computing systems will be used to an even greater degree in all aspects of plant operations including safety and security systems. A rigorous and comprehensive assessment process can assist in strengthening the effectiveness of the computer security programme. This publication outlines a methodology for conducting computer security assessments at nuclear facilities. The methodology can likewise be easily adapted to provide assessments at facilities with other radioactive materials

  19. Operating the worldwide LHC computing grid: current and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, J Flix; Forti, A; Girone, M; Sciaba, A

    2014-01-01

    The Wordwide LHC Computing Grid project (WLCG) provides the computing and storage resources required by the LHC collaborations to store, process and analyse their data. It includes almost 200,000 CPU cores, 200 PB of disk storage and 200 PB of tape storage distributed among more than 150 sites. The WLCG operations team is responsible for several essential tasks, such as the coordination of testing and deployment of Grid middleware and services, communication with the experiments and the sites, followup and resolution of operational issues and medium/long term planning. In 2012 WLCG critically reviewed all operational procedures and restructured the organisation of the operations team as a more coherent effort in order to improve its efficiency. In this paper we describe how the new organisation works, its recent successes and the changes to be implemented during the long LHC shutdown in preparation for the LHC Run 2.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation with the Gate software using grid computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuillon, R.; Hill, D.R.C.; Gouinaud, C.; El Bitar, Z.; Breton, V.; Buvat, I.

    2009-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely used in emission tomography, for protocol optimization, design of processing or data analysis methods, tomographic reconstruction, or tomograph design optimization. Monte Carlo simulations needing many replicates to obtain good statistical results can be easily executed in parallel using the 'Multiple Replications In Parallel' approach. However, several precautions have to be taken in the generation of the parallel streams of pseudo-random numbers. In this paper, we present the distribution of Monte Carlo simulations performed with the GATE software using local clusters and grid computing. We obtained very convincing results with this large medical application, thanks to the EGEE Grid (Enabling Grid for E-science), achieving in one week computations that could have taken more than 3 years of processing on a single computer. This work has been achieved thanks to a generic object-oriented toolbox called DistMe which we designed to automate this kind of parallelization for Monte Carlo simulations. This toolbox, written in Java is freely available on SourceForge and helped to ensure a rigorous distribution of pseudo-random number streams. It is based on the use of a documented XML format for random numbers generators statuses. (authors)

  1. The Model of the Software Running on a Computer Equipment Hardware Included in the Grid network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Mityushkina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to building a cloud computing environment using Grid networks is proposed in this paper. The authors describe the functional capabilities, algorithm, model of software running on a computer equipment hardware included in the Grid network, that will allow to implement cloud computing environment using Grid technologies.

  2. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2004 with the mission of standing up a supercomputer 100 times...

  3. Computing facility at SSC for detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibold, P.; Scipiono, B.

    1990-01-01

    A description of the RISC-based distributed computing facility for detector simulaiton being developed at the SSC Laboratory is discussed. The first phase of this facility is scheduled for completion in early 1991. Included is the status of the project, overview of the concepts used to model and define system architecture, networking capabilities for user access, plans for support of physics codes and related topics concerning the implementation of this facility

  4. gLExec: gluing grid computing to the Unix world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groep, D.; Koeroo, O.; Venekamp, G.

    2008-07-01

    The majority of compute resources in todays scientific grids are based on Unix and Unix-like operating systems. In this world, user and user-group management are based around the concepts of a numeric 'user ID' and 'group ID' that are local to the resource. In contrast, grid concepts of user and group management are centered around globally assigned identifiers and VO membership, structures that are independent of any specific resource. At the fabric boundary, these 'grid identities' have to be translated to Unix user IDs. New job submission methodologies, such as job-execution web services, community-deployed local schedulers, and the late binding of user jobs in a grid-wide overlay network of 'pilot jobs', push this fabric boundary ever further down into the resource. gLExec, a light-weight (and thereby auditable) credential mapping and authorization system, addresses these issues. It can be run both on fabric boundary, as part of an execution web service, and on the worker node in a late-binding scenario. In this contribution we describe the rationale for gLExec, how it interacts with the site authorization and credential mapping frameworks such as LCAS, LCMAPS and GUMS, and how it can be used to improve site control and traceability in a pilot-job system.

  5. gLExec: gluing grid computing to the Unix world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groep, D; Koeroo, O; Venekamp, G

    2008-01-01

    The majority of compute resources in todays scientific grids are based on Unix and Unix-like operating systems. In this world, user and user-group management are based around the concepts of a numeric 'user ID' and 'group ID' that are local to the resource. In contrast, grid concepts of user and group management are centered around globally assigned identifiers and VO membership, structures that are independent of any specific resource. At the fabric boundary, these 'grid identities' have to be translated to Unix user IDs. New job submission methodologies, such as job-execution web services, community-deployed local schedulers, and the late binding of user jobs in a grid-wide overlay network of 'pilot jobs', push this fabric boundary ever further down into the resource. gLExec, a light-weight (and thereby auditable) credential mapping and authorization system, addresses these issues. It can be run both on fabric boundary, as part of an execution web service, and on the worker node in a late-binding scenario. In this contribution we describe the rationale for gLExec, how it interacts with the site authorization and credential mapping frameworks such as LCAS, LCMAPS and GUMS, and how it can be used to improve site control and traceability in a pilot-job system

  6. ATLAS computing activities and developments in the Italian Grid cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldi, L; Ciocca, C; K, M; Annovi, A; Antonelli, M; Martini, A; Barberis, D; Brunengo, A; Corosu, M; Barberis, S; Carminati, L; Campana, S; Di, A; Capone, V; Carlino, G; Doria, A; Esposito, R; Merola, L; De, A; Luminari, L

    2012-01-01

    The large amount of data produced by the ATLAS experiment needs new computing paradigms for data processing and analysis, which involve many computing centres spread around the world. The computing workload is managed by regional federations, called “clouds”. The Italian cloud consists of a main (Tier-1) center, located in Bologna, four secondary (Tier-2) centers, and a few smaller (Tier-3) sites. In this contribution we describe the Italian cloud facilities and the activities of data processing, analysis, simulation and software development performed within the cloud, and we discuss the tests of the new computing technologies contributing to evolution of the ATLAS Computing Model.

  7. The Adoption of Grid Computing Technology by Organizations: A Quantitative Study Using Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Emmanuel E.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in grid technology have enabled some organizations to harness enormous computational power on demand. However, the prediction of widespread adoption of the grid technology has not materialized despite the obvious grid advantages. This situation has encouraged intense efforts to close the research gap in the grid adoption process. In this…

  8. Dynamic stability calculations for power grids employing a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, K

    1982-06-01

    The aim of dynamic contingency calculations in power systems is to estimate the effects of assumed disturbances, such as loss of generation. Due to the large dimensions of the problem these simulations require considerable computing time and costs, to the effect that they are at present only used in a planning state but not for routine checks in power control stations. In view of the homogeneity of the problem, where a multitude of equal generator models, having different parameters, are to be integrated simultaneously, the use of a parallel computer looks very attractive. The results of this study employing a prototype parallel computer (SMS 201) are presented. It consists of up to 128 equal microcomputers bus-connected to a control computer. Each of the modules is programmed to simulate a node of the power grid. Generators with their associated control are represented by models of 13 states each. Passive nodes are complemented by 'phantom'-generators, so that the whole power grid is homogenous, thus removing the need for load-flow-iterations. Programming of microcomputers is essentially performed in FORTRAN.

  9. 2016 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Jim [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) helps researchers solve some of the world’s largest and most complex problems, while also advancing the nation’s efforts to develop future exascale computing systems. This report presents some of the ALCF’s notable achievements in key strategic areas over the past year.

  10. The Future of Distributed Computing Systems in ATLAS: Boldly Venturing Beyond Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Barreiro Megino, Fernando Harald; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has seen big changes over the past couple of years to accommodate new types of distributed computing resources: clouds, HPCs, volunteer computers and other external resources. While PanDA was originally designed for fairly homogeneous resources available through the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid, the new resources are heterogeneous, at diverse scales and with diverse interfaces. Up to a fifth of the resources available to ATLAS are of such new types and require special techniques for integration into PanDA. In this talk, we present the nature and scale of these resources. We provide an overview of the various challenges faced, spanning infrastructure, software distribution, workload requirements, scaling requirements, workflow management, data management, network provisioning, and associated software and computing facilities. We describe the strategies for integrating these heterogeneous resources into ...

  11. Distributed Database Access in the LHC Computing Grid with CORAL

    CERN Document Server

    Molnár, Z; Düllmann, D; Giacomo, G; Kalkhof, A; Valassi, A; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2009-01-01

    The CORAL package is the LCG Persistency Framework foundation for accessing relational databases. From the start CORAL has been designed to facilitate the deployment of the LHC experiment database applications in a distributed computing environment. In particular we cover - improvements to database service scalability by client connection management - platform-independent, multi-tier scalable database access by connection multiplexing, caching - a secure authentication and authorisation scheme integrated with existing grid services. We will summarize the deployment experience from several experiment productions using the distributed database infrastructure, which is now available in LCG. Finally, we present perspectives for future developments in this area.

  12. The Fermilab central computing facility architectural model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.

    1989-01-01

    The goal of the current Central Computing Upgrade at Fermilab is to create a computing environment that maximizes total productivity, particularly for high energy physics analysis. The Computing Department and the Next Computer Acquisition Committee decided upon a model which includes five components: an interactive front-end, a Large-Scale Scientific Computer (LSSC, a mainframe computing engine), a microprocessor farm system, a file server, and workstations. With the exception of the file server, all segments of this model are currently in production: a VAX/VMS cluster interactive front-end, an Amdahl VM Computing engine, ACP farms, and (primarily) VMS workstations. This paper will discuss the implementation of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Architectural Model. Implications for Code Management in such a heterogeneous environment, including issues such as modularity and centrality, will be considered. Special emphasis will be placed on connectivity and communications between the front-end, LSSC, and workstations, as practiced at Fermilab. (orig.)

  13. The Fermilab Central Computing Facility architectural model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.

    1989-05-01

    The goal of the current Central Computing Upgrade at Fermilab is to create a computing environment that maximizes total productivity, particularly for high energy physics analysis. The Computing Department and the Next Computer Acquisition Committee decided upon a model which includes five components: an interactive front end, a Large-Scale Scientific Computer (LSSC, a mainframe computing engine), a microprocessor farm system, a file server, and workstations. With the exception of the file server, all segments of this model are currently in production: a VAX/VMS Cluster interactive front end, an Amdahl VM computing engine, ACP farms, and (primarily) VMS workstations. This presentation will discuss the implementation of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Architectural Model. Implications for Code Management in such a heterogeneous environment, including issues such as modularity and centrality, will be considered. Special emphasis will be placed on connectivity and communications between the front-end, LSSC, and workstations, as practiced at Fermilab. 2 figs

  14. Multiobjective Variable Neighborhood Search algorithm for scheduling independent jobs on computational grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Selvi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Grid computing solves high performance and high-throughput computing problems through sharing resources ranging from personal computers to super computers distributed around the world. As the grid environments facilitate distributed computation, the scheduling of grid jobs has become an important issue. In this paper, an investigation on implementing Multiobjective Variable Neighborhood Search (MVNS algorithm for scheduling independent jobs on computational grid is carried out. The performance of the proposed algorithm has been evaluated with Min–Min algorithm, Simulated Annealing (SA and Greedy Randomized Adaptive Search Procedure (GRASP algorithm. Simulation results show that MVNS algorithm generally performs better than other metaheuristics methods.

  15. Evaluation of the Netherlands' International Test Facility for Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmintier, Bryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pratt, Annabelle [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Netherlands Enterprise Agency (Rijksdienst voor Ondernemend Nederland, or RVO) engaged the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for two primary purposes: to evaluate the International Test Facility for Smart Grids (ITF) sponsored by RVO and to learn best practices for integrated test facilities from NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF). This report covers the ITF evaluation and is largely based on a one-week visit to the Netherlands in November 2014.

  16. Cloud computing for energy management in smart grid - an application survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveen, P; Ing, Wong Kiing; Danquah, Michael Kobina; Sidhu, Amandeep S; Abu-Siada, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The smart grid is the emerging energy system wherein the application of information technology, tools and techniques that make the grid run more efficiently. It possesses demand response capacity to help balance electrical consumption with supply. The challenges and opportunities of emerging and future smart grids can be addressed by cloud computing. To focus on these requirements, we provide an in-depth survey on different cloud computing applications for energy management in the smart grid architecture. In this survey, we present an outline of the current state of research on smart grid development. We also propose a model of cloud based economic power dispatch for smart grid. (paper)

  17. The GLOBE-Consortium: The Erasmus Computing Grid – Building a Super-Computer at Erasmus MC for FREE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractTo meet the enormous computational needs of live-science research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment the Hogeschool Rotterdam and the Erasmus Medical Center are currently setting up one of the largest desktop computing grids in the world – The Erasmus Computing Grid.

  18. An Offload NIC for NASA, NLR, and Grid Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awrach, James

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses distributed data management and access dynamically configurable high-speed access to data distributed and shared over wide-area high-speed network environments. An offload engine NIC (network interface card) is proposed that scales at nX10-Gbps increments through 100-Gbps full duplex. The Globus de facto standard was used in projects requiring secure, robust, high-speed bulk data transport. Novel extension mechanisms were derived that will combine these technologies for use by GridFTP, bandwidth management resources, and host CPU (central processing unit) acceleration. The result will be wire-rate encrypted Globus grid data transactions through offload for splintering, encryption, and compression. As the need for greater network bandwidth increases, there is an inherent need for faster CPUs. The best way to accelerate CPUs is through a network acceleration engine. Grid computing data transfers for the Globus tool set did not have wire-rate encryption or compression. Existing technology cannot keep pace with the greater bandwidths of backplane and network connections. Present offload engines with ports to Ethernet are 32 to 40 Gbps f-d at best. The best of ultra-high-speed offload engines use expensive ASICs (application specific integrated circuits) or NPUs (network processing units). The present state of the art also includes bonding and the use of multiple NICs that are also in the planning stages for future portability to ASICs and software to accommodate data rates at 100 Gbps. The remaining industry solutions are for carrier-grade equipment manufacturers, with costly line cards having multiples of 10-Gbps ports, or 100-Gbps ports such as CFP modules that interface to costly ASICs and related circuitry. All of the existing solutions vary in configuration based on requirements of the host, motherboard, or carriergrade equipment. The purpose of the innovation is to eliminate data bottlenecks within cluster, grid, and cloud computing systems

  19. A large-scale computer facility for computational aerodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, F.R.; Balhaus, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The combination of computer system technology and numerical modeling have advanced to the point that computational aerodynamics has emerged as an essential element in aerospace vehicle design methodology. To provide for further advances in modeling of aerodynamic flow fields, NASA has initiated at the Ames Research Center the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program. The objective of the Program is to develop a leading-edge, large-scale computer facility, and make it available to NASA, DoD, other Government agencies, industry and universities as a necessary element in ensuring continuing leadership in computational aerodynamics and related disciplines. The Program will establish an initial operational capability in 1986 and systematically enhance that capability by incorporating evolving improvements in state-of-the-art computer system technologies as required to maintain a leadership role. This paper briefly reviews the present and future requirements for computational aerodynamics and discusses the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program objectives, computational goals, and implementation plans

  20. CERN database services for the LHC computing grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girone, M [CERN IT Department, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)], E-mail: maria.girone@cern.ch

    2008-07-15

    Physics meta-data stored in relational databases play a crucial role in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments and also in the operation of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) services. A large proportion of non-event data such as detector conditions, calibration, geometry and production bookkeeping relies heavily on databases. Also, the core Grid services that catalogue and distribute LHC data cannot operate without a reliable database infrastructure at CERN and elsewhere. The Physics Services and Support group at CERN provides database services for the physics community. With an installed base of several TB-sized database clusters, the service is designed to accommodate growth for data processing generated by the LHC experiments and LCG services. During the last year, the physics database services went through a major preparation phase for LHC start-up and are now fully based on Oracle clusters on Intel/Linux. Over 100 database server nodes are deployed today in some 15 clusters serving almost 2 million database sessions per week. This paper will detail the architecture currently deployed in production and the results achieved in the areas of high availability, consolidation and scalability. Service evolution plans for the LHC start-up will also be discussed.

  1. CERN database services for the LHC computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girone, M

    2008-01-01

    Physics meta-data stored in relational databases play a crucial role in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments and also in the operation of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) services. A large proportion of non-event data such as detector conditions, calibration, geometry and production bookkeeping relies heavily on databases. Also, the core Grid services that catalogue and distribute LHC data cannot operate without a reliable database infrastructure at CERN and elsewhere. The Physics Services and Support group at CERN provides database services for the physics community. With an installed base of several TB-sized database clusters, the service is designed to accommodate growth for data processing generated by the LHC experiments and LCG services. During the last year, the physics database services went through a major preparation phase for LHC start-up and are now fully based on Oracle clusters on Intel/Linux. Over 100 database server nodes are deployed today in some 15 clusters serving almost 2 million database sessions per week. This paper will detail the architecture currently deployed in production and the results achieved in the areas of high availability, consolidation and scalability. Service evolution plans for the LHC start-up will also be discussed

  2. Computational Science at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Nichols

    2014-03-01

    The goal of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) is to extend the frontiers of science by solving problems that require innovative approaches and the largest-scale computing systems. ALCF's most powerful computer - Mira, an IBM Blue Gene/Q system - has nearly one million cores. How does one program such systems? What software tools are available? Which scientific and engineering applications are able to utilize such levels of parallelism? This talk will address these questions and describe a sampling of projects that are using ALCF systems in their research, including ones in nanoscience, materials science, and chemistry. Finally, the ways to gain access to ALCF resources will be presented. This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. LHCb: The Evolution of the LHCb Grid Computing Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Arrabito, L; Bouvet, D; Cattaneo, M; Charpentier, P; Clarke, P; Closier, J; Franchini, P; Graciani, R; Lanciotti, E; Mendez, V; Perazzini, S; Nandkumar, R; Remenska, D; Roiser, S; Romanovskiy, V; Santinelli, R; Stagni, F; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Ubeda Garcia, M; Vedaee, A; Zhelezov, A

    2012-01-01

    The increase of luminosity in the LHC during its second year of operation (2011) was achieved by delivering more protons per bunch and increasing the number of bunches. Taking advantage of these changed conditions, LHCb ran with a higher pileup as well as a much larger charm physics introducing a bigger event size and processing times. These changes led to shortages in the offline distributed data processing resources, an increased need of cpu capacity by a factor 2 for reconstruction, higher storage needs at T1 sites by 70\\% and subsequently problems with data throughput for file access from the storage elements. To accommodate these changes the online running conditions and the Computing Model for offline data processing had to be adapted accordingly. This paper describes the changes implemented for the offline data processing on the Grid, relaxing the Monarc model in a first step and going beyond it subsequently. It further describes other operational issues discovered and solved during 2011, present the ...

  4. Distributed Monitoring Infrastructure for Worldwide LHC Computing Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, Pedro; Bhatt, Kislay; Chand, Phool; Collados, David; Duggal, Vibhuti; Fuente, Paloma; Hayashi, Soichi; Imamagic, Emir; Joshi, Pradyumna; Kalmady, Rajesh; Karnani, Urvashi; Kumar, Vaibhav; Lapka, Wojciech; Quick, Robert; Tarragon, Jacobo; Teige, Scott; Triantafyllidis, Christos

    2012-01-01

    The journey of a monitoring probe from its development phase to the moment its execution result is presented in an availability report is a complex process. It goes through multiple phases such as development, testing, integration, release, deployment, execution, data aggregation, computation, and reporting. Further, it involves people with different roles (developers, site managers, VO managers, service managers, management), from different middleware providers (ARC, dCache, gLite, UNICORE and VDT), consortiums (WLCG, EMI, EGI, OSG), and operational teams (GOC, OMB, OTAG, CSIRT). The seamless harmonization of these distributed actors is in daily use for monitoring of the WLCG infrastructure. In this paper we describe the monitoring of the WLCG infrastructure from the operational perspective. We explain the complexity of the journey of a monitoring probe from its execution on a grid node to the visualization on the MyWLCG portal where it is exposed to other clients. This monitoring workflow profits from the i...

  5. Engineering of an Extreme Rainfall Detection System using Grid Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Terzo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new approach for intensive rainfall data analysis. ITHACA's Extreme Rainfall Detection System (ERDS is conceived to provide near real-time alerts related to potential exceptional rainfalls worldwide, which can be used by WFP or other humanitarian assistance organizations to evaluate the event and understand the potentially floodable areas where their assistance is needed. This system is based on precipitation analysis and it uses rainfall data from satellite at worldwide extent. This project uses the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis dataset, a NASA-delivered near real-time product for current rainfall condition monitoring over the world. Considering the great deal of data to process, this paper presents an architectural solution based on Grid Computing techniques. Our focus is on the advantages of using a distributed architecture in terms of performances for this specific purpose.

  6. Integration of the Chinese HPC Grid in ATLAS Distributed Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipčič, A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Fifteen Chinese High-Performance Computing sites, many of them on the TOP500 list of most powerful supercomputers, are integrated into a common infrastructure providing coherent access to a user through an interface based on a RESTful interface called SCEAPI. These resources have been integrated into the ATLAS Grid production system using a bridge between ATLAS and SCEAPI which translates the authorization and job submission protocols between the two environments. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) forms the bridge using an extended batch system interface to allow job submission to SCEAPI. The ARC-CE was setup at the Institute for High Energy Physics, Beijing, in order to be as close as possible to the SCEAPI front-end interface at the Computing Network Information Center, also in Beijing. This paper describes the technical details of the integration between ARC-CE and SCEAPI and presents results so far with two supercomputer centers, Tianhe-IA and ERA. These two centers have been the pilots for ATLAS Monte Carlo Simulation in SCEAPI and have been providing CPU power since fall 2015.

  7. Integration of the Chinese HPC Grid in ATLAS Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00081160; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen Chinese High Performance Computing sites, many of them on the TOP500 list of most powerful supercomputers, are integrated into a common infrastructure providing coherent access to a user through an interface based on a RESTful interface called SCEAPI. These resources have been integrated into the ATLAS Grid production system using a bridge between ATLAS and SCEAPI which translates the authorization and job submission protocols between the two environments. The ARC Computing Element (ARC CE) forms the bridge using an extended batch system interface to allow job submission to SCEAPI. The ARC CE was setup at the Institute for High Energy Physics, Beijing, in order to be as close as possible to the SCEAPI front-end interface at the Computing Network Information Center, also in Beijing. This paper describes the technical details of the integration between ARC CE and SCEAPI and presents results so far with two supercomputer centers, Tianhe-IA and ERA. These two centers have been the pilots for ATLAS Monte C...

  8. Integration of the Chinese HPC Grid in ATLAS Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00081160

    2017-01-01

    Fifteen Chinese High-Performance Computing sites, many of them on the TOP500 list of most powerful supercomputers, are integrated into a common infrastructure providing coherent access to a user through an interface based on a RESTful interface called SCEAPI. These resources have been integrated into the ATLAS Grid production system using a bridge between ATLAS and SCEAPI which translates the authorization and job submission protocols between the two environments. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) forms the bridge using an extended batch system interface to allow job submission to SCEAPI. The ARC-CE was setup at the Institute for High Energy Physics, Beijing, in order to be as close as possible to the SCEAPI front-end interface at the Computing Network Information Center, also in Beijing. This paper describes the technical details of the integration between ARC-CE and SCEAPI and presents results so far with two supercomputer centers, Tianhe-IA and ERA. These two centers have been the pilots for ATLAS Monte C...

  9. WNoDeS, a tool for integrated Grid and Cloud access and computing farm virtualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomoni, Davide; Italiano, Alessandro; Ronchieri, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    INFN CNAF is the National Computing Center, located in Bologna, Italy, of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN). INFN CNAF, also called the INFN Tier-1, provides computing and storage facilities to the International High-Energy Physics community and to several multi-disciplinary experiments. Currently, the INFN Tier-1 supports more than twenty different collaborations; in this context, optimization of the usage of computing resources is essential. This is one of the main drivers behind the development of a software called WNoDeS (Worker Nodes on Demand Service). WNoDeS, developed at INFN CNAF and deployed on the INFN Tier-1 production infrastructure, is a solution to virtualize computing resources and to make them available through local, Grid or Cloud interfaces. It is designed to be fully integrated with a Local Resource Management System; it is therefore inherently scalable and permits full integration with existing scheduling, policing, monitoring, accounting and security workflows. WNoDeS dynamically instantiates Virtual Machines (VMs) on-demand, i.e. only when the need arises; these VMs can be tailored and used for purposes like batch job execution, interactive analysis or service instantiation. WNoDeS supports interaction with user requests through traditional batch or Grid jobs and also via the Open Cloud Computing Interface standard, making it possible to allocate compute, storage and network resources on a pay-as-you-go basis. User authentication is supported via several authentication methods, while authorization policies are handled via gLite Argus. WNoDeS is an ambitious solution aimed at virtualizing cluster resources in medium or large scale computing centers, with up to several thousands of Virtual Machines up and running at any given time. In this paper, we describe the WNoDeS architecture.

  10. WNoDeS, a tool for integrated Grid and Cloud access and computing farm virtualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomoni, Davide; Italiano, Alessandro; Ronchieri, Elisabetta

    2011-12-01

    INFN CNAF is the National Computing Center, located in Bologna, Italy, of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN). INFN CNAF, also called the INFN Tier-1, provides computing and storage facilities to the International High-Energy Physics community and to several multi-disciplinary experiments. Currently, the INFN Tier-1 supports more than twenty different collaborations; in this context, optimization of the usage of computing resources is essential. This is one of the main drivers behind the development of a software called WNoDeS (Worker Nodes on Demand Service). WNoDeS, developed at INFN CNAF and deployed on the INFN Tier-1 production infrastructure, is a solution to virtualize computing resources and to make them available through local, Grid or Cloud interfaces. It is designed to be fully integrated with a Local Resource Management System; it is therefore inherently scalable and permits full integration with existing scheduling, policing, monitoring, accounting and security workflows. WNoDeS dynamically instantiates Virtual Machines (VMs) on-demand, i.e. only when the need arises; these VMs can be tailored and used for purposes like batch job execution, interactive analysis or service instantiation. WNoDeS supports interaction with user requests through traditional batch or Grid jobs and also via the Open Cloud Computing Interface standard, making it possible to allocate compute, storage and network resources on a pay-as-you-go basis. User authentication is supported via several authentication methods, while authorization policies are handled via gLite Argus. WNoDeS is an ambitious solution aimed at virtualizing cluster resources in medium or large scale computing centers, with up to several thousands of Virtual Machines up and running at any given time. In this paper, we descrive the WNoDeS architecture.

  11. Computer codes for ventilation in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcey, P.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the authors present some computer codes, developed in the last years, for ventilation and radioprotection. These codes are used for safety analysis in the conception, exploitation and dismantlement of nuclear facilities. The authors present particularly: DACC1 code used for aerosol deposit in sampling circuit of radiation monitors; PIAF code used for modelization of complex ventilation system; CLIMAT 6 code used for optimization of air conditioning system [fr

  12. Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics 2007 : Implementations and Experiences on Large Scale and Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    At the 19th Annual Conference on Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics held in Antalya, Turkey, in May 2007, the most recent developments and implementations of large-scale and grid computing were presented. This book, comprised of the invited and selected papers of this conference, details those advances, which are of particular interest to CFD and CFD-related communities. It also offers the results related to applications of various scientific and engineering problems involving flows and flow-related topics. Intended for CFD researchers and graduate students, this book is a state-of-the-art presentation of the relevant methodology and implementation techniques of large-scale computing.

  13. Multidimensional Environmental Data Resource Brokering on Computational Grids and Scientific Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montella, Raffaele; Giunta, Giulio; Laccetti, Giuliano

    Grid computing has widely evolved over the past years, and its capabilities have found their way even into business products and are no longer relegated to scientific applications. Today, grid computing technology is not restricted to a set of specific grid open source or industrial products, but rather it is comprised of a set of capabilities virtually within any kind of software to create shared and highly collaborative production environments. These environments are focused on computational (workload) capabilities and the integration of information (data) into those computational capabilities. An active grid computing application field is the fully virtualization of scientific instruments in order to increase their availability and decrease operational and maintaining costs. Computational and information grids allow to manage real-world objects in a service-oriented way using industrial world-spread standards.

  14. Parallel Monte Carlo simulations on an ARC-enabled computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, Jon K; Samset, Bjørn H

    2011-01-01

    Grid computing opens new possibilities for running heavy Monte Carlo simulations of physical systems in parallel. The presentation gives an overview of GaMPI, a system for running an MPI-based random walker simulation on grid resources. Integrating the ARC middleware and the new storage system Chelonia with the Ganga grid job submission and control system, we show that MPI jobs can be run on a world-wide computing grid with good performance and promising scaling properties. Results for relatively communication-heavy Monte Carlo simulations run on multiple heterogeneous, ARC-enabled computing clusters in several countries are presented.

  15. Plasma grid design for optimized filter field configuration for the NBI test facility ELISE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocentini, R.; Gutser, R.; Heinemann, B.; Froeschle, M.; Riedl, R.

    2009-01-01

    Maintenance-free RF sources for negative hydrogen ions with moderate extraction areas (100-200 cm 2 ) have been successfully developed in the last years at IPP Garching in the test facilities BATMAN and MANITU. A facility with larger extraction area (1000 cm 2 ), ELISE, is being designed with a 'half-size' ITER-like extraction system, pulsed ion acceleration up to 60 kV for 10 s and plasma generation up to 1 h. Due to the large size of the source, the magnetic filter field (FF) cannot be produced solely by permanent magnets. Therefore, an additional magnetic field produced by current flowing through the plasma grid (PG current) is required. The filter field homogeneity and the interaction with the electron suppression magnetic field have been studied in detail by finite element method (FEM) during the ELISE design phase. Significant improvements regarding the field homogeneity have been introduced compared to the ITER reference design. Also, for the same PG current a 50% higher field in front of the grid has been achieved by optimizing the plasma grid geometry. Hollow spaces have been introduced in the plasma grid for a more homogeneous PG current distribution. The introduction of hollow spaces also allows the insertion of permanent magnets in the plasma grid.

  16. Towards higher reliability of CMS computing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagliesi, G; Bloom, K; Brew, C; Flix, J; Kreuzer, P; Sciabà, A

    2012-01-01

    The CMS experiment has adopted a computing system where resources are distributed worldwide in more than 50 sites. The operation of the system requires a stable and reliable behaviour of the underlying infrastructure. CMS has established procedures to extensively test all relevant aspects of a site and their capability to sustain the various CMS computing workflows at the required scale. The Site Readiness monitoring infrastructure has been instrumental in understanding how the system as a whole was improving towards LHC operations, measuring the reliability of sites when running CMS activities, and providing sites with the information they need to troubleshoot any problem. This contribution reviews the complete automation of the Site Readiness program, with the description of monitoring tools and their inclusion into the Site Status Board (SSB), the performance checks, the use of tools like HammerCloud, and the impact in improving the overall reliability of the Grid from the point of view of the CMS computing system. These results are used by CMS to select good sites to conduct workflows, in order to maximize workflows efficiencies. The performance against these tests seen at the sites during the first years of LHC running is as well reviewed.

  17. Kids at CERN Grids for Kids programme leads to advanced computing knowledge.

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Children as young as 10 are learning computing skills, such as middleware, parallel processing and supercomputing, at CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, last week. The initiative for 10 to 12 years olds is part of the Grids for Kids programme, which aims to introduce Grid computing as a tool for research.

  18. CDF GlideinWMS usage in Grid computing of high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvada, Marian; Sfiligoi, Igor; Benjamin, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Many members of large science collaborations already have specialized grids available to advance their research in the need of getting more computing resources for data analysis. This has forced the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) collaboration to move beyond the usage of dedicated resources and start exploiting Grid resources. Nowadays, CDF experiment is increasingly relying on glidein-based computing pools for data reconstruction. Especially, Monte Carlo production and user data analysis, serving over 400 users by central analysis farm middleware (CAF) on the top of Condor batch system and CDF Grid infrastructure. Condor is designed as distributed architecture and its glidein mechanism of pilot jobs is ideal for abstracting the Grid computing by making a virtual private computing pool. We would like to present the first production use of the generic pilot-based Workload Management System (glideinWMS), which is an implementation of the pilot mechanism based on the Condor distributed infrastructure. CDF Grid computing uses glideinWMS for its data reconstruction on the FNAL campus Grid, user analysis and Monte Carlo production across Open Science Grid (OSG). We review this computing model and setup used including CDF specific configuration within the glideinWMS system which provides powerful scalability and makes Grid computing working like in a local batch environment with ability to handle more than 10000 running jobs at a time.

  19. Sort-Mid tasks scheduling algorithm in grid computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naglaa M. Reda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Scheduling tasks on heterogeneous resources distributed over a grid computing system is an NP-complete problem. The main aim for several researchers is to develop variant scheduling algorithms for achieving optimality, and they have shown a good performance for tasks scheduling regarding resources selection. However, using of the full power of resources is still a challenge. In this paper, a new heuristic algorithm called Sort-Mid is proposed. It aims to maximizing the utilization and minimizing the makespan. The new strategy of Sort-Mid algorithm is to find appropriate resources. The base step is to get the average value via sorting list of completion time of each task. Then, the maximum average is obtained. Finally, the task has the maximum average is allocated to the machine that has the minimum completion time. The allocated task is deleted and then, these steps are repeated until all tasks are allocated. Experimental tests show that the proposed algorithm outperforms almost other algorithms in terms of resources utilization and makespan.

  20. Sort-Mid tasks scheduling algorithm in grid computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Naglaa M; Tawfik, A; Marzok, Mohamed A; Khamis, Soheir M

    2015-11-01

    Scheduling tasks on heterogeneous resources distributed over a grid computing system is an NP-complete problem. The main aim for several researchers is to develop variant scheduling algorithms for achieving optimality, and they have shown a good performance for tasks scheduling regarding resources selection. However, using of the full power of resources is still a challenge. In this paper, a new heuristic algorithm called Sort-Mid is proposed. It aims to maximizing the utilization and minimizing the makespan. The new strategy of Sort-Mid algorithm is to find appropriate resources. The base step is to get the average value via sorting list of completion time of each task. Then, the maximum average is obtained. Finally, the task has the maximum average is allocated to the machine that has the minimum completion time. The allocated task is deleted and then, these steps are repeated until all tasks are allocated. Experimental tests show that the proposed algorithm outperforms almost other algorithms in terms of resources utilization and makespan.

  1. Profitability analysis of grid-connected photovoltaic facilities for household electricity self-sufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colmenar-Santos, Antonio; Campíñez-Romero, Severo; Pérez-Molina, Clara; Castro-Gil, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Spain exhibits a high level of energy dependence and has significant solar energy resources. These two facts have given rise to the prominence that renewable energy, particularly solar photovoltaic technology, has enjoyed in recent years, supported by a favorable regulatory framework. Currently, the Spanish Government is providing new ways in energy policy to enhance and accelerate the development of low-power photovoltaic generation facilities for self-consumption by introducing energy policies for feed-in payments of surplus electricity. Such facilities are an example of distributed electrical generation with important benefits for the environment and the rest of the electrical system because, when properly managed, they can help improve the system’s stability and reduce overall losses. By analyzing household demand and solar photovoltaic energy resources, the profitability of such facilities is considered in this article, taking into account the technical and economic impact of storage systems and proposing models for feed-in payments of surplus electricity, in an attempt to assess whether this method of electricity generation versus the method of conventionally supplied power from a grid at a regulated tariff can rival each other economically, in terms of parity. - Highlight: ► The use of grid-connected photovoltaic facilities for household electricity self-sufficiency is presented. ► The need for legal frameworks that include retributive mechanisms for the surplus energy is pointed out. ► Two models are proposed for the remuneration of surplus energy generated. ► Models show economic profitability without feed-in-tariff or compensations. ► Facilities described offer ancillary services for grid stability and smart-grid integration.

  2. Grid Computing Application for Brain Magnetic Resonance Image Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivia, F; Crépeault, B; Duchesne, S

    2012-01-01

    This work emphasizes the use of grid computing and web technology for automatic post-processing of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) in the context of neuropsychiatric (Alzheimer's disease) research. Post-acquisition image processing is achieved through the interconnection of several individual processes into pipelines. Each process has input and output data ports, options and execution parameters, and performs single tasks such as: a) extracting individual image attributes (e.g. dimensions, orientation, center of mass), b) performing image transformations (e.g. scaling, rotation, skewing, intensity standardization, linear and non-linear registration), c) performing image statistical analyses, and d) producing the necessary quality control images and/or files for user review. The pipelines are built to perform specific sequences of tasks on the alphanumeric data and MRIs contained in our database. The web application is coded in PHP and allows the creation of scripts to create, store and execute pipelines and their instances either on our local cluster or on high-performance computing platforms. To run an instance on an external cluster, the web application opens a communication tunnel through which it copies the necessary files, submits the execution commands and collects the results. We present result on system tests for the processing of a set of 821 brain MRIs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study via a nonlinear registration pipeline composed of 10 processes. Our results show successful execution on both local and external clusters, and a 4-fold increase in performance if using the external cluster. However, the latter's performance does not scale linearly as queue waiting times and execution overhead increase with the number of tasks to be executed.

  3. INFN-Pisa scientific computation environment (GRID, HPC and Interactive Analysis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arezzini, S; Carboni, A; Caruso, G; Ciampa, A; Coscetti, S; Mazzoni, E; Piras, S

    2014-01-01

    The INFN-Pisa Tier2 infrastructure is described, optimized not only for GRID CPU and Storage access, but also for a more interactive use of the resources in order to provide good solutions for the final data analysis step. The Data Center, equipped with about 6700 production cores, permits the use of modern analysis techniques realized via advanced statistical tools (like RooFit and RooStat) implemented in multicore systems. In particular a POSIX file storage access integrated with standard SRM access is provided. Therefore the unified storage infrastructure is described, based on GPFS and Xrootd, used both for SRM data repository and interactive POSIX access. Such a common infrastructure allows a transparent access to the Tier2 data to the users for their interactive analysis. The organization of a specialized many cores CPU facility devoted to interactive analysis is also described along with the login mechanism integrated with the INFN-AAI (National INFN Infrastructure) to extend the site access and use to a geographical distributed community. Such infrastructure is used also for a national computing facility in use to the INFN theoretical community, it enables a synergic use of computing and storage resources. Our Center initially developed for the HEP community is now growing and includes also HPC resources fully integrated. In recent years has been installed and managed a cluster facility (1000 cores, parallel use via InfiniBand connection) and we are now updating this facility that will provide resources for all the intermediate level HPC computing needs of the INFN theoretical national community.

  4. Campus Grids: Bringing Additional Computational Resources to HEP Researchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzel, Derek; Fraser, Dan; Bockelman, Brian; Swanson, David

    2012-01-01

    It is common at research institutions to maintain multiple clusters that represent different owners or generations of hardware, or that fulfill different needs and policies. Many of these clusters are consistently under utilized while researchers on campus could greatly benefit from these unused capabilities. By leveraging principles from the Open Science Grid it is now possible to utilize these resources by forming a lightweight campus grid. The campus grids framework enables jobs that are submitted to one cluster to overflow, when necessary, to other clusters within the campus using whatever authentication mechanisms are available on campus. This framework is currently being used on several campuses to run HEP and other science jobs. Further, the framework has in some cases been expanded beyond the campus boundary by bridging campus grids into a regional grid, and can even be used to integrate resources from a national cyberinfrastructure such as the Open Science Grid. This paper will highlight 18 months of operational experiences creating campus grids in the US, and the different campus configurations that have successfully utilized the campus grid infrastructure.

  5. Porting of Scientific Applications to Grid Computing on GridWay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Herrera

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion and adoption of Grid technologies is prevented by the lack of a standard programming paradigm to port existing applications among different environments. The Distributed Resource Management Application API has been proposed to aid the rapid development and distribution of these applications across different Distributed Resource Management Systems. In this paper we describe an implementation of the DRMAA standard on a Globus-based testbed, and show its suitability to express typical scientific applications, like High-Throughput and Master-Worker applications. The DRMAA routines are supported by the functionality offered by the GridWay2 framework, which provides the runtime mechanisms needed for transparently executing jobs on a dynamic Grid environment based on Globus. As cases of study, we consider the implementation with DRMAA of a bioinformatics application, a genetic algorithm and the NAS Grid Benchmarks.

  6. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility Position Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Hill, Jason J [ORNL; Thach, Kevin G [ORNL; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the business, administration, reliability, and usability aspects of storage systems at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). The OLCF has developed key competencies in architecting and administration of large-scale Lustre deployments as well as HPSS archival systems. Additionally as these systems are architected, deployed, and expanded over time reliability and availability factors are a primary driver. This paper focuses on the implementation of the Spider parallel Lustre file system as well as the implementation of the HPSS archive at the OLCF.

  7. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birman, Kenneth; Ganesh, Lakshmi; Renessee, Robbert van; Ferris, Michael; Hofmann, Andreas; Williams, Brian; Sztipanovits, Janos; Hemingway, Graham; University, Vanderbilt; Bose, Anjan; Stivastava, Anurag; Grijalva, Santiago; Grijalva, Santiago; Ryan, Sarah M.; McCalley, James D.; Woodruff, David L.; Xiong, Jinjun; Acar, Emrah; Agrawal, Bhavna; Conn, Andrew R.; Ditlow, Gary; Feldmann, Peter; Finkler, Ulrich; Gaucher, Brian; Gupta, Anshul; Heng, Fook-Luen; Kalagnanam, Jayant R; Koc, Ali; Kung, David; Phan, Dung; Singhee, Amith; Smith, Basil

    2011-10-05

    The April 2011 DOE workshop, 'Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid', was the culmination of a year-long process to bring together some of the Nation's leading researchers and experts to identify computational challenges associated with the operation and planning of the electric power system. The attached papers provide a journey into these experts' insights, highlighting a class of mathematical and computational problems relevant for potential power systems research. While each paper defines a specific problem area, there were several recurrent themes. First, the breadth and depth of power system data has expanded tremendously over the past decade. This provides the potential for new control approaches and operator tools that can enhance system efficiencies and improve reliability. However, the large volume of data poses its own challenges, and could benefit from application of advances in computer networking and architecture, as well as data base structures. Second, the computational complexity of the underlying system problems is growing. Transmitting electricity from clean, domestic energy resources in remote regions to urban consumers, for example, requires broader, regional planning over multi-decade time horizons. Yet, it may also mean operational focus on local solutions and shorter timescales, as reactive power and system dynamics (including fast switching and controls) play an increasingly critical role in achieving stability and ultimately reliability. The expected growth in reliance on variable renewable sources of electricity generation places an exclamation point on both of these observations, and highlights the need for new focus in areas such as stochastic optimization to accommodate the increased uncertainty that is occurring in both planning and operations. Application of research advances in algorithms (especially related to optimization techniques and uncertainty quantification) could accelerate power

  8. Demand side management scheme in smart grid with cloud computing approach using stochastic dynamic programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sofana Reka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a cloud computing framework in smart grid environment by creating small integrated energy hub supporting real time computing for handling huge storage of data. A stochastic programming approach model is developed with cloud computing scheme for effective demand side management (DSM in smart grid. Simulation results are obtained using GUI interface and Gurobi optimizer in Matlab in order to reduce the electricity demand by creating energy networks in a smart hub approach.

  9. Greedy and metaheuristics for the offline scheduling problem in grid computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Mette

    In grid computing a number of geographically distributed resources connected through a wide area network, are utilized as one computations unit. The NP-hard offline scheduling problem in grid computing consists of assigning jobs to resources in advance. In this paper, five greedy heuristics and two....... All heuristics solve instances with up to 2000 jobs and 1000 resources, thus the results are useful both with respect to running times and to solution values....

  10. Computer modeling of commercial refrigerated warehouse facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoulin, C.V.; Jacobs, P.C.; Tory, S.

    1997-01-01

    The use of computer models to simulate the energy performance of large commercial refrigeration systems typically found in food processing facilities is an area of engineering practice that has seen little development to date. Current techniques employed in predicting energy consumption by such systems have focused on temperature bin methods of analysis. Existing simulation tools such as DOE2 are designed to model commercial buildings and grocery store refrigeration systems. The HVAC and Refrigeration system performance models in these simulations tools model equipment common to commercial buildings and groceries, and respond to energy-efficiency measures likely to be applied to these building types. The applicability of traditional building energy simulation tools to model refrigerated warehouse performance and analyze energy-saving options is limited. The paper will present the results of modeling work undertaken to evaluate energy savings resulting from incentives offered by a California utility to its Refrigerated Warehouse Program participants. The TRNSYS general-purpose transient simulation model was used to predict facility performance and estimate program savings. Custom TRNSYS components were developed to address modeling issues specific to refrigerated warehouse systems, including warehouse loading door infiltration calculations, an evaporator model, single-state and multi-stage compressor models, evaporative condenser models, and defrost energy requirements. The main focus of the paper will be on the modeling approach. The results from the computer simulations, along with overall program impact evaluation results, will also be presented

  11. Performance of grid-tied PV facilities: A case study based on real data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díez-Mediavilla, M.; Dieste-Velasco, M.I.; Rodríguez-Amigo, M.C.; García-Calderón, T.; Alonso-Tristán, C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A new procedure to analyse the performance of PV facilities is presented. • It only requires limited amounts of data that are easily sourced. • Data sets on production were collected over two complete years. • The transformerless inverter outperforms the isolated inverter. - Abstract: A new procedure is presented to analyse the performance of grid-tied PV facilities. It needs limited amounts of data that are easily sourced and is based on knowledge of the analysed system and its mode of operation. The procedure is applied, in a case study, to compare real PV production at two 100 kW p grid-connected PV installations. Located in the same geographical region, the installation of these two facilities followed the same construction criteria – PV panels, panel support system and wiring – and the facilities were exposed to the same atmospheric temperature and solar radiation. They differ with regard to their inverter technology: one facility uses an inverter with an integrated transformer system and the other uses a transformerless inverter. The results show that the transformerless inverter system performed better than the isolated system by a factor of 1.2%, which, in economic terms, represents more than 2000 €/year

  12. ATLAS Tier-2 at the Compute Resource Center GoeGrid in Göttingen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jörg; Quadt, Arnulf; Weber, Pavel; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    GoeGrid is a grid resource center located in Göttingen, Germany. The resources are commonly used, funded, and maintained by communities doing research in the fields of grid development, computer science, biomedicine, high energy physics, theoretical physics, astrophysics, and the humanities. For the high energy physics community, GoeGrid serves as a Tier-2 center for the ATLAS experiment as part of the world-wide LHC computing grid (WLCG). The status and performance of the Tier-2 center is presented with a focus on the interdisciplinary setup and administration of the cluster. Given the various requirements of the different communities on the hardware and software setup the challenge of the common operation of the cluster is detailed. The benefits are an efficient use of computer and personpower resources.

  13. A simple grid implementation with Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing using BLAST as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watthanai Pinthong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of high-throughput technologies, such as Next-generation sequencing, allows thousands of experiments to be performed simultaneously while reducing resource requirement. Consequently, a massive amount of experiment data is now rapidly generated. Nevertheless, the data are not readily usable or meaningful until they are further analysed and interpreted. Due to the size of the data, a high performance computer (HPC is required for the analysis and interpretation. However, the HPC is expensive and difficult to access. Other means were developed to allow researchers to acquire the power of HPC without a need to purchase and maintain one such as cloud computing services and grid computing system. In this study, we implemented grid computing in a computer training center environment using Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC as a job distributor and data manager combining all desktop computers to virtualize the HPC. Fifty desktop computers were used for setting up a grid system during the off-hours. In order to test the performance of the grid system, we adapted the Basic Local Alignment Search Tools (BLAST to the BOINC system. Sequencing results from Illumina platform were aligned to the human genome database by BLAST on the grid system. The result and processing time were compared to those from a single desktop computer and HPC. The estimated durations of BLAST analysis for 4 million sequence reads on a desktop PC, HPC and the grid system were 568, 24 and 5 days, respectively. Thus, the grid implementation of BLAST by BOINC is an efficient alternative to the HPC for sequence alignment. The grid implementation by BOINC also helped tap unused computing resources during the off-hours and could be easily modified for other available bioinformatics software.

  14. High-throughput landslide modelling using computational grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M.; Metson, S.; Holcombe, L.; Anderson, M.; Newbold, D.; Brook, N.

    2012-04-01

    physicists and geographical scientists are collaborating to develop methods for providing simple and effective access to landslide models and associated simulation data. Particle physicists have valuable experience in dealing with data complexity and management due to the scale of data generated by particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC generates tens of petabytes of data every year which is stored and analysed using the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). Tools and concepts from the WLCG are being used to drive the development of a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) platform to provide access to hosted landslide simulation software and data. It contains advanced data management features and allows landslide simulations to be run on the WLCG, dramatically reducing simulation runtimes by parallel execution. The simulations are accessed using a web page through which users can enter and browse input data, submit jobs and visualise results. Replication of the data ensures a local copy can be accessed should a connection to the platform be unavailable. The platform does not know the details of the simulation software it runs, so it is therefore possible to use it to run alternative models at similar scales. This creates the opportunity for activities such as model sensitivity analysis and performance comparison at scales that are impractical using standalone software.

  15. Enabling Grid Computing resources within the KM3NeT computing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippidis Christos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available KM3NeT is a future European deep-sea research infrastructure hosting a new generation neutrino detectors that – located at the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea – will open a new window on the universe and answer fundamental questions both in particle physics and astrophysics. International collaborative scientific experiments, like KM3NeT, are generating datasets which are increasing exponentially in both complexity and volume, making their analysis, archival, and sharing one of the grand challenges of the 21st century. These experiments, in their majority, adopt computing models consisting of different Tiers with several computing centres and providing a specific set of services for the different steps of data processing such as detector calibration, simulation and data filtering, reconstruction and analysis. The computing requirements are extremely demanding and, usually, span from serial to multi-parallel or GPU-optimized jobs. The collaborative nature of these experiments demands very frequent WAN data transfers and data sharing among individuals and groups. In order to support the aforementioned demanding computing requirements we enabled Grid Computing resources, operated by EGI, within the KM3NeT computing model. In this study we describe our first advances in this field and the method for the KM3NeT users to utilize the EGI computing resources in a simulation-driven use-case.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Analysis of a Generic Missile With Grid Fins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeSpirito, James

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study demonstrating an approach for using viscous computational fluid dynamic simulations to calculate the flow field and aerodynamic coefficients for a missile with grid fin...

  17. Taiwan links up to world's 1st LHC Computing Grid Project

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Taiwan's Academia Sinica was linked up to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Computing Grid Project to work jointly with 12 other countries to construct the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator

  18. Software, component, and service deployment in computational Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Laszewski, G.; Blau, E.; Bletzinger, M.; Gawor, J.; Lane, P.; Martin, S.; Russell, M.

    2002-01-01

    Grids comprise an infrastructure that enables scientists to use a diverse set of distributed remote services and resources as part of complex scientific problem-solving processes. We analyze some of the challenges involved in deploying software and components transparently in Grids. We report on three practical solutions used by the Globus Project. Lessons learned from this experience lead us to believe that it is necessary to support a variety of software and component deployment strategies. These strategies are based on the hosting environment

  19. Task-and-role-based access-control model for computational grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Tao; HONG Fan; WU Chi; SUN Ling-li

    2007-01-01

    Access control in a grid environment is a challenging issue because the heterogeneous nature and independent administration of geographically dispersed resources in grid require access control to use fine-grained policies. We established a task-and-role-based access-control model for computational grid (CG-TRBAC model), integrating the concepts of role-based access control (RBAC) and task-based access control (TBAC). In this model, condition restrictions are defined and concepts specifically tailored to Workflow Management System are simplified or omitted so that role assignment and security administration fit computational grid better than traditional models; permissions are mutable with the task status and system variables, and can be dynamically controlled. The CG-TRBAC model is proved flexible and extendible. It can implement different control policies. It embodies the security principle of least privilege and executes active dynamic authorization. A task attribute can be extended to satisfy different requirements in a real grid system.

  20. Digi-Clima Grid: image processing and distributed computing for recovering historical climate data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Nesmachnow

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the Digi-Clima Grid project, whose main goals are to design and implement semi-automatic techniques for digitalizing and recovering historical climate records applying parallel computing techniques over distributed computing infrastructures. The specific tool developed for image processing is described, and the implementation over grid and cloud infrastructures is reported. A experimental analysis over institutional and volunteer-based grid/cloud distributed systems demonstrate that the proposed approach is an efficient tool for recovering historical climate data. The parallel implementations allow to distribute the processing load, achieving accurate speedup values.

  1. A priori modeling of chemical reactions on computational grid platforms: Workflows and data models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampino, S.; Monari, A.; Rossi, E.; Evangelisti, S.; Laganà, A.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The quantum framework of the Grid Empowered Molecular Simulator GEMS assembled on the European Grid allows the ab initio evaluation of the dynamics of small systems starting from the calculation of the electronic properties. Highlights: ► The grid based GEMS simulator accurately models small chemical systems. ► Q5Cost and D5Cost file formats provide interoperability in the workflow. ► Benchmark runs on H + H 2 highlight the Grid empowering. ► O + O 2 and N + N 2 calculated k (T)’s fall within the error bars of the experiment. - Abstract: The quantum framework of the Grid Empowered Molecular Simulator GEMS has been assembled on the segment of the European Grid devoted to the Computational Chemistry Virtual Organization. The related grid based workflow allows the ab initio evaluation of the dynamics of small systems starting from the calculation of the electronic properties. Interoperability between computational codes across the different stages of the workflow was made possible by the use of the common data formats Q5Cost and D5Cost. Illustrative benchmark runs have been performed on the prototype H + H 2 , N + N 2 and O + O 2 gas phase exchange reactions and thermal rate coefficients have been calculated for the last two. Results are discussed in terms of the modeling of the interaction and advantages of using the Grid is highlighted.

  2. Computer Security at Nuclear Facilities (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    category of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series, and deals with computer security at nuclear facilities. It is based on national experience and practices as well as publications in the fields of computer security and nuclear security. The guidance is provided for consideration by States, competent authorities and operators. The preparation of this publication in the IAEA Nuclear Security Series has been made possible by the contributions of a large number of experts from Member States. An extensive consultation process with all Member States included consultants meetings and open-ended technical meetings. The draft was then circulated to all Member States for 120 days to solicit further comments and suggestions. The comments received from Member States were reviewed and considered in the final version of the publication.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Stability to Induced Deadlocks for Computing Grids with Various Node Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana R. Shmeleva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the classification and applications of switching methods, their advantages and disadvantages. A model of a computing grid was constructed in the form of a colored Petri net with a node which implements cut-through packet switching. The model consists of packet switching nodes, traffic generators and guns that form malicious traffic disguised as usual user traffic. The characteristics of the grid model were investigated under a working load with different intensities. The influence of malicious traffic such as traffic duel was estimated on the quality of service parameters of the grid. A comparative analysis of the computing grids stability was carried out with nodes which implement the store-and-forward and cut-through switching technologies. It is shown that the grids performance is approximately the same under work load conditions, and under peak load conditions the grid with the node implementing the store-and-forward technology is more stable. The grid with nodes implementing SAF technology comes to a complete deadlock through an additional load which is less than 10 percent. After a detailed study, it is shown that the traffic duel configuration does not affect the grid with cut-through nodes if the workload is increases to the peak load, at which the grid comes to a complete deadlock. The execution intensity of guns which generate a malicious traffic is determined by a random function with the Poisson distribution. The modeling system CPN Tools is used for constructing models and measuring parameters. Grid performance and average package delivery time are estimated in the grid on various load options.

  4. Sustaining and Extending the Open Science Grid: Science Innovation on a PetaScale Nationwide Facility (DE-FC02-06ER41436) SciDAC-2 Closeout Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livny, Miron [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Shank, James [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Ernst, Michael [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blackburn, Kent [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Goasguen, Sebastien [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Tuts, Michael [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Gibbons, Lawrence [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Pordes, Ruth [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sliz, Piotr [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Deelman, Ewa [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Information Sciences Inst.; Barnett, William [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Olson, Doug [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McGee, John [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Renaissance Computing Inst.; Cowles, Robert [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wuerthwein, Frank [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Gardner, Robert [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Avery, Paul [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Wang, Shaowen [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Lincoln, David Swanson [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2015-02-11

    Under this SciDAC-2 grant the project’s goal w a s t o stimulate new discoveries by providing scientists with effective and dependable access to an unprecedented national distributed computational facility: the Open Science Grid (OSG). We proposed to achieve this through the work of the Open Science Grid Consortium: a unique hands-on multi-disciplinary collaboration of scientists, software developers and providers of computing resources. Together the stakeholders in this consortium sustain and use a shared distributed computing environment that transforms simulation and experimental science in the US. The OSG consortium is an open collaboration that actively engages new research communities. We operate an open facility that brings together a broad spectrum of compute, storage, and networking resources and interfaces to other cyberinfrastructures, including the US XSEDE (previously TeraGrid), the European Grids for ESciencE (EGEE), as well as campus and regional grids. We leverage middleware provided by computer science groups, facility IT support organizations, and computing programs of application communities for the benefit of consortium members and the US national CI.

  5. Grid computing and collaboration technology in support of fusion energy sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.

    2005-01-01

    Science research in general and magnetic fusion research in particular continue to grow in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaborations between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. The simultaneous increase in wide area network speeds has made it practical to envision distributed working environments that are as productive as traditionally collocated work. In computing power, it has become reasonable to decouple production and consumption resulting in the ability to construct computing grids in a similar manner as the electrical power grid. Grid computing, the secure integration of computer systems over high speed networks to provide on-demand access to data analysis capabilities and related functions, is being deployed as an alternative to traditional resource sharing among institutions. For human interaction, advanced collaborative environments are being researched and deployed to have distributed group work that is as productive as traditional meetings. The DOE Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program initiative has sponsored several collaboratory projects, including the National Fusion Collaboratory Project, to utilize recent advances in grid computing and advanced collaborative environments to further research in several specific scientific domains. For fusion, the collaborative technology being deployed is being used in present day research and is also scalable to future research, in particular, to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiment that will require extensive collaboration capability worldwide. This paper briefly reviews the concepts of grid computing and advanced collaborative environments and gives specific examples of how these technologies are being used in fusion research today

  6. 11th International Conference on P2P, Parallel, Grid, Cloud and Internet Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Barolli, Leonard; Amato, Flora

    2017-01-01

    P2P, Grid, Cloud and Internet computing technologies have been very fast established as breakthrough paradigms for solving complex problems by enabling aggregation and sharing of an increasing variety of distributed computational resources at large scale. The aim of this volume is to provide latest research findings, innovative research results, methods and development techniques from both theoretical and practical perspectives related to P2P, Grid, Cloud and Internet computing as well as to reveal synergies among such large scale computing paradigms. This proceedings volume presents the results of the 11th International Conference on P2P, Parallel, Grid, Cloud And Internet Computing (3PGCIC-2016), held November 5-7, 2016, at Soonchunhyang University, Asan, Korea.

  7. ATLAS computing operations within the GridKa Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J; Walker, R; Olszewski, A; Nderitu, S; Serfon, C; Duckeck, G

    2010-01-01

    The organisation and operations model of the ATLAS T1-T2 federation/Cloud associated to the GridKa T1 in Karlsruhe is described. Attention is paid to Cloud level services and the experience gained during the last years of operation. The ATLAS GridKa Cloud is large and divers spanning 5 countries, 2 ROC's and is currently comprised of 13 core sites. A well defined and tested operations model in such a Cloud is of the utmost importance. We have defined the core Cloud services required by the ATLAS experiment and ensured that they are performed in a managed and sustainable manner. Services such as Distributed Data Management involving data replication,deletion and consistency checks, Monte Carlo Production, software installation and data reprocessing are described in greater detail. In addition to providing these central services we have undertaken several Cloud level stress tests and developed monitoring tools to aid with Cloud diagnostics. Furthermore we have defined good channels of communication between ATLAS, the T1 and the T2's and have pro-active contributions from the T2 manpower. A brief introduction to the GridKa Cloud is provided followed by a more detailed discussion of the operations model and ATLAS services within the Cloud.

  8. Minimizing the negative effects of device mobility in cell-based ad-hoc wireless computational grids

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mudali, P

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an outline of research being conducted to minimize the disruptive effects of device mobility in wireless computational grid networks. The proposed wireless grid framework uses the existing GSM cellular architecture, with emphasis...

  9. New data processing technologies at LHC: From Grid to Cloud Computing and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Salvo, A.

    2011-01-01

    Since a few years the LHC experiments at CERN are successfully using the Grid Computing Technologies for their distributed data processing activities, on a global scale. Recently, the experience gained with the current systems allowed the design of the future Computing Models, involving new technologies like Could Computing, virtualization and high performance distributed database access. In this paper we shall describe the new computational technologies of the LHC experiments at CERN, comparing them with the current models, in terms of features and performance.

  10. The OSG Open Facility: an on-ramp for opportunistic scientific computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilaka, B.; Levshina, T.; Sehgal, C.; Gardner, R.; Rynge, M.; Würthwein, F.

    2017-10-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) is a large, robust computing grid that started primarily as a collection of sites associated with large HEP experiments such as ATLAS, CDF, CMS, and DZero, but has evolved in recent years to a much larger user and resource platform. In addition to meeting the US LHC community’s computational needs, the OSG continues to be one of the largest providers of distributed high-throughput computing (DHTC) to researchers from a wide variety of disciplines via the OSG Open Facility. The Open Facility consists of OSG resources that are available opportunistically to users other than resource owners and their collaborators. In the past two years, the Open Facility has doubled its annual throughput to over 200 million wall hours. More than half of these resources are used by over 100 individual researchers from over 60 institutions in fields such as biology, medicine, math, economics, and many others. Over 10% of these individual users utilized in excess of 1 million computational hours each in the past year. The largest source of these cycles is temporary unused capacity at institutions affiliated with US LHC computational sites. An increasing fraction, however, comes from university HPC clusters and large national infrastructure supercomputers offering unused capacity. Such expansions have allowed the OSG to provide ample computational resources to both individual researchers and small groups as well as sizable international science collaborations such as LIGO, AMS, IceCube, and sPHENIX. Opening up access to the Fermilab FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project has also allowed experiments such as mu2e and NOvA to make substantial use of Open Facility resources, the former with over 40 million wall hours in a year. We present how this expansion was accomplished as well as future plans for keeping the OSG Open Facility at the forefront of enabling scientific research by way of DHTC.

  11. The OSG Open Facility: An On-Ramp for Opportunistic Scientific Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayatilaka, B. [Fermilab; Levshina, T. [Fermilab; Sehgal, C. [Fermilab; Gardner, R. [Chicago U.; Rynge, M. [USC - ISI, Marina del Rey; Würthwein, F. [UC, San Diego

    2017-11-22

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) is a large, robust computing grid that started primarily as a collection of sites associated with large HEP experiments such as ATLAS, CDF, CMS, and DZero, but has evolved in recent years to a much larger user and resource platform. In addition to meeting the US LHC community’s computational needs, the OSG continues to be one of the largest providers of distributed high-throughput computing (DHTC) to researchers from a wide variety of disciplines via the OSG Open Facility. The Open Facility consists of OSG resources that are available opportunistically to users other than resource owners and their collaborators. In the past two years, the Open Facility has doubled its annual throughput to over 200 million wall hours. More than half of these resources are used by over 100 individual researchers from over 60 institutions in fields such as biology, medicine, math, economics, and many others. Over 10% of these individual users utilized in excess of 1 million computational hours each in the past year. The largest source of these cycles is temporary unused capacity at institutions affiliated with US LHC computational sites. An increasing fraction, however, comes from university HPC clusters and large national infrastructure supercomputers offering unused capacity. Such expansions have allowed the OSG to provide ample computational resources to both individual researchers and small groups as well as sizable international science collaborations such as LIGO, AMS, IceCube, and sPHENIX. Opening up access to the Fermilab FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project has also allowed experiments such as mu2e and NOvA to make substantial use of Open Facility resources, the former with over 40 million wall hours in a year. We present how this expansion was accomplished as well as future plans for keeping the OSG Open Facility at the forefront of enabling scientific research by way of DHTC.

  12. CheckDen, a program to compute quantum molecular properties on spatial grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacios, Luis F; Fernandez, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    CheckDen, a program to compute quantum molecular properties on a variety of spatial grids is presented. The program reads as unique input wavefunction files written by standard quantum packages and calculates the electron density rho(r), promolecule and density difference function, gradient of rho(r), Laplacian of rho(r), information entropy, electrostatic potential, kinetic energy densities G(r) and K(r), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL) function. These properties can be calculated on a wide range of one-, two-, and three-dimensional grids that can be processed by widely used graphics programs to render high-resolution images. CheckDen offers also other options as extracting separate atom contributions to the property computed, converting grid output data into CUBE and OpenDX volumetric data formats, and perform arithmetic combinations with grid files in all the recognized formats.

  13. Reliable multicast for the Grid: a case study in experimental computer science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekovee, Maziar; Barcellos, Marinho P; Daw, Michael

    2005-08-15

    In its simplest form, multicast communication is the process of sending data packets from a source to multiple destinations in the same logical multicast group. IP multicast allows the efficient transport of data through wide-area networks, and its potentially great value for the Grid has been highlighted recently by a number of research groups. In this paper, we focus on the use of IP multicast in Grid applications, which require high-throughput reliable multicast. These include Grid-enabled computational steering and collaborative visualization applications, and wide-area distributed computing. We describe the results of our extensive evaluation studies of state-of-the-art reliable-multicast protocols, which were performed on the UK's high-speed academic networks. Based on these studies, we examine the ability of current reliable multicast technology to meet the Grid's requirements and discuss future directions.

  14. Grid computing for LHC and methods for W boson mass measurement at CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Two methods for measuring the W boson mass with the CMS detector have been presented in this thesis. Both methods use similarities between W boson and Z boson decays. Their statistical and systematic precisions have been determined for W → μν; the statistics corresponds to one inverse femtobarn of data. A large number of events needed to be simulated for this analysis; it was not possible to use the full simulation software because of the enormous computing time which would have been needed. Instead, a fast simulation tool for the CMS detector was used. Still, the computing requirements for the fast simulation exceeded the capacity of the local compute cluster. Since the data taken and processed at the LHC will be extremely large, the LHC experiments rely on the emerging grid computing tools. The computing capabilities of the grid have been used for simulating all physics events needed for this thesis. To achieve this, the local compute cluster had to be integrated into the grid and the administration of the grid components had to be secured. As this was the first installation of its kind, several contributions to grid training events could be made: courses on grid installation, administration and grid-enabled applications were given. The two methods for the W mass measurement are the morphing method and the scaling method. The morphing method relies on an analytical transformation of Z boson events into W boson events and determines the W boson mass by comparing the transverse mass distributions; the scaling method relies on scaled observables from W boson and Z boson events, e.g. the transverse muon momentum as studied in this thesis. In both cases, a re-weighting technique applied to Monte Carlo generated events is used to take into account different selection cuts, detector acceptances, and differences in production and decay of W boson and Z boson events. (orig.)

  15. Grid computing for LHC and methods for W boson mass measurement at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Christopher

    2007-12-14

    Two methods for measuring the W boson mass with the CMS detector have been presented in this thesis. Both methods use similarities between W boson and Z boson decays. Their statistical and systematic precisions have been determined for W {yields} {mu}{nu}; the statistics corresponds to one inverse femtobarn of data. A large number of events needed to be simulated for this analysis; it was not possible to use the full simulation software because of the enormous computing time which would have been needed. Instead, a fast simulation tool for the CMS detector was used. Still, the computing requirements for the fast simulation exceeded the capacity of the local compute cluster. Since the data taken and processed at the LHC will be extremely large, the LHC experiments rely on the emerging grid computing tools. The computing capabilities of the grid have been used for simulating all physics events needed for this thesis. To achieve this, the local compute cluster had to be integrated into the grid and the administration of the grid components had to be secured. As this was the first installation of its kind, several contributions to grid training events could be made: courses on grid installation, administration and grid-enabled applications were given. The two methods for the W mass measurement are the morphing method and the scaling method. The morphing method relies on an analytical transformation of Z boson events into W boson events and determines the W boson mass by comparing the transverse mass distributions; the scaling method relies on scaled observables from W boson and Z boson events, e.g. the transverse muon momentum as studied in this thesis. In both cases, a re-weighting technique applied to Monte Carlo generated events is used to take into account different selection cuts, detector acceptances, and differences in production and decay of W boson and Z boson events. (orig.)

  16. Erasmus Computing Grid: Het bouwen van een 20 Tera-FLOPS Virtuele Supercomputer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); J.H. van den Berg (Jan); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHet Erasmus Medisch Centrum en de Hogeschool Rotterdam zijn in 2005 een samenwerking begonnen teneinde de ongeveer 95% onbenutte rekencapaciteit van hun computers beschikbaar te maken voor onderzoek en onderwijs. Deze samenwerking heeft geleid tot het Erasmus Computing GRID (ECG),

  17. The GLOBE-Consortium: The Erasmus Computing Grid and The Next Generation Genome Viewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstractThe Set-Up of the 20 Teraflop Erasmus Computing Grid: To meet the enormous computational needs of live-science research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment the Hogeschool Rotterdam and the Erasmus Medical Center are currently setting up one of the largest desktop

  18. Qualities of Grid Computing that can last for Ages | Asagba | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grid computing has emerged as an important new field, distinguished from conventional distributed computing based on its abilities on large-scale resource sharing and services. And it will even become more popular because of the benefits it can offer over the traditional supercomputers, and other forms of distributed ...

  19. Secure grid-based computing with social-network based trust management in the semantic web

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špánek, Roman; Tůma, Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 6 (2006), s. 475-488 ISSN 1210-0552 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET100300419; GA MŠk 1M0554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : semantic web * grid computing * trust management * reconfigurable networks * security * hypergraph model * hypergraph algorithms Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  20. Asia Federation Report on International Symposium on Grid Computing (ISGC) 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Francois; Lin, Simon C.

    This report provides an overview of developments in the Asia-Pacific region, based on presentations made at the International Symposium on Grid Computing 2010 (ISGC 2010), held 5-12 March at Academia Sinica, Taipei. The document includes a brief overview of the EUAsiaGrid project as well as progress reports by representatives of 13 Asian countries presented at ISGC 2010. In alphabetical order, these are: Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.

  1. Asia Federation Report on International Symposium on Grid Computing 2009 (ISGC 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Francois

    This report provides an overview of developments in the Asia-Pacific region, based on presentations made at the International Symposium on Grid Computing 2009 (ISGC 09), held 21-23 April. This document contains 14 sections, including a progress report on general Asia-EU Grid activities as well as progress reports by representatives of 13 Asian countries presented at ISGC 09. In alphabetical order, these are: Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.

  2. Computer Profile of School Facilities Energy Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, Felix E.

    This document outlines a computerized management tool designed to enable building managers to identify energy consumption as related to types and uses of school facilities for the purpose of evaluating and managing the operation, maintenance, modification, and planning of new facilities. Specifically, it is expected that the statistics generated…

  3. PROOF-based analysis on the ATLAS grid facilities: first experience with the PoD/PanDa plugin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilucchi, E; Nardo, R Di; Mancini, G; Pineda, A R Sanchez; Salvo, A De; Donato, C Di; Doria, A; Ganis, G; Manafov, A; Mazza, S; Preltz, F; Rebatto, D; Salvucci, A

    2014-01-01

    In the ATLAS computing model Grid resources are managed by PanDA, the system designed for production and distributed analysis, and data are stored under various formats in ROOT files. End-user physicists have the choice to use either the ATHENA framework or directly ROOT, that provides users the possibility to use PROOF to exploit the computing power of multi-core machines or to dynamically manage analysis facilities. Since analysis facilities are, in general, not dedicated to PROOF only, PROOF-on-Demand (PoD) is used to enable PROOF on top of an existing resource management system. In a previous work we investigated the usage of PoD to enable PROOF-based analysis on Tier-2 facilities using the PoD/gLite plug-in interface. In this paper we present the status of our investigations using the recently developed PoD/PanDA plug-in to enable PROOF and a real end-user ATLAS physics analysis as payload. For this work, data were accessed using two different protocols: XRootD and file protocol. The former in the site where the SRM interface is Disk Pool Manager (DPM) and the latter where the SRM interface is StoRM with GPFS file system. We will first describe the results of some benchmark tests we run on the ATLAS Italian Tier-1 and Tier-2s sites and at CERN. Then, we will compare the results of different types of analysis, comparing performances accessing data in relation to different types of SRM interfaces and accessing data with XRootD in the LAN and in the WAN using the ATLAS XROOTD storage federation infrastructure.

  4. Backfilling the Grid with Containerized BOINC in the ATLAS computing

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Wenjing; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Virtualization is a commonly used solution for utilizing the opportunistic computing resources in the HEP field, as it provides a unified software and OS layer that the HEP computing tasks require over the heterogeneous opportunistic computing resources. However there is always performance penalty with virtualization, especially for short jobs which are always the case for volunteer computing tasks, the overhead of virtualization becomes a big portion in the wall time, hence it leads to low CPU efficiency of the jobs. With the wide usage of containers in HEP computing, we explore the possibility of adopting the container technology into the ATLAS BOINC project, hence we implemented a Native version in BOINC, which uses the singularity container or direct usage of the target OS to replace VirtualBox. In this paper, we will discuss 1) the implementation and workflow of the Native version in the ATLAS BOINC; 2) the performance measurement of the Native version comparing to the previous Virtualization version. 3)...

  5. Definition, modeling and simulation of a grid computing system for high throughput computing

    CERN Document Server

    Caron, E; Tsaregorodtsev, A Yu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study and compare grid and global computing systems and outline the benefits of having an hybrid system called dirac. To evaluate the dirac scheduling for high throughput computing, a new model is presented and a simulator was developed for many clusters of heterogeneous nodes belonging to a local network. These clusters are assumed to be connected to each other through a global network and each cluster is managed via a local scheduler which is shared by many users. We validate our simulator by comparing the experimental and analytical results of a M/M/4 queuing system. Next, we do the comparison with a real batch system and we obtain an average error of 10.5% for the response time and 12% for the makespan. We conclude that the simulator is realistic and well describes the behaviour of a large-scale system. Thus we can study the scheduling of our system called dirac in a high throughput context. We justify our decentralized, adaptive and oppor! tunistic approach in comparison to a centralize...

  6. How to build a high-performance compute cluster for the Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Reinefeld, A

    2001-01-01

    The success of large-scale multi-national projects like the forthcoming analysis of the LHC particle collision data at CERN relies to a great extent on the ability to efficiently utilize computing and data-storage resources at geographically distributed sites. Currently, much effort is spent on the design of Grid management software (Datagrid, Globus, etc.), while the effective integration of computing nodes has been largely neglected up to now. This is the focus of our work. We present a framework for a high- performance cluster that can be used as a reliable computing node in the Grid. We outline the cluster architecture, the management of distributed data and the seamless integration of the cluster into the Grid environment. (11 refs).

  7. Status of the Grid Computing for the ALICE Experiment in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamova, D; Hampl, J; Chudoba, J; Kouba, T; Svec, J; Mendez, Lorenzo P; Saiz, P

    2010-01-01

    The Czech Republic (CR) has been participating in the LHC Computing Grid project (LCG) ever since 2003 and gradually, a middle-sized Tier-2 center has been built in Prague, delivering computing services for national HEP experiments groups including the ALICE project at the LHC. We present a brief overview of the computing activities and services being performed in the CR for the ALICE experiment.

  8. Cloud Computing for Pharmacometrics: Using AWS, NONMEM, PsN, Grid Engine, and Sonic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanduja, S; Jewell, P; Aron, E; Pharai, N

    2015-09-01

    Cloud computing allows pharmacometricians to access advanced hardware, network, and security resources available to expedite analysis and reporting. Cloud-based computing environments are available at a fraction of the time and effort when compared to traditional local datacenter-based solutions. This tutorial explains how to get started with building your own personal cloud computer cluster using Amazon Web Services (AWS), NONMEM, PsN, Grid Engine, and Sonic.

  9. Experimental Demonstration of a Self-organized Architecture for Emerging Grid Computing Applications on OBS Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Hong, Xiaobin; Wu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    As Grid computing continues to gain popularity in the industry and research community, it also attracts more attention from the customer level. The large number of users and high frequency of job requests in the consumer market make it challenging. Clearly, all the current Client/Server(C/S)-based architecture will become unfeasible for supporting large-scale Grid applications due to its poor scalability and poor fault-tolerance. In this paper, based on our previous works [1, 2], a novel self-organized architecture to realize a highly scalable and flexible platform for Grids is proposed. Experimental results show that this architecture is suitable and efficient for consumer-oriented Grids.

  10. Surface Modeling, Grid Generation, and Related Issues in Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yung K. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Steering Committee for Surface Modeling and Grid Generation (SMAGG) sponsored a workshop on surface modeling, grid generation, and related issues in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions at Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, May 9-11, 1995. The workshop provided a forum to identify industry needs, strengths, and weaknesses of the five grid technologies (patched structured, overset structured, Cartesian, unstructured, and hybrid), and to exchange thoughts about where each technology will be in 2 to 5 years. The workshop also provided opportunities for engineers and scientists to present new methods, approaches, and applications in SMAGG for CFD. This Conference Publication (CP) consists of papers on industry overview, NASA overview, five grid technologies, new methods/ approaches/applications, and software systems.

  11. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, CY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wells, Jack C [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL; Hudson, Douglas L [ORNL

    2012-02-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.4 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2011 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Users reported more than 670 publications this year arising from their use of OLCF resources. Of these we report the 300 in this review that are consistent with guidance provided. Scientific achievements by OLCF users cut across all range scales from atomic to molecular to large-scale structures. At the atomic scale, researchers discovered that the anomalously long half-life of Carbon-14 can be explained by calculating, for the first time, the very complex three-body interactions between all the neutrons and protons in the nucleus. At the molecular scale, researchers combined experimental results from LBL's light source and simulations on Jaguar to discover how DNA replication continues past a damaged site so a mutation can be repaired later. Other researchers combined experimental results from ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source and simulations on Jaguar to reveal the molecular structure of ligno-cellulosic material used in bioethanol production. This year, Jaguar has been used to do billion-cell CFD calculations to develop shock wave compression turbo machinery as a means to meet DOE goals for reducing carbon sequestration costs. General Electric used Jaguar to calculate the unsteady flow through turbo machinery to learn what efficiencies the traditional steady flow assumption is hiding from designers. Even a 1% improvement in turbine design can save the nation

  12. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment 2015: Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Ashley D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Bernholdt, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Bland, Arthur S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Gary, Jeff D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Hack, James J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; McNally, Stephen T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Rogers, James H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Smith, Brian E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Straatsma, T. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Sukumar, Sreenivas Rangan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Thach, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Tichenor, Suzy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Wells, Jack C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    2016-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to surpass its operational target goals: supporting users; delivering fast, reliable systems; creating innovative solutions for high-performance computing (HPC) needs; and managing risks, safety, and security aspects associated with operating one of the most powerful computers in the world. The results can be seen in the cutting-edge science delivered by users and the praise from the research community. Calendar year (CY) 2015 was filled with outstanding operational results and accomplishments: a very high rating from users on overall satisfaction that ties the highest-ever mark set in CY 2014; the greatest number of core-hours delivered to research projects; the largest percentage of capability usage since the OLCF began tracking the metric in 2009; and success in delivering on the allocation of 60, 30, and 10% of core hours offered for the INCITE (Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment), ALCC (Advanced Scientific Computing Research Leadership Computing Challenge), and Director’s Discretionary programs, respectively. These accomplishments, coupled with the extremely high utilization rate, represent the fulfillment of the promise of Titan: maximum use by maximum-size simulations. The impact of all of these successes and more is reflected in the accomplishments of OLCF users, with publications this year in notable journals Nature, Nature Materials, Nature Chemistry, Nature Physics, Nature Climate Change, ACS Nano, Journal of the American Chemical Society, and Physical Review Letters, as well as many others. The achievements included in the 2015 OLCF Operational Assessment Report reflect first-ever or largest simulations in their communities; for example Titan enabled engineers in Los Angeles and the surrounding region to design and begin building improved critical infrastructure by enabling the highest-resolution Cybershake map for Southern

  13. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

    2010-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools

  14. Use of Emerging Grid Computing Technologies for the Analysis of LIGO Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koranda, Scott

    2004-03-01

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) today faces the challenge of enabling analysis of terabytes of LIGO data by hundreds of scientists from institutions all around the world. To meet this challenge the LSC is developing tools, infrastructure, applications, and expertise leveraging Grid Computing technologies available today, and making available to LSC scientists compute resources at sites across the United States and Europe. We use digital credentials for strong and secure authentication and authorization to compute resources and data. Building on top of products from the Globus project for high-speed data transfer and information discovery we have created the Lightweight Data Replicator (LDR) to securely and robustly replicate data to resource sites. We have deployed at our computing sites the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) Server and Client packages, developed in collaboration with our partners in the GriPhyN and iVDGL projects, providing uniform access to distributed resources for users and their applications. Taken together these Grid Computing technologies and infrastructure have formed the LSC DataGrid--a coherent and uniform environment across two continents for the analysis of gravitational-wave detector data. Much work, however, remains in order to scale current analyses and recent lessons learned need to be integrated into the next generation of Grid middleware.

  15. GridFactory - Distributed computing on ephemeral resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Frederik; Niinimaki, Marko

    2011-01-01

    A novel batch system for high throughput computing is presented. The system is specifically designed to leverage virtualization and web technology to facilitate deployment on cloud and other ephemeral resources. In particular, it implements a security model suited for forming collaborations...

  16. The DataGrid Project

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggieri, F

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the objectives and status of the DataGrid Project is presented, together with a brief introduction to the Grid metaphor and some references to the Grid activities and initiatives related to DataGrid. High energy physics experiments have always requested state of the art computing facilities to efficiently perform several computing activities related with the handling of large amounts of data and fairly large computing resources. Some of the ideas born inside the community to enhance the user friendliness of all the steps in the computing chain have been, sometimes, successfully applied also in other contexts: one bright example is the World Wide Web. The LHC computing challenge has triggered inside the high energy physics community, the start of the DataGrid Project. The objective of the project is to enable next generation scientific exploration requiring intensive computation and analysis of shared large-scale databases. (12 refs).

  17. Fast calculation method of computer-generated hologram using a depth camera with point cloud gridding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Shi, Chen-Xiao; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Piao, Yan-Ling; Piao, Mei-Lan; Kim, Nam

    2018-03-01

    We propose a fast calculation method for a computer-generated hologram (CGH) of real objects that uses a point cloud gridding method. The depth information of the scene is acquired using a depth camera and the point cloud model is reconstructed virtually. Because each point of the point cloud is distributed precisely to the exact coordinates of each layer, each point of the point cloud can be classified into grids according to its depth. A diffraction calculation is performed on the grids using a fast Fourier transform (FFT) to obtain a CGH. The computational complexity is reduced dramatically in comparison with conventional methods. The feasibility of the proposed method was confirmed by numerical and optical experiments.

  18. Porting of Bio-Informatics Tools for Plant Virology on a Computational Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, A.; Muoio, A.; Iacono-Manno, M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of Tri Grid Project and PI2S2 is the creation of the first Sicilian regional computational Grid. In particular, it aims to build various software-hardware interfaces between the infrastructure and some scientific and industrial applications. In this context, we have integrated some among the most innovative computing applications in virology research inside these Grid infrastructure. Particularly, we have implemented in a complete work flow, various tools for pairwise or multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny tree construction (ClustalW-MPI), phylogenetic networks (Splits Tree), detection of recombination by phylogenetic methods (TOPALi) and prediction of DNA or RNA secondary consensus structures (KnetFold). This work will show how the ported applications decrease the execution time of the analysis programs, improve the accessibility to the data storage system and allow the use of metadata for data processing. (Author)

  19. Computer facilities for ISABELLE data handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, M.A.; Love, W.A.; Miller, R.J.; Zeller, M.

    1977-01-01

    The analysis of data produced by ISABELLE experiments will need a large system of computers. An official group of prospective users and operators of that system should begin planning now. Included in the array will be a substantial computer system at each ISABELLE intersection in use. These systems must include enough computer power to keep experimenters aware of the health of the experiment. This will require at least one very fast sophisticated processor in the system, the size depending on the experiment. Other features of the intersection systems must be a good, high speed graphic display, ability to record data on magnetic tape at 500 to 1000 KB, and a high speed link to a central computer. The operating system software must support multiple interactive users. A substantially larger capacity computer system, shared by the six intersection region experiments, must be available with good turnaround for experimenters while ISABELLE is running. A computer support group will be required to maintain the computer system and to provide and maintain software common to all experiments. Special superfast computing hardware or special function processors constructed with microprocessor circuitry may be necessary both in the data gathering and data processing work. Thus both the local and central processors should be chosen with the possibility of interfacing such devices in mind

  20. ATLAS off-Grid sites (Tier 3) monitoring. From local fabric monitoring to global overview of the VO computing activities

    CERN Document Server

    PETROSYAN, A; The ATLAS collaboration; BELOV, S; ANDREEVA, J; KADOCHNIKOV, I

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing activities have so far concentrated in the "central" part of the experiment computing system, namely the first 3 tiers (the CERN Tier0, 10 Tier1 centers and over 60 Tier2 sites). Many ATLAS Institutes and National Communities have deployed (or intend to) deploy Tier-3 facilities. Tier-3 centers consist of non-pledged resources, which are usually dedicated to data analysis tasks by the geographically close or local scientific groups, and which usually comprise a range of architectures without Grid middleware. Therefore a substantial part of the ATLAS monitoring tools which make use of Grid middleware, cannot be used for a large fraction of Tier3 sites. The presentation will describe the T3mon project, which aims to develop a software suite for monitoring the Tier3 sites, both from the perspective of the local site administrator and that of the ATLAS VO, thereby enabling the global view of the contribution from Tier3 sites to the ATLAS computing activities. Special attention in p...

  1. Proceedings of the second workshop of LHC Computing Grid, LCG-France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chollet, Frederique; Hernandez, Fabio; Malek, Fairouz; Gaelle, Shifrin

    2007-03-01

    The second LCG-France Workshop was held in Clermont-Ferrand on 14-15 March 2007. These sessions organized by IN2P3 and DAPNIA were attended by around 70 participants working with the Computing Grid of LHC in France. The workshop was a opportunity of exchanges of information between the French and foreign site representatives on one side and delegates of experiments on the other side. The event allowed enlightening the place of LHC Computing Task within the frame of W-LCG world project, the undergoing actions and the prospects in 2007 and beyond. The following communications were presented: 1. The current status of the LHC computation in France; 2.The LHC Grid infrastructure in France and associated resources; 3.Commissioning of Tier 1; 4.The sites of Tier-2s and Tier-3s; 5.Computing in ALICE experiment; 6.Computing in ATLAS experiment; 7.Computing in the CMS experiments; 8.Computing in the LHCb experiments; 9.Management and operation of computing grids; 10.'The VOs talk to sites'; 11.Peculiarities of ATLAS; 12.Peculiarities of CMS and ALICE; 13.Peculiarities of LHCb; 14.'The sites talk to VOs'; 15. Worldwide operation of Grid; 16.Following-up the Grid jobs; 17.Surveillance and managing the failures; 18. Job scheduling and tuning; 19.Managing the site infrastructure; 20.LCG-France communications; 21.Managing the Grid data; 22.Pointing the net infrastructure and site storage. 23.ALICE bulk transfers; 24.ATLAS bulk transfers; 25.CMS bulk transfers; 26. LHCb bulk transfers; 27.Access to LHCb data; 28.Access to CMS data; 29.Access to ATLAS data; 30.Access to ALICE data; 31.Data analysis centers; 32.D0 Analysis Farm; 33.Some CMS grid analyses; 34.PROOF; 35.Distributed analysis using GANGA; 36.T2 set-up for end-users. In their concluding remarks Fairouz Malek and Dominique Pallin stressed that the current workshop was more close to users while the tasks for tightening the links between the sites and the experiments were definitely achieved. The IN2P3 leadership expressed

  2. Survey of Energy Computing in the Smart Grid Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Kumar; Arun Agarwala

    2013-01-01

    Resource optimization, with advance computing tools, improves the efficient use of energy resources. The renewable energy resources are instantaneous and needs to be conserve at the same time. To optimize real time process, the complex design, includes plan of resources and control for effective utilization. The advances in information communication technology tools enables data formatting and analysis results in optimization of use the renewable resources for sustainable energy solution on s...

  3. From the web to the grid and beyond. Computing paradigms driven by high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, Rene; Carminati, Federico; Galli Carminati, Giuliana

    2012-01-01

    Born after World War II, large-scale experimental high-energy physics (HEP) has found itself limited ever since by available accelerator, detector and computing technologies. Accordingly, HEP has made significant contributions to the development of these fields, more often than not driving their innovations. The invention of the World Wide Web at CERN is merely the best-known example out of many. This book is the first comprehensive account to trace the history of this pioneering spirit in the field of computing technologies. It covers everything up to and including the present-day handling of the huge demands imposed upon grid and distributed computing by full-scale LHC operations - operations which have for years involved many thousands of collaborating members worldwide and accordingly provide the original and natural testbed for grid computing concepts. This book takes the reader on a guided tour encompassing all relevant topics, including programming languages, software engineering, large databases, the Web, and grid- and cloud computing. The important issue of intellectual property regulations for distributed software engineering and computing is also addressed. Aptly, the book closes with a visionary chapter of what may lie ahead. Approachable and requiring only basic understanding of physics and computer sciences, this book is intended for both education and research. (orig.)

  4. From the web to the grid and beyond. Computing paradigms driven by high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Rene; Carminati, Federico [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Galli Carminati, Giuliana (eds.) [Hopitaux Universitaire de Geneve, Chene-Bourg (Switzerland). Unite de la Psychiatrie du Developpement Mental

    2012-07-01

    Born after World War II, large-scale experimental high-energy physics (HEP) has found itself limited ever since by available accelerator, detector and computing technologies. Accordingly, HEP has made significant contributions to the development of these fields, more often than not driving their innovations. The invention of the World Wide Web at CERN is merely the best-known example out of many. This book is the first comprehensive account to trace the history of this pioneering spirit in the field of computing technologies. It covers everything up to and including the present-day handling of the huge demands imposed upon grid and distributed computing by full-scale LHC operations - operations which have for years involved many thousands of collaborating members worldwide and accordingly provide the original and natural testbed for grid computing concepts. This book takes the reader on a guided tour encompassing all relevant topics, including programming languages, software engineering, large databases, the Web, and grid- and cloud computing. The important issue of intellectual property regulations for distributed software engineering and computing is also addressed. Aptly, the book closes with a visionary chapter of what may lie ahead. Approachable and requiring only basic understanding of physics and computer sciences, this book is intended for both education and research. (orig.)

  5. Integration of small computers in the low budget facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.E.; Crofoot, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    Inexpensive computers (PC's) are well within the reach of low budget reactor facilities. It is possible to envisage many uses that will both improve capabilities of existing instrumentation and also assist operators and staff with certain routine tasks. Both of these opportunities are important for survival at facilities with severe budget and staffing limitations. (author)

  6. From the Web to the Grid and beyond computing paradigms driven by high-energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Carminati, Federico; Galli-Carminati, Giuliana

    2012-01-01

    Born after World War II, large-scale experimental high-energy physics (HEP) has found itself limited ever since by available accelerator, detector and computing technologies. Accordingly, HEP has made significant contributions to the development of these fields, more often than not driving their innovations. The invention of the World Wide Web at CERN is merely the best-known example out of many. This book is the first comprehensive account to trace the history of this pioneering spirit in the field of computing technologies. It covers everything up to and including the present-day handling of the huge demands imposed upon grid and distributed computing by full-scale LHC operations - operations which have for years involved many thousands of collaborating members worldwide and accordingly provide the original and natural testbed for grid computing concepts. This book takes the reader on a guided tour encompassing all relevant topics, including programming languages, software engineering, large databases, the ...

  7. User's Manual for FOMOCO Utilities-Force and Moment Computation Tools for Overset Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, William M.; Buning, Pieter G.

    1996-01-01

    In the numerical computations of flows around complex configurations, accurate calculations of force and moment coefficients for aerodynamic surfaces are required. When overset grid methods are used, the surfaces on which force and moment coefficients are sought typically consist of a collection of overlapping surface grids. Direct integration of flow quantities on the overlapping grids would result in the overlapped regions being counted more than once. The FOMOCO Utilities is a software package for computing flow coefficients (force, moment, and mass flow rate) on a collection of overset surfaces with accurate accounting of the overlapped zones. FOMOCO Utilities can be used in stand-alone mode or in conjunction with the Chimera overset grid compressible Navier-Stokes flow solver OVERFLOW. The software package consists of two modules corresponding to a two-step procedure: (1) hybrid surface grid generation (MIXSUR module), and (2) flow quantities integration (OVERINT module). Instructions on how to use this software package are described in this user's manual. Equations used in the flow coefficients calculation are given in Appendix A.

  8. Economic models for management of resources in peer-to-peer and grid computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyya, Rajkumar; Stockinger, Heinz; Giddy, Jonathan; Abramson, David

    2001-07-01

    The accelerated development in Peer-to-Peer (P2P) and Grid computing has positioned them as promising next generation computing platforms. They enable the creation of Virtual Enterprises (VE) for sharing resources distributed across the world. However, resource management, application development and usage models in these environments is a complex undertaking. This is due to the geographic distribution of resources that are owned by different organizations or peers. The resource owners of each of these resources have different usage or access policies and cost models, and varying loads and availability. In order to address complex resource management issues, we have proposed a computational economy framework for resource allocation and for regulating supply and demand in Grid computing environments. The framework provides mechanisms for optimizing resource provider and consumer objective functions through trading and brokering services. In a real world market, there exist various economic models for setting the price for goods based on supply-and-demand and their value to the user. They include commodity market, posted price, tenders and auctions. In this paper, we discuss the use of these models for interaction between Grid components in deciding resource value and the necessary infrastructure to realize them. In addition to normal services offered by Grid computing systems, we need an infrastructure to support interaction protocols, allocation mechanisms, currency, secure banking, and enforcement services. Furthermore, we demonstrate the usage of some of these economic models in resource brokering through Nimrod/G deadline and cost-based scheduling for two different optimization strategies on the World Wide Grid (WWG) testbed that contains peer-to-peer resources located on five continents: Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America.

  9. Computer experiments with a coarse-grid hydrodynamic climate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenchikov, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    A climate model is developed on the basis of the two-level Mintz-Arakawa general circulation model of the atmosphere and a bulk model of the upper layer of the ocean. A detailed model of the spectral transport of shortwave and longwave radiation is used to investigate the radiative effects of greenhouse gases. The radiative fluxes are calculated at the boundaries of five layers, each with a pressure thickness of about 200 mb. The results of the climate sensitivity calculations for mean-annual and perpetual seasonal regimes are discussed. The CCAS (Computer Center of the Academy of Sciences) climate model is used to investigate the climatic effects of anthropogenic changes of the optical properties of the atmosphere due to increasing CO 2 content and aerosol pollution, and to calculate the sensitivity to changes of land surface albedo and humidity

  10. LHC Computing Grid Project Launches intAction with International Support. A thousand times more computing power by 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The first phase of the LHC Computing Grid project was approved at an extraordinary meeting of the Council on 20 September 2001. CERN is preparing for the unprecedented avalanche of data that will be produced by the Large Hadron Collider experiments. A thousand times more computer power will be needed by 2006! CERN's need for a dramatic advance in computing capacity is urgent. As from 2006, the four giant detectors observing trillions of elementary particle collisions at the LHC will accumulate over ten million Gigabytes of data, equivalent to the contents of about 20 million CD-ROMs, each year of its operation. A thousand times more computing power will be needed than is available to CERN today. The strategy the collabortations have adopted to analyse and store this unprecedented amount of data is the coordinated deployment of Grid technologies at hundreds of institutes which will be able to search out and analyse information from an interconnected worldwide grid of tens of thousands of computers and storag...

  11. Experimental and computational investigations of heat and mass transfer of intensifier grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzar, Leonid; Oleksyuk, Dmitry; Semchenkov, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses experimental and numerical investigations on intensification of thermal and mass exchange which were performed by National Research Centre ''Kurchatov Institute'' over the past years. Recently, many designs of heat mass transfer intensifier grids have been proposed. NRC ''Kurchatov Institute'' has accomplished a large scope of experimental investigations to study efficiency of intensifier grids of various types. The outcomes of experimental investigations can be used in verification of computational models and codes. On the basis of experimental data, we derived correlations to calculate coolant mixing and critical heat flux mixing in rod bundles equipped with intensifier grids. The acquired correlations were integrated in subchannel code SC-INT.

  12. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wells, Jack C [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

    2011-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.5 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2010 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Scientific achievements by OLCF users range from collaboration with university experimentalists to produce a working supercapacitor that uses atom-thick sheets of carbon materials to finely determining the resolution requirements for simulations of coal gasifiers and their components, thus laying the foundation for development of commercial-scale gasifiers. OLCF users are pushing the boundaries with software applications sustaining more than one petaflop of performance in the quest to illuminate the fundamental nature of electronic devices. Other teams of researchers are working to resolve predictive capabilities of climate models, to refine and validate genome sequencing, and to explore the most fundamental materials in nature - quarks and gluons - and their unique properties. Details of these scientific endeavors - not possible without access to leadership-class computing resources - are detailed in Section 4 of this report and in the INCITE in Review. Effective operations of the OLCF play a key role in the scientific missions and accomplishments of its users. This Operational Assessment Report (OAR) will delineate the policies, procedures, and innovations implemented by the OLCF to continue delivering a petaflop-scale resource for cutting-edge research. The 2010 operational assessment of the OLCF yielded recommendations that have been addressed (Reference Section 1) and

  13. National Ignition Facility integrated computer control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Arsdall, P.J. LLNL

    1998-01-01

    The NIF design team is developing the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is based on an object-oriented software framework applicable to event-driven control systems. The framework provides an open, extensible architecture that is sufficiently abstract to construct future mission-critical control systems. The ICCS will become operational when the first 8 out of 192 beams are activated in mid 2000. The ICCS consists of 300 front-end processors attached to 60,000 control points coordinated by a supervisory system. Computers running either Solaris or VxWorks are networked over a hybrid configuration of switched fast Ethernet and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM). ATM carries digital motion video from sensors to operator consoles. Supervisory software is constructed by extending the reusable framework components for each specific application. The framework incorporates services for database persistence, system configuration, graphical user interface, status monitoring, event logging, scripting language, alert management, and access control. More than twenty collaborating software applications are derived from the common framework. The framework is interoperable among different kinds of computers and functions as a plug-in software bus by leveraging a common object request brokering architecture (CORBA). CORBA transparently distributes the software objects across the network. Because of the pivotal role played, CORBA was tested to ensure adequate performance

  14. A Global Computing Grid for LHC; Una red global de computacion para LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Calama, J. M.; Colino Arriero, N.

    2013-06-01

    An innovative computing infrastructure has played an instrumental role in the recent discovery of the Higgs boson in the LHC and has enabled scientists all over the world to store, process and analyze enormous amounts of data in record time. The Grid computing technology has made it possible to integrate computing center resources spread around the planet, including the CIEMAT, into a distributed system where these resources can be shared and accessed via Internet on a transparent, uniform basis. A global supercomputer for the LHC experiments. (Author)

  15. Computers in experimental nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jukl, M.

    1982-01-01

    The CIS 3000 information system is described used for monitoring the operating modes of large technological equipment. The CIS system consists of two ADT computers, an external drum store an analog input side, a bivalent input side, 4 control consoles with monitors and acoustic signalling, a print-out area with typewriters and punching machines and linear recorders. Various applications are described of the installed CIS configuration as is the general-purpose program for processing measured values into a protocol. The program operates in the conversational mode. Different processing variants are shown on the display monitor. (M.D.)

  16. The performance model of dynamic virtual organization (VO) formations within grid computing context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Liangxiu

    2009-01-01

    Grid computing aims to enable 'resource sharing and coordinated problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations (VOs)'. Within the grid computing context, successful dynamic VO formations mean a number of individuals and institutions associated with certain resources join together and form new VOs in order to effectively execute tasks within given time steps. To date, while the concept of VOs has been accepted, few research has been done on the impact of effective dynamic virtual organization formations. In this paper, we develop a performance model of dynamic VOs formation and analyze the effect of different complex organizational structures and their various statistic parameter properties on dynamic VO formations from three aspects: (1) the probability of a successful VO formation under different organizational structures and statistic parameters change, e.g. average degree; (2) the effect of task complexity on dynamic VO formations; (3) the impact of network scales on dynamic VO formations. The experimental results show that the proposed model can be used to understand the dynamic VO formation performance of the simulated organizations. The work provides a good path to understand how to effectively schedule and utilize resources based on the complex grid network and therefore improve the overall performance within grid environment.

  17. Implementation of Grid-computing Framework for Simulation in Multi-scale Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Data Iranata

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new grid-computing framework for simulation in multi-scale structural analysis is presented. Two levels of parallel processing will be involved in this framework: multiple local distributed computing environments connected by local network to form a grid-based cluster-to-cluster distributed computing environment. To successfully perform the simulation, a large-scale structural system task is decomposed into the simulations of a simplified global model and several detailed component models using various scales. These correlated multi-scale structural system tasks are distributed among clusters and connected together in a multi-level hierarchy and then coordinated over the internet. The software framework for supporting the multi-scale structural simulation approach is also presented. The program architecture design allows the integration of several multi-scale models as clients and servers under a single platform. To check its feasibility, a prototype software system has been designed and implemented to perform the proposed concept. The simulation results show that the software framework can increase the speedup performance of the structural analysis. Based on this result, the proposed grid-computing framework is suitable to perform the simulation of the multi-scale structural analysis.

  18. Brookhaven Reactor Experiment Control Facility, a distributed function computer network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmler, D.G.; Greenlaw, N.; Kelley, M.A.; Potter, D.W.; Rankowitz, S.; Stubblefield, F.W.

    1975-11-01

    A computer network for real-time data acquisition, monitoring and control of a series of experiments at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor has been developed and has been set into routine operation. This reactor experiment control facility presently services nine neutron spectrometers and one x-ray diffractometer. Several additional experiment connections are in progress. The architecture of the facility is based on a distributed function network concept. A statement of implementation and results is presented

  19. Survey of computer codes applicable to waste facility performance evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsharif, M.; Pung, D.L.; Rivera, A.L.; Dole, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    This study is an effort to review existing information that is useful to develop an integrated model for predicting the performance of a radioactive waste facility. A summary description of 162 computer codes is given. The identified computer programs address the performance of waste packages, waste transport and equilibrium geochemistry, hydrological processes in unsaturated and saturated zones, and general waste facility performance assessment. Some programs also deal with thermal analysis, structural analysis, and special purposes. A number of these computer programs are being used by the US Department of Energy, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and their contractors to analyze various aspects of waste package performance. Fifty-five of these codes were identified as being potentially useful on the analysis of low-level radioactive waste facilities located above the water table. The code summaries include authors, identification data, model types, and pertinent references. 14 refs., 5 tabs

  20. The QUANTGRID Project (RO)—Quantum Security in GRID Computing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, M.; Dulea, M.; Petre, M.; Petre, C.; Mitrica, B.; Stoica, M.; Udrea, M.; Sterian, R.; Sterian, P.

    2010-01-01

    The QUANTGRID Project, financed through the National Center for Programme Management (CNMP-Romania), is the first attempt at using Quantum Crypted Communications (QCC) in large scale operations, such as GRID Computing, and conceivably in the years ahead in the banking sector and other security tight communications. In relation with the GRID activities of the Center for Computing & Communications (Nat.'l Inst. Nucl. Phys.—IFIN-HH), the Quantum Optics Lab. (Nat.'l Inst. Plasma and Lasers—INFLPR) and the Physics Dept. (University Polytechnica—UPB) the project will build a demonstrator infrastructure for this technology. The status of the project in its incipient phase is reported, featuring tests for communications in classical security mode: socket level communications under AES (Advanced Encryption Std.), both proprietary code in C++ technology. An outline of the planned undertaking of the project is communicated, highlighting its impact in quantum physics, coherent optics and information technology.

  1. A gateway for phylogenetic analysis powered by grid computing featuring GARLI 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazinet, Adam L; Zwickl, Derrick J; Cummings, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    We introduce molecularevolution.org, a publicly available gateway for high-throughput, maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis powered by grid computing. The gateway features a garli 2.0 web service that enables a user to quickly and easily submit thousands of maximum likelihood tree searches or bootstrap searches that are executed in parallel on distributed computing resources. The garli web service allows one to easily specify partitioned substitution models using a graphical interface, and it performs sophisticated post-processing of phylogenetic results. Although the garli web service has been used by the research community for over three years, here we formally announce the availability of the service, describe its capabilities, highlight new features and recent improvements, and provide details about how the grid system efficiently delivers high-quality phylogenetic results. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists.

  2. Remote data access in computational jobs on the ATLAS data grid

    CERN Document Server

    Begy, Volodimir; The ATLAS collaboration; Lassnig, Mario

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the technique of remote data access from computational jobs on the ATLAS data grid. In comparison to traditional data movement and stage-in approaches it is well suited for data transfers which are asynchronous with respect to the job execution. Hence, it can be used for optimization of data access patterns based on various policies. In this study, remote data access is realized with the HTTP and WebDAV protocols, and is investigated in the context of intra- and inter-computing site data transfers. In both cases, the typical scenarios for application of remote data access are identified. The paper also presents an analysis of parameters influencing the data goodput between heterogeneous storage element - worker node pairs on the grid.

  3. An Efficient Approach for Fast and Accurate Voltage Stability Margin Computation in Large Power Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-Yi Su

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an efficient approach for the computation of voltage stability margin (VSM in a large-scale power grid. The objective is to accurately and rapidly determine the load power margin which corresponds to voltage collapse phenomena. The proposed approach is based on the impedance match-based technique and the model-based technique. It combines the Thevenin equivalent (TE network method with cubic spline extrapolation technique and the continuation technique to achieve fast and accurate VSM computation for a bulk power grid. Moreover, the generator Q limits are taken into account for practical applications. Extensive case studies carried out on Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE benchmark systems and the Taiwan Power Company (Taipower, Taipei, Taiwan system are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. mGrid: a load-balanced distributed computing environment for the remote execution of the user-defined Matlab code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpievitch, Yuliya V; Almeida, Jonas S

    2006-03-15

    Matlab, a powerful and productive language that allows for rapid prototyping, modeling and simulation, is widely used in computational biology. Modeling and simulation of large biological systems often require more computational resources then are available on a single computer. Existing distributed computing environments like the Distributed Computing Toolbox, MatlabMPI, Matlab*G and others allow for the remote (and possibly parallel) execution of Matlab commands with varying support for features like an easy-to-use application programming interface, load-balanced utilization of resources, extensibility over the wide area network, and minimal system administration skill requirements. However, all of these environments require some level of access to participating machines to manually distribute the user-defined libraries that the remote call may invoke. mGrid augments the usual process distribution seen in other similar distributed systems by adding facilities for user code distribution. mGrid's client-side interface is an easy-to-use native Matlab toolbox that transparently executes user-defined code on remote machines (i.e. the user is unaware that the code is executing somewhere else). Run-time variables are automatically packed and distributed with the user-defined code and automated load-balancing of remote resources enables smooth concurrent execution. mGrid is an open source environment. Apart from the programming language itself, all other components are also open source, freely available tools: light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server. Transparent, load-balanced distribution of user-defined Matlab toolboxes and rapid prototyping of many simple parallel applications can now be done with a single easy-to-use Matlab command. Because mGrid utilizes only Matlab, light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server, installation and configuration are very simple. Moreover, the web-based infrastructure of mGrid allows for it to be easily extensible over

  5. mGrid: A load-balanced distributed computing environment for the remote execution of the user-defined Matlab code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Jonas S

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matlab, a powerful and productive language that allows for rapid prototyping, modeling and simulation, is widely used in computational biology. Modeling and simulation of large biological systems often require more computational resources then are available on a single computer. Existing distributed computing environments like the Distributed Computing Toolbox, MatlabMPI, Matlab*G and others allow for the remote (and possibly parallel execution of Matlab commands with varying support for features like an easy-to-use application programming interface, load-balanced utilization of resources, extensibility over the wide area network, and minimal system administration skill requirements. However, all of these environments require some level of access to participating machines to manually distribute the user-defined libraries that the remote call may invoke. Results mGrid augments the usual process distribution seen in other similar distributed systems by adding facilities for user code distribution. mGrid's client-side interface is an easy-to-use native Matlab toolbox that transparently executes user-defined code on remote machines (i.e. the user is unaware that the code is executing somewhere else. Run-time variables are automatically packed and distributed with the user-defined code and automated load-balancing of remote resources enables smooth concurrent execution. mGrid is an open source environment. Apart from the programming language itself, all other components are also open source, freely available tools: light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server. Conclusion Transparent, load-balanced distribution of user-defined Matlab toolboxes and rapid prototyping of many simple parallel applications can now be done with a single easy-to-use Matlab command. Because mGrid utilizes only Matlab, light-weight PHP scripts and the Apache web server, installation and configuration are very simple. Moreover, the web

  6. Automatic knowledge extraction in sequencing analysis with multiagent system and grid computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Roberto; Zato, Carolina; Benito, Rocío; Bajo, Javier; Hernández, Jesús M; De Paz, Juan F; Vera, Vicente; Corchado, Juan M

    2012-12-01

    Advances in bioinformatics have contributed towards a significant increase in available information. Information analysis requires the use of distributed computing systems to best engage the process of data analysis. This study proposes a multiagent system that incorporates grid technology to facilitate distributed data analysis by dynamically incorporating the roles associated to each specific case study. The system was applied to genetic sequencing data to extract relevant information about insertions, deletions or polymorphisms.

  7. Automatic knowledge extraction in sequencing analysis with multiagent system and grid computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in bioinformatics have contributed towards a significant increase in available information. Information analysis requires the use of distributed computing systems to best engage the process of data analysis. This study proposes a multiagent system that incorporates grid technology to facilitate distributed data analysis by dynamically incorporating the roles associated to each specific case study. The system was applied to genetic sequencing data to extract relevant information about insertions, deletions or polymorphisms.

  8. Grid computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Some of today's large-scale scientific activities - modelling climate change, Earth observation, studying the human genome and particle physics experiments - involve handling millions of bytes of data very rapidly." (1 page)

  9. COMPUTER ORIENTED FACILITIES OF TEACHING AND INFORMATIVE COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Naumenko

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article it is considered the history of views to the tasks of education, estimations of its effectiveness from the point of view of forming of basic vitally important competences. Opinions to the problem in different countries, international organizations, corresponding experience of the Ukrainian system of education are described. The necessity of forming of informative competence of future teacher is reasonable in the conditions of application of the computer oriented facilities of teaching at the study of naturally scientific cycle subjects in pedagogical colleges. Prognosis estimations concerning the development of methods of application of computer oriented facilities of teaching are presented.

  10. An improved ant colony optimization algorithm with fault tolerance for job scheduling in grid computing systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajara Idris

    Full Text Available The Grid scheduler, schedules user jobs on the best available resource in terms of resource characteristics by optimizing job execution time. Resource failure in Grid is no longer an exception but a regular occurring event as resources are increasingly being used by the scientific community to solve computationally intensive problems which typically run for days or even months. It is therefore absolutely essential that these long-running applications are able to tolerate failures and avoid re-computations from scratch after resource failure has occurred, to satisfy the user's Quality of Service (QoS requirement. Job Scheduling with Fault Tolerance in Grid Computing using Ant Colony Optimization is proposed to ensure that jobs are executed successfully even when resource failure has occurred. The technique employed in this paper, is the use of resource failure rate, as well as checkpoint-based roll back recovery strategy. Check-pointing aims at reducing the amount of work that is lost upon failure of the system by immediately saving the state of the system. A comparison of the proposed approach with an existing Ant Colony Optimization (ACO algorithm is discussed. The experimental results of the implemented Fault Tolerance scheduling algorithm show that there is an improvement in the user's QoS requirement over the existing ACO algorithm, which has no fault tolerance integrated in it. The performance evaluation of the two algorithms was measured in terms of the three main scheduling performance metrics: makespan, throughput and average turnaround time.

  11. A transport layer protocol for the future high speed grid computing: SCTP versus fast tcp multihoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshad, M.J.; Mian, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) is designed for reliable data transfer on the global Internet today. One of its strong points is its use of flow control algorithm that allows TCP to adjust its congestion window if network congestion is occurred. A number of studies and investigations have confirmed that traditional TCP is not suitable for each and every type of application, for example, bulk data transfer over high speed long distance networks. TCP sustained the time of low-capacity and short-delay networks, however, for numerous factors it cannot be capable to efficiently deal with today's growing technologies (such as wide area Grid computing and optical-fiber networks). This research work surveys the congestion control mechanism of transport protocols, and addresses the different issues involved for transferring the huge data over the future high speed Grid computing and optical-fiber networks. This work also presents the simulations to compare the performance of FAST TCP multihoming with SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol) multihoming in high speed networks. These simulation results show that FAST TCP multihoming achieves bandwidth aggregation efficiently and outperforms SCTP multihoming under a similar network conditions. The survey and simulation results presented in this work reveal that multihoming support into FAST TCP does provide a lot of benefits like redundancy, load-sharing and policy-based routing, which largely improves the whole performance of a network and can meet the increasing demand of the future high-speed network infrastructures (such as in Grid computing). (author)

  12. The Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, Wolf-Dieter

    2005-01-01

    Grid technology is widely emerging. Grid computing, most simply stated, is distributed computing taken to the next evolutionary level. The goal is to create the illusion of a simple, robust yet large and powerful self managing virtual computer out of a large collection of connected heterogeneous systems sharing various combinations of resources. This talk will give a short history how, out of lessons learned from the Internet, the vision of Grids was born. Then the extensible anatomy of a Grid architecture will be discussed. The talk will end by presenting a selection of major Grid projects in Europe and US and if time permits a short on-line demonstration.

  13. Solution of Poisson equations for 3-dimensional grid generations. [computations of a flow field over a thin delta wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, K.

    1983-01-01

    A method for generating three dimensional, finite difference grids about complicated geometries by using Poisson equations is developed. The inhomogenous terms are automatically chosen such that orthogonality and spacing restrictions at the body surface are satisfied. Spherical variables are used to avoid the axis singularity, and an alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) solution scheme is used to accelerate the computations. Computed results are presented that show the capability of the method. Since most of the results presented have been used as grids for flow-field computations, this is indicative that the method is a useful tool for generating three-dimensional grids about complicated geometries.

  14. Computational model for turbulent flow around a grid spacer with mixing vane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutomu Ikeno; Takeo Kajishima

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent mixing coefficient and pressure drop are important factors in subchannel analysis to predict onset of DNB. However, universal correlations are difficult since these factors are significantly affected by the geometry of subchannel and a grid spacer with mixing vane. Therefore, we propose a computational model to estimate these factors. Computational model: To represent the effect of geometry of grid spacer in computational model, we applied a large eddy simulation (LES) technique in couple with an improved immersed-boundary method. In our previous work (Ikeno, et al., NURETH-10), detailed properties of turbulence in subchannel were successfully investigated by developing the immersed boundary method in LES. In this study, additional improvements are given: new one-equation dynamic sub-grid scale (SGS) model is introduced to account for the complex geometry without any artificial modification; the higher order accuracy is maintained by consistent treatment for boundary conditions for velocity and pressure. NUMERICAL TEST AND DISCUSSION: Turbulent mixing coefficient and pressure drop are affected strongly by the arrangement and inclination of mixing vane. Therefore, computations are carried out for each of convolute and periodic arrangements, and for each of 30 degree and 20 degree inclinations. The difference in turbulent mixing coefficient due to these factors is reasonably predicted by our method. (An example of this numerical test is shown in Fig. 1.) Turbulent flow of the problem includes unsteady separation behind the mixing vane and vortex shedding in downstream. Anisotropic distribution of turbulent stress is also appeared in rod gap. Therefore, our computational model has advantage for assessing the influence of arrangement and inclination of mixing vane. By coarser computational mesh, one can screen several candidates for spacer design. Then, by finer mesh, more quantitative analysis is possible. By such a scheme, we believe this method is useful

  15. Neutronic computational modeling of the ASTRA critical facility using MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L. P.; Garcia, C. R.; Milian, D.; Milian, E. E.; Brayner, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Very High Temperature Reactor is considered as a prominent candidate among Generation IV nuclear energy systems. Nevertheless the Pebble Bed Very High Temperature Reactor faces an important challenge due to the insufficient validation of computer codes currently available for use in its design and safety analysis. In this paper a detailed IAEA computational benchmark announced by IAEA-TECDOC-1694 in the framework of the Coordinated Research Project 'Evaluation of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Performance' was solved in support of the Generation IV computer codes validation effort using MCNPX ver. 2.6e computational code. In the IAEA-TECDOC-1694 were summarized a set of four calculational benchmark problems performed at the ASTRA critical facility. Benchmark problems include criticality experiments, control rod worth measurements and reactivity measurements. The ASTRA Critical Facility at the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow was used to simulate the neutronic behavior of nuclear pebble bed reactors. (Author)

  16. Thermal Protection System Cavity Heating for Simplified and Actual Geometries Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations with Unstructured Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal Protection System (TPS) Cavity Heating is predicted using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) on unstructured grids for both simplified cavities and actual cavity geometries. Validation was performed using comparisons to wind tunnel experimental results and CFD predictions using structured grids. Full-scale predictions were made for simplified and actual geometry configurations on the Space Shuttle Orbiter in a mission support timeframe.

  17. Improving CMS data transfers among its distributed computing facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Flix, J; Sartirana, A

    2001-01-01

    CMS computing needs reliable, stable and fast connections among multi-tiered computing infrastructures. For data distribution, the CMS experiment relies on a data placement and transfer system, PhEDEx, managing replication operations at each site in the distribution network. PhEDEx uses the File Transfer Service (FTS), a low level data movement service responsible for moving sets of files from one site to another, while allowing participating sites to control the network resource usage. FTS servers are provided by Tier-0 and Tier-1 centres and are used by all computing sites in CMS, according to the established policy. FTS needs to be set up according to the Grid site's policies, and properly configured to satisfy the requirements of all Virtual Organizations making use of the Grid resources at the site. Managing the service efficiently requires good knowledge of the CMS needs for all kinds of transfer workflows. This contribution deals with a revision of FTS servers used by CMS, collecting statistics on thei...

  18. Improving CMS data transfers among its distributed computing facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Flix, Jose

    2010-01-01

    CMS computing needs reliable, stable and fast connections among multi-tiered computing infrastructures. For data distribution, the CMS experiment relies on a data placement and transfer system, PhEDEx, managing replication operations at each site in the distribution network. PhEDEx uses the File Transfer Service (FTS), a low level data movement service responsible for moving sets of files from one site to another, while allowing participating sites to control the network resource usage. FTS servers are provided by Tier-0 and Tier-1 centres and are used by all computing sites in CMS, according to the established policy. FTS needs to be set up according to the Grid site's policies, and properly configured to satisfy the requirements of all Virtual Organizations making use of the Grid resources at the site. Managing the service efficiently requires good knowledge of the CMS needs for all kinds of transfer workflows. This contribution deals with a revision of FTS servers used by CMS, collecting statistics on the...

  19. Improving CMS data transfers among its distributed computing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flix, J; Magini, N; Sartirana, A

    2011-01-01

    CMS computing needs reliable, stable and fast connections among multi-tiered computing infrastructures. For data distribution, the CMS experiment relies on a data placement and transfer system, PhEDEx, managing replication operations at each site in the distribution network. PhEDEx uses the File Transfer Service (FTS), a low level data movement service responsible for moving sets of files from one site to another, while allowing participating sites to control the network resource usage. FTS servers are provided by Tier-0 and Tier-1 centres and are used by all computing sites in CMS, according to the established policy. FTS needs to be set up according to the Grid site's policies, and properly configured to satisfy the requirements of all Virtual Organizations making use of the Grid resources at the site. Managing the service efficiently requires good knowledge of the CMS needs for all kinds of transfer workflows. This contribution deals with a revision of FTS servers used by CMS, collecting statistics on their usage, customizing the topologies and improving their setup in order to keep CMS transferring data at the desired levels in a reliable and robust way.

  20. Intelligent battery energy management and control for vehicle-to-grid via cloud computing network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayyam, Hamid; Abawajy, Jemal; Javadi, Bahman; Goscinski, Andrzej; Stojcevski, Alex; Bab-Hadiashar, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The intelligent battery energy management substantially reduces the interactions of PEV with parking lots. • The intelligent battery energy management improves the energy efficiency. • The intelligent battery energy management predicts the road load demand for vehicles. - Abstract: Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) provide new opportunities to reduce fuel consumption and exhaust emission. PEVs need to draw and store energy from an electrical grid to supply propulsive energy for the vehicle. As a result, it is important to know when PEVs batteries are available for charging and discharging. Furthermore, battery energy management and control is imperative for PEVs as the vehicle operation and even the safety of passengers depend on the battery system. Thus, scheduling the grid power electricity with parking lots would be needed for efficient charging and discharging of PEV batteries. This paper aims to propose a new intelligent battery energy management and control scheduling service charging that utilize Cloud computing networks. The proposed intelligent vehicle-to-grid scheduling service offers the computational scalability required to make decisions necessary to allow PEVs battery energy management systems to operate efficiently when the number of PEVs and charging devices are large. Experimental analyses of the proposed scheduling service as compared to a traditional scheduling service are conducted through simulations. The results show that the proposed intelligent battery energy management scheduling service substantially reduces the required number of interactions of PEV with parking lots and grid as well as predicting the load demand calculated in advance with regards to their limitations. Also it shows that the intelligent scheduling service charging using Cloud computing network is more efficient than the traditional scheduling service network for battery energy management and control

  1. WISDOM-II: Screening against multiple targets implicated in malaria using computational grid infrastructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Colin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite continuous efforts of the international community to reduce the impact of malaria on developing countries, no significant progress has been made in the recent years and the discovery of new drugs is more than ever needed. Out of the many proteins involved in the metabolic activities of the Plasmodium parasite, some are promising targets to carry out rational drug discovery. Motivation Recent years have witnessed the emergence of grids, which are highly distributed computing infrastructures particularly well fitted for embarrassingly parallel computations like docking. In 2005, a first attempt at using grids for large-scale virtual screening focused on plasmepsins and ended up in the identification of previously unknown scaffolds, which were confirmed in vitro to be active plasmepsin inhibitors. Following this success, a second deployment took place in the fall of 2006 focussing on one well known target, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, and on a new promising one, glutathione-S-transferase. Methods In silico drug design, especially vHTS is a widely and well-accepted technology in lead identification and lead optimization. This approach, therefore builds, upon the progress made in computational chemistry to achieve more accurate in silico docking and in information technology to design and operate large scale grid infrastructures. Results On the computational side, a sustained infrastructure has been developed: docking at large scale, using different strategies in result analysis, storing of the results on the fly into MySQL databases and application of molecular dynamics refinement are MM-PBSA and MM-GBSA rescoring. The modeling results obtained are very promising. Based on the modeling results, In vitro results are underway for all the targets against which screening is performed. Conclusion The current paper describes the rational drug discovery activity at large scale, especially molecular docking using FlexX software

  2. Integration of a neuroimaging processing pipeline into a pan-canadian computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoie-Courchesne, S; Chouinard-Decorte, F; Doyon, J; Bellec, P; Rioux, P; Sherif, T; Rousseau, M-E; Das, S; Adalat, R; Evans, A C; Craddock, C; Margulies, D; Chu, C; Lyttelton, O

    2012-01-01

    The ethos of the neuroimaging field is quickly moving towards the open sharing of resources, including both imaging databases and processing tools. As a neuroimaging database represents a large volume of datasets and as neuroimaging processing pipelines are composed of heterogeneous, computationally intensive tools, such open sharing raises specific computational challenges. This motivates the design of novel dedicated computing infrastructures. This paper describes an interface between PSOM, a code-oriented pipeline development framework, and CBRAIN, a web-oriented platform for grid computing. This interface was used to integrate a PSOM-compliant pipeline for preprocessing of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging into CBRAIN. We further tested the capacity of our infrastructure to handle a real large-scale project. A neuroimaging database including close to 1000 subjects was preprocessed using our interface and publicly released to help the participants of the ADHD-200 international competition. This successful experiment demonstrated that our integrated grid-computing platform is a powerful solution for high-throughput pipeline analysis in the field of neuroimaging.

  3. Centralized computer-based controls of the Nova Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krammen, J.

    1985-01-01

    This article introduces the overall architecture of the computer-based Nova Laser Control System and describes its basic components. Use of standard hardware and software components ensures that the system, while specialized and distributed throughout the facility, is adaptable. 9 references, 6 figures

  4. Computer-Assisted School Facility Planning with ONPASS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban Decision Systems, Inc., Los Angeles, CA.

    The analytical capabilities of ONPASS, an on-line computer-aided school facility planning system, are described by its developers. This report describes how, using the Canoga Park-Winnetka-Woodland Hills Planning Area as a test case, the Department of City Planning of the city of Los Angeles employed ONPASS to demonstrate how an on-line system can…

  5. Forecasting Model for Network Throughput of Remote Data Access in Computing Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Begy, Volodimir; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Computing grids are one of the key enablers of eScience. Researchers from many fields (e.g. High Energy Physics, Bioinformatics, Climatology, etc.) employ grids to run computational jobs in a highly distributed manner. The current state of the art approach for data access in the grid is data placement: a job is scheduled to run at a specific data center, and its execution starts only when the complete input data has been transferred there. This approach has two major disadvantages: (1) the jobs are staying idle while waiting for the input data; (2) due to the limited infrastructure resources, the distributed data management system handling the data placement, may queue the transfers up to several days. An alternative approach is remote data access: a job may stream the input data directly from storage elements, which may be located at local or remote data centers. Remote data access brings two innovative benefits: (1) the jobs can be executed asynchronously with respect to the data transfer; (2) when combined...

  6. From the CERN web: grid computing, night shift, ridge effect and more

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This section highlights articles, blog posts and press releases published in the CERN web environment over the past weeks. This way, you won’t miss a thing...   Schoolboy uses grid computing to analyse satellite data 9 December - by David Lugmayer  At just 16, Cal Hewitt, a student at Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys in the United Kingdom became the youngest person to receive grid certification – giving him access to huge grid-computing resources. Hewitt uses these resources to help analyse data from the LUCID satellite detector, which a team of students from the school launched into space last year. Continue to read…    Night shift in the CMS Control Room (Photo: Andrés Delannoy). On Seagull Soup and Coffee Deficiency: Night Shift at CMS 8 December – CMS Collaboration More than half a year, a school trip to CERN, and a round of 13 TeV collisions later, the week-long internship we completed at CMS over E...

  7. Computation for LHC experiments: a worldwide computing grid; Le calcul scientifique des experiences LHC: une grille de production mondiale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairouz, Malek [Universite Joseph-Fourier, LPSC, CNRS-IN2P3, Grenoble I, 38 (France)

    2010-08-15

    In normal operating conditions the LHC detectors are expected to record about 10{sup 10} collisions each year. The processing of all the consequent experimental data is a real computing challenge in terms of equipment, software and organization: it requires sustaining data flows of a few 10{sup 9} octets per second and recording capacity of a few tens of 10{sup 15} octets each year. In order to meet this challenge a computing network implying the dispatch and share of tasks, has been set. The W-LCG grid (World wide LHC computing grid) is made up of 4 tiers. Tiers 0 is the computer center in CERN, it is responsible for collecting and recording the raw data from the LHC detectors and to dispatch it to the 11 tiers 1. The tiers 1 is typically a national center, it is responsible for making a copy of the raw data and for processing it in order to recover relevant data with a physical meaning and to transfer the results to the 150 tiers 2. The tiers 2 is at the level of the Institute or laboratory, it is in charge of the final analysis of the data and of the production of the simulations. Tiers 3 are at the level of the laboratories, they provide a complementary and local resource to tiers 2 in terms of data analysis. (A.C.)

  8. Data grids a new computational infrastructure for data-intensive science

    CERN Document Server

    Avery, P

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-first-century scientific and engineering enterprises are increasingly characterized by their geographic dispersion and their reliance on large data archives. These characteristics bring with them unique challenges. First, the increasing size and complexity of modern data collections require significant investments in information technologies to store, retrieve and analyse them. Second, the increased distribution of people and resources in these projects has made resource sharing and collaboration across significant geographic and organizational boundaries critical to their success. In this paper I explore how computing infrastructures based on data grids offer data-intensive enterprises a comprehensive, scalable framework for collaboration and resource sharing. A detailed example of a data grid framework is presented for a Large Hadron Collider experiment, where a hierarchical set of laboratory and university resources comprising petaflops of processing power and a multi- petabyte data archive must be ...

  9. Understanding and Mastering Dynamics in Computing Grids Processing Moldable Tasks with User-Level Overlay

    CERN Document Server

    Moscicki, Jakub Tomasz

    Scientic communities are using a growing number of distributed systems, from lo- cal batch systems, community-specic services and supercomputers to general-purpose, global grid infrastructures. Increasing the research capabilities for science is the raison d'^etre of such infrastructures which provide access to diversied computational, storage and data resources at large scales. Grids are rather chaotic, highly heterogeneous, de- centralized systems where unpredictable workloads, component failures and variability of execution environments are commonplace. Understanding and mastering the hetero- geneity and dynamics of such distributed systems is prohibitive for end users if they are not supported by appropriate methods and tools. The time cost to learn and use the interfaces and idiosyncrasies of dierent distributed environments is another challenge. Obtaining more reliable application execution times and boosting parallel speedup are important to increase the research capabilities of scientic communities. L...

  10. Numerical Nuclear Second Derivatives on a Computing Grid: Enabling and Accelerating Frequency Calculations on Complex Molecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzuhsiung; Berry, John F

    2018-06-04

    The computation of nuclear second derivatives of energy, or the nuclear Hessian, is an essential routine in quantum chemical investigations of ground and transition states, thermodynamic calculations, and molecular vibrations. Analytic nuclear Hessian computations require the resolution of costly coupled-perturbed self-consistent field (CP-SCF) equations, while numerical differentiation of analytic first derivatives has an unfavorable 6 N ( N = number of atoms) prefactor. Herein, we present a new method in which grid computing is used to accelerate and/or enable the evaluation of the nuclear Hessian via numerical differentiation: NUMFREQ@Grid. Nuclear Hessians were successfully evaluated by NUMFREQ@Grid at the DFT level as well as using RIJCOSX-ZORA-MP2 or RIJCOSX-ZORA-B2PLYP for a set of linear polyacenes with systematically increasing size. For the larger members of this group, NUMFREQ@Grid was found to outperform the wall clock time of analytic Hessian evaluation; at the MP2 or B2LYP levels, these Hessians cannot even be evaluated analytically. We also evaluated a 156-atom catalytically relevant open-shell transition metal complex and found that NUMFREQ@Grid is faster (7.7 times shorter wall clock time) and less demanding (4.4 times less memory requirement) than an analytic Hessian. Capitalizing on the capabilities of parallel grid computing, NUMFREQ@Grid can outperform analytic methods in terms of wall time, memory requirements, and treatable system size. The NUMFREQ@Grid method presented herein demonstrates how grid computing can be used to facilitate embarrassingly parallel computational procedures and is a pioneer for future implementations.

  11. Dosimetry in radiotherapy and brachytherapy by Monte-Carlo GATE simulation on computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiam, Ch.O.

    2007-10-01

    Accurate radiotherapy treatment requires the delivery of a precise dose to the tumour volume and a good knowledge of the dose deposit to the neighbouring zones. Computation of the treatments is usually carried out by a Treatment Planning System (T.P.S.) which needs to be precise and fast. The G.A.T.E. platform for Monte-Carlo simulation based on G.E.A.N.T.4 is an emerging tool for nuclear medicine application that provides functionalities for fast and reliable dosimetric calculations. In this thesis, we studied in parallel a validation of the G.A.T.E. platform for the modelling of electrons and photons low energy sources and the optimized use of grid infrastructures to reduce simulations computing time. G.A.T.E. was validated for the dose calculation of point kernels for mono-energetic electrons and compared with the results of other Monte-Carlo studies. A detailed study was made on the energy deposit during electrons transport in G.E.A.N.T.4. In order to validate G.A.T.E. for very low energy photons (<35 keV), three models of radioactive sources used in brachytherapy and containing iodine 125 (2301 of Best Medical International; Symmetra of Uro- Med/Bebig and 6711 of Amersham) were simulated. Our results were analyzed according to the recommendations of task group No43 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (A.A.P.M.). They show a good agreement between G.A.T.E., the reference studies and A.A.P.M. recommended values. The use of Monte-Carlo simulations for a better definition of the dose deposited in the tumour volumes requires long computing time. In order to reduce it, we exploited E.G.E.E. grid infrastructure where simulations are distributed using innovative technologies taking into account the grid status. Time necessary for the computing of a radiotherapy planning simulation using electrons was reduced by a factor 30. A Web platform based on G.E.N.I.U.S. portal was developed to make easily available all the methods to submit and manage G

  12. Research and development of grid computing technology in center for computational science and e-systems of Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    Center for Computational Science and E-systems of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA) has carried out R and D of grid computing technology. Since 1995, R and D to realize computational assistance for researchers called Seamless Thinking Aid (STA) and then to share intellectual resources called Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL) have been conducted, leading to construct an intelligent infrastructure for the atomic energy research called Atomic Energy Grid InfraStructure (AEGIS) under the Japanese national project 'Development and Applications of Advanced High-Performance Supercomputer'. It aims to enable synchronization of three themes: 1) Computer-Aided Research and Development (CARD) to realize and environment for STA, 2) Computer-Aided Engineering (CAEN) to establish Multi Experimental Tools (MEXT), and 3) Computer Aided Science (CASC) to promote the Atomic Energy Research and Investigation (AERI). This article reviewed achievements in R and D of grid computing technology so far obtained. (T. Tanaka)

  13. MEDUSA - An overset grid flow solver for network-based parallel computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Merritt H.; Pallis, Jani M.

    1993-01-01

    Continuing improvement in processing speed has made it feasible to solve the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations for simple three-dimensional flows on advanced workstations. Combining multiple workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows the application of programming principles learned on MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) distributed memory parallel computers to the solution of larger problems. An overset-grid flow solution code has been developed which uses a cluster of workstations as a network-based parallel computer. Inter-process communication is provided by the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) software. Solution speed equivalent to one-third of a Cray-YMP processor has been achieved from a cluster of nine commonly used engineering workstation processors. Load imbalance and communication overhead are the principal impediments to parallel efficiency in this application.

  14. NASA's Information Power Grid: Large Scale Distributed Computing and Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, William E.; Vaziri, Arsi; Hinke, Tom; Tanner, Leigh Ann; Feiereisen, William J.; Thigpen, William; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large-scale science and engineering are done through the interaction of people, heterogeneous computing resources, information systems, and instruments, all of which are geographically and organizationally dispersed. The overall motivation for Grids is to facilitate the routine interactions of these resources in order to support large-scale science and engineering. Multi-disciplinary simulations provide a good example of a class of applications that are very likely to require aggregation of widely distributed computing, data, and intellectual resources. Such simulations - e.g. whole system aircraft simulation and whole system living cell simulation - require integrating applications and data that are developed by different teams of researchers frequently in different locations. The research team's are the only ones that have the expertise to maintain and improve the simulation code and/or the body of experimental data that drives the simulations. This results in an inherently distributed computing and data management environment.

  15. Distributed and grid computing projects with research focus in human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomidous, Marianna; Zikos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Distributed systems and grid computing systems are used to connect several computers to obtain a higher level of performance, in order to solve a problem. During the last decade, projects use the World Wide Web to aggregate individuals' CPU power for research purposes. This paper presents the existing active large scale distributed and grid computing projects with research focus in human health. There have been found and presented 11 active projects with more than 2000 Processing Units (PUs) each. The research focus for most of them is molecular biology and, specifically on understanding or predicting protein structure through simulation, comparing proteins, genomic analysis for disease provoking genes and drug design. Though not in all cases explicitly stated, common target diseases include research to find cure against HIV, dengue, Duchene dystrophy, Parkinson's disease, various types of cancer and influenza. Other diseases include malaria, anthrax, Alzheimer's disease. The need for national initiatives and European Collaboration for larger scale projects is stressed, to raise the awareness of citizens to participate in order to create a culture of internet volunteering altruism.

  16. Blueprint and First Experiences Bridging Hardware Virtualization and Global Grids for Advanced Scientific Computing: Designing and Building a Global Edge Services Framework (ESF) for OSG, EGEE, and LCG

    CERN Document Server

    Rana, A S; Vaniachine, A; Wurthwein, F; Foster, I; Sotomayor, B; Freeman, T

    2006-01-01

    We report on first experiences with building and operating an edge services framework (ESF) based on Xen virtual machines instantiated via the workspace service in Globus toolkit, and developed as a joint project between EGEE, LCG, and OSG. Many computing facilities are architected with their compute and storage clusters behind firewalls. Edge services (ES) are instantiated on a small set of gateways to provide access to these clusters via standard grid interfaces. Experience on EGEE, LCG, and OSG has shown that at least two issues are of critical importance when designing an infrastructure in support of ES. The first concerns ES configuration. It is impractical to assume that each virtual organization (VO) using a facility will employ the same ES configuration, or that different configurations will coexist easily. Even within a VO, it should be possible to run different versions of the same ES simultaneously. The second issue concerns resource allocation: it is essential that an ESF be able to effectively gu...

  17. Techniques and environments for big data analysis parallel, cloud, and grid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Dehuri, Satchidananda; Kim, Euiwhan; Wang, Gi-Name

    2016-01-01

    This volume is aiming at a wide range of readers and researchers in the area of Big Data by presenting the recent advances in the fields of Big Data Analysis, as well as the techniques and tools used to analyze it. The book includes 10 distinct chapters providing a concise introduction to Big Data Analysis and recent Techniques and Environments for Big Data Analysis. It gives insight into how the expensive fitness evaluation of evolutionary learning can play a vital role in big data analysis by adopting Parallel, Grid, and Cloud computing environments.

  18. Editorial for special section of grid computing journal on “Cloud Computing and Services Science‿

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ivanov, Ivan I.

    This editorial briefly discusses characteristics, technology developments and challenges of cloud computing. It then introduces the papers included in the special issue on "Cloud Computing and Services Science" and positions the work reported in these papers with respect to the previously mentioned

  19. Towards a global service registry for the world-wide LHC computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, Laurence; Pradillo, Maria Alandes; Girolamo, Alessandro Di

    2014-01-01

    The World-Wide LHC Computing Grid encompasses a set of heterogeneous information systems; from central portals such as the Open Science Grid's Information Management System and the Grid Operations Centre Database, to the WLCG information system, where the information sources are the Grid services themselves. Providing a consistent view of the information, which involves synchronising all these informations systems, is a challenging activity that has lead the LHC virtual organisations to create their own configuration databases. This experience, whereby each virtual organisation's configuration database interfaces with multiple information systems, has resulted in the duplication of effort, especially relating to the use of manual checks for the handling of inconsistencies. The Global Service Registry aims to address this issue by providing a centralised service that aggregates information from multiple information systems. It shows both information on registered resources (i.e. what should be there) and available resources (i.e. what is there). The main purpose is to simplify the synchronisation of the virtual organisation's own configuration databases, which are used for job submission and data management, through the provision of a single interface for obtaining all the information. By centralising the information, automated consistency and validation checks can be performed to improve the overall quality of information provided. Although internally the GLUE 2.0 information model is used for the purpose of integration, the Global Service Registry in not dependent on any particular information model for ingestion or dissemination. The intention is to allow the virtual organisation's configuration databases to be decoupled from the underlying information systems in a transparent way and hence simplify any possible future migration due to the evolution of those systems. This paper presents the Global Service Registry architecture, its advantages

  20. Towards a Global Service Registry for the World-Wide LHC Computing Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Laurence; Alandes Pradillo, Maria; Di Girolamo, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    The World-Wide LHC Computing Grid encompasses a set of heterogeneous information systems; from central portals such as the Open Science Grid's Information Management System and the Grid Operations Centre Database, to the WLCG information system, where the information sources are the Grid services themselves. Providing a consistent view of the information, which involves synchronising all these informations systems, is a challenging activity that has lead the LHC virtual organisations to create their own configuration databases. This experience, whereby each virtual organisation's configuration database interfaces with multiple information systems, has resulted in the duplication of effort, especially relating to the use of manual checks for the handling of inconsistencies. The Global Service Registry aims to address this issue by providing a centralised service that aggregates information from multiple information systems. It shows both information on registered resources (i.e. what should be there) and available resources (i.e. what is there). The main purpose is to simplify the synchronisation of the virtual organisation's own configuration databases, which are used for job submission and data management, through the provision of a single interface for obtaining all the information. By centralising the information, automated consistency and validation checks can be performed to improve the overall quality of information provided. Although internally the GLUE 2.0 information model is used for the purpose of integration, the Global Service Registry in not dependent on any particular information model for ingestion or dissemination. The intention is to allow the virtual organisation's configuration databases to be decoupled from the underlying information systems in a transparent way and hence simplify any possible future migration due to the evolution of those systems. This paper presents the Global Service Registry architecture, its advantages compared to the

  1. Molecular Science Computing Facility Scientific Challenges: Linking Across Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the evolving science drivers for performing environmental molecular research at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and to provide guidance associated with the next-generation high-performance computing center that must be developed at EMSL's Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in order to address this critical research. The MSCF is the pre-eminent computing facility?supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER)?tailored to provide the fastest time-to-solution for current computational challenges in chemistry and biology, as well as providing the means for broad research in the molecular and environmental sciences. The MSCF provides integral resources and expertise to emerging EMSL Scientific Grand Challenges and Collaborative Access Teams that are designed to leverage the multiple integrated research capabilities of EMSL, thereby creating a synergy between computation and experiment to address environmental molecular science challenges critical to DOE and the nation.

  2. Advances in Grid Computing for the Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herner, K.; Alba Hernandez, A. F.; Bhat, S.; Box, D.; Boyd, J.; Di Benedetto, V.; Ding, P.; Dykstra, D.; Fattoruso, M.; Garzoglio, G.; Kirby, M.; Kreymer, A.; Levshina, T.; Mazzacane, A.; Mengel, M.; Mhashilkar, P.; Podstavkov, V.; Retzke, K.; Sharma, N.; Teheran, J.

    2017-10-01

    The Fabric for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a major initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division charged with leading the computing model for Fermilab experiments. Work within the FIFE project creates close collaboration between experimenters and computing professionals to serve high-energy physics experiments of differing size, scope, and physics area. The FIFE project has worked to develop common tools for job submission, certificate management, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, robust data transfer, job monitoring, and databases for project tracking. Since the projects inception the experiments under the FIFE umbrella have significantly matured, and present an increasingly complex list of requirements to service providers. To meet these requirements, the FIFE project has been involved in transitioning the Fermilab General Purpose Grid cluster to support a partitionable slot model, expanding the resources available to experiments via the Open Science Grid, assisting with commissioning dedicated high-throughput computing resources for individual experiments, supporting the efforts of the HEP Cloud projects to provision a variety of back end resources, including public clouds and high performance computers, and developing rapid onboarding procedures for new experiments and collaborations. The larger demands also require enhanced job monitoring tools, which the project has developed using such tools as ElasticSearch and Grafana. in helping experiments manage their large-scale production workflows. This group in turn requires a structured service to facilitate smooth management of experiment requests, which FIFE provides in the form of the Production Operations Management Service (POMS). POMS is designed to track and manage requests from the FIFE experiments to run particular workflows, and support troubleshooting and triage in case of problems. Recently a new certificate management infrastructure called

  3. Advances in Grid Computing for the FabrIc for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermialb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herner, K. [Fermilab; Alba Hernandex, A. F. [Fermilab; Bhat, S. [Fermilab; Box, D. [Fermilab; Boyd, J. [Fermilab; Di Benedetto, V. [Fermilab; Ding, P. [Fermilab; Dykstra, D. [Fermilab; Fattoruso, M. [Fermilab; Garzoglio, G. [Fermilab; Kirby, M. [Fermilab; Kreymer, A. [Fermilab; Levshina, T. [Fermilab; Mazzacane, A. [Fermilab; Mengel, M. [Fermilab; Mhashilkar, P. [Fermilab; Podstavkov, V. [Fermilab; Retzke, K. [Fermilab; Sharma, N. [Fermilab; Teheran, J. [Fermilab

    2016-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a major initiative within the Fermilab Scientic Computing Division charged with leading the computing model for Fermilab experiments. Work within the FIFE project creates close collaboration between experimenters and computing professionals to serve high-energy physics experiments of diering size, scope, and physics area. The FIFE project has worked to develop common tools for job submission, certicate management, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, robust data transfer, job monitoring, and databases for project tracking. Since the projects inception the experiments under the FIFE umbrella have signicantly matured, and present an increasingly complex list of requirements to service providers. To meet these requirements, the FIFE project has been involved in transitioning the Fermilab General Purpose Grid cluster to support a partitionable slot model, expanding the resources available to experiments via the Open Science Grid, assisting with commissioning dedicated high-throughput computing resources for individual experiments, supporting the eorts of the HEP Cloud projects to provision a variety of back end resources, including public clouds and high performance computers, and developing rapid onboarding procedures for new experiments and collaborations. The larger demands also require enhanced job monitoring tools, which the project has developed using such tools as ElasticSearch and Grafana. in helping experiments manage their large-scale production work ows. This group in turn requires a structured service to facilitate smooth management of experiment requests, which FIFE provides in the form of the Production Operations Management Service (POMS). POMS is designed to track and manage requests from the FIFE experiments to run particular work ows, and support troubleshooting and triage in case of problems. Recently a new certicate management infrastructure called Distributed

  4. Modern computer hardware and the role of central computing facilities in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharov, V.

    1981-01-01

    Important recent changes in the hardware technology of computer system components are reviewed, and the impact of these changes assessed on the present and future pattern of computing in particle physics. The place of central computing facilities is particularly examined, to answer the important question as to what, if anything, should be their future role. Parallelism in computing system components is considered to be an important property that can be exploited with advantage. The paper includes a short discussion of the position of communications and network technology in modern computer systems. (orig.)

  5. COMPUTER ORIENTED FACILITIES OF TEACHING AND INFORMATIVE COMPETENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Olga M. Naumenko

    2010-01-01

    In the article it is considered the history of views to the tasks of education, estimations of its effectiveness from the point of view of forming of basic vitally important competences. Opinions to the problem in different countries, international organizations, corresponding experience of the Ukrainian system of education are described. The necessity of forming of informative competence of future teacher is reasonable in the conditions of application of the computer oriented facilities of t...

  6. Higher Education Facilities: The SmartGrid Earns a Doctorate in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tysseling, John C.; Zibelman, Audrey; Freifeld, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Most higher education facilities have already accomplished some measure of a "microgrid" investment with building control systems (BCS), energy management systems (EMS), and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) installations. Available energy production facilities may include boilers, chillers, cogeneration, thermal storage, electrical…

  7. The Erasmus Computing Grid - Building a Super-Computer for FREE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractToday advances in scientific research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment are inevitably connected with information solutions concerning computation power and information storage. The needs for information technology are enormous and are in many cases the limiting

  8. The self-adaptation to dynamic failures for efficient virtual organization formations in grid computing context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Liangxiu

    2009-01-01

    Grid computing aims to enable 'resource sharing and coordinated problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations (VOs)'. However, due to the nature of heterogeneous and dynamic resources, dynamic failures in the distributed grid environment usually occur more than in traditional computation platforms, which cause failed VO formations. In this paper, we develop a novel self-adaptive mechanism to dynamic failures during VO formations. Such a self-adaptive scheme allows an individual and member of VOs to automatically find other available or replaceable one once a failure happens and therefore makes systems automatically recover from dynamic failures. We define dynamic failure situations of a system by using two standard indicators: mean time between failures (MTBF) and mean time to recover (MTTR). We model both MTBF and MTTR as Poisson distributions. We investigate and analyze the efficiency of the proposed self-adaptation mechanism to dynamic failures by comparing the success probability of VO formations before and after adopting it in three different cases: (1) different failure situations; (2) different organizational structures and scales; (3) different task complexities. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme can automatically adapt to dynamic failures and effectively improve the dynamic VO formation performance in the event of node failures, which provide a valuable addition to the field.

  9. Helicopter Rotor Blade Computation in Unsteady Flows Using Moving Overset Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jasim; Duque, Earl P. N.

    1996-01-01

    An overset grid thin-layer Navier-Stokes code has been extended to include dynamic motion of helicopter rotor blades through relative grid motion. The unsteady flowfield and airloads on an AH-IG rotor in forward flight were computed to verify the methodology and to demonstrate the method's potential usefulness towards comprehensive helicopter codes. In addition, the method uses the blade's first harmonics measured in the flight test to prescribe the blade motion. The solution was impulsively started and became periodic in less than three rotor revolutions. Detailed unsteady numerical flow visualization techniques were applied to the entire unsteady data set of five rotor revolutions and exhibited flowfield features such as blade vortex interaction and wake roll-up. The unsteady blade loads and surface pressures compare well against those from flight measurements. Details of the method, a discussion of the resulting predicted flowfield, and requirements for future work are presented. Overall, given the proper blade dynamics, this method can compute the unsteady flowfield of a general helicopter rotor in forward flight.

  10. Service task partition and distribution in star topology computer grid subject to data security constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang Yanping [Collaborative Autonomic Computing Laboratory, School of Computer Science, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (China); Levitin, Gregory, E-mail: levitin@iec.co.il [Collaborative Autonomic Computing Laboratory, School of Computer Science, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (China); Israel electric corporation, P. O. Box 10, Haifa 31000 (Israel)

    2011-11-15

    The paper considers grid computing systems in which the resource management systems (RMS) can divide service tasks into execution blocks (EBs) and send these blocks to different resources. In order to provide a desired level of service reliability the RMS can assign the same blocks to several independent resources for parallel execution. The data security is a crucial issue in distributed computing that affects the execution policy. By the optimal service task partition into the EBs and their distribution among resources, one can achieve the greatest possible service reliability and/or expected performance subject to data security constraints. The paper suggests an algorithm for solving this optimization problem. The algorithm is based on the universal generating function technique and on the evolutionary optimization approach. Illustrative examples are presented. - Highlights: > Grid service with star topology is considered. > An algorithm for evaluating service reliability and data security is presented. > A tradeoff between the service reliability and data security is analyzed. > A procedure for optimal service task partition and distribution is suggested.

  11. Service task partition and distribution in star topology computer grid subject to data security constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Yanping; Levitin, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    The paper considers grid computing systems in which the resource management systems (RMS) can divide service tasks into execution blocks (EBs) and send these blocks to different resources. In order to provide a desired level of service reliability the RMS can assign the same blocks to several independent resources for parallel execution. The data security is a crucial issue in distributed computing that affects the execution policy. By the optimal service task partition into the EBs and their distribution among resources, one can achieve the greatest possible service reliability and/or expected performance subject to data security constraints. The paper suggests an algorithm for solving this optimization problem. The algorithm is based on the universal generating function technique and on the evolutionary optimization approach. Illustrative examples are presented. - Highlights: → Grid service with star topology is considered. → An algorithm for evaluating service reliability and data security is presented. → A tradeoff between the service reliability and data security is analyzed. → A procedure for optimal service task partition and distribution is suggested.

  12. Parallel discontinuous Galerkin FEM for computing hyperbolic conservation law on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinrong; Duan, Zhijian

    2018-04-01

    High-order resolution Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods (DGFEM) has been known as a good method for solving Euler equations and Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grid, but it costs too much computational resources. An efficient parallel algorithm was presented for solving the compressible Euler equations. Moreover, the multigrid strategy based on three-stage three-order TVD Runge-Kutta scheme was used in order to improve the computational efficiency of DGFEM and accelerate the convergence of the solution of unsteady compressible Euler equations. In order to make each processor maintain load balancing, the domain decomposition method was employed. Numerical experiment performed for the inviscid transonic flow fluid problems around NACA0012 airfoil and M6 wing. The results indicated that our parallel algorithm can improve acceleration and efficiency significantly, which is suitable for calculating the complex flow fluid.

  13. Review of the French photovoltaic facilities connected to the grid at the end of March 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This newsletter takes stock of the evolution of the photovoltaic power plants connected and waiting to be connected to the French national grid (mainland France and overseas territories), at the national and regional scale, and sorted by power categories. This issue takes stock of the situation at the end of March 2012

  14. Review of the French photovoltaic facilities connected to the grid at the end of June 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This newsletter takes stock of the evolution of the photovoltaic power plants connected and waiting to be connected to the French national grid (mainland France and overseas territories), at the national and regional scale, and sorted by power categories. This issue takes stock of the situation at the end of June 2012

  15. Advances in Grid and Pervasive Computing: 5th International Conference, GPC 2010, Hualien, Taiwan, May 10-13, 2010: Proceedings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellavista, P.; Chang, R.-S.; Chao, H.-C.; Lin, S.-F.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    This book constitutes the proceedings of the 5th international conference, CPC 2010, held in Hualien, Taiwan in May 2010. The 67 full papers are selected from 184 submissions and focus on topics such as cloud and Grid computing, peer-to-peer and pervasive computing, sensor and mobile networks,

  16. CERN readies world's biggest science grid The computing network now encompasses more than 100 sites in 31 countries

    CERN Multimedia

    Niccolai, James

    2005-01-01

    If the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is to yield miraculous discoveries in particle physics, it may also require a small miracle in grid computing. By a lack of suitable tools from commercial vendors, engineers at the famed Geneva laboratory are hard at work building a giant grid to store and process the vast amount of data the collider is expected to produce when it begins operations in mid-2007 (2 pages)

  17. Shieldings for X-ray radiotherapy facilities calculated by computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, Paulo S.; Farias, Marcos S.; Gavazza, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a methodology for calculation of X-ray shielding in facilities of radiotherapy with help of computer. Even today, in Brazil, the calculation of shielding for X-ray radiotherapy is done based on NCRP-49 recommendation establishing a methodology for calculating required to the elaboration of a project of shielding. With regard to high energies, where is necessary the construction of a labyrinth, the NCRP-49 is not very clear, so that in this field, studies were made resulting in an article that proposes a solution to the problem. It was developed a friendly program in Delphi programming language that, through the manual data entry of a basic design of architecture and some parameters, interprets the geometry and calculates the shields of the walls, ceiling and floor of on X-ray radiation therapy facility. As the final product, this program provides a graphical screen on the computer with all the input data and the calculation of shieldings and the calculation memory. The program can be applied in practical implementation of shielding projects for radiotherapy facilities and can be used in a didactic way compared to NCRP-49.

  18. The Erasmus Computing Grid – Building a Super-Computer for Free

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); A. Abuseiris (Anis); R.M. de Graaf (Rob); M. Lesnussa (Michael); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractToday advances in scientific research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment are inevitably connected with information solutions concerning computation power and information storage. The needs for information technology are enormous and are in many cases the limiting factor for

  19. Shielding Calculations for Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baasandorj, Khashbayar [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jeongseon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Integrated PET-CT has been shown to be more accurate for lesion localization and characterization than PET or CT alone, and the results obtained from PET and CT separately and interpreted side by side or following software based fusion of the PET and CT datasets. At the same time, PET-CT scans can result in high patient and staff doses; therefore, careful site planning and shielding of this imaging modality have become challenging issues in the field. In Mongolia, the introduction of PET-CT facilities is currently being considered in many hospitals. Thus, additional regulatory legislation for nuclear and radiation applications is necessary, for example, in regulating licensee processes and ensuring radiation safety during the operations. This paper aims to determine appropriate PET-CT shielding designs using numerical formulas and computer code. Since presently there are no PET-CT facilities in Mongolia, contact was made with radiological staff at the Nuclear Medicine Center of the National Cancer Center of Mongolia (NCCM) to get information about facilities where the introduction of PET-CT is being considered. Well-designed facilities do not require additional shielding, which should help cut down overall costs related to PET-CT installation. According to the results of this study, building barrier thicknesses of the NCCM building is not sufficient to keep radiation dose within the limits.

  20. Availability measurement of grid services from the perspective of a scientific computing centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, H; Koenig, T

    2011-01-01

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is the merger of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and the Technical University Karlsruhe. The Steinbuch Centre for Computing (SCC) was one of the first new organizational units of KIT, combining the former Institute for Scientific Computing of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and the Computing Centre of the University. IT service management according to the worldwide de-facto-standard 'IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL)' was chosen by SCC as a strategic element to support the merging of the two existing computing centres located at a distance of about 10 km. The availability and reliability of IT services directly influence the customer satisfaction as well as the reputation of the service provider, and unscheduled loss of availability due to hardware or software failures may even result in severe consequences like data loss. Fault tolerant and error correcting design features are reducing the risk of IT component failures and help to improve the delivered availability. The ITIL process controlling the respective design is called Availability Management. This paper discusses Availability Management regarding grid services delivered to WLCG and provides a few elementary guidelines for availability measurements and calculations of services consisting of arbitrary numbers of components.

  1. Hacking the lights out. The computer virus threat to the electrical grid; Angriff auf das Stromnetz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, David M. [Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2011-10-15

    The Stuxnet virus which had penetrated in secured facilities to enrich uranium in Iran by June 2007 has made clear that a virus that was developed by experts for industrial automation may cause a large damage in a technical infrastructure. Our electricity network consists of a variety of networks whose components are monitored and controlled by computers or programmable logic controllers. This is a potential target of an attack for computers. Simulations suggest that a sophisticated attack can paralyze a large portion of the electricity networks. With this in mind the safety precautions are being greatly increased.

  2. The Erasmus Computing Grid - Building a Super-Computer Virtually for Free at the Erasmus Medical Center and the Hogeschool Rotterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe Set-Up of the 20 Teraflop Erasmus Computing Grid: To meet the enormous computational needs of live- science research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment the Hogeschool Rotterdam and the Erasmus Medical Center are currently setting up one of the largest desktop

  3. EIAGRID: In-field optimization of seismic data acquisition by real-time subsurface imaging using a remote GRID computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, B. Z.; Vallenilla Ferrara, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    The constant growth of contaminated sites, the unsustainable use of natural resources, and, last but not least, the hydrological risk related to extreme meteorological events and increased climate variability are major environmental issues of today. Finding solutions for these complex problems requires an integrated cross-disciplinary approach, providing a unified basis for environmental science and engineering. In computer science, grid computing is emerging worldwide as a formidable tool allowing distributed computation and data management with administratively-distant resources. Utilizing these modern High Performance Computing (HPC) technologies, the GRIDA3 project bundles several applications from different fields of geoscience aiming to support decision making for reasonable and responsible land use and resource management. In this abstract we present a geophysical application called EIAGRID that uses grid computing facilities to perform real-time subsurface imaging by on-the-fly processing of seismic field data and fast optimization of the processing workflow. Even though, seismic reflection profiling has a broad application range spanning from shallow targets in a few meters depth to targets in a depth of several kilometers, it is primarily used by the hydrocarbon industry and hardly for environmental purposes. The complexity of data acquisition and processing poses severe problems for environmental and geotechnical engineering: Professional seismic processing software is expensive to buy and demands large experience from the user. In-field processing equipment needed for real-time data Quality Control (QC) and immediate optimization of the acquisition parameters is often not available for this kind of studies. As a result, the data quality will be suboptimal. In the worst case, a crucial parameter such as receiver spacing, maximum offset, or recording time turns out later to be inappropriate and the complete acquisition campaign has to be repeated. The

  4. Automated agents for management and control of the ALICE Computing Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoras, C; Carminati, F; Legrand, I; Voicu, R

    2010-01-01

    A complex software environment such as the ALICE Computing Grid infrastructure requires permanent control and management for the large set of services involved. Automating control procedures reduces the human interaction with the various components of the system and yields better availability of the overall system. In this paper we will present how we used the MonALISA framework to gather, store and display the relevant metrics in the entire system from central and remote site services. We will also show the automatic local and global procedures that are triggered by the monitored values. Decision-taking agents are used to restart remote services, alert the operators in case of problems that cannot be automatically solved, submit production jobs, replicate and analyze raw data, resource load-balance and other control mechanisms that optimize the overall work flow and simplify day-to-day operations. Synthetic graphical views for all operational parameters, correlations, state of services and applications as we...

  5. Resource allocation on computational grids using a utility model and the knapsack problem

    CERN Document Server

    Van der ster, Daniel C; Parra-Hernandez, Rafael; Sobie, Randall J

    2009-01-01

    This work introduces a utility model (UM) for resource allocation on computational grids and formulates the allocation problem as a variant of the 0–1 multichoice multidimensional knapsack problem. The notion of task-option utility is introduced, and it is used to effect allocation policies. We present a variety of allocation policies, which are expressed as functions of metrics that are both intrinsic and external to the task and resources. An external user-defined credit-value metric is shown to allow users to intervene in the allocation of urgent or low priority tasks. The strategies are evaluated in simulation against random workloads as well as those drawn from real systems. We measure the sensitivity of the UM-derived schedules to variations in the allocation policies and their corresponding utility functions. The UM allocation strategy is shown to optimally allocate resources congruent with the chosen policies.

  6. Data security on the national fusion grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER

  7. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER

  8. Security on the US Fusion Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burruss, Justin R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  9. Data security on the national fusion grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burruss, Justine R.; Fredian, Tom W.; Thompson, Mary R.

    2005-06-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This work has led to the development of the US Fusion Grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large US fusion research facilities and with users both in the US and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER.

  10. Security on the US fusion grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burruss, J.R.; Fredian, T.W.; Thompson, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The National Fusion Collaboratory project is developing and deploying new distributed computing and remote collaboration technologies with the goal of advancing magnetic fusion energy research. This has led to the development of the U.S. fusion grid (FusionGrid), a computational grid composed of collaborative, compute, and data resources from the three large U.S. fusion research facilities and with users both in the U.S. and in Europe. Critical to the development of FusionGrid was the creation and deployment of technologies to ensure security in a heterogeneous environment. These solutions to the problems of authentication, authorization, data transfer, and secure data storage, as well as the lessons learned during the development of these solutions, may be applied outside of FusionGrid and scale to future computing infrastructures such as those for next-generation devices like ITER

  11. Desktop Grid Computing with BOINC and its Use for Solving the RND telecommunication Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega-Rodriguez, M. A.; Vega-Perez, D.; Gomez-Pulido, J. A.; Sanchez-Perez, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    An important problem in mobile/cellular technology is trying to cover a certain geographical area by using the smallest number of radio antennas, and looking for the biggest cover rate. This is the well known Telecommunication problem identified as Radio Network Design (RND). This optimization problem can be solved by bio-inspired algorithms, among other options. In this work we use the PBIL (Population-Based Incremental Learning) algorithm, that has been little studied in this field but we have obtained very good results with it. PBIL is based on genetic algorithms and competitive learning (typical in neural networks), being a population evolution model based on probabilistic models. Due to the high number of configuration parameters of the PBIL, and because we want to test the RND problem with numerous variants, we have used grid computing with BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing). In this way, we have been able to execute thousands of experiments in few days using around 100 computers at the same time. In this paper we present the most interesting results from our work. (Author)

  12. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drugan, C. (LCF)

    2011-05-09

    Researchers found more ways than ever to conduct transformative science at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) in 2010. Both familiar initiatives and innovative new programs at the ALCF are now serving a growing, global user community with a wide range of computing needs. The Department of Energy's (DOE) INCITE Program remained vital in providing scientists with major allocations of leadership-class computing resources at the ALCF. For calendar year 2011, 35 projects were awarded 732 million supercomputer processor-hours for computationally intensive, large-scale research projects with the potential to significantly advance key areas in science and engineering. Argonne also continued to provide Director's Discretionary allocations - 'start up' awards - for potential future INCITE projects. And DOE's new ASCR Leadership Computing (ALCC) Program allocated resources to 10 ALCF projects, with an emphasis on high-risk, high-payoff simulations directly related to the Department's energy mission, national emergencies, or for broadening the research community capable of using leadership computing resources. While delivering more science today, we've also been laying a solid foundation for high performance computing in the future. After a successful DOE Lehman review, a contract was signed to deliver Mira, the next-generation Blue Gene/Q system, to the ALCF in 2012. The ALCF is working with the 16 projects that were selected for the Early Science Program (ESP) to enable them to be productive as soon as Mira is operational. Preproduction access to Mira will enable ESP projects to adapt their codes to its architecture and collaborate with ALCF staff in shaking down the new system. We expect the 10-petaflops system to stoke economic growth and improve U.S. competitiveness in key areas such as advancing clean energy and addressing global climate change. Ultimately, we envision Mira as a stepping-stone to exascale-class computers

  13. Effect of computational grid on accurate prediction of a wind turbine rotor using delayed detached-eddy simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangga, Galih; Weihing, Pascal; Lutz, Thorsten; Krämer, Ewald [University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The present study focuses on the impact of grid for accurate prediction of the MEXICO rotor under stalled conditions. Two different blade mesh topologies, O and C-H meshes, and two different grid resolutions are tested for several time step sizes. The simulations are carried out using Delayed detached-eddy simulation (DDES) with two eddy viscosity RANS turbulence models, namely Spalart- Allmaras (SA) and Menter Shear stress transport (SST) k-ω. A high order spatial discretization, WENO (Weighted essentially non- oscillatory) scheme, is used in these computations. The results are validated against measurement data with regards to the sectional loads and the chordwise pressure distributions. The C-H mesh topology is observed to give the best results employing the SST k-ω turbulence model, but the computational cost is more expensive as the grid contains a wake block that increases the number of cells.

  14. ESIF 2016: Modernizing Our Grid and Energy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Becelaere, Kimberly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-09

    This 2016 annual report highlights work conducted at the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) in FY 2016, including grid modernization, high-performance computing and visualization, and INTEGRATE projects.

  15. Proceedings of the second workshop of LHC Computing Grid, LCG-France; ACTES, 2e colloque LCG-France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chollet, Frederique; Hernandez, Fabio; Malek, Fairouz; Gaelle, Shifrin (eds.) [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire Clermont-Ferrand, Campus des Cezeaux, 24, avenue des Landais, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2007-03-15

    The second LCG-France Workshop was held in Clermont-Ferrand on 14-15 March 2007. These sessions organized by IN2P3 and DAPNIA were attended by around 70 participants working with the Computing Grid of LHC in France. The workshop was a opportunity of exchanges of information between the French and foreign site representatives on one side and delegates of experiments on the other side. The event allowed enlightening the place of LHC Computing Task within the frame of W-LCG world project, the undergoing actions and the prospects in 2007 and beyond. The following communications were presented: 1. The current status of the LHC computation in France; 2.The LHC Grid infrastructure in France and associated resources; 3.Commissioning of Tier 1; 4.The sites of Tier-2s and Tier-3s; 5.Computing in ALICE experiment; 6.Computing in ATLAS experiment; 7.Computing in the CMS experiments; 8.Computing in the LHCb experiments; 9.Management and operation of computing grids; 10.'The VOs talk to sites'; 11.Peculiarities of ATLAS; 12.Peculiarities of CMS and ALICE; 13.Peculiarities of LHCb; 14.'The sites talk to VOs'; 15. Worldwide operation of Grid; 16.Following-up the Grid jobs; 17.Surveillance and managing the failures; 18. Job scheduling and tuning; 19.Managing the site infrastructure; 20.LCG-France communications; 21.Managing the Grid data; 22.Pointing the net infrastructure and site storage. 23.ALICE bulk transfers; 24.ATLAS bulk transfers; 25.CMS bulk transfers; 26. LHCb bulk transfers; 27.Access to LHCb data; 28.Access to CMS data; 29.Access to ATLAS data; 30.Access to ALICE data; 31.Data analysis centers; 32.D0 Analysis Farm; 33.Some CMS grid analyses; 34.PROOF; 35.Distributed analysis using GANGA; 36.T2 set-up for end-users. In their concluding remarks Fairouz Malek and Dominique Pallin stressed that the current workshop was more close to users while the tasks for tightening the links between the sites and the experiments were definitely achieved. The IN2P3

  16. The HEPCloud Facility: elastic computing for High Energy Physics – The NOvA Use Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuess, S. [Fermilab; Garzoglio, G. [Fermilab; Holzman, B. [Fermilab; Kennedy, R. [Fermilab; Norman, A. [Fermilab; Timm, S. [Fermilab; Tiradani, A. [Fermilab

    2017-03-15

    The need for computing in the HEP community follows cycles of peaks and valleys mainly driven by conference dates, accelerator shutdown, holiday schedules, and other factors. Because of this, the classical method of provisioning these resources at providing facilities has drawbacks such as potential overprovisioning. As the appetite for computing increases, however, so does the need to maximize cost efficiency by developing a model for dynamically provisioning resources only when needed. To address this issue, the HEPCloud project was launched by the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division in June 2015. Its goal is to develop a facility that provides a common interface to a variety of resources, including local clusters, grids, high performance computers, and community and commercial Clouds. Initially targeted experiments include CMS and NOvA, as well as other Fermilab stakeholders. In its first phase, the project has demonstrated the use of the “elastic” provisioning model offered by commercial clouds, such as Amazon Web Services. In this model, resources are rented and provisioned automatically over the Internet upon request. In January 2016, the project demonstrated the ability to increase the total amount of global CMS resources by 58,000 cores from 150,000 cores - a 25 percent increase - in preparation for the Recontres de Moriond. In March 2016, the NOvA experiment has also demonstrated resource burst capabilities with an additional 7,300 cores, achieving a scale almost four times as large as the local allocated resources and utilizing the local AWS s3 storage to optimize data handling operations and costs. NOvA was using the same familiar services used for local computations, such as data handling and job submission, in preparation for the Neutrino 2016 conference. In both cases, the cost was contained by the use of the Amazon Spot Instance Market and the Decision Engine, a HEPCloud component that aims at minimizing cost and job interruption. This paper

  17. The HEPCloud Facility: elastic computing for High Energy Physics - The NOvA Use Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuess, S.; Garzoglio, G.; Holzman, B.; Kennedy, R.; Norman, A.; Timm, S.; Tiradani, A.

    2017-10-01

    The need for computing in the HEP community follows cycles of peaks and valleys mainly driven by conference dates, accelerator shutdown, holiday schedules, and other factors. Because of this, the classical method of provisioning these resources at providing facilities has drawbacks such as potential overprovisioning. As the appetite for computing increases, however, so does the need to maximize cost efficiency by developing a model for dynamically provisioning resources only when needed. To address this issue, the HEPCloud project was launched by the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division in June 2015. Its goal is to develop a facility that provides a common interface to a variety of resources, including local clusters, grids, high performance computers, and community and commercial Clouds. Initially targeted experiments include CMS and NOvA, as well as other Fermilab stakeholders. In its first phase, the project has demonstrated the use of the “elastic” provisioning model offered by commercial clouds, such as Amazon Web Services. In this model, resources are rented and provisioned automatically over the Internet upon request. In January 2016, the project demonstrated the ability to increase the total amount of global CMS resources by 58,000 cores from 150,000 cores - a 38 percent increase - in preparation for the Recontres de Moriond. In March 2016, the NOvA experiment has also demonstrated resource burst capabilities with an additional 7,300 cores, achieving a scale almost four times as large as the local allocated resources and utilizing the local AWS s3 storage to optimize data handling operations and costs. NOvA was using the same familiar services used for local computations, such as data handling and job submission, in preparation for the Neutrino 2016 conference. In both cases, the cost was contained by the use of the Amazon Spot Instance Market and the Decision Engine, a HEPCloud component that aims at minimizing cost and job interruption. This paper

  18. Long range Debye-Hückel correction for computation of grid-based electrostatic forces between biomacromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Martinez, Michael; Wade, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations can be used to study very large molecular systems, such as models of the intracellular environment, using atomic-detail structures. Such simulations require strategies to contain the computational costs, especially for the computation of interaction forces and energies. A common approach is to compute interaction forces between macromolecules by precomputing their interaction potentials on three-dimensional discretized grids. For long-range interactions, such as electrostatics, grid-based methods are subject to finite size errors. We describe here the implementation of a Debye-Hückel correction to the grid-based electrostatic potential used in the SDA BD simulation software that was applied to simulate solutions of bovine serum albumin and of hen egg white lysozyme. We found that the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic correction increased the accuracy of both the protein-protein interaction profiles and the protein diffusion coefficients at low ionic strength. An advantage of this method is the low additional computational cost required to treat long-range electrostatic interactions in large biomacromolecular systems. Moreover, the implementation described here for BD simulations of protein solutions can also be applied in implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations that make use of gridded interaction potentials

  19. Optimisation of energy supply at off-grid healthcare facilities using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufo-López, Rodolfo; Pérez-Cebollada, Eduardo; Bernal-Agustín, José L.; Martínez-Ruiz, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the application of renewable energies in a hospital located in Kalonge. • A stochastic approach is developed by means of Monte Carlo simulation. • We propose adding PV panels to improve the supply of electrical energy. • The results show that optimal design could achieve 28% reduction in the LCE. • Furthermore, we discuss possible improvements to the telecommunications of the hospital. - Abstract: In this paper, we present a methodology for the optimisation of off-grid hybrid systems (photovoltaic–diesel–battery systems). A stochastic approach is developed by means of Monte Carlo simulation to consider the uncertainties of irradiation and load. The optimisation is economic; that is, we look for a system with a lower net present cost including installation, replacement of the components, operation and maintenance, etc. The most important variable that must be estimated is the batteries lifespan, which depends on the operating conditions (charge/discharge cycles, corrosion, state of charge, etc.). Previous works used classical methods for the estimation of batteries lifespan, which can be too optimistic in many cases, obtaining a net present cost of the system much lower than in reality. In this work, we include an advanced weighted Ah-throughput model for the lead-acid batteries, which is much more realistic. The optimisation methodology presented in this paper is applied in the optimisation of the electrical supply for an off-grid hospital located in Kalonge (Democratic Republic of the Congo). At the moment, the power supply relies on a diesel generator; batteries are used in order to ensure the basic supply of energy when the generator is unavailable (night hours). The optimisation includes the possibility of adding solar photovoltaic (PV) panels to improve the supply of electrical energy. The results show that optimal design could achieve a 28% reduction in the levelised cost of energy and a 54% reduction in the diesel fuel

  20. Grid Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The aim of Grid computing is to enable the easy and open sharing of resources between large and highly distributed communities of scientists and institutes across many independent administrative domains. Convincing site security officers and computer centre managers to allow this to happen in view of today's ever-increasing Internet security problems is a major challenge. Convincing users and application developers to take security seriously is equally difficult. This paper will describe the main Grid security issues, both in terms of technology and policy, that have been tackled over recent years in LCG and related Grid projects. Achievements to date will be described and opportunities for future improvements will be addressed.

  1. CERN helps Grid cmputing into the mainstream

    CERN Multimedia

    Moran, Nuala

    2006-01-01

    CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, has launched the seocnd phase of Openlab, its partnership with IT companies for the development of advanced computing facilities. The industrial partners in this phase, Hewlett Packard, Intel and Oracle, will help build on the experience from the last three years when Openlab worked on cluster and Grid computing (1 page)

  2. High resolution muon computed tomography at neutrino beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suerfu, B.; Tully, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials

  3. GENIE - Generation of computational geometry-grids for internal-external flow configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, B. K.

    1988-01-01

    Progress realized in the development of a master geometry-grid generation code GENIE is presented. The grid refinement process is enhanced by developing strategies to utilize bezier curves/surfaces and splines along with weighted transfinite interpolation technique and by formulating new forcing function for the elliptic solver based on the minimization of a non-orthogonality functional. A two step grid adaptation procedure is developed by optimally blending adaptive weightings with weighted transfinite interpolation technique. Examples of 2D-3D grids are provided to illustrate the success of these methods.

  4. Investigation on Transmission and Substation Facilities of Sichuan Power Grid in Wenchuan Earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yongqing; Li Guangfan; Li Peng; Zhu Quanjun; Yuan Dalu; Wang Chengyu; Li Jinzhong; Huang Huang; Li Lixin; Zhang Xinghai; Liu Jingmin

    2009-01-01

    @@ On May 12,2008,an earthquake of Ms 8.0 hit the area around Wenchuan County,Sichuan Province,China.It has been one of the most destructive earthquakes since the founding of P.R.China in 1949.The quake caused not only tremendous loss of life and wealth,but also severe damage to transmission and substation facilities.After the disaster,an expert group from China Electric Power Research Institute (CEPRI)was sent for on-site investigation.This paper is a summary of the investigation,in which suggestions for electric equipment to resist earthquake disasters are also proponed.

  5. Automated agents for management and control of the ALICE Computing Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoras, C; Betev, L; Carminati, F; Legrand, I; Voicu, R

    2010-01-01

    A complex software environment such as the ALICE Computing Grid infrastructure requires permanent control and management for the large set of services involved. Automating control procedures reduces the human interaction with the various components of the system and yields better availability of the overall system. In this paper we will present how we used the MonALISA framework to gather, store and display the relevant metrics in the entire system from central and remote site services. We will also show the automatic local and global procedures that are triggered by the monitored values. Decision-taking agents are used to restart remote services, alert the operators in case of problems that cannot be automatically solved, submit production jobs, replicate and analyze raw data, resource load-balance and other control mechanisms that optimize the overall work flow and simplify day-to-day operations. Synthetic graphical views for all operational parameters, correlations, state of services and applications as well as the full history of all monitoring metrics are available for the ent ire system that now encompasses 85 sites all over the world, mo re than 14000 CPU cores and 10PB of storage.

  6. Role of proactive behaviour enabled by advanced computational intelligence and ICT in Smart Energy Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, P.H.; Kling, W.L.; Ribeiro, P.F.; Venayagamoorthy, G.K.; Croes, R.

    2013-01-01

    Significant increase in renewable energy production and new forms of consumption has enormous impact to the electrical power grid operation. A Smart Energy Grid (SEG) is needed to overcome the challenge of a sustainable and reliable energy supply by merging advanced ICT and control techniques to

  7. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2011 annual report : Shaping future supercomputing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papka, M.; Messina, P.; Coffey, R.; Drugan, C. (LCF)

    2012-08-16

    The ALCF's Early Science Program aims to prepare key applications for the architecture and scale of Mira and to solidify libraries and infrastructure that will pave the way for other future production applications. Two billion core-hours have been allocated to 16 Early Science projects on Mira. The projects, in addition to promising delivery of exciting new science, are all based on state-of-the-art, petascale, parallel applications. The project teams, in collaboration with ALCF staff and IBM, have undertaken intensive efforts to adapt their software to take advantage of Mira's Blue Gene/Q architecture, which, in a number of ways, is a precursor to future high-performance-computing architecture. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) enables transformative science that solves some of the most difficult challenges in biology, chemistry, energy, climate, materials, physics, and other scientific realms. Users partnering with ALCF staff have reached research milestones previously unattainable, due to the ALCF's world-class supercomputing resources and expertise in computation science. In 2011, the ALCF's commitment to providing outstanding science and leadership-class resources was honored with several prestigious awards. Research on multiscale brain blood flow simulations was named a Gordon Bell Prize finalist. Intrepid, the ALCF's BG/P system, ranked No. 1 on the Graph 500 list for the second consecutive year. The next-generation BG/Q prototype again topped the Green500 list. Skilled experts at the ALCF enable researchers to conduct breakthrough science on the Blue Gene system in key ways. The Catalyst Team matches project PIs with experienced computational scientists to maximize and accelerate research in their specific scientific domains. The Performance Engineering Team facilitates the effective use of applications on the Blue Gene system by assessing and improving the algorithms used by applications and the techniques used to

  8. Computer Security at Nuclear Facilities. Reference Manual (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    category of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series, and deals with computer security at nuclear facilities. It is based on national experience and practices as well as publications in the fields of computer security and nuclear security. The guidance is provided for consideration by States, competent authorities and operators. The preparation of this publication in the IAEA Nuclear Security Series has been made possible by the contributions of a large number of experts from Member States. An extensive consultation process with all Member States included consultants meetings and open-ended technical meetings. The draft was then circulated to all Member States for 120 days to solicit further comments and suggestions. The comments received from Member States were reviewed and considered in the final version of the publication.

  9. Computer Security at Nuclear Facilities. Reference Manual (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    category of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series, and deals with computer security at nuclear facilities. It is based on national experience and practices as well as publications in the fields of computer security and nuclear security. The guidance is provided for consideration by States, competent authorities and operators. The preparation of this publication in the IAEA Nuclear Security Series has been made possible by the contributions of a large number of experts from Member States. An extensive consultation process with all Member States included consultants meetings and open-ended technical meetings. The draft was then circulated to all Member States for 120 days to solicit further comments and suggestions. The comments received from Member States were reviewed and considered in the final version of the publication.

  10. Computer Security at Nuclear Facilities. Reference Manual (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    category of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series, and deals with computer security at nuclear facilities. It is based on national experience and practices as well as publications in the fields of computer security and nuclear security. The guidance is provided for consideration by States, competent authorities and operators. The preparation of this publication in the IAEA Nuclear Security Series has been made possible by the contributions of a large number of experts from Member States. An extensive consultation process with all Member States included consultants meetings and open-ended technical meetings. The draft was then circulated to all Member States for 120 days to solicit further comments and suggestions. The comments received from Member States were reviewed and considered in the final version of the publication.

  11. Reaching for the cloud: on the lessons learned from grid computing technology transfer process to the biomedical community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Yassene; Dickmann, Frank; Sax, Ulrich; von Voigt, Gabriele; Smith, Matthew; Rienhoff, Otto

    2010-01-01

    Natural scientists such as physicists pioneered the sharing of computing resources, which led to the creation of the Grid. The inter domain transfer process of this technology has hitherto been an intuitive process without in depth analysis. Some difficulties facing the life science community in this transfer can be understood using the Bozeman's "Effectiveness Model of Technology Transfer". Bozeman's and classical technology transfer approaches deal with technologies which have achieved certain stability. Grid and Cloud solutions are technologies, which are still in flux. We show how Grid computing creates new difficulties in the transfer process that are not considered in Bozeman's model. We show why the success of healthgrids should be measured by the qualified scientific human capital and the opportunities created, and not primarily by the market impact. We conclude with recommendations that can help improve the adoption of Grid and Cloud solutions into the biomedical community. These results give a more concise explanation of the difficulties many life science IT projects are facing in the late funding periods, and show leveraging steps that can help overcoming the "vale of tears".

  12. An investigation of the RCS (radar cross section) computation of grid cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabihi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the aperture of a cavity is covered by a metallic grid net. This metallic grid is to reduce RCS deduced by impinging radar ray on the aperture. A radar ray incident on a grid net installed on a cavity may create six types of propagation. 1-Incident rays entering inside the cavity and backscattered from it.2-Incidebnt rays on the grid net and created reection rays as an array of scatterers. These rays may create a wave with phase difference of 180 degree with respect to the exiting rays from the cavity.3-Incident rays on the grid net create surface currents owing on the net and make travelling waves, which regenerate the magnetic and electric fields. These fields make again propagated waves against incident ones.4-Creeping waves.5-Diffracted rays due to leading edges of net’s elements.6-Mutual impedance among elements of the net could be effective on the resultant RCS. Therefore, the author compares the effects of three out of six properties to a cavity without grid net. This comparison shows that RCS prediction of cavity having a grid net is much more reduced than that of without one

  13. An investigation of the RCS (radar cross section) computation of grid cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabihi, Ahmad [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, the aperture of a cavity is covered by a metallic grid net. This metallic grid is to reduce RCS deduced by impinging radar ray on the aperture. A radar ray incident on a grid net installed on a cavity may create six types of propagation. 1-Incident rays entering inside the cavity and backscattered from it.2-Incidebnt rays on the grid net and created reection rays as an array of scatterers. These rays may create a wave with phase difference of 180 degree with respect to the exiting rays from the cavity.3-Incident rays on the grid net create surface currents owing on the net and make travelling waves, which regenerate the magnetic and electric fields. These fields make again propagated waves against incident ones.4-Creeping waves.5-Diffracted rays due to leading edges of net’s elements.6-Mutual impedance among elements of the net could be effective on the resultant RCS. Therefore, the author compares the effects of three out of six properties to a cavity without grid net. This comparison shows that RCS prediction of cavity having a grid net is much more reduced than that of without one.

  14. iSERVO: Implementing the International Solid Earth Research Virtual Observatory by Integrating Computational Grid and Geographical Information Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Mehmet; Aydin, Galip; Donnellan, Andrea; Fox, Geoffrey; Granat, Robert; Grant, Lisa; Lyzenga, Greg; McLeod, Dennis; Pallickara, Shrideep; Parker, Jay; Pierce, Marlon; Rundle, John; Sayar, Ahmet; Tullis, Terry

    2006-12-01

    We describe the goals and initial implementation of the International Solid Earth Virtual Observatory (iSERVO). This system is built using a Web Services approach to Grid computing infrastructure and is accessed via a component-based Web portal user interface. We describe our implementations of services used by this system, including Geographical Information System (GIS)-based data grid services for accessing remote data repositories and job management services for controlling multiple execution steps. iSERVO is an example of a larger trend to build globally scalable scientific computing infrastructures using the Service Oriented Architecture approach. Adoption of this approach raises a number of research challenges in millisecond-latency message systems suitable for internet-enabled scientific applications. We review our research in these areas.

  15. Development of an international matrix-solver prediction system on a French-Japanese international grid computing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Kushida, Noriyuki; Tatekawa, Takayuki; Teshima, Naoya; Caniou, Yves; Guivarch, Ronan; Dayde, Michel; Ramet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The 'Research and Development of International Matrix-Solver Prediction System (REDIMPS)' project aimed at improving the TLSE sparse linear algebra expert website by establishing an international grid computing environment between Japan and France. To help users in identifying the best solver or sparse linear algebra tool for their problems, we have developed an interoperable environment between French and Japanese grid infrastructures (respectively managed by DIET and AEGIS). Two main issues were considered. The first issue is how to submit a job from DIET to AEGIS. The second issue is how to bridge the difference of security between DIET and AEGIS. To overcome these issues, we developed APIs to communicate between different grid infrastructures by improving the client API of AEGIS. By developing a server deamon program (SeD) of DIET which behaves like an AEGIS user, DIET can call functions in AEGIS: authentication, file transfer, job submission, and so on. To intensify the security, we also developed functionalities to authenticate DIET sites and DIET users in order to access AEGIS computing resources. By this study, the set of software and computers available within TLSE to find an appropriate solver is enlarged over France (DIET) and Japan (AEGIS). (author)

  16. Characterization of antigenetic serotypes from the dengue virus in Venezuela by means of Grid Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isea, Raúl; Montes, Esther; Rubio-Montero, Antonio J; Rosales, José D; Rodríguez-Pascual, Manuel A; Mayo, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    This work determines the molecular epidemiology of dengue virus in Venezuela by means of phylogenetic calculations performed on the EELA-2 Grid infrastructure with the PhyloGrid application, an open source tool that allows users performing phylogeny reconstruction in their research. In this study, a total of 132 E nucleotide gene sequences of dengue virus from Venezuela recorded in GenBank(R) have been processed in order to reproduce and validate the topology described in the literature.

  17. Development and Execution of an Impact Cratering Application on a Computational Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Huedo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact cratering is an important geological process of special interest in Astrobiology. Its numerical simulation comprises the execution of a high number of tasks, since the search space of input parameter values includes the projectile diameter, the water depth and the impactor velocity. Furthermore, the execution time of each task is not uniform because of the different numerical properties of each experimental configuration. Grid technology is a promising platform to execute this kind of applications, since it provides the end user with a performance much higher than that achievable on any single organization. However, the scheduling of each task on a Grid involves challenging issues due to the unpredictable and heterogeneous behavior of both the Grid and the numerical code. This paper evaluates the performance of a Grid infrastructure based on the Globus toolkit and the GridWay framework, which provides the adaptive and fault tolerance functionality required to harness Grid resources, in the simulation of the impact cratering process. The experiments have been performed on a testbed composed of resources shared by five sites interconnected by RedIRIS, the Spanish Research and Education Network.

  18. Academic Computing Facilities and Services in Higher Education--A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warlick, Charles H.

    1986-01-01

    Presents statistics about academic computing facilities based on data collected over the past six years from 1,753 institutions in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Puerto Rico for the "Directory of Computing Facilities in Higher Education." Organizational, functional, and financial characteristics are examined as well as types of…

  19. Public Computer Assisted Learning Facilities for Children with Visual Impairment: Universal Design for Inclusive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Kin Wai Michael; Lam, Mei Seung

    2012-01-01

    Although computer assisted learning (CAL) is becoming increasingly popular, people with visual impairment face greater difficulty in accessing computer-assisted learning facilities. This is primarily because most of the current CAL facilities are not visually impaired friendly. People with visual impairment also do not normally have access to…

  20. An analytical model for computation of reliability of waste management facilities with intermediate storages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallweit, A.; Schumacher, F.

    1977-01-01

    A high reliability is called for waste management facilities within the fuel cycle of nuclear power stations which can be fulfilled by providing intermediate storage facilities and reserve capacities. In this report a model based on the theory of Markov processes is described which allows computation of reliability characteristics of waste management facilities containing intermediate storage facilities. The application of the model is demonstrated by an example. (orig.) [de

  1. DIGRD: an interactive grid generating program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, H.P.; Rice, W.A.; Kincaid, C.T.

    1982-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed the development and documentation of an interactive grid generating program (DIGRD, digitize grid). This program is designed to rapidly generate or modify grids necessary for the unsaturated flow code TRUST. In addition to the code, a user's manual was prepared. Unfortunately, the computer hardware that comprises the PNL interactive graphics capability is unique. Direct technology transfer is not possible, therefore, this report is intended to convey the utility of interactive graphics in supplying a grid generating capability. DIGRD has already been effectively used in the preparation of grids for the analysis of leachate movement from uranium mill tailings. The principal conclusion is that the interactive graphics employed in DIGRD are useful and economical in the development of complex grids. Grid generation activities that previously took between a half- and a full-man month can now be completed in less than a week. DIGRD users have recommended development of an uniform grid of either rectangles or equilateral triangles, which could be superimposed on any domain and then adjusted through the DIGRD program to match the boundaries of a tailings disposal facility. This improvement to the DIGRD package could further reduce the effort in grid generation while providing more optimal grids

  2. Computational comparison of the effect of mixing grids of 'swirler' and 'run-through' types on flow parameters and the behavior of steam phase in WWER fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, S.; Sergeev, V.

    2011-01-01

    The results obtained using the TURBOFLOW computer code are presented for the numerical calculations of space distributions of coolant flow, heating and boiling characteristics in WWER fuel assemblies with regard to the effect of mixing grids of 'Swirler' and 'Run-through' types installed in FA on the above processes. The nature of the effect of these grids on coolant flow was demonstrated to be different. Thus, the relaxation length of cross flows after passing a 'Run-through' grid is five times as compared to a 'Swirler'-type grid, which correlates well with the experimental data. At the same time, accelerations occurring in the flow downstream of a 'Swirler'-type grid are by an order of magnitude greater than those after a 'Run-through' grid. As a result, the efficiency of one-phase coolant mixing is much higher for the grids of 'Run-through' type, while the efficiency of steam removal from fuel surface is much higher for 'Swirler'-type grids. To achieve optimal removal of steam from fuel surface it has been proposed to install into fuel assemblies two 'Swirler'-type grids in tandem at a distance of about 10 cm from each other with flow swirling in opposite directions. 'Run-through' grids would be appropriate for use for mixing in fuel assemblies with a high non-uniformity of fuel-by-fuel power generation. (authors)

  3. The Open Science Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab; Kramer, Bill; Olson, Doug; / /LBL, Berkeley; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Avery, Paul; /Florida U.; Blackburn, Kent; /Caltech; Wenaus, Torre; /Brookhaven; Wurthwein, Frank; /UC, San Diego; Gardner, Rob; Wilde, Mike; /Chicago U. /Indiana U.

    2007-06-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) provides a distributed facility where the Consortium members provide guaranteed and opportunistic access to shared computing and storage resources. OSG provides support for and evolution of the infrastructure through activities that cover operations, security, software, troubleshooting, addition of new capabilities, and support for existing and engagement with new communities. The OSG SciDAC-2 project provides specific activities to manage and evolve the distributed infrastructure and support its use. The innovative aspects of the project are the maintenance and performance of a collaborative (shared & common) petascale national facility over tens of autonomous computing sites, for many hundreds of users, transferring terabytes of data a day, executing tens of thousands of jobs a day, and providing robust and usable resources for scientific groups of all types and sizes. More information can be found at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.

  4. Towards Agent-Based Model Specification in Smart Grid: A Cognitive Agent-based Computing Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Akram, Waseem; Niazi, Muaz A.; Iantovics, Laszlo Barna

    2017-01-01

    A smart grid can be considered as a complex network where each node represents a generation unit or a consumer. Whereas links can be used to represent transmission lines. One way to study complex systems is by using the agent-based modeling (ABM) paradigm. An ABM is a way of representing a complex system of autonomous agents interacting with each other. Previously, a number of studies have been presented in the smart grid domain making use of the ABM paradigm. However, to the best of our know...

  5. Computer Security Incident Response Planning at Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to assist Member States in developing comprehensive contingency plans for computer security incidents with the potential to impact nuclear security and/or nuclear safety. It provides an outline and recommendations for establishing a computer security incident response capability as part of a computer security programme, and considers the roles and responsibilities of the system owner, operator, competent authority, and national technical authority in responding to a computer security incident with possible nuclear security repercussions

  6. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  7. Numerical Computation of a Viscous Flow around a Circular Cylinder on a Cartesian Grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.W.C.P.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    2000-01-01

    We introduce a novel cut-cell Cartesian grid method that preserves the spectral properties of convection and diffusion. That is, convection is discretised by a skew-symmetric operator and diffusion is approximated by a symmetric positive-definite coefficient matrix. Such a symmetry-preserving

  8. Proceedings of the Spanish Conference on e-Science Grid Computing. March 1-2, 2007. Madrid (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado, J.; Mayo, R.; Munoz, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Spanish Conference on e-Science Grid Computing and the EGEE-EELA Industrial Day (http://webrt.ciemat.es:8000/e-science/index.html) are the first edition of this open forum for the integration of Grid Technologies and its applications in the Spanish community. It has been organised by CIEMAT and CETA-CIEMAT, sponsored by IBM and HP and supported by the European Community through their funded projects EELA, EUChinaGrid and EUMedGrid. To all of them, the conference is very grateful. e-Science is the concept that defines those activities developed by using geographically distributed resources, which scientists (or whoever) can access through the Internet. However, commercial Internet does not fulfil resources such as calculus and massive storage -most frequently in demand in the field of e-Science- since they require high-speed networks devoted to research. These networks, alongside the collaborative work applications developed within them, are creating an ideal scenario for interaction among researchers. Thus, this technology that interconnects a huge variety of computers, information repositories, applications software and scientific tools will change the society in the next few years. The science, industry and services systems will benefit from his immense capacity of computation that will improve the quality of life and the well-being of citizens. The future generation of technologies, which will reach all of these areas in society, such as research, medicine, engineering, economy and entertainment will be based on integrated computers and networks, rendering a very high quality of services and applications through a friendly interface. The conference aims at becoming a liaison framework between Spanish and International developers and users of e-Science applications and at implementing these technologies in Spain. It intends to be a forum where the state of the art of different European projects on e- Science is shown, as well as developments in the research

  9. Search for β2 adrenergic receptor ligands by virtual screening via grid computing and investigation of binding modes by docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifeng Bai

    Full Text Available We designed a program called MolGridCal that can be used to screen small molecule database in grid computing on basis of JPPF grid environment. Based on MolGridCal program, we proposed an integrated strategy for virtual screening and binding mode investigation by combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations and free energy calculations. To test the effectiveness of MolGridCal, we screened potential ligands for β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR from a database containing 50,000 small molecules. MolGridCal can not only send tasks to the grid server automatically, but also can distribute tasks using the screensaver function. As for the results of virtual screening, the known agonist BI-167107 of β2AR is ranked among the top 2% of the screened candidates, indicating MolGridCal program can give reasonable results. To further study the binding mode and refine the results of MolGridCal, more accurate docking and scoring methods are used to estimate the binding affinity for the top three molecules (agonist BI-167107, neutral antagonist alprenolol and inverse agonist ICI 118,551. The results indicate agonist BI-167107 has the best binding affinity. MD simulation and free energy calculation are employed to investigate the dynamic interaction mechanism between the ligands and β2AR. The results show that the agonist BI-167107 also has the lowest binding free energy. This study can provide a new way to perform virtual screening effectively through integrating molecular docking based on grid computing, MD simulations and free energy calculations. The source codes of MolGridCal are freely available at http://molgridcal.codeplex.com.

  10. Ice storage facilities may use excess contingents of electricity. Reduction of the payback period by smart grids; Eisspeicher koennen ueberschuessige Stromkontingente nutzen. Amortisationszeit durch Smart Grid verkuerzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Klaus [Fafco S.A., Biel (Switzerland); Schmid, Wolfgang

    2013-03-11

    In Germany, energy storage device attain a great importance in the energy supply. However, up to now economical technologies are missing in order to store fluctuating offers of electricity from renewable energy sources directly in a storage medium. Within the modern refrigeration and air conditioning, ice storage facilities proved over decades could take up this position and could be one component of the energy policy turnaround. New tariff offers as well as the construction of virtual power plants let expect that ice storage facilities may amortize within few years.

  11. Cooperative Strategy for Optimal Management of Smart Grids by Wavelet RNNs and Cloud Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Christian; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Tina, Giuseppe Marco; Tramontana, Emiliano

    2016-08-01

    Advanced smart grids have several power sources that contribute with their own irregular dynamic to the power production, while load nodes have another dynamic. Several factors have to be considered when using the owned power sources for satisfying the demand, i.e., production rate, battery charge and status, variable cost of externally bought energy, and so on. The objective of this paper is to develop appropriate neural network architectures that automatically and continuously govern power production and dispatch, in order to maximize the overall benefit over a long time. Such a control will improve the fundamental work of a smart grid. For this, status data of several components have to be gathered, and then an estimate of future power production and demand is needed. Hence, the neural network-driven forecasts are apt in this paper for renewable nonprogrammable energy sources. Then, the produced energy as well as the stored one can be supplied to consumers inside a smart grid, by means of digital technology. Among the sought benefits, reduced costs and increasing reliability and transparency are paramount.

  12. The MammoGrid Project Grids Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    McClatchey, Richard; Hauer, Tamas; Estrella, Florida; Saiz, Pablo; Rogulin, Dmitri; Buncic, Predrag; Clatchey, Richard Mc; Buncic, Predrag; Manset, David; Hauer, Tamas; Estrella, Florida; Saiz, Pablo; Rogulin, Dmitri

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the recently EU-funded MammoGrid project is, in the light of emerging Grid technology, to develop a European-wide database of mammograms that will be used to develop a set of important healthcare applications and investigate the potential of this Grid to support effective co-working between healthcare professionals throughout the EU. The MammoGrid consortium intends to use a Grid model to enable distributed computing that spans national borders. This Grid infrastructure will be used for deploying novel algorithms as software directly developed or enhanced within the project. Using the MammoGrid clinicians will be able to harness the use of massive amounts of medical image data to perform epidemiological studies, advanced image processing, radiographic education and ultimately, tele-diagnosis over communities of medical "virtual organisations". This is achieved through the use of Grid-compliant services [1] for managing (versions of) massively distributed files of mammograms, for handling the distri...

  13. On-line satellite/central computer facility of the Multiparticle Argo Spectrometer System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E.W.; Fisher, G.P.; Hien, N.C.; Larson, G.P.; Thorndike, A.M.; Turkot, F.; von Lindern, L.; Clifford, T.S.; Ficenec, J.R.; Trower, W.P.

    1974-09-01

    An on-line satellite/central computer facility has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Multiparticle Argo Spectrometer System (MASS). This facility consisting of a PDP-9 and a CDC-6600, has been successfully used in study of proton-proton interactions at 28.5 GeV/c. (U.S.)

  14. Computer applications for the Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worth, G.A.; Patterson, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Computer applications for the FFTF reactor include plant surveillance functions and fuel handling and examination control functions. Plant surveillance systems provide the reactor operator with a selection of over forty continuously updated, formatted displays of correlated data. All data are checked for limits and validity and the operator is advised of any anomaly. Data are also recorded on magnetic tape for historical purposes. The system also provides calculated variables, such as reactor thermal power and anomalous reactivity. Supplementing the basic plant surveillance computer system is a minicomputer system that monitors the reactor cover gas to detect and characterize absorber or fuel pin failures. In addition to plant surveillance functions, computers are used in the FFTF for controlling selected refueling equipment and for post-irradiation fuel pin examination. Four fuel handling or examination systems operate under computer control with manual monitoring and over-ride capability

  15. Implementation of computer security at nuclear facilities in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochthofen, Andre; Sommer, Dagmar [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In recent years, electrical and I and C components in nuclear power plants (NPPs) were replaced by software-based components. Due to the increased number of software-based systems also the threat of malevolent interferences and cyber-attacks on NPPs has increased. In order to maintain nuclear security, conventional physical protection measures and protection measures in the field of computer security have to be implemented. Therefore, the existing security management process of the NPPs has to be expanded to computer security aspects. In this paper, we give an overview of computer security requirements for German NPPs. Furthermore, some examples for the implementation of computer security projects based on a GRS-best-practice-approach are shown. (orig.)

  16. Implementation of computer security at nuclear facilities in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochthofen, Andre; Sommer, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, electrical and I and C components in nuclear power plants (NPPs) were replaced by software-based components. Due to the increased number of software-based systems also the threat of malevolent interferences and cyber-attacks on NPPs has increased. In order to maintain nuclear security, conventional physical protection measures and protection measures in the field of computer security have to be implemented. Therefore, the existing security management process of the NPPs has to be expanded to computer security aspects. In this paper, we give an overview of computer security requirements for German NPPs. Furthermore, some examples for the implementation of computer security projects based on a GRS-best-practice-approach are shown. (orig.)

  17. Grids, virtualization, and clouds at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, S; Chadwick, K; Garzoglio, G; Noh, S

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. To better serve this community, in 2004, the (then) Computing Division undertook the strategy of placing all of the High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources in a Campus Grid known as FermiGrid, supported by common shared services. In 2007, the FermiGrid Services group deployed a service infrastructure that utilized Xen virtualization, LVS network routing and MySQL circular replication to deliver highly available services that offered significant performance, reliability and serviceability improvements. This deployment was further enhanced through the deployment of a distributed redundant network core architecture and the physical distribution of the systems that host the virtual machines across multiple buildings on the Fermilab Campus. In 2010, building on the experience pioneered by FermiGrid in delivering production services in a virtual infrastructure, the Computing Sector commissioned the FermiCloud, General Physics Computing Facility and Virtual Services projects to serve as platforms for support of scientific computing (FermiCloud 6 GPCF) and core computing (Virtual Services). This work will present the evolution of the Fermilab Campus Grid, Virtualization and Cloud Computing infrastructure together with plans for the future.

  18. Grids, virtualization, and clouds at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, S.; Chadwick, K.; Garzoglio, G.; Noh, S.

    2014-06-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. To better serve this community, in 2004, the (then) Computing Division undertook the strategy of placing all of the High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources in a Campus Grid known as FermiGrid, supported by common shared services. In 2007, the FermiGrid Services group deployed a service infrastructure that utilized Xen virtualization, LVS network routing and MySQL circular replication to deliver highly available services that offered significant performance, reliability and serviceability improvements. This deployment was further enhanced through the deployment of a distributed redundant network core architecture and the physical distribution of the systems that host the virtual machines across multiple buildings on the Fermilab Campus. In 2010, building on the experience pioneered by FermiGrid in delivering production services in a virtual infrastructure, the Computing Sector commissioned the FermiCloud, General Physics Computing Facility and Virtual Services projects to serve as platforms for support of scientific computing (FermiCloud 6 GPCF) and core computing (Virtual Services). This work will present the evolution of the Fermilab Campus Grid, Virtualization and Cloud Computing infrastructure together with plans for the future.

  19. Computer-aided system for cryogenic research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, V.P.; Zhelamsky, M.V.; Mozin, I.V.; Repin, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    A computer-aided system is developed for the more effective choice and optimization of the design and manufacturing technologies of the superconductor for the magnet system of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) with the aim to ensure the superconductor certification. The computer-aided system provides acquisition, processing, storage and display of data describing the proceeding tests, the detection of any parameter deviations and their analysis. Besides, it generates commands for the equipment switch off in emergency situations. ((orig.))

  20. Reconstruction and identification of electrons in the Atlas experiment. Setup of a Tier 2 of the computing grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derue, F.

    2008-03-01

    The origin of the mass of elementary particles is linked to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. Its study will be one of the main efforts of the Atlas experiment at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, starting in 2008. In most cases, studies will be limited by our knowledge of the detector performances, as the precision of the energy reconstruction or the efficiency to identify particles. This manuscript presents a work dedicated to the reconstruction of electrons in the Atlas experiment with simulated data and data taken during the combined test beam of 2004. The analysis of the Atlas data implies the use of a huge amount of computing and storage resources which brought to the development of a world computing grid. (author)

  1. FDTD parallel computational analysis of grid-type scattering filter characteristics for medical X-ray image diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasumitsu; Goto, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diagnosis depends on the intensity of transmitted and scattered waves in X-ray propagation in biomedical media. X-ray is scattered and absorbed by tissues, such as fat, bone and internal organs. However, image processing for medical diagnosis, based on the scattering and absorption characteristics of these tissues in X-ray spectrum is not so much studied. To obtain precise information of tissues in a living body, the accurate characteristics of scattering and absorption are required. In this paper, X-ray scattering and absorption in biomedical media are studied using 2-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. In FDTD method, the size of analysis space is very limited by the performance of available computers. To overcome this limitation, parallel and successive FDTD method is introduced. As a result of computer simulation, the amplitude of transmitted and scattered waves are presented numerically. The fundamental filtering characteristics of grid-type filter are also shown numerically. (author)

  2. A Taxonomy for Modeling Flexibility and a Computationally Efficient Algorithm for Dispatch in Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mette Højgaard; Edlund, Kristian; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The word flexibility is central to Smart Grid literature, but still a formal definition of flexibility is pending. This paper present a taxonomy for flexibility modeling denoted Buckets, Batteries and Bakeries. We consider a direct control Virtual Power Plant (VPP), which is given the task...... of servicing a portfolio of flexible consumers by use of a fluctuating power supply. Based on the developed taxonomy we first prove that no causal optimal dispatch strategies exist for the considered problem. We then present two heuristic algorithms for solving the balancing task: Predictive Balancing...

  3. Operational facility-integrated computer system for safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armento, W.J.; Brooksbank, R.E.; Krichinsky, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer system for safeguards in an active, remotely operated, nuclear fuel processing pilot plant has been developed. This sytem maintains (1) comprehensive records of special nuclear materials, (2) automatically updated book inventory files, (3) material transfer catalogs, (4) timely inventory estimations, (5) sample transactions, (6) automatic, on-line volume balances and alarmings, and (7) terminal access and applications software monitoring and logging. Future development will include near-real-time SNM mass balancing as both a static, in-tank summation and a dynamic, in-line determination. It is planned to incorporate aspects of site security and physical protection into the computer monitoring

  4. Chimera Grid Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, William M.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Nash, Steven M.; Buning, Pieter G.; Meakin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Chimera Grid Tools (CGT) is a software package for performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis utilizing the Chimera-overset-grid method. For modeling flows with viscosity about geometrically complex bodies in relative motion, the Chimera-overset-grid method is among the most computationally cost-effective methods for obtaining accurate aerodynamic results. CGT contains a large collection of tools for generating overset grids, preparing inputs for computer programs that solve equations of flow on the grids, and post-processing of flow-solution data. The tools in CGT include grid editing tools, surface-grid-generation tools, volume-grid-generation tools, utility scripts, configuration scripts, and tools for post-processing (including generation of animated images of flows and calculating forces and moments exerted on affected bodies). One of the tools, denoted OVERGRID, is a graphical user interface (GUI) that serves to visualize the grids and flow solutions and provides central access to many other tools. The GUI facilitates the generation of grids for a new flow-field configuration. Scripts that follow the grid generation process can then be constructed to mostly automate grid generation for similar configurations. CGT is designed for use in conjunction with a computer-aided-design program that provides the geometry description of the bodies, and a flow-solver program.

  5. Ubiquitous healthcare computing with SEnsor Grid Enhancement with Data Management System (SEGEDMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preve, Nikolaos

    2011-12-01

    Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) can be deployed to monitor the health of patients suffering from critical diseases. Also a wireless network consisting of biomedical sensors can be implanted into the patient's body and can monitor the patients' conditions. These sensor devices, apart from having an enormous capability of collecting data from their physical surroundings, are also resource constraint in nature with a limited processing and communication ability. Therefore we have to integrate them with the Grid technology in order to process and store the collected data by the sensor nodes. In this paper, we proposed the SEnsor Grid Enhancement Data Management system, called SEGEDMA ensuring the integration of different network technologies and the continuous data access to system users. The main contribution of this work is to achieve the interoperability of both technologies through a novel network architecture ensuring also the interoperability of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and HL7 standards. According to the results, SEGEDMA can be applied successfully in a decentralized healthcare environment.

  6. Information Power Grid: Distributed High-Performance Computing and Large-Scale Data Management for Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, William E.; Gannon, Dennis; Nitzberg, Bill

    2000-01-01

    We use the term "Grid" to refer to distributed, high performance computing and data handling infrastructure that incorporates geographically and organizationally dispersed, heterogeneous resources that are persistent and supported. This infrastructure includes: (1) Tools for constructing collaborative, application oriented Problem Solving Environments / Frameworks (the primary user interfaces for Grids); (2) Programming environments, tools, and services providing various approaches for building applications that use aggregated computing and storage resources, and federated data sources; (3) Comprehensive and consistent set of location independent tools and services for accessing and managing dynamic collections of widely distributed resources: heterogeneous computing systems, storage systems, real-time data sources and instruments, human collaborators, and communications systems; (4) Operational infrastructure including management tools for distributed systems and distributed resources, user services, accounting and auditing, strong and location independent user authentication and authorization, and overall system security services The vision for NASA's Information Power Grid - a computing and data Grid - is that it will provide significant new capabilities to scientists and engineers by facilitating routine construction of information based problem solving environments / frameworks. Such Grids will knit together widely distributed computing, data, instrument, and human resources into just-in-time systems that can address complex and large-scale computing and data analysis problems. Examples of these problems include: (1) Coupled, multidisciplinary simulations too large for single systems (e.g., multi-component NPSS turbomachine simulation); (2) Use of widely distributed, federated data archives (e.g., simultaneous access to metrological, topological, aircraft performance, and flight path scheduling databases supporting a National Air Space Simulation systems}; (3

  7. Computer program for source distribution process in radiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kassiri, H.; Abdul Ghani, B.

    2007-08-01

    Computer simulation for dose distribution using Visual Basic has been done according to the arrangement and activities of Co-60 sources. This program provides dose distribution in treated products depending on the product density and desired dose. The program is useful for optimization of sources distribution during loading process. there is good agreement between calculated data for the program and experimental data.(Author)

  8. NNS computing facility manual P-17 Neutron and Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeberling, M.; Nelson, R.O.

    1993-11-01

    This document describes basic policies and provides information and examples on using the computing resources provided by P-17, the Neutron and Nuclear Science (NNS) group. Information on user accounts, getting help, network access, electronic mail, disk drives, tape drives, printers, batch processing software, XSYS hints, PC networking hints, and Mac networking hints is given

  9. Grid generation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Liseikin, Vladimir D

    2010-01-01

    This book is an introduction to structured and unstructured grid methods in scientific computing, addressing graduate students, scientists as well as practitioners. Basic local and integral grid quality measures are formulated and new approaches to mesh generation are reviewed. In addition to the content of the successful first edition, a more detailed and practice oriented description of monitor metrics in Beltrami and diffusion equations is given for generating adaptive numerical grids. Also, new techniques developed by the author are presented, in particular a technique based on the inverted form of Beltrami’s partial differential equations with respect to control metrics. This technique allows the generation of adaptive grids for a wide variety of computational physics problems, including grid clustering to given function values and gradients, grid alignment with given vector fields, and combinations thereof. Applications of geometric methods to the analysis of numerical grid behavior as well as grid ge...

  10. Uniformity on the grid via a configuration framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor V Terekhov et al.

    2003-01-01

    As Grid permeates modern computing, Grid solutions continue to emerge and take shape. The actual Grid development projects continue to provide higher-level services that evolve in functionality and operate with application-level concepts which are often specific to the virtual organizations that use them. Physically, however, grids are comprised of sites whose resources are diverse and seldom project readily onto a grid's set of concepts. In practice, this also creates problems for site administrators who actually instantiate grid services. In this paper, we present a flexible, uniform framework to configure a grid site and its facilities, and otherwise describe the resources and services it offers. We start from a site configuration and instantiate services for resource advertisement, monitoring and data handling; we also apply our framework to hosting environment creation. We use our ideas in the Information Management part of the SAM-Grid project, a grid system which will deliver petabyte-scale data to the hundreds of users. Our users are High Energy Physics experimenters who are scattered worldwide across dozens of institutions and always use facilities that are shared with other experiments as well as other grids. Our implementation represents information in the XML format and includes tools written in XQuery and XSLT

  11. Computing infrastructure for ATLAS data analysis in the Italian Grid cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreazza, A; Annovi, A; Martini, A; Barberis, D; Brunengo, A; Corosu, M; Campana, S; Girolamo, A Di; Carlino, G; Doria, A; Merola, L; Musto, E; Ciocca, C; Jha, M K; Cobal, M; Pascolo, F; Salvo, A De; Luminari, L; Sanctis, U De; Galeazzi, F

    2011-01-01

    ATLAS data are distributed centrally to Tier-1 and Tier-2 sites. The first stages of data selection and analysis take place mainly at Tier-2 centres, with the final, iterative and interactive, stages taking place mostly at Tier-3 clusters. The Italian ATLAS cloud consists of a Tier-1, four Tier-2s, and Tier-3 sites at each institute. Tier-3s that are grid-enabled are used to test code that will then be run on a larger scale at Tier-2s. All Tier-3s offer interactive data access to their users and the possibility to run PROOF. This paper describes the hardware and software infrastructure choices taken, the operational experience after 10 months of LHC data, and discusses site performances.

  12. Simulation modeling of cloud computing for smart grid using CloudSim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mehmi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a smart grid cloud has been simulated using CloudSim. Various parameters like number of virtual machines (VM, VM Image size, VM RAM, VM bandwidth, cloudlet length, and their effect on cost and cloudlet completion time in time-shared and space-shared resource allocation policy have been studied. As the number of cloudlets increased from 68 to 178, greater number of cloudlets completed their execution with high cloudlet completion time in time-shared allocation policy as compared to space-shared allocation policy. Similar trend has been observed when VM bandwidth is increased from 1 Gbps to 10 Gbps and VM RAM is increased from 512 MB to 5120 MB. The cost of processing increased linearly with respect to increase in number of VMs, VM Image size and cloudlet length.

  13. Introducing Enabling Computational Tools to the Climate Sciences: Multi-Resolution Climate Modeling with Adaptive Cubed-Sphere Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonowski, Christiane [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-14

    The research investigates and advances strategies how to bridge the scale discrepancies between local, regional and global phenomena in climate models without the prohibitive computational costs of global cloud-resolving simulations. In particular, the research explores new frontiers in computational geoscience by introducing high-order Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques into climate research. AMR and statically-adapted variable-resolution approaches represent an emerging trend for atmospheric models and are likely to become the new norm in future-generation weather and climate models. The research advances the understanding of multi-scale interactions in the climate system and showcases a pathway how to model these interactions effectively with advanced computational tools, like the Chombo AMR library developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The research is interdisciplinary and combines applied mathematics, scientific computing and the atmospheric sciences. In this research project, a hierarchy of high-order atmospheric models on cubed-sphere computational grids have been developed that serve as an algorithmic prototype for the finite-volume solution-adaptive Chombo-AMR approach. The foci of the investigations have lied on the characteristics of both static mesh adaptations and dynamically-adaptive grids that can capture flow fields of interest like tropical cyclones. Six research themes have been chosen. These are (1) the introduction of adaptive mesh refinement techniques into the climate sciences, (2) advanced algorithms for nonhydrostatic atmospheric dynamical cores, (3) an assessment of the interplay between resolved-scale dynamical motions and subgrid-scale physical parameterizations, (4) evaluation techniques for atmospheric model hierarchies, (5) the comparison of AMR refinement strategies and (6) tropical cyclone studies with a focus on multi-scale interactions and variable-resolution modeling. The results of this research project

  14. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, Erik L.; Scannapieco, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, ρ i u di = ρ i (u i -u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  15. Implementation of the Facility Integrated Inventory Computer System (FICS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEvers, J.A.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Layman, L.R.; Dunnigan, T.H.; Tuft, R.M.; Murray, W.P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a computer system which has been developed for nuclear material accountability and implemented in an active radiochemical processing plant involving remote operations. The system posesses the following features: comprehensive, timely records of the location and quantities of special nuclear materials; automatically updated book inventory files on the plant and sub-plant levels of detail; material transfer coordination and cataloging; automatic inventory estimation; sample transaction coordination and cataloging; automatic on-line volume determination, limit checking, and alarming; extensive information retrieval capabilities; and terminal access and application software monitoring and logging

  16. Final Assessment: U.S. Virgin Islands Industrial Development Park and Adjacent Facilities Energy-Efficiency and Micro-Grid Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Joseph M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boyd, Paul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dahowski, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Parker, Graham B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this assessment was to undertake an assessment and analysis of cost-effective options for energy-efficiency improvements and the deployment of a micro-grid to increase the energy resilience at the U.S. Virgin Islands Industrial Development Park (IDP) and adjacent facilities in St. Croix, Virgin Islands. The Economic Development Authority sought assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy to undertake this assessment undertaken by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The assessment included 18 buildings plus the perimeter security lighting at the Virgin Islands Bureau of Correctional Facility, four buildings plus exterior lighting at the IDP, and five buildings (one of which is to be constructed) at the Virgin Islands Police Department for a total of 27 buildings with a total of nearly 323,000 square feet.

  17. Porting Erasmus Computing Grid (Condor enabled Applications for EDGeS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc); T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractToday advances in scientific research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment are inevitably connected with information solutions concerning computation power and information storage. The needs for information technology are enormous and are in many cases the limiting

  18. Numerical Study of Detonation Wave Propagation in the Variable Cross-Section Channel Using Unstructured Computational Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lopato

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is dedicated to the numerical study of detonation wave initiation and propagation in the variable cross-section axisymmetric channel filled with the model hydrogen-air mixture. The channel models the large-scale device for the utilization of worn-out tires. Mathematical model is based on two-dimensional axisymmetric Euler equations supplemented by global chemical kinetics model. The finite volume computational algorithm of the second approximation order for the calculation of two-dimensional flows with detonation waves on fully unstructured grids with triangular cells is developed. Three geometrical configurations of the channel are investigated, each with its own degree of the divergence of the conical part of the channel from the point of view of the pressure from the detonation wave on the end wall of the channel. The problem in consideration relates to the problem of waste recycling in the devices based on the detonation combustion of the fuel.

  19. Computer usage among nurses in rural health-care facilities in South Africa: obstacles and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asah, Flora

    2013-04-01

    This study discusses factors inhibiting computer usage for work-related tasks among computer-literate professional nurses within rural healthcare facilities in South Africa. In the past two decades computer literacy courses have not been part of the nursing curricula. Computer courses are offered by the State Information Technology Agency. Despite this, there seems to be limited use of computers by professional nurses in the rural context. Focus group interviews held with 40 professional nurses from three government hospitals in northern KwaZulu-Natal. Contributing factors were found to be lack of information technology infrastructure, restricted access to computers and deficits in regard to the technical and nursing management support. The physical location of computers within the health-care facilities and lack of relevant software emerged as specific obstacles to usage. Provision of continuous and active support from nursing management could positively influence computer usage among professional nurses. A closer integration of information technology and computer literacy skills into existing nursing curricula would foster a positive attitude towards computer usage through early exposure. Responses indicated that change of mindset may be needed on the part of nursing management so that they begin to actively promote ready access to computers as a means of creating greater professionalism and collegiality. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Development of computer model for radionuclide released from shallow-land disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suganda, D.; Sucipta; Sastrowardoyo, P.B.; Eriendi

    1998-01-01

    Development of 1-dimensional computer model for radionuclide release from shallow land disposal facility (SLDF) has been done. This computer model is used for the SLDF facility at PPTA Serpong. The SLDF facility is above 1.8 metres from groundwater and 150 metres from Cisalak river. Numerical method by implicit method of finite difference solution is chosen to predict the migration of radionuclide with any concentration.The migration starts vertically from the bottom of SLDF until the groundwater layer, then horizontally in the groundwater until the critical population group. Radionuclide Cs-137 is chosen as a sample to know its migration. The result of the assessment shows that the SLDF facility at PPTA Serpong has the high safety criteria. (author)

  1. Computer software configuration management plan for 200 East/West Liquid Effluent Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1995-02-27

    This computer software management configuration plan covers the control of the software for the monitor and control system that operates the Effluent Treatment Facility and its associated truck load in station and some key aspects of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility that stores condensate to be processed. Also controlled is the Treated Effluent Disposal System`s pumping stations and monitors waste generator flows in this system as well as the Phase Two Effluent Collection System.

  2. Computer software configuration management plan for 200 East/West Liquid Effluent Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This computer software management configuration plan covers the control of the software for the monitor and control system that operates the Effluent Treatment Facility and its associated truck load in station and some key aspects of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility that stores condensate to be processed. Also controlled is the Treated Effluent Disposal System's pumping stations and monitors waste generator flows in this system as well as the Phase Two Effluent Collection System

  3. Computer control and data acquisition system for the R.F. Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, K.A.; Burris, R.D.; Mankin, J.B.; Thompson, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, used to test and evaluate high-power ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems and components, is monitored and controlled by a multicomponent computer system. This data acquisition and control system consists of three major hardware elements: (1) an Allen-Bradley PLC-3 programmable controller; (2) a VAX 11/780 computer; and (3) a CAMAC serial highway interface. Operating in LOCAL as well as REMOTE mode, the programmable logic controller (PLC) performs all the control functions of the test facility. The VAX computer acts as the operator's interface to the test facility by providing color mimic panel displays and allowing input via a trackball device. The VAX also provides archiving of trend data acquired by the PLC. Communications between the PLC and the VAX are via the CAMAC serial highway. Details of the hardware, software, and the operation of the system are presented in this paper

  4. ATLAS experience with HEP software at the Argonne leadership computing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uram, Thomas D; LeCompte, Thomas J; Benjamin, D

    2014-01-01

    A number of HEP software packages used by the ATLAS experiment, including GEANT4, ROOT and ALPGEN, have been adapted to run on the IBM Blue Gene supercomputers at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. These computers use a non-x86 architecture and have a considerably less rich operating environment than in common use in HEP, but also represent a computing capacity an order of magnitude beyond what ATLAS is presently using via the LCG. The status and potential for making use of leadership-class computing, including the status of integration with the ATLAS production system, is discussed.

  5. ATLAS Experience with HEP Software at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    CERN Document Server

    LeCompte, T; The ATLAS collaboration; Benjamin, D

    2014-01-01

    A number of HEP software packages used by the ATLAS experiment, including GEANT4, ROOT and ALPGEN, have been adapted to run on the IBM Blue Gene supercomputers at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. These computers use a non-x86 architecture and have a considerably less rich operating environment than in common use in HEP, but also represent a computing capacity an order of magnitude beyond what ATLAS is presently using via the LCG. The status and potential for making use of leadership-class computing, including the status of integration with the ATLAS production system, is discussed.

  6. Lincoln Laboratory Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lincoln Laboratory Grid (LLGrid) is an interactive, on-demand parallel computing system that uses a large computing cluster to enable Laboratory researchers to...

  7. Meet the Grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Yurkewicz, Katie

    2005-01-01

    Today's cutting-edge scientific projects are larger, more complex, and more expensive than ever. Grid computing provides the resources that allow researchers to share knowledge, data, and computer processing power across boundaries

  8. Status of the Grid Computing for the ALICE Experiment in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamová, Dagmar; Chudoba, Jiří; Kouba, T.; Lorenzo, P.M.; Saiz, P.; Švec, Jan; Hampl, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 219, č. 7 (2010), s. 1-9 E-ISSN 1742-6596 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : accelerators * PARTICLE PHYSICS * computer data analysis Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics

  9. Erasmus Computing Grid : Het Bouwen van een 20 TeraFLOP Virtuelle Supercomputer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractHet Erasmus Medische Centrum (Erasmus MC) en Hogeschool Rotterdam (HR) zijn in 2005 een unieke samenwerking begonnen om 95% van de capaciteit op al haar computers en die van anderen beschikbaar te maken voor onderzoek en onderwijs. Deze samenwerking heeft geleid tot het Erasmus

  10. The Benefits of Grid Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Roy

    2005-01-01

    In the article, the author talks about the benefits of grid networks. In speaking of grid networks the author is referring to both networks of computers and networks of humans connected together in a grid topology. Examples are provided of how grid networks are beneficial today and the ways in which they have been used.

  11. Operational Circular nr 5 - October 2000 USE OF CERN COMPUTING FACILITIES

    CERN Multimedia

    Division HR

    2000-01-01

    New rules covering the use of CERN Computing facilities have been drawn up. All users of CERN’s computing facilites are subject to these rules, as well as to the subsidiary rules of use. The Computing Rules explicitly address your responsibility for taking reasonable precautions to protect computing equipment and accounts. In particular, passwords must not be easily guessed or obtained by others. Given the difficulty to completely separate work and personal use of computing facilities, the rules define under which conditions limited personal use is tolerated. For example, limited personal use of e-mail, news groups or web browsing is tolerated in your private time, provided CERN resources and your official duties are not adversely affected. The full conditions governing use of CERN’s computing facilities are contained in Operational Circular N° 5, which you are requested to read. Full details are available at : http://www.cern.ch/ComputingRules Copies of the circular are also available in the Divis...

  12. Computer security at ukrainian nuclear facilities: interface between nuclear safety and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumak, D.; Klevtsov, O.

    2015-01-01

    Active introduction of information technology, computer instrumentation and control systems (I and C systems) in the nuclear field leads to a greater efficiency and management of technological processes at nuclear facilities. However, this trend brings a number of challenges related to cyber-attacks on the above elements, which violates computer security as well as nuclear safety and security of a nuclear facility. This paper considers regulatory support to computer security at the nuclear facilities in Ukraine. The issue of computer and information security considered in the context of physical protection, because it is an integral component. The paper focuses on the computer security of I and C systems important to nuclear safety. These systems are potentially vulnerable to cyber threats and, in case of cyber-attacks, the potential negative impact on the normal operational processes can lead to a breach of the nuclear facility security. While ensuring nuclear security of I and C systems, it interacts with nuclear safety, therefore, the paper considers an example of an integrated approach to the requirements of nuclear safety and security

  13. Evolution of facility layout requirements and CAD [computer-aided design] system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.

    1990-06-01

    The overall configuration of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) including the infrastructure and land boundary requirements were developed using a computer-aided design (CAD) system. The evolution of the facility layout requirements and the use of the CAD system are discussed. The emphasis has been on minimizing the amount of input required and maximizing the speed by which the output may be obtained. The computer system used to store the data is also described

  14. Integrating Flexible Sensor and Virtual Self-Organizing DC Grid Model With Cloud Computing for Blood Leakage Detection During Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping-Tzan; Jong, Tai-Lang; Li, Chien-Ming; Chen, Wei-Ling; Lin, Chia-Hung

    2017-08-01

    Blood leakage and blood loss are serious complications during hemodialysis. From the hemodialysis survey reports, these life-threatening events occur to attract nephrology nurses and patients themselves. When the venous needle and blood line are disconnected, it takes only a few minutes for an adult patient to lose over 40% of his / her blood, which is a sufficient amount of blood loss to cause the patient to die. Therefore, we propose integrating a flexible sensor and self-organizing algorithm to design a cloud computing-based warning device for blood leakage detection. The flexible sensor is fabricated via a screen-printing technique using metallic materials on a soft substrate in an array configuration. The self-organizing algorithm constructs a virtual direct current grid-based alarm unit in an embedded system. This warning device is employed to identify blood leakage levels via a wireless network and cloud computing. It has been validated experimentally, and the experimental results suggest specifications for its commercial designs. The proposed model can also be implemented in an embedded system.

  15. Final Technical Report: Sparse Grid Scenario Generation and Interior Algorithms for Stochastic Optimization in a Parallel Computing Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehrotra, Sanjay [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The support from this grant resulted in seven published papers and a technical report. Two papers are published in SIAM J. on Optimization [87, 88]; two papers are published in IEEE Transactions on Power Systems [77, 78]; one paper is published in Smart Grid [79]; one paper is published in Computational Optimization and Applications [44] and one in INFORMS J. on Computing [67]). The works in [44, 67, 87, 88] were funded primarily by this DOE grant. The applied papers in [77, 78, 79] were also supported through a subcontract from the Argonne National Lab. We start by presenting our main research results on the scenario generation problem in Sections 1–2. We present our algorithmic results on interior point methods for convex optimization problems in Section 3. We describe a new ‘central’ cutting surface algorithm developed for solving large scale convex programming problems (as is the case with our proposed research) with semi-infinite number of constraints in Section 4. In Sections 5–6 we present our work on two application problems of interest to DOE.

  16. Navier-Stokes Simulation of Airconditioning Facility of a Large Modem Computer Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    NASA recently assembled one of the world's fastest operational supercomputers to meet the agency's new high performance computing needs. This large-scale system, named Columbia, consists of 20 interconnected SGI Altix 512-processor systems, for a total of 10,240 Intel Itanium-2 processors. High-fidelity CFD simulations were performed for the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) computer room at Ames Research Center. The purpose of the simulations was to assess the adequacy of the existing air handling and conditioning system and make recommendations for changes in the design of the system if needed. The simulations were performed with NASA's OVERFLOW-2 CFD code which utilizes overset structured grids. A new set of boundary conditions were developed and added to the flow solver for modeling the roomls air-conditioning and proper cooling of the equipment. Boundary condition parameters for the flow solver are based on cooler CFM (flow rate) ratings and some reasonable assumptions of flow and heat transfer data for the floor and central processing units (CPU) . The geometry modeling from blue prints and grid generation were handled by the NASA Ames software package Chimera Grid Tools (CGT). This geometric model was developed as a CGT-scripted template, which can be easily modified to accommodate any changes in shape and size of the room, locations and dimensions of the CPU racks, disk racks, coolers, power distribution units, and mass-storage system. The compute nodes are grouped in pairs of racks with an aisle in the middle. High-speed connection cables connect the racks with overhead cable trays. The cool air from the cooling units is pumped into the computer room from a sub-floor through perforated floor tiles. The CPU cooling fans draw cool air from the floor tiles, which run along the outside length of each rack, and eject warm air into the center isle between the racks. This warm air is eventually drawn into the cooling units located near the walls of the room. One

  17. Near-Body Grid Adaption for Overset Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    A solution adaption capability for curvilinear near-body grids has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid computational fluid dynamics code. The approach follows closely that used for the Cartesian off-body grids, but inserts refined grids in the computational space of original near-body grids. Refined curvilinear grids are generated using parametric cubic interpolation, with one-sided biasing based on curvature and stretching ratio of the original grid. Sensor functions, grid marking, and solution interpolation tasks are implemented in the same fashion as for off-body grids. A goal-oriented procedure, based on largest error first, is included for controlling growth rate and maximum size of the adapted grid system. The adaption process is almost entirely parallelized using MPI, resulting in a capability suitable for viscous, moving body simulations. Two- and three-dimensional examples are presented.

  18. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Anton; le Roux, Stephan Gerhard; Guelpa, Anina

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory's first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  19. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessis, Anton du, E-mail: anton2@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Roux, Stephan Gerhard le, E-mail: lerouxsg@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Guelpa, Anina, E-mail: aninag@sun.ac.za [CT Scanner Facility, Central Analytical Facilities, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory’s first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  20. A Step Towards A Computing Grid For The LHC Experiments ATLAS Data Challenge 1

    CERN Document Server

    Sturrock, R; Epp, B; Ghete, V M; Kuhn, D; Mello, A G; Caron, B; Vetterli, M C; Karapetian, G V; Martens, K; Agarwal, A; Poffenberger, P R; McPherson, R A; Sobie, R J; Amstrong, S; Benekos, N C; Boisvert, V; Boonekamp, M; Brandt, S; Casado, M P; Elsing, M; Gianotti, F; Goossens, L; Grote, M; Hansen, J B; Mair, K; Nairz, A; Padilla, C; Poppleton, A; Poulard, G; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Rosati, S; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Wengler, T; Xu, G F; Ping, J L; Chudoba, J; Kosina, J; Lokajícek, M; Svec, J; Tas, P; Hansen, J R; Lytken, E; Nielsen, J L; Wäänänen, A; Tapprogge, Stefan; Calvet, D; Albrand, S; Collot, J; Fulachier, J; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Ohlsson-Malek, F; Viret, S; Wielers, M; Bernardet, K; Corréard, S; Rozanov, A; De Vivie de Régie, J B; Arnault, C; Bourdarios, C; Hrivnác, J; Lechowski, M; Parrour, G; Perus, A; Rousseau, D; Schaffer, A; Unal, G; Derue, F; Chevalier, L; Hassani, S; Laporte, J F; Nicolaidou, R; Pomarède, D; Virchaux, M; Nesvadba, N; Baranov, S; Putzer, A; Khonich, A; Duckeck, G; Schieferdecker, P; Kiryunin, A E; Schieck, J; Lagouri, T; Duchovni, E; Levinson, L; Schrager, D; Negri, G; Bilokon, H; Spogli, L; Barberis, D; Parodi, F; Cataldi, G; Gorini, E; Primavera, M; Spagnolo, S; Cavalli, D; Heldmann, M; Lari, T; Perini, L; Rebatto, D; Resconi, S; Tatarelli, F; Vaccarossa, L; Biglietti, M; Carlino, G; Conventi, F; Doria, A; Merola, L; Polesello, G; Vercesi, V; De Salvo, A; Di Mattia, A; Luminari, L; Nisati, A; Reale, M; Testa, M; Farilla, A; Verducci, M; Cobal, M; Santi, L; Hasegawa, Y; Ishino, M; Mashimo, T; Matsumoto, H; Sakamoto, H; Tanaka, J; Ueda, I; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Fornaini, A; Gorfine, G; Groep, D; Templon, J; Köster, L J; Konstantinov, A; Myklebust, T; Ould-Saada, F; Bold, T; Kaczmarska, A; Malecki, P; Szymocha, T; Turala, M; Kulchitskii, Yu A; Khoreauli, G; Gromova, N; Tsulaia, V; Minaenko, A A; Rudenko, R; Slabospitskaya, E; Solodkov, A; Gavrilenko, I; Nikitine, N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Toms, K; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Kervesan, B; Bosman, M; González, S; Sánchez, J; Salt, J; Andersson, N; Nixon, L; Eerola, Paule Anna Mari; Kónya, B; Smirnova, O G; Sandgren, A; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Gollub, N; Hellman, S; Lipniacka, A; Corso-Radu, A; Pérez-Réale, V; Lee, S C; CLin, S C; Ren, Z L; Teng, P K; Faulkner, P J W; O'Neale, S W; Watson, A; Brochu, F; Lester, C; Thompson, S; Kennedy, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Henderson, R; Jones, R; Kartvelishvili, V G; Smizanska, M; Washbrook, A J; Drohan, J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moyse, E; Salih, S; Loken, J; Baines, J T M; Candlin, D; Candlin, R; Clifft, R; Li, W; McCubbin, N A; George, S; Lowe, A; Buttar, C; Dawson, I; Moraes, A; Tovey, Daniel R; Gieraltowski, J; Malon, D; May, E; LeCompte, T J; Vaniachine, A; Adams, D L; Assamagan, Ketevi A; Baker, R; Deng, W; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Gibbard, B; Ma, H; Nevski, P; Paige, F; Rajagopalan, S; Smith, J; Undrus, A; Wenaus, T; Yu, D; Calafiura, P; Canon, S; Costanzo, D; Hinchliffe, Ian; Lavrijsen, W; Leggett, C; Marino, M; Quarrie, D R; Sakrejda, I; Stravopoulos, G; Tull, C; Loch, P; Youssef, S; Shank, J T; Engh, D; Frank, E; Sen-Gupta, A; Gardner, R; Meritt, F; Smirnov, Y; Huth, J; Grundhoefer, L; Luehring, F C; Goldfarb, S; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Gao, Y; Ryan, T; De, K; Sosebee, M; McGuigan, P; Ozturk, N

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration at CERN is preparing for the data taking and analysis at the LHC that will start in 2007. Therefore, a series of Data Challenges was started in 2002 whose goals are the validation of the Computing Model, of the complete software suite, of the data model, and to ensure the correctness of the technical choices to be made for the final offline computing environment. A major feature of the first Data Challenge (DC1) was the preparation and the deployment of the software required for the production of large event samples as a worldwide distributed activity. It should be noted that it was not an option to "run the complete production at CERN" even if we had wanted to; the resources were not available at CERN to carry out the production on a reasonable time-scale. The great challenge of organising and carrying out this large-scale production at a significant number of sites around the world had therefore to be faced. However, the benefits of this are manifold: apart from realising the require...

  1. Atmospheric dispersion calculation for posturated accident of nuclear facilities and the computer code: PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Yoshihisa; Kishimoto, Yoichiro; Narita, Osamu; Shinohara, Kunihiko

    1979-01-01

    Several Calculation methods for relative concentration (X/Q) and relative cloud-gamma dose (D/Q) of the radioactive materials released from nuclear facilities by posturated accident are presented. The procedure has been formulated as a Computer program PANDA and the usage is explained. (author)

  2. Taking the classical large audience university lecture online using tablet computer and webconferencing facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockhoff, Per B.

    2011-01-01

    During four offerings (September 2008 – May 2011) of the course 02402 Introduction to Statistics for Engineering students at DTU, with an average of 256 students, the lecturing was carried out 100% through a tablet computer combined with the web conferencing facility Adobe Connect (version 7...

  3. The GreenLab Research Facility: A Micro-Grid Integrating Production, Consumption and Storage of Clean Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell Bomani, Bilal Mark; Elbuluk, Malik; Fain, Henry; Kankam, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    There is a large gap between the production and demand for energy from alternative fuel and alternative renewable energy sources. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has initiated a laboratory-pilot study that concentrates on using biofuels as viable alternative fuel resources for the field of aviation, as well as, utilizing wind and solar technologies as alternative renewable energy resources, and in addition, the use of pumped water for storage of energy that can be retrieved through hydroelectric generation. This paper describes the GreenLab Research Facility and its power and energy sources with .recommendations for worldwide expansion and adoption of the concept of such a facility

  4. The GRID seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    The Grid infrastructure is a key part of the computing environment for the simulation, processing and analysis of the data of the LHC experiments. These experiments depend on the availability of a worldwide Grid infrastructure in several aspects of their computing model. The Grid middleware will hide much of the complexity of this environment to the user, organizing all the resources in a coherent virtual computer center. The general description of the elements of the Grid, their interconnections and their use by the experiments will be exposed in this talk. The computational and storage capability of the Grid is attracting other research communities beyond the high energy physics. Examples of these applications will be also exposed during the presentation.

  5. Evolution of user analysis on the grid in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00218990; The ATLAS collaboration; Dewhurst, Alastair

    2017-01-01

    More than one thousand physicists analyse data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN through 150 computing facilities around the world. Efficient distributed analysis requires optimal resource usage and the interplay of several factors: robust grid and software infrastructures, and system capability to adapt to different workloads. The continuous automatic validation of grid sites and the user support provided by a dedicated team of expert shifters have been proven to provide a solid distributed analysis system for ATLAS users. Typical user workflows on the grid, and their associated metrics, are discussed. Measurements of user job performance and typical requirements are also shown.

  6. DOORS to the semantic web and grid with a PORTAL for biomedical computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taswell, Carl

    2008-03-01

    The semantic web remains in the early stages of development. It has not yet achieved the goals envisioned by its founders as a pervasive web of distributed knowledge and intelligence. Success will be attained when a dynamic synergism can be created between people and a sufficient number of infrastructure systems and tools for the semantic web in analogy with those for the original web. The domain name system (DNS), web browsers, and the benefits of publishing web pages motivated many people to register domain names and publish web sites on the original web. An analogous resource label system, semantic search applications, and the benefits of collaborative semantic networks will motivate people to register resource labels and publish resource descriptions on the semantic web. The Domain Ontology Oriented Resource System (DOORS) and Problem Oriented Registry of Tags and Labels (PORTAL) are proposed as infrastructure systems for resource metadata within a paradigm that can serve as a bridge between the original web and the semantic web. The Internet Registry Information Service (IRIS) registers [corrected] domain names while DNS publishes domain addresses with mapping of names to addresses for the original web. Analogously, PORTAL registers resource labels and tags while DOORS publishes resource locations and descriptions with mapping of labels to locations for the semantic web. BioPORT is proposed as a prototype PORTAL registry specific for the problem domain of biomedical computing.

  7. The impact of CFD on development test facilities - A National Research Council projection. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkegi, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a National Research Council study on the effect that advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will have on conventional aeronautical ground testing are reported. Current CFD capabilities include the depiction of linearized inviscid flows and a boundary layer, initial use of Euler coordinates using supercomputers to automatically generate a grid, research and development on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, and preliminary research on solutions to the full N-S equations. Improvements in the range of CFD usage is dependent on the development of more powerful supercomputers, exceeding even the projected abilities of the NASA Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator (1 BFLOP/sec). Full representation of the Re-averaged N-S equations will require over one million grid points, a computing level predicted to be available in 15 yr. Present capabilities allow identification of data anomalies, confirmation of data accuracy, and adequateness of model design in wind tunnel trials. Account can be taken of the wall effects and the Re in any flight regime during simulation. CFD can actually be more accurate than instrumented tests, since all points in a flow can be modeled with CFD, while they cannot all be monitored with instrumentation in a wind tunnel.

  8. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, Carol

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  9. Handling Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Critical Service Incidents : The infrastructure and experience behind nearly 5 years of GGUS ALARMs

    CERN Multimedia

    Dimou, M; Dulov, O; Grein, G

    2013-01-01

    In the Wordwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) project the Tier centres are of paramount importance for storing and accessing experiment data and for running the batch jobs necessary for experiment production activities. Although Tier2 sites provide a significant fraction of the resources a non-availability of resources at the Tier0 or the Tier1s can seriously harm not only WLCG Operations but also the experiments' workflow and the storage of LHC data which are very expensive to reproduce. This is why availability requirements for these sites are high and committed in the WLCG Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). In this talk we describe the workflow of GGUS ALARMs, the only 24/7 mechanism available to LHC experiment experts for reporting to the Tier0 or the Tier1s problems with their Critical Services. Conclusions and experience gained from the detailed drills performed in each such ALARM for the last 4 years are explained and the shift with time of Type of Problems met. The physical infrastructure put in place to ...

  10. Searches for beyond the Standard Model physics with boosted topologies in the ATLAS experiment using the Grid-based Tier-3 facility at IFIC-Valencia

    CERN Document Server

    Villaplana Pérez, Miguel; Vos, Marcel

    Both the LHC and ATLAS have been performing well beyond expectation since the start of the data taking by the end of 2009. Since then, several thousands of millions of collision events have been recorded by the ATLAS experiment. With a data taking efficiency higher than 95% and more than 99% of its channels working, ATLAS supplies data with an unmatched quality. In order to analyse the data, the ATLAS Collaboration has designed a distributed computing model based on GRID technologies. The ATLAS computing model and its evolution since the start of the LHC is discussed in section 3.1. The ATLAS computing model groups the different types of computing centers of the ATLAS Collaboration in a tiered hierarchy that ranges from Tier-0 at CERN, down to the 11 Tier-1 centers and the nearly 80 Tier-2 centres distributed world wide. The Spanish Tier-2 activities during the first years of data taking are described in section 3.2. Tier-3 are institution-level non-ATLAS funded or controlled centres that participate presuma...

  11. Enabling Campus Grids with Open Science Grid Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzel, Derek; Fraser, Dan; Pordes, Ruth; Bockelman, Brian; Swanson, David

    2011-01-01

    The Open Science Grid is a recognized key component of the US national cyber-infrastructure enabling scientific discovery through advanced high throughput computing. The principles and techniques that underlie the Open Science Grid can also be applied to Campus Grids since many of the requirements are the same, even if the implementation technologies differ. We find five requirements for a campus grid: trust relationships, job submission, resource independence, accounting, and data management. The Holland Computing Center's campus grid at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was designed to fulfill the requirements of a campus grid. A bridging daemon was designed to bring non-Condor clusters into a grid managed by Condor. Condor features which make it possible to bridge Condor sites into a multi-campus grid have been exploited at the Holland Computing Center as well.

  12. Enabling campus grids with open science grid technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzel, Derek [Nebraska U.; Bockelman, Brian [Nebraska U.; Swanson, David [Nebraska U.; Fraser, Dan [Argonne; Pordes, Ruth [Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The Open Science Grid is a recognized key component of the US national cyber-infrastructure enabling scientific discovery through advanced high throughput computing. The principles and techniques that underlie the Open Science Grid can also be applied to Campus Grids since many of the requirements are the same, even if the implementation technologies differ. We find five requirements for a campus grid: trust relationships, job submission, resource independence, accounting, and data management. The Holland Computing Center's campus grid at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was designed to fulfill the requirements of a campus grid. A bridging daemon was designed to bring non-Condor clusters into a grid managed by Condor. Condor features which make it possible to bridge Condor sites into a multi-campus grid have been exploited at the Holland Computing Center as well.

  13. Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High Performance Computer Facility Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drewmark Communications; Sartor, Dale; Wilson, Mark

    2010-07-01

    High-performance computing facilities in the United States consume an enormous amount of electricity, cutting into research budgets and challenging public- and private-sector efforts to reduce energy consumption and meet environmental goals. However, these facilities can greatly reduce their energy demand through energy-efficient design of the facility itself. Using a case study of a facility under design, this article discusses strategies and technologies that can be used to help achieve energy reductions.

  14. Specialized, multi-user computer facility for the high-speed, interactive processing of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maples, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    A proposal has been made to develop a specialized computer facility specifically designed to deal with the problems associated with the reduction and analysis of experimental data. Such a facility would provide a highly interactive, graphics-oriented, multi-user environment capable of handling relatively large data bases for each user. By conceptually separating the general problem of data analysis into two parts, cyclic batch calculations and real-time interaction, a multi-level, parallel processing framework may be used to achieve high-speed data processing. In principle such a system should be able to process a mag tape equivalent of data, through typical transformations and correlations, in under 30 sec. The throughput for such a facility, assuming five users simultaneously reducing data, is estimated to be 2 to 3 times greater than is possible, for example, on a CDC7600

  15. Specialized, multi-user computer facility for the high-speed, interactive processing of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maples, C.C.

    1979-05-01

    A proposal has been made at LBL to develop a specialized computer facility specifically designed to deal with the problems associated with the reduction and analysis of experimental data. Such a facility would provide a highly interactive, graphics-oriented, multi-user environment capable of handling relatively large data bases for each user. By conceptually separating the general problem of data analysis into two parts, cyclic batch calculations and real-time interaction, a multilevel, parallel processing framework may be used to achieve high-speed data processing. In principle such a system should be able to process a mag tape equivalent of data through typical transformations and correlations in under 30 s. The throughput for such a facility, for five users simultaneously reducing data, is estimated to be 2 to 3 times greater than is possible, for example, on a CDC7600. 3 figures

  16. Coordinated Use of Heterogeneous Infrastructures for Scientific Computing at CIEMAT by means of Grid Technologies; Aprovechamiento Coordinado de las Infraestructuras Heterogeneas para Calculo Cientifico Participadas por el CIEMAT por medio de Tecnologias Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio-Montero, A. J.

    2008-08-06

    Usually, research data centres maintain platforms from a wide range of architectures to cover the computational needs of their scientists. These centres are also frequently involved in diverse national and international Grid projects. Besides, it is very difficult to achieve a complete and efficient utilization of these recourses, due to the heterogeneity in their hardware and software configurations and their unequal use along the time. This report offers a solution to the problem of enabling a simultaneous and coordinated access to the variety of computing infrastructures and platforms available in great Research Organisms such as CIEMAT. For this purpose, new Grid technologies have been deployed in order to facilitate a common interface which enables the final user to access the internal and external resources. The previous computing infrastructure has not been modified and the independence on its administration has been guaranteed. For a sake of comparison, a feasibility study has been performed with the execution of the Drift Kinetic Equation solver (Dikes) tool, a high throughput scientific application used in the TJ-II Flexible Heliac at National Fusion Laboratory. (Author) 35 refs.

  17. Health workers' knowledge of and attitudes towards computer applications in rural African health facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukums, Felix; Mensah, Nathan; Mpembeni, Rose; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Haefeli, Walter E; Blank, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The QUALMAT (Quality of Maternal and Prenatal Care: Bridging the Know-do Gap) project has introduced an electronic clinical decision support system (CDSS) for pre-natal and maternal care services in rural primary health facilities in Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Tanzania. To report an assessment of health providers' computer knowledge, experience, and attitudes prior to the implementation of the QUALMAT electronic CDSS. A cross-sectional study was conducted with providers in 24 QUALMAT project sites. Information was collected using structured questionnaires. Chi-squared tests and one-way ANOVA describe the association between computer knowledge, attitudes, and other factors. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted to gain further insights. A total of 108 providers responded, 63% were from Tanzania and 37% from Ghana. The mean age was 37.6 years, and 79% were female. Only 40% had ever used computers, and 29% had prior computer training. About 80% were computer illiterate or beginners. Educational level, age, and years of work experience were significantly associated with computer knowledge (pworkplace. Given the low levels of computer knowledge among rural health workers in Africa, it is important to provide adequate training and support to ensure the successful uptake of electronic CDSSs in these settings. The positive attitudes to computers found in this study underscore that also rural care providers are ready to use such technology.

  18. Development of the computer code to monitor gamma radiation in the nuclear facility environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmad, Y. R.; Pudjiyanto, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Computer codes for gamma radiation monitoring in the vicinity of nuclear facility which have been developed could be introduced to the commercial potable gamma analyzer. The crucial stage of the first year activity was succeeded ; that is the codes have been tested to transfer data file (pulse high distribution) from Micro NOMAD gamma spectrometer (ORTEC product) and the convert them into dosimetry and physics quantities. Those computer codes are called as GABATAN (Gamma Analyzer of Batan) and NAGABAT (Natural Gamma Analyzer of Batan). GABATAN code can isable to used at various nuclear facilities for analyzing gamma field up to 9 MeV, while NAGABAT could be used for analyzing the contribution of natural gamma rays to the exposure rate in the certain location

  19. Computer program for storage of historical and routine safety data related to radiologically controlled facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, D.A.; Hall, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    A method for tracking and quick retrieval of radiological status of radiation and industrial safety systems in an active or inactive facility has been developed. The system uses a mini computer, a graphics plotter, and mass storage devices. Software has been developed which allows input and storage of architectural details, radiological conditions such as exposure rates, current location of safety systems, and routine and historical information on exposure and contamination levels. A blue print size digitizer is used for input. The computer program retains facility floor plans in three dimensional arrays. The software accesses an eight pen color plotter for output. The plotter generates color plots of the floor plans and safety systems on 8 1/2 x 11 or 20 x 30 paper or on overhead transparencies for reports and presentations

  20. Maintenance of reactor safety and control computers at a large government facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    In 1950 the US Government contracted the Du Pont Company to design, build, and operate the Savannah River Plant (SRP). At the time, it was the largest construction project ever undertaken by man. It is still the largest of the Department of Energy facilities. In the nearly 35 years that have elapsed, Du Pont has met its commitments to the US Government and set world safety records in the construction and operation of nuclear facilities. Contributing factors in achieving production goals and setting the safety records are a staff of highly qualified personnel, a well maintained plant, and sound maintenance programs. There have been many ''first ever'' achievements at SRP. These ''firsts'' include: (1) computer control of a nuclear rector, and (2) use of computer systems as safety circuits. This presentation discusses the maintenance program provided for these computer systems and all digital systems at SRP. An in-house computer maintenance program that was started in 1966 with five persons has grown to a staff of 40 with investments in computer hardware increasing from $4 million in 1970 to more than $60 million in this decade. 4 figs

  1. Smart grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Bae

    2001-11-01

    This book describes press smart grid from basics to recent trend. It is divided into ten chapters, which deals with smart grid as green revolution in energy with introduction, history, the fields, application and needed technique for smart grid, Trend of smart grid in foreign such as a model business of smart grid in foreign, policy for smart grid in U.S.A, Trend of smart grid in domestic with international standard of smart grid and strategy and rood map, smart power grid as infrastructure of smart business with EMS development, SAS, SCADA, DAS and PQMS, smart grid for smart consumer, smart renewable like Desertec project, convergence IT with network and PLC, application of an electric car, smart electro service for realtime of electrical pricing system, arrangement of smart grid.

  2. Opportunities for artificial intelligence application in computer- aided management of mixed waste incinerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, A.L.; Ferrada, J.J.; Singh, S.P.N.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE/OR) operates a mixed waste incinerator facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. It is designed for the thermal treatment of incinerable liquid, sludge, and solid waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This facility, known as the TSCA Incinerator, services seven DOE/OR installations. This incinerator was recently authorized for production operation in the United States for the processing of mixed (radioactively contaminated-chemically hazardous) wastes as regulated under TSCA and RCRA. Operation of the TSCA Incinerator is highly constrained as a result of the regulatory, institutional, technical, and resource availability requirements. These requirements impact the characteristics and disposition of incinerator residues, limits the quality of liquid and gaseous effluents, limit the characteristics and rates of waste feeds and operating conditions, and restrict the handling of the waste feed inventories. This incinerator facility presents an opportunity for applying computer technology as a technical resource for mixed waste incinerator operation to facilitate promoting and sustaining a continuous performance improvement process while demonstrating compliance. Demonstrated computer-aided management systems could be transferred to future mixed waste incinerator facilities

  3. Automation of a cryogenic facility by commercial process-control computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondericker, J.H.; Campbell, D.; Zantopp, D.

    1983-01-01

    To insure that Brookhaven's superconducting magnets are reliable and their field quality meets accelerator requirements, each magnet is pre-tested at operating conditions after construction. MAGCOOL, the production magnet test facility, was designed to perform these tests, having the capacity to test ten magnets per five day week. This paper describes the control aspects of MAGCOOL and the advantages afforded the designers by the implementation of a commercial process control computer system

  4. Analysis gets on the starting Grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Roger Jones

    It is vital for ATLAS to have a functioning distributed analysis system to analyse its data. There are three major Grid deployments in ATLAS (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE, EGEE; the US Open Science Grid, OSG; and the Nordic DataGrid Facility, NGDF), and our data and jobs need to work across all of them, as well as on local machines and batch systems. Users must also be able to locate the data they want and register new small datasets so they can be used later. ATLAS has a suite of products to meet these needs, and a series of Distributed Analysis tutorials are training an increasing number of brave early adopters to use the system. Real users are vital to make sure that the tools are fit for their purpose and to refine our computing model. One such tutorial happened on the 1st and 2nd February at the National eScience Centre in Edinburgh, UK, sponsored by the GridPP Collaboration. The first day introduced an international set of tutees to the basic tools for Grid-based distributed analysis. The architecture...

  5. Squabbling for a place on the Grid; Ian S Bruce reports on the fight to control the newest form of computing

    CERN Multimedia

    Bruce, I S

    2003-01-01

    "Grid computing, which aims to reduce business costs and reliance upon large-scale data centres by linking the processing power of many smaller machines, has been pushed to the front of the IT agenda... The concept has been embraced wholeheartedly by major high-tech players including Oracle, HP and Dell, who are now furiously jostling for position in the race to become the emerging new field's undisputed leaders" (1 page).

  6. World Wide Grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Grätzel von Grätz, Philipp

    2007-01-01

    Whether for genetic risk analysis or 3D-rekonstruktion of the cerebral vessels: the modern medicine requires more computing power. With a grid infrastructure, this one can be if necessary called by the network. (4 pages)

  7. The Accuracy of Remapping Irregularly Spaced Velocity Data onto a Regular Grid and the Computation of Vorticity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohn, R

    1998-01-01

    .... This technique may be viewed as the molecular counterpart of PIV. To take advantage of standard data processing techniques, the MTV data need to be remapped onto a regular grid with a uniform spacing...

  8. The Accuracy of Remapping Irregularly Spaced Velocity Data onto a Regular Grid and the Computation of Vorticity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohn, Richard

    1999-01-01

    .... This technique may be viewed as the molecular counterpart of PIV. To take advantage of standard data processing techniques, the MTV data need to be remapped onto a regular grid with a uniform spacing...

  9. Description of NORMTRI: a computer program for assessing the off-site consequences from air-borne releases of tritium during normal operation of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.

    1994-10-01

    The computer program NORMTRI has been developed to calculate the behaviour of tritium in the environment released into the atmosphere under normal operation of nuclear facilities. It is possible to investigate the two chemical forms tritium gas and tritiated water vapour. The conversion of tritium gas into tritiated water followed by its reemission back to the atmosphere as well as the conversion into organically bound tritium is considered. NORMTRI is based on the statistical Gaussian dispersion model ISOLA, which calculates the activity concentration in air near the ground contamination due to dry and wet deposition at specified locations in a polar grid system. ISOLA requires a four-parametric meteorological statistics derived from one or more years synoptic recordings of 1-hour-averages of wind speed, wind direction, stability class and precipitation intensity. Additional features of NORMTRI are the possibility to choose several dose calculation procedures, ranging from the equations of the German regulatory guidelines to a pure specific equilibrium approach. (orig.)

  10. An optimized metal grid design to improve the solar cell performance under solar concentration using multiobjective computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djeffal, F.; Bendib, T.; Arar, D.; Dibi, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new MOGA-based approach to design the solar cell metal grid is proposed. ► The cell parameters have been ascertained including the high illumination effects. ► An improved electrical behavior of the solar cell is found. ► The proposed optimized metal grid design is suitable for photovoltaic applications. -- Abstract: In this paper, a new multiobjective genetic algorithm (MOGA)-based approach is proposed to optimize the metal grid design in order to improve the electrical performance and the conversion efficiency behavior of the solar cells under high intensities of illumination. The proposed approach is applied to investigate the effect of two different metal grid patterns (one with 2 busbars outside the active area (linear grid) and another one with a circular busbar surrounding the active area (circular grid)) on the electrical performance of high efficiency c-Si solar cells under concentrated light (up to 150 suns). The dimensional and electrical parameters of the solar cell have been ascertained, and analytical expressions of the power losses and conversion efficiency, including high illumination effects, have been presented. The presented analytical models are used to formulate different objective functions, which are the prerequisite of the multiobjective optimization. The optimized design can also be incorporated into photovoltaic circuit simulator to study the impact of our approach on the photovoltaic circuit design

  11. A Computer Simulation to Assess the Nuclear Material Accountancy System of a MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portaix, C.G.; Binner, R.; John, H.

    2015-01-01

    SimMOX is a computer programme that simulates container histories as they pass through a MOX facility. It performs two parallel calculations: · the first quantifies the actual movements of material that might be expected to occur, given certain assumptions about, for instance, the accumulation of material and waste, and of their subsequent treatment; · the second quantifies the same movements on the basis of the operator's perception of the quantities involved; that is, they are based on assumptions about quantities contained in the containers. Separate skeletal Excel computer programmes are provided, which can be configured to generate further accountancy results based on these two parallel calculations. SimMOX is flexible in that it makes few assumptions about the order and operational performance of individual activities that might take place at each stage of the process. It is able to do this because its focus is on material flows, and not on the performance of individual processes. Similarly there are no pre-conceptions about the different types of containers that might be involved. At the macroscopic level, the simulation takes steady operation as its base case, i.e., the same quantity of material is deemed to enter and leave the simulated area, over any given period. Transient situations can then be superimposed onto this base scene, by simulating them as operational incidents. A general facility has been incorporated into SimMOX to enable the user to create an ''act of a play'' based on a number of operational incidents that have been built into the programme. By doing this a simulation can be constructed that predicts the way the facility would respond to any number of transient activities. This computer programme can help assess the nuclear material accountancy system of a MOX fuel fabrication facility; for instance the implications of applying NRTA (near real time accountancy). (author)

  12. Ressource-Sharing on the Tera-Flop Scale for the Biomedical Research and Care Sector - The Erasmus Computing Grid and MediGRID

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2008-01-01

    markdownabstractToday advances in scientific research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment are inevitably connected with information solutions concerning computation power and information storage. The needs for information technology are enormous and are in many cases the limiting factor

  13. Integration of distributed plant process computer systems to nuclear power generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogard, T.; Finlay, K.

    1996-01-01

    Many operating nuclear power generation facilities are replacing their plant process computer. Such replacement projects are driven by equipment obsolescence issues and associated objectives to improve plant operability, increase plant information access, improve man machine interface characteristics, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. This paper describes a few recently completed and on-going replacement projects with emphasis upon the application integrated distributed plant process computer systems. By presenting a few recent projects, the variations of distributed systems design show how various configurations can address needs for flexibility, open architecture, and integration of technological advancements in instrumentation and control technology. Architectural considerations for optimal integration of the plant process computer and plant process instrumentation ampersand control are evident from variations of design features

  14. Computer mapping and visualization of facilities for planning of D and D operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuller, C.E.; Gelb, G.H.; Cramond, R.; Cracraft, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    The lack of as-built drawings for many old nuclear facilities impedes planning for decontamination and decommissioning. Traditional manual walkdowns subject workers to lengthy exposure to radiological and other hazards. The authors have applied close-range photogrammetry, 3D solid modeling, computer graphics, database management, and virtual reality technologies to create geometrically accurate 3D computer models of the interiors of facilities. The required input to the process is a set of photographs that can be acquired in a brief time. They fit 3D primitive shapes to objects of interest in the photos and, at the same time, record attributes such as material type and link patches of texture from the source photos to facets of modeled objects. When they render the model as either static images or at video rates for a walk-through simulation, the phototextures are warped onto the objects, giving a photo-realistic impression. The authors have exported the data to commercial CAD, cost estimating, robotic simulation, and plant design applications. Results from several projects at old nuclear facilities are discussed

  15. Satin: A high-level and efficient grid programming model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwpoort, R.V.; Wrzesinska, G.; Jacobs, C.J.H.; Bal, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Computational grids have an enormous potential to provide compute power. However, this power remains largely unexploited today for most applications, except trivially parallel programs. Developing parallel grid applications simply is too difficult. Grids introduce several problems not encountered

  16. Scientific workflow and support for high resolution global climate modeling at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaj, V.; Mayer, B.; Wang, F.; Hack, J.; McKenna, D.; Hartman-Baker, R.

    2012-04-01

    The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) facilitates the execution of computational experiments that require tens of millions of CPU hours (typically using thousands of processors simultaneously) while generating hundreds of terabytes of data. A set of ultra high resolution climate experiments in progress, using the Community Earth System Model (CESM), will produce over 35,000 files, ranging in sizes from 21 MB to 110 GB each. The execution of the experiments will require nearly 70 Million CPU hours on the Jaguar and Titan supercomputers at OLCF. The total volume of the output from these climate modeling experiments will be in excess of 300 TB. This model output must then be archived, analyzed, distributed to the project partners in a timely manner, and also made available more broadly. Meeting this challenge would require efficient movement of the data, staging the simulation output to a large and fast file system that provides high volume access to other computational systems used to analyze the data and synthesize results. This file system also needs to be accessible via high speed networks to an archival system that can provide long term reliable storage. Ideally this archival system is itself directly available to other systems that can be used to host services making the data and analysis available to the participants in the distributed research project and to the broader climate community. The various resources available at the OLCF now support this workflow. The available systems include the new Jaguar Cray XK6 2.63 petaflops (estimated) supercomputer, the 10 PB Spider center-wide parallel file system, the Lens/EVEREST analysis and visualization system, the HPSS archival storage system, the Earth System Grid (ESG), and the ORNL Climate Data Server (CDS). The ESG features federated services, search & discovery, extensive data handling capabilities, deep storage access, and Live Access Server (LAS) integration. The scientific workflow enabled on

  17. DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review (HPCOR): Enabling Data-Driven Scientific Discovery at HPC Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Richard; Allcock, William; Beggio, Chris; Campbell, Stuart; Cherry, Andrew; Cholia, Shreyas; Dart, Eli; England, Clay; Fahey, Tim; Foertter, Fernanda; Goldstone, Robin; Hick, Jason; Karelitz, David; Kelly, Kaki; Monroe, Laura; Prabhat,; Skinner, David; White, Julia

    2014-10-17

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are on the verge of a paradigm shift in the way they deliver systems and services to science and engineering teams. Research projects are producing a wide variety of data at unprecedented scale and level of complexity, with community-specific services that are part of the data collection and analysis workflow. On June 18-19, 2014 representatives from six DOE HPC centers met in Oakland, CA at the DOE High Performance Operational Review (HPCOR) to discuss how they can best provide facilities and services to enable large-scale data-driven scientific discovery at the DOE national laboratories. The report contains findings from that review.

  18. Grids, Clouds and Virtualization

    CERN Document Server

    Cafaro, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Research into grid computing has been driven by the need to solve large-scale, increasingly complex problems for scientific applications. Yet the applications of grid computing for business and casual users did not begin to emerge until the development of the concept of cloud computing, fueled by advances in virtualization techniques, coupled with the increased availability of ever-greater Internet bandwidth. The appeal of this new paradigm is mainly based on its simplicity, and the affordable price for seamless access to both computational and storage resources. This timely text/reference int

  19. A personal computer code for seismic evaluations of nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Graves, H.

    1991-01-01

    In the process of review and evaluation of licensing issues related to nuclear power plants, it is essential to understand the behavior of seismic loading, foundation and structural properties and their impact on the overall structural response. In most cases, such knowledge could be obtained by using simplified engineering models which, when properly implemented, can capture the essential parameters describing the physics of the problem. Such models do not require execution on large computer systems and could be implemented through a personal computer (PC) based capability. Recognizing the need for a PC software package that can perform structural response computations required for typical licensing reviews, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored the development of a PC operated computer software package CARES (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) system. This development was undertaken by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during FY's 1988 and 1989. A wide range of computer programs and modeling approaches are often used to justify the safety of nuclear power plants. It is often difficult to assess the validity and accuracy of the results submitted by various utilities without developing comparable computer solutions. Taken this into consideration, CARES is designed as an integrated computational system which can perform rapid evaluations of structural behavior and examine capability of nuclear power plant facilities, thus CARES may be used by the NRC to determine the validity and accuracy of analysis methodologies employed for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. CARES has been designed to operate on a PC, have user friendly input/output interface, and have quick turnaround. This paper describes the various features which have been implemented into the seismic module of CARES version 1.0

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  1. grid will help physicists' global hunt for particles Researchers have begun running experiments with the MidWest Tier 2 Center, one of five regional computing centers in the US.

    CERN Multimedia

    Ames, Ben

    2006-01-01

    "When physicists at Switzerland's CERN laboratory turn on their newsest particle collider in 2007, they will rely on computer scientists in Chicago and Indianapolis to help sift through the results using a worldwide supercomputing grid." (1/2 page)

  2. Conceptual design of an ALICE Tier-2 centre. Integrated into a multi-purpose computing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zynovyev, Mykhaylo

    2012-06-29

    This thesis discusses the issues and challenges associated with the design and operation of a data analysis facility for a high-energy physics experiment at a multi-purpose computing centre. At the spotlight is a Tier-2 centre of the distributed computing model of the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The design steps, examined in the thesis, include analysis and optimization of the I/O access patterns of the user workload, integration of the storage resources, and development of the techniques for effective system administration and operation of the facility in a shared computing environment. A number of I/O access performance issues on multiple levels of the I/O subsystem, introduced by utilization of hard disks for data storage, have been addressed by the means of exhaustive benchmarking and thorough analysis of the I/O of the user applications in the ALICE software framework. Defining the set of requirements to the storage system, describing the potential performance bottlenecks and single points of failure and examining possible ways to avoid them allows one to develop guidelines for selecting the way how to integrate the storage resources. The solution, how to preserve a specific software stack for the experiment in a shared environment, is presented along with its effects on the user workload performance. The proposal for a flexible model to deploy and operate the ALICE Tier-2 infrastructure and applications in a virtual environment through adoption of the cloud computing technology and the 'Infrastructure as Code' concept completes the thesis. Scientific software applications can be efficiently computed in a virtual environment, and there is an urgent need to adapt the infrastructure for effective usage of cloud resources.

  3. Conceptual design of an ALICE Tier-2 centre. Integrated into a multi-purpose computing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zynovyev, Mykhaylo

    2012-01-01

    This thesis discusses the issues and challenges associated with the design and operation of a data analysis facility for a high-energy physics experiment at a multi-purpose computing centre. At the spotlight is a Tier-2 centre of the distributed computing model of the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The design steps, examined in the thesis, include analysis and optimization of the I/O access patterns of the user workload, integration of the storage resources, and development of the techniques for effective system administration and operation of the facility in a shared computing environment. A number of I/O access performance issues on multiple levels of the I/O subsystem, introduced by utilization of hard disks for data storage, have been addressed by the means of exhaustive benchmarking and thorough analysis of the I/O of the user applications in the ALICE software framework. Defining the set of requirements to the storage system, describing the potential performance bottlenecks and single points of failure and examining possible ways to avoid them allows one to develop guidelines for selecting the way how to integrate the storage resources. The solution, how to preserve a specific software stack for the experiment in a shared environment, is presented along with its effects on the user workload performance. The proposal for a flexible model to deploy and operate the ALICE Tier-2 infrastructure and applications in a virtual environment through adoption of the cloud computing technology and the 'Infrastructure as Code' concept completes the thesis. Scientific software applications can be efficiently computed in a virtual environment, and there is an urgent need to adapt the infrastructure for effective usage of cloud resources.

  4. Computer software design description for the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF), Project L-045H, Operator Training Station (OTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) Operator Training Station (OTS) is a computer-based training tool designed to aid plant operations and engineering staff in familiarizing themselves with the TEDF Central Control System (CCS)

  5. A personal computer code for seismic evaluations of nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Graves, H.

    1990-01-01

    A wide range of computer programs and modeling approaches are often used to justify the safety of nuclear power plants. It is often difficult to assess the validity and accuracy of the results submitted by various utilities without developing comparable computer solutions. Taken this into consideration, CARES is designed as an integrated computational system which can perform rapid evaluations of structural behavior and examine capability of nuclear power plant facilities, thus CARES may be used by the NRC to determine the validity and accuracy of analysis methodologies employed for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. CARES has been designed to: operate on a PC, have user friendly input/output interface, and have quick turnaround. The CARES program is structured in a modular format. Each module performs a specific type of analysis. The basic modules of the system are associated with capabilities for static, seismic and nonlinear analyses. This paper describes the various features which have been implemented into the Seismic Module of CARES version 1.0. In Section 2 a description of the Seismic Module is provided. The methodologies and computational procedures thus far implemented into the Seismic Module are described in Section 3. Finally, a complete demonstration of the computational capability of CARES in a typical soil-structure interaction analysis is given in Section 4 and conclusions are presented in Section 5. 5 refs., 4 figs

  6. Current Grid operation and future role of the Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, O.

    2012-12-01

    Grid-like technologies and approaches became an integral part of HEP experiments. Some other scientific communities also use similar technologies for data-intensive computations. The distinct feature of Grid computing is the ability to federate heterogeneous resources of different ownership into a seamless infrastructure, accessible via a single log-on. Like other infrastructures of similar nature, Grid functioning requires not only technologically sound basis, but also reliable operation procedures, monitoring and accounting. The two aspects, technological and operational, are closely related: weaker is the technology, more burden is on operations, and other way around. As of today, Grid technologies are still evolving: at CERN alone, every LHC experiment uses an own Grid-like system. This inevitably creates a heavy load on operations. Infrastructure maintenance, monitoring and incident response are done on several levels, from local system administrators to large international organisations, involving massive human effort worldwide. The necessity to commit substantial resources is one of the obstacles faced by smaller research communities when moving computing to the Grid. Moreover, most current Grid solutions were developed under significant influence of HEP use cases, and thus need additional effort to adapt them to other applications. Reluctance of many non-HEP researchers to use Grid negatively affects the outlook for national Grid organisations, which strive to provide multi-science services. We started from the situation where Grid organisations were fused with HEP laboratories and national HEP research programmes; we hope to move towards the world where Grid will ultimately reach the status of generic public computing and storage service provider and permanent national and international Grid infrastructures will be established. How far will we be able to advance along this path, depends on us. If no standardisation and convergence efforts will take place

  7. Current Grid operation and future role of the Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, O

    2012-01-01

    Grid-like technologies and approaches became an integral part of HEP experiments. Some other scientific communities also use similar technologies for data-intensive computations. The distinct feature of Grid computing is the ability to federate heterogeneous resources of different ownership into a seamless infrastructure, accessible via a single log-on. Like other infrastructures of similar nature, Grid functioning requires not only technologically sound basis, but also reliable operation procedures, monitoring and accounting. The two aspects, technological and operational, are closely related: weaker is the technology, more burden is on operations, and other way around. As of today, Grid technologies are still evolving: at CERN alone, every LHC experiment uses an own Grid-like system. This inevitably creates a heavy load on operations. Infrastructure maintenance, monitoring and incident response are done on several levels, from local system administrators to large international organisations, involving massive human effort worldwide. The necessity to commit substantial resources is one of the obstacles faced by smaller research communities when moving computing to the Grid. Moreover, most current Grid solutions were developed under significant influence of HEP use cases, and thus need additional effort to adapt them to other applications. Reluctance of many non-HEP researchers to use Grid negatively affects the outlook for national Grid organisations, which strive to provide multi-science services. We started from the situation where Grid organisations were fused with HEP laboratories and national HEP research programmes; we hope to move towards the world where Grid will ultimately reach the status of generic public computing and storage service provider and permanent national and international Grid infrastructures will be established. How far will we be able to advance along this path, depends on us. If no standardisation and convergence efforts will take place

  8. Software quality assurance plan for the National Ignition Facility integrated computer control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, J.

    1996-11-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the activities of the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) organization and its subcontractors. The Plan describes the activities implemented by the ICCS section to achieve quality in the NIF Project's controls software and implements the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, NIF-95-499, L-15958-2) and the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Order 5700.6C. This SQAP governs the quality affecting activities associated with developing and deploying all control system software during the life cycle of the NIF Project

  9. Teaching ergonomics to nursing facility managers using computer-based instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Susan S; Walker, Bonnie L

    2006-01-01

    This study offers evidence that computer-based training is an effective tool for teaching nursing facility managers about ergonomics and increasing their awareness of potential problems. Study participants (N = 45) were randomly assigned into a treatment or control group. The treatment group completed the ergonomics training and a pre- and posttest. The control group completed the pre- and posttests without training. Treatment group participants improved significantly from 67% on the pretest to 91% on the posttest, a gain of 24%. Differences between mean scores for the control group were not significant for the total score or for any of the subtests.

  10. The open science grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pordes, R.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. LHC Tier-1 and Tier-2 laboratories and universities are developing production Grids to support LHC applications running across a worldwide Grid computing system. Together with partners in computer science, physics grid projects and active experiments, we will build a common national production grid infrastructure which is open in its architecture, implementation and use. The Open Science Grid (OSG) model builds upon the successful approach of last year's joint Grid2003 project. The Grid3 shared infrastructure has for over eight months provided significant computational resources and throughput to a range of applications, including ATLAS and CMS data challenges, SDSS, LIGO, and biology analyses, and computer science demonstrators and experiments. To move towards LHC-scale data management, access and analysis capabilities, we must increase the scale, services, and sustainability of the current infrastructure by an order of magnitude or more. Thus, we must achieve a significant upgrade in its functionalities and technologies. The initial OSG partners will build upon a fully usable, sustainable and robust grid. Initial partners include the US LHC collaborations, DOE and NSF Laboratories and Universities and Trillium Grid projects. The approach is to federate with other application communities in the U.S. to build a shared infrastructure open to other sciences and capable of being modified and improved to respond to needs of other applications, including CDF, D0, BaBar, and RHIC experiments. We describe the application-driven, engineered services of the OSG, short term plans and status, and the roadmap for a consortium, its partnerships and national focus

  11. AGIS: The ATLAS Grid Information System

    CERN Document Server

    Anisenkov, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, A; Senchenko, A

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Computing model embraces the Grid paradigm and a high degree of decentralization and computing resources able to meet ATLAS requirements of petabytes scale data operations. In this paper we present ATLAS Grid Information System (AGIS) designed to integrate configuration and status information about resources, services and topology of whole ATLAS Grid needed by ATLAS Distributed Computing applications and services.

  12. FIRAC: a computer code to predict fire-accident effects in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolstad, J.W.; Krause, F.R.; Tang, P.K.; Andrae, R.W.; Martin, R.A.; Gregory, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    FIRAC is a medium-sized computer code designed to predict fire-induced flows, temperatures, and material transport within the ventilating systems and other airflow pathways in nuclear-related facilities. The code is designed to analyze the behavior of interconnected networks of rooms and typical ventilation system components. This code is one in a family of computer codes that is designed to provide improved methods of safety analysis for the nuclear industry. The structure of this code closely follows that of the previously developed TVENT and EVENT codes. Because a lumped-parameter formulation is used, this code is particularly suitable for calculating the effects of fires in the far field (that is, in regions removed from the fire compartment), where the fire may be represented parametrically. However, a fire compartment model to simulate conditions in the enclosure is included. This model provides transport source terms to the ventilation system that can affect its operation and in turn affect the fire

  13. Computer-based data acquisition system in the Large Coil Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, S.S.; Layman, L.R.; Million, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    The utilization of computers for data acquisition and control is of paramount importance on large-scale fusion experiments because they feature the ability to acquire data from a large number of sensors at various sample rates and provide for flexible data interpretation, presentation, reduction, and analysis. In the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) PDP-11/60 host computer with the DEC RSX-11M operating system coordinates the activities of five DEC LSI-11/23 front-end processors (FEPs) via direct memory access (DMA) communication links. This provides host control of scheduled data acquisition and FEP event-triggered data collection tasks. Four of the five FEPs have no operating system

  14. Dosimetry in radiotherapy and brachytherapy by Monte-Carlo GATE simulation on computing grid; Dosimetrie en radiotherapie et curietherapie par simulation Monte-Carlo GATE sur grille informatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiam, Ch O

    2007-10-15

    Accurate radiotherapy treatment requires the delivery of a precise dose to the tumour volume and a good knowledge of the dose deposit to the neighbouring zones. Computation of the treatments is usually carried out by a Treatment Planning System (T.P.S.) which needs to be precise and fast. The G.A.T.E. platform for Monte-Carlo simulation based on G.E.A.N.T.4 is an emerging tool for nuclear medicine application that provides functionalities for fast and reliable dosimetric calculations. In this thesis, we studied in parallel a validation of the G.A.T.E. platform for the modelling of electrons and photons low energy sources and the optimized use of grid infrastructures to reduce simulations computing time. G.A.T.E. was validated for the dose calculation of point kernels for mono-energetic electrons and compared with the results of other Monte-Carlo studies. A detailed study was made on the energy deposit during electrons transport in G.E.A.N.T.4. In order to validate G.A.T.E. for very low energy photons (<35 keV), three models of radioactive sources used in brachytherapy and containing iodine 125 (2301 of Best Medical International; Symmetra of Uro- Med/Bebig and 6711 of Amersham) were simulated. Our results were analyzed according to the recommendations of task group No43 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (A.A.P.M.). They show a good agreement between G.A.T.E., the reference studies and A.A.P.M. recommended values. The use of Monte-Carlo simulations for a better definition of the dose deposited in the tumour volumes requires long computing time. In order to reduce it, we exploited E.G.E.E. grid infrastructure where simulations are distributed using innovative technologies taking into account the grid status. Time necessary for the computing of a radiotherapy planning simulation using electrons was reduced by a factor 30. A Web platform based on G.E.N.I.U.S. portal was developed to make easily available all the methods to submit and manage G

  15. CSNI Integral Test Facility Matrices for Validation of Best-Estimate Thermal-Hydraulic Computer Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, H.

    2008-01-01

    Internationally agreed Integral Test Facility (ITF) matrices for validation of realistic thermal hydraulic system computer codes were established. ITF development is mainly for Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). A separate activity was for Russian Pressurised Water-cooled and Water-moderated Energy Reactors (WWER). Firstly, the main physical phenomena that occur during considered accidents are identified, test types are specified, and test facilities suitable for reproducing these aspects are selected. Secondly, a list of selected experiments carried out in these facilities has been set down. The criteria to achieve the objectives are outlined. In this paper some specific examples from the ITF matrices will also be provided. The matrices will be a guide for code validation, will be a basis for comparisons of code predictions performed with different system codes, and will contribute to the quantification of the uncertainty range of code model predictions. In addition to this objective, the construction of such a matrix is an attempt to record information which has been generated around the world over the last years, so that it is more accessible to present and future workers in that field than would otherwise be the case.

  16. Enhanced computational infrastructure for data analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.; Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Terpstra, T.B.; Casper, T.A.; Freeman, J.; Jong, R.; Keith, K.M.; McHarg, B.B.; Meyer, W.H.; Parker, C.T.

    2000-01-01

    Recently a number of enhancements to the computer hardware infrastructure have been implemented at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility. Utilizing these improvements to the hardware infrastructure, software enhancements are focusing on streamlined analysis, automation, and graphical user interface (GUI) systems to enlarge the user base. The adoption of the load balancing software package LSF Suite by Platform Computing has dramatically increased the availability of CPU cycles and the efficiency of their use. Streamlined analysis has been aided by the adoption of the MDSplus system to provide a unified interface to analyzed DIII-D data. The majority of MDSplus data is made available in between pulses giving the researcher critical information before setting up the next pulse. Work on data viewing and analysis tools focuses on efficient GUI design with object-oriented programming (OOP) for maximum code flexibility. Work to enhance the computational infrastructure at DIII-D has included a significant effort to aid the remote collaborator since the DIII-D National Team consists of scientists from nine national laboratories, 19 foreign laboratories, 16 universities, and five industrial partnerships. As a result of this work, DIII-D data is available on a 24x7 basis from a set of viewing and analysis tools that can be run on either the collaborators' or DIII-D's computer systems. Additionally, a web based data and code documentation system has been created to aid the novice and expert user alike

  17. Enhanced Computational Infrastructure for Data Analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.; Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Terpstra, T.B.; Casper, T.A.; Freeman, J.; Jong, R.; Keith, K.M.; Meyer, W.H.; Parker, C.T.; McCharg, B.B.

    1999-01-01

    Recently a number of enhancements to the computer hardware infrastructure have been implemented at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility. Utilizing these improvements to the hardware infrastructure, software enhancements are focusing on streamlined analysis, automation, and graphical user interface (GUI) systems to enlarge the user base. The adoption of the load balancing software package LSF Suite by Platform Computing has dramatically increased the availability of CPU cycles and the efficiency of their use. Streamlined analysis has been aided by the adoption of the MDSplus system to provide a unified interface to analyzed DIII-D data. The majority of MDSplus data is made available in between pulses giving the researcher critical information before setting up the next pulse. Work on data viewing and analysis tools focuses on efficient GUI design with object-oriented programming (OOP) for maximum code flexibility. Work to enhance the computational infrastructure at DIII-D has included a significant effort to aid the remote collaborator since the DIII-D National Team consists of scientists from 9 national laboratories, 19 foreign laboratories, 16 universities, and 5 industrial partnerships. As a result of this work, DIII-D data is available on a 24 x 7 basis from a set of viewing and analysis tools that can be run either on the collaborators' or DIII-Ds computer systems. Additionally, a Web based data and code documentation system has been created to aid the novice and expert user alike

  18. FIRAC - a computer code to predict fire accident effects in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolstad, J.W.; Foster, R.D.; Gregory, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    FIRAC is a medium-sized computer code designed to predict fire-induced flows, temperatures, and material transport within the ventilating systems and other airflow pathways in nuclear-related facilities. The code is designed to analyze the behavior of interconnected networks of rooms and typical ventilation system components. This code is one in a family of computer codes that is designed to provide improved methods of safety analysis for the nuclear industry. The structure of this code closely follows that of the previously developed TVENT and EVENT codes. Because a lumped-parameter formulation is used, this code is particularly suitable for calculating the effects of fires in the far field (that is, in regions removed from the fire compartment), where the fire may be represented parametrically. However, a fire compartment model to simulate conditions in the enclosure is included. This model provides transport source terms to the ventilation system that can affect its operation and in turn affect the fire. A basic material transport capability that features the effects of convection, deposition, entrainment, and filtration of material is included. The interrelated effects of filter plugging, heat transfer, gas dynamics, and material transport are taken into account. In this paper the authors summarize the physical models used to describe the gas dynamics, material transport, and heat transfer processes. They also illustrate how a typical facility is modeled using the code

  19. Application of personal computer to development of entrance management system for radiating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shogo; Hirai, Shouji

    1989-01-01

    The report describes a system for managing the entrance and exit of personnel to radiating facilities. A personal computer is applied to its development. Major features of the system is outlined first. The computer is connected to the gate and two magnetic card readers provided at the gate. The gate, which is installed at the entrance to a room under control, opens only for those who have a valid card. The entrance-exit management program developed is described next. The following three files are used: ID master file (random file of the magnetic card number, name, qualification, etc., of each card carrier), entrance-exit management file (random file of time of entrance/exit, etc., updated everyday), and entrance-exit record file (sequential file of card number, name, date, etc.), which are stored on floppy disks. A display is provided to show various lists including a list of workers currently in the room and a list of workers who left the room at earlier times of the day. This system is useful for entrance management of a relatively small facility. Though small in required cost, it requires only a few operators to perform effective personnel management. (N.K.)

  20. Power grid complex network evolutions for the smart grid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagani, Giuliano Andrea; Aiello, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The shift towards an energy grid dominated by prosumers (consumers and producers of energy) will inevitably have repercussions on the electricity distribution infrastructure. Today the grid is a hierarchical one delivering energy from large scale facilities to end-users. Tomorrow it will be a

  1. Additional Security Considerations for Grid Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidson, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    The use of Grid computing environments is growing in popularity. A Grid computing environment is primarily a wide area network that encompasses multiple local area networks, where some of the local area networks are managed by different organizations. A Grid computing environment also includes common interfaces for distributed computing software so that the heterogeneous set of machines that make up the Grid can be used more easily. The other key feature of a Grid is that the distributed computing software includes appropriate security technology. The focus of most Grid software is on the security involved with application execution, file transfers, and other remote computing procedures. However, there are other important security issues related to the management of a Grid and the users who use that Grid. This note discusses these additional security issues and makes several suggestions as how they can be managed.

  2. Grid interoperability: the interoperations cookbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, L; Schulz, M [CERN (Switzerland)], E-mail: Laurence.Field@cern.ch, E-mail: Markus.Schulz@cern.ch

    2008-07-01

    Over recent years a number of grid projects have emerged which have built grid infrastructures that are now the computing backbones for various user communities. A significant number of these communities are limited to one grid infrastructure due to the different middleware and procedures used in each grid. Grid interoperation is trying to bridge these differences and enable virtual organizations to access resources independent of the grid project affiliation. This paper gives an overview of grid interoperation and describes the current methods used to bridge the differences between grids. Actual use cases encountered during the last three years are discussed and the most important interfaces required for interoperability are highlighted. A summary of the standardisation efforts in these areas is given and we argue for moving more aggressively towards standards.

  3. Grid interoperability: the interoperations cookbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, L; Schulz, M

    2008-01-01

    Over recent years a number of grid projects have emerged which have built grid infrastructures that are now the computing backbones for various user communities. A significant number of these communities are limited to one grid infrastructure due to the different middleware and procedures used in each grid. Grid interoperation is trying to bridge these differences and enable virtual organizations to access resources independent of the grid project affiliation. This paper gives an overview of grid interoperation and describes the current methods used to bridge the differences between grids. Actual use cases encountered during the last three years are discussed and the most important interfaces required for interoperability are highlighted. A summary of the standardisation efforts in these areas is given and we argue for moving more aggressively towards standards

  4. The LHCb Grid Simulation

    CERN Multimedia

    Baranov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb Grid access if based on the LHCbDirac system. It provides access to data and computational resources to researchers with different geographical locations. The Grid has a hierarchical topology with multiple sites distributed over the world. The sites differ from each other by their number of CPUs, amount of disk storage and connection bandwidth. These parameters are essential for the Grid work. Moreover, job scheduling and data distribution strategy have a great impact on the grid performance. However, it is hard to choose an appropriate algorithm and strategies as they need a lot of time to be tested on the real grid. In this study, we describe the LHCb Grid simulator. The simulator reproduces the LHCb Grid structure with its sites and their number of CPUs, amount of disk storage and bandwidth connection. We demonstrate how well the simulator reproduces the grid work, show its advantages and limitations. We show how well the simulator reproduces job scheduling and network anomalies, consider methods ...

  5. GASFLOW: A computational model to analyze accidents in nuclear containment and facility buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, J.R.; Nichols, B.D.; Wilson, T.L.; Lam, K.L.; Spore, J.W.; Niederauer, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    GASFLOW is a finite-volume computer code that solves the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations for multiple gas species. The fluid-dynamics algorithm is coupled to the chemical kinetics of combusting liquids or gases to simulate diffusion or propagating flames in complex geometries of nuclear containment or confinement and facilities' buildings. Fluid turbulence is calculated to enhance the transport and mixing of gases in rooms and volumes that may be connected by a ventilation system. The ventilation system may consist of extensive ductwork, filters, dampers or valves, and fans. Condensation and heat transfer to walls, floors, ceilings, and internal structures are calculated to model the appropriate energy sinks. Solid and liquid aerosol behavior is simulated to give the time and space inventory of radionuclides. The solution procedure of the governing equations is a modified Los Alamos ICE'd-ALE methodology. Complex facilities can be represented by separate computational domains (multiblocks) that communicate through overlapping boundary conditions. The ventilation system is superimposed throughout the multiblock mesh. Gas mixtures and aerosols are transported through the free three-dimensional volumes and the restricted one-dimensional ventilation components as the accident and fluid flow fields evolve. Combustion may occur if sufficient fuel and reactant or oxidizer are present and have an ignition source. Pressure and thermal loads on the building, structural components, and safety-related equipment can be determined for specific accident scenarios. GASFLOW calculations have been compared with large oil-pool fire tests in the 1986 HDR containment test T52.14, which is a 3000-kW fire experiment. The computed results are in good agreement with the observed data

  6. Preliminary results for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics for prediction of flow through a split vane spacer grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashkovan, A.; Novog, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the CFD simulations of turbulent flow past spacer grid with mixing vanes. This study summarizes the first stage of the ongoing numerical blind exercise organized by OECD-NEA. McMaster University along with other participants plan to submit a numerical prediction of the detailed flow field and turbulence characteristics of the flow past 5x5 rod bundle with a spacer grid equipped with two types of mixing vanes. The results will be compared with blind experimental measurements performed in Korea. Due to the fact that a number of the modeling strategies are suggested in literature for such types of flows, we have performed a series of tests to assess the mesh requirements, flow steadiness, turbulence modeling and wall treatment effects. Results of these studies are reported in the present paper. (author)

  7. Three-Dimensional Incompressible Navier-Stokes Flow Computations about Complete Configurations Using a Multiblock Unstructured Grid Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Hyams, Daniel G.; Sreenivas, Kidambi; Gaither, J. Adam; Marcum, David L.; Whitfield, David L.

    2000-01-01

    A multiblock unstructured grid approach is presented for solving three-dimensional incompressible inviscid and viscous turbulent flows about complete configurations. The artificial compressibility form of the governing equations is solved by a node-based, finite volume implicit scheme which uses a backward Euler time discretization. Point Gauss-Seidel relaxations are used to solve the linear system of equations at each time step. This work employs a multiblock strategy to the solution procedure, which greatly improves the efficiency of the algorithm by significantly reducing the memory requirements by a factor of 5 over the single-grid algorithm while maintaining a similar convergence behavior. The numerical accuracy of solutions is assessed by comparing with the experimental data for a submarine with stem appendages and a high-lift configuration.

  8. GRID and FMPhI-UNIBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babik, M.; Daranyi, T.; Fekete, V.; Stavina, P.; Zagiba, M.; Zenis, T.

    2008-01-01

    The word GRID has several meanings, so it is not an abbreviation. All of them have in common description of GRID as a form of hardware and software and software solution for distributive computing. Additionally, word GRID is also used for distributive computing of many computers and not one super computer with several processors. It, of course, does not mean that such a supercomputer cannot be a part of the GRID. Typical task for GRID is computer programs execution and to data storage. (Authors)

  9. The Overview of the National Ignition Facility Distributed Computer Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagin, L.J.; Bettenhausen, R.C.; Carey, R.A.; Estes, C.M.; Fisher, J.M.; Krammen, J.E.; Reed, R.K.; VanArsdall, P.J.; Woodruff, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a layered architecture of 300 front-end processors (FEP) coordinated by supervisor subsystems including automatic beam alignment and wavefront control, laser and target diagnostics, pulse power, and shot control timed to 30 ps. FEP computers incorporate either VxWorks on PowerPC or Solaris on UltraSPARC processors that interface to over 45,000 control points attached to VME-bus or PCI-bus crates respectively. Typical devices are stepping motors, transient digitizers, calorimeters, and photodiodes. The front-end layer is divided into another segment comprised of an additional 14,000 control points for industrial controls including vacuum, argon, synthetic air, and safety interlocks implemented with Allen-Bradley programmable logic controllers (PLCs). The computer network is augmented asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) that delivers video streams from 500 sensor cameras monitoring the 192 laser beams to operator workstations. Software is based on an object-oriented framework using CORBA distribution that incorporates services for archiving, machine configuration, graphical user interface, monitoring, event logging, scripting, alert management, and access control. Software coding using a mixed language environment of Ada95 and Java is one-third complete at over 300 thousand source lines. Control system installation is currently under way for the first 8 beams, with project completion scheduled for 2008

  10. Efficient Scheduling of Scientific Workflows with Energy Reduction Using Novel Discrete Particle Swarm Optimization and Dynamic Voltage Scaling for Computational Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Christobel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant and the topmost parameters in the real world computing environment is energy. Minimizing energy imposes benefits like reduction in power consumption, decrease in cooling rates of the computing processors, provision of a green environment, and so forth. In fact, computation time and energy are directly proportional to each other and the minimization of computation time may yield a cost effective energy consumption. Proficient scheduling of Bag-of-Tasks in the grid environment ravages in minimum computation time. In this paper, a novel discrete particle swarm optimization (DPSO algorithm based on the particle’s best position (pbDPSO and global best position (gbDPSO is adopted to find the global optimal solution for higher dimensions. This novel DPSO yields better schedule with minimum computation time compared to Earliest Deadline First (EDF and First Come First Serve (FCFS algorithms which comparably reduces energy. Other scheduling parameters, such as job completion ratio and lateness, are also calculated and compared with EDF and FCFS. An energy improvement of up to 28% was obtained when Makespan Conservative Energy Reduction (MCER and Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS were used in the proposed DPSO algorithm.

  11. Efficient Scheduling of Scientific Workflows with Energy Reduction Using Novel Discrete Particle Swarm Optimization and Dynamic Voltage Scaling for Computational Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christobel, M.; Tamil Selvi, S.; Benedict, Shajulin

    2015-01-01

    One of the most significant and the topmost parameters in the real world computing environment is energy. Minimizing energy imposes benefits like reduction in power consumption, decrease in cooling rates of the computing processors, provision of a green environment, and so forth. In fact, computation time and energy are directly proportional to each other and the minimization of computation time may yield a cost effective energy consumption. Proficient scheduling of Bag-of-Tasks in the grid environment ravages in minimum computation time. In this paper, a novel discrete particle swarm optimization (DPSO) algorithm based on the particle's best position (pbDPSO) and global best position (gbDPSO) is adopted to find the global optimal solution for higher dimensions. This novel DPSO yields better schedule with minimum computation time compared to Earliest Deadline First (EDF) and First Come First Serve (FCFS) algorithms which comparably reduces energy. Other scheduling parameters, such as job completion ratio and lateness, are also calculated and compared with EDF and FCFS. An energy improvement of up to 28% was obtained when Makespan Conservative Energy Reduction (MCER) and Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS) were used in the proposed DPSO algorithm. PMID:26075296

  12. The FOSS GIS Workbench on the GFZ Load Sharing Facility compute cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, P.; Klump, J.; Thaler, J.

    2012-04-01

    Compute clusters can be used as GIS workbenches, their wealth of resources allow us to take on geocomputation tasks which exceed the limitations of smaller systems. To harness these capabilities requires a Geographic Information System (GIS), able to utilize the available cluster configuration/architecture and a sufficient degree of user friendliness to allow for wide application. In this paper we report on the first successful porting of GRASS GIS, the oldest and largest Free Open Source (FOSS) GIS project, onto a compute cluster using Platform Computing's Load Sharing Facility (LSF). In 2008, GRASS6.3 was installed on the GFZ compute cluster, which at that time comprised 32 nodes. The interaction with the GIS was limited to the command line interface, which required further development to encapsulate the GRASS GIS business layer to facilitate its use by users not familiar with GRASS GIS. During the summer of 2011, multiple versions of GRASS GIS (v 6.4, 6.5 and 7.0) were installed on the upgraded GFZ compute cluster, now consisting of 234 nodes with 480 CPUs providing 3084 cores. The GFZ compute cluster currently offers 19 different processing queues with varying hardware capabilities and priorities, allowing for fine-grained scheduling and load balancing. After successful testing of core GIS functionalities, including the graphical user interface, mechanisms were developed to deploy scripted geocomputation tasks onto dedicated processing queues. The mechanisms are based on earlier work by NETELER et al. (2008). A first application of the new GIS functionality was the generation of maps of simulated tsunamis in the Mediterranean Sea for the Tsunami Atlas of the FP-7 TRIDEC Project (www.tridec-online.eu). For this, up to 500 processing nodes were used in parallel. Further trials included the processing of geometrically complex problems, requiring significant amounts of processing time. The GIS cluster successfully completed all these tasks, with processing times

  13. [Elderlies in street situation or social vulnerability: facilities and difficulties in the use of computational tools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Marcos Antonio da Eira; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Pereira, Valclei Aparecida Gandolpho; Negreiros, Maria Célia de; Paranhos, Wana Yeda; Leite, Maria Madalena Januário

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the advantages and difficulties encountered by older people living on the streets or social vulnerability, to use the computer or internet. It is an exploratory qualitative research, in which five elderlies, attended on a non-governmental organization located in the city of São Paulo, have participated. The discourses were analyzed by content analysis technique and showed, as facilities, among others, to clarify doubts with the monitors, the stimulus for new discoveries coupled with proactivity and curiosity, and develop new skills. The mentioned difficulties were related to physical or cognitive issues, lack of instructor, and lack of knowledge to interact with the machine. The studies focusing on the elderly population living on the streets or in social vulnerability may contribute with evidence to guide the formulation of public policies to this population.

  14. Development of a personal computer based facility-level SSAC component and inspector support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, A.

    1989-08-01

    Research Contract No. 4658/RB was conducted between the IAEA and the Bulgarian Committee on Use of Atomic Energy for Peaceful Purposes. The contract required the Committee to develop and program a personal computer based software package to be used as a facility-level computerized State System of Accounting and Control (SSAC) at an off-load power reactor. The software delivered, called the National Safeguards System (NSS) keeps track of all fuel assembly activity at a power reactor and generates all ledgers, MBA material balances and any required reports to national or international authorities. The NSS is designed to operate on a PC/AT or compatible equipment with a hard disk of 20 MB, color graphics monitor or adaptor and at least one floppy disk drive, 360 Kb. The programs are written in Basic (compiler 2.0). They are executed under MS DOS 3.1 or later

  15. Software quality assurance plan for the National Ignition Facility integrated computer control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, J.

    1996-11-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the activities of the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) organization and its subcontractors. The Plan describes the activities implemented by the ICCS section to achieve quality in the NIF Project`s controls software and implements the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, NIF-95-499, L-15958-2) and the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Order 5700.6C. This SQAP governs the quality affecting activities associated with developing and deploying all control system software during the life cycle of the NIF Project.

  16. Lustre Distributed Name Space (DNE) Evaluation at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, James S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences; Leverman, Dustin B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences; Hanley, Jesse A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences; Oral, Sarp [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences

    2016-08-22

    This document describes the Lustre Distributed Name Space (DNE) evaluation carried at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) between 2014 and 2015. DNE is a development project funded by the OpenSFS, to improve Lustre metadata performance and scalability. The development effort has been split into two parts, the first part (DNE P1) providing support for remote directories over remote Lustre Metadata Server (MDS) nodes and Metadata Target (MDT) devices, while the second phase (DNE P2) addressed split directories over multiple remote MDS nodes and MDT devices. The OLCF have been actively evaluating the performance, reliability, and the functionality of both DNE phases. For these tests, internal OLCF testbed were used. Results are promising and OLCF is planning on a full DNE deployment by mid-2016 timeframe on production systems.

  17. MONITOR: A computer model for estimating the costs of an integral monitored retrievable storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.; Sevigny, N.L.; Schutz, M.E.; Heller, R.A.

    1986-12-01

    The MONITOR model is a FORTRAN 77 based computer code that provides parametric life-cycle cost estimates for a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. MONITOR is very flexible in that it can estimate the costs of an MRS facility operating under almost any conceivable nuclear waste logistics scenario. The model can also accommodate input data of varying degrees of complexity and detail (ranging from very simple to more complex) which makes it ideal for use in the MRS program, where new designs and new cost data are frequently offered for consideration. MONITOR can be run as an independent program, or it can be interfaced with the Waste System Transportation and Economic Simulation (WASTES) model, a program that simulates the movement of waste through a complete nuclear waste disposal system. The WASTES model drives the MONITOR model by providing it with the annual quantities of waste that are received, stored, and shipped at the MRS facility. Three runs of MONITOR are documented in this report. Two of the runs are for Version 1 of the MONITOR code. A simulation which uses the costs developed by the Ralph M. Parsons Company in the 2A (backup) version of the MRS cost estimate. In one of these runs MONITOR was run as an independent model, and in the other run MONITOR was run using an input file generated by the WASTES model. The two runs correspond to identical cases, and the fact that they gave identical results verified that the code performed the same calculations in both modes of operation. The third run was made for Version 2 of the MONITOR code. A simulation which uses the costs developed by the Ralph M. Parsons Company in the 2B (integral) version of the MRS cost estimate. This run was made with MONITOR being run as an independent model. The results of several cases have been verified by hand calculations

  18. Computational Simulations of the NASA Langley HyMETS Arc-Jet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, A. J.; Bruce, W. E., III; Glass, D. E.; Splinter, S. C.

    2017-01-01

    The Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HyMETS) arc-jet facility located at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, is primarily used for the research, development, and evaluation of high-temperature thermal protection systems for hypersonic vehicles and reentry systems. In order to improve testing capabilities and knowledge of the test article environment, an effort is underway to computationally simulate the flow-field using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A detailed three-dimensional model of the arc-jet nozzle and free-jet portion of the flow-field has been developed and compared to calibration probe Pitot pressure and stagnation-point heat flux for three test conditions at low, medium, and high enthalpy. The CFD model takes into account uniform pressure and non-uniform enthalpy profiles at the nozzle inlet as well as catalytic recombination efficiency effects at the probe surface. Comparing the CFD results and test data indicates an effectively fully-catalytic copper surface on the heat flux probe of about 10% efficiency and a 2-3 kpa pressure drop from the arc heater bore, where the pressure is measured, to the plenum section, prior to the nozzle. With these assumptions, the CFD results are well within the uncertainty of the stagnation pressure and heat flux measurements. The conditions at the nozzle exit were also compared with radial and axial velocimetry. This simulation capability will be used to evaluate various three-dimensional models that are tested in the HyMETS facility. An end-to-end aerothermal and thermal simulation of HyMETS test articles will follow this work to provide a better understanding of the test environment, test results, and to aid in test planning. Additional flow-field diagnostic measurements will also be considered to improve the modeling capability.

  19. Intelligent Decision-Making System with Green Pervasive Computing for Renewable Energy Business in Electricity Markets on Smart Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park JongHyuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the intelligent decision-making system for the smart grid based electricity market which requires distributed decision making on the competitive environments composed of many players and components. It is very important to consider the renewable energy and emission problem which are expected to be monitored by wireless communication networks. It is very difficult to predict renewable energy outputs and emission prices over time horizon, so it could be helpful to catch up those data on real time basis using many different kinds of communication infrastructures. On this backgrounds this paper provides an algorithm to make an optimal decision considering above factors.

  20. The Grid PC farm

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Housed in the CERN Computer Centre, these banks of computers process and store data produced on the CERN systems. When the LHC starts operation in 2008, it will produce enough data every year to fill a stack of CDs 20 km tall. To handle this huge amount of data, CERN has also developed the Grid, allowing processing power to be shared between computer centres around the world.

  1. gCube Grid services

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    gCube is a service-based framework for eScience applications requiring collaboratory, on-demand, and intensive information processing. It provides to these communities Virtual Research Environments (VREs) to support their activities. gCube is build on top of standard technologies for computational Grids, namely the gLite middleware. The software was produced by the DILIGENT project and will continue to be supported and further developed by the D4Science project. gCube reflects within its name a three-sided interpretation of the Grid vision of resource sharing: sharing of computational resources, sharing of structured data, and sharing of application services. As such, gCube embodies the defining characteristics of computational Grids, data Grids, and virtual data Grids. Precisely, it builds on gLite middleware for managing distributed computations and unstructured data, includes dedicated services for managing data and metadata, provides services for distributed information retrieval, allows the orchestration...

  2. Can Clouds replace Grids? Will Clouds replace Grids?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiers, J D

    2010-01-01

    The world's largest scientific machine - comprising dual 27km circular proton accelerators cooled to 1.9 o K and located some 100m underground - currently relies on major production Grid infrastructures for the offline computing needs of the 4 main experiments that will take data at this facility. After many years of sometimes difficult preparation the computing service has been declared 'open' and ready to meet the challenges that will come shortly when the machine restarts in 2009. But the service is not without its problems: reliability - as seen by the experiments, as opposed to that measured by the official tools - still needs to be significantly improved. Prolonged downtimes or degradations of major services or even complete sites are still too common and the operational and coordination effort to keep the overall service running is probably not sustainable at this level. Recently 'Cloud Computing' - in terms of pay-per-use fabric provisioning - has emerged as a potentially viable alternative but with rather different strengths and no doubt weaknesses too. Based on the concrete needs of the LHC experiments - where the total data volume that will be acquired over the full lifetime of the project, including the additional data copies that are required by the Computing Models of the experiments, approaches 1 Exabyte - we analyze the pros and cons of Grids versus Clouds. This analysis covers not only technical issues - such as those related to demanding database and data management needs - but also sociological aspects, which cannot be ignored, neither in terms of funding nor in the wider context of the essential but often overlooked role of science in society, education and economy.

  3. Can Clouds replace Grids? Will Clouds replace Grids?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiers, J D, E-mail: Jamie.Shiers@cern.c [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2010-04-01

    The world's largest scientific machine - comprising dual 27km circular proton accelerators cooled to 1.9{sup o}K and located some 100m underground - currently relies on major production Grid infrastructures for the offline computing needs of the 4 main experiments that will take data at this facility. After many years of sometimes difficult preparation the computing service has been declared 'open' and ready to meet the challenges that will come shortly when the machine restarts in 2009. But the service is not without its problems: reliability - as seen by the experiments, as opposed to that measured by the official tools - still needs to be significantly improved. Prolonged downtimes or degradations of major services or even complete sites are still too common and the operational and coordination effort to keep the overall service running is probably not sustainable at this level. Recently 'Cloud Computing' - in terms of pay-per-use fabric provisioning - has emerged as a potentially viable alternative but with rather different strengths and no doubt weaknesses too. Based on the concrete needs of the LHC experiments - where the total data volume that will be acquired over the full lifetime of the project, including the additional data copies that are required by the Computing Models of the experiments, approaches 1 Exabyte - we analyze the pros and cons of Grids versus Clouds. This analysis covers not only technical issues - such as those related to demanding database and data management needs - but also sociological aspects, which cannot be ignored, neither in terms of funding nor in the wider context of the essential but often overlooked role of science in society, education and economy.

  4. Can Clouds replace Grids? Will Clouds replace Grids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiers, J. D.

    2010-04-01

    The world's largest scientific machine - comprising dual 27km circular proton accelerators cooled to 1.9oK and located some 100m underground - currently relies on major production Grid infrastructures for the offline computing needs of the 4 main experiments that will take data at this facility. After many years of sometimes difficult preparation the computing service has been declared "open" and ready to meet the challenges that will come shortly when the machine restarts in 2009. But the service is not without its problems: reliability - as seen by the experiments, as opposed to that measured by the official tools - still needs to be significantly improved. Prolonged downtimes or degradations of major services or even complete sites are still too common and the operational and coordination effort to keep the overall service running is probably not sustainable at this level. Recently "Cloud Computing" - in terms of pay-per-use fabric provisioning - has emerged as a potentially viable alternative but with rather different strengths and no doubt weaknesses too. Based on the concrete needs of the LHC experiments - where the total data volume that will be acquired over the full lifetime of the project, including the additional data copies that are required by the Computing Models of the experiments, approaches 1 Exabyte - we analyze the pros and cons of Grids versus Clouds. This analysis covers not only technical issues - such as those related to demanding database and data management needs - but also sociological aspects, which cannot be ignored, neither in terms of funding nor in the wider context of the essential but often overlooked role of science in society, education and economy.

  5. Beyond grid security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeft, B; Epting, U; Koenig, T

    2008-01-01

    While many fields relevant to Grid security are already covered by existing working groups, their remit rarely goes beyond the scope of the Grid infrastructure itself. However, security issues pertaining to the internal set-up of compute centres have at least as much impact on Grid security. Thus, this talk will present briefly the EU ISSeG project (Integrated Site Security for Grids). In contrast to groups such as OSCT (Operational Security Coordination Team) and JSPG (Joint Security Policy Group), the purpose of ISSeG is to provide a holistic approach to security for Grid computer centres, from strategic considerations to an implementation plan and its deployment. The generalised methodology of Integrated Site Security (ISS) is based on the knowledge gained during its implementation at several sites as well as through security audits, and this will be briefly discussed. Several examples of ISS implementation tasks at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe will be presented, including segregation of the network for administration and maintenance and the implementation of Application Gateways. Furthermore, the web-based ISSeG training material will be introduced. This aims to offer ISS implementation guidance to other Grid installations in order to help avoid common pitfalls

  6. A resource facility for kinetic analysis: modeling using the SAAM computer programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, D M; Boston, R C; Jacquez, J A; Zech, L

    1989-01-01

    Kinetic analysis and integrated system modeling have contributed significantly to understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of metabolic systems in humans and animals. Many experimental biologists are aware of the usefulness of these techniques and recognize that kinetic modeling requires special expertise. The Resource Facility for Kinetic Analysis (RFKA) provides this expertise through: (1) development and application of modeling technology for biomedical problems, and (2) development of computer-based kinetic modeling methodologies concentrating on the computer program Simulation, Analysis, and Modeling (SAAM) and its conversational version, CONversational SAAM (CONSAM). The RFKA offers consultation to the biomedical community in the use of modeling to analyze kinetic data and trains individuals in using this technology for biomedical research. Early versions of SAAM were widely applied in solving dosimetry problems; many users, however, are not familiar with recent improvements to the software. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint biomedical researchers in the dosimetry field with RFKA, which, together with the joint National Cancer Institute-National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute project, is overseeing SAAM development and applications. In addition, RFKA provides many service activities to the SAAM user community that are relevant to solving dosimetry problems.

  7. On a new method to compute photon skyshine doses around radiotherapy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, R.; Facure, A. [Comissao Nacional de Eenrgia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Xavier, A. [PEN/Coppe -UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Nowadays, in a great number of situations constructions are raised around radiotherapy facilities. In cases where the constructions would not be in the primary x-ray beam, 'skyshine' radiation is normally accounted for. The skyshine method is commonly used to to calculate the dose contribution from scattered radiation in such circumstances, when the roof shielding is projected considering there will be no occupancy upstairs. In these cases, there will be no need to have the usual 1,5-2,0 m thick ceiling, and the construction costs can be considerably reduced. The existing expression to compute these doses do not accomplish to explain mathematically the existence of a shadow area just around the outer room walls, and its growth, as we get away from these walls. In this paper we propose a new method to compute photon skyshine doses, using geometrical considerations to find the maximum dose point. An empirical equation is derived, and its validity is tested using M.C.N.P. 5 Monte Carlo calculation to simulate radiotherapy rooms configurations. (authors)

  8. Computer-guided facility for the study of single crystals at the gamma diffractometer GADI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heer, H.; Bleichert, H.; Gruhn, W.; Moeller, R.

    1984-10-01

    In the study of solid-state properties it is in many cases necessary to work with single crystals. The increased requirement in the industry and research as well as the desire for better characterization by means of γ-diffractometry made it necessary to improve and to modernize the existing instrument. The advantages of a computer-guided facility against the conventional, semiautomatic operation are manifold. Not only the process guidance, but also the data acquisition and evaluation are performed by the computer. By a remote control the operator is able to find quickly a reflex and to drive the crystal in every desired measuring position. The complete protocollation of all important measuring parameters, the convenient data storage, as well as the automatic evaluation are much useful for the user. Finally the measuring time can be increased to practically 24 hours per day. By this the versed characterization by means of γ-diffractometry is put on a completely new level. (orig.) [de

  9. A guide for the selection of computer assisted mapping (CAM) and facilities informations systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslin, S.; Baxter, P.; Jarvis, L.

    1980-12-01

    Many distribution engineers are now aware that computer assisted mapping (CAM) and facilities informations systems are probably the most significant breakthrough to date in computer applications for distribution engineering. The Canadian Electrical Asociation (CEA) recognized this and requested engineers of B.C. Hydro make a study of the state of the art in Canadian utilities and the progress of CAM systems on an international basis. The purpose was to provide a guide to assist Canadian utility distribution engineers faced with the problem of studying the application of CAM systems as an alternative to present methods, consideration being given to the long-term and other benefits that were perhaps not apparent for those approaching this field for the first time. It soon became apparent that technology was developing at a high rate and competition in the market was very strong. Also a number of publications were produced by other sources which adequately covered the scope of this study. This report is thus a collection of references to reports, manuals, and other documents with a few considerations provided for those companies interested in exploring further the use of interactive graphics. 24 refs.

  10. Computer programs for capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes for laser fusion and other advanced technology facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendergrass, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Three FORTRAN programs, CAPITAL, VENTURE, and INDEXER, have been developed to automate computations used in assessing the economic viability of proposed or conceptual laser fusion and other advanced-technology facilities, as well as conventional projects. The types of calculations performed by these programs are, respectively, capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes. The codes permit these three topics to be addressed with considerable sophistication commensurate with user requirements and available data

  11. An overview of an architecture proposal for a high energy physics Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Wäänänen, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kónya, B; Smirnova, O G

    2002-01-01

    The article gives an overview of a Grid testbed architecture proposal for the NorduGrid project. The aim of the project is to establish an inter-Nordic (Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland) testbed facility for implementation of wide area computing and data handling. The architecture is supposed to define a Grid system suitable for solving data intensive problems at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. We present the various architecture components needed for such a system. After that we go on to give a description of the dynamics by showing the task flow. (12 refs).

  12. Energy Systems Integration Facility Videos | Energy Systems Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility | NREL Energy Systems Integration Facility Videos Energy Systems Integration Facility Integration Facility NREL + SolarCity: Maximizing Solar Power on Electrical Grids Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration Robot-Powered Reliability Testing at NREL's ESIF Microgrid

  13. Enabling Extreme Scale Earth Science Applications at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaj, V. G.; Mozdzynski, G.; Hamrud, M.; Deconinck, W.; Smith, L.; Hack, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Oak Ridge Leadership Facility (OLCF), established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), welcomes investigators from universities, government agencies, national laboratories and industry who are prepared to perform breakthrough research across a broad domain of scientific disciplines, including earth and space sciences. Titan, the OLCF flagship system, is currently listed as #2 in the Top500 list of supercomputers in the world, and the largest available for open science. The computational resources are allocated primarily via the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program, sponsored by the U.S. DOE Office of Science. In 2014, over 2.25 billion core hours on Titan were awarded via INCITE projects., including 14% of the allocation toward earth sciences. The INCITE competition is also open to research scientists based outside the USA. In fact, international research projects account for 12% of the INCITE awards in 2014. The INCITE scientific review panel also includes 20% participation from international experts. Recent accomplishments in earth sciences at OLCF include the world's first continuous simulation of 21,000 years of earth's climate history (2009); and an unprecedented simulation of a magnitude 8 earthquake over 125 sq. miles. One of the ongoing international projects involves scaling the ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) model to over 200K cores of Titan. ECMWF is a partner in the EU funded Collaborative Research into Exascale Systemware, Tools and Applications (CRESTA) project. The significance of the research carried out within this project is the demonstration of techniques required to scale current generation Petascale capable simulation codes towards the performance levels required for running on future Exascale systems. One of the techniques pursued by ECMWF is to use Fortran2008 coarrays to overlap computations and communications and

  14. Optimizing Grid Patterns on Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    CELCAL computer program helps in optimizing grid patterns for different photovoltaic cell geometries and metalization processes. Five different powerloss phenomena associated with front-surface metal grid pattern on photovoltaic cells.

  15. The CMS Computing Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonacorsi, D.

    2007-01-01

    The CMS experiment at LHC has developed a baseline Computing Model addressing the needs of a computing system capable to operate in the first years of LHC running. It is focused on a data model with heavy streaming at the raw data level based on trigger, and on the achievement of the maximum flexibility in the use of distributed computing resources. The CMS distributed Computing Model includes a Tier-0 centre at CERN, a CMS Analysis Facility at CERN, several Tier-1 centres located at large regional computing centres, and many Tier-2 centres worldwide. The workflows have been identified, along with a baseline architecture for the data management infrastructure. This model is also being tested in Grid Service Challenges of increasing complexity, coordinated with the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid community

  16. New science on the Open Science Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pordes, R; Altunay, M; Sehgal, C [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Avery, P [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Bejan, A; Gardner, R; Wilde, M [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Blackburn, K [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Blatecky, A; McGee, J [Renaissance Computing Institute, Chapel Hill, NC 27517 (United States); Kramer, B; Olson, D; Roy, A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Livny, M [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Potekhin, M; Quick, R; Wenaus, T [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Wuerthwein, F [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)], E-mail: ruth@fnal.gov

    2008-07-15

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) includes work to enable new science, new scientists, and new modalities in support of computationally based research. There are frequently significant sociological and organizational changes required in transformation from the existing to the new. OSG leverages its deliverables to the large-scale physics experiment member communities to benefit new communities at all scales through activities in education, engagement, and the distributed facility. This paper gives both a brief general description and specific examples of new science enabled on the OSG. More information is available at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org.

  17. New science on the Open Science Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pordes, R; Altunay, M; Sehgal, C; Avery, P; Bejan, A; Gardner, R; Wilde, M; Blackburn, K; Blatecky, A; McGee, J; Kramer, B; Olson, D; Roy, A; Livny, M; Potekhin, M; Quick, R; Wenaus, T; Wuerthwein, F

    2008-01-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) includes work to enable new science, new scientists, and new modalities in support of computationally based research. There are frequently significant sociological and organizational changes required in transformation from the existing to the new. OSG leverages its deliverables to the large-scale physics experiment member communities to benefit new communities at all scales through activities in education, engagement, and the distributed facility. This paper gives both a brief general description and specific examples of new science enabled on the OSG. More information is available at the OSG web site: www.opensciencegrid.org

  18. Handbook of research on P2P and grid systems for service-oriented computing : models, methodologies, and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonopoulos, N.; Exarchakos, G.; Li, Maozhen; Liotta, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Service-oriented computing is a popular design methodology for large scale business computing systems. A significant number of companies aim to reap the benefit of cost reduction by realizing B2B and B2C processes on large-scale SOA-compliant software system platforms. Peer-to-Peer

  19. Grid technologies and applications: architecture and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ian Foster

    2001-01-01

    The 18 months since CHEP'2000 have seen significant advances in Grid computing, both within and outside high energy physics. While in early 2000, Grid computing was a novel concept that most CHEP attendees were being exposed to for the first time, now considerable consensus is seen on Grid architecture, a solid and widely adopted technology base, major funding initiatives, a wide variety of projects developing applications and technologies, and major deployment projects aimed at creating robust Grid infrastructures. The author provides a summary of major developments and trends, focusing on the Globus open source Grid software project and the GriPhyN data grid project

  20. Data location-aware job scheduling in the grid. Application to the GridWay metascheduler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado Peris, Antonio; Hernandez, Jose; Huedo, Eduardo; Llorente, Ignacio M

    2010-01-01

    Grid infrastructures constitute nowadays the core of the computing facilities of the biggest LHC experiments. These experiments produce and manage petabytes of data per year and run thousands of computing jobs every day to process that data. It is the duty of metaschedulers to allocate the tasks to the most appropriate resources at the proper time. Our work reviews the policies that have been proposed for the scheduling of grid jobs in the context of very data-intensive applications. We indicate some of the practical problems that such models will face and describe what we consider essential characteristics of an optimum scheduling system: aim to minimise not only job turnaround time but also data replication, flexibility to support different virtual organisation requirements and capability to coordinate the tasks of data placement and job allocation while keeping their execution decoupled. These ideas have guided the development of an enhanced prototype for GridWay, a general purpose metascheduler, part of the Globus Toolkit and member of the EGEE's RESPECT program. Current GridWay's scheduling algorithm is unaware of data location. Our prototype makes it possible for job requests to set data needs not only as absolute requirements but also as functions for resource ranking. As our tests show, this makes it more flexible than currently used resource brokers to implement different data-aware scheduling algorithms.