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Sample records for greig syndrome lessons

  1. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  2. Isolation of a yeast artificial chromosome contig spanning the Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) gene region

    OpenAIRE

    Vortkamp, Andrea; Gessler, Manfred; Paslier, D. Le; Elaswarapu, R.; Smith, S.; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of the zinc finger gene GLI3 has been shown to be the cause of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS), at least in some GCPS translocation patients. To characterize this genomic region on human chromosome 7p13, we have isolated a VAC contig of more than 1000 kb including the GLI3 gene. In this contig the gene itself spans at least 200-250 kb. A CpG island is located in the vicinity of the 5' region of the known GLI3 cDNA, implying a potential promoter region.

  3. Metopic and sagittal synostosis in Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome: five cases with intragenic mutations or complete deletions of GLI3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurst, Jane A; Jenkins, Dagan; Vasudevan, Pradeep C

    2011-01-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is a multiple congenital malformation characterised by limb and craniofacial anomalies, caused by heterozygous mutation or deletion of GLI3. We report four boys and a girl who were presented with trigonocephaly due to metopic synostosis, in association ...

  4. Molecular and clinical analyses of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly and Pallister-Hall syndromes: Robust phenotype prediction from the type and position of GLI3 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Olivos-Glander, Isabelle; Killoran, Christina; Elson, Emma; Turner, Joyce T.; Peters, Kathryn F.; Abbott, Margaret H.; Aughton, David J.; Aylsworth, Arthur S.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Booth, Carol; Curry, Cynthia J.; David, Albert; Dinulos, Mary Beth; Flannery, David B.; Fox, Michelle A.; Graham, John M.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Guttmacher, Alan E.; Hannibal, Mark C.; Henn, Wolfram; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Holmes, Lewis B.; Hoyme, H. Eugene; Leppig, Kathleen A.; Lin, Angela E.; Macleod, Patrick; Manchester, David K.; Marcelis, Carlo; Mazzanti, Laura; McCann, Emma; McDonald, Marie T.; Mendelsohn, Nancy J.; Moeschler, John B.; Moghaddam, Billur; Neri, Giovanni; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Pagon, Roberta A.; Phillips, John A.; Sadler, Laurie S.; Stoler, Joan M.; Tilstra, David; Walsh Vockley, Catherine M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Zadeh, Touran M.; Brueton, Louise; Black, Graeme Charles M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the GLI3 zinc-finger transcription factor gene cause Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS), which are variable but distinct clinical entities. We hypothesized that GLI3 mutations that predict a truncated functional repressor protein cause PHS and

  5. Nonwoven greige cotton for wound healing and hygienic product applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential to use greige (non-bleached) cotton in nonwoven absorbent products has received increased attention. This is due to innovations in cotton cleaning and nonwoven hydroentanglement processes that open and expose the hydrophilic cellulosic component of greige cotton fiber to water absorpt...

  6. Effects of greige cotton lint properties on hydroentangled nonwoven fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study determined the effects of fiber length, the length uniformity index, micronaire (fineness), and strength of greige cotton lint on properties of nonwoven fabrics. Seven bales of pre-cleaned greige (non-bleached) cotton were procured from a U.S cotton producer and ginner. Each bale primar...

  7. Bleaching of hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabrics without scouring

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work investigated whether a hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabric made at a relatively high hydroentangling water pressure, say, 135-bar, could be successfully bleached to attain the desired whiteness, absorbency and other properties without traditional scouring. Accordingly, the scoured...

  8. Fashionably Ethnic: Individuality and Heritage in Greig Coetzee's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This essay highlights a shift in South African literature towards ideals of individualism and explores some of the paradoxes inherent in the competing claims of individuality and heritage. The characters created by Greig Coetzee in Happy Natives are examined as examples of identities constructed in terms of tradition, ...

  9. Fluid handling and fabric handle profiles of hydroentangled greige cotton and spunbond polypropylene nonwoven topsheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absorbent nonwoven topsheets are traditionally spunbond (or spunbond-meltblown (SM)) polypropylene nonwoven fabrics, and are used for a wide range of incontinence applications. Here we describe how nonwoven greige cotton demonstrates positive incontinence performance indices suitable for top sheet ...

  10. Structure/function relations of hemostatic nonwoven dressings based on greige cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variety of natural and synthetic fibers are employed in hemostatic dressings. Here we demonstrate the use of greige cotton as a functional fiber, which when combined with hydrophilic and hydrophobic fibers in hydroentangled nonwoven materials, promotes accelerated clotting. A biophysical approach...

  11. Effect of water pressure on absorbency of hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A studied has been conducted to determine the effect of water pressure in a commercial-grade Fleissner MiniJet hydroentanglement system on the absorbency of greige (non-bleached) cotton lint-based nonwoven fabric. The study has shown that a water pressure of 125 Bar or higher on only two high-pressu...

  12. Effect of urea additive on the thermal decomposition kinetics of flame retardant greige cotton nonwoven fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunghyun Nam; Brian D. Condon; Robert H. White; Qi Zhao; Fei Yao; Michael Santiago Cintrón

    2012-01-01

    Urea is well known to have a synergistic action with phosphorus-based flame retardants (FRs) in enhancing the FR performance of cellulosic materials, but the effect of urea on the thermal decomposition kinetics has not been thoroughly studied. In this study, the activation energy (Ea) for the thermal decomposition of greige...

  13. Our experience in processing a pre-cleaned greige cotton lint for certain nonwoven base materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditionally bleached cotton has been used for the production of nonwoven fabrics. One primary reason for this scenario was that there was no greige cotton fiber alternative that would meet the required cotton cleanliness needs of the nonwovens manufacturers. However, today, there are several vers...

  14. Advent of Greige Cotton Nonwovens Made By Hydro-Entanglement Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using greige (scour/bleachless) cotton, a few nonwoven fabrics have been successfully produced by adopting conventional fiber opening, cleaning and (modified) carding machines followed by cross-lapping, pre/light needling, and hydro-entanglement (H-E) on modern commercial machinery and equipment. Us...

  15. Lessons learned from studying syndromic autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2016-10-26

    Syndromic autism spectrum disorders represent a group of childhood neurological conditions, typically associated with chromosomal abnormalities or mutations in a single gene. The discovery of their genetic causes has increased our understanding of the molecular pathways critical for normal cognitive and social development. Human studies have revealed that the brain is particularly sensitive to changes in dosage of various proteins from transcriptional and translational regulators to synaptic proteins. Investigations of these disorders in animals have shed light on previously unknown pathogenic mechanisms leading to the identification of potential targets for therapeutic intervention. The demonstration of reversibility of several phenotypes in adult mice is encouraging, and brings hope that with novel therapies, skills and functionality might improve in affected children and young adults. As new research reveals points of convergence between syndromic and nonsyndromic autism spectrum disorders, we believe there will be opportunities for shared therapeutics for this class of conditions.

  16. Lesson of the month 2: Cauda equina in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslin, Douglas; Gounaris, Ioannis; Ng, Kenrick; Corrie, Pippa

    2016-02-01

    We present the case of a 34-year old woman who initially presented with obesity and back pain. She was eventually diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome secondary to an adrenocortical carcinoma that had metastasised to her spine, causing cauda equina compression. The delays in reaching the correct diagnosis caused significant morbidity and exemplify the pitfalls of premature closing, a common cognitive error in diagnostic reasoning. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  17. Hallmarks of progeroid syndromes: lessons from mice and reprogrammed cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dido Carrero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a process that inevitably affects most living organisms and involves the accumulation of macromolecular damage, genomic instability and loss of heterochromatin. Together, these alterations lead to a decline in stem cell function and to a reduced capability to regenerate tissue. In recent years, several genetic pathways and biochemical mechanisms that contribute to physiological ageing have been described, but further research is needed to better characterize this complex biological process. Because premature ageing (progeroid syndromes, including progeria, mimic many of the characteristics of human ageing, research into these conditions has proven to be very useful not only to identify the underlying causal mechanisms and identify treatments for these pathologies, but also for the study of physiological ageing. In this Review, we summarize the main cellular and animal models used in progeria research, with an emphasis on patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell models, and define a series of molecular and cellular hallmarks that characterize progeroid syndromes and parallel physiological ageing. Finally, we describe the therapeutic strategies being investigated for the treatment of progeroid syndromes, and their main limitations.

  18. Superior Canal Dehiscence Syndrome: Lessons from the First 20 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan K. Ward

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome was first reported by Lloyd Minor and colleagues in 1998. Patients with a dehiscence in the bone overlying the superior semicircular canal experience symptoms of pressure or sound-induced vertigo, bone conduction hyperacusis, and pulsatile tinnitus. The initial series of patients were diagnosed based on common symptoms, a physical examination finding of eye movements in the plane of the superior semicircular canal when ear canal pressure or loud tones were applied to the ear, and high-resolution computed tomography imaging demonstrating a dehiscence in the bone over the superior semicircular canal. Research productivity directed at understanding better methods for diagnosing and treating this condition has substantially increased over the last two decades. We now have a sound understanding of the pathophysiology of third mobile window syndromes, higher resolution imaging protocols, and several sensitive and specific diagnostic tests. Furthermore, we have a treatment (surgical occlusion of the superior semicircular canal that has demonstrated efficacy. This review will highlight some of the fundamental insights gained in SCDS, propose diagnostic criteria, and discuss future research directions.

  19. Lesson of the month 2: toxic shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Tamer; Anandappa, Samantha; Pocock, Nicholas John; Keough, Alexander; Turner, Angus

    2014-06-01

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) represents a fascinating example of immune activation caused by infection resulting in a dramatic and challenging clinical syndrome. TSS is commonly associated with tampon use and still causes significant morbidity and mortality in young healthy women. A misconception is that TSS presents with a skin rash and only occurs in women and children; however, it can occur in males and can present without skin changes. TSS presents initially as a febrile illness and within a few hours can progress to severe hypotension and multiple organ failure (MOF). Staphylococcus aureus and group A beta haemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) can secrete toxins from a small or hidden focus of infection and hence blood culture and sensitivity (C+S) tests can be negative, thereby making diagnosing this condition challenging. Clindamycin is superior to penicillin in the treatment of this condition and significantly decreases the mortality rate in TSS. However, there is also an important role for intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG). Early intensive care unit (ICU) as well as surgical team involvement (in selected cases) is required to avoid mortality which may approach 70%. © 2014 Royal College of Physicians.

  20. In vitro hemostatic, hydrogen peroxide production and elastase sequestration properties of nonwoven ultra clean greige cotton dressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonwoven UltraCleanTM Cotton (highly cleaned and hydroentangled, greige cotton) retains the native wax and pectin content (~2%) of the cotton fiber traditionally removed from scoured and bleached cotton gauze, yet potentially affording wound healing properties. In vitro thromboelastography, hydrog...

  1. Progressive and cumulative fabric effects of multiple hydroentangling impacts at different water pressures on greige cotton substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    A practical study was conducted to determine the effects of the hydroentangling jet strip’s orifice size and the hydroentangling water pressure on the energy expended and the properties of the resulting nonwoven fabrics produced on a commercial-grade hydro-entanglement (HE) system, using greige cott...

  2. Effects of certain key metrics of hydroentanglement system on properties of nonwoven fabrics made with commercially cleaned greige cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research was conducted to determine the effects of certain key process metrics of a commercial-grade hydroentanglement system on properties of the nonwoven fabrics made with cleaned Upland greige cotton lint. The metrics studied, among others, were the hydroentangling water pressure, the strip orif...

  3. Adipose energy stores, physical work, and the metabolic syndrome: lessons from hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, James L

    2005-12-13

    Hummingbirds and other nectar-feeding, migratory birds possess unusual adaptive traits that offer important lessons concerning obesity, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Hummingbirds consume a high sugar diet and have fasting glucose levels that would be severely hyperglycemic in humans, yet these nectar-fed birds recover most glucose that is filtered into the urine. Hummingbirds accumulate over 40% body fat shortly before migrations in the spring and autumn. Despite hyperglycemia and seasonally elevated body fat, the birds are not known to become diabetic in the sense of developing polyuria (glucosuria), polydipsia and polyphagia. The tiny (3-4 g) Ruby-throated hummingbird has among the highest mass-specific metabolic rates known, and loses most of its stored fat in 20 h by flying up to 600 miles across the Gulf of Mexico. During the breeding season, it becomes lean and maintains an extremely accurate energy balance. In addition, hummingbirds can quickly enter torpor and reduce resting metabolic rates by 10-fold. Thus, hummingbirds are wonderful examples of the adaptive nature of fat tissue, and may offer lessons concerning prevention of metabolic syndrome in humans.

  4. Adipose energy stores, physical work, and the metabolic syndrome: lessons from hummingbirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hargrove James L

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hummingbirds and other nectar-feeding, migratory birds possess unusual adaptive traits that offer important lessons concerning obesity, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Hummingbirds consume a high sugar diet and have fasting glucose levels that would be severely hyperglycemic in humans, yet these nectar-fed birds recover most glucose that is filtered into the urine. Hummingbirds accumulate over 40% body fat shortly before migrations in the spring and autumn. Despite hyperglycemia and seasonally elevated body fat, the birds are not known to become diabetic in the sense of developing polyuria (glucosuria, polydipsia and polyphagia. The tiny (3–4 g Ruby-throated hummingbird has among the highest mass-specific metabolic rates known, and loses most of its stored fat in 20 h by flying up to 600 miles across the Gulf of Mexico. During the breeding season, it becomes lean and maintains an extremely accurate energy balance. In addition, hummingbirds can quickly enter torpor and reduce resting metabolic rates by 10-fold. Thus, hummingbirds are wonderful examples of the adaptive nature of fat tissue, and may offer lessons concerning prevention of metabolic syndrome in humans.

  5. Development of WebQuest Lesson Enhancing Thai Reading Skills for Students with Down Syndrome at Lower Elementary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewchote, Nantawan; Chongchaikit, Maturos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to enhancing the Thai language oral reading skills of lower elementary students with Down syndrome using WebQuest lesson. The sample groups were the 5 lower elementary students, purposively selected from Watnonsaparam public school under the Office of Saraburi Educational Service Area, Thailand. The research…

  6. Music lessons are associated with increased verbal memory in individuals with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Brittany A; Martens, Marilee A; Jungers, Melissa K

    2014-11-16

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized by intellectual delay and an affinity for music. It has been previously shown that familiar music can enhance verbal memory in individuals with WS who have had music training. There is also evidence that unfamiliar, or novel, music may also improve cognitive recall. This study was designed to examine if a novel melody could also enhance verbal memory in individuals with WS, and to more fully characterize music training in this population. We presented spoken or sung sentences that described an animal and its group name to 44 individuals with WS, and then tested their immediate and delayed memory using both recall and multiple choice formats. Those with formal music training (average duration of training 4½ years) scored significantly higher on both the spoken and sung recall items, as well as on the spoken multiple choice items, than those with no music training. Music therapy, music enjoyment, age, and Verbal IQ did not impact performance on the memory tasks. These findings provide further evidence that formal music lessons may impact the neurological pathways associated with verbal memory in individuals with WS, consistent with findings in typically developing individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adsorption of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride on low-weight greige and bleached cotton nonwovens in different aqueous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous research has shown the adsorption of alkyl-dimethyl-benzyl-ammonium chloride (ADBAC) on cotton nonwovens is dependent on pretreatment of the substrate, more specifically whether it is greige or bleached fabric. In this work we examine the effect of varying the chemical and physical propert...

  8. Prenatal Testing for Intellectual Disability: Misperceptions and Reality with Lessons from Down syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Kruti

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common cause of intellectual disability. In the United States, it is recommended that prenatal testing for Down syndrome be offered to all women. Because of this policy and consequent public perception, having Down syndrome has become a disadvantage in the prenatal period. However, in the postnatal period, there may be some advantage to having Down syndrome. In order to help parents make informed decisions about screening and testing, it is crucial to reconcile diver...

  9. Prenatal Testing for Intellectual Disability: Misperceptions and Reality with Lessons from down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Kruti

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common cause of intellectual disability. In the United States, it is recommended that prenatal testing for Down syndrome be offered to all women. Because of this policy and consequent public perception, having Down syndrome has become a disadvantage in the prenatal period. However, in the postnatal period, there may be…

  10. Early termination of a trial of mycophenolate mofetil for treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Claire C; Burks, David A; Propert, Kathleen J; Mayer, Robert D; Peters, Kenneth M; Nickel, J Curtis; Payne, Christopher K; FitzGerald, Mary P; Hanno, Philip M; Chai, Toby C; Kreder, Karl J; Lukacz, Emily S; Foster, Harris E; Cen, Liyi; Landis, J Richard; Kusek, John W; Nyberg, Leroy M

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of mycophenolate mofetil in patients with treatment refractory interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. A total of 210 patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome were to be randomized into a multicenter, placebo controlled trial using a 2:1 randomization. Participants in whom at least 3 interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome specific treatments had failed and who had at least moderately severe symptoms were enrolled in a 12-week treatment study. The primary study end point was the global response assessment. Secondary end points were general and disease specific symptom questionnaires, and voiding diaries. Only 58 subjects were randomized before a black box warning regarding mycophenolate mofetil safety was issued by the manufacturer in October 2007. The trial was halted, and interim analysis was performed and presented to an independent data and safety monitoring board. Six of the 39 subjects (15%) randomized at study cessation were considered responders for mycophenolate mofetil compared to 3 of 19 controls (16%, p=0.67). Secondary outcome measures reflected more improvement in controls. In a randomized, placebo controlled trial that was prematurely halted mycophenolate mofetil showed efficacy similar to that of placebo to treat symptoms of refractory interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. The results of this limited study cannot be used to confirm or refute the hypothesis that immunosuppressive therapy may be beneficial to at least a subgroup of patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. Despite study termination lessons can be gleaned to inform future investigations. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Hyper-IgE syndrome. Lessons from function and defects of STAT-3 or DOCK-8].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-Montiel, Julio César; Vega-Torres, Brittany Itzel

    2016-01-01

    In the classification of primary immunodeficiencies, hyper-IgE syndrome, identified with OMIM code # 147060 in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man catalog, belongs to the group of syndromes associated with combined immunodeficiencies. It is characterized by elevated levels of IgE, eosinophilia, recurrent skin abscesses, pneumonia, lung parenchyma lesions, recurrent infections, rashes in newborns, eczema, sinusitis, otitis, and mucocutaneous candidiasis. Hyper-IgE syndrome can be transmitted by autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive modes of inheritance. Hyper-IgE syndrome in its dominant form includes non-immunological manifestations like characteristic facies, pathological dentition, scoliosis, bone disorders, and joint hyperextensibility. The reported cause of the dominant form is the loss of function of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT-3, with MIM # 102582). Mutations in dedicator of cytokines 8 (DOCK-8) is the most common cause of the autosomal recessive form of hyper-IgE syndrome.

  12. Syndromic Surveillance System for Korea-US Joint Biosurveillance Portal: Design and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Chulwoo; Burkom, Howard; Yoon, Chang-Gyo; Stewart, Miles; Elbert, Yevgeniy; Katz, Aaron; Tak, Sangwoo

    2016-01-01

    Driven by the growing importance of situational awareness of bioterrorism threats, the Republic of Korea (ROK) and the United States have constructed a joint military capability, called the Biosurveillance Portal (BSP), to enhance biosecurity. As one component of the BSP, we developed the Military Active Real-time Syndromic Surveillance (MARSS) system to detect and track natural and deliberate disease outbreaks. This article describes the ROK military health data infrastructure and explains how syndromic data are derived and made available to epidemiologists. Queries corresponding to 8 syndromes, based on published clinical effects of weaponized pathogens, were used to classify military hospital patient records to form aggregated daily syndromic counts. A set of ICD-10 codes for each syndrome was defined through literature review and expert panel discussion. A study set of time series of national daily counts for each syndrome was extracted from the Defense Medical Statistical Information System between January 1, 2011, and May 31, 2014. A stratified, adjusted cumulative summation algorithm was implemented for each syndrome group to signal alerts prompting investigation. The algorithm was developed by calculating sensitivity to sets of 1,000 artificial outbreak signals randomly injected in the dataset, with each signal injected in a separate trial. Queries and visualizations were adapted from the Suite for Automated Global bioSurveillance. Findings indicated that early warning of outbreaks affecting fewer than 50 patients will require analysis at subnational levels, especially for common syndrome groups. Developing MARSS to improve sensitivity will require modification of underlying syndromic diagnosis codes, engineering to coordinate alerts among subdivisions, and enhanced algorithms. The bioterrorist threat in the Korean peninsula mandates these efforts.

  13. Rituximab in steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome: lessons from clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Kazumoto; Sako, Mayumi; Kamei, Koichi; Nozu, Kandai

    2017-07-17

    Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome is the most common chronic glomerular disease in children. A total of 80-90% of patients with childhood idiopathic nephrotic syndrome achieve remission with steroid therapy [steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS)]. However, approximately 50% of children with SSNS develop frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome (FRNS) or steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome (SDNS). Children with FRNS or SDNS are usually treated with immunosuppressive agents, but 10-20% of children receiving immunosuppressive agents still show frequent relapses or steroid dependence during or after treatment, defined as complicated FRNS or SDNS. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that was originally developed to treat patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, is currently used for treating SSNS. In this review we highlight recent studies, mainly randomized controlled trials of rituximab for SSNS, including complicated and uncomplicated forms of FRNS or SDNS in children. We also discuss the effects of these studies on the management of patients suffering from these conditions.

  14. Consciousness and body image: lessons from phantom limbs, Capgras syndrome and pain asymbolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, V S

    1998-01-01

    Words such as 'consciousness' and 'self' actually encompass a number of distinct phenomena that are loosely lumped together. The study of neurological syndromes allows us to explore the neural mechanisms that might underlie different aspects of self, such as body image and emotional responses to sensory stimuli, and perhaps even laughter and humour. Mapping the 'functional logic' of the many different attributes of human nature on to specific neural circuits in the brain offers the best hope of understanding how the activity of neurons gives rise to conscious experience. We consider three neurological syndromes (phantom limbs, Capgras delusion and pain asymbolia) to illustrate this idea. PMID:9854257

  15. Rett Syndrome: Of Girls and Mice--Lessons for Regression in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Daniel G.

    2004-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder occurring almost exclusively in females. Regression is a defining feature of RTT. During the regression stage, RTT girls display many autistic features, such as loss of communication and social skills, poor eye contact, and lack of interest, and initially may be given the diagnosis of autism.…

  16. Laparoscopic bilateral transperitoneal adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome: surgical challenges and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sandeep; Yadav, Kunal; Sharma, Aditya P; Sethi, Vrishketan

    2013-06-01

    Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is well established for treatment of adrenal lesions. However, bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome is a challenging and time-consuming operation. We report our experience of laparoscopic bilateral adrenalectomy for this disease in 19 patients. From September 2009 to August 2012, we have operated 19 patients with Cushing syndrome and performed bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy using the transperitoneal approach; synchronous in 15 patients and staged in 4 patients. In 15 patients, the surgery was carried out sequentially on both the sides in lateral position with intraoperative change in position. Complete adrenalectomy including periadrenal fat was carried out on both the sides. Nineteen patients were referred from Department of Endocrinology for bilateral adrenalectomy for adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH)-dependent and ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome. The indications for surgery were Cushing disease in 15 patients, occult/ectopic source of ACTH in 2 patients, and primary adrenal hyperplasia in 2 patients. Fifteen patients underwent bilateral adrenalectomy during the same operation. Four patients underwent staged procedures. All procedures were completed laparoscopically with no conversions. The mean operating time for simultaneous bilateral adrenalectomy was 210 minutes (range, 150 to 240 min). This included the repositioning and reprepping time. There were no major intraoperative complications. The average blood loss was 100 mL (range, 50 to 200 mL). None of the patients required blood transfusions in the postoperative period. The postoperative complications included minor port-site infection in 2 patients. One severely debilitated patient died on the 14th postoperative day because of hospital-acquired pneumonia. The remaining 18 patients have done well in terms of impact on the disease. Laparoscopic bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome is feasible and safe. It confers all the advantages of minimally invasive

  17. Studying Acute Coronary Syndrome Through the World Wide Web: Experiences and Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Angelo A

    2017-10-13

    This study details my viewpoint on the experiences, lessons, and assessments of conducting a national study on care-seeking behavior for heart attack in the United States utilizing the World Wide Web. The Yale Heart Study (YHS) was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Grounded on two prior studies, the YHS combined a Web-based interview survey instrument; ads placed on the Internet; flyers and posters in public libraries, senior centers, and rehabilitation centers; information on chat rooms; a viral marketing strategy; and print ads to attract potential participants to share their heart attack experiences. Along the way, the grant was transferred from Ohio State University (OSU) to Yale University, and significant administrative, information technology, and personnel challenges ensued that materially delayed the study's execution. Overall, the use of the Internet to collect data on care-seeking behavior is very time consuming and emergent. The cost of using the Web was approximately 31% less expensive than that of face-to-face interviews. However, the quality of the data may have suffered because of the absence of some data compared with interviewing participants. Yet the representativeness of the 1154 usable surveys appears good, with the exception of a dearth of African American participants. ©Angelo A Alonzo. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 13.10.2017.

  18. Development of criteria for a diagnosis: lessons from the night eating syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stunkard, Albert J.; Allison, Kelly C.; Geliebter, Allan; Lundgren, Jennifer D.; Gluck, Marci E.; O’Reardon, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Criteria for inclusion of diagnoses of Axis I disorders in the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V) of the American Psychiatric Association are being considered. The 5 criteria that were proposed by Blashfield et al as necessary for inclusion in DSM-IV are reviewed and are met by the night eating syndrome (NES). Seventy-seven publications in refereed journals in the last decade indicate growing recognition of NES. Two core diagnostic criteria have been established: evening hyperphagia (consumption of at least 25% of daily food intake after the evening meal) and/or the presence of nocturnal awakenings with ingestions. These criteria have been validated in studies that used self-reports, structured interviews, and symptom scales. Night eating syndrome can be distinguished from binge eating disorder and sleep-related eating disorder. Four additional features attest to the usefulness of the diagnosis of NES: (1) its prevalence, (2) its association with obesity, (3) its extensive comorbidity, and (4) its biological aspects. In conclusion, research on NES supports the validity of the diagnosis and its inclusion in DSM-V. PMID:19683608

  19. Epilepsy in Rett syndrome--lessons from the Rett networked database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenkorn, Andreea; Levy-Drummer, Rachel S; Bondi, Ori; Renieri, Alessandra; Villard, Laurent; Mari, Francesca; Mencarelli, Maria A; Lo Rizzo, Caterina; Meloni, Ilaria; Pineda, Mercedes; Armstrong, Judith; Clarke, Angus; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Mejaski, Bosnjak Vlatka; Djuric, Milena; Craiu, Dana; Djukic, Alexsandra; Pini, Giorgio; Bisgaard, Anne Marie; Melegh, Bela; Vignoli, Aglaia; Russo, Silvia; Anghelescu, Cristina; Veneselli, Edvige; Hayek, Joussef; Ben-Zeev, Bruria

    2015-04-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene, and characterized by cognitive and communicative regression, loss of hand use, and midline hand stereotypies. Epilepsy is a core symptom, but literature is controversial regarding genotype-phenotype correlation. Analysis of data from a large cohort should overcome this shortcoming. Data from the Rett Syndrome Networked Database on 1,248 female patients were included. Data on phenotypic and genotypic parameters, age of onset, severity of epilepsy, and type of seizures were collected. Statistical analysis was done using the IBM SPSS Version 21 software, logistic regression, and Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Epilepsy was present in 68.1% of the patients, with uncontrolled seizures in 32.6% of the patients with epilepsy. Mean age of onset of epilepsy was 4.68 ± (standard deviation) 3.5 years. Younger age of onset was correlated to severity of epilepsy (Spearman correlation r = 0.668, p Rett phenotype, increased the risk for epilepsy (odds ratio [OR] 2.46, confidence interval [CI] 95% 1.3-4.66), but not for severe epilepsy. The p.R255X mutation conferred an increased risk for epilepsy (OR 2.07, CI 95% 1.2-3.59) as well as for severe epilepsy (OR 3.4, CI 95% 1.6-7.3). The p.T158M and p.C306C mutations relatively increased the risk for severe epilepsy (OR 3.09 and 2.69, CI 95% 1.48-6.4 and 1.19-6.05, respectively), but not for epilepsy occurrence. Various mutations in the MECP2 gene have a different influence on epilepsy, unrelated to the severity of the general Rett phenotype. This might suggest a site-specific effect of MeCp2 on epileptic pathways. Further investigation of these mechanisms should promote better understanding of epileptogenesis in Rett syndrome. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Aging in the Cardiovascular System: Lessons from Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamczyk, Magda R; del Campo, Lara; Andrés, Vicente

    2018-02-10

    Aging, the main risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), is becoming progressively more prevalent in our societies. A better understanding of how aging promotes CVD is therefore urgently needed to develop new strategies to reduce disease burden. Atherosclerosis and heart failure contribute significantly to age-associated CVD-related morbimortality. CVD and aging are both accelerated in patients suffering from Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic disorder caused by the prelamin A mutant progerin. Progerin causes extensive atherosclerosis and cardiac electrophysiological alterations that invariably lead to premature aging and death. This review summarizes the main structural and functional alterations to the cardiovascular system during physiological and premature aging and discusses the mechanisms underlying exaggerated CVD and aging induced by prelamin A and progerin. Because both proteins are expressed in normally aging non-HGPS individuals, and most hallmarks of normal aging occur in progeria, research on HGPS can identify mechanisms underlying physiological aging.

  1. Plasma Calcium Concentration Modifies the Blood Sodium During Hemodialysis: Lessons from Hard Water Syndrome

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    Viggiano Davide

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Extracellular sodium (Na+ concentration is maintained within a tight physiological range due to hormonal control, that mainly modulates thirst, Na+ and water renal excretion. Extra-renal regulation of Na+ and water homeostasis is only partially understood. Recently it has been debated whether the osmotically inactive Na+ storage is fixed or variable. Methods. In the present study, fourteen End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD patients treated by chronic hemodialysis underwent by accident to a sharp increase in plasmatic calcium (Ca+2 levels due to the failure of the water control system, leading to the so-called hard water syndrome. The levels of plasmatic Ca+2 after 1 hr of hemodialysis were correlated with urea, Na+, potassium (K+ and creatinine levels. Eleven ESRD patients treated with hemodialysis under similar conditions were used as controls. Results. The hard water syndrome resulted in hypercalcemia, while mean plasma levels of Na+, K+ and urea were not different compared to controls. Plasma creatinine levels were slightly but significantly higher that control. A correlation analysis on the measured variables has showed a positive correlation between plasma Ca+2 and Na+ levels (Pearson=0.428, p=0.032, and the absence of any correlation with K+, creatinine and urea concentration. Conclusions. Our study suggests that acute changes in plasmatic Ca+2 levels may affect Na+ concentration in the absence of renal function; it is possible that hypercalcemia may trigger Na+ release from the osmotically inactive storage. These data further support previous observations on the interplay of sodium and calcium at extrarenal sites.

  2. Strengthening epidemiologic investigation of infectious diseases in Korea: lessons from the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome outbreak

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    Changhwan Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS coronavirus infection in Korea resulted in large socioeconomic losses. This provoked the Korean government and the general public to recognize the importance of having a well-established system against infectious diseases. Although epidemiologic investigation is one of the most important aspects of prevention, it has been pointed out that much needs to be improved in Korea. We review here the current status of the Korean epidemiologic service and suggest possible supplementation measures. We examine the current national preventive infrastructure, including human resources such as Epidemic Intelligence Service officers, its governmental management, and related policies. In addition, we describe the practical application of these resources to the recent MERS outbreak and the progress in preventive measures. The spread of MERS demonstrated that the general readiness for emerging infectious diseases in Korea is considerably low. We believe that it is essential to increase society’s investment in disease prevention. Fostering public health personnel, legislating management policies, and establishing research centers for emerging infectious diseases are potential solutions. Evaluating international preventive systems, developing cooperative measures, and initiating improvements are necessary. We evaluated the Korean epidemiologic investigation system and the public preventive measures against infectious diseases in light of the recent MERS outbreak. We suggest that governmental authorities in Korea enforce preventive policies, foster the development of highly qualified personnel, and increase investment in the public health domain of infectious disease prevention.

  3. MOVING TOWARDS INTEGRATIVE, MULTI-DIMENSIONAL RESEARCH IN MODERN PSYCHIATRY: LESSONS LEARNED FROM FRAGILE X SYNDROME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Lawrence K.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2016-01-01

    The field of psychiatry is approaching a major inflection point. The basic science behind cognition, emotion, behavior and social processes has been advancing rapidly in the past 20 years. However, clinical research supporting the classification system in psychiatry has not kept up with these scientific advances. In order to begin organizing the basic science of psychiatry in a comprehensive manner, we begin by selecting fragile X syndrome (FraX), a neurogenetic disease with cognitive-behavioral manifestations, to illustrate key concepts in an integrative, multi-dimensional model. Specifically, we will describe key genetic and molecular mechanisms (e.g. GABAergic dysfunction and mGluR5-associated long-term depression) relevant to the pathophysiology of FraX, as well as neural correlates of cognitive-behavioral symptoms. We will then describe what we have learned from FraX, which may be applicable to other psychiatric disorders. We conclude the article by discussing on-going and future opportunities in both diagnosing and treating psychiatric diseases in the future. PMID:26868443

  4. [Acute coronary syndromes in Latin America: lessons from the ACCESS registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, Carlos; Jerjes-Sánchez, Carlos; Nicolau, José Carlos; Bazzino, Oscar; Antepara, Norka; Mármol, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of the clinical characteristics, treatment and outcomes among Latin American (LA) patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) is scarce. ACCESS, international prospective multicenter registry to evaluate risk stratification, management and outcomes in ACS (unstable angina or non-ST elevation myocardial infarction [UA/NSTEMI] or ST elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI]) in developing countries. Primary endpoint: all-cause death at 1 year; all-cause mortality within 30 days was also recorded, Patients with acute ischemic symptoms within 24 hours of symptoms onset and electrocardiographic evidence of ischemia were enrolled. Coronary artery disease was proved by positive invasive or non-invasive tests. Between 2007 and 2008, 4436 patients with ACS (2562 UA/NSTEMI and 2374 STEMI) from eight LA countries. On admission, acute symptoms were identified in 79 % and 90%, respectively. Both groups had a long delay from symptom onset to hospital arrival. Low access to pharmacological (29%) and mechanical reperfusion (32%) were observed. At admission, rates of evidence-based treatment were low in all groups. The most common in-hospital complications were heart failure (10% UA/NSTEMI and 20% STEMI) and recurrent ischemia (8% and 11%). Mortality at 30 days was 2% and 8% at 1 year. ACCESS registry provides contemporary information of patients with ACS in LA and their hospital management and subsequent clinical outcomes.

  5. [From pathogenesis to treatment of genetic intellectual disabilities: a lesson from Angelman syndrome research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Shinji

    2013-06-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe intellectual disability, epilepsy and ataxic motor dysfunction. Paternally imprinted UBE3A, which is located in the imprinted domain of 15q11-q13, is the causative gene of AS. UBE3A is exclusively expressed from the maternally inherited allele only in neurons (neuron-specific imprinting), and is regulated by antisense RNA. UBE3A is an E3 ubiquitin protein ligase and Arc is one of its targets in the brain. Arc is known to regulate AMPA-type glutamate receptor at the post-synaptic membrane. Loss-of-function of UBE3A results in upregulation of Arc and downregulation of AMPA receptors, giving rise to disturbance in experience-dependent synaptic plasticity. Unraveling the pathophysiology of AS will shed light on the development of pharmaceutical agents for genetic intellectual disabilities. Recently, topoisomerase inhibitors were shown to unsilence imprinted Ube3a in a mouse model of AS. This success indicated the possibility of an epigenetic therapy for AS. Therefore, AS is also a good model for the development of epigenetic therapy for genetic intellectual disorders caused by epigenetic dysfunction.

  6. Lessons from healthcare utilization in children with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Beneyto, Paz; Soria Checa, Cristina E; Botella-Rocamora, Paloma; Rincon-Piedrahita, Inés; Garcia Callejo, Francisco J; Algarra, Jaime Marco

    Paediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnoea-Hypopnoea Syndrome (OSAS) is a multisystemic condition affecting child's health status that may be investigated analyzing demand for healthcare. to quantify the frequency of medical consultations in children with OSAS over a 5-year period, compared to a healthy population. A longitudinal, case-control, ambispective study was conducted at a hospital pertaining to the national public health system. 69 consecutive children referred for OSAS were recruited with no diseases other than OSAS so that healthcare demand was purely attributed to this condition. Matched healthy control children were selected to compare these data. Data regarding frequency of the medical consultations were obtained over 5 years: the year of the treatment ("Year0"), 1 and 2 years before ("Year -1" and "Year -2" respectively), and 1 and 2 years after treatment ("Year+1" and "Year+2") RESULTS: Frequentation Index (FI), as ratio between the use of health services by OSAS children and healthy controls was 1.89 during Year-2, and 2.15 during Year-1 (Pde Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  7. Developing a systems approach to prevent meconium aspiration syndrome: lessons learned from multinational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutani, V K

    2008-12-01

    Passage of fetal bowel movement (meconium) is common (in about one out of six births), and in some the staining of the amniotic fluid is a sign of fetal distress. Inhalation of meconium (aspiration syndrome, in upto one out of five to eight such births) just before or at birth may be preventable by a coordinated approach by well-trained and informed birth attendants. Respiratory failure secondary to meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal population. Infants with hypoxemic respiratory failure because of MAS, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and pneumonia/sepsis have an increased survival with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Other treatment options earlier limited to inotropic support, continuous airway pressure (CPAP), conventional ventilatory management, respiratory alkalosis, paralysis and intravenous vasodilators have been replaced by synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV), high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), surfactant and inhaled nitric oxide (iNO). HFOV has been advocated for use to improve lung inflation while potentially decreasing lung injury through volutrauma. Other reports describe the enhanced efficacy of HFOV when combined with iNO. Subsequent to studies reporting that surfactant deficiency or inactivation may contribute to neonatal respiratory failure, exogenous surfactant therapy has been implemented with apparent success. Recent studies have shown that iNO therapy in the neonate with hypoxemic respiratory failure can result in improved oxygenation and decreased need for ECMO. However, these innovative interventions are costly, require a sophisticated infrastructure and are not universally accessible. In this paper, a context of systems-approach for prenatal, natal and postnatal management of babies delivered through meconium stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) so that adverse outcomes are minimized and the least number of babies require

  8. Hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome: lessons from a large cohort from Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Eytan; Krause, Ilan; Fraser, Abigail; Goldberg, Elad; Garty, Moshe

    2012-11-01

    There is a striking increase in the number of people with metabolic syndrome (MetS) as a result of the global epidemic of obesity and diabetes. Increasing evidence suggests that uric acid may play a role in MetS. To assess the prevalence of MetS in a large cohort from Israel and its association with hyperuricemia using the latest three definitions of MetS. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the database from a screening center in Israel, using the revised National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the Harmonizing definitions of MetS, to assess 12,036 subjects with an age range of 20-80 years. The mean age of the study sample was 46.1 +/- 10.2 years and 69.8% were male. The prevalence of MetS was 10.6%, 18.2% and 20.2% in the revised NCEP ATP III, the IDF and the Harmonizing definitions respectively. The prevalence of hyperuricemia in subjects with MetS, for all three MetS definitions, was similar: 20.0%, 19.9% and 19.1% respectively. There was a graded increase in the prevalence of MetS among subjects with increasing levels of uric acid. The increasing trend persisted after stratifying for age and gender and after multivariate analysis (P for trend (0.001). This large cohort shows a high prevalence of MetS in Israel, but is still lower than the prevalence in western countries. Hyperuricemia is common in those subjects and might be considered a potential clinical parameter in the definition of MetS.

  9. Lower extremity compartment syndrome in the acute care surgery paradigm: safety lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cothren Clay C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prompt diagnosis and decompression of acute lower extremity compartment syndrome (LECS in the multisystem injured patient is essential to avoid the devastating complications of progressive tissue necrosis and amputation. Despite collaborative trauma and orthopedic management of these difficult cases, significant delays in diagnosis and treatment occur. Periodic system review of our trauma and orthopedic data for complications of LECS led us to hypothesize that delayed diagnosis and limb loss were potentially preventable events in our trauma center. Setting Academic level 1 trauma center. Methods We performed a prospective review of our trauma registry for all cases of LECS over a 7 year period (2/98–10/2005. Variables reviewed included demographics, injury patterns, tissue necrosis, amputation and mortality. Results Eighty-three (10 female, 73 male cases were reviewed. Mean age = 33.3 years (range 1–78. Mean ISS = 19.4, GCS = 12.5. Five (6.0% had amputations; 7 (8.4% died. Fractures occurred in 68.7% (n = 57, and vascular injuries were present in 38.6% (n = 32. In 7 patients (8.4%, a delayed compartment release resulted in muscle necrosis requiring multiple debridements, subsequent wound closure problems, and long term disability. Of note, none of these patients had prior compartment pressure measurements. Furthermore, 6 patients (7% had superficial peroneal nerve transections as complications of their fasciotomy. Conclusion In the multisystem injured patient, LECS remains a major diagnostic and treatment challenge with significant risks of limb loss as well as complications from decompressive fasciotomy. These data underscore the importance of routine surveillance for LECS. In addition, a thorough knowledge of regional anatomy is essential to avoid technical morbidity.

  10. Correlating nerve conduction studies and clinical outcome measures on carpal tunnel syndrome: lessons from a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, Hans M.; Gerritsen, Annette A. M.; Strijers, Rob L. M.; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2005-01-01

    The reported relationships between nerve conduction studies (NCS) and outcome measures in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are weak to moderate. However, selection of patients may have confounded nonrandomized studies. NCS have potentially great value in selecting patients for a specific treatment and

  11. Lessons from genetics: is it time to revise the therapeutic approach to children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherucci, Francesca; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Provenzano, Aldesia; Murer, Luisa; Giglio, Sabrina; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Primitive nephrotic syndrome is one of the most common glomerular diseases in childhood and represents the clinical manifestation of various pathologic changes in the kidney. In children, nephrotic syndrome is classified based on the initial response to empiric corticosteroid treatment, which is considered as the best predictor of patients' final outcome. The advent of next-generation sequencing technology showed that genetic alterations in structural genes of the podocyte can be recognized in a significant proportion of not only familial or syndromic patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), but also of sporadic cases, raising the question of whether it is time to update current protocols of patient care. In this review, we discuss the implications derived from several studies describing a high prevalence in children with SRNS of pathogenic mutations in a group of genes and their unresponsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy. We propose a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm to reduce the exposure to immunosuppressants in individuals with unresponsive forms of the disease, sparing patients the untoward side effects of prolonged ineffective treatments, and at the same time guaranteeing the optimal immunosuppressive or other new therapy in potentially responsive patients.

  12. Repeated failed non-invasive prenatal testing in a woman with immune thrombocytopenia and antiphospholipid syndrome: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, C Y Y; Tan, W C; Tan, E L; Tan, L K

    2016-12-05

    We present a case of a 37-year-old Chinese woman (gravida 4 para 0) with a history of immune thrombocytopenia and type IIb antiphospholipid syndrome. She was started on 100 mg of aspirin, 20 mg of prednisolone and 20 mg of subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin daily for her fourth pregnancy. She opted for non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy screening but had failed results three times consecutively from insufficient fetal cfDNA initially or high variance in cfDNA counts on redraws. She declined invasive karyotyping. Her pregnancy was complicated by severe pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction at 19+6 weeks of gestation and was terminated. Subsequent fetal karyotyping revealed a normal karyotype of 46XY with no apparent abnormalities. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Using local language syndromic terminology in participatory epidemiology: Lessons for One Health practitioners among the Maasai of Ngorongoro, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queenan, Kevin; Mangesho, Peter; Ole-Neselle, Moses; Karimuribo, Esron; Rweyemamu, Mark; Kock, Richard; Häsler, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    Pastoralists and agro-pastoralists often occupy remote and hostile environments, which lack infrastructure and capacity in human and veterinary healthcare and disease surveillance systems. Participatory epidemiology (PE) and Participatory Disease Surveillance (PDS) are particularly useful in situations of resource scarcity, where conventional diagnostics and surveillance data of disease prevalence may be intermittent or limited. Livestock keepers, when participating in PE studies about health issues, commonly use their local language terms, which are often syndromic and descriptive in nature. Practitioners of PE recommend confirmation of their findings with triangulation including biomedical diagnostic techniques. However, the latter is not practiced in all studies, usually due to time, financial or logistical constraints. A cross sectional study was undertaken with the Maasai of Ngorongoro District, Tanzania. It aimed to identify the terms used to describe the infectious diseases of livestock and humans with the greatest perceived impact on livelihoods. Furthermore, it aimed to characterise the usefulness and limitations of relying on local terminology when conducting PE studies in which diagnoses were not confirmed. Semi-structured interviews were held with 23 small groups, totalling 117 community members within five villages across the district. In addition, informal discussions and field observations were conducted with village elders, district veterinary and medical officers, meat inspectors and livestock field officers. For human conditions including zoonoses, several biomedical terms are now part of the common language. Conversely, livestock conditions are described using local Maasai terms, usually associated with the signs observed by the livestock keeper. Several of these descriptive, syndromic terms are used inconsistently and showed temporal and spatial variations. This study highlights the complexity and ambiguity which may exist in local terminology

  14. Knowledge translation lessons from an audit of Aboriginal Australians with acute coronary syndrome presenting to a regional hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Emma; Hohnen, Harry; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M; Scalley, Benjamin D; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    Translation of evidence into practice by health systems can be slow and incomplete and may disproportionately impact disadvantaged populations. Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death among Aboriginal Australians. Timely access to effective medical care for acute coronary syndrome substantially improves survival. A quality-of-care audit conducted at a regional Western Australian hospital in 2011-2012 compared the Emergency Department management of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal acute coronary syndrome patients. This audit is used as a case study of translating knowledge processes in order to identify the factors that support equity-oriented knowledge translation. In-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of the audit team and further key stakeholders with interest/experience in knowledge translation in the context of Aboriginal health. Interviews were analysed for alignment of the knowledge translation process with the thematic steps outlined in Tugwell's cascade for equity-oriented knowledge translation framework. In preparing the audit, groundwork helped shape management support to ensure receptivity to targeting Aboriginal cardiovascular outcomes. Reporting of audit findings and resulting advocacy were undertaken by the audit team with awareness of the institutional hierarchy, appropriate timing, personal relationships and recognising the importance of tailoring messages to specific audiences. These strategies were also acknowledged as important in the key stakeholder interviews. A follow-up audit documented a general improvement in treatment guideline adherence and a reduction in treatment inequalities for Aboriginal presentations. As well as identifying outcomes such as practice changes, a useful evaluation increases understanding of why and how an intervention worked. Case studies such as this enrich our understanding of the complex human factors, including individual attributes, experiences and relationships and systemic factors

  15. Knowledge translation lessons from an audit of Aboriginal Australians with acute coronary syndrome presenting to a regional hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Haynes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Translation of evidence into practice by health systems can be slow and incomplete and may disproportionately impact disadvantaged populations. Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death among Aboriginal Australians. Timely access to effective medical care for acute coronary syndrome substantially improves survival. A quality-of-care audit conducted at a regional Western Australian hospital in 2011–2012 compared the Emergency Department management of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal acute coronary syndrome patients. This audit is used as a case study of translating knowledge processes in order to identify the factors that support equity-oriented knowledge translation. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of the audit team and further key stakeholders with interest/experience in knowledge translation in the context of Aboriginal health. Interviews were analysed for alignment of the knowledge translation process with the thematic steps outlined in Tugwell’s cascade for equity-oriented knowledge translation framework. Results: In preparing the audit, groundwork helped shape management support to ensure receptivity to targeting Aboriginal cardiovascular outcomes. Reporting of audit findings and resulting advocacy were undertaken by the audit team with awareness of the institutional hierarchy, appropriate timing, personal relationships and recognising the importance of tailoring messages to specific audiences. These strategies were also acknowledged as important in the key stakeholder interviews. A follow-up audit documented a general improvement in treatment guideline adherence and a reduction in treatment inequalities for Aboriginal presentations. Conclusion: As well as identifying outcomes such as practice changes, a useful evaluation increases understanding of why and how an intervention worked. Case studies such as this enrich our understanding of the complex human factors, including

  16. Acute coronary syndromes in patients with pre-existing moderate to severe valvular disease of the heart: lessons from the Euro-Heart Survey of acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasdai, David; Lev, Eli I; Behar, Solomon; Boyko, Valentina; Danchin, Nicholas; Vahanian, Alec; Battler, Alexander

    2003-04-01

    To determine the frequency of pre-existing valvular disease (VD) among patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and to compare the clinical characteristics, clinical course, treatment, and outcomes of ACS patients with and without pre-existing VD. The Euro Heart Survey ACS prospectively enrolled 10,484 ACS patients in 103 hospitals in 25 countries across Europe and the Mediterranean basin. Of the 10,207 patients with data on VD status, 489 (4.8%) had a diagnosis of pre-existing VD: 3.7% of 4339 ST-segment-elevation-ACS patients, 5.2% of 5210 non-ST-segment-elevation-ACS patients, and 10.8% of 658 undetermined-electrocardiogram-ACS patients. Moderate/severe mitral regurgitation had been diagnosed in 54.0% (48.7% without and 5.3% with concomitant mitral stenosis), and moderate/severe aortic stenosis occurred in 31.7% (26.4% without and 5.3% with concomitant aortic regurgitation). Patients with pre-existing VD had worse baseline clinical and demographic characteristics, were more likely to present with heart failure and less likely to have typical angina, and had a more complicated in-hospital course (heart failure, atrial arrhythmias, and renal failure). They were more likely to receive inotropic agents, diuretics, amiodarone, and warfarin, and less likely to receive antiplatelet agents and beta-adrenergic blockers. As compared to patients without VD, the adjusted risk (95% confidence interval) of in-hospital death for VD patients was 1.55 (0.85, 2.80), 1.92 (1.03, 3.59), and 1.77 (0.75, 4.17) for ST-segment-elevation-ACS, non-ST-segment-elevation-ACS, and undetermined-electrocardiogram-ACS, respectively. Patients with ACS and pre-existing VD constitute about 5% of all ACS patients; they have high-risk features and poor prognosis. There is a need to better define their optimal treatment, in order to improve their prognosis.

  17. Skeletal stigmata as keys to access to the composite and ancient Gorlin-Goltz syndrome history: The Egypt, Pompeii and Herculaneum lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo; Sammaria, Giuliano; Manfredini, Marco

    2016-09-10

    There are several genetic diseases with a wide spectrum of congenital bone stigmata in association to cutaneous and visceral benign and malignant neoplasms. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also named nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant systemic disease with almost complete penetrance and high intra-familial phenotypic variability, caused by germline mutations of the gene PTCH1. The syndrome is characterized by unusual skeletal changes and high predisposition to the development of multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts tumors and other visceral tumors. The Gorlin syndrome, clinically defined as distinct syndrome in 1963, existed during Dynastic Egyptian times, as revealed by a costellation of skeletal findings compatible with the syndrome in mummies dating back to 3000years ago and, most likely, in the ancient population of Pompeii. These paleogenetic and historical evidences, together with the clinical and biomolecular modern evidences, confirm the quite benign behavior of the syndrome and the critical value of the multiple and synchronous skeletal anomalies in the recognition of these rare and complex genetic disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Spontaneous cervical intradural disc herniation presenting with Brown-Séquard and Horner's syndrome: lesson learned from a very unique case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudracco, Irene; Grahovac, Gordan; Russo, Vittorio M

    2017-05-01

    Cervical spontaneous intradural disc herniation (IDH) is an extremely rare condition. We describe a unique case of a patient presenting with a Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) and Horner's syndrome (HS). This study aimed to report an unusual case of spontaneous cervical intradural disc herniation that presented with Horner's and Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) and discuss difficulties in preoperative diagnosis and treatment difficulties of intradural cervical disc. Notes and images review, and analysis of the relevant literature. A 45-year old female presented with acute Horner's syndrome and Brown-Séquard syndrome. The magnetic resonance imaging of cervical spine revealed C4-5 disc extrusion with cord compression. The patient underwent urgent decompression through an anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion. Patient fully recovered 6 months after disease onset. We would like to emphasize that prompt and anterior cervical decompression is the treatment of choice, as it directly address the problem and allows dura repair in spontaneous cervical disc herniation.

  19. Lesson Learning at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  20. The diagnostic dilemma of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/hemolytic uremic syndrome in the obstetric triage and emergency department: lessons from 4 tertiary hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Caroline L; Dacus, John; Guzman, Edwin; Dhillon, Pushpinder; Coppage, Kristin; How, Helen; Sibai, Baha

    2009-04-01

    We report a series of occurrences of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)/hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in pregnancy that emphasizes early diagnosis. Fourteen pregnancies with TTP (n = 12) or HUS (n = 2) were studied. Analysis focused on clinical and laboratory findings on examination, initial diagnosis, and treatment. There were 14 pregnancies in 12 patients; 2 cases of TTP were diagnosed as recurrent. Five women were admitted to the emergency department (ED), and 7 patients were admitted to an obstetrics triage. Patients who were evaluated by an obstetrician were treated initially for hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets syndrome/preeclampsia, whereas patients who were seen in the ED had a diagnosis that is commonplace in the ED (panic attack, domestic violence, gastroenteritis). Latency from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis ranged from 1-7 days. Plasmapheresis treatments in early gestation resulted in favorable maternal-neonatal outcome. Maternal and perinatal mortality rates were 25% each. TTP/HUS is a challenging diagnosis in obstetric triage and ED areas. We propose a management scheme that suggests how to triage patients for early diagnosis in pregnancy.

  1. Lessons in Ponapean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC.

    This volume contains 35 beginning Ponapean lessons for native English speakers. Each lesson consists of a dialogue structured around an aspect of Ponapean grammar and substitution exercises designed for drill. Vocabulary is introduced in the substitution exercises. (CLK)

  2. Over-stimulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling by western diet may promote diseases of civilization: lessons learnt from laron syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz Gerd

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 pathway drives an evolutionarily conserved network that regulates lifespan and longevity. Individuals with Laron syndrome who carry mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR gene that lead to severe congenital IGF-1 deficiency with decreased insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS exhibit reduced prevalence rates of acne, diabetes and cancer. Western diet with high intake of hyperglycemic carbohydrates and insulinotropic dairy over-stimulates IIS. The reduction of IIS in Laron subjects unmasks the potential role of persistent hyperactive IIS mediated by Western diet in the development of diseases of civilization and offers a rational perspective for dietary adjustments with less insulinotropic diets like the Paleolithic diet.

  3. Over-stimulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling by western diet may promote diseases of civilization: lessons learnt from laron syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) pathway drives an evolutionarily conserved network that regulates lifespan and longevity. Individuals with Laron syndrome who carry mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene that lead to severe congenital IGF-1 deficiency with decreased insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) exhibit reduced prevalence rates of acne, diabetes and cancer. Western diet with high intake of hyperglycemic carbohydrates and insulinotropic dairy over-stimulates IIS. The reduction of IIS in Laron subjects unmasks the potential role of persistent hyperactive IIS mediated by Western diet in the development of diseases of civilization and offers a rational perspective for dietary adjustments with less insulinotropic diets like the Paleolithic diet. PMID:21699736

  4. Over-stimulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling by western diet may promote diseases of civilization: lessons learnt from laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C; John, Swen Malte; Schmitz, Gerd

    2011-06-24

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) pathway drives an evolutionarily conserved network that regulates lifespan and longevity. Individuals with Laron syndrome who carry mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene that lead to severe congenital IGF-1 deficiency with decreased insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) exhibit reduced prevalence rates of acne, diabetes and cancer. Western diet with high intake of hyperglycemic carbohydrates and insulinotropic dairy over-stimulates IIS. The reduction of IIS in Laron subjects unmasks the potential role of persistent hyperactive IIS mediated by Western diet in the development of diseases of civilization and offers a rational perspective for dietary adjustments with less insulinotropic diets like the Paleolithic diet.

  5. The Knitting Lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pamela

    1987-01-01

    Based on Jean-Francois Millet's 1869 painting, "The Knitting Lesson," this lesson's goal is to introduce students in grades seven through nine to genre (everyday life) painting the nineteenth century. The lesson is also designed to show that some aspects of genre may be timeless. (BSR)

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Interferon-γ and Its Antagonists in Autoinflammation: Lessons from Murine Models of Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Macrophage Activation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneleen Avau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ (IFN-γ affects immune responses in a complex fashion. Its immunostimulatory actions, such as macrophage activation and induction of T helper 1-type responsiveness, are widely acknowledged, however, as documented by a large body of literature, IFN-γ has also the potential to temper inflammatory processes via other pathways. In autoimmune and autoinflammatory disorders, IFN-γ can either play a disease-enforcing role or act as protective agent, depending on the nature of the disease. In animal models of any particular autoimmune disease, certain changes in the induction procedure can reverse the net outcome of introduction or ablation of IFN-γ. Here, we review the role of endogenous IFN-γ in inflammatory disorders and related murine models, with a focus on systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS. In particular, we discuss our recent findings in a mouse model of sJIA, in which endogenous IFN-γ acts as a regulatory agent, and compare with results from mouse models of MAS. Also, we elaborate on the complexity in the activity of IFN-γ and the resulting difficulty of predicting its value or that of its antagonists as treatment option.

  7. A multi-function public health surveillance system and the lessons learned in its development: the Alberta Real Time Syndromic Surveillance Net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shihe; Blair, Corinne; Brown, Angela; Gabos, Stephan; Honish, Lance; Hughes, Trina; Jaipaul, Joy; Johnson, Marcia; Lo, Eric; Lubchenko, Anna; Mashinter, Laura; Meurer, David P; Nardelli, Vanessa; Predy, Gerry; Shewchuk, Liz; Sosin, Daniel; Wicentowich, Bryan; Talbot, James

    2010-01-01

    We describe a centralized automated multi-function detection and reporting system for public health surveillance--the Alberta Real Time Syndromic Surveillance Net (ARTSSN). This improves upon traditional paper-based systems which are often fragmented, limited by incomplete data collection and inadequate analytical capacity, and incapable of providing timely information for public health action. ARTSSN concurrently analyzes multiple electronic data sources in real time to describe results in tables, charts and maps. Detected anomalies are immediately disseminated via alerts to decision-makers for action. ARTSSN provides richly integrated information on a variety of health conditions for early detection of and prompt action on abnormal events such as clusters, outbreaks and trends. Examples of such health conditions include chronic and communicable disease, injury and environment-mediated adverse incidents. Key advantages of ARTSSN over traditional paper-based methods are its timeliness, comprehensiveness and automation. Public health surveillance of communicable disease, injury, environmental hazard exposure and chronic disease now occurs in a single system in real time year round. Examples are given to demonstrate the public health value of this system, particularly during Pandemic (H1N1) 2009.

  8. Lessons learned bulletin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    During the past four years, the Department of Energy -- Savannah River Operations Office and the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program completed various activities ranging from waste site investigations to closure and post closure projects. Critiques for lessons learned regarding project activities are performed at the completion of each project milestone, and this critique interval allows for frequent recognition of lessons learned. In addition to project related lessons learned, ER also performs lessons learned critiques. T'he Savannah River Site (SRS) also obtains lessons learned information from general industry, commercial nuclear industry, naval nuclear programs, and other DOE sites within the complex. Procedures are approved to administer the lessons learned program, and a database is available to catalog applicable lessons learned regarding environmental remediation, restoration, and administrative activities. ER will continue to use this database as a source of information available to SRS personnel

  9. NASA Engineering Network Lessons Learned

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Lessons Learned system provides access to official, reviewed lessons learned from NASA programs and projects. These lessons have been made available to the...

  10. Great Expectations. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Kelley

    Based on Charles Dickens' novel "Great Expectations," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand the differences between totalitarianism and democracy; and a that a writer of a story considers theme, plot, characters, setting, and point of view. The main activity of the lesson involves students working in groups to…

  11. Soybean Production Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Keith R.

    These lesson plans for teaching soybean production in a secondary or postsecondary vocational agriculture class are organized in nine units and cover the following topics: raising soybeans, optimum tillage, fertilizer and lime, seed selection, pest management, planting, troubleshooting, double cropping, and harvesting. Each lesson plan contains…

  12. Lesson study i Danmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Der beskrives et japansk lesson study forløb, og det diskuteres i hvilket omfang, de gode japanske erfaringer kan overføres til dansk matematikundervisning.......Der beskrives et japansk lesson study forløb, og det diskuteres i hvilket omfang, de gode japanske erfaringer kan overføres til dansk matematikundervisning....

  13. Don Quixote. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooks, Kristen

    Based on Miguel de Cervantes' novel "Don Quixote," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Quixote's misperceptions are understandable; writers often describe one object to sound as if it were something else; and metaphors help readers see with new eyes. The main activity of the lesson involves students…

  14. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  15. Greige cotton comber noils for sustainable nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    To increase utilization of cotton in value-added nonwoven products, a study was conducted to examine the feasibility of utilizing cotton textile processing/combing bye-product known as griege cotton comber noils. The study was conducted on a commercial-grade, textile-cum-nonwovens pilot plant and ha...

  16. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  17. Breathing Life into Engineering: A Lesson Study Life Science Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Maria; Yang, Li-Ling; Briggs, May; Hession, Alicia; Koussa, Anita; Wagoner, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A fifth grade life science lesson was implemented through a lesson study approach in two fifth grade classrooms. The research lesson was designed by a team of four elementary school teachers with the goal of emphasizing engineering practices consistent with the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) (Achieve Inc. 2013). The fifth…

  18. Lessons for Teaching Art Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Terry, Ed.; Clark, Gilbert, Ed.

    This collection of lessons is meant to be a practical guide to help teachers engage children in art criticism. The lessons generally follow a similar format. Most suggest an age group but may be modified for use with younger or older students. Several authors suggest variations and extensions for lessons that include studio activities. A broad…

  19. The lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kintner, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    What happened at TMI-2 and to the United States Nuclear Industry since the accident to that plant is recounted. Four main points are made: commercial use of nuclear power evolved so rapidly that neither industry nor society generally, was able to assimilate this dramatically new technology fast enough; accidents like TMI-2, and now, the much more damaging Chernobyl, are a part of the price paid; we must take every possible step so that the risks from nuclear power are reduced by learning from accidents and putting that knowledge into practice; the lessons learned and applied after TMI-2 have tended to be the readily achievable, shorter term ones. The most drastic changes will take more time. The organizational and institutional lessons are considered first, then the technical ones. The sequence and status of the TMI-2 cleanup is discussed. The design lessons are summarized. (author)

  20. Rethinking lessons learned processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttler, T.; Lukosch, S.G.; Kolfschoten, G.L.; Verbraeck, A.

    2012-01-01

    Lessons learned are one way to retain experience and knowledge in project-based organizations, helping them to prevent reinventin,g the wheel or to repeat past mistakes. However, there are several challenges that make these lessonts learned processes a challenging endeavor. These include capturing

  1. War Literature. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Alisa

    Based on Stephen Crane's poems about war and his novel "The Red Badge of Courage," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Crane examined war-related themes in prose and poetry; that close study of a poem for oral presentation helps readers see meaning or techniques not noted earlier; and that not all readers…

  2. Recycling Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Environmental Resources, Harrisburg.

    This document contains lesson plans about recycling for teachers in grades K-12. Titles include: (1) "Waste--Where Does It Come From? Where Does It Go?" (2) "Litter Detectives," (3) "Classroom Paper Recycling," (4) "Recycling Survey," (5) "Disposal and Recycling Costs," (6) "Composting…

  3. From a writing lesson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Mafra Ney Reinhardt

    Full Text Available Beginning with Jacques Derrida's interpolation of the celebrated chapter A Writing Lesson by Claude Lévi-Strauss's, and James Clifford critique of the ethnographic text, the authors of this essay reflect on the written dimension of the ethnographic métier.

  4. DSCOVR Contamination Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    The Triana observatory was built at NASA GSFC in the late 1990's, then placed into storage. After approximately ten years it was removed from storage and repurposed as the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR). This presentation outlines the contamination control program lessons learned during the integration, test and launch of DSCOVR.

  5. Recycling Lesson Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaz, Abeer Ali

    2013-01-01

    This lesson plan designed for grade 2 students has the goal of teaching students about the environmental practice of recycling. Children will learn language words related to recycling such as: "we can recycle"/"we can't recycle" and how to avoid littering with such words as: "recycle paper" and/or "don't throw…

  6. Online Conferencing: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lyndsay

    This guide summarizes lessons learned from the author's experience of organizing and moderating five non-pedagogical online conferences that use World Wide Web-based conferencing software, whether synchronous or asynchronous. Seven sections cover the following topics: (1) the pros and cons of online conferencing; (2) setting objectives; (3)…

  7. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  8. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  9. Hunter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in girls. There's no cure for Hunter syndrome. Treatment of Hunter syndrome involves management of symptoms and complications. Symptoms Hunter syndrome is one type of a group of inherited metabolic disorders called mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs), and Hunter syndrome is ...

  10. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes...

  11. Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome in a patient with self-neglect associated with severe depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Lesson Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder resulting from thiamine deficiency and commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, but we describe the first case report resulting from self-neglect associated with depression. PMID:25057374

  12. Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome in a patient with self-neglect associated with severe depression

    OpenAIRE

    Cocksedge, Karen A; Flynn, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Lesson Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder resulting from thiamine deficiency and commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, but we describe the first case report resulting from self-neglect associated with depression.

  13. Lessons from Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazari Alves, R.

    2000-01-01

    The lessons learned from the radiological accident of Goiania in 1987 derived from the observations from the Regulatory Agency which was in charge of the decontamination tasks may be consolidated into four classes: Preventive Actions, characterised as those that aim to minimise the probability of occurrence of a radiological accident; Minimisation of time between the moment of the accident occurrence and the beginning of intervention, in case a radiological accident does occur, despite all preventive measures; Intervention, which is correlated to the type of installation, its geographical location, the social classes involved and their contamination vectors; and Follow up, for which well established rules to allow continuing monitoring of the victims and rebuilding of homes are necessary. The greatest lesson of all was the need for integration of the professionals involved, from all organizations. (author)

  14. Design for Life. Abortion. A Student's Lesson Plan [and] A Teacher's Lesson Plan [and] A Lawyer's Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Estelle; And Others

    One of a series of secondary level teaching units presenting case studies with pro and con analyses of particular legal problems, the document consists of a student's lesson plan, a teacher's lesson plan, and a lawyer's lesson plan for a unit on abortion. The lessons are designed to expose students to the Supreme Court's decision concerning…

  15. Can You Haiku? [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    In this lesson plan, students learn the rules and conventions of haiku, study examples by Japanese masters, and create haiku of their own. Its 4 lessons seek to help students be able to: (1) describe the traditional rules and conventions of haiku; (2) interpret examples of haiku; (3) characterize the image-evoking power of haiku; (4) develop a…

  16. Lesson Study and History Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Anne-Lise; Kesler Lund, Alisa

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the experiences of a group of fifth-grade teachers who used lesson study, a teacher-driven form of professional development, to teach history in a project supported by a Teaching American History Grant. The project addressed the following questions: What does a lesson study cycle for history education look like? What…

  17. Bead Game Simulation. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Ken

    This lesson plan offers students the opportunity to participate in the three basic economic systems (market, command, and tradition). By working in each of the systems, students will internalize the fundamental values present in each system and will gain insights into the basic advantages and disadvantages of each system. The lesson plan provides…

  18. Simple and Practical Efficiency Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpin, Van

    2018-01-01

    The derivation of conditions necessary for Pareto efficient production and exchange is a lesson frequently showcased in microeconomic theory textbooks. Traditional delivery of this lesson is, however, limited in its scope of application and can be unnecessarily convoluted. The author shows that the universe of application is greatly expanded and a…

  19. Keiko, Killer Whale. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    This lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Keiko, the killer whale, lived for a long time in an aquarium and had to be taught to live independently; and that computer users can get updates on how Keiko is doing. The main activity of the lesson involves middle school students working in small groups to produce a…

  20. Masterwork Art Lesson: Kandinsky Watercolors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LiPira, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used with sixth-grade students which also can be used with other grade levels. Explains that the artwork of Wassily Kandinsky served as inspiration for this lesson. Explains that the students learned about abstract art and used watercolors to create their own paintings in the style of Kandinsky. (CMK)

  1. The history of a lesson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Vedby

    2003-01-01

    and emphasises the need to study the history of lessons rather than the lessons of history. This approach shows that Munich is the end point of a constitutive history that begins in the failure of the Versailles treaty to create a durable European order following the First World War. The Munich lesson is thus...... one element of the lesson of Versailles, which is a praxeology that defines how the West is to make peace, and against whom peace must be defended. The lesson of Versailles has been, at least in part, constitutive of the outbreak of the Cold War, and it continues to define the Western conception...... of what defines peace and security even in the 'war against terrorism'....

  2. Lesson Study: Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Richard; Weinhardt, Felix; Wyness, Gill; Rolfe, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Lesson Study is a popular approach to teacher professional development used widely in Japan. It involves a small group of teachers co-planning a series of lessons based on a shared learning goal for the pupils, with one teacher leading the co-constructed lesson and their colleagues invited to observe pupil learning in the lesson. The team then…

  3. Safeguards Culture: Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2009-05-27

    Abstract: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper builds on that theoretical discussion to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Paper: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop on “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges,” in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper, coauthored by Karyn R. Durbin and Andrew Van Duzer, described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper updates that theoretical discussion, and seeks to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Implicit in this discussion is an understanding that improving a culture is not an end in itself, but is one method of improving the underlying discipline, that is safety, security, or safeguards. Culture can be defined as a way of life, or general customs and beliefs of a particular group of people at a particular time. There are internationally accepted definitions of safety culture and nuclear security culture. As yet, there is no official agreed upon definition of safeguards culture. At the end of the paper I will propose my definition. At the Santa Fe Workshop the summary by the Co-Chairs of Working Group 1, “The Further Evolution of Safeguards,” noted: “It is clear that ‘safeguards culture

  4. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  5. WIEDEMANN SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    BILATERAL BENIGN HAEMORRHAGIC ADRENAL CYSTS IN BECKWITH - WIEDEMANN. SYNDROME: CASE REPORT. P. ANOOP and M. A. ANJAY. SUMMARY. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is the most common overgrowth malformation syndrome. The classical features include macrosomia, macroglossia, ...

  6. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  7. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  8. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Piriformis Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Piriformis syndrome ...

  9. HYPNOTEACHING IN HISTORY LESSON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Budianto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Hypnoteaching in History Lesson. Historical learning is a science that can’t be separated in educating the younger generation. Through this lesson, teachers in secondary schools can provide the foundation of nationality through important events in the study of the social sciences. Many of the problems that occur in learning history, such as the boring and make sleepy. Everyone must have heard the term hypnosis, hypnotism, or hypnotherapy. Each person must also have a different view or understanding when hearing these terms. Hypnoteaching is one of the learning methods by using the art of communicating to influence learners. Hypnoteaching is a combination of five teaching-learning methods such as quantum learning, accelerate learning, power teaching, neuro-linguistic programming (NLP and hypnosis. Hypnoteaching can be done using informal hypnosis as well as formal hypnosis. Informal hypnosis is also called indirect hypnosis ie teachers can naturally make the Critical Area learners become no longer critical, through a very persuasive communication pattern. Here's what the teacher can do in Informal hypnosis: (1 get attention; (2 establishing Themes; (3 presenting the structure and regulations; (4 building relationships. If the learners are already comfortable and interested, the next step is to do a formal hypnosis before the lesson begins. Here are the steps that must be done: (1 Induction; (2 Deepening; (3 Deep level test; (4 Suggestion, and; (5 Termination.   Keywords: Historical learning, hypnoteaching, hypnosis, hypnotism, hypnotherapy, history Abstrak: Hipnoteaching dalam Pembelajaran Sejarah. Pelajaran sejarah tidak bisa dihilangkan dalam mendidik para generasi muda. Melalui pembelajaran ini, guru pada sekolah menengah pertama dapat memberikan pondasi rasa nasionalisme melalui peristiwa peristiwa penting dalam pelajaran ilmu pengetahuan social. Masalah yang sering muncul pada pembelajaran ini adalah kebosanan siswa dan

  10. Lessons learned from VISIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantin, E.; Doucet, C.; Käufl, H. U.; Lagage, P. O.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Sterzik, M.

    2008-07-01

    VISIR is the VLT mid-infrared (mid-IR) Imager and Spectrometer. Since 2004, it provides data at high spatial and spectral resolutions in the N (8-13 μm) and Q (16-24 μm) atmospheric windows. VISIR observations have provided unique constraints on targets such as central regions of nearby galaxies, or protoplanetary disks. We review here VISIR Imager and Spectrometer characteristics, emphasizing on some current limitations because of various undesirable effects. Its successor on an ELT will provide data with a unique sharpness (0.05") and sensitivity (35 μJy source detectable in 1 hour at 10 σ level), thus allowing a characterization of exoplanetary disks and inner exoplanets with an unprecedent precision. At the light of VISIR experience, we discuss how the lessons learned from VISIR can be turned to good account for designing and operating the future mid-IR instrument on the European ELT.

  11. Lessons Learned from FUSRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Darina [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Carpenter, Cliff [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Miller, Michele [Navarro Research and Engineering

    2016-03-06

    The US DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the long-term steward for 90 sites remediated under numerous regulatory regimes including the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites. In addition, LM holds considerable historical information, gathered in the 1970s, to determine site eligibility for remediation under FUSRAP. To date, 29 FUSRAP sites are in LM’s inventory of sites for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M), and 25 are with the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for remediation or in the process of being transitioned to LM. It is forecasted that 13 FUSRAP sites will transfer from the USACE to LM over the next 10 years; however, the timing of the transfers is strongly dependent upon federal funding of the ongoing remedial actions. Historically, FUSRAP sites were generally cleaned up for “unrestricted” industrial use or remediated to the “cleanup standards” at that time, and their use remained unchanged. Today, these sites as well as the adjacent properties are now changing or envisioned to have changes in land use, typically from industrial to commercial or residential uses. The implication of land-use change affects DOE’s LTS&M responsibility for the sites under LM stewardship as well as the planning for the additional sites scheduled to transition in time. Coinciding with land-use changes at or near FUSRAP sites is an increased community awareness of these sites. As property development increases near FUSRAP sites, the general public and interested stakeholders regularly inquire about the sufficiency of cleanups that impact their neighborhoods and communities. LM has used this experience to address a series of lessons learned to improve our program management in light of the changing conditions of our sites. We describe these lessons learned as (1) improved stakeholder relations, (2) enhanced LTS&M requirements for the sites, and (3) greater involvement in the transition process.

  12. Lesson "Balance in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanova, V.

    2012-04-01

    Lesson "Balance in Nature" This simulation game-lesson (Balance in Nature) gives an opportunity for the students to show creativity, work independently, and to create models and ideas. It creates future-oriented thought connected to their experience, allowing them to propose solutions for global problems and personal responsibility for their activities. The class is divided in two teams. Each team chooses questions. 1. Question: Pollution in the environment. 2. Question: Care for nature and climate. The teams work on the chosen tasks. They make drafts, notes and formulate their solutions on small pieces of paper, explaining the impact on nature and society. They express their points of view using many different opinions. This generates alternative thoughts and results in creative solutions. With the new knowledge and positive behaviour defined, everybody realizes that they can do something positive towards nature and climate problems and the importance of individuals for solving global problems is evident. Our main goal is to recover the ecological balance, and everybody explains his or her own well-grounded opinions. In this work process the students obtain knowledge, skills and more responsible behaviour. This process, based on his or her own experience, dialogue and teamwork, helps the participant's self-development. Making the model "human↔ nature" expresses how human activities impact the natural Earth and how these impacts in turn affect society. Taking personal responsibility, we can reduce global warming and help the Earth. By helping nature we help ourselves. Teacher: Veselina Boycheva-Chapanova " Saint Patriarch Evtimii" Scholl Str. "Ivan Vazov"-19 Plovdiv Bulgaria

  13. Lessons learned in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodenough, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper reviews aspects of the history of radiology with the goal of identifying lessons learned, particularly in the area of radiological protection of the patient in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. It is pointed out that since the days of Roentgen there has been a need not only to control and quantify the amount of radiation reaching the patient but also to optimize the imaging process to offer the greatest diagnostic benefit within allowable levels of patient dose. To this end, in diagnostic radiology, one finds the development of better films, X rays tubes, grids, screens and processing techniques, while in fluoroscopy, one sees the increased luminance of calcium tungstate. In interventional radiology, one finds an improvement in catheterization techniques and contrast agents. In nuclear medicine, the development of tracer techniques into modern cameras and isotopes such as technetium can be followed. In radiotherapy, one sees the early superficial X rays and radium sources gradually replaced with radon seeds, supervoltage, 60 Co and today's linear accelerators. Along with the incredible advances in imaging and therapeutic technologies comes the growing realization of the potential danger of radiation and the need to protect the patient (as well as physicians, ancillary personnel and the general population) from unnecessary radiation. The important lesson learned is that we must walk a tightrope, balancing the benefits and risks of any technology utilizing radiation to produce the greatest benefits at the lowest acceptable risk. The alternative techniques using non-ionizing radiation will have to be considered as part of the general armamentarium for medical imaging whenever radiation consequences are unacceptable. (author)

  14. Lessons learned from accident investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga-Bello, P.; Croft, J.R.; Glenn, J.

    1998-01-01

    Accidents in three main practices - medical applications, industrial radiography and industrial irradiators - are used to illustrate some common causes of accidents and the main lessons to be learned from them. A brief description of some of these accidents is given. Lessons learned from the accidents described are approached bearing in mind: safety culture, quality assurance, human factors, good engineering practice, defence in depth, security of sources, safety assessment and monitoring and verification compliance. (author)

  15. The NATO Lessons Learned Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Business, 1994, ISBN : 9780385260954 . 15 hww.hq.nato.int/NOS/en/library/index.asp on NS WAN. 34 References A. NATO Lessons Learned Policy, SG(2008...from experience, Chandos Publishing, 1st Edition, 2010, ISBN 978843345879. C. Bi-SC Directive 80-6 Lessons Learned, 23 July 2007, NATO/PfP...Adrian; Research Methods for Business Students Fourth Edition, Prentice Hall, 2007. ISBN 9780273701484. 35 Annex A LL Glossary The following

  16. Mitochondria in complex psychiatric disorders: Lessons from mouse models of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: Hemizygous deletion of several mitochondrial genes in the 22q11.2 genomic region can lead to symptoms associated with neuropsychiatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraju, Prakash; Zakharenko, Stanislav S

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondrial ATP synthesis, calcium buffering, and trafficking affect neuronal function and survival. Several genes implicated in mitochondrial functions map within the genomic region associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), which is a key genetic cause of neuropsychiatric diseases. Although neuropsychiatric diseases impose a serious health and economic burden, their etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown because of the dearth of valid animal models and the challenges in investigating the pathophysiology in neuronal circuits. Mouse models of 22q11DS are becoming valid tools for studying human psychiatric diseases, because they have hemizygous deletions of the genes that are deleted in patients and exhibit neuronal and behavioral abnormalities consistent with neuropsychiatric disease. The deletion of some 22q11DS genes implicated in mitochondrial function leads to abnormal neuronal and synaptic function. Herein, we summarize recent findings on mitochondrial dysfunction in 22q11DS and extend those findings to the larger context of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric diseases. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Music and Anxiety in Williams Syndrome: A Harmonious or Discordant Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.; Rosner, Beth A.; Ly, Tran; Sagun, Jaclyn

    2005-01-01

    In this two-part study, we assessed musical involvements in two samples of persons with Williams syndrome compared to others with mental retardation and also related musicality to anxiety and fears in Study 2. Relative to others with mental retardation, those with Williams syndrome were more likely to take music lessons, play an instrument, and…

  18. lessons and challenges from software quality assessment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    We discussed these lessons and challenges across two measurable characteristics namely quality of design (life cycle ... KEYWORDS: Software, Software Quality ,Quality Standard, Characteristics, Assessment, Challanges, lessons. 1. ... F. Bakpo, Department of Computer Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria ...

  19. Supporting teachers' technology integration in lesson plans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Noortje

    2017-01-01

    Lesson planning offers rich opportunities for teachers to consider and implement technology in the classroom. This dissertation investigated the design and effectiveness of supplementary information to assist pre-service teachers during the lesson planning process. Based on the Technological,

  20. Patient safety: lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagian, James P.

    2006-01-01

    The traditional approach to patient safety in health care has ranged from reticence to outward denial of serious flaws. This undermines the otherwise remarkable advances in technology and information that have characterized the specialty of medical practice. In addition, lessons learned in industries outside health care, such as in aviation, provide opportunities for improvements that successfully reduce mishaps and errors while maintaining a standard of excellence. This is precisely the call in medicine prompted by the 1999 Institute of Medicine report ''To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System.'' However, to effect these changes, key components of a successful safety system must include: (1) communication, (2) a shift from a posture of reliance on human infallibility (hence ''shame and blame'') to checklists that recognize the contribution of the system and account for human limitations, and (3) a cultivation of non-punitive open and/or de-identified/anonymous reporting of safety concerns, including close calls, in addition to adverse events. (orig.)

  1. Lessons from independence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptfuhrer, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    The recent history of Oryx provides invaluable lessons for those who plan future energy strategies, relates the author of this paper. When Oryx became an independent oil and gas company, its reserves were declining, its stock was selling below asset values, and the price of oil seemed stuck below $15 per barrel. The message from Oryx management to Oryx employees was: We are in charge of our own destiny. We are about to create our own future. Oryx had developed a new, positive corporate culture and the corporate credit required for growth. This paper points to two basic principles that have guided the metamorphosis in Oryx's performance. The first objective was to improve operational efficiency and to identify the right performance indicators to measure this improvement. It states that the most critical performance indicator for an exploration and production company must be replacement and expansion of reserves at a competitive replacement cost. Oryx has cut its finding costs from $12 to $5 per barrel, while the BP acquisition provided proven reserves at a cost of only $4 per barrel. Another performance indicator measures Oryx's standing in the financial markets

  2. Lessons from the Trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubchenco, J.

    2006-12-01

    One of the most important roles of science is to inform the discussions and decisions of individuals and institutions. In a world that is changing rapidly, information is urgently needed to help citizens and leaders understand what's happening, what's causing changes, what the implications are and what are the likely consequences of various options. Most everyone agrees that decisions should be informed (not dictated) by scientific information, but achieving that goal has proven a challenge. Decision-makers need to have access to scientific information that is understandable, relevant, useable, current and credible. However, the science is complex, nuanced and difficult to communicate simply. Most scientists are ill equipped to speak in language that is non-technical. Many academic scientists are wary of talking to the press. Academia does not generally reward time spent doing outreach. As a consequence, others step into the breach and communicate their version of `the science.' All too often this means that vested interests spin, distort or cherry-pick information. The result is that decisions are made without good scientific knowledge and science is seen increasingly as a weapon, not as useful knowledge. The presentation will focus on how one program, the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program is training academic environmental scientists to be better communicators of their science to non-scientists. Lessons learned and suggestions for revolutionizing the communication of scientific information will be offered.

  3. Patient safety: lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagian, James P. [National Center for Patient Safety, Department of Veterans Affairs, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The traditional approach to patient safety in health care has ranged from reticence to outward denial of serious flaws. This undermines the otherwise remarkable advances in technology and information that have characterized the specialty of medical practice. In addition, lessons learned in industries outside health care, such as in aviation, provide opportunities for improvements that successfully reduce mishaps and errors while maintaining a standard of excellence. This is precisely the call in medicine prompted by the 1999 Institute of Medicine report ''To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System.'' However, to effect these changes, key components of a successful safety system must include: (1) communication, (2) a shift from a posture of reliance on human infallibility (hence ''shame and blame'') to checklists that recognize the contribution of the system and account for human limitations, and (3) a cultivation of non-punitive open and/or de-identified/anonymous reporting of safety concerns, including close calls, in addition to adverse events. (orig.)

  4. Constellation Program Lessons Learned. Volume 2; Detailed Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer; Neubek, Deborah J.; Thomas, L. Dale

    2011-01-01

    These lessons learned are part of a suite of hardware, software, test results, designs, knowledge base, and documentation that comprises the legacy of the Constellation Program. The context, summary information, and lessons learned are presented in a factual format, as known and described at the time. While our opinions might be discernable in the context, we have avoided all but factually sustainable statements. Statements should not be viewed as being either positive or negative; their value lies in what we did and what we learned that is worthy of passing on. The lessons include both "dos" and "don ts." In many cases, one person s "do" can be viewed as another person s "don t"; therefore, we have attempted to capture both perspectives when applicable and useful. While Volume I summarizes the views of those who managed the program, this Volume II encompasses the views at the working level, describing how the program challenges manifested in day-to-day activities. Here we see themes that were perhaps hinted at, but not completely addressed, in Volume I: unintended consequences of policies that worked well at higher levels but lacked proper implementation at the working level; long-term effects of the "generation gap" in human space flight development, the need to demonstrate early successes at the expense of thorough planning, and the consequences of problems and challenges not yet addressed because other problems and challenges were more immediate or manifest. Not all lessons learned have the benefit of being operationally vetted, since the program was cancelled shortly after Preliminary Design Review. We avoid making statements about operational consequences (with the exception of testing and test flights that did occur), but we do attempt to provide insight into how operational thinking influenced design and testing. The lessons have been formatted with a description, along with supporting information, a succinct statement of the lesson learned, and

  5. Psychological Aspects of Aging. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Barbara

    This lesson plan is designed for a 50-minute class to teach adult caretakers of the aged about the psychological aspects of aging. The lesson is part of a course for caregivers in residential facilities and in home care. The lesson plan contains references, a list of equipment needed, objectives, information on how to set up the classroom, and the…

  6. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, R.

    2012-07-12

    The purpose of lessons learned is to identify insight gained during a project – successes or failures – that can be applied on future projects. Lessons learned can contribute to the overall success of a project by building on approaches that have worked well and avoiding previous mistakes. Below are examples of lessons learned during ERDF’s ARRA-funded expansion project.

  7. What Happens at the Lesson Start?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloviita, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Transitional periods, such as lesson starts, are necessary steps from one activity to another, but they also compete with time for actual learning. The aim of the present study was to replicate a previous pilot study on lesson starts and explore possible disturbances. In total, 130 lesson starts in Finnish basic education in grades 1-9 were…

  8. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood cells, and the cells have a specific mutation in their DNA. Myelodysplastic syndrome with excess blasts — ... Chemicals linked to myelodysplastic syndromes include tobacco smoke, pesticides and industrial chemicals, such as benzene. Exposure to ...

  9. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and supports a broad range of research on neurogenetic disorders, including Moebius syndrome. The goals of these ... and supports a broad range of research on neurogenetic disorders, including Moebius syndrome. The goals of these ...

  10. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan) to look for two characteristics of Pendred syndrome. One characteristic might be a cochlea with too few turns. ... Inner Ear Credit: NIH Medical Arts A second characteristic of Pendred syndrome is an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (see figure). The ...

  11. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and ...

  12. Ohtahara Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but be profoundly handicapped. As they grow, some children will progress into other epileptic disorders such as West syndrome and Lennox-Gestaut syndrome. What research is being done? The NINDS conducts and supports an extensive research program on seizures ...

  13. Gardner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrado Junior, C.W.; Bresser, A.; Cerri, G.G.; Habr-Gama, A.; Pinotti, H.W.; Magalhaes, A.

    1988-01-01

    A case of familiar poliposis of colon related to a right mandibular osteoma is reported (this association is usually called Gardner's syndrome). Radiologic pictures ae shown and some commentaries about this syndrome concerning the treatment are made. (author) [pt

  14. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete X ... work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  15. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  16. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  17. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that ... your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  18. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  19. Piriformis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudosciatica; Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... Sciatica is the main symptom of piriformis syndrome. Other symptoms include: Tenderness or a dull ache in ...

  20. Dressler's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome Overview Dressler's syndrome is a type of pericarditis — inflammation of the sac surrounding the heart (pericardium). ... reducing its ability to pump blood efficiently. Constrictive pericarditis. Recurring or chronic inflammation can cause the pericardium ...

  1. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ...

  2. [Capgras syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoverro Fortuny, O; Sierra Acín, A C

    2001-01-01

    The authors report a case of Capgras' syndrome in a 16-years-old child, who had been hospitalized for psychotic disorder. A review of the literature is performed. Most authors state that Capgras' syndrome would represent a symptom of underlying medical o functional disorders, although the term syndrome is used. The main etiopathogenic hypothesis of this syndrome are put forward (psychodynamic, disconnection, neuropsychological and medical).

  3. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  4. Lessons in Contingent, Recursive Humility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagle, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author argues that critical work in teacher education should begin with teacher educators turning a critical eye on their own practices. The author uses Lesko's conception of contingent, recursive growth and change to analyze a lesson he observed as part of a phenomenological study aimed at understanding more about what it is…

  5. For Sale: Your Lesson Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The last several years has seen an increasingly popular trend of teachers buying and selling their lesson plans and other self-created classroom materials in online marketplaces. The leader in this space is a website called Teachers Pay Teachers, which boasts 3.8 million active users. In this article, the author examines why these sites became…

  6. Charismatic Leaders: A Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Robert W.

    1983-01-01

    Focusing upon Franklin D. Roosevelt and Adolf Hitler, these lessons for high school students in U.S. or world history courses deal with what charismatic leadership is, what circumstances and personality factors generate charismatic movements, and the role, results, and dangers of charismatic leadership. (RM)

  7. Field observations and lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  8. "Pride and Prejudice". [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Alisa

    Based on Jane Austen's novel "Pride and Prejudice," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that classics are those pieces of literature that continue to be popular long after they were written; classics tend to have universal themes; and Austen's writing has been updated and dramatized and, most likely, will…

  9. Lessons for Psychometrics from Thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choppin, Bruce

    1985-01-01

    Preparing this article posthumously from Choppin's presentation notes, the author used the historical development of thermometry to suggest some lessons for educational measurement: (1) mathematical models are important; (2) models can be useful long before their underlying processes are understood; and (3) since there are no true models, there…

  10. Multimedia Principle in Teaching Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari Jabbour, Khayrazad

    2012-01-01

    Multimedia learning principle occurs when we create mental representations from combining text and relevant graphics into lessons. This article discusses the learning advantages that result from adding multimedia learning principle into instructions; and how to select graphics that support learning. There is a balance that instructional designers…

  11. The Revolutionary War. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchberg, Wendy

    Based on James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier's novel "My Brother Sam Is Dead," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that one way to learn about the past is to read historical novels; and that some people take one side or another in a war or other conflict, and some find themselves caught in the…

  12. Salem Witch Trials. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Lara

    Based on Arthur Miller' play "The Crucible," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that in 17th-century New England, people were persecuted for allegedly practicing witchcraft; students of this period have looked into the allegations and offer alternatives to witchcraft to explain the people's behavior; and…

  13. Basic safety principles: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erp, J.B. van

    1997-01-01

    The presentation reviews the following issues: basic safety principles and lessons learned; some conclusions from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; some recommendations from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; conclusions and recommendations from the Rogovin report on the accident on TMI; instrumentation deficiencies (from Rogovin report)

  14. The Great Gatsby. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelasko, Ken

    Based on F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel "The Great Gatsby," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that adapting part of a novel into a dramatic reading makes students more intimate with the author's intentions and craft; and that a part of a novel may lend itself to various oral interpretations. The main activity…

  15. Gallery of ESOL Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literacy Assistance Center, New York, NY.

    This collection of lesson plans for teaching English as a Second Language includes the following: "You Scratched Me!" which has students examine verbs in three forms (base, past, and progressive) together with questions, accelerating the memorization and understanding of verb forms and tenses; "Getting Acquainted/Inferential Thinking," which…

  16. EMU Lessons Learned Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kevin M., Jr.; Crocker, Lori; Cupples, J. Scott

    2011-01-01

    As manned space exploration takes on the task of traveling beyond low Earth orbit, many problems arise that must be solved in order to make the journey possible. One major task is protecting humans from the harsh space environment. The current method of protecting astronauts during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is through use of the specially designed Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). As more rigorous EVA conditions need to be endured at new destinations, the suit will need to be tailored and improved in order to accommodate the astronaut. The Objective behind the EMU Lessons Learned Database(LLD) is to be able to create a tool which will assist in the development of next-generation EMUs, along with maintenance and improvement of the current EMU, by compiling data from Failure Investigation and Analysis Reports (FIARs) which have information on past suit failures. FIARs use a system of codes that give more information on the aspects of the failure, but if one is unfamiliar with the EMU they will be unable to decipher the information. A goal of the EMU LLD is to not only compile the information, but to present it in a user-friendly, organized, searchable database accessible to all familiarity levels with the EMU; both newcomers and veterans alike. The EMU LLD originally started as an Excel database, which allowed easy navigation and analysis of the data through pivot charts. Creating an entry requires access to the Problem Reporting And Corrective Action database (PRACA), which contains the original FIAR data for all hardware. FIAR data are then transferred to, defined, and formatted in the LLD. Work is being done to create a web-based version of the LLD in order to increase accessibility to all of Johnson Space Center (JSC), which includes converting entries from Excel to the HTML format. FIARs related to the EMU have been completed in the Excel version, and now focus has shifted to expanding FIAR data in the LLD to include EVA tools and support hardware such as

  17. UNLEARNED LESSONS OF CONTEMPORARY HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А Н Данилов

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the complex geopolitical situation in the global world at the end of the second decade of the 21st century as determined by the consequences of the collapse of the Soviet Union and by the new world order. The author seeks to answer the questions who will define the current geopolitical situation, whose aims it will reflect, what will become the basis of new geopolitical realities, the basis of moral solidarity of humankind, and the spiritual basis of future civilizations. The new challenges give rise to a desperate struggle for different scenarios for building a happy life. Moreover, it is not clear which ideal of the future world will be widely supported as a development guideline. The recognition as such of the standard of living and development of the strongest ones becomes a real threat to the new civilization for it leads to the loss of national interests of sovereign states, and to the loss of an independent future. Today, there is an active search for new theories and concepts that will adequately explain con-temporary global processes. In this thematic context, the author identifies main lessons not learned by the world political elites. The first lesson: new states are not born in an empty place, their common history is a great advantage ensuring prospects for the further development of interstate cooperation. The second lesson: the widespread falsification of history has a negative impact on national, cultural and social-group identity in transforming societies. The third lesson: after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the post-war balance of power was destroyed together with the system of checks and balances in world politics (a bipolar model of the world. The fourth lesson: under radical social transformations, the moral system of the population devaluates with numerous crisis consequences.

  18. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  19. Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanti Devi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  20. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  1. Joubert Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner (meaning both parents must have a copy of ... physical, occupational, and speech therapy may benefit some children. Infants with abnormal ...

  2. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that contain aspirin. Some hospitals and medical facilities conduct newborn screenings for fatty acid oxidation disorders to determine which children are at greater risk of developing Reye's syndrome. ...

  3. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See More About Research The NINDS supports and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Angelman syndrome, to develop techniques to diagnose, treat, ... Publications Definition Angelman ...

  4. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... One in 10 children with this syndrome has a problem involving chromosome 7. In other people with the syndrome, it may affect chromosome 11. Most of the time, it ...

  5. [Ballantyne syndrome or mirror syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Silva-González, María Eugenia; González-Hernández, Rigoberto

    2010-11-01

    Ballantyne syndrome or mirror syndrome is a triad consisting of the presence of fetal hydrops, generalized edema placentomegaly mother. May be related to any cause of fetal hydrops. The fetal prognosis is poor in untreated cases, the mother has reference to be the cause or the termination of pregnancy. Present the case of a 26-year-old who developed mirror syndrome secondary to non-immune fetal hydrops of unknown origin, accompanied by preeclampsia.

  6. The Joint Lessons Learned System and Interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-02

    should not be artificially separated. 4 8 That lesson would not be learned here. Another lesson which was learned, however, was that interservice... artificially high level of support masked the continuing rivalry between the Army and Air Force over mission priorities. 6 4 In spite of Air Force...knowledge concerning joint interoperability issues and lessons learned activities. -72- MAP 2 Central African Republic Sudan sangu . Bo"oo Cameroon tuie

  7. USING LITERATURE IN GEOGRAPHY LESSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROXANA HOBAI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Including in a novel information about relief, climate, vegetation, fauna and various aspects of socio-economic life can make literature a real source of geographical information. Using realistic literary works in Geography lessons has multiple benefits, which are not limited only to geographical knowledge. In this paper there are some fragments from literature, suggestions of activities about how to integrate the fragments during Geography lessons and the results of these activities. The activities are from fifth to twelfth grade, passing through a first example of water pollution resulting from a Hercules labour, through the lyricism of the aurora borealis description, through the dramatic life of a refugee from Darfur, through the Dobrudgea winter landscape, through the grey urban landscape of Bucharest in the 90s and so on. Students were put into learning situations that stimulated their creativity, developed communication competencies and enriched their general knowledge.

  8. Mass Casualties in Combat: Lessons Learned

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beekley, Alex C

    2007-01-01

    .... Analysis of multiple and mass casualty events from current conflicts can provide critical lessons learned regarding triage and resource utilization that can potentially be applied to other conflicts...

  9. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  10. Ascher syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Zhai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ascher syndrome is a rare, benign skin disorder characterized by a double upper lip, blepharochalasis, and nontoxic enlargement of the thyroid gland. The exact cause is unknown, but it is considered to be a hereditary disease with an autosomal dominant trait. We report here a case of forme fruste Ascher syndrome in a 29-year-old man.

  11. Passwell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available There is an expanding list of syndromes that combine ichthyosis with neuroectodermal and mesodermal defects. We report a syndrome of congenital ichthyosis with atrophy, mental retardation, dwarfism, aminoaciduria, primary amenorrhoea and underdeveloped secondary sexual characters in a 38-year-old woman of non consanguinous parentage.

  12. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  13. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causing...

  14. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  15. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. × Definition Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. View Full Definition Treatment There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, ...

  16. USING LITERATURE IN GEOGRAPHY LESSONS

    OpenAIRE

    ROXANA HOBAI

    2015-01-01

    Including in a novel information about relief, climate, vegetation, fauna and various aspects of socio-economic life can make literature a real source of geographical information. Using realistic literary works in Geography lessons has multiple benefits, which are not limited only to geographical knowledge. In this paper there are some fragments from literature, suggestions of activities about how to integrate the fragments during Ge...

  17. Establishing a Lessons Learned Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Learned Centers 75 Center for Army Lessons Learned Director Chief, Plans CALL Analyst Editor Graphic Artist Colonel Thomas H. Roe Larry...clarity, and correctness. ••Ensure funding is available. ••Retain necessary editorial and graphic artist support. •• Accomplish all staffing...information empowerment . You should address organizational considerations from the very beginning, allowing the organizational transformation to occur

  18. TAFRO Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Brentwood Lessons Learned Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, Carl H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Caton, Melanie C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Christopher D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Marcinkoski, Jason [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2017-09-26

    The purpose of this report is to document lessons learned in the installation of the hydrogen fueling station at the National Park Service Brentwood site in Washington, D.C., to help further the deployment of hydrogen infrastructure required to support hydrogen and other fuel cell technologies. Hydrogen fueling is the most difficult infrastructure component to build and permit. Hydrogen fueling can include augmenting hydrogen fueling capability to existing conventional fuel fueling stations as well as building brand new hydrogen fueling stations. This report was produced as part of the Brentwood Lessons Learned project. The project consisted of transplanting an existing modular hydrogen fueling station from Connecticut to the National Park Service Brentwood site. This relocation required design and construction at the Brentwood site to accommodate the existing station design as well as installation and validation of the updated station. One of the most important lessons learned was that simply moving an existing modular station to an operating site was not necessarily straight-forward - performing the relocation required significant effort and cost. The station has to function at the selected operating site and this functionality requires a power supply, building supports connecting to an existing alarm system, electrical grounding and lighting, providing nitrogen for purging, and providing deionized water if an electrolyzer is part of the station package. Most importantly, the station has to fit into the existing site both spatially and operationally and not disrupt existing operations at the site. All of this coordination and integration requires logistical planning and project management. The idea that a hydrogen fueling station can be simply dropped onto a site and made immediately operational is generally not realistic. Other important lessons learned include that delineating the boundaries of the multiple jurisdictions that have authority over a project for

  20. 75 FR 23300 - Greige Polyester/Cotton Printcloth From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... firm's(s') exports to the United States of Subject Merchandise and, if known, an estimate of the... for by your firm's(s') exports. (12) Identify significant changes, if any, in the supply and demand.../Cotton Printcloth From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of...

  1. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  2. Bouveret's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, A.; Hasan, Z.; Saeed, A.; Abdullah, K.

    2008-01-01

    Gastric Outlet Obstruction (GOO) due to impaction of a gallstone in the duodenum after migration through a bilioduodenal fistula is known as Bouveret's syndrome. Its clinical symptoms are entirely vague and nonspecific. Because of its rarity, insidiousness and unpredictable symptomatology. Bouveret's syndrome is never thought of in the differential diagnosis as aetiology of gastric outlet obstruction. Recent advances in fiberoptics technology, advent of modern imaging modalities and minimally-invasive techniques like endoscopy and laparoscopy has brought a great revolution in the management of Bouveret's syndrome and have tremendously decreased morbidity and mortality associated with this rare clinical entity. (author)

  3. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  4. Cowden syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Prakash S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with variable expressions that result mainly from mutation in the PTEN gene on arm 10q. It is characterized by multiple hamartomatous neoplasms of the skin, oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, bones, CNS, eyes, and genitourinary tract. Mucocutaneous features include trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomatosis, acral keratosis, and palmoplantar keratosis. Here we present a case of Cowden syndrome in a 14-year-old female patient with the chief complaint of multiple oral papillomatous lesions.

  5. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search FAQs Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Patient Education FAQs Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish ...

  6. How Does Lesson Study Improve Mathematics Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical model of lesson study's impact on instruction, through intervening impact on teachers' knowledge, beliefs and dispositions, teachers' learning community, and curriculum. It also describes four different types of lesson study in Japan, pointing out their synergies in producing a system where local teachers…

  7. Leadership in American Indian Communities: Winter Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metoyer, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Winter lessons, or stories told in the winter, were one of the ways in which tribal elders instructed and directed young men and women in the proper ways to assume leadership responsibilities. Winter lessons stressed the appropriate relationship between the leader and the community. The intent was to remember the power and purpose of that…

  8. The World of Haiku. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    In this lesson plan, students explore the traditions and conventions of haiku, comparing this classic form of Japanese poetry to a related genre of Japanese visual art. Students also compose haiku of their own. The lesson's learning objectives are: (1) to learn about the history and poetic conventions of Japanese haiku; (2) to read and interpret…

  9. Lesson Planning with the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Linda A.; McDuffie, Amy Roth; Tate, Cathie

    2014-01-01

    Planning a lesson can be similar to planning a road trip--a metaphor the authors use to describe how they applied research and theory to their lesson planning process. A map and mode of transportation, the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) and textbooks as resources, can lead to desired destinations, such as students engaging in…

  10. Supercharging Lessons with a Virtual Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jefferson; Vincent, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The authors describes their experiences incorporating the virtual lab into a simple circuit lesson during an energy unit in a sixth-grade class. The lesson included a hands-on group experiment using wire, batteries, and light bulbs to make a circuit and an online simulation, using a virtual lab. Class discussions, student inquiries, and the study…

  11. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the last in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the primary level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, spelling, printing, listening, planning and problem solving, social behavior,…

  12. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the third in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the primary grade level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, spelling, printing, listening, planning, problem solving, social behavior,…

  13. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the second in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subjects areas on the primary grade level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, listening, planning, problem solving, social behavior, art, music, and…

  14. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the first in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the kindergarten level: arithmetic concepts, number concepts, reading readiness, vocabulary, language, listening, social behavior,…

  15. Authoring a CAI Lesson in Nutrition Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Carol P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A nutrition lesson on vegetarianism (focusing on vegetarian types, complementary protein, special-care nutrients, and diet planning) that uses a pre-developed plan which concentrates on lesson content and design has been developed. Initial planning and procedures involved in developing the unit (selecting teaching modes, text writing, formatting,…

  16. Professor's Page: Do Demonstration Lessons Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Doug

    2011-01-01

    As part of a large research and professional development project funded by the Catholic Education Office Melbourne (CEOM), called "Contemporary Teaching and Learning of Mathematics," the ACU team has been leading demonstration lessons. There is certainly not universal agreement on the worth of demonstration lessons in the mathematics…

  17. Planning Physical Education Lessons as Teaching "Episodes"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatoupis, Constantine

    2016-01-01

    An "episode" is a unit of time within which teachers and students are working on the same objective and are engaged in the same teaching/learning style. The duration of each episode, as well as the number of them in a single lesson, may vary. Additionally, the multiple episodes of a lesson may have similar objectives, offer similar…

  18. Population Education in Health: Some Sample Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This manual for home economics teachers contains eight sample lessons on health issues related to population growth. Among the topics treated are nutrition, family health, communicable diseases, causes of high mortality, and community health services. Lessons are designed for lower primary through high school students. A scope and sequence chart…

  19. Population Education in Mathematics: Some Sample Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This mathematics teacher's manual contains ten sample lessons on population growth and demography that were adapted from materials produced in several countries in Asia and Oceania. Among the mathematics concepts and skills students apply during these lessons are set theory, cardinal and ordinal numbers, frequency tallies, percentages, ratios,…

  20. Telecentres, Access and Development : Experience and Lessons ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Telecentres, Access and Development : Experience and Lessons from Uganda and South Africa. Couverture du livre Telecentres, Access and Development : Experience and Lessons from Uganda and South. Auteur(s) : Sarah Parkinson. Maison(s) d'édition : Practical Action Publishing, Fountain, CRDI. 1 janvier 2005.

  1. The individual teacher in lesson study collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skott, Charlotte Krog; Møller, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    used in lesson study research. Design/methodology/approach The authors use collective case studies. By being participant observers the authors provide detailed descriptions of two selected teachers’ lived experiences of lesson study collaboration. In addition to gain first-hand insights, the authors...

  2. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vomiting Diarrhea Reye's syndrome Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  3. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... girls and women with TS may have low self- esteem, anxiety, or depression. How is Turner syndrome diagnosed? ... to active partners in their health care. This fact sheet is also available in Spanish at www. ...

  4. Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have equally severe disease. Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females ... and girls have hearing loss during childhood. With ADAS, it occurs later in life. Hearing loss usually ...

  5. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and social development; hypotonia (low muscle tone), and speech impairments. Clumsiness, an awkward gait, and unusual aggressiveness or irritability may also occur. Although most cases of Sotos syndrome occur sporadically (meaning they are not known to be inherited), familial ...

  6. Potter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter phenotype ... In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is ... kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine). Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that ...

  7. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... signs and symptoms may differ, based on age, gender and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, ... prevention and treatment of kidney disease. The Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Charity Seal provides the ...

  8. Gilbert's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor before taking new medications. Also, having certain types of Gilbert's syndrome may increase your risk of ... of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  9. Compartment syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... term (chronic) compartment syndrome can be caused by repetitive activities, such as running. The pressure in a compartment ... or loosened to relieve the pressure Stopping the repetitive activity or exercise, or changing the way it's done ...

  10. Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See More About Research The NINDS supports and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Aicardi syndrome. The goals of this research are to locate and understand ... Publications Definition Aicardi ...

  11. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... swallow. Some babies will be born with glaucoma, retinal degeneration, and impaired hearing. Jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding also may occur. Treatment There is no cure for Zellweger syndrome, nor ...

  12. Gerstmann's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drawings. Frequently, there is also an impairment in reading. Children with a high level of intellectual functioning as well as those with brain damage may be affected with the disorder. × Definition Gerstmann's syndrome is a cognitive impairment that results ...

  13. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with age. Decline in hearing and vision varies. Children with type 3 Usher syndrome often develop hearing loss by adolescence, requiring hearing aids by mid-to-late adulthood. Night blindness also usually begins during adolescence. Blind spots appear ...

  14. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may order additional tests. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans cannot diagnose piriformis syndrome, ... you are sitting, driving or standing. Don’t lift by bending over. Lift an object by bending ...

  15. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have an increased risk of an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) due to the autoimmune disorder Hashimoto's thyroiditis. They also have an increased risk of diabetes. Some women with Turner syndrome have gluten intolerance (celiac disease) or inflammatory bowel disease. Skeletal ...

  16. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now What Is Reye’s Syndrome? ...

  17. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Alagille Syndrome Back Alagille ...

  18. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mellitus High blood pressure (hypertension) Increased cholesterol and triglycerides (hyperlipidemia) Women with Cushing syndrome may have: Excess ... Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine, ...

  19. A Relevant Lesson: Hitler Goes to the Mall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, David

    2003-01-01

    A "Motivation" eliciting the "Aim" of each lesson initiates each lesson in the orthodox "developmental lesson-plan" that has dominated classroom instruction in NYC public schools for at least the past half-century. An action-research study of 38 lesson-plans (over 5 each from 5 teachers) drawn from student-teaching…

  20. Improving Mathematics Teaching as Deliberate Practice through Chinese Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongjin; Prince, Kyle M.; Barlow, Angela T.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined how a ninth grade teacher improved an Algebra I lesson through a lesson study approach. We used multiple data sources to investigate the improvement of the lesson towards student-centered mathematics instruction, perceived benefits of the teacher, and factors associated with the improvement of teaching. The lesson group…

  1. Southwest Airlines: lessons in loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aurizio, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Southwest Airlines continues to garner accolades in the areas of customer service, workforce management, and profitability. Since both the health care and airlines industries deal with a service rather than a product, the customer experience depends on the people who deliver that experience. Employees' commitment or "loyalty" to their customers, their employer, and their work translates into millions of dollars of revenue. What employee wants to work for "the worst employer in town?" Nine loyalty lessons from Southwest can be carried over to the health care setting for the benefit of employees and patients.

  2. Chernobyl: lessons of the decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident led to a drastic increase the incidents of thyroid cancer in children living at territories contaminated with radionuclides. The incidents of hemoblastoses which are etiologically closely related to radiation did not change after the incident. The lessons of the decade that passed since the accident necessitate measures aimed at alleviation of the medical consequences of the accident which are to be implemented for many years. The program of such measures should be based on a strictly scientific evaluation of each factor, that will be conductive to a most adequate state financing of this work [ru

  3. Implementing US Department of Energy lessons learned programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The DOE Lessons Learned Handbook is a two-volume publication developed to supplement the DOE Lessons Learned Standard (DOE-STD-7501-95) with information that will organizations in developing or improving their lessons learned programs. Volume 1 includes greater detail than the Standard in areas such as identification and documentation of lessons learned; it also contains sections on specific processes such as training and performance measurement. Volume 2 (this document) contains examples of program documents developed by existing lessons learned programs as well as communications material, functional categories, transmittal documents, sources of professional and industry lessons learned, and frequently asked questions about the Lessons Learned List Service.

  4. Historical problem areas: Lessons learned for expendable and reusable vehicle propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fester, Dale A.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: expendable launch vehicle lessons learned, upper stage/transfer vehicle lessons learned, shuttle systems - reuse, and reusable system issues and lessons learned.

  5. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome What Is Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  6. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Also known as Pickwickian Syndrome What ... your neck is larger than normal. Complications of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome When left untreated, OHS can cause ...

  7. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children who have WAGR syndrome may have normal intelligence. Other symptoms of WAGR syndrome may also include: ... mild. Some individuals with WAGR syndrome have normal intelligence. Children with WAGR syndrome should be referred for ...

  8. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may also be caused by toxins produced by group A streptococcus (strep) bacteria. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated ... syndrome. The syndrome can also be caused by group A streptococcus (strep) bacteria. Risk factors Toxic shock syndrome can ...

  9. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium ...

  10. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it? Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a random error ... The Down Syndrome Registry . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  11. Intergenerational Lessons and 'Fabulous Stories'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewenson, Sandra B; Welch, Cathryne A; Hassmiller, Susan B

    2015-10-01

    While directing the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, Susan B. Hassmiller, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's senior adviser for nursing, realized the value that nursing history could bring to the campaign. She decided to interview her mother, Jacqueline J. Wouwenberg, a 1947 graduate of the Bellevue Hospital School of Nursing, in order to better understand and contextualize changes that had occurred in the nursing profession during the 20th century. In collaboration with nurse historians Cathryne A. Welch and Sandra B. Lewenson, Hassmiller participated in interviewing her mother and was also interviewed herself. The stories that emerged revealed a great deal: each woman had found that nursing had given them countless opportunities that reflected the time periods in which they lived. Wouwenberg's experiences, transmitted to Hassmiller through words and actions, also served as important lessons for her daughter. This article shares five lessons: be independent and courageous, know that nursing has no bounds, follow your passion, honor diversity, and give back. It also asks readers to reflect on the relevance of nurses' work from one generation to the next..

  12. Alternative Energy Lessons in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Julie

    2010-05-01

    In Scotland the new science curriculum for pupils aged 12 to 15 shall include the following outcomes: "Using my knowledge and understanding, I can express an informed view on a national or global environmental issue;" "I have participated in constructing a model to harness a renewable source of energy and can investigate how to optimise the output;" and "I can discuss why it is important to me and to the future of the world that alternatives to fossil fuels are developed." There will be an emphasis on creating lessons that will nurture responsible citizens, improve pupil engagement and allow students to develop their team working skills. To help teachers plan lessons to address this, the Scottish Schools Equipment Research Centre and Edinburgh University made teaching materials on four renewable energy resources. This poster describes how their suggested activities on solar cells, wind turbines, hydroelectric power stations and wave power were used in science lessons with twelve year old students. After an initial class discussion based on issues related to climate change and diminishing fossil fuel supplies, a workshop activity was carried out in three stages. The students were issued with a fact sheet about one of four imaginary islands (Skisdale, Cloudy Island, Surfsville and Sun City) and they were asked to work in teams to choose the most suitable method of generating electricity for their island. Issues such as costs, where it will be sited and environmental implications were considered. They were then asked to conduct practical activities by constructing and testing models for these forms of renewable energy. To conclude, they presented their proposal to the rest of the class with reasoned explanations. The kits used in the lessons can be purchased from Anderson Scientific (sales@andersonscientific.co.uk). The solar cells were simply connected to a voltmeter. The wind and hydroelectric groups used the same basic equipment. This was made using a small water

  13. Pathogenesis of the Metabolic Syndrome: Insights from Monogenic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinki Murphy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying rare human metabolic disorders that result from a single-gene defect has not only enabled improved diagnostic and clinical management of such patients, but also has resulted in key biological insights into the pathophysiology of the increasingly prevalent metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are linked to obesity and driven by excess caloric intake and reduced physical activity. However, key events in the causation of the metabolic syndrome are difficult to disentangle from compensatory effects and epiphenomena. This review provides an overview of three types of human monogenic disorders that result in (1 severe, non-syndromic obesity, (2 pancreatic beta cell forms of early-onset diabetes, and (3 severe insulin resistance. In these patients with single-gene defects causing their exaggerated metabolic disorder, the primary defect is known. The lessons they provide for current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the common metabolic syndrome are highlighted.

  14. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  15. Instructional Accommodations for Students with Asperger Syndrome in the General High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Myrna

    2011-01-01

    General education teachers in the secondary sector are held responsible for adapting their lessons and classroom environment for students with Asperger Syndrome. With the growing number of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder being placed in general education classrooms, teachers are faced with yet another challenge in making their curriculum…

  16. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  17. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network...... of birth defect registries. Between January 1990 and December 2008, we identified 26 cases of Fraser syndrome in the monitored population of 12,886,464 births (minimal estimated prevalence of 0.20 per 100,000 or 1:495,633 births). Most cases (18/26; 69%) were registered in the western part of Europe, where...... was particularly high (42%). Most cases of Fraser syndrome (85%) are suspected prenatally, often due to the presence of the association of renal agenesis and cryptophthalmos. In the European population, a high proportion (82%) of pregnancies is terminated, thus reducing the live birth prevalence to a third...

  18. Dressler Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Ceylan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dressler Syndrome (DS is a febrile illness secondary to an inflammatory reaction involving the pleura and pericardium. It is more common in patients who have undergone surgery that involves opening the pericardium. However, DS has also been described following myocardial infarction and as an unusual complication after percutaneous procedures such as coronary stent implantation, after implantation of epicardial pacemaker leads and transvenous pacemaker leads, and following blunt trauma, stab wounds, and heart puncture. Pericardial effusions often accompany the syndrome and may develop into early or late postoperative cardiac tamponade and even recurrent cardiac tamponade. The syndrome is also characterized by pericardial or pleuritic pain, pleural effusions, pneumonitis, and abnormal ECG and radiography findings.

  19. BRUGADA SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Kostić

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1992, Brugada syndrom was introduced as a new clinical entity linking typical but variable ST segment changes in the right precordial leads to an increased vulnerability for lethal ventricular arrhythmias. The diagnosis of Brugada syndrome is based on clinical and electrocardiographic features. Recent studies illustrate the dynamic character of these ECG patterns. Whenever a large number of baseline ECGs was available during a follow-up, the diagnostic pattern could be documented only in approximately 25% of the tracings. Because the presence of the spontaneous coved type I ECG pattern is thought to be a useful predictor of future arrhythmic events in asymptomatic patients, these findings are of great clinical importance. ICD implantation is an option for the patients with Brugada syndrome and ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Extensive research is ongoing to find alternative pharmacological options for these patients, especially for patients in whom ICD implantation is contraindicated for various reasons.

  20. lessons from tuberous sclerosis complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    example here is the relationship between trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) and high rates of Alzheimer's disease, which led to the discovery of the molecular basis of ... Treatment is often inadequate or wrong. For example, a recent case report[13] in the SAMJ was clearly a case of an adolescent with TSC, facial angiofibromas ...

  1. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  2. Health communication: lessons from research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, A V

    1981-01-01

    In discussing the lessons learned from research in the area of health communication, focus is on basic strategic issues; the scope of health communications in terms of audience, information, education and motivation approaces and India's satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE). Health communication is the process by which a health idea is transferred from a source, such as a primary health center, to a receiver, community, with the intention of changing the community's behavior. This involves the formulation of specific strategies for the conduct of health and family welfare communication. In the processs of health communication, it has been a common practice in India as well as in other developing countries to depend upon a plethora of communication media. Yet, despite maximum utilization of the mass media and interpersonal channels of communication, questions remain about the efficacy of the system in bringing about change. Thus, the need to draw upon lessons from research becomes obvious. Communication effectiveness researches have concentrated on 3 basic strategic issues: the question of physical reception of messages by the audience; interpretation or understanding of messages on the part of the audience in accordance with the intention of the communicator; and effectiveness of communication on the cognitive, affective and behavioral dimensions of the audience. Innumberable researches in communication have provided several lessons which have expanded the scope of health communication. This expansion can be observed in terms of audiences reached, information disseminated, education undertaken, and motivation provided. Research has identified several distinct groups to whom specific health messages have to be addressed. These include government and political elites, health and family welfare program administrators, and the medical profession and clinical staff. Information on health needs to include both the concept of health and the pertinent ideas

  3. Eagle syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, Deepika; Gothi, Rajesh; Rajan, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Eagle syndrome occurs due to elongation of the styloid process or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which then may produce a pain sensation due the pressure exerted on various structures in the head and neck. When suspected, imaging helps in identifying the abnormally elongated styloid process or the calcified ligament. In recent years, three-dimensional CT (3DCT) has proved to be valuable in these cases. We report the case of a 62-year-old man with this syndrome in whom imaging with 3DCT conclusively established the diagnosis

  4. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  5. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  6. Rapunzel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Wadan, Ali H.; Al-Saai, Azan S.; Abdoulgafour, Mohamed; Al-Absi, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    An 18-year-old single female patient, presented with non specific gastrointestinal symptoms of anorexia, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habit. Clinically she was anemic, cachectic, and depressed. Abdominal examination revealed mobile epigastric mass. The scalp alopecia and endoscopy coupled by computed tomography scan, confirmed the diagnoses of trichobezoar, but it was not diagnosed as Rapunzel syndrome except after laparotomy, gastrotomy, and enterotomy. There are less than 16 cases of Rapunzel syndrome described worldwide, and this is the first case to be described in the middle east. (author)

  7. Fenton's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimondi, E.; Albasini, V.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report two recent cases of Fenton's syndrome, a very rare carpal fracture-dislocation. After some anatomophysiopathological considerations and a review of the literature, a wider nosographic frame is proposed in which the entity of the dislocation of the head of capitate bone is not essential. According to both the literature and personal findings, the authors remark that this syndrome is always found in the presence of two morphological variants of the distal radioulnar joint. Finally, the authors stress the importance of a corect diagnosis of this lesion to avoid unnecessary attempts of reduction

  8. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  9. Morbihan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  10. Joubert syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanua, J.A.; Lopez, J.M.; Recondo, J.A.; Garcia, J.M.; Gaztanaga, R.

    1998-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a rare malformation of the posterior fossa, mainly affecting the cerebellar vermis, which generally appears as a dysplastic lesion. Other structures of the cervico medullary junction may be involved, with accompanying brainstem hypoplasia according to neuroimaging studies. The diagnosis is usually reached during, childhood, based on a constellation of changes in the child's neurological development that are supported by the results of imaging studied. Respiratory problems are the most common signs in newborns,leading to the suspicion of the presence of this syndrome. (Author) 11 refs

  11. Lemierre's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, J.; Garcia, J.

    1999-01-01

    Postanginal sepsis, or Lemierre's syndrome, is rare but with life-threatening potential involving mainly infants and adolescents. The morbidity or mortality is caused mainly by lack of knowledge of the syndrome. The 18-year-old boy described here developed a jugular thrombosis 7 days after an angina. Fusobacterium necrophorum was isolated from the culture of the excised jugular vein. Secondary embolism involved the lungs, associated with an iliac osteomyelitis and sacroiliitis. Computed tomography was used for diagnosis and follow-up. (orig.)

  12. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  13. Lessons of the radiological accident in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, R.N.; Xavier, A.M.; Heilbron, P.F.L.

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of the lessons teamed from the radiological accident of Goiania, actions are described which a nuclear regulatory body should undertake while responding to an accident of this nature. (author)

  14. Planning geometry lessons with learning platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborg, Andreas Lindenskov

    This paper investigates how mathematics teachers plan lessons with a recently implemented Danish learning platform designed to support teachers in planning lessons in line with a recent objective-oriented curriculum. Drawing on data from observations of and interviews with teachers, three...... mathematics teachers’ joint planning of a lesson in geometry with a learning platform called Meebook is analyzed using the instrumental approach. It is concluded that the interface in Meebook orients the teachers work toward what the students should do rather than what they should learn, although the latter...... is a key intention behind the implementation of the platform. It is also concluded that when the teachers succeed in using learning objectives actively in their planning, the objectives support the teachers in designing lessons that correspond with their intentions. The paper concludes with a discussion...

  15. Experimental Garden Plots for Botany Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodnicheva, V. V.; Vasil'eva, E. I.

    1976-01-01

    Discussion of the botany lessons used at two schools points out the need for fifth and sixth grade students to be taught the principles of plant life through observations made at an experimental garden plot at the school. (ND)

  16. Lessons from World War I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Scales Avery

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of World War I is reviewed, starting with a discussion of the development of nationalist movements in Europe. It is pointed out that the global disaster started with a seemingly small operation by Austria, which escalated uncontrollably into an all-destroying conflagration. A striking feature of the war was that none of the people who started it had any idea of what it would be like. Technology had changed the character of war, but old patterns of thought remained in place. We also examine the roots of the war in industrial and colonial competition, and in an arms race. Finally, parallels with current events, and the important lessons for today’s world are discussed.

  17. Seven brief lessons on physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    These seven "short lessons" guide us, with admirable clarity, through the scientific revolution that shook physics in the twentieth century and still continues to shake us today. In this short, playful, entertaining and mind-bending introduction to modern physics, Rovelli explains Einstein's theory of general relativity, quantum mechanics, black holes, the complex architecture of the universe, elementary particles, gravity, and the nature of the mind. In under one hundred pages, readers will understand the most transformative scientific discoveries of the twentieth century. Not since Richard Feynman's celebrated best-seller Six Easy Pieces has physics been so vividly, intelligently and entertainingly revealed. Carlo Rovelli is an eminent physicist with an extraordinary ability to write about complex topics in a lucid, clear prose. His book was top of the bestseller charts in Italy for months and has sold over 150,000 copies since publication in November. He is the head of the Équipe de Gravité Quantique at ...

  18. Logistics Lessons Learned in NASA Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William A.; DeWeck, Olivier; Laufer, Deanna; Shull, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration sets out a number of goals, involving both strategic and tactical objectives. These include returning the Space Shuttle to flight, completing the International Space Station, and conducting human expeditions to the Moon by 2020. Each of these goals has profound logistics implications. In the consideration of these objectives,a need for a study on NASA logistics lessons learned was recognized. The study endeavors to identify both needs for space exploration and challenges in the development of past logistics architectures, as well as in the design of space systems. This study may also be appropriately applied as guidance in the development of an integrated logistics architecture for future human missions to the Moon and Mars. This report first summarizes current logistics practices for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and the International Space Station (ISS) and examines the practices of manifesting, stowage, inventory tracking, waste disposal, and return logistics. The key findings of this examination are that while the current practices do have many positive aspects, there are also several shortcomings. These shortcomings include a high-level of excess complexity, redundancy of information/lack of a common database, and a large human-in-the-loop component. Later sections of this report describe the methodology and results of our work to systematically gather logistics lessons learned from past and current human spaceflight programs as well as validating these lessons through a survey of the opinions of current space logisticians. To consider the perspectives on logistics lessons, we searched several sources within NASA, including organizations with direct and indirect connections with the system flow in mission planning. We utilized crew debriefs, the John Commonsense lessons repository for the JSC Mission Operations Directorate, and the Skylab Lessons Learned. Additionally, we searched the public version of the Lessons Learned

  19. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  20. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  1. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but can be reduced by anticonvulsant drugs. A ketogenic diet, high in fats and low in carbohydrates, also may be beneficial. View Full Treatment Information Definition Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  2. Kartagener's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, D K; Ganguly, K C; Alam, S; Hossain, A; Sarker, U K; Das, B K; Haque, M J

    2009-01-01

    Kartagener's Syndrome or Immotile Cilia Syndrome, a variant of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by defect in the tiny hair like structure, the cilia lining the respiratory tract (upper and lower), sinuses, eustachian tubes, middle ear and fallopian tubes. Here electron microscopy shows abnormal arrangement of ciliary tubules and patients with Kartagener's syndrome has an absence of dynein arms at the base of the cilia. The inability of cilia to move results in inadequate clearance of bacteria from the air passages, resulting in an increased risk of infection and causing bronchiectasis. Another result of ciliary immobility is infertility. A 60 years old lady was diagnosed as a case of Kartagener's syndrome. She had history of chronic cough for 20 years, irregular fever for 20 years and occasional shortness of breath for 5 years. Relevant investigations revealed dextrocardia, situs inversus, bilateral maxillary sinusitis with non pneumatised frontal sinus and bronchiectasis. She was treated with low concentration oxygen inhalation, antibiotic, bronchodilator, chest physiotherapy including postural drainage, vitamins and other supportive treatment.

  3. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    , liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated...

  4. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  5. Sjogren syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Baldini, Chiara; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bowman, Simon J.; Jonsson, Roland; Mariette, Xavier; Sivils, Kathy; Theander, Elke; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Sjogren syndrome (SjS) is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects the exocrine glands (mainly the salivary and lacrimal glands) and results in the severe dryness of mucosal surfaces, principally in the mouth and eyes. This disease predominantly affects middle-aged women, but can also be

  6. Goldenhar syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operational on the derivatives of the first and second bran- chial arches and clefts before the end of the organogenetic period (7'h or 8'h week of embryonic life)? ..... Marshman WE, Schalit G, Jones RB, Lee JP, Mathews TD and McCabe S: Congenital anomalies in patients with Duane retraction syndrome and their relatives.

  7. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  8. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  9. Metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/pubmed/26718656 . Ruderman NB, Shulman GI. Metabolic syndrome. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 43. Review ... NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more Health ...

  10. Stickler Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tongue to drop back toward the throat. Blindness. Blindness can occur if retinal detachments aren't repaired promptly. Ear infections. Children with facial structure abnormalities associated with Stickler syndrome are more likely to develop ear infections than are children with normal facial ...

  11. Gorlin syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    develop medulloblastomas and are treated with radiation, it is mandatory that they be monitored for the development of BCCs in the radiation field. Management of a patient or family with this syndrome should include genetic counselling and neurological evaluations to detect medulloblastoma until the age of 7, after which ...

  12. Kartagener's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    presenting with recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections, sinusitis or bronchiectasis. Inability to diagnose this condition may subject the patient to unnecessary and repeated hospital admissions, investigations and treatment failure. KEY WORDS: Kartagener's syndrome, primary cilliary dyskinesia, situs inversus, ...

  13. Kounis syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kounis syndrome is charac terised by a group of symp toms that manifest as unsta ble vasospastic or nonvaso spastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction.[1] It was first described by. Kounis and Zavras in 1991[2] as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and ...

  14. A Lesson about the Circular Flow. Active Learning Lessons. Economics International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfried, Janet

    This lesson plan was developed through "Economics International," an international program to help build economic education infrastructures in the emerging market economies. It provides a lesson description; appropriate grade level; economic concepts; content standards and benchmarks; related subjects; instructional objectives; time…

  15. Analysing the Integration of Engineering in Science Lessons with the Engineering-Infused Lesson Rubric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Karen; Daugherty, Jenny L.; Custer, Rodney L.; Ross, Julia M.

    2017-01-01

    Science teachers are being called on to incorporate engineering practices into their classrooms. This study explores whether the Engineering-Infused Lesson Rubric, a new rubric designed to target best practices in engineering education, could be used to evaluate the extent to which engineering is infused into online science lessons. Eighty lessons…

  16. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Marfan Syndrome KidsHealth / For Teens / Marfan Syndrome What's in this ... a genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, the ...

  17. The Source for Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  18. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  19. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is functional renal failure that occurs with advanced liver failure. HRS is considered the most severe complication of cirrhosis. Type 1 HRS develops due to severe reduction of effective circulating volume results in hemodynamic dysfunction. Type 1 HRS is characterized by acute renal failure and rapid deterioration in the function of other organs. It can ocur spontaneously or in the setting of a precipitating event. Type 2 hepatorenal syndrome (HRS, which is characterized by slowly progressive renal failure and refractory ascites. Liver transplantation is the only definitive treatment for both type. The most suitable and ldquo;bridge treatments and rdquo; or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 106-113

  20. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  1. Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farruggia, Piero; Di Marco, Floriana; Dufour, Carlo

    2018-03-01

    Pearson syndrome (PS) is a sporadic and very rare syndrome classically associated with single large-scale deletions of mitochondrial DNA and characterized by refractory sideroblastic anemia during infancy. Areas covered: This review presents an analysis and interpretation of the published data that forms the basis for our understanding of PS. PubMed, Google Scholarand Thompson ISI Web of Knowledge were searched for relevant data. Expert commentary: PS is a very rare mitochodrial disease that involves different organs and systems. Clinical phenotype is extremely variable and may change over the course of disease itself with the possibility both of worsenings and improvements. Outcome is invariably lethal and at the moment no cure is available. Accurate supportive treatment and follow up program in centres with experience in mitochondrial diseases and marrow failure may positively influence quality and duration of life.

  2. Otodental syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloch-Zupan Agnès

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The otodental syndrome also named otodental dysplasia, is characterised by a striking dental phenotype known as globodontia, associated with sensorineural high frequency hearing loss and eye coloboma. Globodontia occurs in both primary and permanent dentition, affecting canine and molar teeth (i.e. enlarged bulbous malformed posterior teeth with almost no discernable cusps or grooves. The condition appears to be inherited in an autosomal dominant mode, although sporadic cases have been reported. It is a rare disease, a few families have been described in the literature. In the British family, the locus for oculo-oto-dental syndrome was mapped to 20q13.1 within a 12-cM critical chromosomal region. Dental management is complex, interdisciplinary and will include regular follow up, scheduled teeth extraction and orthodontic treatment. Hearing checks and, if necessary, hearing aids are mandatory, as well as eye examination and ad hoc treatment if necessary.

  3. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Ricard

    2017-03-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the development of venous and/or arterial thromboses, often multiple, and pregnancy morbidity (mainly, recurrent fetal losses), in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Some estimates indicate that the incidence of the APS is around 5 new cases per 100,000 persons per year and the prevalence around 40-50 cases per 100,000 persons. The aPL are positive in approximately 13% of patients with stroke, 11% with myocardial infarction, 9.5% of patients with deep vein thrombosis and 6% of patients with pregnancy morbidity. Currently, there is consensus in treating APS patients with thrombosis with long-term oral anticoagulation and to prevent obstetric manifestations with the use of aspirin and heparin. This review summarizes the main knowledge on the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  5. Mini-Lessons on Language (The Round Table).

    Science.gov (United States)

    English Journal, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Describes several successful lessons that provide students with new awareness of the English language. Includes lessons focusing on language change, onomatopoeia, slang, word origin, dialect, and language functions. (MM)

  6. Lessons Learned from the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility Decommissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    NASA has been conducting decommissioning activities at its PBRF for the last decade. As a result of all this work there have been several lessons learned both good and bad. This paper presents some of the more exportable lessons.

  7. Feedback of safety - related operational experience: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, D.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation considers the following aspects of feedback of safety-related operational experience: lessons learned program, objectives, personnel characteristics; three types of documents for transmitting lessons learned issues

  8. Lessons from Early Medicaid Expansions Under Health Reform..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Lessons from Early Medicaid Expansions Under Health Reform, Interviews with Medicaid Officials In a new study entitled Lessons from Early Medicaid Expansions Under...

  9. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  10. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  11. Asperger Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Friedlander, Robin

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Asperger syndrome (AS) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder of social interaction, communication, and a restricted range of behaviors or interests. Although not generally associated with intellectual disability, the severe social disability and, in many cases, associated mental health and other medical problems, result in disability throughout life. The diagnosis is often delayed, sometimes into adulthood, which is unfortunate because there are now a range...

  12. What Is Marfan Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Outreach Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Marfan Syndrome Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Marfan Syndrome Marfan syndrome affects connective tissue, which is the “ ...

  13. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... celiac disease. 5 Is Turner syndrome considered a disability? Turner syndrome is not considered a disability, although ... girls with Turner syndrome have difficulty with arithmetic, visual memory, and visio-spatial skills (such as determining ...

  14. Basal cell nevus syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nevus syndrome Basal cell nevus syndrome - face References Evans DG, Farndon PA. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. ... A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among ...

  15. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it? Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Rett syndrome? Most cases of Rett syndrome are ... in the MECP2 gene represent the most prevalent causes of Rett syndrome. The development and severity of ...

  16. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  17. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  18. Four lessons in adaptive leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Useem, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The armed services have been in the business of leadership development much longer than the corporate world has. Today's military leaders need tools and techniques to face a fast-changing and unpredictable type of enemy--so the armed services train their officers in ways that build a culture of readiness and commitment. Business leaders need to foster an adaptive culture to survive and succeed, given that they, too, face unprecedented uncertainty--and new types of competitors. Michael Useem and his colleagues at the Wharton School incorporate exposure to military leadership into MBA and executive MBA programs. Highlights include direct contact in the classroom with leaders in the U.S. Army, the U.S. Marine Corps, and the Department of Defense, along with field-training exercises and battlefield visits. The programs are designed to help students connect viscerally to essential leadership lessons. Four are featured in the article: Meet the troops. Creating a personal link is crucial to leading people in challenging times. Make decisions. Making good and timely calls is the crux of leadership. Mission first. Focus on common purpose and eschew personal gain. Convey strategic intent. Make the objectives clear, but give people the freedom to execute on them in their own way.

  19. Achievements and Lessons from Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    For almost a quarter of a century, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider was the centerpiece of the world's high energy physics program - beginning operation in December of 1985 until it was overtaken by LHC in 2011. The aim of the this unique scientific instrument was to explore the elementary particle physics reactions with center of mass collision energies of up to 1.96 TeV. The initial design luminosity of the Tevatron was 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, however as a result of two decades of upgrades, the accelerator has been able to deliver 430 times higher luminosities to each of two high luminosity experiments, CDF and D0. Tevatron will be shut off September 30, 2011. The collider was arguably one of the most complex research instruments ever to reach the operation stage and is widely recognized for many technological breakthroughs and numerous physics discoveries. Below we briefly present the history of the Tevatron, major advances in accelerator physics, and technology implemented during the long quest for better and better performance. We also discuss some lessons learned from our experience.

  20. FRMAC-93 lessons learned report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, K.C.

    1994-03-01

    FRMAC-93 simulated a radiological accident at the Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant, 25 miles north of Omaha, Nebraska. The exercise involved the state Iowa and Nebraska, NRC as the lead Federal agency, FRMAC (Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center), and several federal agencies with statutory emergency responsibility. FRMAC-93 was a major 2-day field exercise designed to determine the effectiveness, coordination, and operations of a DOE-managed FRMAC. Other objectives were to ensure that appropriate priorities were established and assistance was provided to the states and the lead Federal agency by FRMAC. Day 1 involved the Fort Calhoun evaluated plume phase exercise. On Day 2, the flow of data, which was slow initially, improved so that confidence of states and other federal responders in FRMAC support capabilities was high. The impact and lessons learned from FRMAC-93 provided the necessary impetus to make organizational and operational changes to the FRMAC program, which were put into effect in the DOE exercise FREMONT at Hanford 3 months later

  1. Science and Sandy: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, K.

    2013-12-01

    Following Hurricane Sandy's impact on the mid-Atlantic region, President Obama established a Task Force to '...ensure that the Federal Government continues to provide appropriate resources to support affected State, local, and tribal communities to improve the region's resilience, health, and prosperity by building for the future.' The author was detailed from NOAA to the Task Force between January and June 2013. As the Task Force and others began to take stock of the region's needs and develop plans to address them, many diverse approaches emerged from different areas of expertise including: infrastructure, management and construction, housing, public health, and others. Decision making in this environment was complex with many interests and variables to consider and balance. Although often relevant, science and technical expertise was not always at the forefront of this process. This talk describes the author's experience with the Sandy Task Force focusing on organizing scientific expertise to support the work of the Task Force. This includes a description of federal activity supporting Sandy recovery efforts, the role of the Task Force, and lessons learned from developing a science support function within the Task Force.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Antiphospholipid syndrome Antiphospholipid syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... area? Other Names for This Condition anti-phospholipid syndrome antiphospholipid antibody syndrome Hughes syndrome Related Information How are ...

  3. The physical education lesson in Turkish primary schools: Affective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the study students' affective entry characteristics related to Physical Education lessons were examined based on three dimensions: interest towards the lesson, level of motivation in the lesson and educational gains. The study further aimed to investigate how these three dimensions were affected by the gender factor.

  4. A Qualitative Study on Primary School Mathematics Lesson Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongchen; Ma, Yunpeng

    2009-01-01

    Through the qualitative interviews of five implementers of primary school mathematics curriculum, this study addresses the ways in which mathematics lessons are evaluated. Results show that each evaluator recognizes different aspects of a "good lesson," however, among all criteria, the design of the lesson plan, realization of the lesson…

  5. Professional Development through Lesson Study: Teaching the Derivative Using Geogebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Nellie C.; Coenders, Fer; Pieters, Jules M.; van Smaalen, Daan; Tall, David O.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on mathematics teachers' professional development through elements of Japanese lesson study. The teachers designed a research lesson with regard to sense-making of the derivative using the integration of GeoGebra. In the second year of the four-year lesson study project, seven secondary school teachers--from different Dutch…

  6. Instructing ICT Lessons in Primary Schools: Teachers' Opinions and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbiyik, Cenk; Seferoglu, S. Sadi

    2012-01-01

    Regarding the use of information and communication technologies, acquiring basic knowledge and skills has become a necessity. Schools offer ICT lessons to young generations in order to enable them to use of ICTs effectively. But there are uncertainties about this relatively new lesson concerning effectiveness of the lesson and about how…

  7. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Investigating Situational Interest in Primary Science Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukomies, Anni; Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari

    2015-12-01

    Pupils' interest has been one of the major concerns in science education research because it can be seen as a gateway to more personalised forms of interest and motivation. However, methods to investigate situational interest in science teaching and learning are not broadly examined. This study compares the pupils' observed situational interest and their expressed situational interest. One class of Finnish fourth-graders (N = 22, age 9-10 years) participated in a heat transfer lesson. The lesson encompassed an interactive demonstration with a thermal camera, teacher-led discussions and the conduct and presentation of a collaborative inquiry task. Pupils expressed their interest levels (scale: 1 = very boring, 5 = very interesting) by using an electronic response system called a 'clicker'. The measurement took place 15 times during the lesson, with 1 measurement being just a rehearsal. The lesson was video recorded, and visible aspects of interest at the measurement time points were analysed. Reported and observational data were compared. In most cases, the observations did not yield data compatible with the pupils' own evaluations, indicating that most pupils' expressed interest is not easily interpreted through observation of their facial expressions and behaviour. In general, the interest of the group as a whole seems to diminish during the lesson. We argue that in order to maintain and increase pupils' interest, their evaluations should be taken into account in lesson planning. Video-based research might also be further enriched and validated by employing the participants' own expressions. The clicker is a suitable means of collecting primary pupils' experiences concerning their interest levels.

  9. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties......, leading to death by 12 years of age on average. It is an autosomal recessive disorder, with a prevalence of approximately 2.5 per million. There are several phenotypes (1-3) and two complementation groups (CSA and CSB), and CS overlaps with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). It has been considered a progeria...

  10. [Dependency syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorisalo, Sailaritta

    2013-01-01

    The most common causes of lower limb edema include cardiac insufficiency, venous insufficiency, insufficiency of lymph flow, and side effects of drugs. It can also be due to dependency syndrome, in which the edema and skin changes can only be explained by a passive calf muscle pump and the resulting venous hypertension. Underlying the drop foot is always immobilization for one reason or other. The patient must be given an explanation about the situation, activated to move if possible, and in any case guided to the use of support stockings and postural therapy.

  11. Eagle Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beytholahi JM

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Eagle's syndrome is characterized by an elongated styloid process and (or calcification of"nstylohyoid ligament besides clinical symptoms. The symptoms are those related to pain when"nswallowing or rotating the neck, headacke, earache, dizziness, intermittent glossitis, sensation of"nforeign body in pharynx and transient syncope. The case which is presented can be considered a very"nrare form of the disease in which complete calcification of the ligament and it's thickening has"noccured. Also there is little relationship between the severity of calcification and severity of symptoms."nA careful and thorough evaluation of each panoramic radiography is emphasized.

  12. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  13. HELLP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Acar

    2014-08-01

    Suggested treatment modality consists, stabilization of blood pressure and magnesium sulfate infusion. Then evaluation of fetal status and planning delivery method and time if maternal status remains unstable. If prognosis seems favorable without urgent delivery and fetus can benefit from it, a course of betamethasone can be given to fetuses between 24 and 34 weeks of gestational age. The only and definite treatment of HELLP syndrome is delivering the baby. Suggested benefits of steroid therapy and other experimental treatments are still to be proven effective by large randomized controlled trials. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 735-760

  14. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  15. Lessons learned from nutrition curricular enhancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, Lisa A

    2006-04-01

    The Nutrition Academic Award funded 21 US medical schools to develop, implement, evaluate, and disseminate nutrition curricula for medical students, residents, and physicians in practice over a 5-y period. This article summarizes some of the important lessons learned from this process and offers guidance and strategies for long-term success of nutrition curricular enhancements. Medical educators need to continue to develop, implement, evaluate, and disseminate nutrition curricula with and without funding. By using the lessons learned and the products developed by the Nutrition Academic Award schools, educators will be in a position to enhance their medical curriculum.

  16. An inquiry-based programming lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Rice, Emily; Derdzinski, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    We designed a 2-day inquiry activity where students learned about error analysis and coding practices in Python. Inquiry-based lessons provide students with opportunities to independently investigate scientific concepts and tools. A general structure is developed ahead of time and minimal, careful guidance provided during the activity, but students are given as much freedom as possible to explore the concepts at their own pace. We designed our activity to help students learn to write flexible, re-usable, and readable code. I will describe the lesson structure we initially designed, as well as what aspects worked for our students (or didn't) and our experience leading the activity.

  17. Very Large System Dynamics Models - Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Leonard Malczynski

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides lessons learned from developing several large system dynamics (SD) models. System dynamics modeling practice emphasize the need to keep models small so that they are manageable and understandable. This practice is generally reasonable and prudent; however, there are times that large SD models are necessary. This paper outlines two large SD projects that were done at two Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Idaho National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes the models and then discusses some of the valuable lessons learned during these two modeling efforts.

  18. Lessons from Fukushima - February 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris-Suzuki, Tessa; Boilley, David; McNeill, David; Gundersen, Arnie; Beranek, Jan; Blomme, Brian; Hanaoka, Wakao; Schulz, Nina; Stensil, Shawn-Patrick; Teule, Rianne; Tumer, Aslihan; McCann, Christine; Otani, Nanako; Hirsch, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    It has been almost 12 months since the Fukushima nuclear disaster began. Although the Great East Japan earthquake and the following tsunami triggered it, the key causes of the nuclear accident lie in the institutional failures of political influence and industry-led regulation. It was a failure of human institutions to acknowledge real reactor risks, a failure to establish and enforce appropriate nuclear safety standards and a failure to ultimately protect the public and the environment. This report, commissioned by Greenpeace International, addresses what lessons can be taken away from this catastrophe. The one-year memorial of the Fukushima accident offers a unique opportunity to ask ourselves what the tragedy - which is far from being over for hundreds of thousands of Japanese people - has taught us. And it also raises the question, are we prepared to learn? There are broader issues and essential questions that still deserve our attention: - How it is possible that - despite all assurances - a major nuclear accident on the scale of the Chernobyl disaster of 1986 happened again, in one of the world's most industrially advanced countries? - Why did emergency and evacuation plans not work to protect people from excessive exposure to the radioactive fallout and resulting contamination? Why is the government still failing to better protect its citizens from radiation one year later? - Why are the over 100,000 people who suffer the most from the impacts of the nuclear accident still not receiving adequate financial and social support to help them rebuild their homes, lives and communities? These are the fundamental questions that we need to ask to be able to learn from the Fukushima nuclear disaster. This report looks into them and draws some important conclusions: 1. The Fukushima nuclear accident marks the end of the 'nuclear safety' paradigm. 2. The Fukushima nuclear accident exposes the deep and systemic failure of the very institutions that are supposed to

  19. Lessons Learned from ISS Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, C.

    2002-01-01

    Forty years of human spaceflight activities are now culminating in the International Space Station program (ISS). The ISS involves fifteen nations, working together to create a permanently occupied orbital facility that will support scientific and potentially, commercial endeavours. The assembly of the ISS is scheduled to be completed later in this decade, after which it will be operated for at least ten years. At the strategic level, such a complex international project is highly dependent on the fifteen Partners' respective internal politics and foreign policies. On the operational level, Partners still have certain difficulties in issuing and agreeing to common technical procedures. As with almost all aspects of International Space Station cooperation, the Partners are going through a constant learning process, where they have to deal with complex political, legal and operational differences. Intergovernmental Agreement and the Memoranda of Understanding, the instruments forming the legal backbone of the International Space Station cooperation, are still lacking a fair number of arrangements that need to be created for completing and operating the Station. The whole endeavour is also a constant learning process at the operational level, as astronauts, cosmonauts, engineers and technicians on the ground with different cultural and educational backgrounds, learn to work together. One recent Space Shuttle mission to the Station showed the importance of standardising even trivial system components such as packaging labels, as it took the astronauts half a day more than planned to correctly unpack the equipment. This paper will provide a synthesis of some of the main lessons learned during the first few years of International Space Station's lifetime. Important political, legal and operational issues will be addressed and combined. This analysis will provide some guidelines and recommendations for future international space projects, such as an international human

  20. Lessons from reproductive technology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, George E

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) have come into routine use over the past half century. Some of these procedures were used much earlier experimentally. For example, Spallanzani performed artificial insemination in the dog in the late 1700s, and Heape did successful embryo transfer in the rabbit in 1890. Truly revolutionary tools and concepts important for ART occur at approximately half-decade intervals, for example, recombinant DNA procedures, transgenic technology, somatic cell nuclear transplantation, the polymerase chain reaction, and microRNAs. Similarly, obvious technologies sometimes take decades to come into practical use, such as sexing sperm and in vitro fertilization. I have categorized ARTs into five somewhat arbitrary categories in terms of perceived difficulty and feasibility: (a) when the seemingly possible turns out to be (essentially) impossible, e.g., homozygous, uniparental females; (b) when the seemingly impossible becomes possible, e.g., cryopreservation of embryos and transgenesis; (c) when the seemingly difficult turns out to be relatively easy, e.g., cryopreservation of sperm; (d) when the seemingly easy turns out to be difficult in key species, e.g., in vitro fertilization; and (e) when the seemingly difficult remains difficult, e.g., making true embryonic stem cells. The adage that "it is easy when you know how" applies repeatedly. The boundaries between what appears impossible/possible and difficult/easy change constantly owing to new tools and insights, one of the more important lessons learned. ARTs frequently are synergistic with each other. For example, somatic cell nuclear transplantation has made many kinds of experiments feasible that otherwise were impractical. Another example is that sexing sperm is useless for application without artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization. ARTs frequently are perceived as neat tricks and stimulate further thinking. This is useful for both teaching and research.

  1. A Social Studies Education Lesson from Turkey: Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Acikalin

    2014-02-01

    Therefore, an example of a social studies lesson from Turkish educational context is provided for the special issue of Journal of Social Science Education. This may be the first recorded and transcribed social studies lesson from Turkey.  To my knowledge there is no other example to date of a completely recorded and transcribed social studies lesson from Turkey. Thus, this study provides an example of a social studies lesson from Turkey in order to facilitate comparison with examples of social studies lessons from other parts of the world.

  2. The Role of a Commander in Military Lessons Learned Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenon Waliński

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to investigate the role of a commander in military Lessons Learned systems. In order to achieve the aim, the paper presents (1 the architecture of the Lessons Learned capabilities in the U.S. Army, NATO and the Polish Armed Forces, (2 the commander’s role in the Lessons Learned process (3 the commander’s role in fostering Lessons Learned organisation culture. The paper is based on multiple case study analysis including Lessons Learned systems in NATO, the U.S. Army and the Polish Armed Forces.

  3. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  4. Cardiorenal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease.  Heart failure may lead to acute kidney injury and vice versa. Chronic kidney disease may affect the clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Renal impairment with any degree of albuminuria has been increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and heart failure hospitalizations, while chronic heart failure may cause chronic kidney disease. The bidirectional nature of these disorders contributes to the complexity and the composite definitions of cardiorenal syndromes. However, the most important clinical trials in heart failure tend to exclude patients with significant renal dysfunction. The mechanisms whereby renal insufficiency worsens the outcome in heart failure are not known, and several pathways could contribute to the ‘‘vicious heart/kidney circle.’’ Traditionally, renal impairment has been attributed to the renal hypoperfusion due to reduced cardiac output and decreased systemic pressure. The hypovolemia leads to sympathetic activity, increased renin-angiotensin aldosterone pathway, and arginine-vasopressin release. These mechanisms cause fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, and volume overload. Therapy to improve renal dysfunction, reduce neurohormonal activation and ameliorate renal blood flow could lead to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with cardiorenal syndrome.

  5. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  6. Drug withdrawal and hyperphagia: lessons from tobacco and other drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Paula J; Gold, Mark S

    2011-01-01

    'Globesity' is a descriptive term for the obesity epidemic now facing the U.S. and indeed, the world. Hyperphagia (i.e. overeating) can lead to metabolic syndrome which in turn can lead to Type 2 diabetes mellitus, heart disease, stroke and some cancers. The World Health Organization even states that more people die each year from the consequences of obesity than from hunger. Something must be done to stem the tsunami of obesity and its resultant medical complications. Our work and that of others suggests that new obesity treatments and anti-obesity medications should be based on those already successful in treating other addictions. This paper looks at empirical evidence linking addictions to food and to drugs such as tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, amphetamines, and cocaine. Hypotheses are put forth as to why hyperphagia is so difficult to treat. Additionally, prenatal programming for addiction is explored. Lessons from successful drug treatment are elucidated and potential pharmaceutical targets for hyperphagia and obesity are suggested.

  7. Accessing children's knowledge of sociolinguistic rules for speech therapy lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripich, D N; Panagos, J M

    1985-11-01

    Eight dyads of misarticulating school children (M = 7:9 years) enrolled in clinical programs were videotaped while they role-played 5-min remedial articulation lessons. Analysis of lesson transcripts was carried out at selected levels (lesson management, roles, discourse contexts, communicative acts, discourse sequences, and topic introduction). The "clinicians" controlled the lesson tasks and topics and used communicative acts in a manner typical of adult clinicians. The "clients" role-played cooperatively and displayed the response patterns of children receiving remedial lessons. Hierarchical relationships among the selected levels of analysis suggested the use of a cohesive register appropriate for clinical teaching. It is suggested that children's sociolinguistic perspectives on remedial speech and language lessons should be taken into account when intervention lessons are planned and implemented.

  8. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Marfan Syndrome KidsHealth / For Parents / Marfan Syndrome Print en español Síndrome de Marfan What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder of the ...

  9. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Usher syndrome. However, the RP associated with Usher syndrome shares most of its characteristics with other forms of RP. Researchers expect that advances in understanding and treating other forms of RP will directly benefit people with Usher syndrome and vice versa. What is Usher Syndrome? Risk ...

  10. Burnout Syndrome of Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Semrádová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis covers burnout syndrome of teachers. Defines burnout syndrome, describes its causes and symptoms. Describes teaching as helping profession and focousing on stressful situations at school. In the last chapter described different prevention strategies burnout syndrome. Key words: burnout syndrome, teaching, teacher, helping professions, beginning teacher, stress

  11. Rett Syndrome Turns 50: Themes From a Chronicle: Medical Perspectives and the Human Face of Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronen, Gabriel M; Rosenbaum, Peter L

    2016-08-01

    Fifty years ago Andreas Rett first described in great detail what came to be known as "Rett syndrome." Understanding girls and women with this syndrome and their families helped in many ways to revolutionize modern neurodevelopmental medicine. For some people the identification of the genetic underpinning of the syndrome and the ongoing biological research into this condition represented the peak of the scientific accomplishments in Rett syndrome. For others, it was developments in clinical research methodologies that were especially important. Above all, the patient- and family-oriented empathetic and collaborative approach to care by professionals collaborating with families has led to immense achievements, both scientific and humanistic. The aim of this narrative was to describe the medical and personal life story of a young woman with Rett syndrome and to offer a history that highlights developments in the unraveling of this condition from its initial recognition to our current understanding. We believe that much can be learned from the humanistic style of care provision combined with the best possible level of assisted autonomy and life enjoyment of the young woman with Rett syndrome. In addition, the approach to collaborative research by dedicated and often charitable leaders in the field can teach us many important lessons about the ethics of clinical and health services research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome or Wilkie Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano Llano, Rodrigo; Chams Anturi, Abraham; Arango Vargas, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We described three cases of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome, also known as Wilkie's syndrome, chronic duodenal ileus, or cast syndrome. This syndrome occurs when the third portion of the duodenum is compressed between the SMA and the aorta. The major risk factors for development of SMA syndrome are rapid weight loss and surgical correction of spinal deformities. The clinical presentation of SMA syndrome is variable and nonspecific, including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and weight loss. The diagnosis is based on endoscopic, radiographic and tomographic findings of duodenal compression by the SMA. The treatment of SMA syndrome is aimed at the precipitating factor, which usually is related to weight loss. Therefore, conservative therapy with nutritional supplementation is the initial approach, and surgery is reserved for those who do not respond to nutritional therapy.

  13. Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltsee, G.

    2000-02-24

    This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

  14. Lessons Learned from the Private Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, Robert J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-07

    This session is focused on lessons learned from private sector energy projects that could be applied to the federal sector. This presentation tees up the subsequent presentations by outlining the differences between private and federal sectors in objectives, metrics for determining success, funding resources/mechanisms, payback and ROI evaluation, risk tolerance/aversion, new technology adoption perspectives, and contracting mechanisms.

  15. The Joy and Dread of Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingher, Gary

    1995-01-01

    Children learn in a variety of contexts and from a variety of teachers, including their peers. It can be stimulating for children to examine the learning process and identify their own learning milestones. Brief reviews of stories about family and outside lessons and an activities sampler are provided. (Author/AEF)

  16. Rectifying Horizontal Inequalities: Lessons from African Conflict

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the conflict, and the action taken after violent conflict ceased. Section three will be dedicated to the lessons learned from the Malian and the Rwandan experience, including policy recommendations that should be instituted for any nation where horizontal inequalities are a major catalyst of conflict. Introduction. As a new ...

  17. Bicycle lessons, activity participation and empowerment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloof, A. van der; Bastiaanssen, J.; Martens, C.J.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the impact of bicycle lessons for immigrant and refugee women on bicycle use and activity participation. Especially non-Western immigrant and refugee women have been identified as one of the population groups most likely to experience accessibility problems and, subsequently,

  18. Lessons Learned from a Consultation Process Overseas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Soto, César

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary I discuss three international school consultation experiences, highlighting aspects that serve as lessons for professional development and the implementation of effective and helpful strategies that meet the needs of children and youth in school systems. Relationships developed and maintained between the consulting teams and the…

  19. Most Effective Practices in Lesson Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Sid T.; Pepper, Stephanie; Hanna, Shellie L.; Bell, Columbus David

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study with 130 undergraduate teacher candidates from all licensure levels, data on candidate effectiveness were examined using factor analysis. Four factors were found in effective teaching, those being lesson planning, teacher and student reflection, safe school environment, and teacher professionalism. The present study followed…

  20. Improving IT Project Portfolio Management: Lessons Learned

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Keld

    2013-01-01

    The IT PPM improvement process is not well understood, and our knowledge about what makes IT PPM improvement succeed or fail is not well developed. This article presents lessons learned from organizations trying to improve their IT PPM practice. Based on this research IT PPM practitioners are adv...

  1. Werk geven en nemen lessons learned

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, T. de; Smit, A.

    2012-01-01

    “Werk geven en nemen - lessons learned” geeft inzicht in de leerpunten, verworven inzichten en conclusies die zijn voortgekomen uit de opzet, activiteiten en resultaten van BESO in de periode 2010 - 2012. De publicatie is met name bedoeld voor professionals en bestuurders van zowel publieke als

  2. Making recovery sustainable : lessons from country innovations

    OpenAIRE

    International Labour Office; International Institute for Labour Studies

    2011-01-01

    Examines the crucial contribution of employment and incomes to a sustainable recovery and assesses how policies can best be designed in order to promote employment and incomes, taking into account the lessons learned from country experiences since the start of the global crisis in 2008.

  3. Lessons in Outbreak a Consumer perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, A.R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Lessons in Outbreak a Consumer perspective. Arnout Fischer Consumer risk perceptions is not necessarily the same as an economic weighing of risks and benefits. Consumers tend to be risk averse, tend to estimate catastrophic, unnatural or involuntary risks as larger, while personal lifestyle risks

  4. A Few Lessons from the Past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Harold D.

    1986-01-01

    The author looks back to see whether lessons from the past might help as we face the present and future. He offers quotes from H.S. Commager's "Our Schools Have Kept Us Free"; Deanne W. Mallot, president of Cornell University; and the faculty of George Peabody College for Teachers. (CT)

  5. Promoting Systems Thinking through Biology Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Werner; Mischo, Christoph

    2010-04-01

    This study's goal was to analyze various teaching approaches within the context of natural science lessons, especially in biology. The main focus of the paper lies on the effectiveness of different teaching methods in promoting systems thinking in the field of Education for Sustainable Development. The following methods were incorporated into the study: special lessons designed to promote systems thinking, a computer-simulated scenario on the topic "ecosystem forest," and a combination of both special lessons and the computer simulation. These groups were then compared to a control group. A questionnaire was used to assess systems thinking skills of 424 sixth-grade students of secondary schools in Germany. The assessment differentiated between a conceptual understanding (measured as achievement score) and a reflexive justification (measured as justification score) of systems thinking. The following control variables were used: logical thinking, grades in school, memory span, and motivational goal orientation. Based on the pretest-posttest control group design, only those students who received both special instruction and worked with the computer simulation showed a significant increase in their achievement scores. The justification score increased in the computer simulation condition as well as in the combination of computer simulation and lesson condition. The possibilities and limits of promoting various forms of systems thinking by using realistic computer simulations are discussed.

  6. Lessons from the Electricity Auctions in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutra, Joisa; Menezes, Flavio

    2005-01-01

    The first lesson to emerge from the recent auctions falls within a category that might be described as 'higher costs of reforms in developing economies.' These range from bidders' fears of future government-imposed price caps to technical issues, such as the potential loss of efficiency resulting from bidders' lack of knowledge about ceiling prices, reference supply, and the demand reduction mechanism

  7. Sample Lesson Plans. Management for Effective Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfax County Public Schools, VA. Dept. of Instructional Services.

    This guide is part of the Management for Effective Teaching (MET) support kit, a pilot project developed by the Fairfax County (Virginia) Public Schools to assist elementary school teachers in planning, managaing, and implementing the county's curriculum, Program of Studies (POS). In this guide, a sample lesson plan of a teaching-learning activity…

  8. Finding Possibility and Probability Lessons in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busadee, Nutjira; Laosinchai, Parames; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2011-01-01

    Today's students demand that their lessons be real, interesting, relevant, and manageable. Mathematics is one subject that eludes many students partly because its traditional presentation lacks those elements that encourage students to learn. Easy accessibility through electronic media has exposed people all over the world to a variety of sports…

  9. LESSONS FOR THE FUTURE OF WOMEN ENTREPRENEURSHIP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With globalization and increasing use of. ICTs, networking can be easily harnessed for business success. Synergizing the Lessons Learnt for Future Women Entrepreneurs. To stem the tide of unemployment in parts of South Eastern Nigeria, there is need for new groups of women entrepreneurs that possess innovation or ...

  10. Teaching about Terrorism: Lessons Learned at SWOTT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gregory D.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses some of the challenges and lessons for teaching undergraduate-level courses related to terrorism. The author outlines some of the primary issues that instructors can expect to face, and provides strategies for dealing with several of these challenges. The goal is to relay useful information to those teaching, or planning to…

  11. Commissioning MMS: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul; Gramling, Cheryl; Reiter, Jennifer; Smith, Patrick; Stone, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses commissioning of NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission. The mission includes four identical spacecraft with a large, complex set of instrumentation. The planning for and execution of commissioning for this mission is described. The paper concludes by discussing lessons learned.

  12. English Pronunciation Lessons: A Teacher's Resource Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Catholic Migration Commission, Morong (Philippines).

    The manual for English pronunciation instruction is designed for use in intensive language courses for Southeast Asians learning English as a Second Language. An introductory section suggests classroom presentation and lesson planning techniques and gives background information on English phonology and pronunciation instruction. A variety of…

  13. What Teachers Understand of Model Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, researchers in mathematics teacher education have identified characteristics of high quality professional development (PD). This report describes an investigation of a common approach to PD with secondary mathematics teachers, providing teachers with opportunities to experience reform-oriented model lessons as students…

  14. Probing Teachers' Lesson Planning: Promoting Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilam, Billie

    2017-01-01

    Classrooms are complex systems, with dynamic interactions of different kinds among their composing varied elements. Such complex interactions lead to the system's unpredictable emergent learning behaviors. To support teachers' lesson planning and monitoring in the complex environment of classrooms, the present article examines the core…

  15. Lessons learned on digital systems safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivertsen, Terje

    2005-06-01

    A decade ago, in 1994, lessons learned from Halden research activities on digital systems safety were summarized in the reports HWR-374 and HWR-375, under the title 'A Lessons Learned Report on Software Dependability'. The reports reviewed all activities made at the Halden Project in this field since 1977. As such, the reports provide a wealth of information on Halden research. At the same time, the lessons learned from the different activities are made more accessible to the reader by being summarized in terms of results, conclusions and recommendations. The present report provides a new lessons learned report, covering the Halden Project research activities in this area from 1994 to medio 2005. As before, the emphasis is on the results, conclusions and recommendations made from these activities, in particular how they can be utilized by different types of organisations, such as licensing authorities, safety assessors, power companies, and software developers. The contents of the report have been edited on the basis of input from a large number of Halden work reports, involving many different authors. Brief summaries of these reports are included in the last part of the report. (Author)

  16. Rural Entrepreneurship in Nigeria: Lessons From Scientific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article focussed on the lessons that can be garnered from the tenets of Scientific Management. We undertook an X-ray of the tenets of Scientific Management and how these tenets can be adopted to ensure the success of emerging entrepreneurs in the rural areas. Many rural entrepreneurs fail within a short period of ...

  17. Lessons learned from failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le May, I.

    2006-01-01

    Failure analysis can be a very useful tool to designers and operators of plant and equipment. It is not simply something that is done for lawyers and insurance companies, but is a tool from which lessons can be learned and by means of which the 'breed' can be improved. In this presentation, several failure investigations that have contributed to understanding will be presented. Specifically, the following cases will be discussed: 1) A fire at a refinery that occurred in a desulphurization unit. 2) The failure of a pipeline before it was even put into operation. 3) Failures in locomotive axles that took place during winter operation. The refinery fire was initially blamed on defective Type 321 seamless stainless steel tubing, but there were conflicting views between 'experts' involved as to the mechanism of failure and the writer was called upon to make an in-depth study. This showed that there were a variety of failure mechanism involved, including high temperature fracture, environmentally-induced cracking and possible manufacturing defects. The unraveling of the failure sequence is described and illustrated. The failure of an oil transmission was discovered when the line was pressure tested some months after it had been installed and before it was put into service. Repairs were made and failure occurred in another place upon the next pressure test being conducted. After several more repairs had been made the line was abandoned and a lawsuit was commenced on the basis that the steel was defective. An investigation disclosed that the material was sensitive to embrittlement and the causes of this were determined. As a result, changes were made in the microstructural control of the product to avoid similar problems in future. A series of axle failures occurred in diesel electric locomotives during winter. An investigation was made to determine the nature of the failures which were not by classical fatigue, nor did they correspond to published illustrations of Cu

  18. [Syndrome X vs metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Villegas, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Himsworth in 1939 postulated that Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2) was not only an insulin deficiency state but also a cellular insulin insensitivity disease. Thirty years later, DeFronzo and Reaven demonstrated that insulin resistance (IR) preceded and predisposed for DM2 and atherosclerotic-cardiovascular-disease (ACVD). Reaven was the first to point out the relationship between IR and with hyperglycemia, dyslipidosis, and hypertension as mediators for ACVD, creating the concept of Syndrome X (SX) in 1988. WHO and, thereafter, other medical societies and medical groups, mainly ATP-III, in 2002, based on the difficulty of diagnosing IR in a simple, reliable, and inexpensive way, proposed and published the Metabolic Syndrome (MS) concept, as a group of five variables, i.e., obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL, and hypertension, as an easy clinical approximation to suspect and treat an increased cardiometabolic risk. Nowadays, there are deep and extensive controversies on this issue; however, these controversies do not really exist since all discordant points of view are rather quantitative and not qualitative in nature. This article is aimed at differentiating and harmonizing the complementary concepts of SX and MS, at analyzing why MS is a good "clinical window" to look for IR and its underlying manifestations, and finally to accept that the MS concept complements, but does not substitute or antagonize, traditional scales used to asses cardiovascular risk, such as the Framingham scale.

  19. Syndromes with supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinsky, Mark; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-10-01

    While most supernumerary teeth are idiopathic, they can be associated with a number of Mendelian syndromes. However, this can also be a coincidental finding, since supernumerary teeth occur in 6% or more of the normal population. To better define this relationship, we analyzed the evidence for specific associations. We excluded conditions with a single affected patient reported, supernumerary teeth adjacent to clefts or other forms of alveolar disruption (as secondary rather than primary findings), and natal teeth, which can involve premature eruption of a normal tooth. Since, the cause of supernumerary teeth shows considerable heterogeneity, certain findings are less likely to be coincidental, such as five or more supernumerary teeth in a single patient, or locations outside of the premaxilla. We found only eight genetic syndromes with strong evidence for an association: cleidocranial dysplasia; familial adenomatous polyposis; trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; Nance-Horan syndrome; Opitz BBB/G syndrome; oculofaciocardiodental syndrome; and autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome. There is also suggestive evidence of an association with two uncommon disorders, Kreiborg-Pakistani syndrome (craniosynostosis and dental anomalies), and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosisnigricans. An association of a Mendelian disorder with a low frequency manifestation of supernumerary teeth is difficult to exclude without large numbers, but several commonly cited syndromes lacked evidence for clear association, including Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Fabry disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Apert and Crouzon syndromes, Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. HEPATORENAL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Hafner

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is acommon complication of advanced hepatic disease characterizedby marked abnormalities in arterial circulation and byrenal failure. An extreme arteriolar vasodilatation located inthe splanchnic circulation results in a reduction of total systemicvascular resistence and arterial hypotension. Vasoconstrictionoccurs in the renal circulation as in all other extrasplanchnicvascular territories. In the kidney, marked renalvasoconstriction results in a low glomerular filtration rate.Conclusions. The diagnosis of HRS is currently based on exclusionof other causes of renal failure. Prognosis of patientswith HRS is very poor. Liver transplantation is the best therapeuticoption, but it is seldom applicable due to the short survivalexpectancy of most patients with HRS, particularly thosewith the rapidly progressive type of HRS. New therapies developedduring the last few years, such as the use of systemicvasoconstrictors or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemicshunts (TIPS appear promising. Such treatments are of interestnot only as a bridge to liver transplantation but also as atherapy for patients who are not candidates for transplantation.

  1. Teaching science to science teachers: Lessons taught and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, E. M.; Hashimoto-Martell, E. A.; Balicki, S.; Oglavie, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    our diverse participants was a constant challenge for us as instructors. In summer 2008, the course was organized so that fundamentals (chemistry, heat transfer, convection, physics) were taught in the first week and then applied in broader topics (water cycle, carbon cycle, weather and precipitation) in the second week. Learning these fundamentals was challenging for many teachers. Furthermore, the organization of topics caused frustration because there was not enough connection to the broader concepts of the course. In summer 2009, we rearranged the topics and interwove fundamentals with contextual topics within each week. We found this approach to be more successful in engaging and educating the teachers. The most successful activities were often the simplest to organize. Valuable instructional strategies included daily assessments in the form of morning quizzes, keeping a class website with all course materials, and centering the major project of the course around a lesson that teachers would design for their particular context. We saw a dramatic improvement in pre- and post-assessment test scores, with the class average increasing from 58% (pre-test) to 95% (post-test).

  2. Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burgt Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Noonan Syndrome (NS is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care.

  3. Sotos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2007-09-07

    Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation) are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (therapies are mostly symptomatic, including phototherapy in case of jaundice, treatment of the feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux, and detection and treatment of hypoglycemia. General pediatric follow-up is important during the first years of life to allow detection and management of clinical complications such as scoliosis and febrile seizures. An adequate psychological and educational program with speech therapy and motor stimulation plays an important role in the global development of the

  4. Raynaud syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdovinos, Sergio Toledo; Landry, Gregory J

    2014-12-01

    Raynaud syndrome (RS) was first described by the French physician Maurice Raynaud in 1862 with the characteristic tricolor change featuring pallor (ischemic phase), cyanosis (deoxygenation phase), and erythema (reperfusion phase) induced by cold or stress. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanism is unclear, alterations in activity of the peripheral adrenoceptor have been implicated, specifically an enhanced smooth muscle contraction due to overexpression or hyperactivity of postsynaptic alpha 2 receptors. There are 2 ways that RS can appear clinically; isolated, formerly referred as Raynaud disease or now primary RS and in association with other conditions, usually connective tissue disorders (eg, Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, and rheumatoid arthritis), frequently called Raynaud phenomenon or secondary RS. The estimated prevalence in the general population is 3%-5%, with a higher prevalence in women than in men. The diagnosis is mainly clinical, based on patient descriptions of skin changes. Upper extremity pulse-volume recording is used to rule out proximal arterial obstruction. The differentiation between a vasospastic vs and obstructive mechanism is made using digital pressures and photoplethysmography, where an obstructive mechanism has decreased pressures and blunted waveforms. Cold challenge testing, such as ice water immersion with temperature recovery, is highly sensitive but lack specificity. Serologic screening (antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor) is advocated to rule out associated connective tissue disorders. Most patients with RS can be managed conservatively, with avoidance of cold exposure or hand warming. For those in whom conservative management is inadequate, a number of pharmacologic and surgical therapies have been used. Owing to lack of complete understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, targeted therapy has not been possible; rather, therapy has been focused on the use of general

  5. Griscelli syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Patrick O; Sternberg, Lauren J; Phelps, Robert G

    2007-01-01

    The dermatology staff was called to evaluate abnormal hair on a 22-month-old Hispanic girl whose parents were first cousins. Her medical history was significant for leptomeningitis with subsequent neurologic devastation, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and recurrent respiratory infections. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis, liver dysfunction, pan-cytopenia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. She had developed normally for the first year of life. At 13 months she became progressively lethargic and developed floppy muscle tone; a delay in mental and motor milestones was recognized. Results of a metabolic workup were negative. On examination she was noted to have generalized excessively fair skin when compared with her parents. She had silver-gray hair (Figure 1) and white eyebrows and body hair. Her maternal grandfather and granduncles had silver hair since childhood, but were without health problems. A maternal family member was said to have light skin. The presumed diagnosis before pathologic examination was Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Hematoxylin and eosin stain tests revealed prominent melanocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis. The melanocytes were large and distended with a large volume of melanin (Figure 2). The adjacent keratinocytes were completely devoid of melanin. Application of Masson-Fontana ammoniac silver stain highlighted prominent melanocytic melanin and a relative paucity of melanin in the adjacent keratinocytes (Figure 3). Microscopic examination of her hair revealed clumps of melanin of various sizes and shapes irregularly distributed throughout the hair shaft. Ultrastructural examination of the epidermis showed the melanocytes were distended by an accumulation of large stage IV mature melanosomes. Peripheral blood smear failed to show abnormal granules, even after repeated examination. Based on the clinical features and the pathologic findings, a diagnosis of Griscelli syndrome type 2 was made.

  6. Lessons Learned and Technical Standards: A Logical Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Paul; Vaughan, William W.; Garcia, Danny; Gill, Maninderpal S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive database of lessons learned that corresponds with relevant technical standards would be a boon to technical personnel and standards developers. The authors discuss the emergence of one such database within NASA, and show how and why the incorporation of lessons learned into technical standards databases can be an indispensable tool for government and industry. Passed down from parent to child, teacher to pupil, and from senior to junior employees, lessons learned have been the basis for our accomplishments throughout the ages. Government and industry, too, have long recognized the need to systematically document And utilize the knowledge gained from past experiences in order to avoid the repetition of failures and mishaps. The use of lessons learned is a principle component of any organizational culture committed to continuous improvement. They have formed the foundation for discoveries, inventions, improvements, textbooks, and technical standards. Technical standards are a very logical way to communicate these lessons. Using the time-honored tradition of passing on lessons learned while utilizing the newest in information technology, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has launched an intensive effort to link lessons learned with specific technical standards through various Internet databases. This article will discuss the importance of lessons learned to engineers, the difficulty in finding relevant lessons learned while engaged in an engineering project, and the new NASA project that can help alleviate this difficulty. The article will conclude with recommendations for more expanded cross-sectoral uses of lessons learned with reference to technical standards.

  7. Lessons learned in CMAM implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, Nicky; Brown, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    -going. Despite the need to adapt protocols and approaches to each specific context, there is a need for a common research agenda and sharing of what works and does not. Concerted efforts have been made to improve information-sharing and to draw on lessons learned to advance technical and organisational challenges. However many health workers have limited access to quality information due to barriers such as internet access and language. For example, one recent initiative identified less than 10% of resources are available in French, despite high caseloads of acute malnutrition in francophone West Africa. Key actions to address challenges in information-sharing include: -Improve availability of and access to translated information -Increase use of social media, e-learning and audio-visual materials for extended reach and use of information -Stimulate interactive dialogue and sharing between practitioners for improved problem solving and learning -Strengthen the collaboration between complementary initiatives. In one decade significant advances in the adaptation and implementation of community-based management of acute malnutrition approach have been made in various contexts, but challenges to quality service delivery, scale-up and sustainability remain. It is time to draw on what we know to support scale-up and have equitable access to treatment to the millions of children who still remain outside of existing services. (author)

  8. Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Duane Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U D Shrestha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome (GHS is also known as Oculo-Auriculo-Vertebral (OAV syndrome or Branchial arch syndrome. Duane retraction syndrome (DRS is a congenital disorder of ocular motility characterized by limited abduction, adduction or both. It is unilateral in 80% of cases. The important and interesting part of this eight months old child is presence of GHS with DRS. She has bilateral invol-vement, which is seen in only 5-8% of GHS, as compared to high incidence of unilateral involve-ment. This child also had refractive error of + 6.00/ - 1.5 * 180. At four year of age her vision with glass was 6/9. Children with GHS and DRS should have early eye examination done to treat the problem of refractive error. Keywords: Duane retraction syndrome; goldenhar syndrome, refractive error.

  9. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: a never ending story!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes N. van den Anker

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal Abstinence syndrome (NAS is the result of fetal exposure to illicit or prescription drugs (for example opioids, benzodiazepines, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors taken by the mother prenatally. NAS is a complex of symptoms, caused by acute withdrawal of the illicit drug(s used by their mothers during pregnancy, seen in neonates hours or days after being born. In the United States of America around 16% of teenagers and 7% of women between the ages of 18 and 25 use illicit drugs during their pregnancies. In this paper the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy and treatment of NAS are presented. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  10. Prenatal Tests for Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME S HARE W ITH W OMEN PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME What Is Down Syndrome? ... suggests that you consult your health care provider. PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME 256 Volume 50, No. ...

  11. Sharing Lessons Learned Between Industries in EU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehleisen, A.; Strucic, M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent events in nuclear industry remind us on importance of continuous sharing of the knowledge and experience gained through evaluations of incidents and accidents. We frequently use experience from our daily life activities to improve our performance and avoid some mistakes or unwanted events. In the similar way we can use other industries experience. These experiences can be applied to improve nuclear safety. For example, Safety Culture, which has a great influence on the level of nuclear power plants safety, is similarly presented in other industries. Mechanisms which led to accidents from weak safety culture in one branch of other industry could be comparable to those in nuclear industry. Some other industries have many more cumulative years of experience than nuclear industry. Aviation and Oil industries are typical representatives. Part of their experience can be used in nuclear industry too. Number of reports from nuclear power plants showed us that not only specific equipment related causes lay behind accidents; there are also other causes and contributors which are more common for all industries. Hence lessons learned in other industry should be assessed and used in nuclear industry too. In the European Union, a regional initiative has been set up in 2008 in support of EU Member State nuclear safety authorities, but also EU technical support organizations, international organizations and the broader nuclear community, to enhance nuclear safety through improvement of the use of lessons learned from operational experience of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The initiative, called ''the EU Clearinghouse on Operational Experience Feedback for NPP'', is organized as a network operated by a centralized office located at the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. The reduction of occurrence and significance of events in NPPs and their safe operation is its ultimate goal. Among others EU Clearinghouse provides services such as technical and scientific

  12. Learning to observe mathematical learning in lesson studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Klaus; Østergaard, Camilla Hellsten; Foss, Kristian Kildemoes

    2016-01-01

    This poster deals with lesson study (LS) in pre-service teacher education. In particular how to prepare for, carry out, and reflect upon, observations of pupil learning. Observation is of crucial importance to the lesson study process, and here we present a study of observation features which ena...... enable or hinder fruitful lesson study. While substantial research has been carried out in the general field of bserving pupils’ learning processes and teachers’ pedagogical practice, little is known about this in the particular setting of lesson study.......This poster deals with lesson study (LS) in pre-service teacher education. In particular how to prepare for, carry out, and reflect upon, observations of pupil learning. Observation is of crucial importance to the lesson study process, and here we present a study of observation features which...

  13. Overview of Brazilian industrial radiography accidents with cutaneous radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, C.M.A.; Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    It is well documented that industrial radiography is related to radiological accidents, which makes it the highest potential risk for human health. More than 80 radiological accidents happened in the world that includes 6 Brazilian accidents with Cutaneous Radiation Syndrome. Five of them happened with 192 Ir and one with 60 Co radioactive sources. Nineteen members of the public and 8 radiographers were involved. All of them suffered severe hands and fingers injuries. The Brazilian radiological accident happened in 1985 with 16 persons is analyzed showing causes, consequences, radiation doses and lessons learned. (author)

  14. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is a common major complication in patients with advanced cirrhosis and generally indicates a poor prognosis when combined with liver failure. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is characterised by a combination of disturbances in circulatory and kidney function. Arterial pressure is decreased in the systemic circulation due to reduced total systemic vascular resistance. Kidney dysfunction is caused by reduction in renal blood flow. The diagnosis of HRS is based on exclusion of other disorders that cause acute kidney injury in cirrhosis as there are no specific tests. There are two types of HRS with different characteristics and prognostics. Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for all patients without contraindication. The best approach to the pharmacologic management is the administration vasoconstrictor drugs based on the pathogenesis. Many vasoconstrictors including vasopressin analogues (terlipressin, ornipressin and vasopressin, somatostatin analogues (octreotide and alpha-adrenergic analogues (midodrine and norepinephrine have been studied. In most of the studies intravenous albumin therapy was coadministered with vasoconstrictor drugs and suggested that albumin should be considered as the component of pharmacologic intervention in patients with HRS. Renal replacement therapy in the form of hemodialysis or continuous venovenous hemofiltration has been used in the management of HRS patients awaiting transplantation or in those with acute potentially reversible conditions. The artificial hepatic support systems require further investigation. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 37-44

  15. Lessons learned in terms of crisis management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This document outlines that nobody was prepared to the crisis which occurred after the Chernobyl accident, whether in Russia, Europe or France. In order to illustrate the fact that crisis management has been different from one country to another, the report describes how the crisis has been managed in Norway (which has been quickly reached by fallouts and with a rather high level) and in Switzerland. It comments radioactivity measurements performed in France during spring 1986 by the SCPRI, the CEA and the ISPN. It discusses the lessons drawn in France in terms of emergency situation management regarding the protection of the population, crisis management, and the French post-accidental doctrine. It comments the lessons drawn in eastern European countries, with the cooperative implication of the IRSN. International projects are evoked: the Chernobyl Centre, the French-German Initiative, the European projects (EURANOS, NERIS, FARMING, STRATEGY, MOSES and SAMEN)

  16. Cryptography and the Internet: lessons and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCurley, K.S.

    1996-12-31

    The popularization of the Internet has brought fundamental changes to the world, because it allows a universal method of communication between computers. This carries enormous benefits with it, but also raises many security considerations. Cryptography is a fundamental technology used to provide security of computer networks, and there is currently a widespread engineering effort to incorporate cryptography into various aspects of the Internet. The system-level engineering required to provide security services for the Internet carries some important lessons for researchers whose study is focused on narrowly defined problems. It also offers challenges to the cryptographic research community by raising new questions not adequately addressed by the existing body of knowledge. This paper attempts to summarize some of these lessons and challenges for the cryptographic research community.

  17. MSL Lessons Learned and Knowledge Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxbaum, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Program has recently been informed of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee (PPS) recommendation, which was endorsed by the NAC, concerning Mars Science Lab (MSL) lessons learned and knowledge capture. The Mars Program has not had an opportunity to consider any decisions specific to the PPS recommendation. Some of the activities recommended by the PPS would involve members of the MSL flight team who are focused on cruise, entry descent & landing, and early surface operations; those activities would have to wait. Members of the MSL planetary protection team at JPL are still available to support MSL lessons learned and knowledge capture; some of the specifically recommended activities have already begun. The Mars Program shares the PPS/NAC concerns about loss of potential information & expertise in planetary protection practice.

  18. WHC significant lessons learned 1993--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickford, J.C.

    1997-12-12

    A lesson learned as defined in DOE-STD-7501-95, Development of DOE Lessons Learned Programs, is: A ``good work practice`` or innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat applications or an adverse work practice or experience that is captured and shared to avoid a recurrence. The key word in both parts of this definition is ``shared``. This document was published to share a wide variety of recent Hanford experiences with other DOE sites. It also provides a valuable tool to be used in new employee and continuing training programs at Hanford facilities and at other DOE locations. This manual is divided into sections to facilitate extracting appropriate subject material when developing training modules. Many of the bulletins could be categorized into more than one section, however, so examination of other related sections is encouraged.

  19. Lessons Learned in Software Testing A Context-Driven Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kaner, Cem; Pettichord, Bret

    2008-01-01

    Decades of software testing experience condensed into the most important lessons learned.The world's leading software testing experts lend you their wisdom and years of experience to help you avoid the most common mistakes in testing software. Each lesson is an assertion related to software testing, followed by an explanation or example that shows you the how, when, and why of the testing lesson. More than just tips, tricks, and pitfalls to avoid, Lessons Learned in Software Testing speeds you through the critical testing phase of the software development project without the extensive trial an

  20. Lessons Learned from Developing SAWA: A Situation Awareness Assistant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matheus, Christopher J; Kokar, Mieczyslaw M; Letkowski, Jerzy J; Call, Catherine; Baclawski, Kenneth; Hinman, Michael; Salerno, John; Boulware, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    .... During the process of its development several lessons were learned about advantages and limitations of certain approaches, techniques and technologies as they are applied to situation awareness...

  1. Knowledge and cognitive process dimensions of Technology teachers' lesson objectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mathumbu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A clearly stated lesson objective is considered an essential component of a well-planned lesson. Many teachers of Technology, a relatively new subject in South African schools, teach Technology with rather limited training both in content and methodological approaches. This study sought to investigate and classify lesson objectives framed or implied by teachers in their lesson plans according to knowledge and cognitive process dimensions. The two-dimensional Taxonomy Table introduced by Krathwohl was adapted for Technology and formed the framework for this study. It was found that most of the directly stated objectives are directed to the lower level of the cognitive process dimension and address mainly factual knowledge, while no activities or lesson components address meta-cognitive knowledge. Some lesson objectives inferred from planned assessment activities placed higher demands on learners' cognitive domain. A recommendation flowing from the study is that, during pre-service training and in-service teacher support processes, the importance of clear lesson objectives should be emphasised and that assessments planned for such lessons should closely match the lesson objectives. Further research is also needed on the reasons why low cognitive demands are made in the teaching of Technology.

  2. Radiological Control Technician: Phase 1, Site academic training lesson plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This volume provides lesson plans for training radiological control technicians. Covered here is basic radiological documentation, counting errors, dosimetry, environmental monitoring, and radiation instruments

  3. Speed, Acceleration, and Velocity: Level II, Unit 9, Lesson 1; Force, Mass, and Distance: Lesson 2; Types of Motion and Rest: Lesson 3; Electricity and Magnetism: Lesson 4; Electrical, Magnetic, and Gravitational Fields: Lesson 5; The Conservation and Conversion of Matter and Energy: Lesson 6; Simple Machines and Work: Lesson 7; Gas Laws: Lesson 8; Principles of Heat Engines: Lesson 9; Sound and Sound Waves: Lesson 10; Light Waves and Particles: Lesson 11; Program. A High.....

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for high-school level contains lessons on: Speed, Acceleration, and Velocity; Force, Mass, and Distance; Types of Motion and Rest; Electricity and Magnetism; Electrical, Magnetic, and Gravitational Fields; The Conservation and Conversion of Matter and Energy; Simple Machines and Work; Gas Laws; Principles of Heat Engines;…

  4. The lessons of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, K.C.

    1990-01-01

    This article looks at the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident in 1979 from the perspective of the manager of public affairs for General Public Utilities. A review of what was done, the types of information presented, the interfaces to the press, public and local and state government and why it did not work is presented. The article addresses communications and crisis management

  5. Impressions management: lessons from the oil industry

    OpenAIRE

    Halderen, Mignon; Berens, Guido; Bhatt, Mamta; Brown, Tom; Riel, Cees

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn the late 1990s, after over a century of extracting hydrocarbons, the petroleum industry faced a growing scientific consensus that pollution from fossil fuels is a major cause of global warming. Operationally and in terms of their global image, oil and gas companies faced a serious dilemma. Two major players, Exxon and British Petroleum, took very different approaches in their corporate communications strategies, the outcomes of which offer valuable lessons in impressions ma...

  6. VTEC: lessons learned from British outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, T H

    2000-01-01

    Important Escherichia coli O157 outbreaks in England and Scotland since 1982-83 are reviewed. The scientific lessons learned from them are described and their legal consequences outlined. The light shed by them on relationships between law and science is discussed, and questions of blame are analysed in the context of Reason's 'resident pathogen' metaphor and Vaughan's study of the 1986 Challenger Space Shuttle disaster.

  7. Lessons Learned From Joint Training Land Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    accredited to ISO 9001 . 3.2.6 Environmental Testing (Impact of the Munition on the Environment) Cranfield University’s Environmental Science Group has...Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited i LESSONS LEARNED FROM JOINT TRAINING LAND MANAGMENT CONTRACT REPORT by Dr Geoff Hooper and...AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Engineer Research & Development Center - International Research Office, ERDC-IRO, ATT: RICHMOND, Unit 4507, APO, AE

  8. Designing Lesson Content in Adaptive Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Danijela Milosevic

    2006-01-01

    Online learning is widely spreading and adaptive learning environments are increasing its potentials. We present a scenario of adapting learning content towards individual student characteristics taking into consideration his/her learning style type and subject matter motivation level. We use an ontology based student model for storing student information. The scenario of designing lesson content tailored to individual student needs is presented as a cross section of learning style and motiva...

  9. Unmanned Ground Vehicle Communications Relays: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    radio- frequency identification ( RFID ), magnetic coupling, and infrared data association (IrDA). The magnetic coupling and IrDA methods were used in...or rainy conditions) and keeping them clean (due to dust and gunk build up).  Radio-frequency identification ( RFID ) – We have considered using RFID ...lessons learned H.. Nguyen U U U UU 30 (619) 553–1871 INITIAL DISTRIBUTION 853 Archive/Stock (1) 843 Library (1) 71710 H

  10. Brazil's state debt crisis: lessons learned

    OpenAIRE

    Dillinger, William

    1998-01-01

    This note summarizes the chronology of the state debt crisis and the efforts by the Brazilian government to resolve it. It also describes the World Banks efforts to assist in this process through state level adjustment loans. It concludes with lessons. A technical appendix, detailing the loan conditionahty and disbursement mechanism used in the adjustment loans, is attached. Instituto de Investigaciones Económicas

  11. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OTC Relief for Diarrhea Home Diseases and Conditions Tics and Tourette Syndrome Condition Tics and Tourette Syndrome Share Print Table of Contents1. ... little or no control over. These are called tics. Several different tics can happen at the same ...

  12. Stuttering and Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... written specifically for parents. - Understanding Tourette Syndrome: A Handbook for Educators published by The Tourette Syndrome Foundation ... Earl Jones Actor James Earl Jones, a Broadway, television and movie star, is well-known for his ...

  13. The obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, R. H. W. M.; de Grootb, Ph. G.

    The association of persistent presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies and thromboembolic events, (recurrent) pregnancy loss or both is termed antiphospholipid syndrome. Pregnancies in women with the syndrome should be regarded as at high-risk for complications. Optimal management

  14. Prune belly syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001269.htm Prune belly syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Prune belly syndrome is a group of birth defects that ...

  15. Oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia (Goldenhar's syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, F K

    1971-03-01

    A case of Goldenhar's Syndrome or Oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia in a Ghanaian infant is described. Significant were the additional findings of congenital esophageal atresia and arthrogryposis which have so far not been reported in association with the syndrome.

  16. Cri du chat syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001593.htm Cri du chat syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cri du chat syndrome is a group of symptoms that result ...

  17. Alport Syndrome Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Groups Hear From the Experts Follow us on Facebook! Alport Syndrome Foundation of USA 2 days ago ... BIRTHDAY! ... See More See Less Photo View on Facebook · Share View on Facebook The Alport syndrome Foundation ...

  18. Terlipressin for hepatorenal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Christensen, Kurt; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials suggest that terlipressin improves renal function in hepatorenal syndrome, but the evidence concerning mortality is equivocal.......Clinical trials suggest that terlipressin improves renal function in hepatorenal syndrome, but the evidence concerning mortality is equivocal....

  19. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preena A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disease, with oculocutneous albinism, pulmonary fibrosis and bleeding diathesis. Here we report a case of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome who presented with dyspnea, oculocutaneous albinism and nystagmus.

  20. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Contact Us Donate Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ...

  1. Marfan syndrome (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue which causes skeletal defects typically recognized in a tall, lanky person. A person with Marfan syndrome may exhibit long limbs and spider-like fingers, ...

  2. What is Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Turner Syndrome Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a ... years today. 4 Down syndrome is named after John Langdon Down, the first physician to describe the ...

  3. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Yosemite FAQ: Non-U.S. Visitors to Yosemite History of HPS Related Links Prevent Rodent Infestations Cleaning Up After Rodents Diseases From Rodent Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is ...

  4. Chediak-Higashi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001312.htm Chediak-Higashi syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chediak-Higashi syndrome is a rare disease of the immune ...

  5. Complex regional pain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRPS; RSDS; Causalgia - RSD; Shoulder-hand syndrome; Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome; Sudeck atrophy; Pain - CRPS ... In: Cifu DX, ed. Braddom's Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 37.

  6. Klinefelter Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sexual development in guys. It's a genetic condition (meaning a person is born with it). Klinefelter syndrome ... Klinefelter syndrome may also have problems with attention, speech development, and learning word skills like spelling, reading, ...

  7. 4H Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome? 4H syndrome is short for hypomyelination, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and hypodontia. Hypomyelination means that there is lack ... myelin in the central nervous system. In hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, normal puberty development is absent because the central ...

  8. Moebius Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conference. If you ... READ MORE » The Foundation is Hiring! Posted by Kim Cunningham The Moebius Syndrome Foundation ... in individuals nor does it endorse particular medical professionals, treatments, products or services. The Moebius Syndrome Foundation ...

  9. Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome can be helpful in genetic counseling. Complications Obesity-related complications In addition to having constant hunger, ... result from Prader-Willi syndrome include: Effects of binge eating. Eating large amounts of food quickly, called binge ...

  10. Chinese restaurant syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese restaurant syndrome is a set of symptoms that some people have after eating Chinese food. A food additive ... Chinese restaurant syndrome is most often diagnosed based on the symptoms. The health care provider may ask the following ...

  11. Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suter, Aude-Annick; Itin, Peter; Heinimann, Karl

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poikiloderma is defined as a chronic skin condition presenting with a combination of punctate atrophy, areas of depigmentation, hyperpigmentation and telangiectasia. In a variety of hereditary syndromes such as Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS), Clericuzio-type poikiloderma...

  12. Coffin Lowry Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome varies depending on the severity of symptoms. Early intervention may improve the outlook for patients. Life span ... syndrome varies depending on the severity of symptoms. Early intervention may improve the outlook for patients. Life span ...

  13. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000085.htm Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some ...

  14. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ121 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) • What are common signs and symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? • What causes PCOS? • What is insulin ...

  15. Polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycystic ovaries; Polycystic ovary disease; Stein-Leventhal syndrome; Polyfollicular ovarian disease; PCOS ... RL, Barnes RB, Ehrmann DA. Hyperandrogenism, hirsuitism, and polycystic ovary syndrome. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de ...

  16. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NDSS Events Shop NDSS Contact NDSS > Resources > Sexuality Sexuality Sexuality & Down Syndrome Human sexuality encompasses an individual’s self- ... community standards for adult behavior. How Can Healthy Sexuality be Encouraged for Individuals with Down Syndrome? Creating ...

  17. Meconium aspiration syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001596.htm Meconium aspiration syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) refers to breathing problems that a newborn ...

  18. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Changed What's Life Like for Kids With Down Syndrome? Print en español El síndrome de Down You have probably seen people who have Down syndrome. They have certain physical features, such as a ...

  19. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  20. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes your immune system to attack your peripheral nervous system (PNS). The PNS ... your brain. No one knows what causes the syndrome. Sometimes it is triggered by an infection, surgery, ...

  1. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) happens when a woman's ovaries or adrenal glands produce more male hormones than normal. PCOS causes cysts ( ... PCOS are at higher risk of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, and high blood pressure. PCOS is ...

  2. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... switch to the Professional version Home Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes Types Type 1 disease Type 2A disease Type 2B disease Diagnosis Treatment Resources In This Article Drugs Mentioned In This ...

  3. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001311.htm Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes ...

  4. Research Data Curation Pilots: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Minor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 2011, the UC San Diego Research Cyberinfrastructure (RCI Implementation Team invited researchers and research teams to participate in a research curation and data management pilot program. This invitation took the form of a campus-wide solicitation. More than two dozen applications were received and, after due deliberation, the RCI Oversight Committee selected five curation-intensive projects. These projects were chosen based on a number of criteria, including how they represented campus research, varieties of topics, researcher engagement, and the various services required. The pilot process began in September 2011, and will be completed in early 2014. Extensive lessons learned from the pilots are being compiled and are being used in the on-going design and implementation of the permanent Research Data Curation Program in the UC San Diego Library. In this paper, we present specific implementation details of these various services, as well as lessons learned. The program focused on many aspects of contemporary scholarship, including data creation and storage, description and metadata creation, citation and publication, and long term preservation and access. Based on the lessons learned in our processes, the Research Data Curation Program will provide a suite of services from which campus users can pick and choose, as necessary. The program will provide support for the data management requirements from national funding agencies.

  5. Organizational safety factors research lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, T.G.

    1995-01-01

    This Paper reports lessons learned and state of knowledge gained from an organizational factors research activity involving commercial nuclear power plants in the United States, through the end of 1991, as seen by the scientists immediately involved in the research. Lessons learned information was gathered from the research teams and individuals using a question and answer format. The following five questions were submitted to each team and individual: (1) What organizational factors appear to influence safety performance in some systematic way, (2) Should organizational factors research focus at the plant level, or should it extend beyond the plant level to the parent company, rate setting commissions, regulatory agencies, (3) How important is having direct access to plants for doing organizational factors research, (4) What lessons have been learned to date as the result of doing organizational factors research in a nuclear regulatory setting, and (5) What organizational research topics and issues should be pursued in the future? Conclusions based on the responses provided for this report are that organizational factors research can be conducted in a regulatory setting and produce useful results. Technologies pioneered in other academic, commercial, and military settings can be adopted for use in a nuclear regulatory setting. The future success of such research depends upon the cooperation of regulators, contractors, and the nuclear industry

  6. Low level waste shipment accident lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rast, D.M.; Rowe, J.G.; Reichel, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    On October 1, 1994 a shipment of low-level waste from the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, was involved in an accident near Rolla, Missouri. The accident did not result in the release of any radioactive material. The accident did generate important lessons learned primarily in the areas of driver and emergency response communications. The shipment was comprised of an International Standards Organization (ISO) container on a standard flatbed trailer. The accident caused the low-level waste package to separate from the trailer and come to rest on its top in the median. The impact of the container with the pavement and median inflicted relatively minor damage to the container. The damage was not substantial enough to cause failure of container integrity. The success of the package is attributable to the container design and the packaging procedures used at the Fernald Environmental Management Project for low-level waste shipments. Although the container survived the initial wreck, is was nearly breached when the first responders attempted to open the ISO container. Even though the container was clearly marked and the shipment documentation was technically correct, this information did not identify that the ISO container was the primary containment for the waste. The lessons learned from this accident have DOE complex wide applicability. This paper is intended to describe the accident, subsequent emergency response operations, and the lessons learned from this incident

  7. Enhancing mathematics teachers' quality through Lesson Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomibao, Laila S

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency and effectivity of the learning experience is dependent on the teacher quality, thus, enhancing teacher's quality is vital in improving the students learning outcome. Since, the usual top-down one-shot cascading model practice for teachers' professional development in Philippines has been observed to have much information dilution, and the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization demanded the need to develop mathematics teachers' quality standards through the Southeast Asia Regional Standards for Mathematics Teachers (SEARS-MT), thus, an intensive, ongoing professional development model should be provided to teachers. This study was undertaken to determine the impact of Lesson Study on Bulua National High School mathematics teachers' quality level in terms of SEARS-MT dimensions. A mixed method of quantitative-qualitative research design was employed. Results of the analysis revealed that Lesson Study effectively enhanced mathematics teachers' quality and promoted teachers professional development. Teachers positively perceived Lesson Study to be beneficial for them to become a better mathematics teacher.

  8. [The Capgras syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikina, M A; Levin, O S

    2013-01-01

    The Capgras syndrome is one of delusional-like misidentification syndrome in which a person holds a delusion that one or several his/her friends or relatives have been replaced by an identical-looking impostor. As any other delusional disorder, the Capgras syndrome is characterized by stability despite the indisputable arguments against fault views. Initially, this syndrome was considered as a presentation of schizophrenia but later it has been described in brain organic disorders, primarily in elderly patients with dementia.

  9. Ogilvies syndrom efter sectio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, B T; Sørensen, Jette Led; Svaerke, T

    2001-01-01

    Ogilvie's syndrome, acute pseudo-obstruction of the colon, can lead to perforation of the caecum and death. The syndrome is not well known and diagnosis can be difficult to make in time.......Ogilvie's syndrome, acute pseudo-obstruction of the colon, can lead to perforation of the caecum and death. The syndrome is not well known and diagnosis can be difficult to make in time....

  10. The wellness syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2015-01-01

    Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.).......Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.)....

  11. Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priori Silvia G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A novel clinical entity characterized by ST segment elevation in right precordial leads (V1 to V3, incomplete or complete right bundle branch block, and susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden cardiac death has been described by Brugada et al. in 1992. This disease is now frequently called "Brugada syndrome" (BrS. The prevalence of BrS in the general population is unknown. The suggested prevalence ranges from 5/1,000 (Caucasians to 14/1,000 (Japanese. Syncope, typically occurring at rest or during sleep (in individuals in their third or fourth decades of life is a common presentation of BrS. In some cases, tachycardia does not terminate spontaneously and it may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and lead to sudden death. Both sporadic and familial cases have been reported and pedigree analysis suggests an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. In approximately 20% of the cases BrS is caused by mutations in the SCN5A gene on chromosome 3p21-23, encoding the cardiac sodium channel, a protein involved in the control of myocardial excitability. Since the use of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD is the only therapeutic option of proven efficacy for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiac arrest, the identification of high-risk subjects is one of the major goals in the clinical decision-making process. Quinidine may be regarded as an adjunctive therapy for patients at higher risk and may reduce the number of cases of ICD shock in patients with multiple recurrences.

  12. Lessons learned: Past to future [Identification, preservation and incorporation of decommissioning lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camper, L.W.

    2007-01-01

    The identification, preservation and incorporation of decommissioning lessons learned are critical to the continued expansion of nuclear power. Decommissioning experience will be developed in Europe and Asia over the next several years and that experience will be invaluable for the decommissioning of the next wave of plants in the USA. Industry and regulators will need to work cooperatively to ensure that the information is preserved and included in the design and operation of all new nuclear facilities, as well as in ongoing decommissioning projects. The paper describes the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's efforts to capture the decommissioning lessons learned from the first wave of decommissioning projects in USA. (author)

  13. Sjogren's Syndrome Information Page

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials Organizations Publications Definition Sjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disorder in which immune cells attack and destroy the ... syndrome than men. × Definition Sjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disorder in which immune cells attack and destroy the ...

  14. Gorlin-goltz syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Salman, M.; Mansoor, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple jaw cysts are a characteristic manifestation of basal cell nevus (Gorlin) syndrome. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is characterized by symptoms primarily involving the skin, central nervous system, and skeletal system. In 90% of the patients, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is associated with recurring odontogenic keratocysts. This patient showed recurrent jaw and maxillary cysts, for which he was followed for 2 years. (author)

  15. Diagnostik af Dravet syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Rasmussen, Niels Henrik; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2010-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epileptic syndrome of infancy. We describe the features of two cases with genetically verified SCNA1 mutations. The diagnosis was established rather late in one case. The epilepsies were medically intractable and the symptoms characteristic of Dravet syndrome. The children...

  16. Exophthalmos in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, W

    1996-08-01

    Exophthalmos was noted in 4 of the 12 patients reported by Harvey Cushing in 1932. Although exophthalmos has often been included in clinical descriptions, no previous study has reported actual measurements in patients with active and treated Cushing's syndrome, and in control patients. The aim of this study was to obtain these measurements. Thirty-one patients with active Cushing's syndrome (19 iatrogenic), 15 with treated Cushing's syndrome, 18 with Graves' ophthalmopathy, 59 control patients, and 3 patients with active Cushing's syndrome plus a family or personal history of thyroid disease. A consecutive series of patients with active and treated Cushing's syndrome were assessed. They were compared with patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy, and with control patients. Exophthalmos was assessed by the author using a Hertel meter. Urinary free cortisol was measured on patients with Cushing's syndrome, and serum thyroxine was estimated for them, and for the patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Exophthalmos exceeding 16 mm (> 2 SD above normal mean) was found in 45% of active Cushing's syndrome, 21% of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, 20% of treated Cushing's syndrome, 2% of normal controls, and 77% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. No patient with Cushing's syndrome had significant symptoms due to exophthalmos. Patients with active Cushing's syndrome have statistically significant exophthalmos. This rarely causes symptoms, and diminishes when cortisol concentrations become normal. Cushing's syndrome and autoimmune thyroid disease may coexist in patients with exophthalmos.

  17. DIDMOAD (Wolfram Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Nashibi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome was first described by physician D J Wolfram and Wagener in 1938. This autosomal recessive syndrome is also referred to as DIDMOAD syndrome which stands for Diabetes Insipidus, Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness

  18. The acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souhami Filho, L.

    1985-01-01

    Symptoms and signs from medical aspects resulting from whole body exposure, or in the main part, to ionizing radiation are described. The dose-response relationship is studied and the exposure is divided in three parts: central nervous system syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome and hematopoietic syndrome. Brief comments about the treatment are reported. (M.A.C.) [pt

  19. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery...

  20. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  1. Integrating Social Marketing Into Fijian HIV/AIDS Prevention Programs: Lessons From Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewak, Aarti; Singh, Gurmeet

    2017-01-01

    Social marketing techniques have been tested and proven useful within the health sector worldwide. In Fiji, social marketing was introduced in the early 1990s, and more rapidly during the last decade to improve national response to an increasing incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Given the limited amount of research in the area of program evaluation in Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs), this study systematically analyzes five Fijian HIV/AIDS prevention programs through Andreasen's benchmark criteria, in order to identify gaps in program design that ultimately impact program effectiveness. Assessment results unveil some interesting trends regarding the focus and applications of past Fijian HIV/AIDS prevention programs in the past decade. This article discusses these findings and other valuable lessons for future HIV/AIDS prevention strategies in Fiji and elsewhere.

  2. Barth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Sarah LN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM, skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA. Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE, left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC, ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical, compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and

  3. [The Othello syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, R

    1980-12-01

    A case is described and 7 others are discussed of the Othello Syndrome, characterized by cognitive, affective and conative manifestations plus non-specific psychosomatic accesory symptoms. The nuclear symptom is the delusional or delusion-like idea of jealousy. The syndrome is seen in both sexes, as part of a number of clinical entities (paranoia, psychoses, organic brain syndromes, neuroses and personality disorders). Premorbid personality and family history are always abnormal. Cases of cocaine abuse, involutional melancholia and borderline syndrome are remarkers. The management of this syndrome and of its social sequelae is emphasized.

  4. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Pandeshwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome—NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the PTCH (patched gene found on chromosome arm 9q. The syndrome, characterized by increased predisposition to develop basal cell carcinoma and associated multiorgan anomalies, has a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem, early diagnosis of which allows introduction of secondary prophylaxis and following an appropriate treatment to delay the progress of the syndrome. The following report emphasizes the need for awareness of the diagnostic criteria of this syndrome in cases with no typical skin lesions.

  5. Addressing social skills deficits in adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Marisa H; Morin, Lindsay

    2017-12-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are hypersocial; yet, they experience social difficulties and trouble with relationships. This report summarizes findings from three studies examining the social functioning of adults with WS and the feasibility of a social skills training program for adults with WS (SSTP-WS) through the examination of performance on initial lesson plans. Study 1: 114 parents of adults with WS completed the Social Responsiveness Scale-2. Study 2: 10 adults with WS and 12 of their parents participated in focus groups to further describe the deficits identified in Study 1 and to discuss a SSTP-WS. Study 3: 30 adults with WS were randomly assigned to 2 lessons on either conversations or relationships and pre-post change in social skills knowledge was assessed. Study 1 indicates adults with WS experience severe social impairments in social cognition, and mild-moderate impairments in social awareness and social communication. Qualitative results in Study 2 indicate a SSTP-WS should address conversation skills and relationships. In Study 3, participants showed gains in social skills knowledge following completion of lessons. A SSTP-WS may be beneficial for adults with WS. Future research should describe the social needs of individuals with WS at different ages and should further develop a SSTP-WS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Discovering Euler Circuits and Paths through a Culturally Relevant Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaux, Rebecca R.; Rodrigue, Paulette R.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a middle school discrete mathematics lesson that uses the context of catching crawfish to provide students with a hands-on experience related to Euler circuits and paths. The lesson promotes mathematical communication through the use of cooperative learning as well as connections between mathematics and the real world…

  7. Sharing Views of CLIL Lesson Planning in Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banegas, Dario Luis

    2015-01-01

    Argentina seems to favour CLIL (content and language integrated learning) as a language-driven approach in secondary and higher education. In this paper, I investigate curriculum development and lesson planning based on trainees' perceptions and lesson plans submitted to pass a module on Didactics as part of their formal initial English language…

  8. Atomic Structure and Valence: Level II, Unit 10, Lesson 1; Chemical Bonding: Lesson 2; The Table of Elements: Lesson 3; Electrolysis: Lesson 4. Advanced General Education Program. A High School Self-Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for high-school level contains lessons on: Atomic Structure and Valence, Chemical Bonding, The Table of Elements, and Electrolysis. Each of the lessons concludes with a Mastery Test to be completed by the student. (DB)

  9. Thinking about Folklore: Lessons for Grades K-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Carole

    1991-01-01

    Presents a series of lessons that can be used to teach children about underlying literary patterns in folklore. The six lessons address the study of (1) nursery rhymes; (2) repetitive tales; (3) cumulative tales; (4) archetypes; and (5) the motif of the hero. Book titles that are representative of these categories are included. (six references)…

  10. Teaching Tennessee History: Lesson Plans for the Classroom. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Lisa, Ed.

    These teacher developed lessons focus on the impact of the New Deal and World War II on east Tennessee. The forum for developing the lessons included a series of lectures by experts in 20th-century scholarship and interpretation, tours, and experiences at historic sites in the region. During the week long program, teachers traveled throughout east…

  11. Physically Active Lessons: Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sarah; Gildea, Aideen Gildea; Sloan, Seaneen; Thurston, Allen

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of a pilot study of the Physically Active Lessons (PAL) programme, which was piloted in five primary schools in Hertfordshire between February and July 2014. PAL involves adapting lesson plans to combine short bursts of physical activity with academic content. The study had two aims: (1) to explore the feasibility of adapting a…

  12. Teachers' Professional Growth through Engagement with Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, Wanty; Vale, Colleen; Groves, Susie; Doig, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Lesson study is highly regarded as a model for professional learning, yet remains under-theorised. This article examines the professional learning experiences of teachers and numeracy coaches from three schools in a local network of schools, participating in a lesson study project over two research cycles in 2012. It maps the interconnections…

  13. "O Mundo da Lingua Portuguesa," a Supplementary Cultural Lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, James H.

    The text of a classroom lesson on the distribution and use of the Portuguese language in African countries, written in Portuguese and containing an explanation of and practice in using the definite article with African place names, is presented. The lesson is accompanied by vocabulary notes in the margin, a list of questions on the text, and a mpa…

  14. Moroccan Arabic Technical Lessons for Rehab./Special Ed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtatou, Mohamed, Ed.

    The instructional materials in Moroccan Arabic are designed to meet the language needs of Peace Corps volunteers working in rehabilitation and special education in Morocco. The lessons are almost entirely in Arabic, and include vocabulary lists with both technical and everyday language pertaining to disabilities. Lesson topics include singing, the…

  15. Gross Domestic Pizza. Active Learning Lessons. Economics International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleskiene, Irena; Venger, Anatoly; MacDonald, Rich; Davis, Debbie

    This lesson plan was developed through "Economics International," an international program to help build economic education infrastructures in the emerging market economies. It provides a lesson description; appropriate age level; economic concepts; content standards and benchmarks; related subject areas; instructional objectives; time…

  16. Lessons and challenges from software quality assessment: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... human resource, result computation etc. We discussed these lessons and challenges across two measurable characteristics namely quality of design (life cycle stages) and quality of conformance. Finally, we also recommended the lessons and challenges from software quality management for space system software.

  17. Indonesian Basic Course: Volume II, Lessons 9-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This is a field-test edition of the revised "Indonesian Basic Course," prepared by the Defense Language Institute. Lessons are structured around language pattern recognition exercises, dialogue mastery and translation, and a review of grammar. Cultural notes and vocabulary lists are included. Lessons concern: (1) occupations, (2) color, (3) points…

  18. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Regulators Workshop: Lessons from Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, E. Ian

    2015-09-03

    Ian Baring-Gould presented these lessons learned from wind energy to an audience of marine hydrokinetic regulators. Lessons learned spanned the areas of technology advances, using collaborative approaches to involve key stakeholders; using baseline studies to measure and prioritize wildlife impacts, and look at avoidance and mitigation options early in the process.

  19. Implementing Japanese Lesson Study in Foreign Countries: Misconceptions Revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiakira

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on data gathered during visits to Uganda and Malawi, conducted by the International Math-teacher Professionalization Using Lesson Study (IMPULS) project and the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The author's observations and experiences highlighted misconceptions about lesson study. The paper concludes that some…

  20. World Hunger: Famine in Africa. Sample Lessons, Secondary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeson, Eileen; And Others

    This model social studies lesson includes a simulated interview with a relief worker describing the famine conditions in Ethiopia. A map of Africa and pictures of famine victims are included. The objectives of the lesson are to have students describe the situation in Ethiopia, analyze the causes, and evaluate solutions to the famine. In the model…

  1. Behavioural changes among Fadama II Project farmers and lessons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Behavioural changes among Fadama II Project farmers and lessons in agriculture development of Enugu State, Nigeria. ... Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR) ... The study analyzed the behavioral changes and Fadama ii project farmers and lesson in Agricultural development of Enugu State, Nigeria.

  2. Integrating UNESCO ICT-Based Instructional Materials in Chemistry Lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHARLIE P. NACARIO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effectiveness of the lessons in Chemistry integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional material on the achievement of Chemistry students at Central Bicol State University of Agriculture. It aimed to identify lessons that may be developed integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional materials, determine the effect of the developed lessons using the material on: conceptual understanding; science process skills; and attitude towards chemistry and gather insights from the experiences of the students and teacher. The study used the single group pretest and posttest experimental design. Descriptive, quantitative and qualitative techniques were also utilized. Quantitative data were taken from the pretest-posttest results on the Test on Conceptual Understanding, Science Process Skills and Chemistry Attitudinaire. Qualitative data were drawn from the experts’ assessment of the developed lessons and research instruments, and the insights of students and teacher. The developed lessons integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional materials were Atomic Model and Structure, Periodic Table of Elements, Chemical Bonding, and Balancing Chemical Equation. These lessons increased the conceptual understanding of the students by topic and skill from very low mastery to average mastery level. The students have slightly improved along the different science process skills. After teaching the lessons, the students’ attitude also improved. The students became more motivated and interested in Chemistry and the lessons were student centered and entailed teacher’s competence and flexibility in computer use.

  3. The Paper Airplane Challenge: A Market Economy Simulation. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Kimberly

    This lesson plan features a classroom simulation that helps students understand the characteristics of a market economic system. The lesson plan states a purpose; cites student objectives; suggests a time duration; lists materials needed; and details a step-by-step teaching procedure. The "Paper Airplane Challenge" handout is attached. (BT)

  4. Fighting for the Past: Lessons from the David Irving Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, A. Scott

    2008-01-01

    This article offers lessons from the David Irving trial. These lessons about Holocaust denial allow educators to identify how deniers violate certain scholarly tenets. This also serves as a safeguard against legitimizing deniers' efforts, while also reinforcing important principles of historical inquiry. (Contains 11 notes.)

  5. Lessons learned from AU PSO-missions in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    The paper deals with the lessons learned from AU's PSO since 2002, and what that entails for the design of future PSO.......The paper deals with the lessons learned from AU's PSO since 2002, and what that entails for the design of future PSO....

  6. The Aswan Dam: A Lesson on Man's Environmental Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Burnell

    This curriculum unit was prepared for senior high classroom use to teach geography, history, and environmental issues. The objective of the lesson is to illustrate the historical man/river relationship between Egypt and the Nile River, and the impact of the Aswan dam on the agricultural and economic needs of the country today. The lesson requires…

  7. The Construction of Biology Lessons: A Meta-Paradigmatic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jaime

    1991-01-01

    The views of Piaget, Ausubel, and Bruner have been used to present an integrated view of biology lesson construction and to assist teachers in the design and development of tools and strategies to improve their teaching. The structure of an integrated model for biology lesson construction and an example of a biolesson using the metaparadigmatic…

  8. Primary Teachers' Algebraic Thinking: Example from Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported on primary children's algebraic thinking and generalising in a range of problem settings but there is little evidence of primary teachers' knowledge of algebraic thinking. In this paper the development in algebraic thinking of one primary teacher who taught a research lesson in a Japanese Lesson Study project…

  9. Evolving Lessons from Group Work Involvement in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyne, Robert K.; Wilson, F. Robert; Tang, Mei

    2000-01-01

    Contains a report of lessons the authors have been developing based on their group work in China. Lessons learned include understanding how cultural imperatives apply and work gets done in relation to planning, and being sensitive to the uniqueness of another culture's communication styles and attitudes about leadership. (Contains 36 references.)…

  10. Go West: Imagining the Oregon Trail. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    In this lesson plan, students in grades 3-5 compare imagined travel experiences of their own with the actual experiences of 19th-century pioneers on the Oregon Trail. After the 4 lessons students will have: (1) learned about the pioneer experience on the Oregon Trail; (2) compared and contrasted modern-day travel experiences with those of the 19th…

  11. Students' perception of mathematics and science plasma lessons in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to follow the lessons appropriately. Moreover, on regular basis the ministry of education should make appropriate mechanisms for the improvements of the lessons. In addition to this, trainings should be given to high school teachers for maximum utilization of the technology. Keywords: education, plasma TV, mathematics, ...

  12. Exploring Ethograms in the Schoolyard: A Lesson on Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graszer, Christina L.; Gnau, Katie; Melber, Leah M.

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights a core lesson that has been used in a number of Lincoln Park Zoo educational programs. The lesson teaches students to conduct an ethological, or animal behavior, study on a bird. This study can be implemented in a variety of outdoor settings, including a park, schoolyard, or zoo. Using an ethogram, students will practice…

  13. Managing Water Demand : Policies, Practices and Lessons from the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    30 août 2005 ... Managing Water Demand : Policies, Practices and Lessons from the Middle East and North Africa Forums. Couverture du livre Managing Water Demand : Policies, Practices, and Lessons from the Middle. Auteur(s) : Ellysar Baroudy, Abderrafii Abid Lahlou, et Bayoumi Attia. Maison(s) d'édition :.

  14. Japanese Lesson Study Sustaining Teacher Learning in the Classroom Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loose, Crystal Corle

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this action research study were first to explore teacher perceptions of Japanese lesson study as a method of professional development, and second to take teachers through an action research process as they observed the implementation of a literacy lesson in the classroom. Situated Learning Theory, particularly related to teacher…

  15. s perception of mathematics science plasma lessons in ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    information, visual and audio experiences; often beyond the capacity of the classroom teacher to assemble, would sustain students' attention and motivation. The responsiveness of plasma lessons to students with special need presents different stance. Plasma lessons provide both sound and vision hence marginalizes.

  16. Lessons about Art in History and History in Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary, Ed.; Clark, Gilbert, Ed.

    Written by teachers from the United States and Canada, these lesson plans focus on integrating the teaching of history and art history. Seventeen lesson plans cover the topics of (1) Slavery, Henry Ossawa Tanner, and His Family--Grades: Elementary; (2) Chinese Landscape Painting--Grades: Elementary; (3) Regionalism: American Art of the Great…

  17. Why Lesson Study Works in Japan: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebaeguin, Marlon; Stephens, Max

    2014-01-01

    Japanese lesson study has attracted many international educators who have been impressed by its capacity to foster student learning and sustained professional growth of teachers. This paper reports a study on its cultural orientations that may explain why lesson study works seamlessly in Japan. Hofstede's dimensions of national culture are…

  18. Fusing Form with Content: A Collection of Exemplary Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Joyce Armstrong, Ed.

    Designed to provide examples of the art form that in teaching has been tagged "the lesson cycle," this monograph contains a collection of 50 exemplary lessons that elementary and secondary English teachers have designed and that demonstrate the fusion of form and content that characterize the art of their teaching. The monograph is…

  19. Lessons Learnt on Rain Forest Management for Wood Production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out with the aim of analyzing and establishing what lessons have been learnt from positive and negative experiences of various initiatives, projects and programmes aiming at sustainable management, use and conservation of rain forests in Sub-Saharan Africa. The lessons learnt from the case ...

  20. Power, Policy and Performance: Learning Lessons about Lesson Observation from England's Further Education Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Lesson observation has been widely debated in education circles in recent times. From politicians to practitioners, everyone seems to have a view on it. Surprisingly, however, very little empirical research has been done on this important area of practice. With this in mind, this article explores some of the findings from a national research…

  1. Common Geometry Shapes/Formas Geometricas: An Introductory-English Lesson & Introductory Spanish Lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, James A.; Solano, Angele

    A lesson plan for first-grade children beginning to learn English describes an activity using manipulatives and visual aids to develop recognition of three geometric shapes (circle, square, rectangle), their names, and a few additional words in English (e.g., "bag,""table,""door"). Students are grouped at tables of four to six and provided with…

  2. Launch Vehicle Propulsion Life Cycle Cost Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Edgar; Rhodes, Russell E.; Robinson, John W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will review lessons learned for space transportation systems from the viewpoint of the NASA, Industry and academia Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST). The paper provides the basic idea and history of "lessons learned". Recommendations that are extremely relevant to NASA's future investments in research, program development and operations are"'provided. Lastly, a novel and useful approach to documenting lessons learned is recommended, so as to most effectively guide future NASA investments. Applying lessons learned can significantly improve access to space for cargo or people by focusing limited funds on the right areas and needs for improvement. Many NASA human space flight initiatives have faltered, been re-directed or been outright canceled since the birth of the Space Shuttle program. The reasons given at the time have been seemingly unique. It will be shown that there are common threads as lessons learned in many a past initiative.

  3. Feldenkrais Movement Lessons Improve Older Adults’ Awareness, Comfort, and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn F. Palmer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This prospective controlled intervention study assessed Feldenkrais Moving Forward movement lessons for older adults. Participants ( N = 87 returning from original sample of 124; median age = 76 years were assigned to movement ( n = 51 or waitlist control ( n = 36 groups. The movement groups took twelve 60-min lessons across either 6 or 12 weeks, to compare lesson density. Pretests and posttests included Base of Support, Timed Up and Go, Tandem Stance, Functional Reach, modified OPTIMAL, and questions about individual priorities and outcomes. Results included significant correlations between lessons attended and both improved Functional Reach and improved OPTIMAL score. A significantly higher proportion of the movement (vs. control group reported positive changes at the posttest in both prioritized and newly identified activities. These results show that Feldenkrais lessons are helpful to older adults for promoting balance, mobility, and confidence.

  4. Feldenkrais Movement Lessons Improve Older Adults’ Awareness, Comfort, and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Carolyn F.

    2017-01-01

    This prospective controlled intervention study assessed Feldenkrais Moving Forward movement lessons for older adults. Participants (N = 87 returning from original sample of 124; median age = 76 years) were assigned to movement (n = 51) or waitlist control (n = 36) groups. The movement groups took twelve 60-min lessons across either 6 or 12 weeks, to compare lesson density. Pretests and posttests included Base of Support, Timed Up and Go, Tandem Stance, Functional Reach, modified OPTIMAL, and questions about individual priorities and outcomes. Results included significant correlations between lessons attended and both improved Functional Reach and improved OPTIMAL score. A significantly higher proportion of the movement (vs. control) group reported positive changes at the posttest in both prioritized and newly identified activities. These results show that Feldenkrais lessons are helpful to older adults for promoting balance, mobility, and confidence. PMID:28840179

  5. Feldenkrais Movement Lessons Improve Older Adults' Awareness, Comfort, and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Carolyn F

    2017-01-01

    This prospective controlled intervention study assessed Feldenkrais Moving Forward movement lessons for older adults. Participants ( N = 87 returning from original sample of 124; median age = 76 years) were assigned to movement ( n = 51) or waitlist control ( n = 36) groups. The movement groups took twelve 60-min lessons across either 6 or 12 weeks, to compare lesson density. Pretests and posttests included Base of Support, Timed Up and Go, Tandem Stance, Functional Reach, modified OPTIMAL, and questions about individual priorities and outcomes. Results included significant correlations between lessons attended and both improved Functional Reach and improved OPTIMAL score. A significantly higher proportion of the movement (vs. control) group reported positive changes at the posttest in both prioritized and newly identified activities. These results show that Feldenkrais lessons are helpful to older adults for promoting balance, mobility, and confidence.

  6. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sarraf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed.

  7. Defense Language Institute Russian Basic Course. Volumes XXVIII, Lessons 131-140. Volume XXX, Lessons 151-159.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    The 19 lessons in these two volumes are intended for the advanced phase of a 159-lesson intensive audiolingual basic Russian course developed recently by the Defense Language Institute to train native speakers of English to a Level 3 second language proficiency. These third and fifth volumes contain such features as (1) texts on the Russian Civil…

  8. A Model of Microteaching Lesson Study Implementation in the Prospective History Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, Indah Wahyu Puji; Mashuri; Nafi'ah, Ulfatun

    2016-01-01

    Microteaching lesson study is a model to improve prospective teacher quality by incorporating several element of microteaching and lesson study. This study concern on the implementation of microteaching lesson study in prospective history teacher education. Microteaching lesson study model implemented in this study consist of three stages: plan,…

  9. Pre-Service Teachers' Middle-Level Lessons on World Religions: Planning, Teaching, and Reflecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Derek L.; Cook, Tanya; Mathys, Holly

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how 22 elementary pre-service teachers (PSTs) planned and taught lessons on world religions to 7th-grade students. Pre- and post-lesson interview transcripts, lesson observations, as well as PST lesson plans and reflection journals served as data sources. Prior to teaching, the PSTs lacked adequate…

  10. Lessons Learned From Hurricane Maria: Pharmacists' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Kyle; Maldonado, Wanda T; López-Candales, Angel

    2018-01-01

    The destruction in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria brought an increased demand for health care services while severely limiting the health care system's ability to provide patient care. Immediately following the hurricane, countless patients found themselves in a situation without their medications for both acute and chronic conditions. Many of these patients turned first to community pharmacies for access to their medications. In this letter, we describe the response of pharmacists to the needs of their communities following the natural disaster, Hurricane Maria, and summarize some lessons learned from the experience that may be useful in future disaster planning.

  11. Teacher perception, lesson study and science achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Whitney E.

    The purpose of this research was to explore group differences between teachers participating in North Cascades Olympic Science Partnership (NCOSP) activities and a matched group of non-NCOSP teachers. Specifically, the study explored potential differences between groups on: (a) science achievement as measured by the science Washington Assessment of Student Learning (WASL), (b) teacher perception of knowledge, experience and confidence with lesson study, a collaborative professional development model, (c) teacher perception of knowledge with curriculum, and (d) teacher perception of knowledge and experience with pedagogy. Further, in order todemonstrate group similarities, demographic data for each group were described and considered in the areas of teacher gender, school grade span, school enrollment, percent of students receiving free and reduced meal benefits, percent of female students, percent of students who are an ethnic minority, and percent of students who are identified as special education. A total of 206 science teachers were randomly selected for this population. The experimental (NCOSP science teachers) and comparison (non-NCOSP science teachers) groups were both initially comprised of 103 participants. Data collected from 55 NCOSP teachers and 32 non-NCOSP teachers were valid and used in the statistical analyses. Descriptive and inferential analyses were completed. To ensure the NCOSP and matched groups were statistically similar, chi-square tests for independence were computed. A one-way Hotelling's T2, the equivalent of a MANOVA for two groups, was computed using the SPSS general linear model. The procedure simultaneously compared the independent variable (Group: NCOSP teachers and non-NCOSP teachers) across the seven dependent variables, student science achievement as measured by science WASL, curriculum knowledge, pedagogy knowledge, pedagogy confidence, lesson study knowledge, lesson study experience, and lesson study confidence. Results for the

  12. Lessons Learned from Environmental Remediation Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Several remediation projects have been developed to date, and experience with these projects has been accumulated. Lessons learned span from non-technical to technical aspects, and need to be shared with those who are beginning or are facing the challenge to implement environmental remediation works. This publication reviews some of these lessons. The key role of policy and strategies at the national level in framing the conditions in which remediation projects are to be developed and decisions made is emphasized. Following policy matters, this publication pays attention to the importance of social aspects and the requirement for fairness in decisions to be made, something that can only be achieved with the involvement of a broad range of interested parties in the decision making process. The publication also reviews the funding of remediation projects, planning, contracting, cost estimates and procurement, and issues related to long term stewardship. Lessons learned regarding technical aspects of remediation projects are reviewed. Techniques such as the application of cover systems and soil remediation (electrokinetics, phytoremediation, soil flushing, and solidification and stabilization techniques) are analysed with respect to performance and cost. After discussing soil remediation, the publication covers issues associated with water treatment, where techniques such as ‘pump and treat’ and the application of permeable barriers are reviewed. Subsequently, there is a section dedicated to reviewing briefly the lessons learned in the remediation of uranium mining and processing sites. Many of these sites throughout the world have become orphaned, and are waiting for remediation. The publication notes that little progress has been made in the management of some of these sites, particularly in the understanding of associated environmental and health risks, and the ability to apply prediction to future environmental and health standards. The publication concludes

  13. HCI Lessons From PlayStation VR

    OpenAIRE

    Habgood, Jacob; Wilson, David; Moore, David; Alapont, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    PlayStation VR has quickly built up a significant user-base of over a million headsets and its own ecosystem of games across a variety of genres. These games form part of a rapidly evolving testing ground for design solutions which can usefully inform HCI design for virtual reality. This paper reviews every PlayStation VR title released in the first three months of its lifecycle in order to identify emerging themes for locomotion. These themes are discussed with respect to the lessons learned...

  14. Operations to Research: Communication of Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This presentation explores ways to build upon previous spaceflight experience and communicate this knowledge to prepare for future exploration. An operational approach is highlighted, focusing on selection and retention standards (disease screening and obtaining medical histories); pre-, in-, and post-flight monitoring (establishing degrees of bone loss, skeletal muscle loss, cardiovascular deconditioning, medical conditions, etc.); prevention, mitigation, or treatment (in-flight countermeasures); and, reconditioning, recovery, and reassignment (post-flight training regimen, return to pre-flight baseline and flight assignment). Experiences and lessons learned from the Apollo, Skylab, Shuttle, Shuttle-Mir, International Space Station, and Orion missions are outlined.

  15. Worldwide market developments : lessons for Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percival, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    A review of competitive retail electricity markets in Argentina, New Zealand, Australia and California were discussed, highlighting lessons for Alberta policy makers, market designers and electricity retailers. Some of the emerging strategies in the retail electricity marketplace such as horizontal integration, generation retailing, defensive retailing and virtual vertical integration were explored. Emphasis was on showing that electricity retailing is not an easy business. It is a business for large and existing players, and although horizontal and vertical integration have growth and profit potential, there are also risks

  16. Lessons learnt from the organ retention controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the lessons to be learnt from the organ retention controversy in the Republic of Ireland. The paper emphasises the importance of good communication between clinicians and families of deceased persons and a move away from a medical culture based on paternalism to a partnership approach between clinicians and patients based on mutual trust and understanding. A model of authorisation rather than consent is proposed as the way forward for dealing with the difficult and traumatic experience of asking families for permission to carry out a post mortem examination on their deceased child. (authors)

  17. Gulf War Syndrome: a review of current knowledge and understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, D

    2014-01-01

    The 1991 Persian Gulf War was a resounding military success for coalition forces, who liberated Kuwait following the Iraqi invasion. The medical legacy we have from the conflict is the poorly understood, yet remarkable, phenomenon of Gulf War Syndrome, which surfaced soon after. Epidemiological research has proven beyond doubt that Gulf War veterans report a wide variety of symptoms, in excess of appropriately matched control subjects, and experience worse general health. Numerous toxic environmental hazards have been suggested as causes of Gulf War Syndrome, yet exhaustive scientific study has failed to provide conclusive proof of any link. No novel or recognised disease has been found to account for the symptomatic burden of veterans, and the optimal treatment remains uncertain. This understanding can be added to from an anthropological perspective, where the narratives of those afflicted provide further insight. The nature of military life was changing at the time of the Gulf War, challenging the identity and beliefs of some veterans and causing socio-cultural distress. The symptomatic presentation of Gulf War Syndrome can be considered an articulation of this disharmony. Gulf War Syndrome can also be considered within the group of post-combat disorders such as shellshock, the like of which have occurred after major wars in the last century. With the current withdrawal from Afghanistan, the Defence Medical Services (DMS) should heed the lessons of history.

  18. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  19. Gorlin-goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B V Shobha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT in the jaw, multiple basal cell carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic examination in the first decade of life, as KCOTs are usually one of the first manifestations of the NBCCS syndrome. This article reports the case of a 12-year-old girl with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, emphasizing its clinical and radiographic manifestation. This study highlights the importance of health professionals in the early diagnosis of this syndrome and a multidisciplinary approach to provide a better diagnosis and prognosis.

  20. Mobius syndrome: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroel, Gonzalo M.; Nagel, Jorge R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Mobius Syndrome or congenital facial diplegia is associated with paralysis of the lateral gaze movements. This syndrome may include other cranial nerve palsies and be associated to musculoskeletal anomalies. Our objective is to show the MRI findings in Mobius Syndrome. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 3 patients with clinic diagnosis of Mobius Syndrome. RMI (1.5T); exams included axial FSE (T1 and T2), FLAIR, SE/EPI, GRE/20, sagittal FSE T2 , coronal T1, diffusion, angio MRI and Spectroscopy sequences. Results: The common features of this syndrome found in MRI were: depression or straightening of the floor of the fourth ventricle, brainstem anteroposterior diameter diminution, morphologic alteration of the pons and medulla oblongata and of the hypoglossal nuclei as well as severe micrognathia. Conclusion: The morphologic alterations of Mobius Syndrome can be clearly identified by MRI; this method has proved to be a useful diagnostic examination. (author)