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Sample records for green fluorescent protein-expressing

  1. Constitutive and Inducible Green Fluorescent Protein Expression in Bartonella henselae

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Anthea K.; Falkow, Stanley

    1998-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was expressed on a plasmid in B. henselae, and GFP-expressing bacteria were visualized by fluorescence microscopy. HEp-2 cells infected with GFP-expressing bacteria were separated from uninfected cells with a fluorescence activated cell sorter. Promoter fusions of B. henselae chromosomal DNA to gfp were examined by flow cytometry, and a B. henselae groEL promoter fusion which induced expression at 37°C was isolated.

  2. 'Green mice' display limitations in enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in retina and optic nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminos, Elena; Vaquero, Cecilia F; García-Olmo, Dolores C

    2014-12-01

    Characterization of retinal cells, cell transplants and gene therapies may be helped by pre-labeled retinal cells, such as those transfected with vectors for green fluorescent protein expression. The aim of this study was to analyze retinal cells and optic nerve components from transgenic green mice (GM) with the 'enhanced' green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene under the control of the CAG promoter (a chicken β-actin promoter and a cytomegalovirus enhancer). The structural analysis and electroretinography recordings showed a normal, healthy retina. Surprisingly, EGFP expression was not ubiquitously located in the retina and optic nerve. Epithelial cells, photoreceptors and bipolar cells presented high green fluorescence levels. In contrast, horizontal cells, specific amacrine cells and ganglion cells exhibited a null EGFP expression level. The synaptic terminals of rod bipolar cells displayed a high green fluorescence level when animals were kept in the dark. Immature retinas exhibited different EGFP expression patterns to those noted in adults. Axons and glial cells in the optic nerve revealed a specific regional EGFP expression pattern, which correlated with the presence of myelin. These results suggest that EGFP expression might be related to the activity of both the CAG promoter and β-actin in mature retinal neurons and oligodendrocytes. Moreover, EGFP expression might be regulated by light in both immature and adult animals. Since GM are used in numerous retina bioassays, it is essential to know the differential EGFP expression in order to select cells of interest for each study.

  3. Aequorea green fluorescent protein. Expression of the gene and fluorescence characteristics of the recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, S; Tsuji, F I

    1994-03-21

    Expression of the cDNA for Aequorea green fluorescent protein in E. coli yielded a fused protein with fluorescence excitation and emission spectra virtually identical to those of the native green fluorescent protein. Further, a solution of the protein, when mixed with aequorin and calcium ion, emitted a greenish luminescence characteristic of the in vivo luminescence of the animal, indicating a radiationless energy transfer to the protein.

  4. A Codon Deletion at the Beginning of Green Fluorescent Protein Genes Enhances Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mejía, José-Luis; Roldán-Salgado, Abigail; Osuna, Joel; Merino, Enrique; Gaytán, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant protein expression is one of the key issues in protein engineering and biotechnology. Among the different models for assessing protein production and structure-function studies, green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the preferred models because of its importance as a reporter in cellular and molecular studies. In this research we analyze the effect of codon deletions near the amino terminus of different GFP proteins on fluorescence. Our study includes Gly4 deletions in the enhanced GFP (EGFP), the red-shifted GFP and the red-shifted EGFP. The Gly4 deletion mutants and their corresponding wild-type counterparts were transcribed under the control of the T7 or Trc promoters and their expression patterns were analyzed. Different fluorescent outcomes were observed depending on the type of fluorescent gene versions. In silico analysis of the RNA secondary structures near the ribosome binding site revealed a direct relationship between their minimum free energy and GFP production. Integrative analysis of these results, including SDS-PAGE analysis, led us to conclude that the fluorescence improvement of cells expressing different versions of GFPs with Gly4 deleted is due to an enhancement of the accessibility of the ribosome binding site by reducing the stability of the RNA secondary structures at their mRNA leader regions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Fluorescence imaging of angiogenesis in green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jin W.; Li, Lingna; Yagi, Shigeo; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2002-05-01

    The development of therapeutics for the control of tumor angiogenesis requires a simple, reliable in vivo assay for tumor-induced vascularization. For this purpose, we have adapted the orthotopic implantation model of angiogenesis by using human and rodent tumors genetically tagged with Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) for grafting into nude mice. Genetically-fluorescent tumors can be readily imaged in vivo. The non-luminous induced capillaries are clearly visible against the bright tumor fluorescence examined either intravitally or by whole-body luminance in real time. Fluorescence shadowing replaces the laborious histological techniques for determining blood vessel density. High-level GFP-expressing tumor cell lines made it possible to acquire the high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical images of angiogenesis in both primary tumors and their metastatic lesions in various human and rodent tumor models by means of a light-based imaging system. Intravital images of angiogenesis onset and development were acquired and quantified from a GFP- expressing orthotopically-growing human prostate tumor over a 19-day period. Whole-body optical imaging visualized vessel density increasing linearly over a 20-week period in orthotopically-growing, GFP-expressing human breast tumor MDA-MB-435. Vessels in an orthotopically-growing GFP- expressing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor were visualized through the chest wall via a reversible skin flap. These clinically-relevant angiogenesis mouse models can be used for real-time in vivo evaluation of agents inhibiting or promoting tumor angiogenesis in physiological micro- environments.

  6. The Bright Fluorescent Protein mNeonGreen Facilitates Protein Expression Analysis In Vivo

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    Lola Hostettler

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP has been tremendously useful in investigating cell architecture, protein localization, and protein function. Recent developments in transgenesis and genome editing methods now enable working with fewer transgene copies and, consequently, with physiological expression levels. However, lower signal intensity might become a limiting factor. The recently developed mNeonGreen protein is a brighter alternative to GFP in vitro. The goal of the present study was to determine how mNeonGreen performs in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans—a model used extensively for fluorescence imaging in intact animals. We started with a side-by-side comparison between cytoplasmic forms of mNeonGreen and GFP expressed in the intestine, and in different neurons, of adult animals. While both proteins had similar photostability, mNeonGreen was systematically 3–5 times brighter than GFP. mNeonGreen was also used successfully to trace endogenous proteins, and label specific subcellular compartments such as the nucleus or the plasma membrane. To further demonstrate the utility of mNeonGreen, we tested transcriptional reporters for nine genes with unknown expression patterns. While mNeonGreen and GFP reporters gave overall similar expression patterns, low expression tissues were detected only with mNeonGreen. As a whole, our work establishes mNeonGreen as a brighter alternative to GFP for in vivo imaging in a multicellular organism. Furthermore, the present research illustrates the utility of mNeonGreen to tag proteins, mark subcellular regions, and describe new expression patterns, particularly in tissues with low expression.

  7. Using Green and Red Fluorescent Proteins to Teach Protein Expression, Purification, and Crystallization

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    Wu, Yifeng; Zhou, Yangbin; Song, Jiaping; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Zhihong

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory curriculum using the green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and RFP) to visualize the cloning, expression, chromatography purification, crystallization, and protease-cleavage experiments of protein science. The EGFP and DsRed monomer (mDsRed)-coding sequences were amplified by PCR and cloned into pMAL (MBP-EGFP) or…

  8. External optical imaging of freely moving mice with green fluorescent protein-expressing metastatic tumors

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    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Shimada, Hiroshi; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2000-04-01

    We report here a new approach to genetically engineering tumors to become fluorescence such that they can be imaged externally in freely-moving animals. We describe here external high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical imaging of metastatic tumors in live mice. Stable high-level green flourescent protein (GFP)-expressing human and rodent cell lines enable tumors and metastasis is formed from them to be externally imaged from freely-moving mice. Real-time tumor and metastatic growth were quantitated from whole-body real-time imaging in GFP-expressing melanoma and colon carcinoma models. This GFP optical imaging system is highly appropriate for high throughput in vivo drug screening.

  9. Green fluorescent protein expression triggers proteome changes in breast cancer cells.

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    Coumans, J V F; Gau, D; Poljak, A; Wasinger, V; Roy, P; Moens, P

    2014-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is the most commonly used reporter of expression in cell biology despite evidence that it affects the cell physiology. The molecular mechanism of GFP-associated modifications has been largely unexplored. In this paper we investigated the proteome modifications following stable expression of GFP in breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). A combination of three different proteome analysis methods (2-DE, iTRAQ, label-free) was used to maximise proteome coverage. We found that GFP expression induces changes in expression of proteins that are associated with protein folding, cytoskeletal organisation and cellular immune response. In view of these findings, the use of GFP as a cell reporter should be carefully monitored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in the transcriptional profile of cardiac myocytes following green fluorescent protein expression.

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    Badrian, Bahareh; Bogoyevitch, Marie A

    2007-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its multiple forms, such as enhanced GFP (EGFP), have been widely used as marker proteins and for tracking purposes in many biological systems, including the heart and cardiac cell systems. Despite some concerns on its toxicity under certain circumstances, GFP remains amongst the most reliable and easy-to-use markers available. Using rat full genome DNA microarrays, we have investigated the broader consequences of adenoviral-driven GFP expression in cardiac myocytes. In our transcriptional profiling analysis, we set a threshold of a twofold change. We removed possible changes resulting from adenoviral infection by comparison with transcriptional profiles of cardiac myocytes with adenoviral-driven expression of an unrelated protein, the kinase MEK. Our analysis revealed changes in the expression of 212 genes. Of these genes, 174 were upregulated and 38 were downregulated following GFP expression. Many of these genes remain unannotated, but an evaluation of those with described functions for their resulting proteins indicated that many were involved in processes, including responses to stimuli/stress and signal transduction. Our analysis thus indicates the broader consequences of GFP expression in altering gene expression profiles in cardiac cells. Care should therefore be taken when using GFP expression as a control in gene expression studies.

  11. Receptor-mediated oral delivery of a bioencapsulated green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic chloroplasts into the mouse circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Arati; Koya, Vijay; Samsam, Mohtashem; Daniell, Henry

    2006-05-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutical proteins expressed in plant cells should reduce their cost of production, purification, processing, cold storage, transportation, and delivery. However, poor intestinal absorption of intact proteins is a major challenge. To overcome this limitation, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of chloroplast-expressed foreign proteins. Therefore, the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B-subunit and green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP), separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy. Immunoblot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of monomeric and pentameric forms of CTB-GFP, up to 21.3% of total soluble proteins. An in vitro furin cleavage assay confirmed integrity of the engineered furin cleavage site, and a GM1 binding assay confirmed the functionality of CTB-GFP pentamers. Following oral administration of CTB-GFP expressing leaf material to mice, GFP was observed in the mice intestinal mucosa, liver, and spleen in fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies, while CTB remained in the intestinal cell. This report of receptor-mediated oral delivery of a foreign protein into the circulatory system opens the door for low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins.

  12. Effects of antibiotic concentration and nutrient medium composition on Escherichia coli biofilm formation and green fluorescent protein expression.

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    Gomes, Luciana C; Mergulhão, Filipe J

    2017-03-01

    Recombinant protein production processes have to maximise yield while minimising cost, which involves balancing plasmid maintenance with cell growth and protein expression. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of two factors on heterologous protein production in Escherichia coli biofilm cells-the concentration of antibiotic used to maintain the selective pressure and the nutrient medium composition. Escherichia coli JM109(DE3) cells transformed with plasmid pFM23 for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and containing a kanamycin resistance gene were used. They were exposed to 20 or 30 μg mL-1 kanamycin during biofilm growth in two different culture media, a diluted medium (DM) or the lysogeny broth (LB). The higher antibiotic concentration increased the specific eGFP production in planktonic cells, whereas no increase was detected in biofilm cells. Biofilm formation was increased in DM when compared to LB. Nevertheless, bacteria grown in LB had higher eGFP production than those grown in DM in both planktonic and sessile states (20-fold and 2-fold, respectively). Therefore, among the conditions tested, LB supplemented with 20 μg mL-1 kanamycin was the most advantageous medium to obtain the highest specific eGFP production in biofilm cells. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Noninvasive optical diagnostics of enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in skeletal muscle for comparison of electroporation and sonoporation efficiencies

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    Tamošiūnas, Mindaugas; Kadikis, Roberts; Saknīte, Inga; Baltušnikas, Juozas; Kilikevičius, Audrius; Lihachev, Alexey; Petrovska, Ramona; Jakovels, Dainis; Šatkauskas, Saulius

    2016-04-01

    We highlight the options available for noninvasive optical diagnostics of reporter gene expression in mouse tibialis cranialis muscle. An in vivo multispectral imaging technique combined with fluorescence spectroscopy point measurements has been used for the transcutaneous detection of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression, providing information on location and duration of EGFP expression and allowing quantification of EGFP expression levels. For EGFP coding plasmid (pEGFP-Nuc Vector, 10 μg/50 ml) transfection, we used electroporation or ultrasound enhanced microbubble cavitation [sonoporation (SP)]. The transcutaneous EGFP fluorescence in live mice was monitored over a period of one year using the described parameters: area of EGFP positive fibers, integral intensity, and mean intensity of EGFP fluorescence. The most efficient transfection of EGFP coding plasmid was achieved, when one high voltage and four low voltage electric pulses were applied. This protocol resulted in the highest short-term and long-term EGFP expression. Other electric pulse protocols as well as SP resulted in lower fluorescence intensities of EGFP in the transfected area. We conclude that noninvasive multispectral imaging technique combined with fluorescence spectroscopy point measurements is a suitable method to estimate the dynamics and efficiency of reporter gene transfection in vivo.

  14. High-efficiency type II cell-enhanced green fluorescent protein expression facilitates cellular identification, tracking, and isolation.

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    Vanderbilt, Jeff N; Gonzalez, Robert F; Allen, Lennell; Gillespie, AnneMarie; Leaffer, David; Dean, Willow B; Chapin, Cheryl; Dobbs, Leland G

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a transgenic mouse expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in virtually all type II (TII) alveolar epithelial cells. The CBG mouse (SPC-BAC-EGFP) contains a bacterial artificial chromosome modified to express EGFP within the mouse surfactant protein (SP)-C gene 3' untranslated region. EGFP mRNA expression is limited to the lung. EGFP fluorescence is both limited to and exhibited by all cells expressing pro-SP-C; fluorescence is uniform throughout all lobes of the lung and does not change as mice age. EGFP(+) cells also express SP-B but do not express podoplanin, a type I (TI) cell marker. CBG mice show no evidence of lung disease with aging. In 3 hours, TII cells can be isolated in >99% purity from CBG mice by FACS; the yield of 3.7 ± 0.6 × 10(6) cells represents approximately 25 to 60% of the TII cells in the lung. By FACS analysis, approximately 0.9% of TII cells are in mitosis in uninjured lungs; after bleomycin injury, 4.1% are in mitosis. Because EGFP fluorescence can be detected for >14 days in culture, at a time that SP-C mRNA expression is essentially nil, this line may be useful for tracking TII cells in culture and in vivo. When CBG mice are crossed to transgenic mice expressing rat podoplanin, TI and TII cells can be easily simultaneously identified and isolated. When bred to other strains of mice, EGFP expression can be used to identify TII cells without the need for immunostaining for SP-C. These mice should be useful in models of mouse pulmonary disease and in studies of TII cell biology, biochemistry, and genetics.

  15. A Novel Prokaryotic Green Fluorescent Protein Expression System for Testing Gene Editing Tools Activity Like Zinc Finger Nuclease.

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    Sabzehei, Faezeh; Kouhpayeh, Shirin; Dastjerdeh, Mansoureh Shahbazi; Khanahmad, Hossein; Salehi, Rasoul; Naderi, Shamsi; Taghizadeh, Razieh; Rabiei, Parisa; Hejazi, Zahra; Shariati, Laleh

    2017-01-01

    Gene editing technology has created a revolution in the field of genome editing. The three of the most famous tools in gene editing technology are zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and CRISPR-associated systems. As their predictable nature, it is necessary to assess their efficiency. There are some methods for this purpose, but most of them are time labor and complicated. Here, we introduce a new prokaryotic reporter system, which makes it possible to evaluate the efficiency of gene editing tools faster, cheaper, and simpler than previous methods. At first, the target sites of a custom ZFN, which is designed against a segment of ampicillin resistance gene, were cloned on both sides of green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene to construct pPRO-GFP. Then pPRO-GFP was transformed into Escherichia coli TOP10F' that contains pZFN (contains expression cassette of a ZFN against ampicillin resistant gene), or p15A-KanaR as a negative control. The transformed bacteria were cultured on three separate media that contained ampicillin, kanamycin, and ampicillin + kanamycin; then the resulted colonies were assessed by flow cytometry. The results of flow cytometry showed a significant difference between the case (bacteria contain pZFN) and control (bacteria contain p15A, KanaR) in MFI (Mean Fluorescence Intensity) ( P fluorescence. Our flow cytometry results showed that this ZFN could reduce the intensity of GFP color and colony count of bacteria in media containing amp + kana versus control sample.

  16. A Novel Prokaryotic Green Fluorescent Protein Expression System for Testing Gene Editing Tools Activity Like Zinc Finger Nuclease

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    Faezeh Sabzehei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gene editing technology has created a revolution in the field of genome editing. The three of the most famous tools in gene editing technology are zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR, and CRISPR-associated systems. As their predictable nature, it is necessary to assess their efficiency. There are some methods for this purpose, but most of them are time labor and complicated. Here, we introduce a new prokaryotic reporter system, which makes it possible to evaluate the efficiency of gene editing tools faster, cheaper, and simpler than previous methods. Materials and Methods: At first, the target sites of a custom ZFN, which is designed against a segment of ampicillin resistance gene, were cloned on both sides of green fluorescent protein (GFP gene to construct pPRO-GFP. Then pPRO-GFP was transformed into Escherichia coli TOP10F' that contains pZFN (contains expression cassette of a ZFN against ampicillin resistant gene, or p15A-KanaR as a negative control. The transformed bacteria were cultured on three separate media that contained ampicillin, kanamycin, and ampicillin + kanamycin; then the resulted colonies were assessed by flow cytometry. Results: The results of flow cytometry showed a significant difference between the case (bacteria contain pZFN and control (bacteria contain p15A, KanaR in MFI (Mean Fluorescence Intensity (P < 0.0001. Conclusion: According to ZFN efficiency, it can bind and cut the target sites, the bilateral cutting can affect the intensity of GFP fluorescence. Our flow cytometry results showed that this ZFN could reduce the intensity of GFP color and colony count of bacteria in media containing amp + kana versus control sample.

  17. Trade-Offs Associated with Photoprotective Green Fluorescent Protein Expression as Potential Drivers of Balancing Selection for Color Polymorphism in Reef Corals

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    Cathryn Quick

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodamage of symbiotic algae exposed to thermal stress is involved in mass coral bleaching, a major cause of reef decline. Photoprotection is therefore a vital part of coral stress physiology. Corals produce a variety of green fluorescent protein (GFP-like proteins, some of which screen the symbiotic algae from excess sun light. Different tissue concentrations of these GFP-like proteins distinguish color morphs that are characteristic for many coral species. The question arises whether these pigmentation differences may diversify the niches that can be occupied by corals along the steep light gradient that structures coral reef communities. We assessed the implications of GFP-like protein expression in two color morphs of the symbiotic coral Hydnophora grandis, both associated with the same Symbiodinium sp. (subclade C40. The color morphs of this species (high fluorescent, HF; and low fluorescent, LF, characterized by markedly different contents of a cyan fluorescent protein, were exposed to different quantities of blue light (470 nm that matched the major absorption band of the host pigment (473 nm. High intensities of blue light caused less photodamage to the symbiotic algae of the HF morph and resulted in higher growth rates of these corals compared to representatives of the LF morph. In contrast, under low intensities of blue light, the HF morph showed lower growth rates than the LF morph, indicating that trade-offs are associated with high levels of fluorescent protein expression under this condition. Both morphs showed highest growth rates at medium light intensities with no obvious influence of the tissue pigmentation. Reef coral color polymorphism caused by photoprotective GFP-like proteins may therefore be a product of balancing selection in which high pigment contents may be beneficial at the upper and detrimental at the lower end of the depth distribution range of symbiotic corals. Conversely, color morphs with GFP-like proteins

  18. Effect of aqueous media on the copper-ion-mediated phototoxicity of CuO nanoparticles toward green fluorescent protein-expressing Escherichia coli.

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    Shang, Enxiang; Li, Yang; Niu, Junfeng; Guo, Huiyuan; Zhou, Yijing; Liu, Han; Zhang, Xinqi

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative comparison of different aqueous media on the phototoxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) is crucial for understanding their ecological effects. In this study, the phototoxicity of CuO NPs toward the green fluorescent protein-expressing Escherichia coli (GFP-E. coli) under UV irradiation (365 nm) was investigated in Luria-Bertani medium (LB), NaCl solution, deionized water (DI) and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The phototoxicity of CuO NPs toward GFP-E. coli decreased in the order of DI>NaCl>PBS>LB because of different released concentrations of Cu(2+). The 3h released Cu(2+) concentrations by 10mg/L CuO NPs in DI water, NaCl solution, LB medium, and PBS were 1946.3 ± 75.6, 1242.5 ± 47.6, 1023.4 ± 41.2, and 1162.1 ± 41.9 μg/L, respectively. Transmission electron microscope and laser scanning confocal microscope images of E. coli exposed to CuO NPs demonstrated that the released Cu(2+) resulted in fragmentation of bacterial cell walls, leakage of intracellular components, and finally death of bacteria in four media after UV light irradiation. In each medium, the bacterial mortality rate logarithmically increased with the releasing concentrations of Cu(2+) by CuO NPs (R(2)>0.90) exposed to 3h UV light. This study highlights the importance of taking into consideration of water chemistry when the phototoxicity of CuO NPs is assessed in nanotoxicity research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Oligonucleotide-mediated gene editing is underestimated in cells expressing mutated green fluorescent protein and is positively associated with target protein expression.

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    Disterer, Petra; Papaioannou, Ioannis; Evans, Vanessa C; Simons, J Paul; Owen, James S

    2012-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can introduce small, specific sequence alterations into genomes. Potential applications include creating disease-associated mutations in cell lines or animals, functional studies of single nucleotide polymorphisms and, ultimately, clinical therapy by correcting genetic point mutations. Here, we report feasibility studies into realizing this potential by targeting a reporter gene, mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP). Three mammalian cell lines, CHO, HEK293T and HepG2, expressing multiple copies of mEGFP were transfected with a 27-mer ssODN capable of restoring fluorescence. Successful cell correction was quantified by flow cytometry. Gene editing in each isogenic cell line, as measured by percentage of green cells, correlated tightly with target protein levels, and thus gene expression. In the total population, 2.5% of CHO-mEGFP cells were successfully edited, although, remarkably, in the highest decile producing mEGFP protein, over 20% of the cells had restored green fluorescence. Gene-edited clones initially selected for green fluorescence lost EGFP expression during cell passaging, which partly reflected G2-phase cycle arrest and perhaps eventual cell death. The major cause, however, was epigenetic down-regulation; incubation with sodium butyrate or 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine reactivated fluorescent EGFP expression and hence established that the repaired genotype was stable. Our data establish that ssODN-mediated gene editing is underestimated in cultured mammalian cells expressing nonfluorescent mutated EGFP, because of variable expression of this mEGFP target gene in the cell population. This conclusion was endorsed by studies in HEK293T-mEGFP and HepG2-mEGFP cells. We infer that oligonucleotide-directed editing of endogenous genes is feasible, particularly for those that are transcriptionally active. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Trade-Offs Associated with Photoprotective Green Fluorescent Protein Expression as Potential Drivers of Balancing Selection for Color Polymorphism in Reef Corals

    OpenAIRE

    Cathryn Quick; Cecilia D'Angelo; Cecilia D'Angelo; Jörg Wiedenmann; Jörg Wiedenmann

    2018-01-01

    Photodamage of symbiotic algae exposed to thermal stress is involved in mass coral bleaching, a major cause of reef decline. Photoprotection is therefore a vital part of coral stress physiology. Corals produce a variety of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like proteins, some of which screen the symbiotic algae from excess sun light. Different tissue concentrations of these GFP-like proteins distinguish color morphs that are characteristic for many coral species. The question arises whether the...

  1. Genetic transformation of an obligate anaerobe, P. gingivalis for FMN-green fluorescent protein expression in studying host-microbe interaction.

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    Chul Hee Choi

    Full Text Available The recent introduction of "oxygen-independent" flavin mononucleotide (FMN-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs is of major interest to both eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial biologists. Accordingly, we demonstrate for the first time that an obligate anaerobe, the successful opportunistic pathogen of the oral cavity, Porphyromonas gingivalis, can be genetically engineered for expression of the non-toxic green FbFP. The resulting transformants are functional for studying dynamic bacterial processes in living host cells. The visualization of the transformed P. gingivalis (PgFbFP revealed strong fluorescence that reached a maximum emission at 495 nm as determined by fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorometry. Human primary gingival epithelial cells (GECs were infected with PgFbFP and the bacterial invasion of host cells was analyzed by a quantitative fluorescence microscopy and antibiotic protection assays. The results showed similar levels of intracellular bacteria for both wild type and PgFbFP strains. In conjunction with organelle specific fluorescent dyes, utilization of the transformed strain provided direct and accurate determination of the live/metabolically active P. gingivalis' trafficking in the GECs over time. Furthermore, the GECs were co-infected with PgFbFP and the ATP-dependent Clp serine protease-deficient mutant (ClpP- to study the differential fates of the two strains within the same host cells. Quantitative co-localization analyses displayed the intracellular PgFbFP significantly associated with the endoplasmic reticulum network, whereas the majority of ClpP- organisms trafficked into the lysosomes. Hence, we have developed a novel and reliable method to characterize live host cell-microbe interactions and demonstrated the adaptability of FMN-green fluorescent protein for studying persistent host infections induced by obligate anaerobic organisms.

  2. Efficient Generation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitors Based on Tissue-Specific Enhanced Green Fluorescence Protein Expression

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    Szebényi, Kornélia; Péntek, Adrienn; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Várady, György; Orbán, Tamás I.; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are committed to the cardiac lineage but retain their proliferative capacity before becoming quiescent mature cardiomyocytes (CMs). In medical therapy and research, the use of human pluripotent stem cell-derived CPCs would have several advantages compared with mature CMs, as the progenitors show better engraftment into existing heart tissues, and provide unique potential for cardiovascular developmental as well as for pharmacological studies. Here, we demonstrate that the CAG promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) reporter system enables the identification and isolation of embryonic stem cell-derived CPCs. Tracing of CPCs during differentiation confirmed up-regulation of surface markers, previously described to identify cardiac precursors and early CMs. Isolated CPCs express cardiac lineage-specific transcripts, still have proliferating capacity, and can be re-aggregated into embryoid body-like structures (CAG-EGFPhigh rEBs). Expression of troponin T and NKX2.5 mRNA is up-regulated in long-term cultured CAG-EGFPhigh rEBs, in which more than 90% of the cells become Troponin I positive mature CMs. Moreover, about one third of the CAG-EGFPhigh rEBs show spontaneous contractions. The method described here provides a powerful tool to generate expandable cultures of pure human CPCs that can be used for exploring early markers of the cardiac lineage, as well as for drug screening or tissue engineering applications. PMID:24734786

  3. Morphological analysis of the early development of telencephalic and diencephalic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal systems in enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic medaka lines.

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    Takahashi, Akiko; Islam, M Sadiqul; Abe, Hideki; Okubo, Kataaki; Akazome, Yasuhisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Teleosts possess two or three paralogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) genes: gnrh1, gnrh2, and gnrh3. Some species have lost the gnrh1 and/or gnrh3 genes, whereas gnrh2 has been completely conserved in the teleost species analyzed to date. In most teleosts that possess gnrh1, GnRH1 peptide is the authentic GnRH that stimulates gonadotropin release, whereas GnRH2 and GnRH3, if present, are neuromodulatory. Progenitors of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons originate from olfactory placodes and migrate to their destination during early development. However, because of the relatively low affinity/specificity of generally available antibodies that recognize GnRH1 or GnRH3, labeling of these neurons has only been possible using genetic manipulation. We used a model teleost, medaka, which possesses all three paralogous gnrh genes, to analyze development of forebrain GnRH neurons composed of GnRH1 and GnRH3 neurons. Here, we newly generated transgenic medaka lines that express enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of promoters for gnrh1 or gnrh3, to detect GnRH neurons and facilitate immunohistochemical analysis of the neuronal morphology. We used a combination of immunohistochemistry and three-dimensional confocal microscopy image reconstructions to improve identification of neurites from GnRH1 or GnRH3 neuronal populations with greater precision. This led us to clearly identify the hypophysiotropic innervation of GnRH1 neurons residing in the ventral preoptic area (vPOA) from as early as 10 days post hatching. Furthermore, these analyses also revealed retinopetal projections of nonhypophysiotropic GnRH1 neurons in vPOA, prominent during early developmental stages, and multiple populations of GnRH3 neurons with different origins and migratory pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Stable enhanced green fluorescent protein expression after differentiation and transplantation of reporter human induced pluripotent stem cells generated by AAVS1 transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

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    Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Cerbini, Trevor; San, Hong; Lin, Yongshun; Chen, Guokai; Rao, Mahendra S; Zou, Jizhong

    2014-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell lines with tissue-specific or ubiquitous reporter genes are extremely useful for optimizing in vitro differentiation conditions as well as for monitoring transplanted cells in vivo. The adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus has been used as a "safe harbor" locus for inserting transgenes because of its open chromatin structure, which permits transgene expression without insertional mutagenesis. However, it is not clear whether targeted transgene expression at the AAVS1 locus is always protected from silencing when driven by various promoters, especially after differentiation and transplantation from hiPS cells. In this paper, we describe a pair of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that enable more efficient genome editing than the commercially available zinc finger nuclease at the AAVS1 site. Using these TALENs for targeted gene addition, we find that the cytomegalovirus-immediate early enhancer/chicken β-actin/rabbit β-globin (CAG) promoter is better than cytomegalovirus 7 and elongation factor 1α short promoters in driving strong expression of the transgene. The two independent AAVS1, CAG, and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) hiPS cell reporter lines that we have developed do not show silencing of EGFP either in undifferentiated hiPS cells or in randomly and lineage-specifically differentiated cells or in teratomas. Transplanting cardiomyocytes from an engineered AAVS1-CAG-EGFP hiPS cell line in a myocardial infarcted mouse model showed persistent expression of the transgene for at least 7 weeks in vivo. Our results show that high-efficiency targeting can be obtained with open-source TALENs and that careful optimization of the reporter and transgene constructs results in stable and persistent expression in vitro and in vivo. ©AlphaMed Press.

  5. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  6. Green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfie, M

    1995-10-01

    Several bioluminescent coelenterates use a secondary fluorescent protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), in an energy transfer reaction to produce green light. The most studied of these proteins have been the GFPs from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria and the sea pansy Renilla reniformis. Although the proteins from these organisms are not identical, they are thought to have the same chromophore, which is derived from the primary amino acid sequence of GFP. The differences are thought to be due to changes in the protein environment of the chromophore. Recent interest in these molecules has arisen from the cloning of the Aequorea gfp cDNA and the demonstration that its expression in the absence of other Aequorea proteins results in a fluorescent product. This demonstration indicated that GFP could be used as a marker of gene expression and protein localization in living and fixed tissues. Bacterial, plant and animal (including mammalian) cells all express GFP. The heterologous expression of the gfp cDNA has also meant that it could be mutated to produce proteins with different fluorescent properties. Variants with more intense fluorescence or alterations in the excitation and emission spectra have been produced.

  7. Antibody fusions with fluorescent proteins: a versatile reagent for profiling protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, K; Katsumi, H; Akahori, Y; Iba, Y; Shinohara, M; Ukai, Y; Kohara, Y; Kurosawa, Y

    2001-11-01

    We developed a system by which antibodies, fused to fluorescent proteins with different wavelengths, can be prepared within a month against various antigens. An antibody library composed of a large number of single-chain Fv-CL fragment was constructed by means of a phage-display system. The constructs were designed to facilitate changing of the protein forms by simple enzyme manipulation. In the present study, we adopted a molecular form of antibody in which a single-chain Fv-CL fragment is fused with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). In addition, a His-tag was inserted between CL and GFP (or RFP). We describe the utility of this system using Caenorhabditis elegans embryo as a model.

  8. Fluorescent protein-expressing neural progenitor cells as a tool for transplantation studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Skardelly

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to generate quadruple fluorescent protein (QFP transgenic mice as a source for QFP-expressing neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs that could be utilized as a tool for transplantation research. When undifferentiated, these NSCs only express cyan fluorescent protein (CFP; however, upon neuronal differentiation, the cells express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP. During astrocytic differentiation, the cells express green fluorescent protein (GFP, and during oligodendrocytic differentiation, the cells express red fluorescent protein (DsRed. Using immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting, flow cytometry and electrophysiology, quadruple transgenic NPCs (Q-NPCs and GFP-sorted NPCs were comprehensively characterized in vitro. Overall, the various transgenes did not significantly affect proliferation and differentiation of transgenic NPCs in comparison to wild-type NPCs. In contrast to a strong CFP and GFP expression in vitro, NPCs did not express YFP and dsRed either during proliferation or after differentiation in vitro. GFP-positive sorted NPCs, expressing GFP under the control of the human GFAP promoter, demonstrated a significant improvement in astroglial differentiation in comparison to GFP-negative sorted NPCs. In contrast to non-sorted and GFP-positive sorted NPCs, GFP-negative sorted NPCs demonstrated a high proportion of neuronal differentiation and proved to be functional in vitro. At 6 weeks after the intracerebroventricular transplantation of Q-NPCs into neonatal wild-type mice, CFP/DCX (doublecortin double-positive transplanted cells were observed. The Q-NPCs did not express any other fluorescent proteins and did not mature into neuronal or glial cells. Although this model failed to visualize NPC differentiation in vivo, we determined that activation of the NPC glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP promoter, as indicated by GFP expression, can be used to separate neuronal and glial progenitors as a valuable

  9. Engineering and Characterization of a Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedelacq, J.; Cabantous, S.; Tran, T.; Terwilliger, T.; Waldo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Existing variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) often misfold when expressed as fusions with other proteins. We have generated a robustly folded version of GFP, called 'superfolder' GFP, that folds well even when fused to poorly folded polypeptides. Compared to 'folding reporter' GFP, a folding-enhanced GFP containing the 'cycle-3' mutations and the 'enhanced GFP' mutations F64L and S65T, superfolder GFP shows improved tolerance of circular permutation, greater resistance to chemical denaturants and improved folding kinetics. The fluorescence of Escherichia coli cells expressing each of eighteen proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum as fusions with superfolder GFP was proportional to total protein expression. In contrast, fluorescence of folding reporter GFP fusion proteins was strongly correlated with the productive folding yield of the passenger protein. X-ray crystallographic structural analyses helped explain the enhanced folding of superfolder GFP relative to folding reporter GFP

  10. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  11. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M C Volgenant

    Full Text Available Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation. Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  12. Electric field effects on fluorescence of the green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2008-05-01

    External electric field effects on state energy and photoexcitation dynamics have been examined for a mutant of UV-excited green fluorescent protein (GFPuv5) in a PVA film. The electrofluorescence spectrum of GFPuv5 is reproduced by a linear combination between the fluorescence spectrum and its second derivative spectrum, indicating the field-induced fluorescence quenching and the difference in electric dipole moment between the fluorescent state and the ground state. The direct measurements of the field-induced change in fluorescence decay show that the field-induced quenching results from the field-induced increase in the rate of the non-radiative process from the fluorescent state.

  13. Application of Fluorescent Protein Expressing Strains to Evaluation of Anti-Tuberculosis Therapeutic Efficacy In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Kong

    Full Text Available The slow growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, hinders development of new diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines. Using non-invasive real-time imaging technologies to monitor the disease process in live animals would facilitate TB research in all areas. We developed fluorescent protein (FP expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains for in vivo imaging, which can be used to track bacterial location, and to quantify bacterial load in live animals. We selected an optimal FP for in vivo imaging, by first cloning six FPs: tdTomato, mCherry, mPlum, mKate, Katushka and mKeima, into mycobacteria under either a mycobacterial Hsp60 or L5 promoter, and compared their fluorescent signals in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence from each FP-expressing strain was measured with a multimode reader using the optimal excitation and emission wavelengths for the FP. After normalizing bacterial numbers with optical density, the strain expressing L5-tdTomato displayed the highest fluorescence. We used the tdTomato-labeled M. bovis BCG to obtain real-time images of pulmonary infections in living mice and rapidly determined the number of bacteria present. Further comparison between L5-tdTomato and Hsp60-tdTomato revealed that L5-tdTomato carried four-fold more tdTomato gene copies than Hsp60-tdTomato, which eventually led to higher protein expression of tdTomato. Evaluating anti-TB efficacy of rifampicin and isoniazid therapy in vitro and in vivo using the L5-tdTomato strain demonstrated that this strain can be used to identify anti-TB therapeutic efficacy as quickly as 24 h post-treatment. These M. bovis BCG reporter strains represent a valuable new tool for evaluation of therapeutics, vaccines and virulence.

  14. Understanding, improving and using green fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, A B; Heim, R; Adams, S R; Boyd, A E; Gross, L A; Tsien, R Y

    1995-11-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are presently attracting tremendous interest as the first general method to create strong visible fluorescence by purely molecular biological means. So far, they have been used as reporters of gene expression, tracers of cell lineage, and as fusion tags to monitor protein localization within living cells. However, the GFP originally cloned from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria has several nonoptimal properties including low brightness, a significant delay between protein synthesis and fluorescence development, and complex photoisomerization. Fortunately, the protein can be re-engineered by mutagenesis to ameliorate these deficiencies and shift the excitation and emission wavelengths, creating different colors and new applications.

  15. A bright monomeric green fluorescent protein derived from Branchiostoma lanceolatum

    OpenAIRE

    Shaner, Nathan C.; Lambert, Gerard G.; Chammas, Andrew; Ni, Yuhui; Cranfill, Paula J.; Baird, Michelle A.; Sell, Brittney R.; Allen, John R.; Day, Richard N.; Israelsson, Maria; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Jiwu

    2013-01-01

    Despite the existence of fluorescent proteins spanning the entire visual spectrum, the bulk of modern imaging experiments continue to rely on variants of the green fluorescent protein derived from Aequorea victoria. Meanwhile, a great deal of recent effort has been devoted to engineering and improving red fluorescent proteins, and relatively little attention has been given to green and yellow variants. Here we report a novel monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein, mNeonGreen, which is der...

  16. Green fluorescent protein: untapped potential in immunotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrick, J W; Balint, R F; Youvan, D C

    1995-08-01

    Many invertebrates produce bioluminescence using green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) as energy-transfer acceptors. GFPs fluoresce in vivo upon receiving energy from either a luciferase-oxyluciferin excited-state complex or a Ca(2+)-activated photoprotein depending upon the organism. These highly fluorescent proteins are unique due to the chemical nature of their chromophore, which is comprised of modified amino acid residues within the polypeptide chain. Recently GFP was sequenced and cloned. GFP, GFP mutants or related proteins with altered spectra will have widespread use as a markers of gene expression and as a protein tags in cell culture and in multicellular organisms. Many of the uses of fluorescent-labeled proteins or antibodies in immunotechnology will be improved by the use of GFP. Many new applications were discussed at a recent international symposium [1].

  17. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  18. Structural plasticity of green fluorescent protein to amino acid deletions and fluorescence rescue by folding-enhancing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-su; Wei, Xuan; Dong, Xue; Xu, Liang; Liu, Jia; Jiang, Biao

    2015-07-25

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its derivative fluorescent proteins (FPs) are among the most commonly used reporter systems for studying gene expression and protein interaction in biomedical research. Most commercially available FPs have been optimized for their oligomerization state to prevent potential structural constraints that may interfere with the native function of fused proteins. Other approach to reducing structural constraints may include minimizing the structure of GFPs. Previous studies in an enhanced GFP variant (EGFP) identified a series of deletions that can retain GFP fluorescence. In this study, we interrogated the structural plasticity of a UV-optimized GFP variant (GFP(UV)) to amino acid deletions, characterized the effects of deletions and explored the feasibility of rescuing the fluorescence of deletion mutants using folding-enhancing mutations. Transposon mutagenesis was used to screen amino acid deletions in GFP that led to fluorescent and nonfluorescent phenotypes. The fluorescent GFP mutants were characterized for their whole-cell fluorescence and fraction soluble. Fluorescent GFP mutants with internal deletions were purified and characterized for their spectral and folding properties. Folding-ehancing mutations were introduced to deletion mutants to rescue their compromised fluorescence. We identified twelve amino acid deletions that can retain the fluorescence of GFP(UV). Seven of these deletions are either at the N- or C- terminus, while the other five are located at internal helices or strands. Further analysis suggested that the five internal deletions diminished the efficiency of protein folding and chromophore maturation. Protein expression under hypothermic condition or incorporation of folding-enhancing mutations could rescue the compromised fluorescence of deletion mutants. In addition, we generated dual deletion mutants that can retain GFP fluorescence. Our results suggested that a "size-minimized" GFP may be developed by

  19. Use of fluorescent Ca2+ dyes with green fluorescent protein and its variants: problems and solutions.

    OpenAIRE

    Bolsover, S; Ibrahim, O; O'luanaigh, N; Williams, H; Cockcroft, S

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the degree to which fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dyes, and green fluorescent protein and its variants, can be used together. We find that the most commonly used fluorescent protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), seriously contaminates fura 2 signals. We suggest two alternative combinations for which there is no detectable contamination of the Ca(2+) indicator signal by the fluorescent protein. Blue fluorescent protein can be used with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura Red...

  20. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Marker for Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfie, Martin; Tu, Yuan; Euskirchen, Ghia; Ward, William W.; Prasher, Douglas C.

    1994-02-01

    A complementary DNA for the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) produces a fluorescent product when expressed in prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) or eukaryotic (Caenorhabditis elegans) cells. Because exogenous substrates and cofactors are not required for this fluorescence, GFP expression can be used to monitor gene expression and protein localization in living organisms.

  1. A toolkit for graded expression of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Ehm, Patrick; Giehler, Susanne; Mayr, Georg W

    2012-09-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-like proteins of different colors are important tools in cell biology. In many studies, the intracellular targeting of proteins has been determined by transiently expressing GFP fusion proteins and analyzing their intracellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. In most vectors, expression of GFP is driven by the enhancer/promoter cassette of the immediate early gene of human cytomegalovirus (hCMV). This cassette generates high levels of protein expression in most mammalian cell lines. Unfortunately, these nonphysiologically high protein levels have been repeatedly reported to artificially alter the intracellular targeting of proteins fused to GFP. To cope with this problem, we generated a multitude of attenuated GFP expression vectors by modifying the hCMV enhancer/promoter cassette. These modified vectors were transiently expressed, and the expression levels of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) alone and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) fused to another protein were determined by fluorescence microscopy and/or Western blotting. As shown in this study, we were able to (i) clearly reduce the expression of EGFP alone and (ii) reduce expression of an EYFP fusion protein down to the level of the endogenous protein, both in a graded manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An optical marker based on the UV-induced green-to-red photoconversion of a fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Ryoko; Hama, Hiroshi; Yamamoto-Hino, Miki; Mizuno, Hideaki; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2002-10-01

    We have cloned a gene encoding a fluorescent protein from a stony coral, Trachyphyllia geoffroyi, which emits green, yellow, and red light. The protein, named Kaede, includes a tripeptide, His-Tyr-Gly, that acts as a green chromophore that can be converted to red. The red fluorescence is comparable in intensity to the green and is stable under usual aerobic conditions. We found that the green-red conversion is highly sensitive to irradiation with UV or violet light (350-400 nm), which excites the protonated form of the chromophore. The excitation lights used to elicit red and green fluorescence do not induce photoconversion. Under a conventional epifluorescence microscope, Kaede protein expressed in HeLa cells turned red in a graded fashion in response to UV illumination; maximal illumination resulted in a 2,000-fold increase in the ratio of red-to-green signal. These color-changing properties provide a simple and powerful technique for regional optical marking. A focused UV pulse creates an instantaneous plane source of red Kaede within the cytosol. The red spot spreads rapidly throughout the cytosol, indicating its free diffusibility in the compartment. The extensive diffusion allows us to delineate a single neuron in a dense culture, where processes originating from many different somata are present. Illumination of a focused UV pulse onto the soma of a Kaede-expressing neuron resulted in filling of all processes with red fluorescence, allowing visualization of contact sites between the red and green neurons of interest.

  3. Use of anaerobic green fluorescent protein versus green fluorescent protein as reporter in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landete, José M; Langa, Susana; Revilla, Concepción; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in the production of fermented and probiotic foods. Development of molecular tools to discriminate the strains of interest from the endogenous microbiota in complex environments like food or gut is of high interest. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophores strictly requires molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which restrict the study of microorganisms in low-oxygen environments. In this work, we have developed a noninvasive cyan-green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of LAB that is functional under anoxic conditions. The evoglow-Pp1 was cloned downstream from the promoters D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and elongation factor Tu of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT925 using pNZ8048 and downstream of the lactococcal P1 promoter using pT1NX. The classical gfp was also cloned in pT1NX. These recombinant expression vectors were electroporated into Lactococccus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus strains with biotechnological and/or probiotic interests to assess and compare their functionality under different conditions of oxygen and pH. The expression was analyzed by imaging and fluorometric methods as well as by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that reporter systems pNZ:TuR-aFP and pT1-aFP are two versatile molecular markers for monitoring LAB in food and fecal environments without the potential problems caused by oxygen and pH limitations, which could be exploited for in vivo studies. Production of the fluorescent protein did not disturb any important physiological properties of the parental strains, such as growth rate, reuterin, or bacteriocin production.

  4. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification...

  5. Circularly permuted green fluorescent proteins engineered to sense Ca2+

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Takeharu; Sawano, Asako; Park, Eun Sun; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2001-01-01

    To visualize Ca2+-dependent protein–protein interactions in living cells by fluorescence readouts, we used a circularly permuted green fluorescent protein (cpGFP), in which the amino and carboxyl portions had been interchanged and reconnected by a short spacer between the original termini. The cpGFP was fused to calmodulin and its target peptide, M13. The chimeric protein, which we have named “pericam,” was fluorescent and its spectral properties changed reversibly...

  6. Wavelength mutations and posttranslational autoxidation of green fluorescent protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Heim, R; Prasher, D C; Tsien, R Y

    1994-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is an unusual protein with strong visible absorbance and fluorescence from a p-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolidinone chromophore, which is generated by cyclization and oxidation of the protein's own Ser-Tyr-Gly sequence at positions 65-67. Cloning of the cDNA and heterologous expression of fluorescent protein in a wide variety of organisms indicate that this unique posttranslational modification must be either spontaneous or ...

  7. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH

  8. Early quantitative profiling of differential retinal protein expression in lens-induced myopia in guinea pig using fluorescence difference two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi; Lam, Carly Siu-Yin; Tse, Dennis Yan-Yin; To, Chi Ho; Liu, Quan; McFadden, Sally A; Chun, Rachel Ka-Man; Li, King Kit; Bian, Jianfang; Lam, Chuen

    2018-04-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the differential protein expression in guinea pig retinas in response to lens-induced myopia (LIM) before fully compensated eye growth. Four days old guinea pigs (n=5) were subjected to ‑4D LIM for 8 days. Refractive errors were measured before and at the end of the lens wear period. Ocular dimensions were also recorded using high‑frequency A‑scan ultrasonography. After the LIM treatment, retinas of both eyes were harvested and soluble proteins were extracted. Paired retinal protein expressions in each animal were profiled and compared using a sensitive fluorescence difference two‑dimensional gel electrophoresis. The quantitative retinal proteomes of myopic and control eye were analysed using computerised DeCyder software. Those proteins that were consistently changed with at least 1.2‑fold difference (P<0.05) in the same direction in all five animals were extracted, trypsin digested and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Significant myopia was induced in guinea pigs after 8 days of lens wear. The vitreous chamber depth in lens‑treated eyes was found to be significantly elongated. Typically, more than 1,000 protein spots could be detected from each retina. Thirty‑two of them showed differential expression between myopic and untreated retina. Among these proteins, 21 spots were upregulated and 11 were downregulated. Eight protein spots could be successfully identified which included β‑actin, enolase 1, cytosolic malate dehydrogenase, Ras‑related protein Rab‑11B, protein‑L‑isoaspartate (D‑aspartate) O‑methyltransferase, PKM2 protein, X‑linked eukaryotic translation initiation factor 1A and ACP1 protein. The present study serves as the first report to uncover the retinal 2D proteome expressions in mammalian guinea pig myopia model using a top‑down fluorescent dyes labelling gel approach. The results showed a downregulation in glycolytic enzymes that may suggest a significant alteration of

  9. Jellyfish green fluorescent protein as a reporter for virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulcombe, D C; Chapman, S; Santa Cruz, S

    1995-06-01

    The gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria was introduced into the expression cassette of a virus vector based on potato virus X (PVX). Host plants of PVX inoculated with PVX.GFP became systemically infected. Production of GFP in these plants was detected initially between 1 and 2 days postinoculation by the presence of regions on the inoculated leaf that fluoresced bright green under UV light. Subsequently, this green fluorescence was evident in systemically infected tissue. The fluorescence could be detected by several methods. The simplest of these was by looking at the UV-illuminated plants in a darkened room. The PVX.GFP-infected tissue has been analysed either by epifluorescence or confocal laser scanning microscopy. These microscopical methods allow the presence of the virus to be localized to individual infected cells. It was also possible to detect the green fluorescence by spectroscopy or by electrophoresis of extracts from infected plants. To illustrate the potential application of this reporter gene in virological studies a derivative of PVX.GFP was constructed in which the coat protein gene of PVX was replaced by GFP. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of the inoculated tissue showed that the virus was restricted to the inoculated cells thereby confirming earlier speculation that the PVX coat protein is essential for cell-to-cell movement. It is likely that GFP will be useful as a reporter gene in transgenic plants as well as in virus-infected tissue.

  10. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Marker in Rickettsia typhi Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Troyer, Jill Michelle; Radulovic, Suzana; Azad, Abdu F.

    1999-01-01

    Transformation of rickettsiae is a recent accomplishment, but utility of this technique is limited due to the paucity of selectable markers suitable for use in this intracellular pathogen. We chose a green fluorescent protein variant optimized for fluorescence under UV lights (GFPUV) as a fluorometric marker and transformed Rickettsia typhi with an rpoB-GFPUV fusion construct. The rickettsiae were subsequently grown in Vero cells, and cultures were screened by PCR and restriction fragment len...

  11. Green fluorescent protein as a new expression marker in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, L; Baulard, A; Estaquier, J; Poulain-Godefroy, O; Locht, C

    1995-09-01

    This study describes the use and the advantages of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter molecule for mycobacteria. The gfp gene from Aequorea victoria was placed under the control of the hsp60 promoter in the shuttle vector pGFM-11. The gfp expression in the recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis and BCG was readily detected on agar plates by the development of an intense green fluorescence upon irradiation with long-wave u.v. light. In mycobacteria containing a pGFM-11 derivative that lacks the hsp60 promoter, no fluorescence was observed. However, this plasmid was successfully used as a promoter-probe vector to identify BCG promoters. The fluorescence emission of GFP in mycobacteria harbouring pGFM-11 and grown in liquid media could be quantified by spectrofluorimetry. This allowed for easy assessment of drug susceptibility. As GFP does not require the addition of substrates or co-factors, the green fluorescent bacilli could be directly observed within infected macrophages using fluorescence and laser confocal microscopy, or in tissue sections of infected mice. Finally, infected cells or free-living recombinant mycobacteria could also be analysed by flow cytometry. The GFP thus appears to be a convenient reporter for mycobacteria, allowing tracing of recombinant mycobacteria, isolation of promoters with interesting properties, in vivo drug testing and the development of new diagnostic tools.

  12. Expression-Enhanced Fluorescent Proteins Based on Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein for Super-resolution Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwé, Sam; De Zitter, Elke; Gielen, Vincent; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Vandenberg, Wim; Grotjohann, Tim; Clays, Koen; Jakobs, Stefan; Van Meervelt, Luc; Dedecker, Peter

    2015-10-27

    "Smart fluorophores", such as reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins, are crucial for advanced fluorescence imaging. However, only a limited number of such labels is available, and many display reduced biological performance compared to more classical variants. We present the development of robustly photoswitchable variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), named rsGreens, that display up to 30-fold higher fluorescence in E. coli colonies grown at 37 °C and more than 4-fold higher fluorescence when expressed in HEK293T cells compared to their ancestor protein rsEGFP. This enhancement is not due to an intrinsic increase in the fluorescence brightness of the probes, but rather due to enhanced expression levels that allow many more probe molecules to be functional at any given time. We developed rsGreens displaying a range of photoswitching kinetics and show how these can be used for multimodal diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging such as pcSOFI and RESOLFT, achieving a spatial resolution of ∼70 nm. By determining the first ever crystal structures of a negative reversibly switchable FP derived from Aequorea victoria in both the "on"- and "off"-conformation we were able to confirm the presence of a cis-trans isomerization and provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the photochromism. Our work demonstrates that genetically encoded "smart fluorophores" can be readily optimized for biological performance and provides a practical strategy for developing maturation- and stability-enhanced photochromic fluorescent proteins.

  13. Green fluorescent protein with anionic tryptophan-based chromophore and long fluorescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Goryashchenko, Alexander S; Lidsky, Peter V; Gorbachev, Dmitry A; Bozhanova, Nina G; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu; Pereverzeva, Alina R; Ryumina, Alina P; Zherdeva, Victoria V; Savitsky, Alexander P; Solntsev, Kyril M; Bommarius, Andreas S; Sharonov, George V; Lindquist, Jake R; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Mishin, Alexander S

    2015-07-21

    Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins, crucial for multiparameter imaging, is based mainly on chemical diversity of their chromophores. Recently we have reported, to our knowledge, a new green fluorescent protein WasCFP-the first fluorescent protein with a tryptophan-based chromophore in the anionic state. However, only a small portion of WasCFP molecules exists in the anionic state at physiological conditions. In this study we report on an improved variant of WasCFP, named NowGFP, with the anionic form dominating at 37°C and neutral pH. It is 30% brighter than enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and exhibits a fluorescence lifetime of 5.1 ns. We demonstrated that signals of NowGFP and EGFP can be clearly distinguished by fluorescence lifetime in various models, including mammalian cells, mouse tumor xenograft, and Drosophila larvae. NowGFP thus provides an additional channel for multiparameter fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of green fluorescent proteins. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A photoactivatable green-fluorescent protein from the phylum Ctenophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Steven H D; Mastroianni, Nadia; Christianson, Lynne M

    2010-04-22

    Genes for the family of green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) have been found in more than 100 species of animals, with some species containing six or more copies producing a variety of colours. Thus far, however, these species have all been within three phyla: Cnidaria, Arthropoda and Chordata. We have discovered GFP-type fluorescent proteins in the phylum Ctenophora, the comb jellies. The ctenophore proteins share the xYG chromophore motif of all other characterized GFP-type proteins. These proteins exhibit the uncommon property of reversible photoactivation, in which fluorescent emission becomes brighter upon exposure to light, then gradually decays to a non-fluorescent state. In addition to providing potentially useful optical probes with novel properties, finding a fluorescent protein in one of the earliest diverging metazoans adds further support to the possibility that these genes are likely to occur throughout animals.

  15. Green fluorescence of terbium ions in lithium fluoroborate glasses ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 3. Green fluorescence of terbium ions in lithium fluoroborate glasses for fibre lasers and display devices. G R DILLIP C MADHUKAR REDDY M RAJESH SHIVANAND CHAURASIA B DEVA PRASAD RAJU S W JOO. Volume 39 Issue 3 June 2016 pp 711-717 ...

  16. Development of a Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Laboratory Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Patrick D.; Hartberg, Yasha

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory curriculum has been designed for an undergraduate biochemistry course that focuses on the investigation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The sequence of procedures extends from analysis of the DNA sequence through PCR amplification, recombinant plasmid DNA synthesis, bacterial transformation, expression, isolation, and…

  17. A comparative analysis of green fluorescent protein and β ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srinivas

    comparative analysis of two reporter genes, β-glucuronidase (gus) and green fluorescent protein (sgfp), for studying the temporal expression pattern of ..... each graph represents the mean of readings from 8 independent single-copy transgenic lines and the bars represent the standard errors. A9-gus. TA29-gus. A9-sgfp.

  18. Expression of green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) in Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) was expressed by transformed cells of Escherichia coli DH5-α grown in LB/amp broth at 37oC, for 8 h and 24 h. To evaluate the effectiveness of different parameters to improve the expression of GFPuv by E. coli, four variable culturing conditions were set up for assays by ...

  19. Molecular Iodine Fluorescence Using a Green Helium-Neon Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Excitation of molecular iodine vapor with a green (543.4 nm) helium-neon laser produces a fluorescence spectrum that is well suited for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory. Application of standard evaluation techniques to the spectrum yields ground electronic-state molecular parameters in good agreement with literature…

  20. [Construction and Fluorescence Analysis of the RecombinantListeria ivanoviiStrain Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Su, Lin; Liu, Si-Jing; Li, Yong-Yu; Jiang, Ming-Juan; Huang, Huan; Wang, Chuan

    2017-11-01

    Constructing the recombinant Listeria ivanovii strain expressing green fluorescent protein to provide an important tool for study of Listeria ivanovii. The promoter of Listeria monocytogenes Listeriolysin O ( phly ) and the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene were fused by SOEing PCR,and then ligated the fusion gene into plasmid pCW to result in recombinant plasmid pCW- phly-GFP. Recombinant plasmid was electroporated into Listeria ivanovii ,and fluorescence microscope was used to analyze the expression of GFP. To observe the stability of recombinant plasmid and the stable expression of GFP in Listeria ivanovii ,bacteria were cultured in the BHI broth with or without erythromycin for several generations. The stability of recombinant plasmid pCW- phly-GFP and fluorescent protein in each generation of bacteriawas studied by extracting plasmids and observing fluorescence. The exactness of recombinant plasmid pCW- phly-GFP was confirmed with restrictive endonuclease assay and sequence analysis. Under the fluorescence microscope,the green fluorescence was obvious in Listeria ivanovii carried with pCW- phly-GFP. The recombinant plasmid pCW- phly-GFP was stable in Listeria ivanovii and the GFP kept expressing in a high level under the pressure of erythromycin. The prokaryotic expression plasmid pCW- phly-GFP containing GFP gene was successfully constructed. Listeria ivanovii carried with the plasmid efficiently expressed GFP. This research provides an important tool for further study of Listeria ivanovii as a vaccine carrier.

  1. Engineering color variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for thermostability, pH-sensitivity, and improved folding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliye, Naser; Fabbretti, Attilio; Lupidi, Giulio; Tsekoa, Tsepo; Spurio, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    A number of studies have been conducted to improve chromophore maturation, folding kinetics, thermostability, and other traits of green fluorescent protein (GFP). However, no specific work aimed at improving the thermostability of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and of the pH-sensitive, yet thermostable color variants of GFP has so far been done. The protein variants reported in this study were improved through rational multiple site-directed mutagenesis of GFP (ASV) by introducing up to ten point mutations including the mutations near and at the chromophore region. Therefore, we report the development and characterization of fast folder and thermo-tolerant green variant (FF-GFP), and a fast folder thermostable yellow fluorescent protein (FFTS-YFP) endowed with remarkably improved thermostability and folding kinetics. We demonstrate that the fluorescence intensity of this yellow variant is not affected by heating at 75 °C. Moreover, we have developed a pH-unresponsive cyan variant AcS-CFP, which has potential use as part of in vivo imaging irrespective of intracellular pH. The combined improved properties make these fluorescent variants ideal tools to study protein expression and function under different pH environments, in mesophiles and thermophiles. Furthermore, coupling of the FFTS-YFP and AcS-CFP could potentially serve as an ideal tool to perform functional analysis of live cells by multicolor labeling.

  2. A variant of green fluorescent protein exclusively deposited to active intracellular inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Govindan; Munussami, Ganapathiraman; Moon, Hyojin; Paik, Hyun-jong; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Yong-Sung; Kang, Sebyung; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2014-05-16

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) were generally considered to be inactive protein deposits and did not hold any attractive values in biotechnological applications. Recently, some IBs of recombinant proteins were confirmed to show their functional properties such as enzyme activities, fluorescence, etc. Such biologically active IBs are not commonly formed, but they have great potentials in the fields of biocatalysis, material science and nanotechnology. In this study, we characterized the IBs of DL4, a deletion variant of green fluorescent protein which forms active intracellular aggregates. The DL4 proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were exclusively deposited to IBs, and the IBs were estimated to be mostly composed of active proteins. The spectral properties and quantum yield of the DL4 variant in the active IBs were almost same with those of its native protein. Refolding and stability studies revealed that the deletion mutation in DL4 didn't affect the folding efficiency of the protein, but destabilized its structure. Analyses specific for amyloid-like structures informed that the inner architecture of DL4 IBs might be amorphous rather than well-organized. The diameter of fluorescent DL4 IBs could be decreased up to 100-200 nm by reducing the expression time of the protein in vivo. To our knowledge, DL4 is the first GFP variant that folds correctly but aggregates exclusively in vivo without any self-aggregating/assembling tags. The fluorescent DL4 IBs have potentials to be used as fluorescent biomaterials. This study also suggests that biologically active IBs can be achieved through engineering a target protein itself.

  3. An optical method for reducing green fluorescence from urine during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvold, Lars René; Hermann, Gregers G

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder tumour tissue significantly improves endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer in rigid cystoscopes in the operating theatre and thus reduces tumour recurrence. PDD comprises the use of blue light, which unfortunately excites green fluorescence...... this light source also is useful for exciting autofluorescence in healthy bladder mucosa. This autofluorescence then provides a contrast to the sensitized fluorescence (PDD) of tumours in the bladder....

  4. An optical method for reducing green fluorescence from urine during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvold, Lars R.; Hermann, Gregers G.

    2016-12-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder tumour tissue significantly improves endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer in rigid cystoscopes in the operating theatre and thus reduces tumour recurrence. PDD comprises the use of blue light, which unfortunately excites green fluorescence from urine. As this green fluorescence confounds the desired red fluorescence of the PDD, methods for avoiding this situation particularly in cystoscopy using flexible cystoscopes are desirable. In this paper we demonstrate how a tailor made high power LED light source at 525 nm can be used for fluorescence assisted tumour detection using both a flexible and rigid cystoscope used in the outpatient department (OPD) and operating room (OR) respectively. It is demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo how this light source can significantly reduce the green fluorescence problem with urine. At the same time this light source also is useful for exciting autofluorescence in healthy bladder mucosa. This autofluorescence then provides a contrast to the sensitized fluorescence (PDD) of tumours in the bladder.

  5. Novel fluorescent protein from Hydnophora rigida possesses green emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, M; Thangavelu, K; Sikaroodi, M; Smith, C; Sivaraman, J; Gillevet, P M; Bokhari, H

    2014-05-23

    Fluorescent proteins are a family of proteins capable of producing fluorescence at various specific wavelengths of ultra violet light. We have previously reported the identification and characterization of a novel cyan fluorescent protein (HriCFP) from a reef coral species, Hydnophora rigida. In search of new members of the diverse family of fluorescent proteins, here we report a new green fluorescent protein (HriGFP) from H. rigida. HriGFP was identified, cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity by metal affinity and size exclusion chromatography. The dynamic light scattering and gel filtration experiments suggested the presence of monomers in solution. The peptide mass fingerprint on the purified protein established the identity of HriGFP. HriGFP had excitation peak at 507 nm and emission peak at 527 nm. HriGFP was similar to HriCFP except the last 16 amino acid sequence at the C-terminal; however, they have shown least similarity with other known fluorescent proteins. Moreover the computational model suggests that HriGFP is a globular protein which consists of 6 α-helices and 3 β-sheets. Taken together our results suggested that HriGFP is a novel naturally occurring fluorescent protein that exists as a monomer in solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exciton dynamics in solid-state green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Christof P.; Siegert, Marie; Betzold, Simon; Ohmer, Jürgen; Fischer, Utz; Höfling, Sven

    2017-01-01

    We study the decay characteristics of Frenkel excitons in solid-state enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) dried from solution. We further monitor the changes of the radiative exciton decay over time by crossing the phase transition from the solved to the solid state. Complex interactions between protonated and deprotonated states in solid-state eGFP can be identified from temperature-dependent and time-resolved fluorescence experiments that further allow the determination of activation energies for each identified process.

  7. Incomplete proteasomal degradation of green fluorescent proteins in the context of tandem fluorescent protein timers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Meurer, Matthias; Ho, Chi-Ting; Besenbeck, Birgit; Füller, Julia; Lemberg, Marius K; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel; Knop, Michael

    2016-01-15

    Tandem fluorescent protein timers (tFTs) report on protein age through time-dependent change in color, which can be exploited to study protein turnover and trafficking. Each tFT, composed of two fluorescent proteins (FPs) that differ in maturation kinetics, is suited to follow protein dynamics within a specific time range determined by the maturation rates of both FPs. So far, tFTs have been constructed by combining slower-maturing red fluorescent proteins (redFPs) with the faster-maturing superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP). Toward a comprehensive characterization of tFTs, we compare here tFTs composed of different faster-maturing green fluorescent proteins (greenFPs) while keeping the slower-maturing redFP constant (mCherry). Our results indicate that the greenFP maturation kinetics influences the time range of a tFT. Moreover, we observe that commonly used greenFPs can partially withstand proteasomal degradation due to the stability of the FP fold, which results in accumulation of tFT fragments in the cell. Depending on the order of FPs in the timer, incomplete proteasomal degradation either shifts the time range of the tFT toward slower time scales or precludes its use for measurements of protein turnover. We identify greenFPs that are efficiently degraded by the proteasome and provide simple guidelines for the design of new tFTs. © 2016 Khmelinskii et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Synthesis of fluorescent dipeptidomimetics and their ribosomal incorporation into green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sandipan Roy; Maini, Rumit; Dedkova, Larisa M; Hecht, Sidney M

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis and incorporation into position 66 of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by in vitro protein translation of novel oxazole and thiazole based dipeptidomimetics are described. The compounds may be regarded as GFP chromophore analogues, and are strongly fluorescent. An α-amido-β-ketoester intermediate was obtained via bisacylation of a protected glycine. The intermediate underwent dehydrative cyclization to afford the 1,3-oxazole and was treated with Lawesson's reagent to furnish the 1,3-thiazole. When these fluorophores were introduced into position 66 of GFP in place of Tyr66, the resulting GFP analogues exhibited fluorescence emission several-fold greater than wild-type GFP; the emission was also shifted to shorter wavelength. It may be noted that compared to the typical fluorophores formed in the natural and modified fluorescent proteins, the oxazole and thiazole fluorophores are completely stable and do not require activation by posttranslational modification to exhibit fluorescence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of vessel stenosis on indocyanine green fluorescence intensity assessed by near-infrared fluorescence angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Nishimori, Hideaki; Fukutomi, Takashi; Handa, Takemi; Kihara, Kazuki; Tashiro, Miwa; Sato, Takayuki; Orihashi, Kazumasa

    2017-07-01

    Although useful for visualizing blood flow during revascularization surgery, the permeability of near-infrared fluorescence (NIR) angiography using indocyanine green (ICG) does not allow for vessel stenosis visualization. We hypothesized that changes in ICG fluorescence intensity reflect vessel stenosis, and evaluated the influence of stenosis on blood flow by ex vivo experimentation. The vessel stenosis model comprised a silicon tube, a graft occluder, and artificial blood. During near-infrared angiography, the fluorescense intensity was calculated during pre- and post-stenosis of an artificial circuit, using a NIR angiography. We measured the maximum fluorescence intensity and the time to maximum fluorescence intensity. Severe stenosis (≥75%) attenuated the increase in ICG fluorescence intensity in the tube significantly, pre- and post-stenosis. The time to maximum fluorescence intensity did not differ between sites pre- and post-stenosis, irrespective of stenosis severity. Stenosis affected the ICG fluorescence intensity through the vessel. Thus, quantitative analysis using NIR angiography may detect severe vessel stenosis (≥75%), and the extinction curve of indocyanine fluorescence intensity may support the evaluation of blood flow. The absence of differences in the time to maximum fluorescence intensity for degrees of stenosis might suggest a limitation of previous conventional qualitative assessments.

  10. Wavelength Mutations and Posttranslational Autoxidation of Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Roger; Prasher, Douglas C.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1994-12-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is an unusual protein with strong visible absorbance and fluorescence from a p-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolidinone chromophore, which is generated by cyclization and oxidation of the protein's own Ser-Tyr-Gly sequence at positions 65-67. Cloning of the cDNA and heterologous expression of fluorescent protein in a wide variety of organisms indicate that this unique posttranslational modification must be either spontaneous or dependent only on ubiquitous enzymes and reactants. We report that formation of the final fluorophore requires molecular oxygen and proceeds with a time constant (≈4 hr at 22^circC and atmospheric pO_2) independent of dilution, implying that the oxidation does not require enzymes or cofactors. GFP was mutagenized and screened for variants with altered spectra. The most striking mutant fluoresced blue and contained histidine in place of Tyr-66. The availability of two visibly distinct colors should significantly extend the usefulness of GFP in molecular and cell biology by enabling in vivo visualization of differential gene expression and protein localization and measurement of protein association by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

  11. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Reporter To Monitor Gene Expression and Food Colonization by Aspergillus flavus

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Wanglei; Huang, Zhengyu; Flaherty, Joseph E.; Wells, Kevin; Payne, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    Transformants of Aspergillus flavus containing the Aequorea victoria gfp gene fused to a viral promoter or the promoter region and 483 bp of the coding region of A. flavus aflR expressed green fluorescence detectable without a microscope or filters. Expression of green fluorescent protein fluorescence was correlated with resistance to aflatoxin accumulation in five corn genotypes inoculated with these transformants.

  12. Fluorescence imaging preparation methods for tissue scaffolds implanted into a green fluorescent protein porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah E; White, Richard A; Grant, David A; Grant, Sheila A

    2015-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) animal models have become increasingly popular due to their potential to enhance in vivo imaging and their application to many fields of study. We have developed a technique to observe host tissue integration into scaffolds using GFP expressing swine and fluorescence imaging. Current fluorescence imaging preparation methods cannot be translated to a full GFP animal model due to several challenges and limitations that are investigated here. We have implanted tissue scaffolds into GFP expressing swine and have prepared explanted scaffolds for fluorescence imaging using four different methods including formalin fixation and paraffin embedding, vapor fixation, freshly prepared paraformaldehyde fixation, and fresh frozen tissue. Explanted scaffolds and tissue were imaged using confocal microscopy with spectral separation to evaluate the GFP animal model for visualization of host tissue integration into explanted scaffolds. All methods except fresh frozen tissue induced autofluorescence of the scaffold, preventing visualization of detail between host tissue and scaffold fibers. Fresh frozen tissue preparation allowed for the most reliable visualization of fluorescent host tissue integration into non-fluorescent scaffolds. It was concluded that fresh frozen tissue preparation is the best method for fluorescence imaging preparation when using scaffolds implanted into GFP whole animal models.

  13. A Novel Prokaryotic Green Fluorescent Protein Expression System for Testing Gene Editing Tools Activity Like Zinc Finger Nuclease

    OpenAIRE

    Sabzehei, Faezeh; Kouhpayeh, Shirin; Dastjerdeh, Mansoureh Shahbazi; Khanahmad, Hossein; Salehi, Rasoul; Naderi, Shamsi; Taghizadeh, Razieh; Rabiei, Parisa; Hejazi, Zahra; Shariati, Laleh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Gene editing technology has created a revolution in the field of genome editing. The three of the most famous tools in gene editing technology are zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and CRISPR-associated systems. As their predictable nature, it is necessary to assess their efficiency. There are some methods for this purpose, but most of them are time labor and complicate...

  14. Blue-green phosphor for fluorescent lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Alok; Comanzo, Holly; Manivannan, Venkatesan; Setlur, Anant Achyut

    2005-03-15

    A fluorescent lamp including a phosphor layer including Sr.sub.4 Al.sub.14 O.sub.25 :Eu.sup.2+ (SAE) and at least one of each of a red, green and blue emitting phosphor. The phosphor layer can optionally include an additional, deep red phosphor and a yellow emitting phosphor. The resulting lamp will exhibit a white light having a color rendering index of 90 or higher with a correlated color temperature of from 2500 to 10000 Kelvin. The use of SAE in phosphor blends of lamps results in high CRI light sources with increased stability and acceptable lumen maintenance over, the course of the lamp life.

  15. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification...... is provided by a competitively coamplified DNA standard constructed by point mutation PCR. A single base difference was introduced to achieve a suitable migration difference in TGGE between the original target DNA and the modified standard without altering the PCR amplification efficiency. This competitive...... PCR strategy is a highly specific and sensitive way to monitor recombinant DNA in environments like the efflux of a biotechnological plant....

  16. Raman microscopy of bladder cancer cells expressing green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandair, Gurjit S.; Han, Amy L.; Keller, Evan T.; Morris, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Gene engineering is a commonly used tool in cellular biology to determine changes in function or expression of downstream targets. However, the impact of genetic modulation on biochemical effects is less frequently evaluated. The aim of this study is to use Raman microscopy to assess the biochemical effects of gene silencing on T24 and UMUC-13 bladder cancer cell lines. Cellular biochemical information related to nucleic acid and lipogenic components was obtained from deconvolved Raman spectra. We show that the green fluorescence protein (GFP), the chromophore that served as a fluorescent reporter for gene silencing, could also be detected by Raman microscopy. Only the gene-silenced UMUC-13 cell lines exhibited low-to-moderate GFP fluorescence as determined by fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic studies. Moreover, we show that gene silencing and cell phenotype had a greater effect on nucleic acid and lipogenic components with minimal interference from GFP expression. Gene silencing was also found to perturb cellular protein secondary structure in which the amount of disorderd protein increased at the expense of more ordered protein. Overall, our study identified the spectral signature for cellular GFP expression and elucidated the effects of gene silencing on cancer cell biochemistry and protein secondary structure.

  17. Local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Bolotin, Dmitry A; Meer, Margarita V; Usmanova, Dinara R; Mishin, Alexander S; Sharonov, George V; Ivankov, Dmitry N; Bozhanova, Nina G; Baranov, Mikhail S; Soylemez, Onuralp; Bogatyreva, Natalya S; Vlasov, Peter K; Egorov, Evgeny S; Logacheva, Maria D; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Tawfik, Dan S; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Kondrashov, Fyodor A

    2016-05-19

    Fitness landscapes depict how genotypes manifest at the phenotypic level and form the basis of our understanding of many areas of biology, yet their properties remain elusive. Previous studies have analysed specific genes, often using their function as a proxy for fitness, experimentally assessing the effect on function of single mutations and their combinations in a specific sequence or in different sequences. However, systematic high-throughput studies of the local fitness landscape of an entire protein have not yet been reported. Here we visualize an extensive region of the local fitness landscape of the green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria (avGFP) by measuring the native function (fluorescence) of tens of thousands of derivative genotypes of avGFP. We show that the fitness landscape of avGFP is narrow, with 3/4 of the derivatives with a single mutation showing reduced fluorescence and half of the derivatives with four mutations being completely non-fluorescent. The narrowness is enhanced by epistasis, which was detected in up to 30% of genotypes with multiple mutations and mostly occurred through the cumulative effect of slightly deleterious mutations causing a threshold-like decrease in protein stability and a concomitant loss of fluorescence. A model of orthologous sequence divergence spanning hundreds of millions of years predicted the extent of epistasis in our data, indicating congruence between the fitness landscape properties at the local and global scales. The characterization of the local fitness landscape of avGFP has important implications for several fields including molecular evolution, population genetics and protein design.

  18. Changes of the laser-induced blue, green and red fluorescence signatures during greening of etiolated leaves of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stober, F.; Lichtenthaler, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    The UV-laser-induced blue, green and red fluorescence-emission spectra were used to characterize the pigment status of etiolated leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) during a 48 h greening period under white light conditions. Upon UV-light excitation (337 nm) leaves not only show a fluorescence emission in the red spectral region between 650 and 800nm (chlorophyll fluorescence with maxima near 690nm and 735 nm), but also in the blue and green regions between 400 to 570 nm with maxima or shoulders near 450 nm (blue) and 530 nm (green). During greening of etiolated leaves the chlorophyll-fluorescence ratio F690/F735 strongly correlated with the total chlorophyll content and the ratio of the chlorophylls to the carotenoids (a+b/x+c). The ratio of the blue to the green fluorescence F450/F530 was also correlated with the total chlorophyll content and the ratio of chlorophylls to total carotenoids (a+b/x+c). Consequently, there also existed a correlation between the chlorophyll-fluorescence ratio F690/F735 and the ratio of the blue to green fluorescence F450/F530. In contrast, the ratios of the blue to red fluorescences F450/F690 and F450/F735 did not show clear relations to the pigment content of the investigated plants. The particular shape of the UV-laser-induced-fluorescence emission spectra of wheat leaves as well as the dependencies of the fluorescence ratios on the pigment content are due to a partial and differential reabsorption of the emitted fluorescences by the photosynthetic pigments

  19. Dimerization-dependent green and yellow fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Spencer C; Ding, Yidan; Simmen, Thomas; Campbell, Robert E

    2012-12-21

    Dimerization-dependent fluorescent proteins (ddFP) are a recently introduced class of genetically encoded reporters that can be used for the detection of protein interactions in live cells. The progenitor of this class of tools was a red fluorescent ddFP (ddRFP) derived from a homodimeric variant of Discosoma red fluorescent protein. Here, we describe the engineering and application of an expanded palette of ddFPs, which includes green (ddGFP) and yellow (ddYFP) variants. These optimized variants offer several advantages relative to ddRFP including increased in vitro contrast and brightness for ddGFP and increased brightness and a lowered pK a for ddYFP. We demonstrate that both variants are useful as biosensors for protease activity in live cells. Using the ddGFP tool, we generated a highly effective indicator of endomembrane proximity that can be used to image the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) interface of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria.

  20. Evolutionary and functional diversity of green fluorescent proteins in cephalochordates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Zhang, Qiu-Jin; Zhong, Jing; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2009-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been widely used as a molecular marker in modern biological research. Before the recent report of one GFP gene in Branchiostoma floridae, GFP family members were cloned only from other two groups of species: Cnidaria and Copepoda. Here we describe the complete GFP gene repertoire of B. floridae which includes 13 functional genes and 2 pseudogenes, representing the largest GFP family found so far. Coupling with nine other GFP sequences from another two species of genus Branchiostoma and the sequences from Cnidaria and Copepoda, we made a deep-level phylogenetic analysis for GFP genes in cephalochordates and found: 1) GFP genes have experienced a divergent evolution in cephalochordates; 2) all amphioxus GFP genes form four main clades on the tree which had diverged before the radiation of the last common ancestor of all extant cephalochordates; 3) GFP genes in amphioxus shared a common ancestor with that in Copepoda rather than being derived from horizontal gene transfer, which indicates that our ancestor was derived from a fluorescent organism and lost this ability after its separation from Cephalochordata, and also makes GFP a rare gene which has a rather unusual evolutionary path. In addition, we also provided evidence indicating that GFP genes have evolved divergent functions by specializing their expression profile, and different fluorescent spectra by changing their emission peaks. These findings spark two interesting issues: what are GFP in vivo functions in cephalochordates and why they are lost in other examined deuterostomes?

  1. Green synthesis, structure and fluorescence spectra of new azacyanine dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enchev, Venelin; Gadjev, Nikolai; Angelov, Ivan; Minkovska, Stela; Kurutos, Atanas; Markova, Nadezhda; Deligeorgiev, Todor

    2017-11-01

    A series of symmetric and unsymmetric monomethine azacyanine dyes (monomethine azacyanine and merocyanine sulfobetaines) were synthesized with moderate to high yields via a novel method using microwave irradiation. The compounds are derived from a condensation reaction between 2-thiomethylbenzotiazolium salts and 2-imino-3-methylbenzothiazolines proceeded under microwave irradiation. The synthetic approach involves the use of green solvent and absence of basic reagent. TD-DFT calculations were performed to simulate absorption and fluorescent spectra of synthesized dyes. Absorption maxima, λmax, of the studied dyes were found in the range 364-394 nm. Molar absorbtivities were evaluated in between 40300 and 59200 mol-1 dm3 cm-1. Fluorescence maxima, λfl, were registered around 418-448 nm upon excitation at 350 nm. A slight displacements of theoretically estimated absorption maxima according to experimental ones is observed. The differences are most probably due to the fact that the DFT calculations were carried out without taking into account the solvent effect. In addition, the merocyanine sulfobetaines also fluorescence in blue optical range (420-480 nm) at excitation in red range (630-650 nm).

  2. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between green fluorescent protein and doxorubicin enabled by DNA nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Zbynek; Kominkova, Marketa; Cernei, Natalia; Krejcova, Ludmila; Kopel, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-12-01

    DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly growing research area, where DNA may be used for wide range of applications such as construction of nanodevices serving for large scale of diverse purposes. Likewise a panel of various purified fluorescent proteins is investigated for their ability to emit their typical fluorescence spectra under influence of particular excitation. Hence these proteins may form ideal donor molecules for assembly of fluorescence resonance emission transfer (FRET) constructions. To extend the application possibilities of fluorescent proteins, while using DNA nanotechnology, we developed nanoconstruction comprising green fluorescent protein (GFP) bound onto surface of surface active nanomaghemite and functionalized with gold nanoparticles. We took advantage of natural affinity between gold and thiol moieties, which were modified to bind DNA fragment. Finally we enclosed doxorubicin into fullerene cages. Doxorubicin intercalated in DNA fragment bound on the particles and thus we were able to connect these parts together. Because GFP behaved as a donor and doxorubicin as an acceptor using excitation wavelength for GFP (395 nm) in emission wavelength of doxorubicin (590 nm) FRET was observed. This nanoconstruction may serve as a double-labeled transporter of doxorubicin guided by force of external magnetic force owing to the presence of nanomaghemite. Further nanomaghemite offers the possibility of using this technology for thermotherapy. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The structure of mAG, a monomeric mutant of the green fluorescent protein Azami-Green, reveals the structural basis of its stable green emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Tatsuki; Yamamura, Akihiro; Kameda, Yasuhiro; Hayakawa, Kou; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of a monomeric mutant of Azami-Green (mAG) from G. fascicularis was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. Monomeric Azami-Green (mAG) from the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis is the first known monomeric green-emitting fluorescent protein that is not a variant of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP). These two green fluorescent proteins are only 27% identical in their amino-acid sequences. mAG is more similar in its amino-acid sequence to four fluorescent proteins: Dendra2 (a green-to-red irreversibly photoconverting fluorescent protein), Dronpa (a bright-and-dark reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein), KikG (a tetrameric green-emitting fluorescent protein) and Kaede (another green-to-red irreversibly photoconverting fluorescent protein). To reveal the structural basis of stable green emission by mAG, the 2.2 Å crystal structure of mAG has been determined and compared with the crystal structures of avGFP, Dronpa, Dendra2, Kaede and KikG. The structural comparison revealed that the chromophore formed by Gln62-Tyr63-Gly64 (QYG) and the fixing of the conformation of the imidazole ring of His193 by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts involving His193, Arg66 and Thr69 are likely to be required for the stable green emission of mAG. The crystal structure of mAG will contribute to the design and development of new monomeric fluorescent proteins with faster maturation, brighter fluorescence, improved photostability, new colours and other preferable properties as alternatives to avGFP and its variants

  4. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating.

  5. Circularly permuted green fluorescent proteins engineered to sense Ca2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T; Sawano, A; Park, E S; Miyawaki, A

    2001-03-13

    To visualize Ca(2+)-dependent protein-protein interactions in living cells by fluorescence readouts, we used a circularly permuted green fluorescent protein (cpGFP), in which the amino and carboxyl portions had been interchanged and reconnected by a short spacer between the original termini. The cpGFP was fused to calmodulin and its target peptide, M13. The chimeric protein, which we have named "pericam," was fluorescent and its spectral properties changed reversibly with the amount of Ca(2+), probably because of the interaction between calmodulin and M13 leading to an alteration of the environment surrounding the chromophore. Three types of pericam were obtained by mutating several amino acids adjacent to the chromophore. Of these, "flash-pericam" became brighter with Ca(2+), whereas "inverse-pericam" dimmed. On the other hand, "ratiometric-pericam" had an excitation wavelength changing in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. All of the pericams expressed in HeLa cells were able to monitor free Ca(2+) dynamics, such as Ca(2+) oscillations in the cytosol and the nucleus. Ca(2+) imaging using high-speed confocal line-scanning microscopy and a flash-pericam allowed to detect the free propagation of Ca(2+) ions across the nuclear envelope. Then, free Ca(2+) concentrations in the nucleus and mitochondria were simultaneously measured by using ratiometric-pericams having appropriate localization signals, revealing that extra-mitochondrial Ca(2+) transients caused rapid changes in the concentration of mitochondrial Ca(2+). Finally, a "split-pericam" was made by deleting the linker in the flash-pericam. The Ca(2+)-dependent interaction between calmodulin and M13 in HeLa cells was monitored by the association of the two halves of GFP, neither of which was fluorescent by itself.

  6. Aequorea green fluorescent protein analysis by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropp, J D; Donahue, C J; Wolfgang-Kimball, D; Hooley, J J; Chin, J Y; Hoffman, R A; Cuthbertson, R A; Bauer, K D

    1995-12-01

    The isolation and expression of the cDNA for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria has highlighted its potential use as a marker for gene expression in a variety of cell types (Chalfie et al.: Science 263: 802-805, 1994). The longer wavelength peak (470 nm) of GFP's bimodal absorption spectrum better matches standard fluorescein filter sets; however, it has a considerably lower amplitude than the major absorption peak at 395. In an effort to increase the sensitivity of GFP with routinely available instrumentation, Heim et al. (Nature 373:663-664, 1995) have generated a GFP mutant (serine-65 to threonine; S65T-GFP) which possesses a single absorption peak centered at 490 nm. We have constructed this mutant in order to determine whether it or wild-type GFP (wt-GFP) afforded greater sensitivity when excited near their respective absorption maxima. Using the conventionally available 488 nm and ultraviolet (UV) laser lines from the argon ion laser as well as the 407 nm line from a krypton ion laser with enhanced violet emission, we were able to closely match the absorption maxima of both the S65T and wild-type forms of Aequorea GFP and analyze differences in fluorescence intensity of transiently transfected 293 cells with flow cytometry. The highest fluorescence signal was observed with 488 nm excitation of S65T-GFP relative to all other laser line/GFP pairs. The wt-GFP fluorescence intensity, in contrast, was significantly higher at 407 nm relative to either 488 nm or UV. These results were consistent with parallel spectrofluorometric analysis of the emission spectrum for wt-GFP and S65T-GFP. The relative contribution of cellular autofluorescence at each wavelength was also investigated and shown to be significantly reduced at 407 nm relative to either UV or 488 nm.

  7. Local energetic frustration affects the dependence of green fluorescent protein folding on the chaperonin GroEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Boudhayan; Goldenzweig, Adi; Unger, Tamar; Adato, Orit; Fleishman, Sarel J; Unger, Ron; Horovitz, Amnon

    2017-12-15

    The GroE chaperonin system in Escherichia coli comprises GroEL and GroES and facilitates ATP-dependent protein folding in vivo and in vitro Proteins with very similar sequences and structures can differ in their dependence on GroEL for efficient folding. One potential but unverified source for GroEL dependence is frustration, wherein not all interactions in the native state are optimized energetically, thereby potentiating slow folding and misfolding. Here, we chose enhanced green fluorescent protein as a model system and subjected it to random mutagenesis, followed by screening for variants whose in vivo folding displays increased or decreased GroEL dependence. We confirmed the altered GroEL dependence of these variants with in vitro folding assays. Strikingly, mutations at positions predicted to be highly frustrated were found to correlate with decreased GroEL dependence. Conversely, mutations at positions with low frustration were found to correlate with increased GroEL dependence. Further support for this finding was obtained by showing that folding of an enhanced green fluorescent protein variant designed computationally to have reduced frustration is indeed less GroEL-dependent. Our results indicate that changes in local frustration also affect partitioning in vivo between spontaneous and chaperonin-mediated folding. Hence, the design of minimally frustrated sequences can reduce chaperonin dependence and improve protein expression levels. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Detection of ALK gene rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer: a comparison of fluorescence in situ hybridization and chromogenic in situ hybridization with correlation of ALK protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyojin; Yoo, Seol-Bong; Choe, Ji-Young; Paik, Jin Ho; Xu, Xianhua; Nitta, Hiroaki; Zhang, Wenjun; Grogan, Thomas M; Lee, Choon-Taek; Jheon, Sanghoon; Chung, Jin-Haeng

    2011-08-01

    Accurate determination of ALK rearrangement is important in lung cancer patients, especially in determining their eligibility for crizotinib therapy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been regarded as the gold standard method for detecting ALK rearrangement. However, FISH requires a fluorescence microscope, and the signals are labile and rapidly fade over time. This study evaluates the concordance between ALK gene rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer assessed by ALK FISH and a newly developed ALK chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and correlates the results with ALK protein expression assessed by immunohistochemistry. A total of 465 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded non-small cell lung cancer samples were analyzed by ALK FISH (PathVysion, Vysis, Abbott) and ALK CISH. For comparison, all specimens were stained by immunohistochemistry (clone 5A4, Novocastra) and interobserver reproducibility was assessed. We found that agreement between the pathologists on the CISH-determined ALK status was achieved in 449 patients (96.6%), and ALK rearrangement was identified in 18 patients (4.0%) in CISH method. Among these cases, 443 cases (95.3%) had results matching the corresponding FISH results: 17 rearranged, 425 wild types, and 1 discordant case. There was high concordance in the assessment of ALK gene rearrangement between FISH and CISH techniques (κ = 0.92) and between observers (κ = 0.97). In addition, there was high concordance in the ALK gene status and ALK protein expression between CISH and IHC tests (κ = 0.82). CISH is a highly reproducible and practical method to detect ALK gene rearrangement and correlated well with ALK protein expression. Here, we present a diagnostic algorithm (Chung's SNUBH ALK protocol) to detect lung cancer with ALK rearrangements using IHC, FISH and CISH. Because CISH allows a concurrent analysis of histological features of the tumors and gene rearrangement, it appears to be a useful method in determining ALK gene

  9. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a reporter gene for the plant pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko Riedel; Gautier Calmin; Lassaad Belbahri; Francois Lefort; Monika Gotz; Stefan Wagner; Sabine. Werres

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic Phytophthora ramorum strains that produce green fluorescent protein (GFP) constitutively were obtained after stable DNA integration using a polyethylene glycol and CaCl2-based transformation protocol. Green fluorescent protein production was studied in developing colonies and in different propagules of the pathogen...

  10. Expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein in Bacillus methanolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilasari, Dewi; Dover, Nir; Rech, Sabine; Komives, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biocatalysts are used in a wide range of industries to produce large scale quantities of proteins, amino acids, and commodity chemicals. While the majority of these processes use glucose or other low-cost sugars as the substrate, Bacillus methanolicus is one example of a biocatalyst that has shown sustained growth on methanol as a carbon source at elevated temperature (50-53°C optimum) resulting in reduced feed and utility costs. Specifically, the complete chemical process enabled by this approach takes methane from natural gas, and following a low-cost conversion to methanol, can be used for the production of high value products. In this study, production of recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) by B. methanolicus is explored. A plasmid was constructed that incorporates the methanol dehydrogenase (mdh) promoter of B. methanolicus MGA3 together with the GFPuv gene. The plasmid, pNW33N, was shown to be effective for expression in other Bacillus strains, although not previously in B. methanolicus. A published electroporation protocol for transformation of B. methanolicus was modified to result in expression of GFP using plasmid pNW33N-mdh-GFPuv (pNmG). Transformation was confirmed by both agarose gel electrophoresis and by observation of green fluorescence under UV light exposure. The mass yield of cells and protein were measured in shake flask experiments. The optimum concentration of methanol for protein production was found to be at 200 mM. Higher concentrations than 200 mM resulted in slightly higher biomass production but lower amounts of recombinant protein. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  11. Green Fluorescent Organic Light Emitting Device with High Luminance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning YANG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we fabricated the small molecule green fluorescent bottom-emission organic light emitting device (OLED with the configuration of glass substrate/indium tin oxide (ITO/Copper Phthalocyanine (CuPc 25 nm/ N,N’-di(naphthalen-1-yl-N,N’-diphenyl-benzidine (NPB 45 nm/ tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminium (Alq3 60 nm/ Lithium fluoride (LiF 1 nm/Aluminum (Al 100 nm where CuPc and NPB are the hole injection layer and the hole transport layer, respectively. CuPc is introduced in this device to improve carrier injection and efficiency. The experimental results indicated that the turn-on voltage is 2.8 V with a maximum luminance of 23510 cd/m2 at 12 V. The maximum current efficiency and power efficiency are 4.8 cd/A at 100 cd/m2 and 4.2 lm/W at 3 V, respectively. The peak of electroluminance (EL spectrum locates at 530 nm which is typical emission peak of green light. In contrast, the maximum current efficiency and power efficiency of the device without CuPc are only 4.0 cd/A at 100 mA/cm2 and 4.2 lm/W at 3.6 V, respectively.

  12. Correlation of Hypoxia and Pro-senescence Protein Expression in Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas Lung Epithelial and Dermal Fibroblast Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggraini Barlian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown hypoxia-induced gene expression correlated with cellular senescence. HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, p53, and pRB were induced under hypoxia and correlated with cellular senescence. The localization and expression of HIF-1α, p53, and pRB in Chelonia mydas lung epithelial and dermal fibroblast cell cultures were analyzed under normoxic and hypoxic conditions (at 4 and 24 hours. Human dermal fibroblast was used for comparison purposes. Protein localization was analyzed with immunocytochemistry, while protein expression was analyzed with the Western blot and enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL method. HIF-1α, p53, and pRB were localized in the nuclei of the C. mydas cell cultures treated with hypoxia. The C. mydas lung epithelial cell cultures had a higher increase of HIF-1α expression than the human dermal fibroblast cell culture. The hypoxic conditions did not affect p53 expression significantly in C. mydas lung epithelial and dermal fibroblast cell cultures. Meanwhile, pRB expression changed significantly under hypoxia in the C. mydas dermal fibroblast cells. Expression of p53 and pRB in the human cell cultures was higher than in the C. mydas cell cultures. This research suggests that C. mydas and human cell cultures have different pro-senescence protein expression responses under hypoxic conditions.

  13. Green fluorescent protein is lighting up fungal biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorang, J.M.; Tuori, R.P; Martinez, J.P; Sawyer, T.L.; Redman, R.S.; Rollins, J. A.; Wolpert, T.J.; Johnson, K.B.; Rodriguez, R.J.; Dickman, M. B.; Ciuffetti, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    Prasher (42) cloned a cDNA for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from the jellyfishAequorea victoria in 1992. Shortly thereafter, to the amazement of many investigators, this gene or derivatives thereof were successfully expressed and conferred fluorescence to bacteria andCaenorhabditis elegans cells in culture (10,31), followed by yeast (24, 39), mammals (40), Drosophila (66),Dictyostelium(23, 30), plants (28,49), and filamentous fungi (54). The tremendous success of GFP as a reporter can be attributed to unique qualities of this 238-amino-acid, 27-kDa protein which absorbs light at maxima of 395 and 475 nm and emits light at a maximum of 508 nm. The fluorescence of GFP requires only UV or blue light and oxygen, and therefore, unlike the case with other reporters (β-glucuronidase, β-galacturonidase, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, and firefly luciferase) that rely on cofactors or substrates for activity, in vivo observation ofgfp expression is possible with individual cells, with cell populations, or in whole organisms interacting with symbionts or environments in real time. Complications caused by destructive sampling, cell permeablization for substrates, or leakage of products do not occur. Furthermore, the GFP protein is extremely stable in vivo and has been fused to the C or N terminus of many cellular and extracellular proteins without a loss of activity, thereby permitting the tagging of proteins for gene regulation analysis, protein localization, or specific organelle labeling. The mature protein resists many proteases and is stable up to 65°C and at pH 5 to 11, in 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate or 6 M guanidinium chloride (reviewed in references 17and 67), and in tissue fixed with formaldehyde, methanol, or glutaraldehyde. However, GFP loses fluorescence in methanol-acetic acid (3:1) and can be masked by autofluorescent aldehyde groups in tissue fixed with glutaraldehyde. Fluorescence is optimal at pH 7.2 to 8.0 (67).

  14. Blue-Shifted Green Fluorescent Protein Homologues Are Brighter than Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein under Two-Photon Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Rosana S; Tran, Tam M; Campbell, Robert E; Lambert, Gerard G; Salih, Anya; Shaner, Nathan C; Hughes, Thomas E; Drobizhev, Mikhail

    2017-06-15

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are indispensable markers for two-photon imaging of live tissue, especially in the brains of small model organisms. The quantity of physiologically relevant data collected, however, is limited by heat-induced damage of the tissue due to the high intensities of the excitation laser. We seek to minimize this damage by developing FPs with improved brightness. Among FPs with the same chromophore structure, the spectral properties can vary widely due to differences in the local protein environment. Using a physical model that describes the spectra of FPs containing the anionic green FP (GFP) chromophore, we predict that those that are blue-shifted in one-photon absorption will have stronger peak two-photon absorption cross sections. Following this prediction, we present 12 blue-shifted GFP homologues and demonstrate that they are up to 2.5 times brighter than the commonly used enhanced GFP (EGFP).

  15. Parts Characterization for Tunable Protein Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Michael Schantz; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2018-01-01

    . Constructing targeted genomic variation around genomically integrated fluorescent marker genes enables rapid elucidation of the contribution of specific sequence variants to protein expression. Such an approach can be used to characterize the impact of modifications to the Shine-Dalgarno sequence...

  16. Analysis of green fluorescent protein bioluminescence in vivo and in vitro using a glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, L.; Mandujano, L. A.; Cuevas, J.; Reyes, P. G.; Osorio-González, D.

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of fluorescent proteins has been a revolution in cell biology and related sciences because of their many applications, mainly emphasizing their use as cellular markers. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used as it requires no cofactors to generate fluorescence and retains this property into any organism when it is expressed by recombinant DNA techniques, which is a great advantage. In this work, we analyze the emission spectra of recombinant green fluorescent protein in vivo and in vitro exposed to a glow discharge plasma of nitrogen in order to relate electron temperature to fluorescence intensity.

  17. Use of green fluorescent protein to monitor fungal growth in biomass hydrolysate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was introduced into the Ascomycete Coniochaeta ligniaria NRRL30616, and fluorescence of cultures was monitored as a measure of cell growth. Fluorescence in the GFP-expressing strain was measured during growth of cells in defined and complex media as well as in the liq...

  18. Uncovering the hidden ground state of green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennis, John T. M.; Larsen, Delmar S.; van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Vengris, Mikas; van Thor, Jasper J.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2004-01-01

    The fluorescence properties of GFP are strongly influenced by the protonation states of its chromophore and nearby amino acid side chains. In the ground state, the GFP chromophore is neutral and absorbs in the near UV. Upon excitation, the chromophore is deprotonated, and the resulting anionic chromophore emits its green fluorescence. So far, only excited-state intermediates have been observed in the GFP photocycle. We have used ultrafast multipulse control spectroscopy to prepare and directly observe GFP's hidden anionic ground-state intermediates as an integral part of the photocycle. Combined with dispersed multichannel detection and advanced global analysis techniques, the existence of two distinct anionic ground-state intermediates, I1 and I2, has been unveiled. I1 and I2 absorb at 500 and 497 nm, respectively, and interconvert on a picosecond timescale. The I2 intermediate has a lifetime of 400 ps, corresponding to a proton back-transfer process that regenerates the neutral ground state. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange of the protein leads to a significant increase of the I1 and I2 lifetimes, indicating that proton motion underlies their dynamics. We thus have assessed the complete chain of reaction intermediates and associated timescales that constitute the photocycle of GFP. Many elementary processes in biology rely on proton transfers that are limited by slow diffusional events, which seriously precludes their characterization. We have resolved the true reaction rate of a proton transfer in the molecular ground state of GFP, and our results may thus aid in the development of a generic understanding of proton transfer in biology. PMID:15608070

  19. Proton Wire Dynamics in the Green Fluorescent Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinobu, Ai; Agmon, Noam

    2017-01-10

    Inside proteins, protons move on proton wires (PWs). Starting from the highest resolution X-ray structure available, we conduct a 306 ns molecular dynamics simulation of the (A-state) wild-type (wt) green fluorescent protein (GFP) to study how its PWs change with time. We find that the PW from the chromophore via Ser205 to Glu222, observed in all X-ray structures, undergoes rapid water molecule insertion between Ser205 and Glu222. Sometimes, an alternate Ser205-bypassing PW exists. Side chain rotations of Thr203 and Ser205 play an important role in shaping the PW network in the chromophore region. Thr203, with its bulkier side chain, exhibits slower transitions between its three rotameric states. Ser205 experiences more frequent rotations, slowing down when the Thr203 methyl group is close by. The combined states of both residues affect the PW probabilities. A random walk search for PWs from the chromophore reveals several exit points to the bulk, one being a direct water wire (WW) from the chromophore to the bulk. A longer WW connects the "bottom" of the GFP barrel with a "water pool" (WP1) situated below Glu222. These two WWs were not observed in X-ray structures of wt-GFP, but their analogues have been reported in related fluorescent proteins. Surprisingly, the high-resolution X-ray structure utilized herein shows that Glu222 is protonated at low temperatures. At higher temperatures, we suggest ion pairing between anionic Glu222 and a proton hosted in WP1. Upon photoexcitation, these two recombine, while a second proton dissociates from the chromophore and either exits the protein using the short WW or migrates along the GFP-barrel axis on the long WW. This mechanism reconciles the conflicting experimental and theoretical data on proton motion within GFP.

  20. Proton transfer and water exchange in the green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon, Noam

    2014-03-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is the only naturally occurring protein in which excited-state proton-transfer has been identified. Upon excitation, a proton is ejected from its chromophore, travelling through the ``privileged water molecule'' (PWM) and Ser205 to Glu222, on a 10 ps timescale or faster. However, time-resolved fluorescence from the chromophore exhibits a t-α power-law decay extending into the ns regime. With increasing temperature, α switches from 1/2 (below 230 K) to 3/2 (above it). This has been interpreted as pseudo one-dimensional proton hopping along an internal ``proton wire,'' with an activated process that opens a ``doorway'' for proton escape to solution at the higher temperatures. To identify such putative pathways, we have developed a computer code mapping all ``proton wires'' within a protein structure. Applying it to a X-ray GFP structure of 0.9 Angstrom resolution, a proton wire indeed continues from Glu222 along the axis of the GFP ``barrel,'' connecting to a negatively charged surface patch (a ``proton collecting antenna''?). This might explain the t- 1 / 2 behavior. However, a direct escape pathway opening from the chromophore to solution is not readily identified in the X-ray structure. Here we report molecular dynamics results showing that the PWM escapes to solution on the 100 ps timescale. This occurs by fluctuations of the beta-sheet, creating an opening through which water molecules can leave and enter the protein. The exact pathway of the PWM on its way in and out has been identified, as well as the water-exchange kinetics that follows a stretched-exponential time behavior. This research was supported by the ISRAEL SCIENCE FOUNDATION grant No. 766/12.

  1. Green fluorescent protein-doped sol-gel silica planar waveguide to detect organophosphorus compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enami, Y.; Suye, S.

    2012-02-01

    We report novel living protein-doped planar waveguide, and real-time detection of an organophosphorus compound using a sol-gel silica planar waveguide doped with a green fluorescent protein and an organophosphorus hydrolase on a yeast-cell surface. The waveguide was pumped at 488 nm, and emitted green fluorescence at the far field. The green fluorescent light at 550 nm changed by 50% from the original power 1 min after application of the organophosphorus compound. The results enable the real-time detection of biochemical weapon and insecticide harmful for human body by using an in-line fiber sensor network.

  2. A Model to Study the Phenotypic Changes of Insect Cell Transfection by Copepod Super Green Fluorescent Protein (cop-GFP) in Baculovirus Expression System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahi, Narjes; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Pooshang-Bagheri, Kamran; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Behdani, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Baculovirus expression system is one of the most attractive and powerful eukaryotic expression systems for the production of recombinant proteins. The presence of a biomarker is required to monitor transfection efficiency or protein expression levels in insect cells. The aim of this study was to construct a baculovirus expression vector encoding a copepod super green fluorescent protein (copGFP). In this light, the resultant vector was constructed and used for transfection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells. Expression of the copGFP protein in insect cells was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy and Western-blot analysis. The application of copGFP control bacmid can be considered as an appropriate control for insect cell transfection.

  3. Crystallization of small proteins assisted by green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Hiraki, Masahiko; Yamada, Yusuke; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Kato, Ryuichi; Dikic, Ivan; Drew, David; Iwata, So; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Kawasaki, Masato

    2010-10-01

    The generation of crystal lattice contacts by proteinaceous tags fused to target proteins is an attractive approach to aid in the crystallization of otherwise intractable proteins. Here, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions for this purpose is demonstrated, using ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-binding motif (UBM) of Y-family polymerase ι as examples. The structure of the GFP-ubiquitin fusion protein revealed that the crystal lattice was formed by GFP moieties. Ubiquitin was accommodated in the lattice through interactions with the peripheral loops of GFP. However, in the GFP-UBM fusion crystal UBM formed extensive interactions with GFP and these interactions, together with UBM dimerization, mediated the crystal packing. Interestingly, the tyrosine residues that are involved in mediating crystal contacts in both GFP-ubiquitin and GFP-UBM crystals are arranged in a belt on the surface of the β-barrel structure of GFP. Therefore, it is likely that GFP can assist in the crystallization of small proteins and of protein domains in general.

  4. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Proton Transfer in Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, J. Timothy; O'Brien, Mannis; Salna, Bridget; Abdelkrim, Benabbas; Champion, Paul M.; van Thor, Jasper

    2014-03-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an ideal probe for proton transfer in biological molecules because of its sensitivity to the motion of protons, which are difficult to track with more direct structural methods such as X-ray crystallography. Previous time-resolved infrared measurements provided direct experimental evidence for Glu 222 as the excited state proton acceptor following excitation of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Here, we use infrared cryospectroscopy to characterize a low quantum yield photochemical channel that leads to decarboxylation of Glu 222 coupled with proton transfer to complete the methyl group on the resulting α-aminobutyric acid residue. The irreversible nature of this process allows us to obtain infrared data at much higher sensitivity and over an extended frequency range. Difference spectra recorded over the full 1000-4000 cm-1 range at 100 K probe perturbations of internal water molecules and nearby amino acids as well as the chromophore. We identify vibrational frequencies that probe hydrogen bonding along the ``proton wire'' that connects the chromophore to Glu 222.

  5. Green fluorescence in young individual(s) of cubomedusa, scyphomedusa and ctenophora

    OpenAIRE

    Kubota, Shin

    2011-01-01

    Green fluorescence is found in young individual(s) of cubomedusa (possibly Carybdea rastoni) and ctenophora (Haeckelia rubra and possibly Beroe cucumis), while it is not found in ephyrae of scyphomedusa (possibly Aurelia aurita).

  6. Two-color RESOLFT nanoscopy with green and red fluorescent photochromic proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Lavoie-Cardinal, Flavie; Jensen, Nickels A.; Westphal, Volker; Stiel, Andre C.; Chmyrov, Andriy; Bierwagen, Jakob; Testa, Ilaria; Jakobs, Stefan; Hell, Stefan W.

    2014-01-01

    Up to now, all demonstrations of reversible saturable optical fluorescence transitions (RESOLFT) superresolution microscopy of living cells have relied on the use of reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFP) emitting in the green spectral range. Here we show RESOLFT imaging with rsCherryRev1.4, a new red-emitting RSFP enabling a spatial resolution up to four times higher than the diffraction barrier. By co-expressing green and red RSFPs in living cells we demonstrate two-color RESOLFT...

  7. New unstable variants of green fluorescent protein for studies of transient gene expression in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Bo; Sternberg, Claus; Poulsen, Lars K.

    1998-01-01

    Use of the green fluorescent protein (Gfp) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria ia is a powerful method for nondestructive in situ monitoring, since expression of green fluorescence does not require any substrate addition. To expand the use of Gfp as a reporter protein, new variants have been con...... and Pseudomonas putida. The new Gfp variants should be useful for in situ studies of temporal gene expression....

  8. New Unstable Variants of Green Fluorescent Protein for Studies of Transient Gene Expression in Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Jens Bo; Sternberg, Claus; Poulsen, Lars Kongsbak; Bjørn, Sara Petersen; Givskov, Michael; Molin, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Use of the green fluorescent protein (Gfp) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is a powerful method for nondestructive in situ monitoring, since expression of green fluorescence does not require any substrate addition. To expand the use of Gfp as a reporter protein, new variants have been constructed by the addition of short peptide sequences to the C-terminal end of intact Gfp. This rendered the Gfp susceptible to the action of indigenous housekeeping proteases, resulting in protein variant...

  9. Structural analysis of the bright monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen obtained by directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Damien; Gotthard, Guillaume; von Stetten, David; De Sanctis, Daniele; Pasquier, Hélène; Lambert, Gerard G; Shaner, Nathan C; Royant, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, genes coding for homologues of the autofluorescent protein GFP had only been identified in marine organisms from the phyla Cnidaria and Arthropoda. New fluorescent-protein genes have now been found in the phylum Chordata, coding for particularly bright oligomeric fluorescent proteins such as the tetrameric yellow fluorescent protein lanYFP from Branchiostoma lanceolatum. A successful monomerization attempt led to the development of the bright yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen. The structures of lanYFP and mNeonGreen have been determined and compared in order to rationalize the directed evolution process leading from a bright, tetrameric to a still bright, monomeric fluorescent protein. An unusual discolouration of crystals of mNeonGreen was observed after X-ray data collection, which was investigated using a combination of X-ray crystallography and UV-visible absorption and Raman spectroscopies, revealing the effects of specific radiation damage in the chromophore cavity. It is shown that X-rays rapidly lead to the protonation of the phenolate O atom of the chromophore and to the loss of its planarity at the methylene bridge.

  10. Using Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein for Periplasmic Protein Localization Studies ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dinh, Thuy; Bernhardt, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Studies investigating the subcellular localization of periplasmic proteins have been hampered by problems with the export of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Here we show that a superfolding variant of GFP (sfGFP) is fluorescent following Sec-mediated transport and works best when the cotranslational branch of the pathway is employed.

  11. Inhibition of twisting of a green fluorescent protein-like chromophore by metal complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Anthony; Solntsev, Kyril M; Song, Charles; Tanioka, Tatsuro; Kowalik, Janusz; Hardcastle, Kenneth; Tolbert, Laren M

    2010-08-21

    Substitution of a pyridyl for the hydroxyphenyl moiety in the Green Fluorescent Protein analog p-hydroxybenzylidene-dimethylimidiazolinone produces a chromophore which "turns on" fluorescence in the presence of Zn(2+) or Cd(2+) ions. Such a phenomenon provides "proof of principle" for using GFP chromophores in a variety of sensing applications.

  12. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP-Based Overexpression Screening and Characterization of AgrC, a Receptor Protein of Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengdi Fan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus AgrC is an important component of the agr quorum-sensing system. AgrC is a membrane-embedded histidine kinase that is thought to act as a sensor for the recognition of environmental signals and the transduction of signals into the cytoplasm. However, the difficulty of expressing and purifying functional membrane proteins has drastically hindered in-depth understanding of the molecular structures and physiological functions of these proteins. Here, we describe the high-yield expression and purification of AgrC, and analyze its kinase activity. A C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP fusion to AgrC served as a reporter for monitoring protein expression levels in real time. Protein expression levels were analyzed by the microscopic assessment of the whole-cell fluorescence. The expressed AgrC-GFP protein with a C-terminal His-tagged was purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC and size exclusion chromatography (SEC at yields of ≥10 mg/L, following optimization. We also assessed the effects of different detergents on membrane solubilization and AgrC kinase activity, and polyoxyethylene-(23-lauryl-ether (Brij-35 was identified as the most suitable detergent. Furthermore, the secondary structural stability of purified AgrC was analyzed using circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy. This study may serve as a general guide for improving the yields of other membrane protein preparations and selecting the appropriate detergent to stabilize membrane proteins for biophysical and biochemical analyses.

  13. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based overexpression screening and characterization of AgrC, a Receptor protein of quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Quan, Chunshan; Liu, Baoquan; Xu, Yongbin; Zhao, Pengchao; Xiong, Wen; Fan, Shengdi

    2013-09-06

    Staphylococcus aureus AgrC is an important component of the agr quorum-sensing system. AgrC is a membrane-embedded histidine kinase that is thought to act as a sensor for the recognition of environmental signals and the transduction of signals into the cytoplasm. However, the difficulty of expressing and purifying functional membrane proteins has drastically hindered in-depth understanding of the molecular structures and physiological functions of these proteins. Here, we describe the high-yield expression and purification of AgrC, and analyze its kinase activity. A C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion to AgrC served as a reporter for monitoring protein expression levels in real time. Protein expression levels were analyzed by the microscopic assessment of the whole-cell fluorescence. The expressed AgrC-GFP protein with a C-terminal His-tagged was purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) at yields of ≥ 10 mg/L, following optimization. We also assessed the effects of different detergents on membrane solubilization and AgrC kinase activity, and polyoxyethylene-(23)-lauryl-ether (Brij-35) was identified as the most suitable detergent. Furthermore, the secondary structural stability of purified AgrC was analyzed using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. This study may serve as a general guide for improving the yields of other membrane protein preparations and selecting the appropriate detergent to stabilize membrane proteins for biophysical and biochemical analyses.

  14. Optimization of mNeonGreen for Homo sapiens increases its fluorescent intensity in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida-Miyake, Emiko; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Tanida, Isei

    2018-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is tremendously useful for investigating many cellular and intracellular events. The monomeric GFP mNeonGreen is about 3- to 5-times brighter than GFP and monomeric enhanced GFP and shows high photostability. The maturation half-time of mNeonGreen is about 3-fold faster than that of monomeric enhanced GFP. However, the cDNA sequence encoding mNeonGreen contains some codons that are rarely used in Homo sapiens. For better expression of mNeonGreen in human cells, we synthesized a human-optimized cDNA encoding mNeonGreen and generated an expression plasmid for humanized mNeonGreen under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The resultant plasmid was introduced into HEK293 cells. The fluorescent intensity of humanized mNeonGreen was about 1.4-fold higher than that of the original mNeonGreen. The humanized mNeonGreen with a mitochondria-targeting signal showed mitochondrial distribution of mNeonGreen. We further generated an expression vector of humanized mNeonGreen with 3xFLAG tags at its carboxyl terminus as these tags are useful for immunological analyses. The 3xFLAG-tagged mNeonGreen was recognized well with an anti-FLAG-M2 antibody. These plasmids for the expression of humanized mNeonGreen and mNeonGreen-3xFLAG are useful tools for biological studies in mammalian cells using mNeonGreen.

  15. Recombinant tagging system using ribosomal frameshifting to monitor protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Se Jong; Cho, Sayeon; Lowehhaupt, Ky; Park, So-Young; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Yang-Gyun

    2013-03-01

    For rapid and accurate quantitation of recombinant proteins during expression and after purification, we introduce a new tagging strategy that expresses both target proteins and limitedly tagged target proteins together in a single cell at a constant ratio by utilizing cis-elements of programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1RFS) as an embedded device. -1RFS is an alternative reading mechanism that effectively controls protein expression by many viruses. When a target gene is fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene with a -1RFS element implanted between them, the unfused target and the target-GFP fusion proteins are expressed at a fixed ratio. The expression ratio between these two protein products is adjustable simply by changing -1RFS signals. This limited-tagging system would be valuable for the real-time monitoring of protein expression when optimizing expression condition for a new protein, and in monitoring large-scale bioprocesses without a large metabolic burden on host cells. Furthermore, this strategy allows for the direct measurement of the quantity of a protein on a chip surface and easy application to proteomewide study of gene products. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The jellyfish green fluorescent protein: a new tool for studying ion channel expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J; Molloy, R; Moss, G W; Howe, J R; Hughes, T E

    1995-02-01

    Two methods are described for using the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter gene for ion channel expression. GFP fluorescence can be used to identify the transfected cells, and to estimate the relative levels of ion channel expression, in cotransfection experiments. A GFP-NMDAR1 chimera can be constructed that produces a functional, fluorescent receptor subunit. These methods should facilitate studies of ion channel expression, localization, and processing.

  17. Transformation of Sclerotinia Sclerotiorum with the Green Fluorescent Protein Gene and Fluorescence of Hyphae in Four Inoculated Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is an important pathogen of a wide variety of crops. To obtain a genetic marker to observe and study the interaction of the pathogen with its hosts, isolates ND30 and ND21 were transformed using pCT74 and gGFP constructs both containing genes for the green fluorescent protei...

  18. Quantification of factors influencing fluorescent protein expression using RMCE to generate an allelic series in the ROSA26 locus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sara X; Osipovich, Anna B; Ustione, Alessandro; Potter, Leah A; Hipkens, Susan; Gangula, Rama; Yuan, Weiping; Piston, David W; Magnuson, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have great utility in identifying specific cell populations and in studying cellular dynamics in the mouse. To quantify the factors that determine both the expression and relative brightness of FPs in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and in mice, we generated eight different FP-expressing ROSA26 alleles using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). These alleles enabled us to analyze the effects on FP expression of a translational enhancer and different 3'-intronic and/or polyadenylation sequences, as well as the relative brightness of five different FPs, without the confounding position and copy number effects that are typically associated with randomly inserted transgenes. We found that the expression of a given FP can vary threefold or more depending on the genetic features present in the allele. The optimal FP expression cassette contained both a translational enhancer sequence in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and an intron-containing rabbit β-globin sequence within the 3'-UTR. The relative expressed brightness of individual FPs varied up to tenfold. Of the five different monomeric FPs tested, Citrine (YFP) was the brightest, followed by Apple, eGFP, Cerulean (CFP) and Cherry. Generation of a line of Cherry-expressing mice showed that there was a 30-fold variation of Cherry expression among different tissues and that there was a punctate expression pattern within cells of all tissues examined. This study should help investigators make better-informed design choices when expressing FPs in mESCs and mice.

  19. Green Fluorescence of Cytaeis Hydroids Living in Association with Nassarius Gastropods in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Prudkovsky, Andrey A.

    2016-02-03

    Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs) have been reported from a wide diversity of medusae, but only a few observations of green fluorescence have been reported for hydroid colonies. In this study, we report on fluorescence displayed by hydroid polyps of the genus Cytaeis Eschscholtz, 1829 (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Filifera) found at night time in the southern Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) living on shells of the gastropod Nassarius margaritifer (Dunker, 1847) (Neogastropoda: Buccinoidea: Nassariidae). We examined the fluorescence of these polyps and compare with previously reported data. Intensive green fluorescence with a spectral peak at 518 nm was detected in the hypostome of the Cytaeis polyps, unlike in previous reports that reported fluorescence either in the basal parts of polyps or in other locations on hydroid colonies. These results suggest that fluorescence may be widespread not only in medusae, but also in polyps, and also suggests that the patterns of fluorescence localization can vary in closely related species. The fluorescence of polyps may be potentially useful for field identification of cryptic species and study of geographical distributions of such hydroids and their hosts.

  20. Binary gene induction and protein expression in individual cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conolly Rory B

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic gene transcription is believed to occur in either a binary or a graded fashion. With binary induction, a transcription activator (TA regulates the probability with which a gene template is switched from the inactive to the active state without affecting the rate at which RNA molecules are produced from the template. With graded, also called rheostat-like, induction the gene template has continuously varying levels of transcriptional activity, and the TA regulates the rate of RNA production. Support for each of these two mechanisms arises primarily from experimental studies measuring reporter proteins in individual cells, rather than from direct measurement of induction events at the gene template. Methods and results In this paper, using a computational model of stochastic gene expression, we have studied the biological and experimental conditions under which a binary induction mode operating at the gene template can give rise to differentially expressed "phenotypes" (i.e., binary, hybrid or graded at the protein level. We have also investigated whether the choice of reporter genes plays a significant role in determining the observed protein expression patterns in individual cells, given the diverse properties of commonly-used reporter genes. Our simulation confirmed early findings that the lifetimes of active/inactive promoters and half-lives of downstream mRNA/protein products are important determinants of various protein expression patterns, but showed that the induction time and the sensitivity with which the expressed genes are detected are also important experimental variables. Using parameter conditions representative of reporter genes including green fluorescence protein (GFP and β-galactosidase, we also demonstrated that graded gene expression is more likely to be observed with GFP, a longer-lived protein with low detection sensitivity. Conclusion The choice of reporter genes may determine whether protein

  1. Mispacking and the Fitness Landscape of the Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shounak; Schenkelberg, Christian D; Jordan, Thomas B; Reimertz, Julia M; Crone, Emily E; Crone, Donna E; Bystroff, Christopher

    2017-02-07

    The autocatalytic maturation of the chromophore in green fluorescent protein (GFP) was thought to require the precise positioning of the side chains surrounding it in the core of the protein, many of which are strongly conserved among homologous fluorescent proteins. In this study, we screened for green fluorescence in an exhaustive set of point mutations of seven residues that make up the chromophore microenvironment, excluding R96 and E222 because mutations at these positions have been previously characterized. Contrary to expectations, nearly all amino acids were tolerated at all seven positions. Only four point mutations knocked out fluorescence entirely. However, chromophore maturation was found to be slower and/or fluorescence reduced in several cases. Selected combinations of mutations showed nonadditive effects, including cooperativity and rescue. The results provide guidelines for the computational engineering of GFPs.

  2. Amino-functionalized green fluorescent carbon dots as surface energy transfer biosensors for hyaluronidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siyu; Zhao, Ning; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2015-04-21

    Amino-functionalized fluorescent carbon dots have been prepared by hydrothermal treatment of glucosamine with excess pyrophosphate. The produced carbon dots showed stabilized green emission fluorescence at various excitation wavelengths and pH environments. Herein, we demonstrate the surface energy transfer between the amino-functionalized carbon dots and negatively charged hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles. Hyaluronidase can degrade hyaluronate and break down the hyaluronate stabilized gold nanoparticles to inhibit the surface energy transfer. The developed fluorescent carbon dot/gold nanoparticle system can be utilized as a biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of hyaluronidase by two modes which include fluorescence measurements and colorimetric analysis.

  3. Absorption and fluorescence spectra of the neutral and anionic green fluorescent protein chromophore: Franck-Condon simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tsung-wei; Yang, Ling; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2012-07-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectra of the neutral and anionic green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore, namely p-hydroxybenzylideneimidazolidinone (p-HBDI), have been simulated using the Franck-Condon factors including inhomogeneous broadening of solvent effect. Ground and the first excited states were calculated by time dependent density functional theory with and without the polarizable continuum model environment. Simulated peak of the neutral/anionic p-HBDI at 380 nm (423 nm)/421 nm agrees with experiment value 370 nm (434 nm)/419 nm for absorption (fluorescence) spectrum. Simulated width of the neutral/anionic p-HBDI at 0.51 eV (0.54 eV)/0.57 eV agrees with experiment value 0.54 eV (0.66 eV)/0.56 eV for absorption (fluorescence) spectrum.

  4. Implantable CMOS imaging device with absorption filters for green fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaga, Yoshinori; Haruta, Makito; Takehara, Hironari; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Green fluorescent materials such as Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) and fluorescein are often used for observing neural activities. Thus, it is important to observe the fluorescence in a freely moving state in order to understand neural activities corresponding to behaviors. In this work, we developed an implantable CMOS imaging device for in-vivo green fluorescence imaging with efficient excitation light rejection using a combination of absorption filters. An interference filter is usually used for a fluorescence microscope in order to achieve high fluorescence imaging sensitivity. However, in the case of the implantable device, interference filters are not suitable because their transmission spectra depend on incident angle. To solve this problem we used two kinds of absorption filters that do not have angle dependence. An absorption filter consisting of yellow dye (VARYFAST YELLOW 3150) was coated on the pixel array of an image sensor. The rejection ratio of ideal excitation light (490 nm) against green fluorescence (510 nm) was 99.66%. However, the blue LED as an excitation light source has a broad emission spectrum and its intensity at 510 nm is 2.2 x 10-2 times the emission peak intensity. By coating LEDs with the emission absorption filters, the intensity of the unwanted component of the excitation light was reduced to 1.4 x 10-4. Using the combination of absorption filters, we achieved excitation light transmittance of 10-5 onto the image sensor. It is expected that high-sensitivity green fluorescence imaging of neural activities in a freely moving mouse will be possible by using this technology.

  5. Green fluorescent protein purification through Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatografy (IMAC and its relevance for Biomedical Science students during Biochemistry practical classes at La Trobe University – Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Jose José de Melo Silva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work was performed as an integrated practical of a Biomedical Science undergraduate course of Biochemistry subject, in order to demonstrate used techniques to purify of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP. To perform the experiments the main methodology applied was the by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC.  The open reading frame for enhanced GFP was sub-cloned into the pQE30 expression vector. The subsequent production of protein tagged N-terminally with hexahistidine, facilitated its purification by IMAC.  An approximate 3-fold purification of GFP was achieved. Thus, the students who completed the course gained significant experience related to fundamental techniques in molecular cloning and a sound basis in the principles of recombinant protein expression and purification.

  6. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter gene for the plant pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora ramorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Marko; Calmin, Gautier; Belbahri, Lassaad; Lefort, Francois; Götz, Monika; Wagner, Stefan; Werres, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic Phytophthora ramorum strains that produce green fluorescent protein (GFP) constitutively were obtained after stable DNA integration using a polyethylene glycol and CaCl₂-based transformation protocol. Green fluorescent protein production was studied in developing colonies and in different propagules of the pathogen to evaluate its use in molecular and physiological studies. About 12% of the GFP transformants produced GFP to a level detectable by a confocal laser scanning microscope. Green fluorescent protein could be visualized in structures with vital protoplasm, such as hyphal tips and germinating cysts. In infection studies with Rhododendron, one of the GFP expressing strains showed aggressiveness equal to that of the corresponding non-labelled isolate. Thus, GFP could be used as a reporter gene in P. ramorum. Limitations of the technology are discussed.

  7. Manipulation of cellular light from green fluorescent protein by a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Wang, Shaoyang; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2012-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most widely studied and exploited proteins in biochemistry and cell biology. It emits fluorescence following optical excitation, which is usually provided by a laser. Here, we report that fluorescence from enhanced GFP can be `turned off' by exposing cells to laser light. A short flash of femtosecond laser light is shown to deplete calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells. Calcium-release-activated calcium channels are then activated by stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). The rise in intracellular Ca2+ depolarizes mitochondria and increases the leakage of reactive oxygen species, which then permanently bleach the GFP. This controllable optical scheme for reactive oxygen species generation can also be used to modulate the photoconversion of GFP fluorescence from green to red emission and provide a mechanism for influencing cellular molecular dynamics.

  8. Improved blue, green, and red fluorescent protein tagging vectors for S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sidae; Lim, Wendell A; Thorn, Kurt S

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent protein fusions are a powerful tool to monitor the localization and trafficking of proteins. Such studies are particularly easy to carry out in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the ease with which tags can be introduced into the genome by homologous recombination. However, the available yeast tagging plasmids have not kept pace with the development of new and improved fluorescent proteins. Here, we have constructed yeast optimized versions of 19 different fluorescent proteins and tested them for use as fusion tags in yeast. These include two blue, seven green, and seven red fluorescent proteins, which we have assessed for brightness, photostability and perturbation of tagged proteins. We find that EGFP remains the best performing green fluorescent protein, that TagRFP-T and mRuby2 outperform mCherry as red fluorescent proteins, and that mTagBFP2 can be used as a blue fluorescent protein tag. Together, the new tagging vectors we have constructed provide improved blue and red fluorescent proteins for yeast tagging and three color imaging.

  9. Two-photon directed evolution of green fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R; Barnett, Lauren M; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Wicks, Geoffrey; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander

    2015-07-06

    Directed evolution has been used extensively to improve the properties of a variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs). Evolutionary strategies, however, have not yet been used to improve the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of a fluorescent protein, properties that are important for two-photon imaging in living tissues, including the brain. Here we demonstrate a technique for quantitatively screening the two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) efficiency and 2PA cross section of tens of thousands of mutant FPs expressed in E. coli colonies. We use this procedure to move EGFP through three rounds of two-photon directed evolution leading to new variants showing up to a 50% enhancement in peak 2PA cross section and brightness within the near-IR tissue transparency wavelength range.

  10. Constitutive and Inducible Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein in Brucella suis

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Stephan; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Layssac, Marion; Teyssier, Jacques; Liautard, Jean-Pierre

    1999-01-01

    A gene fusion system based on plasmid pBBR1MCS and the expression of green fluorescent protein was developed for Brucella suis, allowing isolation of constitutive and inducible genes. Bacteria containing promoter fusions of chromosomal DNA to gfp were visualized by fluorescence microscopy and examined by flow cytometry. Twelve clones containing gene fragments induced inside J774 murine macrophages were isolated and further characterized.

  11. Ratiometric Matryoshka biosensors from a nested cassette of green- and orange-emitting fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ast, Cindy; Foret, Jessica; Oltrogge, Luke M; De Michele, Roberto; Kleist, Thomas J; Ho, Cheng-Hsun; Frommer, Wolf B

    2017-09-05

    Sensitivity, dynamic and detection range as well as exclusion of expression and instrumental artifacts are critical for the quantitation of data obtained with fluorescent protein (FP)-based biosensors in vivo. Current biosensors designs are, in general, unable to simultaneously meet all these criteria. Here, we describe a generalizable platform to create dual-FP biosensors with large dynamic ranges by employing a single FP-cassette, named GO-(Green-Orange) Matryoshka. The cassette nests a stable reference FP (large Stokes shift LSSmOrange) within a reporter FP (circularly permuted green FP). GO- Matryoshka yields green and orange fluorescence upon blue excitation. As proof of concept, we converted existing, single-emission biosensors into a series of ratiometric calcium sensors (MatryoshCaMP6s) and ammonium transport activity sensors (AmTryoshka1;3). We additionally identified the internal acid-base equilibrium as a key determinant of the GCaMP dynamic range. Matryoshka technology promises flexibility in the design of a wide spectrum of ratiometric biosensors and expanded in vivo applications.Single fluorescent protein biosensors are susceptible to expression and instrumental artifacts. Here Ast et al. describe a dual fluorescent protein design whereby a reference fluorescent protein is nested within a reporter fluorescent protein to control for such artifacts while preserving sensitivity and dynamic range.

  12. Photoacoustic tomography of human hepatic malignancies using intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Miyata

    Full Text Available Recently, fluorescence imaging following the preoperative intravenous injection of indocyanine green has been used in clinical settings to identify hepatic malignancies during surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green as a contrast agent to produce representative fluorescence images of hepatic tumors by visualizing the spatial distribution of indocyanine green on ultrasonographic images. Indocyanine green (0.5 mg/kg, intravenous was preoperatively administered to 9 patients undergoing hepatectomy. Intraoperatively, photoacoustic tomography was performed on the surface of the resected hepatic specimens (n = 10 under excitation with an 800 nm pulse laser. In 4 hepatocellular carcinoma nodules, photoacoustic imaging identified indocyanine green accumulation in the cancerous tissue. In contrast, in one hepatocellular carcinoma nodule and five adenocarcinoma foci (one intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and 4 colorectal liver metastases, photoacoustic imaging delineated indocyanine green accumulation not in the cancerous tissue but rather in the peri-cancerous hepatic parenchyma. Although photoacoustic tomography enabled to visualize spatial distribution of ICG on ultrasonographic images, which was consistent with fluorescence images on cut surfaces of the resected specimens, photoacoustic signals of ICG-containing tissues decreased approximately by 40% even at 4 mm depth from liver surfaces. Photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green also failed to identify any hepatocellular carcinoma nodules from the body surface of model mice with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In conclusion, photoacoustic tomography has a potential to enhance cancer detectability and differential diagnosis by ultrasonographic examinations and intraoperative fluorescence imaging through visualization of stasis of bile-excreting imaging agents in and/or around hepatic tumors. However, further technical

  13. Indocyanine green fluorescence angiography for quantitative evaluation of in situ parathyroid gland perfusion and function after total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Brian Hung-Hin; Wong, Carlos K H; Hung, Hing Tsun; Wong, Kai Pun; Mak, Ka Lun; Au, Kin Bun

    2017-01-01

    Because the fluorescent light intensity on an indocyanine green fluorescence angiography reflects the blood perfusion within a focused area, the fluorescent light intensity in the remaining in situ parathyroid glands may predict postoperative hypocalcemia risk after total thyroidectomy. Seventy patients underwent intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence angiography after total thyroidectomy. Any parathyroid glands with a vascular pedicle was left in situ while any parathyroid glands without pedicle or inadvertently removed was autotransplanted. After total thyroidectomy, an intravenous 2.5 mg indocyanine green fluorescence angiography was given and real-time fluorescent images of the thyroid bed were recorded using the SPY imaging system (Novadaq, Ontario, Canada). The fluorescent light intensity of each indocyanine green fluorescence angiography as well as the average and greatest fluorescent light intensity in each patient were calculated. Postoperative hypocalcemia was defined as adjusted calcium 150% developed postoperative hypocalcemia while 9 (81.8%) patients with a greatest fluorescent light intensity ≤150% did. Similarly, no patients with an average fluorescent light intensity >109% developed PH while 9 (30%) with an average fluorescent light intensity ≤109% did. The greatest fluorescent light intensity was more predictive than day-0 postoperative hypocalcemia (P = .027) and % PTH drop day-0 to 1 (P parathyroid glands function and predicting postoperative hypocalcemia risk after total thyroidectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinetics of proton transfer in a green fluorescent protein: A laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    GFP consists of a compact cylinder made up of β-sheet strands and an α-helix running along the axis of the cylinder.15–17,19,20 The GFP chromophore, which gives the protein its characteristic green fluorescence, is ..... Thus model B would demand that protons enter rapidly (though the H- bonded network mentioned ...

  15. Absorption tuning of the green fluorescent protein chromophore: synthesis and studies of model compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted Nielsen, Mogens; Andersen, Lars Henrik; Rinza, Tomás Rocha

    2011-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore is a heterocyclic compound containing a p-hydroxybenzylidine attached to an imidazol-5(4H)-one ring. This review covers the synthesis of a variety of model systems for elucidating the intrinsic optical properties of the chromophore in the gas phase...

  16. Ab initio study of the optical properties of green fluorescent protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaccheddu, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    In the present we focus on the optical properties of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are modelled using the state-of-the-art computational tools availeable up to date: the Density Functional Theory (DFT) in the Hybrid QM/MM approach is employed to access the ground state configuration of

  17. Chromophore-protein coupling beyond nonpolarizable models: understanding absorption in green fluorescent protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daday, C.; Curutchet, C.; Sinicropi, A.; Mennucci, B.; Filippi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the coupling of the photoexcited chromophore with the environment in a prototypical system like green fluorescent protein (GFP) is to date not understood, and its description still defies state-of-the-art multiscale approaches. To identify which theoretical framework of the

  18. Complex assembly behavior during the encapsulation of green fluorescent protein analogs in virus derived protein capsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minten, Inge J.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes encapsulated in nanocontainers are a better model of the conditions inside a living cell than free enzymes in solution. In a first step toward the encapsulation of multiple enzymes inside the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was attached

  19. Absorption spectrum of the Green Fluorescent Protein chromphore: A difficult case for ab into methods?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filippi, Claudia; Zaccheddu, Maurizio; Buda, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We perform a thorough comparative investigation of the excitation energies of the anionic and neutral forms of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore in the gas phase using a variety of first-principle theoretical approaches commonly used to access excited state properties of photoactive

  20. Bathochromic Shift in Green Fluorescent Protein: A Puzzle for QM/MM Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filippi, Claudia; Buda, F.; Guidoni, L.; Sinicropi, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present an extensive investigation of the vertical excitations of the anionic and neutral forms of wild-type green fluorescent protein using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), multiconfigurational perturbation theory (CASPT2), and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods within a quantum

  1. Intracellular distribution of cowpea mosaic virus movement protein as visualised by green fluorescent protein fusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gopinath, K.; Bertens, P.; Pouwels, J.; Marks, H.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Wellink, J.E.; Kammen, van A.

    2003-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) derivatives expressing movement protein (MP) green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions (MP:GFP) were used to study the intracellular targeting and localization of the MP in cowpea protoplasts and plants. In protoplasts, a virus coding for a wild type MP:GFP (MPfGFP) induced

  2. A Photostable Green Fluorescent Protein Variant for Analysis of Protein Localization in Candida albicans▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chengda; Konopka, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Fusions to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are an effective way to monitor protein localization. However, altered codon usage in Candida species has delayed implementation of new variants. Examination of three new GFP variants in Candida albicans showed that one has higher signal intensity and increased resistance to photobleaching.

  3. Study of the glucoamylase promoter in Aspergillus niger using green fluorescent protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santerre Henriksen, A.L.; Even, S.; Müller, C.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Nielsen, J.

    1999-01-01

    An Aspergillus niger strain expressing a red-shifted green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the cytoplasm under the control of the glucoamylase promoter (PglaA) was characterized with respect to its physiology and morphology. Although xylose acted as a repressor carbon source during batch cultivations,

  4. Structural dynamics of green fluorescent protein alone and fused with a single chain Fv protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Griep, R.A.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Schots, A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2000-01-01

    Structural information on intracellular fusions of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria with endogenous proteins is required as they are increasingly used in cell biology and biochemistry. We have investigated the dynamic properties of GFP alone and fused to a

  5. A Practical Teaching Course in Directed Protein Evolution Using the Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from "Aequorea victoria" by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase…

  6. Changing blue fluorescent protein to green fluorescent protein using chemical RNA editing as a novel strategy in genetic restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Luyen T; Nguyen, Thanh T K; Alam, Shafiul; Sakamoto, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenzo; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    Using the transition from cytosine of BFP (blue fluorescent protein) gene to uridine of GFP (green fluorescent protein) gene at position 199 as a model, we successfully controlled photochemical RNA editing to effect site-directed deamination of cytidine (C) to uridine (U). Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing 5'-carboxyvinyl-2'-deoxyuridine ((CV) U) were used for reversible photoligation, and single-stranded 100-nt BFP DNA and in vitro-transcribed full-length BFP mRNA were the targets. Photo-cross-linking with the responsive ODNs was performed using UV (366 nm) irradiation, which was followed by heat treatment, and the cross-linked nucleotide was cleaved through photosplitting (UV, 312 nm). The products were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and fluorescence measurements. Western blotting and fluorescence-analysis results revealed that in vitro-translated proteins were synthesized from mRNAs after site-directed RNA editing. We detected substantial amounts of the target-base-substituted fragment using RFLP and observed highly reproducible spectra of the transition-GFP signal using fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated protein stability. ODNc restored approximately 10% of the C-to-U transition. Thus, we successfully used non-enzymatic site-directed deamination for genetic restoration in vitro. In the near future, in vivo studies that include cultured cells and model animals will be conducted to treat genetic disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Effect of pH on the Heat-Induced Denaturation and Renaturation of Green Fluorescent Protein: A Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rosa V.; Sola, Hilda M.; Torres, Juan C.; Torres, Rafael E.; Guzman, Ernick E.

    2013-01-01

    A fluorescence spectroscopy experiment is described where students integrated biochemistry and instrumental analysis, while characterizing the green fluorescent protein excitation and emission spectra in terms of its phenolic and phenolate chromophores. Students studied the combined effect of pH and temperature on the protein's fluorescence,…

  8. Effect of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) on the Development of Canine Intergeneric Embryo= Pengaruh Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) Pada Perkembangan Anjing Dari Embryo Intergeneris.

    OpenAIRE

    Fibrianto, Yuda Heru

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of green fluorescent protein on the development of canine intergeneric clone embryo with bovine oocyte recipient. Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were collected from slaughterhouse and matured in TCM-199 supplemented with 10% (v/v) fetal bovine serum (FBS) (Life Technologies), 0.005 U/m1 bovine FSH (Antrin®, Denka Kanagawa, Japan) and 1 pg/m1 estradiol (Sigma-Aldrich) at 39 °C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air and donor cell tranfect...

  9. Recombination-stable multimeric green fluorescent protein for characterization of weak promoter outputs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Knuf, Christoph; Förster, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are widely used for visualization of proteins to track localization and expression dynamics. However, phenotypically important processes can operate at too low expression levels for routine detection, i.e. be overshadowed by autofluorescence noise. While GFP...... functions well in translational fusions, the use of tandem GFPs to amplify fluorescence signals is currently avoided in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many other microorganisms due to the risk of loop-out by direct-repeat recombination. We increased GFP fluorescence by translationally fusing three different...... cultured for 25 generations under strong and slightly toxic expression after which only limited reduction in fluorescence was detectable. Such non-recombinogenic GFPs can help quantify intracellular responses operating a low copy number in recombination-prone organisms....

  10. Shedding light on disulfide bond formation: engineering a redox switch in green fluorescent protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, H.; Henriksen, A.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2001-01-01

    To visualize the formation of disulfide bonds in living cells, a pair of redox-active cysteines was introduced into the yellow fluorescent variant of green fluorescent protein. Formation of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines was fully reversible and resulted in a >2-fold decrease...... in the intrinsic fluorescence. Inter conversion between the two redox states could thus be followed in vitro as well as in vivoby non- invasive fluorimetric measurements. The 1.5 Angstrom crystal structure of the oxidized protein revealed a disulfide bond- induced distortion of the beta -barrel, as well...... as a structural reorganization of residues in the immediate chromophore environment. By combining this information with spectroscopic data, we propose a detailed mechanism accounting for the observed redox state-dependent fluorescence. The redox potential of the cysteine couple was found to be within...

  11. Expression and analysis of the green fluorescent protein gene in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, D; Izant, J G

    1995-11-01

    This report demonstrates that the Aequorea victoria green fluorescence protein (gfp) gene product will fluoresce in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe when expressed from an episomal expression vector. Fluorescence was readily detectable at both the colony and single cell level. Application of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) techniques showed that gfp-expressing cells could be detected when they were as rare as 1% of a total yeast population. Quantitative analysis of gfp-expressing cells constituting as little as 5% of a total population was possible. These observations establish the suitability of the gfp gene for use in S. pombe and, in combination with FACS, offers an experimental strategy for quantitative analysis of gene expression in yeast populations.

  12. Green-fluorescent protein as a new vital marker in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, J; Hwang, S; Niwa, Y; Kobayashi, H; Galbraith, D W

    1995-11-01

    The green-fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea victoria has been used as a convenient new vital marker in various heterologous systems. However, it has been problematic to express GFP in higher eukaryotes, especially in higher plants. This paper reports that either a strong constitutive or a heat-shock promoter can direct the expression of GFP which is easily detectable in maize mesophyll protoplasts. In this single-cell system, bright green fluorescence emitted from GFP is visible when excited with UV or blue light even in the presence of blue fluorescence from the vacuole or the red chlorophyll autofluorescence from chloroplasts using a fluorescence microscope. No exogenous substrate, co-factor, or other gene product is required. GFP is very stable in plant cells and shows little photobleaching. Viable cells can be obtained after fluorescence-activated cell sorting based on GFP. The paper further reports that GFP can be detected in intact tissues after delivering the constructs into Arabidopsis leaf and root by microprojectile bombardment. The successful detection of GFP in plant cells relies on the use of a universal transcription enhancer from maize or the translation enhancer from tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to boost the expression. This new reporter could be used to monitor gene expression, signal transduction, co-transfection, transformation, protein trafficking and localization, protein-protein interaction, cell separation and purification, and cell lineage in higher plants.

  13. Green fluorescent protein as a reporter of gene expression and protein localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kain, S R; Adams, M; Kondepudi, A; Yang, T T; Ward, W W; Kitts, P

    1995-10-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is rapidly becoming an important reporter molecule for monitoring gene expression and protein localization in vivo, in situ and in real time. GFP emits bright green light (lambda max = 509 nm) when excited with UV or blue light (lambda max = 395 nm, minor peak at 470 nm). The fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of GFP are similar to those of fluorescein, and the conditions used to visualize this fluorophore are also suitable for GFP. Unlike other bioluminescent reporters, the chromophore in GFP is intrinsic to the primary structure of the protein, and GFP fluorescence does not require a substrate or cofactor. GFP fluorescence is stable, species-independent and can be monitored non-invasively in living cells and, in the case of transparent organisms, whole animals. Here we demonstrate GFP fluorescence in bacterial and mammalian cells and introduce our Living Colors line of GFP reporter vectors, GFP protein and anti-GFP antiserum. The reporter vectors for GFP include a promoterless GFP vector for monitoring the expression of cloned promoters/enhancers in mammalian cells and a series of six vectors for creating fusion protein to either the N or C terminus of GFP.

  14. A green fluorescent protein with photoswitchable emission from the deep sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vogt

    Full Text Available A colorful variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine invertebrates are utilized as genetically encoded markers for live cell imaging. The increased demand for advanced imaging techniques drives a continuous search for FPs with new and improved properties. Many useful FPs have been isolated from species adapted to sun-flooded habitats such as tropical coral reefs. It has yet remained unknown if species expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-like proteins also exist in the darkness of the deep sea. Using a submarine-based and -operated fluorescence detection system in the Gulf of Mexico, we discovered ceriantharians emitting bright green fluorescence in depths between 500 and 600 m and identified a GFP, named cerFP505, with bright fluorescence emission peaking at 505 nm. Spectroscopic studies showed that approximately 15% of the protein bulk feature reversible ON/OFF photoswitching that can be induced by alternating irradiation with blue und near-UV light. Despite being derived from an animal adapted to essentially complete darkness and low temperatures, cerFP505 maturation in living mammalian cells at 37 degrees C, its brightness and photostability are comparable to those of EGFP and cmFP512 from shallow water species. Therefore, our findings disclose the deep sea as a potential source of GFP-like molecular marker proteins.

  15. A green method for the preparation of fluorescent hybrid structures of gold and corrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Ângela S., E-mail: aspereira@ua.pt; Barata, Joana F. B. [University of Aveiro, CICECO – Chemistry Department, Aveiro Institute of Materials (Portugal); Vaz Serra, Vanda I. R. C. [University of Aveiro, QOPNA Chemistry Department (Portugal); Pereira, Sérgio; Trindade, Tito [University of Aveiro, CICECO – Chemistry Department, Aveiro Institute of Materials (Portugal)

    2015-10-15

    Gold/soap nanostructures were prepared by a green methodology using saponified household sunflower oil, as reducing and organic dispersing agent of auric acid. The incorporation of hydrophobic molecules on the novel water-soluble gold nanoparticles was followed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, using as model hydrophobic compound 5,10,15-tris-(pentafluorophenyl)corrolatogallium(III)(pyridine) (GaPFC), a highly fluorescent corrole. The results showed the hydrophobic GaPFC located between the organic bilayer surrounding several Au nanoparticles, which in turn were coated with fatty acids salts anchored by the double bond at the gold’s surface.

  16. Protein Expression Analyses at the Single Cell Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masae Ohno

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central dogma of molecular biology explains how genetic information is converted into its end product, proteins, which are responsible for the phenotypic state of the cell. Along with the protein type, the phenotypic state depends on the protein copy number. Therefore, quantification of the protein expression in a single cell is critical for quantitative characterization of the phenotypic states. Protein expression is typically a dynamic and stochastic phenomenon that cannot be well described by standard experimental methods. As an alternative, fluorescence imaging is being explored for the study of protein expression, because of its high sensitivity and high throughput. Here we review key recent progresses in fluorescence imaging-based methods and discuss their application to proteome analysis at the single cell level.

  17. An optical marker based on the UV-induced green-to-red photoconversion of a fluorescent protein

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, Ryoko; Hama, Hiroshi; Yamamoto-Hino, Miki; Mizuno, Hideaki; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2002-01-01

    We have cloned a gene encoding a fluorescent protein from a stony coral, Trachyphyllia geoffroyi, which emits green, yellow, and red light. The protein, named Kaede, includes a tripeptide, His-Tyr-Gly, that acts as a green chromophore that can be converted to red. The red fluorescence is comparable in intensity to the green and is stable under usual aerobic conditions. We found that the green-red conversion is highly sensitive to irradiation with UV or violet light (350–400 nm), which excites...

  18. Green fluorescent protein: an in vivo reporter of plant gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedz, R P; Sussman, M R; Satterlee, J S

    1995-04-01

    Protoplasts were isolated from H89, an embryogenic sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck cv. Hamlin) suspension culture, and electroporated with p35S-GFP, a plasmid carrying the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea victoria. p35S-GFP was constructed by replacing the GUS coding sequence of pBI221 with a functional GFP gene, thereby placing the GFP gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter. Protoplasts were viewed by incident-light fluorescence microscopy twentyfour h after electroporation. 20-60% of the protoplasts emitted an intense green light when illuminated with blue (450-490 nm) light.

  19. Early history, discovery, and expression of Aequorea green fluorescent protein, with a note on an unfinished experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Frederick I

    2010-08-01

    The bioluminescent hydromedusan jellyfish, Aequorea victoria, emits a greenish light (lambda(max) = 508 nm) when stimulated electrically or mechanically. The light comes from photocytes located along the margin of its umbrella. The greenish light depends on two intracellular proteins working in consort: aequorin (21.4 kDa) and a green fluorescent protein (27 kDa). An excited state green fluorescent protein molecule results, which, on returning to the ground state, emits a greenish light. Similarly, a green light emission may be induced in the green fluorescent protein by exposing it to ultraviolet or blue light. Because the green light can be readily detected under a fluorescence microscope, the green fluorescent protein, tagged to a protein of interest, has been used widely as a marker to locate proteins in cells and to monitoring gene expression. This article reviews the work that took place leading to the discovery, cloning, and expression of the green fluorescent protein, with a note on an unfinished experiment. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Application of Green Fluorescent Protein as a Marker for Selection of Transgenic Mouse Embryos before Implantation

    OpenAIRE

    BAĞIŞ, Haydar

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the application of green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, for efficient selection of possible transgenic and non-mosaic mouse embryos after microinjection. We injected 353 one-cell mouse zygotes with a DNA fragment carrying Gfp gene under the control of b-actin gene promoter. Eighty-seven per cent (307 embryos) of the injected embryos survived after microinjection. The surviving embryos were cultured for an additional day and then an...

  1. Propidium iodide and PicoGreen as dyes for the DNA fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kral, Teresa; Widerak, K.; Langner, M.; Hof, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2005), s. 179-183 ISSN 1053-0509 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400400413; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/2308 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : nucleic acid * fluorescence labeling * PicoGreen * propidium iodide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.038, year: 2005

  2. Green fluorescent protein based indicators of dynamic redox changes and reactive oxygen species

    OpenAIRE

    Dooley, Colette

    2006-01-01

    Alterations in the redox equilibrium are precipitated by changing either the glutathione/glutathione-disulfide ratio (GSH/GSSG) and/or the reduced/oxidized thioredoxin ratio. Redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (GFP) allow real time visualization of the oxidation state of the indicator while canceling out the amount of indicator and the absolute optical sensitivity. Because the indicator is genetically encoded, it can be targeted to specific proteins or organelles of interest and expre...

  3. Green fluorescent protein transgene driven by Kit regulatory sequences is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cerisoli, Francesco; Cassinelli, Letizia; Lamorte, Giuseppe; Citterio, Stefania; Bertolotti, Francesca; Magli, Maria Cristina; Ottolenghi, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The expression of Kit in multiple types of stem cells suggests that common transcriptional programs might regulate this gene in different stem cells. In this work, the authors used mouse lines expressing transgenic green fluorescent protein under the control of Kit promoter/first intron regulatory elements. This study provides the basis for the elucidation of DNA sequences regulating a stem cell gene in multiple types of stem cells.

  4. Green fluorescent protein as a vital marker and reporter of gene expression in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Yeh, E; Gustafson, K; Boulianne, G L

    1995-01-01

    We have used the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria as a vital marker/reporter in Drosophila melanogaster. Transgenic flies were generated in which GFP was expressed under the transcriptional control of the yeast upstream activating sequence that is recognized by GAL4. These flies were crossed to several GAL4 enhancer trap lines, and expression of GFP was monitored in a variety of tissues during development using confocal microscopy. Here, we show that GFP co...

  5. Development of a green fluorescent tagged strain of Aspergillus carbonarius to monitor fungal colonization in grapes

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo Sempere, Ana; López Pérez, Mario; Martínez-Culebras, Pedro V.; González-Candelas, Luis

    2011-01-01

    An enhanced green fluorescent protein has been used to tag an OTA-producing strain of Aspergillus carbonarius (W04-40) isolated from naturally infected grape berries. Transformation of the fungus was mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The most efficient transformation occurred when the co-cultivation was done with 104 conidia due to higher frequency of resistance colonies (894 per 104 conidia) and lower background obtained. To confirm the presence of the hph gene in hygromycin resistant c...

  6. Facile and eco-friendly synthesis of green fluorescent carbon nanodots for applications in bioimaging, patterning and staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lihong; Li, Yanyan; Li, Xiaofeng; Wen, Xiangping; Zhang, Guomei; Yang, Jun; Dong, Chuan; Shuang, Shaomin

    2015-04-28

    We report a facile and eco-friendly strategy for the fabrication of green fluorescent carbon nanodots (CDs), and demonstrate their applications for bio-imaging, patterning, and staining. A one-pot hydrothermal method using various plant petals yields bright green-emitting CDs, providing an easy way for the production of green fluorescent CDs without the need for a tedious synthetic methodology or the use of toxic/expensive solvents and starting materials. The as-prepared CDs show small size distribution and excellent dispersibility. Their strong green fluorescence is observed when the excitation wavelength is between 430 nm and 490 nm. Moreover, they exhibit high tolerance to various external conditions, such as pH values, external cations, and continuous excitation. Due to minimum toxicity as well as good photoluminescence properties, these CDs can be applied to in vitro and in vivo imaging, patterning, and staining. According to confocal fluorescence imaging of human uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma cells, CDs penetrate into the cell and enter the cytoplasm and the nucleus. More strikingly, carp is directly fed with CDs for in vivo imaging and shows bright green fluorescence at an excitation wavelength of 470 nm. In addition, the obtained CDs are used as fluorescent inks for drawing luminescence patterns. Finally, we also apply the CDs as a fluorescent dye. Interestingly, the absorbent filter paper with staining emits dramatic fluorescence under 470 nm excitation.

  7. Binding mechanism of PicoGreen to DNA characterized by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Schellenberg, Helene; Walhorn, Volker; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescent dyes are broadly used in many biotechnological applications to detect and visualize DNA molecules. However, their binding to DNA alters the structural and nanomechanical properties of DNA and, thus, interferes with associated biological processes. In this work we employed magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the binding of PicoGreen to DNA at room temperature in a concentration-dependent manner. PicoGreen is an ultrasensitive quinolinium nucleic acid stain exhibiting hardly any background signal from unbound dye molecules. By means of stretching and overwinding single, torsionally constrained, nick-free double-stranded DNA molecules, we acquired force-extension and supercoiling curves which allow quantifying DNA contour length, persistence length and other thermodynamical binding parameters, respectively. The results of our magnetic tweezers single-molecule binding study were well supported through analyzing the fluorescent spectra of stained DNA. On the basis of our work, we could identify a concentration-dependent bimodal binding behavior, where, apparently, PicoGreen associates to DNA as an intercalator and minor-groove binder simultaneously.

  8. [Rapid selection of recombinant orf virus expression vectors using green fluorescent protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiachun; Guo, Xianfeng; Zhang, Min; Wu, Feifan; Peng, Yongzheng

    2016-01-01

    To construct a universal, highly attenuated orf virus expression vector for exogenous genes using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as the reporter gene. The flanking regions of the ORFV132 of orf virus DNA were amplified by PCR to construct the shuttle plasmid pSPV-132LF-EGFP-132RF. The shuttle plasmid was transfected into OFTu cells and GFP was incorporated into orf virus IA82Delta 121 by homologous recombination. The recombinant IA82Delta121-V was selected by green fluorescent signal. The deletion gene was identified by PCR and sequencing. The effects of ORFV132 knockout were evaluated by virus titration and by observing the proliferation of the infected vascular endothelial cells in vitro. The recombinant orf virus IA82Delta121-V was obtained successfully and quickly, and the deletion of ORFV132 did not affect the replication of the virus in vitro but reduced its virulence. Green fluorescent protein is a selectable marker for rapid, convenient and stable selection of the recombinant viruses. Highly attenuated recombinant orf virus IA82Delta121-V can serve as a new expression vector for exogenous genes.

  9. Estimation of indocyanine green concentration in blood from fluorescence emission: application to hemodynamic assessment during hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2009-09-01

    There is considerable interest in assessing cardiovascular function noninvasively in patients receiving hemodialysis. A possible approach is to measure the blood concentration of bolus-injected indocyanine green dye and to apply the dye-dilution method for estimating cardiac output and blood volume. Blood ICG concentration can be derived from a measurement of the ICG fluorescence through the dialysis tubing if a simple and unique calibration relationship can be established between transmural fluorescence intensity and blood ICG concentration. We investigated this relationship using Monte Carlo simulations of light transport in blood with varying hematocrit and ICG concentrations and performed empiric measurements of optical absorption and ICG fluorescence emission to confirm our findings. The ICG fluorescence intensity measured at the blood surface, as well as the light intensity remitted by the blood, varied as hematocrit changes modified the absorption and scattering characteristics of the blood. Calibration relationships were developed between fluorescence intensity and ICG concentration that accounted for hematocrit changes. Combining the backreflected fluorescence and the reflected light measured near the point of illumination provided optimal signal intensity, linearity, and robustness to hematocrit changes. These results provide a basis for developing a noninvasive approach to derive optically circulating blood ICG concentration in hemodialysis circuits.

  10. Green Synthesis of Fluorescent Carbon Dots for Selective Detection of Tartrazine in Food Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Yang, Xiupei; Li, Gu; Zhao, Chuan; Liao, Xiangjun

    2015-08-05

    A simple, economical, and green method for the preparation of water-soluble, high-fluorescent carbon quantum dots (C-dots) has been developed via hydrothermal process using aloe as a carbon source. The synthesized C-dots were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence spectrophotometer, UV-vis absorption spectra as well as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results reveal that the as-prepared C-dots were spherical shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and emit bright yellow photoluminescence (PL) with a quantum yield of approximately 10.37%. The surface of the C-dots was rich in hydroxyl groups and presented various merits including high fluorescent quantum yield, excellent photostability, low toxicity and satisfactory solubility. Additionally, we found that one of the widely used synthetic food colorants, tartrazine, could result in a strong fluorescence quenching of the C-dots through a static quenching process. The decrease of fluorescence intensity made it possible to determine tartrazine in the linear range extending from 0.25 to 32.50 μM, This observation was further successfully applied for the determination of tartrazine in food samples collected from local markets, suggesting its great potential toward food routine analysis. Results from our study may shed light on the production of fluorescent and biocompatible nanocarbons due to our simple and environmental benign strategy to synthesize C-dots in which aloe was used as a carbon source.

  11. In vivo labelling of Anagallis arvensis L. cells with green fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Łukaszewicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A few methods only enable to follow the fate of plant cells in vivo. One of the most promising is using the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP. In our preliminary study we set up the experimental system enabling labelling of Anagallis arvensis cells with this marker. We prepared an expression plasmid containing red-shifted gfp with optimised translation start site context, under the control of CaMV 35S transcription promoter. The construct was introduced into A. arvensis cells by particle bombardment. We developed two methods of material preparation for this transformation: in vitro cultured stem internodes with regenerating adventitious shoots (the earliest stages of regeneration; and shoot tips with temporarily exposed apices. The reflected light fluorescence microscope Olympus with the set of filters U-MNB designed for fluorescein detection enables the observation of GFP fluorescence. Both ordinary epidermal cells and stomata guard cells were transformed. Their fluorescence was observed for up to 14 days. Artefacts (autofluorescence of glandular trichomes and faint green glowing of meristematic tissue could be overcome by the optimisation of the filter set.

  12. A flow cytometric protocol for titering recombinant adenoviral vectors containing the green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, D C; Booth, J L; Dandapani, V; Pennington, L R; Gimble, J M; Metcalf, J

    2000-03-01

    As the use of adenoviral vectors in gene therapy protocols increases, there is a corresponding need for rapid, accurate, and reproducible titer methods. Multiple methods currently exist for determining titers of recombinant adenoviral vector, including optical absorbance, electron microscopy, fluorescent focus assay, and the "gold standard" plaque assay. This paper introduces a novel flow cytometric method for direct titer determination that relies on the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), a tracking marker incorporated into several adenoviral vectors. This approach was compared to the plaque assay using 10(-4)- to 10(-6)-fold dilutions of a cesium-chloride-purified, GFP expressing adenovirus (AdEasy + GFP + GAL). The two approaches yielded similar titers: 3.25 +/- 1.85 x 10(9) PFU/mL versus 3.46 +/- 0.76 x 10(9) green fluorescent units/(gfu/mL). The flow cytometric method is complete within 24 h in contrast to the 7 x 10 days required by the plaque assay. These results indicate that the GFU/mL is an alternative functional titer method for fluorescent-tagged adenoviral vectors.

  13. Green-lighting green fluorescent protein: faster and more efficient folding by eliminating a cis-trans peptide isomerization event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenman, David J; Huang, Yao-ming; Xia, Ke; Fraser, Keith; Jones, Victoria E; Lamberson, Colleen M; Van Roey, Patrick; Colón, Wilfredo; Bystroff, Christopher

    2014-04-01

    Wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP) folds on a time scale of minutes. The slow step in folding is a cis-trans peptide bond isomerization. The only conserved cis-peptide bond in the native GFP structure, at P89, was remodeled by the insertion of two residues, followed by iterative energy minimization and side chain design. The engineered GFP was synthesized and found to fold faster and more efficiently than its template protein, recovering 50% more of its fluorescence upon refolding. The slow phase of folding is faster and smaller in amplitude, and hysteresis in refolding has been eliminated. The elimination of a previously reported kinetically trapped state in refolding suggests that X-P89 is trans in the trapped state. A 2.55 Å resolution crystal structure revealed that the new variant contains only trans-peptide bonds, as designed. This is the first instance of a computationally remodeled fluorescent protein that folds faster and more efficiently than wild type. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  14. A Double Decarboxylation in Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein Leads to High Contrast Photoactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Joshua D; Webb, Lauren J

    2017-07-06

    A photoactivatable variant of superfolder green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by replacing the threonine at position 203 with aspartic acid. Photoactivation by exposure of this mutant to UV light resulted in conversion of the fluorophore from the neutral to the negatively charged form, accompanied by a ∼95-fold increase in fluorescence under 488 nm excitation. Mass spectrometry before and after exposure to UV light revealed a change in mass of 88 Da, attributed to the double decarboxylation of Glu 222 and Asp 203. Kinetics studies and nonlinear power-dependence of the initial rate of photoconversion indicated that the double decarboxylation occurred via a multiphoton absorption process at 254 nm. In addition to providing a photoactivatable GFP with robust folding properties, a detailed mechanistic understanding of this double decarboxylation in GFP will lead to a better understanding of charge transfer in fluorescent proteins.

  15. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    CERN Document Server

    Awazu, K; Tamiya, E

    2002-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm sup 2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 mu m, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 mu m. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%.

  16. Shedding light on disulfide bond formation: engineering a redox switch in green fluorescent protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, H.; Henriksen, A.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2001-01-01

    To visualize the formation of disulfide bonds in living cells, a pair of redox-active cysteines was introduced into the yellow fluorescent variant of green fluorescent protein. Formation of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines was fully reversible and resulted in a >2-fold decrease...... the physiological range for redox-active cysteines. In the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli, the protein was a sensitive probe for the redox changes that occur upon disruption of the thioredoxin reductive pathway....... in the intrinsic fluorescence. Inter conversion between the two redox states could thus be followed in vitro as well as in vivoby non- invasive fluorimetric measurements. The 1.5 Angstrom crystal structure of the oxidized protein revealed a disulfide bond- induced distortion of the beta -barrel, as well...

  17. Fluorescence lifetime images of different green fluorescent proteins in fly brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Sih-Yu; Lin, Y. Y.; Chiang, A. S.; Huang, Y. C.

    2009-02-01

    The mechanisms of learning and memory are the most important functions in an animal brain. Investigating neuron circuits and network maps in a brain is the first step toward understanding memory and learning behavior. Since Drosophila brain is the major model for understanding brain functions, we measure the florescence lifetimes of different GFP-based reporters expressed in a fly brain. In this work, two Gal4 drivers, OK 107 and MZ 19 were used. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]) concentration is an importation indicator of neuronal activity. Therefore, several groups have developed GFP-based calcium sensors, among which G-CaMP is the most popular and reliable. The fluorescence intensity of G-CaMP will increase when it binds to calcium ion; however, individual variation from different animals prevents quantitative research. In this work, we found that the florescence lifetime of G-CaMP will shrink from 1.8 ns to 1.0 ns when binding to Ca2+. This finding can potentially help us to understand the neuron circuits by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is a light-activated ion-channel protein on a neuron cell membrane. In this work, we express ChR2 and G-CaMP in a fly brain. Using a pulsed 470-nm laser to activate the neurons, we can also record the fluorescence lifetime changes in the structure. Hence, we can trace and manipulate a specific circuit in this animal. This method provides more flexibility in brain research.

  18. Improved in Vivo Whole-Animal Detection Limits of Green Fluorescent Protein–Expressing Tumor Lines by Spectral Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny M. Tam

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Green fluorescent protein (GFP has been used for cell tracking and imaging gene expression in superficial or surgically exposed structures. However, in vivo murine imaging is often limited by several factors, including scatter and attenuation with depth and overlapping autofluorescence. The autofluorescence signals have spectral profiles that are markedly different from the GFP emission spectral profile. The use of spectral imaging allows separation and quantitation of these contributions to the total fluorescence signal seen in vivo by weighting known pure component profiles. Separation of relative GFP and autofluorescence signals is not readily possible using epifluorescent continuous-wave single excitation and emission bandpass imaging (EFI. To evaluate detection thresholds using these two methods, nude mice were subcutaneously injected with a series of GFP-expressing cells. For EFI, optimized excitation and emission bandpass filters were used. Owing to the ability to separate autofluorescence contributions from the emission signal using spectral imaging compared with the mixed contributions of GFP and autofluorescence in the emission signal recorded by the EFI system, we achieved a 300-fold improvement in the cellular detection limit. The detection limit was 3 × 103 cells for spectral imaging versus 1 × 106 cells for EFI. Despite contributions to image stacks from autofluorescence, a 100-fold dynamic range of cell number in the same image was readily visualized. Finally, spectral imaging was able to separate signal interference of red fluorescent protein from GFP images and vice versa. These findings demonstrate the utility of the approach in detecting low levels of multiple fluorescent markers for whole-animal in vivo applications.

  19. Silica Nanoparticles for Intracellular Protein Delivery: a Novel Synthesis Approach Using Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sarah; Tavernaro, Isabella; Cavelius, Christian; Weber, Eva; Kümper, Alexander; Schmitz, Carmen; Fleddermann, Jana; Kraegeloh, Annette

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a novel approach for preparation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-doped silica nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution is presented. GFP was chosen as a model protein due to its autofluorescence. Protein-doped nanoparticles have a high application potential in the field of intracellular protein delivery. In addition, fluorescently labelled particles can be used for bioimaging. The size of these protein-doped nanoparticles was adjusted from 15 to 35 nm using a multistep synthesis process, comprising the particle core synthesis followed by shell regrowth steps. GFP was selectively incorporated into the silica matrix of either the core or the shell or both by a one-pot reaction. The obtained nanoparticles were characterised by determination of particle size, hydrodynamic diameter, ζ-potential, fluorescence and quantum yield. The measurements showed that the fluorescence of GFP was maintained during particle synthesis. Cellular uptake experiments demonstrated that the GFP-doped nanoparticles can be used as stable and effective fluorescent probes. The study reveals the potential of the chosen approach for incorporation of functional biological macromolecules into silica nanoparticles, which opens novel application fields like intracellular protein delivery.

  20. Green tea catechins quench the fluorescence of bacteria-conjugated Alexa fluor dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lin; Li, Wei; Zhu, Shu; Tsai, Sheena; Li, Jianhua; Tracey, Kevin J; Wang, Ping; Fan, Saijun; Sama, Andrew E; Wang, Haichao

    2013-10-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Green tea polyphenolic catechins, especially the (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), can be cross-linked to many proteins, and confer a wide range of anti-bacterial activities possibly by damaging microbial cytoplasmic lipids and proteins. At the doses that conferred protection against lethal polymicrobial infection (induced by cecal ligation and puncture), EGCG significantly reduced bacterial loads particularly in the liver and lung. To elucidate its bactericidal mechanisms, we determined whether EGCG affected the fluorescence intensities of bacteria-conjugated Alexa Fluor 488 or 594 dyes. When mixed with unconjugated Alexa Fluor 488 or 594 dyes, EGCG or analogs did not affect the fluorescence intensity of these dyes. In a sharp contrast, EGCG and some analogs (e.g., Catechin Gallate, CG), markedly reduced the fluorescence intensity of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus-conjugated Alexa 594 and Gram-negative Escherichia coli-conjugated Alexa 488. Interestingly, co-treatment with ethanol impaired the EGCG-mediated fluorescence quenching of the G(+) S. aureus, but not of the G(-) E. coli-conjugated Alexa Flour dyes. In light of the notion that Alexa Fluor dyes can be quenched by aromatic amino acids, it is plausible that EGCG exerts antimicrobial activities possibly by altering microbial protein conformations and functions. This possibility can now be explored by screening other fluorescence-quenching agents for possible antimicrobial activities.

  1. Eel green fluorescent protein is associated with resistance to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Aki; Komatsu, Masaharu; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Yoshizono, Yuki; Yoshizono, Hikari; Orikawa, Yasuhiro; Takumi, Shota; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Seiichi; Kaminishi, Yoshio; Itakura, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from eel (Anguilla japonica) muscle (eelGFP) is unique in the vertebrates and requires bilirubin as a ligand to emit fluorescence. This study was performed to clarify the physiological function of the unique GFP. Investigation of susceptibility to oxidative stress was carried out using three types of cell lines including jellyfish (Aequorea coerulescens) GFP (jfGFP)-, or eel GFP (eelGFP)-expressing HEK293 cells, and control vector-transfected HEK293 cells. Binding of eelGFP to bilirubin was confirmed by the observation of green fluorescence in HEK293-eelGFP cells. The growth rate was compared with the three types of cells in the presence or absence of phenol red which possessed antioxidant activity. The growth rates of HEK293-CV and HEK293-jfGFP under phenol red-free conditions were reduced to 52 and 31% of those under phenol red. Under the phenol red-free condition, HEK293-eelGFP had a growth rate of approximately 70% of the phenol red-containing condition. The eelGFP-expressing cells were approximately 2-fold resistant to oxidative stress such as H2O2 exposure. The fluorescence intensity partially decreased or disappeared after exposure to H2O2, and heterogeneous intensity of fluorescence was also observed in isolated eel skeletal muscle cells. These results suggested eelGFP, but not jfGFP, coupled with bilirubin provided the antioxidant activity to the cells as compared to non-bound free bilirubin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Crystal structure of the fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. in both green and photoconverted red forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletneva, Nadya V; Pletnev, Sergei; Pakhomov, Alexey A; Chertkova, Rita V; Martynov, Vladimir I; Muslinkina, Liya; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir Z

    2016-08-01

    The fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. (DendFP) is a member of the Kaede-like group of photoconvertible fluorescent proteins with a His62-Tyr63-Gly64 chromophore-forming sequence. Upon irradiation with UV and blue light, the fluorescence of DendFP irreversibly changes from green (506 nm) to red (578 nm). The photoconversion is accompanied by cleavage of the peptide backbone at the C(α)-N bond of His62 and the formation of a terminal carboxamide group at the preceding Leu61. The resulting double C(α)=C(β) bond in His62 extends the conjugation of the chromophore π system to include imidazole, providing the red fluorescence. Here, the three-dimensional structures of native green and photoconverted red forms of DendFP determined at 1.81 and 2.14 Å resolution, respectively, are reported. This is the first structure of photoconverted red DendFP to be reported to date. The structure-based mutagenesis of DendFP revealed an important role of positions 142 and 193: replacement of the original Ser142 and His193 caused a moderate red shift in the fluorescence and a considerable increase in the photoconversion rate. It was demonstrated that hydrogen bonding of the chromophore to the Gln116 and Ser105 cluster is crucial for variation of the photoconversion rate. The single replacement Gln116Asn disrupts the hydrogen bonding of Gln116 to the chromophore, resulting in a 30-fold decrease in the photoconversion rate, which was partially restored by a further Ser105Asn replacement.

  3. Expanding the spectral palette of fluorescent proteins for the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasala, Beth A; Barrera, Daniel J; Ng, Jenny; Plucinak, Thomas M; Rosenberg, Julian N; Weeks, Donald P; Oyler, George A; Peterson, Todd C; Haerizadeh, Farzad; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have become essential tools for a growing number of fields in biology. However, such tools have not been widely adopted for use in microalgal research. The aim of this study was to express and compare six FPs (blue mTagBFP, cyan mCerulean, green CrGFP, yellow Venus, orange tdTomato and red mCherry) in the popular model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. To circumvent the transgene silencing that often occurs in C. reinhardtii, the FPs were expressed from the nuclear genome as transcriptional fusions with the sh-ble antibiotic resistance gene, with the foot and mouth disease virus 2A self-cleaving sequence placed between the coding sequences. All ble-2A-FPs tested are well-expressed and efficiently processed to yield mature, unfused FPs that localize throughout the cytoplasm. The fluorescence signals of each FP were detectable in whole cells by fluorescence microplate reader analysis, live-cell fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Furthermore, we report a comparative analysis of fluorescence levels relative to auto-fluorescence for the chosen FPs. Finally, we demonstrate that the ble-2A expression vector may be used to fluorescently label an endogenous protein (α-tubulin). We show that the mCerulean-α-tubulin fusion protein localizes to the cytoskeleton and flagella, as expected, and that cells containing this fusion protein had normal cellular function. Overall, our results indicate that, by use of the ble-2A nuclear expression construct, a wide array of FP tools and technologies may be applied to microalgal research, opening up many possibilities for microalgal biology and biotechnology. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Community profiling of culturable fluorescent pseudomonads in the rhizosphere of green gram (Vigna radiata L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak K Sarma

    Full Text Available Study on microbial diversity in the unexplored rhizosphere is important to understand their community structure, biology and ecological interaction with the host plant. This research assessed the genetic and functional diversity of fluorescent pseudomonads [FP] in the green gram rhizophere. One hundred and twenty types of morphologically distinct fluorescent pseudomonads were isolated during vegetative as well as reproductive growth phase of green gram. Rep PCR, ARDRA and RISA revealed two distinct clusters in each case at 75, 61 and 70% similarity coefficient index respectively. 16S rRNA partial sequencing analysis of 85 distantly related fluorescent pseudomonads depicted Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the dominant group. Out of 120 isolates, 23 (19% showed antagonistic activity towards phytopathogenic fungi. These bacterial isolates showed varied production of salicylic acid, HCN and chitinase, 2, 4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA and pyoluteorin (PLT. Production efficiency of inherent level of plant growth promoting (PGP traits among the 120 isolates demonstrated that 10 (8% solubilised inorganic phosphates, 25 (20% produced indoles and 5 (4% retained ACC deaminase activity. Pseudomonas aeruginosa GGRJ21 showed the highest production of all antagonistic and plant growth promoting (PGP traits. In a greenhouse experiment, GGRJ21 suppressed root rot disease of green gram by 28-93% (p = 0.05. Consistent up regulation of three important stress responsive genes, i.e., acdS, KatA and gbsA and elevated production efficiency of different PGP traits could promote GGRJ21 as a potent plant growth regulator.

  6. In Vivo Photoacoustic and Fluorescence Cystography Using Clinically Relevant Dual Modal Indocyanine Green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjo Park

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventional X-ray-based cystography uses radio-opaque materials, but this method uses harmful ionizing radiation and is not sensitive. In this study, we demonstrate nonionizing and noninvasive photoacoustic (PA and fluorescence (FL cystography using clinically relevant indocyanine green (ICG in vivo. After transurethral injection of ICG into rats through a catheter, their bladders were photoacoustically and fluorescently visualized. A deeply positioned bladder below the skin surface (i.e., ~1.5–5 mm was clearly visible in the PA and FL image using a laser pulse energy of less than 2 mJ/cm2 (1/15 of the safety limit. Then, the in vivo imaging results were validated through in situ studies. Our results suggest that dual modal cystography can provide a nonionizing and noninvasive imaging tool for bladder mapping.

  7. Broadband photon pair generation in green fluorescent proteins through spontaneous four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Siyuan; Thomas, Abu; Corzo, Neil V.; Kumar, Prem; Huang, Yuping; Lee, Kim Fook

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies in quantum biology suggest that quantum mechanics help us to explore quantum processes in biological system. Here, we demonstrate generation of photon pairs through spontaneous four-wave mixing process in naturally occurring fluorescent proteins. We develop a general empirical method for analyzing the relative strength of nonlinear optical interaction processes in five different organic fluorophores. Our results indicate that the generation of photon pairs in green fluorescent proteins is subject to less background noises than in other fluorophores, leading to a coincidence-to-accidental ratio ~145. As such proteins can be genetically engineered and fused to many biological cells, our experiment enables a new platform for quantum information processing in a biological environment such as biomimetic quantum networks and quantum sensors.

  8. ZnO nanoparticles assist the refolding of denatured green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Zamany, Ahmad Jawid; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2016-04-01

    Proteins are essential for cellular and biological processes. Proteins are synthesized and fold into the native structure to become active. The inability of a protein molecule to remain in its native conformation is called as protein misfolding, and this is due to several environmental factors. Protein misfolding and aggregation handle several human diseases. Protein misfolding is believed to be one of the causes of several disorders such as cancer, degenerative diseases, and metabolic pathologies. The zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle was significantly promoted refolding of thermally denatured green fluorescent protein (GFP). In the present study, ZnO nanoparticles interaction with GFP was investigated by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer, fluorescence spectrophotometer, and dynamic light scattering. Results suggest that the ZnO nanoparticles significantly assist the refolding of denatured GFP. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A rewired green fluorescent protein: folding and function in a nonsequential, noncircular GFP permutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Philippa J; Huang, Yao-Ming; Dordick, Jonathan S; Bystroff, Christopher

    2010-12-28

    The sequential order of secondary structural elements in proteins affects the folding and activity to an unknown extent. To test the dependence on sequential connectivity, we reconnected secondary structural elements by their solvent-exposed ends, permuting their sequential order, called "rewiring". This new protein design strategy changes the topology of the backbone without changing the core side chain packing arrangement. While circular and noncircular permutations have been observed in protein structures that are not related by sequence homology, to date no one has attempted to rationally design and construct a protein with a sequence that is noncircularly permuted while conserving three-dimensional structure. Herein, we show that green fluorescent protein can be rewired, still functionally fold, and exhibit wild-type fluorescence excitation and emission spectra.

  10. Non-adiabatic dynamics of isolated green fluorescent protein chromophore anion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Zhou, Pan-Wang; Li, Bin; Gao, Ai-Hua; Han, Ke-Li

    2014-12-01

    On-the-fly ab initio molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to investigate the relaxation mechanism of green fluorescent protein chromophore anion under vacuum. The CASSCF surface hopping simulation method based on Zhu-Nakamura theory is applied to present the real-time conformational changes of the target molecule. The static calculations and dynamics simulation results suggest that not only the twisting motion around bridging bonds between imidazolinone and phenoxy groups but the strength mode of C=O and pyramidalization character of bridging atom are major factors on the ultrafast fluorescence quenching process of the isolated chromophore anion. The abovementioned factors bring the molecule to the vicinity of conical intersections on its potential energy surface and to finish the internal conversion process. A Hula-like twisting pattern is displayed during the relaxation process and the entire decay process disfavors a photoswitching pattern which corresponds to cis-trans photoisomerization.

  11. Green synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots for sensitive detection of Fe2+ and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Ni, Gang; Tu, Jinchun; Jin, Xiaoyong; Peng, Juan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the green synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) via one-step hydrothermal treatment of cornstalk was investigated. This approach is facile, economical, and effective. The obtained CDs with an average diameter of 5.2 nm possess many excellent properties such as emitting blue fluorescence under UV light (365 nm), high monodispersity, good stability, excellent water dispersibility, and absolute quantum yield of 7.6%. Then, these CDs were used as sensing probes for the detection of Fe2+ and H2O2 with detection limits as low as 0.18 and 0.21 μM, respectively. This sensing platform shows advantages such as high selectivity, good precision, rapid operation, and avoiding the precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides.

  12. Photo-initiated dynamics and spectroscopy of the deprotonated Green Fluorescent Protein chromophore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochenkova, Anastasia; Andersen, Lars Henrik

    2013-01-01

    . Knowledge of intrinsic properties of the GFP photoabsorbing molecular unit is a prerequisite in understanding the atomic-scale interactions that play a key role for the diverse functioning of these proteins. Here, we show how recent developments in action and photoelectron spectroscopy combined with state-of-the......This chapter combines recent advances in understanding the photophysics of the chromophore anion of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea Victoria. GFP and its homologues are widely used for in vivo labeling in biology through their remarkable fluorescent properties...... dynamics, where non-radiative decay occurs on a (sub)picosecond timescale. Deactivation includes resonant electron emission and fast internal conversion followed by slow statistical decay in the vibrationally hot ground state. Remarkably, both electronic and nuclear excited-state decay channels may here...

  13. Development and Evaluation of Transgenic Nude Mice Expressing Ubiquitous Green Fluorescent Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Srikanth; Arindkar, Shailendra; Mishra, Alaknanda; Manglani, Kapil; Kumar, Jerald Mahesh; Majumdar, Subeer S; Upadhyay, Pramod; Nagarajan, Perumal

    2015-08-01

    Researchers had developed and characterized transgenic green/red fluorescent protein (GFP/RFP) nude mouse with ubiquitous RFP or GFP expression, but none has evaluated the level of immune cells and expression levels of GFP in this model. The nude GFP mice were evaluated by imaging, hematological indices, and flow cytometry to compare the proportion of immune T cells. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was done for evaluating the relative expression of GFP transcripts in few organs of the nude GFP mice. The hematological and immune cells of nude GFP were within the range of nude mice. However, the gene expression levels were relatively less in various tissues compared with B6 GFP mice. These findings suggest that nude GFP is an ideal model resembling normal nude mice; however, GFP expression in various tissues by fluorescence should be considered, as the expression of GFP differs in various organs.

  14. Fluorescence, spectroscopic and NLO properties of green tea extract in deoxyribonucleic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Ana-Maria; Rau, Ileana; Kajzar, Francois; Meghea, Aurelia

    2013-11-01

    Natural, purely biological deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-green tea extract (GTE) complexes at different concentrations were prepared and characterized for their spectroscopic, fluorescent, linear and nonlinear optical properties. The complexes can be processed into good optical quality thin films by solution casting. They fluoresce when excited in UV absorption band, with a significantly larger quantum yield for the DNA-GTE complex than for a pure GTE solution. The thin film refractive indices were determined by Fabry-Perot (FP) interference patterns. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of thin films were determined by the optical third-harmonic generation technique at 1064.2 nm fundamental wavelength. The phase of THG susceptibility was determined from the concentration variation of THG susceptibility. It reveals presence of a two-photon resonance with a band lying in the optical gap.

  15. Expression of a green fluorescence protein-carrier protein into mouse spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogas, Teresa; Fernández-Novell, Josep M; Palomo, Maria Jesús; Otaegui, Pedro J; Gomis, Roger R; Ballester, Joan; Izquierdo, Dolors; Guinovart, Joan J; Ferrer, Joan C; Rigau, Teresa; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E

    2002-10-04

    Intra-testicular inoculation of an adenoviral vector carrying the fusion gene Aequorea victoria green fluorescence protein/rat-liver glycogen synthase (GFP/LGS) resulted in the presence of GFP/GLS in spermatozoa from 7days to, at least, 16days after inoculation. The GFP/LGS was detected in the sperm heads after an "in vitro" fertilization procedure, either before or after the oocyte penetration. Our results indicate that spermatozoa carrying GFP/LGS protein conserved their fertilizing ability and were also detectable after oocyte penetration. This technique will allow to develop an easy system to follow the fate of mature sperm proteins.

  16. Decoupling Electronic versus Nuclear Photoresponse of Isolated Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophores Using Short Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Hjalte V.; Pedersen, Henrik B.; Bochenkova, Anastasia V.; Andersen, Lars H.

    2016-12-01

    The photophysics of a deprotonated model chromophore for the green fluorescent protein is studied by femtosecond laser pulses in an electrostatic ion-storage ring. The laser-pulse duration is much shorter than the time for internal conversion, and, hence, contributions from sequential multiphoton absorption, typically encountered with ns-laser pulses, are avoided. Following single-photon excitation, the action-absorption maximum is shown to be shifted within the S0 to S1 band from its origin at about 490 to 450 nm, which is explained by the different photophysics involved in the detected action.

  17. Green Fluorescent Protein as a protein localization and topological reporter in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Jackson, Mary

    2017-07-01

    The cell envelope-associated proteins of Mycobacterium species play critical functions in the physiology and pathogenicity of these microorganisms. Because the determination of their subcellular localization and transmembrane topology is often critical to the understanding of their function, we investigated whether the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) could be used as a reporter to probe protein localization and map the topology of inner membrane proteins directly in intact mycobacterial cells. To this end, two GFP-based mycobacterial reporter plasmids were engineered and their functionality validated using a variety of membrane-associated, exported and cytosolic proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure of the green fluorescent protein NowGFP with an anionic tryptophan-based chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletnev, Vladimir Z; Pletneva, Nadya V; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Goryacheva, Ekaterina A; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2015-08-01

    A green-emitting fluorescent variant, NowGFP, with a tryptophan-based chromophore (Thr65-Trp66-Gly67) was recently developed from the cyan mCerulean by introducing 18 point mutations. NowGFP is characterized by bright green fluorescence at physiological and higher pH and by weak cyan fluorescence at low pH. Illumination with blue light induces irreversible photoconversion of NowGFP from a green-emitting to a cyan-emitting form. Here, the X-ray structures of intact NowGFP at pH 9.0 and pH 4.8 and of its photoconverted variant, NowGFP_conv, are reported at 1.35, 1.18 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. The structure of NowGFP at pH 9.0 suggests the anionic state of Trp66 of the chromophore to be the primary cause of its green fluorescence. At both examined pH values Trp66 predominantly adopted a cis conformation; only ∼ 20% of the trans conformation was observed at pH 4.8. It was shown that Lys61, which adopts two distinct pH-dependent conformations, is a key residue playing a central role in chromophore ionization. At high pH the side chain of Lys61 forms two hydrogen bonds, one to the indole N atom of Trp66 and the other to the carboxyl group of the catalytic Glu222, enabling an indirect noncovalent connection between them that in turn promotes Trp66 deprotonation. At low pH, the side chain of Lys61 is directed away from Trp66 and forms a hydrogen bond to Gln207. It has been shown that photoconversion of NowGFP is accompanied by decomposition of Lys61, with a predominant cleavage of its side chain at the C(γ)-C(δ) bond. Lys61, Glu222, Thr203 and Ser205 form a local hydrogen-bond network connected to the indole ring of the chromophore Trp66; mutation of any of these residues dramatically affects the spectral properties of NowGFP. On the other hand, an Ala150Val replacement in the vicinity of the chromophore indole ring resulted in a new advanced variant with a 2.5-fold improved photostability.

  19. Absorption spectrum of the green fluorescent protein chromophore anion in vacuo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S B; Lapierre, A; Andersen, J U; Pedersen, U V; Tomita, S; Andersen, L H

    2001-11-26

    A sensitive photoabsorption technique for studies of gas-phase biomolecules has been used at the ELISA electrostatic heavy-ion storage ring. We show that the anion form of the chromophore of the green fluorescent protein in vacuo has an absorption maximum at 479 nm, which coincides with one of the two absorption peaks of the protein. Its absorption characteristics are therefore ascribed to intrinsic chemical properties of the chromophore. Evidently, the special beta-can structure of the protein provides shielding of the chromophore from the surroundings without significantly changing the electronic structure of the chromophore through interactions with amino acid side chains.

  20. A codon-optimized green fluorescent protein for live cell imaging in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilaru, S; Schuster, M; Studholme, D; Soanes, D; Lin, C; Talbot, N J; Steinberg, G

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools to investigate intracellular dynamics and protein localization. Cytoplasmic expression of FPs in fungal pathogens allows greater insight into invasion strategies and the host-pathogen interaction. Detection of their fluorescent signal depends on the right combination of microscopic setup and signal brightness. Slow rates of photo-bleaching are pivotal for in vivo observation of FPs over longer periods of time. Here, we test green-fluorescent proteins, including Aequorea coerulescens GFP (AcGFP), enhanced GFP (eGFP) from Aequorea victoria and a novel Zymoseptoria tritici codon-optimized eGFP (ZtGFP), for their usage in conventional and laser-enhanced epi-fluorescence, and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. We show that eGFP, expressed cytoplasmically in Z. tritici, is significantly brighter and more photo-stable than AcGFP. The codon-optimized ZtGFP performed even better than eGFP, showing significantly slower bleaching and a 20-30% further increase in signal intensity. Heterologous expression of all GFP variants did not affect pathogenicity of Z. tritici. Our data establish ZtGFP as the GFP of choice to investigate intracellular protein dynamics in Z. tritici, but also infection stages of this wheat pathogen inside host tissue. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S G; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolution beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub-30-nm resolution structural images and ∼90-nm-resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.

  2. Development and validation of a custom made indocyanine green fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotta, Olivia J; van Zanten, Malou; McEwen, Mark; Burrow, Lynne; Beesley, Jack; Piller, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Lymphoedema is a chronic progressive condition often producing significant morbidity. An in-depth understanding of an individual's lymphatic architecture is valuable both in the understanding of underlying pathology and for targeting and tailoring treatment. Severe lower limb injuries resulting in extensive loss of soft tissue require transposition of a flap consisting of muscle and/or soft tissue to close the defect. These patients are at risk of lymphoedema and little is known about lymphatic regeneration within the flap. Indocyanine green (ICG), a water-soluble dye, has proven useful for the imaging of lymphatic vessels. When injected into superficial tissues it binds to plasma proteins in lymph. By exposing the dye to specific wavelengths of light, ICG fluoresces with near-infrared light. Skin is relatively transparent to ICG fluorescence, enabling the visualization and characterization of superficial lymphatic vessels. An ICG fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager was manufactured to excite ICG and visualize real-time fluorescence as it travels through the lymphatic vessels. Animal studies showed successful ICG excitation and detection using this imager. Clinically, the imager has assisted researchers to visualize otherwise hidden superficial lymphatic pathways in patients postflap surgery. Preliminary results suggest superficial lymphatic vessels do not redevelop in muscle flaps.

  3. Development and validation of a custom made indocyanine green fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotta, Olivia J.; van Zanten, Malou; McEwen, Mark; Burrow, Lynne; Beesley, Jack; Piller, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Lymphoedema is a chronic progressive condition often producing significant morbidity. An in-depth understanding of an individual's lymphatic architecture is valuable both in the understanding of underlying pathology and for targeting and tailoring treatment. Severe lower limb injuries resulting in extensive loss of soft tissue require transposition of a flap consisting of muscle and/or soft tissue to close the defect. These patients are at risk of lymphoedema and little is known about lymphatic regeneration within the flap. Indocyanine green (ICG), a water-soluble dye, has proven useful for the imaging of lymphatic vessels. When injected into superficial tissues it binds to plasma proteins in lymph. By exposing the dye to specific wavelengths of light, ICG fluoresces with near-infrared light. Skin is relatively transparent to ICG fluorescence, enabling the visualization and characterization of superficial lymphatic vessels. An ICG fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager was manufactured to excite ICG and visualize real-time fluorescence as it travels through the lymphatic vessels. Animal studies showed successful ICG excitation and detection using this imager. Clinically, the imager has assisted researchers to visualize otherwise hidden superficial lymphatic pathways in patients postflap surgery. Preliminary results suggest superficial lymphatic vessels do not redevelop in muscle flaps.

  4. Using green fluorescent malaria parasites to screen for permissive vector mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Beatrice

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Plasmodium species that infect rodents, particularly Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium yoelii, are useful to investigate host-parasite interactions. The mosquito species that act as vectors of human plasmodia in South East Asia, Africa and South America show different susceptibilities to infection by rodent Plasmodium species. P. berghei and P. yoelii infect both Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi, which are found mainly in Africa and Asia, respectively. However, it was reported that P. yoelii can infect the South American mosquito, Anopheles albimanus, while P. berghei cannot. Methods P. berghei lines that express the green fluorescent protein were used to screen for mosquitoes that are susceptible to infection by P. berghei. Live mosquitoes were examined and screened for the presence of a fluorescent signal in the abdomen. Infected mosquitoes were then examined by time-lapse microscopy to reveal the dynamic behaviour of sporozoites in haemolymph and extracted salivary glands. Results A single fluorescent oocyst can be detected in live mosquitoes and P. berghei can infect A. albimanus. As in other mosquitoes, P. berghei sporozoites can float through the haemolymph and invade A. albimanus salivary glands and they are infectious in mice after subcutaneous injection. Conclusion Fluorescent Plasmodium parasites can be used to rapidly screen susceptible mosquitoes. These results open the way to develop a laboratory model in countries where importation of A. gambiae and A. stephensi is not allowed.

  5. Green synthesis of highly fluorescent carbon quantum dots from sugarcane bagasse pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thambiraj, S. [Nano-Bio Materials and Sensors Laboratory, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Coimbatore, 641 004, Tamil Nadu (India); Ravi Shankaran, D., E-mail: dravishankaran@hotmail.com [Nano-Bio Materials and Sensors Laboratory, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Coimbatore, 641 004, Tamil Nadu (India); National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai, 600 025, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-12-30

    Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of CQDs from sugarcane bagasse carbon. - Highlights: • CQDs were synthesised from sugarcane bagasse waste with top down approaches. • Synthesis method is green, simple and efficient process. • CQDs possess high quantum yield, good stability and highly fluorescent in nature. • The morphological and topographical study of CQDs was done by HR-TEM and AFM and was observed that the average size is 4.1 ± 0.17 nm and surface thickness is 5 nm. - Abstract: Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have great potential due to its advantageous characteristics of highly fluorescent nature and good stability. In this study, we aimed to develop a simple and efficient method for the green synthesis of fluorescent CQDs from sugarcane bagasse, a renewable and sustainable resource. The process involves the top down approach of chemical oxidation followed by exfoliation of sugarcane carbon. The synthesized CQDs was characterized by UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, Spectrofluorophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The synthesized CQDs possess stable fluorescent properties, good bio-compatibility and high quantum yield. The CQDs are highly crystalline with longitudinal dimensions of 4.1 ± 0.17 nm with an average roughness of around 5 nm. The XRD and TEM analysis indicates that the synthesized CQDs possess face centred cubic crystal structure. The results suggest that the proposed CQDs could be utilized for bio-sensor, bio-imaging and drug delivery applications.

  6. POLA EKSPRESI GEN ENHANCED GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN PADA EMBRIO DAN LARVA IKAN PATIN SIAM (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raden Roro Sri Pudji Sinarni Dewi

    2016-04-01

    menggunakan gen reporter berguna untuk mendesain konstruksi gen yang akan digunakan pada penelitian transgenesis. Gen reporter yang umum digunakan dalam penelitian ekspresi sementara transgen adalah gen GFP (green fluorescent protein. Pengamatan gen EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein pada embrio dan larva ikan patin siam (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus ditujukan untuk mendapatkan informasi mengenai kemampuan promoter -aktin ikan mas dalam mengendalikan ekspresi gen EGFP. Gen EGFP diintroduksikan ke dalam sperma ikan patin siam menggunakan metode elektroporasi. Sperma yang telah dielektroporasi digunakan untuk membuahi sel telur ikan patin siam. Pengamatan ekspresi gen EGFP dilakukan setiap enam jam dimulai dari embrio fase 2 sel sampai larva. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, gen EGFP terekspresi pada fase embrio dan larva ikan patin siam. Puncak ekspresi gen EGFP terjadi pada fase neurula dan menurun pada fase larva. Berdasarkan penelitian ini maka ikan patin siam transgenik telah berhasil dibentuk dan promoter -aktin ikan mas terbukti aktif dalam mengarahkan ekspresi gen asing (GFP di dalam tubuh ikan patin siam.

  7. Two-color RESOLFT nanoscopy with green and red fluorescent photochromic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Cardinal, Flavie; Jensen, Nickels A; Westphal, Volker; Stiel, Andre C; Chmyrov, Andriy; Bierwagen, Jakob; Testa, Ilaria; Jakobs, Stefan; Hell, Stefan W

    2014-03-17

    Up to now, all demonstrations of reversible saturable optical fluorescence transitions (RESOLFT) superresolution microscopy of living cells have relied on the use of reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFP) emitting in the green spectral range. Here we show RESOLFT imaging with rsCherryRev1.4, a new red-emitting RSFP enabling a spatial resolution up to four times higher than the diffraction barrier. By co-expressing green and red RSFPs in living cells we demonstrate two-color RESOLFT imaging both for single ("donut") beam scanning and for parallelized versions of RESOLFT nanoscopy where an array of >23,000 "donut-like" minima are scanned simultaneously. ©2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH&Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

  8. Expression of pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseyko, N.; Feldman, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    This is the first report on using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a pH reporter in plants. Proton fluxes and pH regulation play important roles in plant cellular activity and therefore, it would be extremely helpful to have a plant gene reporter system for rapid, non-invasive visualization of intracellular pH changes. In order to develop such a system, we constructed three vectors for transient and stable transformation of plant cells with a pH-sensitive derivative of green fluorescent protein. Using these vectors, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco plants were produced. Here the application of pH-sensitive GFP technology in plants is described and, for the first time, the visualization of pH gradients between different developmental compartments in intact whole-root tissues of A. thaliana is reported. The utility of pH-sensitive GFP in revealing rapid, environmentally induced changes in cytoplasmic pH in roots is also demonstrated.

  9. Use of green fluorescent protein for visualization of cell-specific gene expression and subcellular protein localization during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, C D; Decatur, A; Teleman, A; Losick, R

    1995-01-01

    We report the use of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria to visualize cell-specific gene expression and protein subcellular localization during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. Sporangia bearing the gene (gfp) for the green fluorescent protein fused to genes under the control of the sporulation transcription factor sigma F exhibited a forespore-specific pattern of fluorescence. Forespore-specific fluorescence could be detected with fusions to promoters that are utilized ...

  10. Applicability of radiocolloids, blue dyes and fluorescent indocyanine green to sentinel node biopsy in melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhara, Hisashi; Takata, Minoru; Yamazaki, Naoya

    2012-01-01

    Patients with primary cutaneous melanoma underwent sentinel node (SN) mapping and biopsy at 25 facilities in Japan by the combination of radiocolloid with gamma probe and dye. Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc)-tin colloid, 99m Tc-phytate, 2% patent blue violet (PBV) and 0.4% indigo carmine were used as tracers. In some hospitals, 0.5% fluorescent indocyanine green, which allows visualization of the SN with an infrared camera, was concomitantly used and examined. A total of 673 patients were enrolled, and 562 cases were eligible. The detection rates of SN were 95.5% (147/154) with the combination of tin colloid and PBV, 98.9% (368/372) with the combination of phytate and PBV, and 97.2% (35/36) with the combination of tin colloid or phytate and indigo carmine. SN was not detected in 12 cases by the combination method, and the primary tumor was in the head and neck in six of those 12 cases. In eight of 526 cases (1.5%), SN was detected by PBV but not by radiocolloid. There were 13 cases (2.5%) in which SN was detected by radiocolloid but not by PBV. In 18 of 36 cases (50%), SN was detected by radiocolloid but not by indigo carmine. Concomitantly used fluorescent indocyanine green detected SN in all of 67 cases. Interference with transcutaneous oximetry by PVB was observed in some cases, although it caused no clinical trouble. Allergic reactions were not reported with any of the tracers. 99m Tc-tin colloid, 99m Tc-phytate, PBV and indocyanine green are useful tracers for SN mapping. (author)

  11. Modulating fluorescence quantum yield of highly concentrated fluorescein using differently shaped green synthesized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Jisha; Thomas, Lincy; Kurian, Achamma; George, Sajan D.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of dye molecules with differently shaped nanoparticles is of great interest owing to the potential applications in areas of bioimaging, sensing and photodynamic therapy (biology) as well as solar cells (photonics) applications. For such applications, noble metallic nanoparticles are commonly employed to either enhance or quench the luminescence of a nearby fluorophore. However, in most of the studies, the dye concentration is limited to avoid self-quenching. This paper reports the influence of differently shaped gold nanoparticles (spherical, bean and star), prepared via green synthesis, on the emission behavior as well as on the fluorescence quantum yield of fluorescein dye at concentrations for which self-quenching occurs. The emission behavior is probed via laser based steady state fluorescence whereas quantum yield is measured using a dual beam laser based thermal lens technique. The experimentally observed fluorescence quenching with a concomitant increase in thermal lens signal in the vicinity of nanoparticles are explained in terms of nonradiative energy transfer between the donor and the acceptor. Further, the influence of pH of the prepared gold nanofluid on the absorption, emission as well as quantum yield are also accounted. These studies elucidate that even at high concentrations of dye, the gold nanoparticle and its shape clearly influences the optical properties of nearby dye molecules and thus can be exploited for future applications. - Highlights: • Green synthesis of differently shaped gold nanoparticles. • Tailoring emission properties of fluorescein with respect to nanoparticle concentration and shape. • Tailoring the quantum yield of highly concentrated fluorescein with nanoparticles.

  12. Green synthesis of highly fluorescent carbon quantum dots from sugarcane bagasse pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thambiraj, S.; Ravi Shankaran, D.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have great potential due to its advantageous characteristics of highly fluorescent nature and good stability. In this study, we aimed to develop a simple and efficient method for the green synthesis of fluorescent CQDs from sugarcane bagasse, a renewable and sustainable resource. The process involves the top down approach of chemical oxidation followed by exfoliation of sugarcane carbon. The synthesized CQDs was characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, Spectrofluorophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The synthesized CQDs possess stable fluorescent properties, good bio-compatibility and high quantum yield. The CQDs are highly crystalline with longitudinal dimensions of 4.1 ± 0.17 nm with an average roughness of around 5 nm. The XRD and TEM analysis indicates that the synthesized CQDs possess face centred cubic crystal structure. The results suggest that the proposed CQDs could be utilized for bio-sensor, bio-imaging and drug delivery applications.

  13. Green fluorescent protein/beta-galactosidase double reporters for visualizing Drosophila gene expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, L; Becker, J; Barthmaier, P; Fyrberg, C; Shearn, A; Fyrberg, E

    1997-01-01

    We characterized 120 novel yeast Ga14-targeted enhancer trap lines in Drosophila using upstream activating sequence (UAS) reporter plasmids incorporating newly constructed fusions of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase genes. Direct comparisons of GFP epifluorescence and beta-galactosidase staining revealed that both proteins function comparably to their unconjugated counterparts within a wide variety of Drosophila tissues. Generally, both reporters accumulated in similar patterns within individual lines, but in some tissues, e.g., brain, GFP staining was more reliable than that of beta-galactosidase, whereas in other tissues, most notably tests and ovaries, the converse was true. In cases of weak enhancers, we occasionally could detect beta-galactosidase staining in the absence of discernible GFP fluorescence. This shortcoming of GFP can, in most cases, be alleviated by using the more efficient S65T GFP derivative. The GFP/beta-gal reporter fusion protein facilitated monitoring several aspects of protein accumulation. In particular, the ability to visualize GFP fluorescence enhances recognition of global static and dynamic patterns in live animals, whereas beta-galactosidase histochemistry affords sensitive high resolution protein localization. We present a catalog of Ga 14-expressing strains that will be useful for investigating several aspects of Drosophila melanogaster cell and developmental biology.

  14. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-06-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians.

  15. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model for Protein Crystal Growth Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, Sabine; Smith, Lori; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea Victoria has become a popular marker for e.g. mutagenesis work. Its fluorescent property, which originates from a chromophore located in the center of the molecule, makes it widely applicable as a research too]. GFP clones have been produced with a variety of spectral properties, such as blue and yellow emitting species. The protein is a single chain of molecular weight 27 kDa and its structure has been determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution. The combination of GFP's fluorescent property, the knowledge of its several crystallization conditions, and its increasing use in biophysical and biochemical studies, all led us to consider it as a model material for macromolecular crystal growth studies. Initial preparations of GFP were from E.coli with yields of approximately 5 mg/L of culture media. Current yields are now in the 50 - 120 mg/L range, and we hope to further increase this by expression of the GFP gene in the Pichia system. The results of these efforts and of preliminary crystal growth studies will be presented.

  16. Confinement effect of organic nanotubes toward green fluorescent protein (GFP) depending on the inner diameter size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameta, Naohiro; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Someya, Yuu; Yui, Hiroharu; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Shimizu, Toshimi

    2010-04-12

    Transportation, release behavior, and stability of a green fluorescent protein (GFP, 3x4 nm) in self-assembled organic nanotubes with three different inner diameters (10, 20, and 80 nm) have been studied in terms of novel nanocontainers. Selective immobilization of a fluorescent acceptor dye on the inner surface enabled us to not only visualize the transportation of GFP in the nanochannels but to also detect release of the encapsulated GFP to the bulk solution in real time, based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Obtained diffusion constants and release rates of GFP markedly decreased as the inner diameter of the nanotubes was decreased. An endo-sensing procedure also clarified the dependence of the thermal and chemical stabilities of the GFP on the inner diameters. The GFP encapsulated in the 10 nm nanochannel showed strong resistance to heat and to a denaturant. On the other hand, the 20 nm nanochannel accelerated the denaturation of the encapsulated GFP compared with the rate of denaturation of the free GFP in bulk and the encapsulated GFP in the 80 nm nanochannels. The confinement effect based on rational fitting of the inner diameter to the size of GFP allowed us to store it stably and without denaturation under high temperatures and high denaturant concentrations.

  17. Green fluorescent protein (GFP): is seeing believing and is that enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, Susan A; Pettit, Marie W; Dyer, Paul D R; Coakley Youngs, Emma; Gorringe-Pattrick, Monique A M; El-Daher, Samer; Richardson, Simon

    Intracellular compartmentalisation is a significant barrier to the successful nucleocytosolic delivery of biologics. The endocytic system has been shown to be responsible for compartmentalisation, providing an entry point, and trigger(s) for the activation of drug delivery systems. Consequently, many of the technologies used to understand endocytosis have found utility within the field of drug delivery. The use of fluorescent proteins as markers denoting compartmentalisation within the endocytic system has become commonplace. Several of the limitations associated with the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) within the context of drug delivery have been explored here by asking a series of related questions: (1) Are molecules that regulate fusion to a specific compartment (i.e. Rab- or SNARE-GFP fusions) a good choice of marker for that compartment? (2) How reliable was GFP-marker overexpression when used to define a given endocytic compartment? (3) Can glutathione-s-transferase (GST) fused in frame with GFP (GST-GFP) act as a fluid phase endocytic probe? (4) Was GFP fluorescence a robust indicator of (GFP) protein integrity? This study concluded that there are many appropriate and useful applications for GFP; however, thought and an understanding of the biological and physicochemical character of these markers are required for the generation of meaningful data.

  18. Reporter mice express green fluorescent protein at initiation of meiosis in spermatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Paula R; Odet, Fanny; Bortner, Carl D; Eddy, Edward M

    2014-12-01

    Transgenic mice were generated using a heat shock protein 2 (Hspa2) gene promoter to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) at the beginning of meiotic prophase I in spermatocytes. Expression was confirmed in four lines by in situ fluorescence, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and PCR assays. The expression and distribution of the GFP and HSPA2 proteins co-localized in spermatocytes and spermatids in three lines, but GFP expression was variegated in one line (F46), being present in some clones of meiotic and post-meiotic germ cells and not in others. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to isolate purified populations of spermatocytes and spermatids. Although bisulfite sequencing revealed differences in the DNA methylation patterns in the promoter regions of the transgene of the variegated expressing GFP line, a uniformly expressing GFP reporter line, and the Hspa2 gene, these differences did not correlate with variegated expression. The Hspa2-GFP reporter mice provide a novel tool for studies of meiosis by allowing detection of GFP in situ and in isolated spermatogenic cells. They will allow sorting of meiotic and post-meiotic germ cells for characterization of molecular features and correlation of expression of GFP with stage-specific spermatogenic cell proteins and developmental events. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Use of Green Fluorescent Protein To Detect Expression of an Endopolygalacturonase Gene of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum during Bean Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Dumas, Bernard; Centis, Sylvie; Sarrazin, Nathalie; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse

    1999-01-01

    The 5′ noncoding region of clpg2, an endopolygalacturonase gene of the bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, was fused to the coding sequence of a gene encoding a green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the construct was introduced into the fungal genome. Detection of GFP accumulation by fluorescence microscopy examination revealed that clpg2 was expressed at the early stages of germination of the conidia and during appressorium formation both in vitro and on the host plant.

  20. Transcript and protein expression profile of PF11_0394, a Plasmodium falciparum protein expressed in salivary gland sporozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlarman Maggie S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a significant problem around the world today, thus there is still a need for new control methods to be developed. Because the sporozoite displays dual infectivity for both the mosquito salivary glands and vertebrate host tissue, it is a good target for vaccine development. Methods The P. falciparum gene, PF11_0394, was chosen as a candidate for study due to its potential role in the invasion of host tissues. This gene, which was selected using a data mining approach from PlasmoDB, is expressed both at the transcriptional and protein levels in sporozoites and likely encodes a putative surface protein. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and green fluorescent protein (GFP-trafficking studies, a transcript and protein expression profile of PF11_0394 was determined. Results The PF11_0394 protein has orthologs in other Plasmodium species and Apicomplexans, but none outside of the group Apicomplexa. PF11_0394 transcript was found to be present during both the sporozoite and erythrocytic stages of the parasite life cycle, but no transcript was detected during axenic exoerythrocytic stages. Despite the presence of transcript throughout several life cycle stages, the PF11_0394 protein was only detected in salivary gland sporozoites. Conclusions PF11_0394 appears to be a protein uniquely detected in salivary gland sporozoites. Even though a specific function of PF11_0394 has not been determined in P. falciparum biology, it could be another candidate for a new vaccine.

  1. Recombination-stable multimeric green fluorescent protein for characterization of weak promoter outputs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Knuf, Christoph; Förster, Jochen; Sommer, Morten O A

    2015-12-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are widely used for visualization of proteins to track localization and expression dynamics. However, phenotypically important processes can operate at too low expression levels for routine detection, i.e. be overshadowed by autofluorescence noise. While GFP functions well in translational fusions, the use of tandem GFPs to amplify fluorescence signals is currently avoided in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many other microorganisms due to the risk of loop-out by direct-repeat recombination. We increased GFP fluorescence by translationally fusing three different GFP variants, yeast-enhanced GFP, GFP+ and superfolder GFP to yield a sequence-diverged triple GFP molecule 3vGFP with 74-84% internal repeat identity. Unlike a single GFP, the brightness of 3vGFP allowed characterization of a weak promoter in S. cerevisiae. Utilizing 3vGFP, we further engineered a less leaky Cu(2+)-inducible promoter based on CUP1. The basal expression level of the new promoter was approximately 61% below the wild-type CUP1 promoter, thus expanding the absolute range of Cu(2+)-based gene control. The stability of 3vGFP towards direct-repeat recombination was assayed in S. cerevisiae cultured for 25 generations under strong and slightly toxic expression after which only limited reduction in fluorescence was detectable. Such non-recombinogenic GFPs can help quantify intracellular responses operating a low copy number in recombination-prone organisms. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. In Vitro Osteogenic Potential of Green Fluorescent Protein Labelled Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Osteoprogenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intekhab Islam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy using stem cells in bone regeneration has gained increasing interest. Various studies suggest the clinical utility of osteoprogenitors-like mesenchymal stem cells in bone regeneration. However, limited availability of mesenchymal stem cells and conflicting evidence on their therapeutic efficacy limit their clinical application. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are potentially an unlimited source of healthy and functional osteoprogenitors (OPs that could be utilized for bone regenerative applications. However, limited ability to track hESC-derived progenies in vivo greatly hinders translational studies. Hence, in this study, we aimed to establish hESC-derived OPs (hESC-OPs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP and to investigate their osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro. We fluorescently labelled H9-hESCs using a plasmid vector encoding GFP. The GFP-expressing hESCs were differentiated into hESC-OPs. The hESC-OPsGFP+ stably expressed high levels of GFP, CD73, CD90, and CD105. They possessed osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro as demonstrated by increased expression of COL1A1, RUNX2, OSTERIX, and OPG transcripts and mineralized nodules positive for Alizarin Red and immunocytochemical expression of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and collagen-I. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs can maintain their GFP expression for the long term and their potential for osteogenic differentiation in vitro. In future, these fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs could be used for noninvasive assessment of bone regeneration, safety, and therapeutic efficacy.

  3. Engineering a novel multifunctional green fluorescent protein tag for a wide variety of protein research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetically encoded tag is a powerful tool for protein research. Various kinds of tags have been developed: fluorescent proteins for live-cell imaging, affinity tags for protein isolation, and epitope tags for immunological detections. One of the major problems concerning the protein tagging is that many constructs with different tags have to be made for different applications, which is time- and resource-consuming. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report a novel multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP tag which was engineered by inserting multiple peptide tags, i.e., octa-histidine (8xHis, streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP, and c-Myc tag, in tandem into a loop of GFP. When fused to various proteins, mfGFP monitored their localization in living cells. Streptavidin agarose column chromatography with the SBP tag successfully isolated the protein complexes in a native form with a high purity. Tandem affinity purification (TAP with 8xHis and SBP tags in mfGFP further purified the protein complexes. mfGFP was clearly detected by c-Myc-specific antibody both in immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy (EM. These findings indicate that mfGFP works well as a multifunctional tag in mammalian cells. The tag insertion was also successful in other fluorescent protein, mCherry. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The multifunctional fluorescent protein tag is a useful tool for a wide variety of protein research, and may have the advantage over other multiple tag systems in its higher expandability and compatibility with existing and future tag technologies.

  4. Chimeric green fluorescent protein as a tool for visualizing subcellular organelles in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuto, R; Brini, M; Pizzo, P; Murgia, M; Pozzan, T

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria retains its fluorescent properties when recombinantly expressed in both prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) and eukaryotic (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster) living cells; it can therefore be used as a powerful marker of gene expression in vivo. The specific targeting of recombinant GFP within cells would allow it to be used for even more applications, but no information is yet available on the possibility of targeting GFP to intracellular organelles. In this study, we show that the GFP cDNA can be expressed at high levels in cultured mammalian cells; the recombinant polypeptide is highly fluorescent and is exclusively localized in the cytosol. Furthermore, we have modified the GFP cDNA to include a mitochondrial targeting sequence (and a strong immunological epitope at the amino terminus of the encoded polypeptide). When transiently transfected into mammalian cells, this construct drives the expression of a strongly fluorescent GFP chimera which selectively localizes to the mitochondria. We also describe two of the many possible applications of this recombinant GFP in physiological studies. The targeted chimera allows the visualization of mitochondrial movement in living cells. Also, unlike dyes such as rhodamine, it reveals morphological changes induced in mitochondria by drugs that collapse the organelle membrane potential. Moreover, when GFP is cotransfected with a membrane receptor, such as the alpha 1-adrenergic receptor, the fluorescence of the GFP in intact cells can be used in recognizing the transfected cells. Thus, specific changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration that occur in cells expressing the recombinant receptor can be identified using a classical fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. GFP is an invaluable new tool for studies of molecular biology and cell physiology. As a marker of transfection in vivo, it provides a simple means of

  5. Developing a genetically encoded green fluorescent protein mutant for sensitive light-up fluorescent sensing and cellular imaging of Hg(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Guo, Daiping; Wang, Qian; Wu, Xin; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Zhenhua; Yin, Boyuan; Xia, Lin; Tang, Jixian; Luo, Wenxin; Xia, Ningshao; Jiang, Yunbao

    2015-05-30

    Hg(II) is well-known for quenching fluorescence in a distance dependent manner. Nevertheless, when we exposed the fluorophore of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) toward Hg(II), through H148C mutation, the GFP fluorescence could be "lighted up" by Hg(II) down to sub-nM level. The detection linear range is 0.5-3.0 nM for protein solutions at 8.0 nM. The GFPH148C protein displayed a promising selectivity toward Hg(II) and also the cellular imaging capacity. Spectra measurements suggested that the ground-state redistribution of protein contributed to the fluorescence enhancement, which was found not limited to Hg(II), and thus presented an opening for building a pool of GFP-based chemosensors toward other heavy metal ions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein in parasitic dodder as a tool for studying of cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaštier Peter

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dodder (Cuscuta species cause severe agricultural damage in many countries throughout the world. To establish strategies for control of its growth and spreading it is important to study its life cycle and survival strategies. For these efforts genetic modification would represent a powerful tool. Here we report on Agrobacteriummediated transformation of dodder using green fluorescent protein (GFP fused to actin-binding protein as a vital marker. Since the shoot of germinating C. europaea contains a functional apical meristem and grows quickly comparing to the root-like structure, the shoot apex was used here as explant. The transgene expression was only transient, nevertheless it enabled to detect allocation of actin filaments and studying the cytoskeleton organization in dodder shoot apex. Transient expression of GFP appears to be a suitable method for studying Cuscuta development through cytoskeleton organisation that is presently largely unexplored.

  7. Evidence of green fluorescent protein and growth hormone expression in red abalone (Haliotis rufescens larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancilla-Sánchez Edgar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The red abalone Haliotis rufescens is a highly appreciated mollusk in the national and international markets. Due to its natural over-exploitation and low growth rate, several genetic improvements were made, however special efforts are needed to increase its production. This study presents transgenic abalone’s larvae expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP fused to Cobia (Rachycentron canadum Growth Hormone (GH using sperm media transgenesis technique (SMT, pAcGFP1-N vector under the control of cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. Sperms were exposed to three voltages (0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 Kv using a micropulser electroporator (Bio-Rad®. The highest GFP-GH expression average (40% was obtained in abalone larvae at 0.75 v. GFP and GH transgenes were positively detected by PCR, western blot and confocal microscope, respectively.

  8. Application of split-green fluorescent protein for topology mapping membrane proteins in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toddo, Stephen; Soderstrom, Bill; Palombo, Isolde

    2012-01-01

    /periplasmic location of the N-terminus of a protein. Here, we show that the bimolecular split-green fluorescent protein complementation system can overcome this limitation and can be used to determine the location of both the N- and C-termini of inner membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.......A topology map of a membrane protein defines the location of transmembrane helices and the orientation of soluble domains relative to the membrane. In the absence of a high-resolution structure, a topology map is an essential guide for studying structurefunction relationships. Although these maps...... can be predicted directly from amino acid sequence, the predictions are more accurate if combined with experimental data, which are usually obtained by fusing a reporter protein to the C-terminus of the protein. However, as reporter proteins are large, they cannot be used to report on the cytoplasmic...

  9. Application of split-green fluorescent protein for topology mapping membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toddo, Stephen; Söderström, Bill; Palombo, Isolde; von Heijne, Gunnar; Nørholm, Morten H H; Daley, Daniel O

    2012-10-01

    A topology map of a membrane protein defines the location of transmembrane helices and the orientation of soluble domains relative to the membrane. In the absence of a high-resolution structure, a topology map is an essential guide for studying structure-function relationships. Although these maps can be predicted directly from amino acid sequence, the predictions are more accurate if combined with experimental data, which are usually obtained by fusing a reporter protein to the C-terminus of the protein. However, as reporter proteins are large, they cannot be used to report on the cytoplasmic/periplasmic location of the N-terminus of a protein. Here, we show that the bimolecular split-green fluorescent protein complementation system can overcome this limitation and can be used to determine the location of both the N- and C-termini of inner membrane proteins in Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  10. Protein knockouts in living eukaryotes using deGradFP and green fluorescent protein fusion targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caussinus, Emmanuel; Kanca, Oguz; Affolter, Markus

    2013-09-24

    This unit describes deGradFP (degrade Green Fluorescent Protein), an easy-to-implement protein knockout method applicable in any eukaryotic genetic system. Depleting a protein in order to study its function in a living organism is usually achieved at the gene level (genetic mutations) or at the RNA level (RNA interference and morpholinos). However, any system that acts upstream of the proteic level depends on the turnover rate of the existing target protein, which can be extremely slow. In contrast, deGradFP is a fast method that directly depletes GFP fusion proteins. In particular, deGradFP is able to counteract maternal effects in embryos and causes early and fast onset loss-of-function phenotypes of maternally contributed proteins. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. The effect of oxidation on the electronic structure of the green fluorescent protein chromophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epifanovsky, E.; Polyakov, I.; Grigorenko, B.; Nemukhin, A.; Krylov, A. I.

    2010-03-01

    Electronic structure calculations of the singly and doubly ionized states of deprotonated 4'-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone (HBDI anion) are presented. One-electron oxidation produces a doublet radical that has blueshifted absorption, whereas the detachment of two electrons yields a closed-shell cation with strongly redshifted (by about 0.6 eV) absorption relative to the HBDI anion. The results suggest that the doubly oxidized species may be responsible for oxidative redding of green fluorescent protein. The proposed mechanism involves two-step oxidation via electronically excited states and is consistent with the available experimental information [A. M. Bogdanov, A. S. Mishin, I. V. Yampolsky, et al., Nat. Chem. Biol. 5, 459 (2009)]. The spectroscopic signatures of the ionization-induced structural changes in the chromophore are also discussed.

  12. Relaxation of green fluorescent protein chromophore anion observed by photodissociation in an electrostatic storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, T.; Saito, M.; Noda, K.

    2011-04-01

    The gas-phase absorption properties of the green fluorescent protein chromophore anion were studied using an electrostatic storage ring. The time sequence of neutral particles produced by photodissociation was detected following laser irradiation. The lifetimes of the photo-absorbed ions depended on their storage time in an ion trap before injection into the storage ring. The lifetime increased with the storage time and saturated, indicating a change in the population of rovibrationally excited states with respect to the storage time. Photodissociation neutral spectrum of the relaxed ions measured as a function of the laser wavelength was characterized by a narrow asymmetric shape, which was in good agreement with the photo fragment ion action spectrum reported recently.

  13. Efficient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) mediated by a chimeric promoter in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinxia; Hu, Zhangli; Wang, Chaogang; Li, Shuangfei; Lei, Anping

    2008-08-01

    To improve the expression efficiency of exogenous genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a high efficient expression vector was constructed. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was expressed in C. reinhardtii under the control of promoters: RBCS2 and HSP70A-RBCS2. Efficiency of transformation and expression were compared between two transgenic algae: RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-I and HSP70A-RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-II. Results show that HSP70A-RBCS2 could improve greatly the transformation efficiency by approximately eightfold of RBCS2, and the expression efficiency of GFP in Tran-II was at least double of that in Tran-I. In addition, a threefold increase of GFP in Tran-II was induced by heat shock at 40°C. All of the results demonstrated that HSP70A-RBCS2 was more efficient than RBCS2 in expressing exogenous gene in C. reinhardtii.

  14. Green fluorescent protein as a vital marker and reporter of gene expression in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, E; Gustafson, K; Boulianne, G L

    1995-07-18

    We have used the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria as a vital marker/reporter in Drosophila melanogaster. Transgenic flies were generated in which GFP was expressed under the transcriptional control of the yeast upstream activating sequence that is recognized by GAL4. These flies were crossed to several GAL4 enhancer trap lines, and expression of GFP was monitored in a variety of tissues during development using confocal microscopy. Here, we show that GFP could be detected in freshly dissected ovaries, imaginal discs, and the larval nervous system without prior fixation or the addition of substrates or antibodies. We also show that expression of GFP could be monitored in intact living embryos and larvae and in cultured egg chambers, allowing us to visualize dynamic changes in gene expression during real time.

  15. Sequential melting of two hydrophobic clusters within the green fluorescent protein GFP-cycle3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Tatiana N; Povarnitsyna, Tatiana V; Glukhov, Anatoly S; Uversky, Vladimir N; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2011-09-13

    The analysis of the three-dimensional structure of green fluorescent protein (GFP-cycle3) revealed the presence of two well-defined hydrophobic clusters located on the opposite sides of the GFP β-can that might contribute to the formation of partially folded intermediate(s) during GFP unfolding. The microcalorimetric analysis of the nonequilibrium melting of GFP-cycle3 and its two mutants, I14A and I161A, revealed that due to the sequential melting of the mentioned hydrophobic clusters, the temperature-induced denaturation of this protein most likely occurs in three stages. The first and second stages involve melting of a smaller hydrophobic cluster formed around the residue I161, whereas a larger hydrophobic cluster (formed around the residues I14) is melted only at the last GFP-cycle3 denaturation step or remains rather structured even in the denatured state.

  16. Green synthesis of 1,4-quinone derivatives and evaluation of their fluorescent and electrochemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanisamy Ravichandiran

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Green synthesis of some 1,4-quinone derivatives by conventional and solvent free microwave assisted methods has been reported. The microwave assisted method resulted in higher percentage yield at shorter time compared to the conventional one. In the conventional method environmentally friendly solvent was used and the results were compared with other solvents. When water was used as a solvent the reaction exhibited higher yield than other solvents like ethanol. The solvent free method under microwave irradiation method yielded the highest yield compared to the conventional methods. The resultant compounds were analyzed by UV–Vis, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The synthesized quinone derivatives exhibited the fluorescent and electrochemical properties.

  17. The lineshape of the electronic spectrum of the green fluorescent protein chromophore, part I: gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Mehdi D; Ferrer, Francisco J Avila; Morozov, Dmitry; Santoro, Fabrizio; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2014-10-20

    In this work we present the vibrationally resolved optical absorption spectrum of p-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone (HBDI), the green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore, computed at several levels of theory, including time-dependent DFT with various functionals and basis sets, CASSCF, CASPT2 and XMCQDPT2. We also investigated what happens to the spectrum if the ground- and excited-state geometries are optimized at different levels of theory (mixed approach), as has been used previously. The vibrationally resolved absorption spectra obtained by DFT, CASPT2 and XMCQDPT2 are very similar and consist of a main absorption peak and a shoulder that is ∼1500 cm(-1) higher in energy. The vibrational progression increases moderately with temperature. These spectra are in qualitative agreement with experimental action spectra, but much narrower and lack the long tail in the blue, even at high temperatures. Because our calculated emission spectra, which are equally narrow, are in good agreement with the emission of green fluorescent protein at 253 K, we argue that the action spectrum are too broad to be considered as the absorption spectrum. The CASSCF method and the mixed approaches overestimate the vibrational progressions with respect to CAM-B3LYP, CASPT2 and XMCQDPT2, due to inaccuracies in the geometric S0 →S1 displacements. Finally, we computed the vibronic spectra of four chromophore analogues with different substitutions on the rings and found that these substitutions hardly affect the lineshape in vacuum. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Development of a novel fluorescent protein construct by genetically fusing green fluorescent protein to the N-terminal of aspartate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, Canan; Evran, Serap; Telefoncu, Azmi

    2013-01-01

    We developed a fluorescent protein construct by genetically fusing green fluorescent protein (GFP) to aspartate dehydrogenase from Thermotoga maritima. The fusion protein was cloned, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and purified by Ni-chelate affinity chromatography. It was then introduced into a measurement cuvette to monitor its fluorescence signal. Aspartate dehydrogenase functioned as the biorecognition element, and aspartate-induced conformational change was converted to a fluorescence signal by GFP. The recombinant protein responded to l-aspartate (l-Asp) linearly within the concentration range of 1-50 mM, and it was capable of giving a fluorescence signal in 1 Min. Although a linear response was also observed for l-Glu, the fluorescence signal was 2.7 times lower than that observed for l-Asp. In the present study, we describe two novelties: development of a genetically encoded fluorescent protein construct for monitoring of l-Asp in vitro, and employment of aspartate dehydrogenase scaffold as a biorecognition element. A few genetically encoded amino-acid biosensors have been described in the literature, but to our knowledge, a protein has not been constructed solely for determination of l-Asp. Periplasmic ligand binding proteins offer high binding affinity in the micromolar range, and they are frequently used as biorecognition elements. Instead of choosing a periplasmic l-Asp binding protein, we attempted to use the substrate specificity of aspartate dehydrogenase enzyme. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Optimization of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression from a lactose-inducible promoter in Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Arellano, Isabel; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2003-05-16

    An expression vector for Lactobacillus casei has been constructed containing the inducible lac promoter and the gene encoding ultraviolet visible green fluorescent protein (GFP(UV)) as reporter. Different conditions to grow L. casei were assayed and fluorescence as well as total protein synthesized were quantified. The maintenance of neutral pH had the greatest incidence on GFP(UV) expression, followed by aeration and a temperature of 30 degrees C. Environmental factors favoring GFP(UV) accumulation did not exactly correlate with those enhancing fluorescence. Therefore, oxygenation, by stirring the culture, had the greatest influence on the proportion of fluorescent protein, which is in accordance with the structural requirements of this protein. The highest yield obtained was 1.3 microg of GFP per mg of total protein, from which 55% was fluorescent.

  20. Concerted asynchronous hula-twist photoisomerization in the S65T/H148D mutant of green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Chen, Xuebo; Cui, Ganglong; Fang, Wei-Hai; Thiel, Walter

    2014-08-11

    Fluorescence emission of wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP) is lost in the S65T mutant, but partly recovered in the S65T/H148D double mutant. These experimental findings are rationalized by a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study at the QM(CASPT2//CASSCF)/AMBER level. A barrierless excited-state proton transfer, which is exclusively driven by the Asp148 residue introduced in the double mutant, is responsible for the ultrafast formation of the anionic fluorescent state, which can be deactivated through a concerted asynchronous hula-twist photoisomerization. This causes the lower fluorescence quantum yield in S65T/H148D compared to wild-type GFP. Hydrogen out-of-plane motion plays an important role in the deactivation of the S65T/H148D fluorescent state. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Induction of the arginine vasopressin-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion transgene in the rat locus coeruleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Todoroki, M.; Ueta, Y.; Fujihara, H.; Otsubo, H.; Shibata, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Kabayashi, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Kawata, M.; Dayanithi, Govindan; Murphy, D.; Hiro, H.; Takahashi, E.; Nagata, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2010), s. 281-292 ISSN 1025-3890 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : colchicine * green fluorescent protein * hypothalamus Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.553, year: 2010

  2. Effect of changes in chlorophyll concentration on photosynthetic properties I. Fluorescence and absorption of greening bean leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.

    1961-01-01

    In order to obtain new information about the way of functioning of chlorophyll in vivo a study was made of optical properties and photosynthesis under condition of a low chlorophyll content in the leave. It was found that the fluorescence yeild of greening bean leaves decreased from a value

  3. [In vivo expression of green fluorescent protein gene and immunogenicity of ES312 vaccine both mediated by starburst polyamidoamine dendrimers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun-Jun; Guo, Chen-Ying; Cai, Qi-Liang; Lin, Ya-Hui; Wang, Heng

    2005-08-01

    To study the expression of green fluorescent protein gene and immunogenicity of ES312 vaccine both mediated by Starburst polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers in vivo. The complex of green fluorescent protein or ES312 gene with Starburst PAMAM dendrimers were injected intramuscularly in Balb/c mice. The expression level and distribution of green fluorescent protein gene was detected by flow cytometer, Western blot and immunofluorescence assay. The immunogenicity of DNA vaccine was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of green fluorescent protein mediated by Starburst PAMAM dendrimers was found in heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, brain and injected muscle from 2 hours to 7 days after the vaccination. The highest expression level of the gene was detected in kidney, as well as in endothelial cells. The antibody response evoked by the DNA vaccine carried by the Starburst PAMAM dendrimers was significantly higher than that of the net DNA vaccination. Vaccination with Starburst PAMAM dendrimers elicited higher expression level of the gene in brain and kidney than with the net gene itself. As a novel non-viral DNA carrier with low self-antigenicity, Starburst PAMAM dendrimers have potential to mediate DNA transfer and expression in vivo.

  4. Spontaneous silencing of humanized green fluorescent protein (hGFP) gene expression from a retroviral vector by DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, G J; Nielsen, S D; Hansen, J E

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed a functional murine leukemia virus (MLV)-derived retroviral vector transducing two genes encoding the autofluorescent humanized green fluorescent protein (hGFP) and neomycin phosphotransferase (Neo). This was done to determine whether hGFP could function as a marker gene...

  5. Enhanced expression in tobacco of the gene encoding green fluorescent protein by modification of its codon usage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwendal, G.J.A.; Mendes, O.; Wolbert, E.J.H.; Boer, de A.D.

    1997-01-01

    The gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria was resynthesized to adapt its codon usage for expression in plants by increasing the frequency of codons with a C or a G in the third position from 32 to 60%. The strategy for constructing the synthetic gfp gene was based on

  6. Benchmarking Various Green Fluorescent Protein Variants in Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Lactococcus lactis for Live Cell Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overkamp, Wout; Beilharz, Katrin; Weme, Ruud Detert Oude; Solopova, Ana; Karsens, Harma; Kovacs, Akos T.; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2013-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) offers efficient ways of visualizing promoter activity and protein localization in vivo, and many different variants are currently available to study bacterial cell biology. Which of these variants is best suited for a certain bacterial strain, goal, or experimental

  7. Toward Computationally Designed Self-Reporting Biosensors Using Leave-One-Out Green Fluorescent Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao-Ming; Banerjee, Shounak; Crone, Donna E; Schenkelberg, Christian D; Pitman, Derek J; Buck, Patrick M; Bystroff, Christopher

    2015-10-13

    Leave-one-out green fluorescent protein (LOOn-GFP) is a circularly permuted and truncated GFP lacking the nth β-strand element. LOO7-GFP derived from the wild-type sequence (LOO7-WT) folds and reconstitutes fluorescence upon addition of β-strand 7 (S7) as an exogenous peptide. Computational protein design may be used to modify the sequence of LOO7-GFP to fit a different peptide sequence, while retaining the reconstitution activity. Here we present a computationally designed leave-one-out GFP in which wild-type strand 7 has been replaced by a 12-residue peptide (HA) from the H5 antigenic region of the Thailand strain of H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin. The DEEdesign software was used to generate a sequence library with mutations at 13 positions around the peptide, coding for approximately 3 × 10(5) sequence combinations. The library was coexpressed with the HA peptide in E. coli and colonies were screened for in vivo fluorescence. Glowing colonies were sequenced, and one (LOO7-HA4) with 7 mutations was purified and characterized. LOO7-HA4 folds, fluoresces in vivo and in vitro, and binds HA. However, binding results in a decrease in fluorescence instead of the expected increase, caused by the peptide-induced dissociation of a novel, glowing oligomeric complex instead of the reconstitution of the native structure. Efforts to improve binding and recover reconstitution using in vitro evolution produced colonies that glowed brighter and matured faster. Two of these were characterized. One lost all affinity for the HA peptide but glowed more brightly in the unbound oligomeric state. The other increased in affinity to the HA peptide but still did not reconstitute the fully folded state. Despite failing to fold completely, peptide binding by computational design was observed and was improved by directed evolution. The ratio of HA to S7 binding increased from 0.0 for the wild-type sequence (no binding) to 0.01 after computational design (weak binding) and to 0

  8. Functional incorporation of green fluorescent protein into hepatitis B virus envelope particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Carsten; Thome, Nicole; Kluck, Christoph J.; Prange, Reinhild

    2004-01-01

    The envelope of hepatitis B virus (HBV), containing the L, M, and S proteins, is essential for virus entry and maturation. For direct visualization of HBV, we determined whether envelope assembly could accommodate the green fluorescent protein (GFP). While the C-terminal addition of GFP to S trans-dominant negatively inhibited empty envelope particle secretion, the N-terminal GFP fusion to S (GFP.S) was co-integrated into the envelope, giving rise to fluorescent particles. Microscopy and topogenesis analyses demonstrated that the proper intracellular distribution and folding of GFP.S, required for particle export were rescued by interprotein interactions with wild-type S. Thereby, a dual location of GFP, inside and outside the envelope, was observed. GFP.S was also efficiently packaged into the viral envelope, and these GFP-tagged virions retained the capacity for attachment to HBV receptor-positive cells in vitro. Together, GFP-tagged virions should be suitable to monitor HBV uptake and egress in live hepatocytes

  9. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hau B; Hung, Li-Wei; Yeates, Todd O; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2013-12-01

    A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10-11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1-9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10-11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1-9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization.

  10. Imaging dynamic redox changes in mammalian cells with green fluorescent protein indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Colette T; Dore, Timothy M; Hanson, George T; Jackson, W Coyt; Remington, S James; Tsien, Roger Y

    2004-05-21

    Changes in the redox equilibrium of cells influence a host of cell functions. Alterations in the redox equilibrium are precipitated by changing either the glutathione/glutathione-disulfide ratio (GSH/GSSG) and/or the reduced/oxidized thioredoxin ratio. Redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (GFP) allow real time visualization of the oxidation state of the indicator. Ratios of fluorescence from excitation at 400 and 490 nm indicate the extent of oxidation and thus the redox potential while canceling out the amount of indicator and the absolute optical sensitivity. Because the indicator is genetically encoded, it can be targeted to specific proteins or organelles of interest and expressed in a wide variety of cells and organisms. We evaluated roGFP1 (GFP with mutations C48S, S147C, and Q204C) and roGFP2 (the same plus S65T) with physiologically or toxicologically relevant oxidants both in vitro and in living mammalian cells. Furthermore, we investigated the response of the redox probes under physiological redox changes during superoxide bursts in macrophage cells, hyperoxic and hypoxic conditions, and in responses to H(2)O(2)-stimulating agents, e.g. epidermal growth factor and lysophosphatidic acid.

  11. Introduction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) into hippocampal neurons through viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinow, Roberto; Hayashi, Yasunori; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Zaman, Shahid H; Poncer, Jean-Christophe; Shi, Song-Hai; Esteban, José A; Osten, Pavel; Seidenman, Ken

    2010-04-01

    Expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP), its more fluorescent mutant forms (e.g., EGFP [enhanced GFP]), or their fusion protein derivatives, affords a number of informative possibilities in cellular neuroscience. EGFP is a soluble protein and appears to be homogeneously distributed within the cytosol of neurons when expressed. Thus, it reveals the structure of the neuron, including the cell body, and axonal and dendritic arbors. It is also sufficiently bright to reveal detailed structures such as axonal boutons and dendritic spines. When expressed as a fusion protein, EGFP can provide information about the distribution characteristics of the proteins within neurons. Furthermore, during single-cell electrophysiological studies, such expression can direct the investigator to record from a cell carrying a foreign gene. In this protocol, we describe the use of the Sindbis pseudovirus expression system to deliver GFP to neurons. Sindbis is a member of the alphaviruses, which are plus-stranded RNA viruses. This protocol uses the DH(26S) strain, which preferentially infects neurons over glia (50:1). Two infection methods are given: one for dissociated hippocampal cultured neurons and one for organotypic hippocampal slices.

  12. Quantitative imaging of green fluorescent protein in cultured cells: comparison of microscopic techniques, use in fusion proteins and detection limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niswender, K D; Blackman, S M; Rohde, L; Magnuson, M A; Piston, D W

    1995-11-01

    To determine the application limits of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter gene or protein tag, we expressed GFP by itself and with fusion protein partners, and used three different imaging methods to identify GFP fluorescence. In conventional epifluorescence photomicroscopy, GFP expressed in cells could be distinguished as a bright green signal over a yellow-green autofluorescence background. In quantitative fluorescence microscopy, however, the GFP signal is contaminated by cellular autofluorescence. Improved separation of GFP signal from HeLa cell autofluorescence was achieved by the combination of confocal scanning laser microscopy using 488-nm excitation, a rapid cut-on dichroic mirror and a narrow-bandpass emission filter. Two-photon excitation of GFP fluorescence at the equivalent of approximately 390 nm provided better absorption than did 488-nm excitation. This resulted in increased signal/background but also generated a different autofluorescence pattern and appeared to increase GFP photobleaching. Fluorescence spectra similar to those of GFP alone were observed when GFP was expressed as a fusion protein either with glutathione-S-transferase (GST) or with glucokinase. Furthermore, purified GST.GFP fusion protein displayed an extinction coefficient and quantum yield consistent with values previously reported for GFP alone. In HeLa cells, the cytoplasmic GFP concentration must be greater than approximately 1 microM to allow quantifiable discrimination over autofluorescence. However, lower expression levels may be detectable if GFP is targeted to discrete subcellular compartments, such as the plasma membrane, organelles or nucleus.

  13. Experimental Evolution of a Green Fluorescent Protein Composed of 19 Unique Amino Acids without Tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara-Kobayashi, Akio; Hitotsuyanagi, Mitsuhiro; Amikura, Kazuaki; Kiga, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    At some stage of evolution, genes of organisms may have encoded proteins that were synthesized using fewer than 20 unique amino acids. Similar to evolution of the natural 19-amino-acid proteins GroEL/ES, proteins composed of 19 unique amino acids would have been able to evolve by accumulating beneficial mutations within the 19-amino-acid repertoire encoded in an ancestral genetic code. Because Trp is thought to be the last amino acid included in the canonical 20-amino-acid repertoire, this late stage of protein evolution could be mimicked by experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without tryptophan (Trp). To further understand the evolution of proteins, we tried to mimic the evolution of a 19-amino-acid protein involving the accumulation of beneficial mutations using directed evolution by random mutagenesis on the whole targeted gene sequence. We created active 19-amino-acid green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) without Trp from a poorly fluorescent 19-amino-acid mutant, S1-W57F, by using directed evolution with two rounds of mutagenesis and selection. The N105I and S205T mutations showed beneficial effects on the S1-W57F mutant. When these two mutations were combined on S1-W57F, we observed an additive effect on the fluorescence intensity. In contrast, these mutations showed no clear improvement individually or in combination on GFPS1, which is the parental GFP mutant composed of 20 amino acids. Our results provide an additional example for the experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without Trp, and would help understand the mechanisms underlying the evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins. (236 words)

  14. Review of fluorescence guided surgery systems: identification of key performance capabilities beyond indocyanine green imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Lin, Huiyun; Henderson, Eric R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest in using fluorescence imaging instruments to guide surgery, and the leading options for open-field imaging are reviewed here. While the clinical fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) field has been focused predominantly on indocyanine green (ICG) imaging, there is accelerated development of more specific molecular tracers. These agents should help advance new indications for which FGS presents a paradigm shift in how molecular information is provided for resection decisions. There has been a steady growth in commercially marketed FGS systems, each with their own differentiated performance characteristics and specifications. A set of desirable criteria is presented to guide the evaluation of instruments, including: (i) real-time overlay of white-light and fluorescence images, (ii) operation within ambient room lighting, (iii) nanomolar-level sensitivity, (iv) quantitative capabilities, (v) simultaneous multiple fluorophore imaging, and (vi) ergonomic utility for open surgery. In this review, United States Food and Drug Administration 510(k) cleared commercial systems and some leading premarket FGS research systems were evaluated to illustrate the continual increase in this performance feature base. Generally, the systems designed for ICG-only imaging have sufficient sensitivity to ICG, but a fraction of the other desired features listed above, with both lower sensitivity and dynamic range. In comparison, the emerging research systems targeted for use with molecular agents have unique capabilities that will be essential for successful clinical imaging studies with low-concentration agents or where superior rejection of ambient light is needed. There is no perfect imaging system, but the feature differences among them are important differentiators in their utility, as outlined in the data and tables here.

  15. Experimental evolution of a green fluorescent protein composed of 19 unique amino acids without tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara-Kobayashi, Akio; Hitotsuyanagi, Mitsuhiro; Amikura, Kazuaki; Kiga, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    At some stage of evolution, genes of organisms may have encoded proteins that were synthesized using fewer than 20 unique amino acids. Similar to evolution of the natural 19-amino-acid proteins GroEL/ES, proteins composed of 19 unique amino acids would have been able to evolve by accumulating beneficial mutations within the 19-amino-acid repertoire encoded in an ancestral genetic code. Because Trp is thought to be the last amino acid included in the canonical 20-amino-acid repertoire, this late stage of protein evolution could be mimicked by experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without tryptophan (Trp). To further understand the evolution of proteins, we tried to mimic the evolution of a 19-amino-acid protein involving the accumulation of beneficial mutations using directed evolution by random mutagenesis on the whole targeted gene sequence. We created active 19-amino-acid green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) without Trp from a poorly fluorescent 19-amino-acid mutant, S1-W57F, by using directed evolution with two rounds of mutagenesis and selection. The N105I and S205T mutations showed beneficial effects on the S1-W57F mutant. When these two mutations were combined on S1-W57F, we observed an additive effect on the fluorescence intensity. In contrast, these mutations showed no clear improvement individually or in combination on GFPS1, which is the parental GFP mutant composed of 20 amino acids. Our results provide an additional example for the experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without Trp, and would help understand the mechanisms underlying the evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins. (236 words).

  16. Indocyanine green fluorescence imaging for evaluation of uterine blood flow in cynomolgus macaque.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iori Kisu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uterine blood flow is an important factor in uterine viability, but the number of blood vessels required to maintain viability is uncertain. In this study, indocyanine green (ICG fluorescence imaging was used to examine uterine hemodynamics and vessels associated with uterine blood flow in cynomolgus macaque. METHODS: The uterus of a female cynomolgus macaque was cut from the vaginal canal to mimic a situation during trachelectomy or uterine transplantation surgery in which uterine perfusion is maintained only with uterine and ovarian vessels. Intraoperative uterine hemodynamics was observed using ICG fluorescence imaging under conditions in which various nutrient vessels were selected by clamping of blood vessels. A time-intensity curve was plotted using imaging analysis software to measure the T(max of uterine perfusion for selected blood vessel patterns. Open surgery was performed with the uterus receiving nutritional support only from uterine vessels on one side. The size of the uterus after surgery was monitored using transabdominal ultrasonography. RESULTS: The resulting time-intensity curves displayed the average intensity in the regions of the uterine corpus and uterine cervix, and in the entire uterus. Analyses of the uterine hemodynamics in the cynomolgus macaque showed that uterine vessels were significantly related to uterine perfusion (P=0.008, whereas ovarian vessels did not have a significant relationship (P=0.588. When uterine vessels were clamped, ovarian vessels prolonged the time needed to reach perfusion maximum. Postoperative transabdominal ultrasonography showed that the size of the uterus was not changed 2 months after surgery, with recovery of periodic menstruation. The cynomolgus macaque has got pregnant with favorable fetus well-being. CONCLUSION: Uterine vessels may be responsible for uterine blood flow, and even one uterine vessel may be sufficient to maintain uterine viability in cynomolgus macaque. Our

  17. Ultrastable green fluorescence carbon dots with a high quantum yield for bioimaging and use as theranostic carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Chuanxu; Thomsen, Rasmus Peter; Ogaki, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    to widely used semiconductor quantum dots. However, it remains a great challenge to prepare highly stable, water-soluble green luminescent Cdots with a high quantum yield. Herein we report a new synthesis route for green luminescent Cdots imbuing these desirable properties and demonstrate their potential......Carbon dots (Cdots) have recently emerged as a novel platform of fluorescent nanomaterials. These carbon nanoparticles have great potential in biomedical applications such as bioimaging as they exhibit excellent photoluminescence properties, chemical inertness and low cytotoxicity in comparison...... in biomedical applications. Oligoethylenimine (OEI)–β-cyclodextrin (βCD) Cdots were synthesised using a simple and fast heating method in phosphoric acid. The synthesised Cdots showed strong green fluorescence under UV excitation with a 30% quantum yield and exhibited superior stability over a wide pH range. We...

  18. Predictable tuning of protein expression in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Pedersen, Margit; Klausen, Michael Schantz

    2016-01-01

    We comprehensively assessed the contribution of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence to protein expression and used the data to develop EMOPEC (Empirical Model and Oligos for Protein Expression Changes; http://emopec.biosustain.dtu.dk). EMOPEC is a free tool that makes it possible to modulate the expressi...

  19. Indocyanine green fluorescence in second near-infrared (NIR-II) window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosolski, Zbigniew; Bhavane, Rohan; Ghaghada, Ketan B; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A; Kaay, Alexander; Annapragada, Ananth

    2017-01-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG), a FDA approved near infrared (NIR) fluorescent agent, is used in the clinic for a variety of applications including lymphangiography, intra-operative lymph node identification, tumor imaging, superficial vascular imaging, and marking ischemic tissues. These applications operate in the so-called "NIR-I" window (700-900 nm). Recently, imaging in the "NIR-II" window (1000-1700 nm) has attracted attention since, at longer wavelengths, photon absorption, and scattering effects by tissue components are reduced, making it possible to image deeper into the underlying tissue. Agents for NIR-II imaging are, however, still in pre-clinical development. In this study, we investigated ICG as a NIR-II dye. The absorbance and NIR-II fluorescence emission of ICG were measured in different media (PBS, plasma and ethanol) for a range of ICG concentrations. In vitro and in vivo testing were performed using a custom-built spectral NIR assembly to facilitate simultaneous imaging in NIR-I and NIR-II window. In vitro studies using ICG were performed using capillary tubes (as a simulation of blood vessels) embedded in Intralipid solution and tissue phantoms to evaluate depth of tissue penetration in NIR-I and NIR-II window. In vivo imaging using ICG was performed in nude mice to evaluate vascular visualization in the hind limb in the NIR-I and II windows. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated for comparison of image quality in NIR-I and NIR-II window. ICG exhibited significant fluorescence emission in the NIR-II window and this emission (similar to the absorption profile) is substantially affected by the environment of the ICG molecules. In vivo imaging further confirmed the utility of ICG as a fluorescent dye in the NIR-II domain, with the CNR values being ~2 times those in the NIR-I window. The availability of an FDA approved imaging agent could accelerate the clinical translation of NIR-II imaging technology.

  20. Indocyanine green fluorescence in second near-infrared (NIR-II window.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Starosolski

    Full Text Available Indocyanine green (ICG, a FDA approved near infrared (NIR fluorescent agent, is used in the clinic for a variety of applications including lymphangiography, intra-operative lymph node identification, tumor imaging, superficial vascular imaging, and marking ischemic tissues. These applications operate in the so-called "NIR-I" window (700-900 nm. Recently, imaging in the "NIR-II" window (1000-1700 nm has attracted attention since, at longer wavelengths, photon absorption, and scattering effects by tissue components are reduced, making it possible to image deeper into the underlying tissue. Agents for NIR-II imaging are, however, still in pre-clinical development. In this study, we investigated ICG as a NIR-II dye. The absorbance and NIR-II fluorescence emission of ICG were measured in different media (PBS, plasma and ethanol for a range of ICG concentrations. In vitro and in vivo testing were performed using a custom-built spectral NIR assembly to facilitate simultaneous imaging in NIR-I and NIR-II window. In vitro studies using ICG were performed using capillary tubes (as a simulation of blood vessels embedded in Intralipid solution and tissue phantoms to evaluate depth of tissue penetration in NIR-I and NIR-II window. In vivo imaging using ICG was performed in nude mice to evaluate vascular visualization in the hind limb in the NIR-I and II windows. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR were calculated for comparison of image quality in NIR-I and NIR-II window. ICG exhibited significant fluorescence emission in the NIR-II window and this emission (similar to the absorption profile is substantially affected by the environment of the ICG molecules. In vivo imaging further confirmed the utility of ICG as a fluorescent dye in the NIR-II domain, with the CNR values being ~2 times those in the NIR-I window. The availability of an FDA approved imaging agent could accelerate the clinical translation of NIR-II imaging technology.

  1. Green synthesis of carbon dots originated from Lycii Fructus for effective fluorescent sensing of ferric ion and multicolor cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaohan; He, Jiang; Yang, Shenghong; Zheng, Mingda; Wang, Yingying; Ma, Shuang; Zheng, Haipeng

    2017-10-01

    Green, economical and effective method was developed for synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots (CDs), using one-pot hydrothermal treatment of Lycii Fructus. Optical and structural properties of the CDs have been extensively studied by UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic, x-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM). Surface functionality and composition of CDs has been illustrated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra and elemental analysis. The fabricated CDs possess stable fluorescent properties. The fluorescent quantum yield of the CDs can reach 17.2%. The prepared CDs emitted a broad fluorescence between 415 and 545nm and their fluorescence was tuned by changing excitation wavelength. Meanwhile, the fluorescence intensity of the CDs could be significantly quenched by Fe 3+ (turn-off). The CDs exhibit captivating sensitivity and selectivity toward Fe 3+ with a linear range from 0 to 30μM and a detection limit of 21nM. The prepared CDs were successfully applied to the determination of Fe 3+ in the urine samples, the water samples from the from the Yellow River and living HeLa (Henrietta Lacks) cells. Moreover, the low-toxicity and excellent biocompatibility of the CDs were evaluated through MTT assay on HeLa cells. The CDs were also employed as fluorescent probes for multicolor imaging of HeLa cells successfully. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. ERG protein expression over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Brasso, Klaus; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk

    2015-01-01

    by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 625 biopsy sets and 86 radical prostatectomy specimens from 265 patients with prostate cancer managed on active surveillance. For IHC, a rabbit monoclonal primary antibody was used (clone: EPR3864). TMPRSS2-ERG fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analyses were performed in 74...... biopsies using the FISH ZytoLight TriCheck Probe (SPEC ERG/TMPRSS2). FISH results were correlated with IHC findings. RESULTS: The concordance between FISH and IHC was 97.3% and IHC demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity for ERG rearrangement of 100% and 95.5%, respectively. Applying IHC, 38...

  3. Trafficking of Na,K-ATPase fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein is mediated by protein kinase A or C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B; Birkelund, Svend; Jørgensen, PL

    2003-01-01

    Fusion of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to the C-terminal of rat Na,K-ATPase a1-subunit is introduced as a novel procedure for visualizing trafficking of Na,K-pumps in living COS-1 renal cells in response to PKA or PKC stimulation. Stable, functional expression of the fluorescent...... along the plasma membrane of COS cells. In unstimulated COS cells, Na,K-EGFP was also present in lysosomes and in vesicles en route from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane, but it was almost absent from recycling endosomes labelled with fluorescent transferrin. After activation of protein...... chimera (Na,K-EGFP) was achieved in COS-1 cells using combined puromycin and ouabain selection procedures. Na,K-pump activities were unchanged after fusion with EGFP, both in basal and regulated states. In confocal laser scanning and fluorescence microscopes, the Na,K-EGFP chimera was distributed mainly...

  4. Comparison between the indocyanine green fluorescence and blue dye methods for sentinel lymph node biopsy using novel fluorescence image-guided resection equipment in different types of hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kunshan; Chi, Chongwei; Kou, Deqiang; Huang, Wenhe; Wu, Jundong; Wang, Yabing; He, Lifang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Wang, Jiandong; Tian, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has become a standard of care to detect axillary lymph metastasis in early-stage breast cancer patients with clinically negative axillary lymph nodes. Current SLNB detection modalities comprising a blue dye, a radioactive tracer, or a combination of both have advantages as well as disadvantages. Thus, near-infrared fluorescence imaging using indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been regarded as a novel method that has generated interest for SLNB around the world. However, the lack of appropriate fluorescence imaging systems has hindered further research and wide application of this method. Therefore, we developed novel fluorescence image-guided resection equipment (FIRE) to detect sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). Moreover, to compare the ICG fluorescence imaging method with the blue dye method and to explore the universal feasibility of the former, a different type of hospital study was conducted. Ninety-nine eligible patients participated in the study at 3 different types of hospitals. After subcutaneous ICG allergy testing, all the patients were subcutaneously injected with methylene blue and ICG into the subareolar area. Consequently, 276 SLNs (range 1-7) were identified in 98 subjects (detection rate: 99%) by using the ICG fluorescence imaging method. In contrast, the blue dye method only identified 202 SLNs (range 1-7) in 91 subjects (detection rate: 91.92%). Besides, the results of the fluorescence imaging method were similar in the 3 hospitals. Our findings indicate the universal feasibility of the ICG fluorescence imaging method for SLNB using the fluorescence image-guided resection equipment in early breast cancer detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method to study green tides in the Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Chun; Liu, Qing; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Kang, Zhen-Jun; Guo, Wei; Ding, Yue-Min; Chen, Jian-Hua; Wang, Yun-Feng; Li, Yan; Yan, Tian; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Massive green tides of Ulva prolifera have been recorded consecutively since 2007 in the Yellow Sea (YS). It has been proposed that the floating green algae in the YS are originally from the culture rafts of Porphyra yezoensis in the Subei Shoal. However, there is still much debate about this, mainly due to the difficulty in rapid and accurate identification of U. prolifera. In this study, a developed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method was adopted to identify U. prolifera and assess its relative abundance in the green algal community. Using this method, several processes related to the formation of green tides were studied, including: (1) variation of the relative abundance of U. prolifera in the green algal community attached to Porphyra rafts in the Subei Shoal; (2) contribution of the microscopic propagules in seawater to the U. prolifera population attached to the rafts; and (3) variation of the proportion of U. prolifera in the floating green algae in the YS. U. prolifera were detected in the green algae attached to Porphyra rafts from March to May 2012, where its relative abundance increased rapidly from 10% at the end of April to 40-60% in mid-May. Microscopic propagules of U. prolifera, which could be detected from seawater and sediment, contributed significantly to the dramatic increase of the attached U. prolifera on the Porphyra rafts. After the attached green algae were removed from the rafts, U. prolifera rapidly demonstrated dominance in the floating green algal community, and the proportion of U. prolifera increased gradually from south to north. Our conceptual model is that the germination of U. prolifera microscopic propagules on Porphyra rafts promotes the proliferation of attached U. prolifera on the rafts, which release more microscopic propagules into seawater and sediments after they became mature. This positive feedback enhances the dominance of U. prolifera in the attached green algal community in late May, which leads to the

  6. Microwave assisted one-step green synthesis of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles from ionic liquids and their application as novel fluorescence probe for quercetin determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Deli; Yuan, Danhua [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); He, Hua, E-mail: dochehua@163.com [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Gao, Mengmeng [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2013-08-15

    In this study, a new sensitive and convenient method for the determination of quercetin based on the fluorescence quenching of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) was developed. The CNPs derived from ionic liquids were prepared using a green and rapid microwave-assisted synthetic approach for the first time. The one-step green preparation process is simple and effective, neither a strong acid solvent nor surface modification reagent is needed, which makes this approach very suitable for large-scale production. The prepared CNPs were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, elemental analysis and spectrofluorometry. In NH{sub 3}–NH{sub 4}Cl buffer solution (pH 9.47), the fluorescence signals of CNPs decreased obviously with increase of the quercetin concentration. The effect of other coexisting foreign substances on the intensity of CNPs showed a low interference response. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity presented a linear response versus quercetin concentration according to the Stern–Volmer equation with an excellent 0.9989 correlation coefficient. The linearity ranged from 2.87×10{sup −6} to 31.57×10{sup −6} mol L{sup −1} with the detection limit (3σ) of 9.88×10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1}. The recovery of this method was in the range of 93.3–105.1%. Therefore, the CNPs could to be a promising candidate as a fluorescence probe for the detection of trace levels of quercetin due to their advantages in low-cost production, low cytotoxicity, strong fluorescence and excellent biocompatibility. -- Highlights: ► Fluorescent CNPs were synthesized with microwave pyrolysis approach. ► Ionic liquids were used as sources of carbon and nitrogen for the first time. ► The formation and functionalization of CNPs were accomplished simultaneously. ► CNPs were used as fluorescent probes for the determination of quercetin. ► A sensitive and convenient method based

  7. [Analysis of bacterial colonization associated with Gigaspora margarita spores by green fluorescence protein (GFP) marked technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Liangkun; Yao, Qing; Ai, Yuncan; Zhu, Honghui

    2009-05-01

    We analyzed bacterial colonization associated with spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) Gigaspora margarita, to indicate their ecological niche, and to provide information for further researches on their populations or functions. Six bacteria strains (Peanibacillus sp. M060106-1, Peanibacillus sp. M061122-2, Peanibacillus sp. M061122-6, Bacillus sp. M061122-4, Bacillus sp. M061122-10 and Brevibacillus sp. M061122-12) isolated from G. margarita spores were tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP) using the carrier plasmid pNF8 (gfp-mut1). We analyzed the ecological niche and population dynamics of tagged strains on G. margarita under different conditions by using fluorescent microscope and/or plate counts. Four strains (M060106-1, M061122-6, M061122-10 and M061122-12) were tagged with GFP, showing high plasmid stability. These tagged strains possessed the basic characteristics identical to their original strains and, hence, were fit for short-term study of environmental colonization. All four GFP-tagged strains colonized the spore wall of G. margarita, and M061122-6 and M061122-12 further colonized the fungal hyphae. Under different pH conditions,the population dynamic of each GFP-tagged strain on the spores showed the same trend, i.e. first increased and then decreased, and the effects on the population size varied with different pH value. GFP-tagged strains colonized the spores of low viability more easily than those of high viability, and the population dynamic on the spores of high viability was different for each tagged strain. The isolated bacteria associated with G. margarita spores can re-colonize the fungal spores, whereas their colonizing ability depends on their characteristics and environmental factors. These data contributes to the further understanding of populations and functions of AMF-associated bacteria.

  8. Green fluorescence protein-based content-mixing assay of SNARE-driven membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Paul; Kong, Byoungjae; Jung, Young-Hun; Park, Joon-Bum; Shin, Jonghyeok; Park, Myungseo; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2017-06-17

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins mediate intracellular membrane fusion by forming a ternary SNARE complex. A minimalist approach utilizing proteoliposomes with reconstituted SNARE proteins yielded a wealth of information pinpointing the molecular mechanism of SNARE-mediated fusion and its regulation by accessory proteins. Two important attributes of a membrane fusion are lipid-mixing and the formation of an aqueous passage between apposing membranes. These two attributes are typically observed by using various fluorescent dyes. Currently available in vitro assay systems for observing fusion pore opening have several weaknesses such as cargo-bleeding, incomplete removal of unencapsulated dyes, and inadequate information regarding the size of the fusion pore, limiting measurements of the final stage of membrane fusion. In the present study, we used a biotinylated green fluorescence protein and streptavidin conjugated with Dylight 594 (DyStrp) as a Föster resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor and acceptor, respectively. This FRET pair encapsulated in each v-vesicle containing synaptobrevin and t-vesicle containing a binary acceptor complex of syntaxin 1a and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 revealed the opening of a large fusion pore of more than 5 nm, without the unwanted signals from unencapsulated dyes or leakage. This system enabled determination of the stoichiometry of the merging vesicles because the FRET efficiency of the FRET pair depended on the molar ratio between dyes. Here, we report a robust and informative assay for SNARE-mediated fusion pore opening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS(SV40)) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS(SV40) in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS(SV40) formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS(SV40) likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS(SV40) can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a functional antibody by using a green fluorescent protein frame as the template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongzhi; Xiang, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Yonghui; Chen, Qiuyu; Zhong, Yanfang; Wang, Shihua

    2014-07-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies are widely used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents or biosensors for a majority of human disease. However, the limitations of the present scFv antibody in terms of stability, solubility, and affinity are challenging to produce by traditional antibody screening and expression formats. We describe here a feasible strategy for creating the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based antibody. Complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3), which retains the antigen binding activity, was introduced into the structural loops of superfolder GFP, and the result showed that CDR3-inserted GFP displayed almost the same fluorescence intensity as wild-type GFP, and the purified proteins of CDR3 insertion showed the similar binding activity to antigen as the corresponding scFv. Among of all of the CDRs, CDR3s are responsible for antigen recognition, and only the CDR3a insertion is the best format for producing GFP-based antibody binding to specific antigen. The wide versatility of this system was further verified by introducing CDR3 from other scFvs into loop 9 of GFP. We developed a feasible method for rapidly and effectively producing a high-affinity GFP-based antibody by inserting CDR3s into GFP loops. Further, the affinity can be enhanced by specific amino acids scanning and site-directed mutagenesis. Notably, this method had better versatility for creating antibodies to various antigens using GFP as the scaffold, suggesting that a GFP-based antibody with high affinity and specificity may be useful for disease diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Transgenic rats with green, red, and blue fluorescence: powerful tools for bioimaging, cell trafficking, and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2005-04-01

    The rat represents a perfect animal for broadening medical experiments, because its physiology has been well understood in the history of experimental animals. In addition, its larger body size takes enough advantage for surgical manipulation, compared to the mouse. Many rat models mimicking human diseases, therefore, have been used in a variety of biomedical studies including physiology, pharmacology, transplantation, and immunology. In an effort to create the specifically designed rats for biomedical research and regenerative medicine, we have developed the engineered rat system on the basis of transgenic technology and succeeded in establishing various transgenic rat strains. The transgenic rats with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were generated in the two different strains (Wistar and Lewis), in which GFP is driven under the chicken beta-actin promoter and cytomegalovirus enhancer (CAG promoter). Their GFP expression levels were different in each organ, but the Lewis line expressed GFP strongly and ubiquitously in most of the organs compared with that of Wistar. For red fluorescence, DsRed2 was transduced to the Wistar rats: one line specifically expresses DsRed2 in the liver under the mouse albumin promoter, another is designed for the Cre/LoxP system as the double reporter rat (the initial DsRed2 expression turns on GFP in the presence of Cre recombinase). LacZ-transgenic rats represent blue color, and LacZ is driven the CAG (DA) or ROSA26 promoter (Lewis). Our unique transgenic rats" system highlights the powerful performance for the elucidation of many cellular processes in regenerative medicine, leading to innovative medical treatments.

  12. Efficient and Scalable Synthesis of 4-Carboxy-Pennsylvania Green Methyl Ester: A Hydrophobic Building Block for Fluorescent Molecular Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woydziak, Zachary R; Fu, Liqiang; Peterson, Blake R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorinated fluorophores are valuable tools for studies of biological systems. However, amine-reactive single-isomer derivatives of these compounds are often very expensive. To provide an inexpensive alternative, we report a practical synthesis of 4-carboxy-Pennsylvania Green methyl ester. Derivatives of this hydrophobic fluorinated fluorophore, a hybrid of the dyes Oregon Green and Tokyo Green, are often cell permeable, enabling labeling of intracellular targets and components. Moreover, the low pKa of Pennsylvania Green (4.8) confers bright fluorescence in acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes, enhancing its utility for chemical biology investigations. To improve access to the key intermediate 2,7-difluoro-3,6-dihydroxyxanthen-9-one, we subjected bis-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)methanone to iterative nucleophilic aromatic substitution by hydroxide on scales of > 40 g. This intermediate was used to prepare over 15 grams of pure 4-carboxy-Pennsylvania Green methyl ester in 28% overall yield without requiring chromatography. This compound can be converted into the amine reactive N -hydroxysuccinimidyl ester in essentially quantitative yield for the synthesis of a wide variety of fluorescent molecular probes.

  13. Detection of organophosphorus compound based on a sol-gel silica planar waveguide doped with a green fluorescent protein and an organophosphorus hydrolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enami, Y.; Tsuchiya, K.; Suye, S.

    2011-06-01

    In this letter, the authors report the real-time detection of an organophosphorus compound using a sol-gel silica planar waveguide doped with a green fluorescent protein and an organophosphorus hydrolase on a yeast-cell surface display. The waveguide was pumped at 488 nm, and it emitted green fluorescence at the far field. The green fluorescent light at 550 nm changed by 50% from the original power 1 min after application of the organophosphorus compound. The results enable the real-time detection of sarin and other biochemicals by using an in-line fiber sensor network.

  14. Enhanced green fluorescent protein is a nearly ideal long-term expression tracer for hematopoietic stem cells, whereas DsRed-express fluorescent protein is not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wen; Evans, Barbara-Graham; Yao, Jing; Cooper, Scott; Cornetta, Kenneth; Ballas, Christopher B; Hangoc, Giao; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2007-03-01

    Validated gene transfer and expression tracers are essential for elucidating functions of mammalian genes. Here, we have determined the suitability and unintended side effects of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and DsRed-Express fluorescent protein as expression tracers in long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Retrovirally transduced mouse bone marrow cells expressing either EGFP or DsRed-Express in single or mixed dual-color cell populations were clearly discerned by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The results from in vivo competitive repopulation assays demonstrated that EGFP-expressing HSCs were maintained nearly throughout the lifespan of the transplanted mice and retained long-term multilineage repopulating potential. All mice assessed at 15 months post-transplantation were EGFP positive, and, on average, 24% total peripheral white blood cells expressed EGFP. Most EGFP-expressing recipient mice lived at least 22 months. In contrast, Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DsRed)-expressing donor cells dramatically declined in transplant-recipient mice over time, particularly in the competitive setting, in which mixed EGFP- and DsRed-expressing cells were cotransplanted. Moreover, under in vitro culture condition favoring preservation of HSCs, purified EGFP-expressing cells grew robustly, whereas DsRed-expressing cells did not. Therefore, EGFP has no detectable deteriorative effects on HSCs, and is nearly an ideal long-term expression tracer for hematopoietic cells; however, DsRed-Express fluorescent protein is not suitable for these cells.

  15. First Experience on Laparoscopic Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Hepatic Uveal Melanoma Metastases using Indocyanine Green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummers, Quirijn R.J.G.; Verbeek, Floris P.R.; Prevoo, Hendrica A.J.M.; Braat, Andries E.; Baeten, Coen I.M.; Frangioni, John V.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular tumor in adults and up to 50% of patients will develop liver metastases. Complete surgical resection of these metastases can improve 5-year survival, but only a few patients are eligible for radical surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to introduce a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence laparoscope during minimally-invasive surgery for intraoperative identification of uveal melanoma hepatic metastases and to use it to provide guidance during resection. Methods Three patients diagnosed with one solitary liver metastasis from uveal melanoma are presented. Patients received 10 mg indocyanine green (ICG) intravenously 24 h before surgery. A NIR fluorescence laparoscope was used to detect malignant liver lesions. Results In all 3 patients, laparoscopic NIR fluorescence imaging using ICG successfully identified uveal melanoma metastases. In 2 patients, multiple additional lesions were identified by inspection and NIR fluorescence imaging, which were not identified by preoperative conventional imaging. In one patient, one additional lesion, not identified by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, laparoscopic ultrasonography and inspection, was observed with NIR fluorescence imaging only.. Importantly, NIR fluorescence imaging provided guidance during resection of these metastases. Conclusions We describe the successful use of laparoscopic identification and resection of uveal melanoma liver metastases using NIR fluorescence imaging and ICG. This procedure is minimally-invasive, and should be used as complementary to conventional techniques for the detection and resection of liver metastases. PMID:24902685

  16. Optimization of transfection of green fluorescent protein in pursuing mesenchymal stem cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Elçi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP has been used as a marker of gene expression and a single cell marker in living organisms in cell biology studies. The important areas that GFP is used are expression levels of different genes in different organisms by inserting GFP in these genes and as a marker in living cells. In this study, we tried to optimize transfection of mesenchymal stem cells, (MSCs used for regeneration of damaged tissues in animals, by GFP containing plasmid vector by which MSCs can be followed in vivo.METHODS: To this aim, phM-GFP plasmid vector carrying GFP gene and effectene transfection reagent were used. RESULTS: The data revealed that twice transfection of MSCs resulted in higher expression of GFP for longer times as compared to once transfected MSCs. On the other hand, leaving the chemical transfection agents in the medium induced apoptosis after a while. CONCLUSION: As a conclusion we suggest the transfection of MSCs twice with 48 hours interval and removal of transfection agents after 8 hours which removed toxic and apoptotic effects of the chemicals.

  17. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Garcia Diaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Wistar Kyoto (WKY rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminary in vitro and in vivo imaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades.

  18. Technical Advance: Stable chloroplast transformation in potato: use of green fluorescent protein as a plastid marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov; Kasten; Pang; Hajdukiewicz; Staub; Nehra

    1999-07-01

    We describe here the development of a reproducible plastid transformation system for potato and regeneration of plants with uniformly transformed plastids. Two distinct tobacco-specific plastid vectors, pZS197 (Prrn/aadA/TpsbA) and pMON30125 (Prrn/GFP/Trps16:PpsbA/aadA/TpsbA), designed for integration into the large single copy and inverted repeat regions of the plastid genome, respectively, were bombarded into leaf explants of potato line FL1607. A total of three transgenic lines were selected out of 46 plates bombarded with pZS197 and three transgenic lines out of 104 plates were obtained with pMON30125. Development of a high frequency leaf-based regenera- tion system, a stringent selection scheme and optimization of biolistic transformation protocol were critical for recovery of plastid transformants. Plastid-expressed green fluorescent protein was used as a visual marker for identification of plastid transformants at the early stage of selection and shoot regeneration. The establishment of a plastid transformation system in potato, which has several advantages over routinely used nuclear transformation, offers new possibilities for genetic improvement of this crop.

  19. Illuminating the origins of spectral properties of green fluorescent proteins via proteochemometric and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantasenamat, Chanin; Simeon, Saw; Owasirikul, Wiwat; Songtawee, Napat; Lapins, Maris; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2014-10-15

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has immense utility in biomedical imaging owing to its autofluorescent nature. In efforts to broaden the spectral diversity of GFP, there have been several reports of engineered mutants via rational design and random mutagenesis. Understanding the origins of spectral properties of GFP could be achieved by means of investigating its structure-activity relationship. The first quantitative structure-property relationship study for modeling the spectral properties, particularly the excitation and emission maximas, of GFP was previously proposed by us some years ago in which quantum chemical descriptors were used for model development. However, such simplified model does not consider possible effects that neighboring amino acids have on the conjugated π-system of GFP chromophore. This study describes the development of a unified proteochemometric model in which the GFP chromophore and amino acids in its vicinity are both considered in the same model. The predictive performance of the model was verified by internal and external validation as well as Y-scrambling. Our strategy provides a general solution for elucidating the contribution that specific ligand and protein descriptors have on the investigated spectral property, which may be useful in engineering novel GFP variants with desired characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Comparison of different sites in recombinant Marek's disease virus for the expression of green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Kai; Cui, Hongyu; Gao, Li; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2017-05-02

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a preferred vector for recombinant vaccine construction, and insertion site is the main factor influencing foreign gene expression and vaccine efficacy. In this study, recombinant MDVs inserted with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene at different sites in its genome were generated from overlapping fosmid DNAs and the eGFP expression was compared. The results showed that the eGFP expression levels from the sites in the unique long (UL) region (within UL41, between UL45 and UL46, and between UL55 and LORF10) were comparable, which were significantly higher than those from the sites in the unique short (US) region (US2 and US10), and the eGFP expression level from US2 was significantly higher than that from US10. The identification and comparison of the insertion sites in MDV genome could help elevate the protection efficacy of the recombinant MDVs expressing desired antigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Isoforms of green fluorescent protein differ from each other in solvent molecules 'trapped' inside this protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhova, Kseniya F; Marchenkov, Victor V; Melnik, Tatiana N; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2017-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been studied quite thoroughly, however, up to now some experimental data have not been explained explicitly. For example, under native conditions this protein can have two isoforms differing in their mobility in gel. In this case, no differences between the isoforms are revealed under denaturing conditions. In order to understand the difference in the isoforms of this protein, we have investigated GFP-cycle3 using mass spectrometry, gel electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography, microcalorimetry, and spectroscopy methods under varying conditions. We have also designed and studied three mutant forms of this protein with substitutions of amino acid residues inside the GFP barrel. The mutations have allowed us to influence the formation of different GFP isoforms. Each of the mutant proteins has predominantly only one isoform. As a result of the performed research, it can be concluded that most likely the GFP isoforms differ in the solvent molecules 'trapped' inside the GFP barrel. In their turn, these molecules have an effect on the protein charge and consequently on its mobility at electrophoresis under native conditions.

  2. Mild and cost-effective green fluorescent protein purification employing small synthetic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Ana Sofia; Dias, Ana Margarida G C; Ustok, Fatma Isik; El Khoury, Graziella; Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Branco, Ricardo J F; Lowe, Christopher R; Roque, A Cecília A

    2015-10-30

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a useful indicator in a broad range of applications including cell biology, gene expression and biosensing. However, its full potential is hampered by the lack of a selective, mild and low-cost purification scheme. In order to address this demand, a novel adsorbent was developed as a generic platform for the purification of GFP or GFP fusion proteins, giving GFP a dual function as reporter and purification tag. After screening a solid-phase combinatorial library of small synthetic ligands based on the Ugi-reaction, the lead ligand (A4C7) selectively recovered GFP with 94% yield and 94% purity under mild conditions and directly from Escherichia coli extracts. Adsorbents containing the ligand A4C7 maintained the selectivity to recover other proteins fused to GFP. The performance of A4C7 adsorbents was compared with two commercially available methods (immunoprecipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography), confirming the new adsorbent as a low-cost viable alternative for GFP purification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Computational prediction of the tolerance to amino-acid deletion in green-fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Eleisha L; Spielman, Stephanie J; Wilke, Claus O

    2017-01-01

    Proteins evolve through two primary mechanisms: substitution, where mutations alter a protein's amino-acid sequence, and insertions and deletions (indels), where amino acids are either added to or removed from the sequence. Protein structure has been shown to influence the rate at which substitutions accumulate across sites in proteins, but whether structure similarly constrains the occurrence of indels has not been rigorously studied. Here, we investigate the extent to which structural properties known to covary with protein evolutionary rates might also predict protein tolerance to indels. Specifically, we analyze a publicly available dataset of single-amino-acid deletion mutations in enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) to assess how well the functional effect of deletions can be predicted from protein structure. We find that weighted contact number (WCN), which measures how densely packed a residue is within the protein's three-dimensional structure, provides the best single predictor for whether eGFP will tolerate a given deletion. We additionally find that using protein design to explicitly model deletions results in improved predictions of functional status when combined with other structural predictors. Our work suggests that structure plays fundamental role in constraining deletions at sites in proteins, and further that similar biophysical constraints influence both substitutions and deletions. This study therefore provides a solid foundation for future work to examine how protein structure influences tolerance of more complex indel events, such as insertions or large deletions.

  4. Expression of exogenetic enhanced green fluorescent protein in rat endocranium through lentivirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Qiang; Li, Li; Zhang, Zhaolong; Wu, Yina; Xu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate whether exogenetic green fluorescent protein is able to express in the endocranium of rats, and to establish a method for further study in exogenetic gene knock-in or gene overexpression. Forty female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 4 groups with 10 in each: low and high dose groups, treated with 10% and 100% EGFP-lentivirus, respectively; negative control group, treated with virus enhancer; sham group, treated with normal saline. Seven days later, half rats' brain tissues were perfusion fixed and fresh brain tissues were obtained from the rest after euthanasia in each group. Immunohistochemical analysis, Western blotting and RT-PCR were respectively performed to detect the site where EGFP expressed and its levels. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that EGFP was successfully expressed in brain tissue of those rats infected with EGFP-lentivirus. Both Western blotting and RT-PCR showed that EGFP was expressed after treatment with EGFP-lentivirus, and the expression level increased with the dosage of the vector. Exogenetic EGFP gene can express in brain tissue of the rat, which laid a solid foundation for future studies in exogenetic gene knock in or gene overexpression.

  5. Spatially selective binding of green fluorescent protein on designed organosilane nanopatterns prepared with particle lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highland, Zachary L; Garno, Jayne C

    2017-04-19

    A practical approach for preparing protein nanopatterns has been to design surface templates of nanopatterns of alkanethiols or organosilanes that will selectively bind and localize the placement of biomolecules. Particle lithography provides a way to prepare millions of protein nanopatterns with a few basic steps. For our nanopatterning strategy, organosilanes with methoxy and sulfhydryl groups were chosen as a surface template. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was selected as a model for patterning. Areas of 2-[methoxy (polyethyleneoxy)6-9propyl]trichlorosilane (MPT-silane) are effective as a matrix for resisting the attachment of proteins, whereas nanopatterns with sulfur groups provide reactive sites for binding linker groups to connect proteins. A protocol with particle lithography was designed to make a surface template of nanopatterns of (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) surrounded by a methoxy terminated matrix. The sulfhydryl groups of the MPTMS nanopatterns were activated with a sulfosuccinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate linker. The activated regions of MPTMS furnished sites for binding GFP. Samples were characterized with atomic force microscopy after successive steps of the patterning protocol to evaluate the selectivity of protein binding. Direct views of the protein bound selectively to designated sites of MPTMS are presented, as evidence of robust and reproducible patterning. Nanoscale patterns of proteins can be used for surfaces of biochips and biosensors, and also for immunochemistry test platforms.

  6. A systematic investigation of the stability of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczak, Monika; Bukowski, Michał; Górecki, Andrzej; Dubin, Grzegorz; Dubin, Adam; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides important insights into structure-function relationship in biomolecules. However, protein crystals are usually hard to obtain which hinders our understanding of multiple important processes. Crystallization requires large amount of protein sample, whereas recombinant proteins are often unstable or insoluble. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion is one of the approaches to increase protein synthesis, solubility and stability, facilitating crystallization. In this study we analyze the influence of the linker length, composition and the position of GFP relative to the fusion partner on the fusion protein production and stability. To this end, multiple constructs of enzymatically impaired variant of PemKSa toxin from Staphylococcus aureus CH91 fused to GFP were generated. Fusion protein production in Escherichia coli was evaluated. The proteins were purified and their stability tested. PemKSa-α14aa-GFP fusion provided best production and stability. Obtained results demonstrate the importance of optimization of fusion protein construct, including linker selection and the order of fusion partners, in obtaining high quantities of stable protein for crystallization.

  7. Profile of new green fluorescent protein transgenic Jinhua pigs as an imaging source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Hirao, Atsushi; Azuma, Sadahiro; Otake, Masayoshi; Shibata, Masatoshi; Tsuchiya, Seiko; Enosawa, Shin; Takeuchi, Koichi; Konno, Kenjiro; Hakamata, Yoji; Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Wakai, Takuya; Ookawara, Shigeo; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Murakami, Takashi

    2009-09-01

    Animal imaging sources have become an indispensable material for biological sciences. Specifically, gene-encoded biological probes serve as stable and high-performance tools to visualize cellular fate in living animals. We use a somatic cell cloning technique to create new green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Jinhua pigs with a miniature body size, and characterized the expression profile in various tissues/organs and ex vivo culture conditions. The born GFP-transgenic pig demonstrate an organ/tissue-dependent expression pattern. Strong GFP expression is observed in the skeletal muscle, pancreas, heart, and kidney. Regarding cellular levels, bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, hepatocytes, and islet cells of the pancreas also show sufficient expression with the unique pattern. Moreover, the cloned pigs demonstrate normal growth and fertility, and the introduced GFP gene is stably transmitted to pigs in subsequent generations. The new GFP-expressing Jinhua pigs may be used as new cellular/tissue light resources for biological imaging in preclinical research fields such as tissue engineering, experimental regenerative medicine, and transplantation.

  8. Visualizing proton antenna in a high-resolution green fluorescent protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinobu, Ai; Palm, Gottfried J; Schierbeek, Abraham J; Agmon, Noam

    2010-08-18

    "Proton-collecting antenna" are conjectured to consist of several carboxylates within hydrogen-bond (HB) networks on the surface of proteins, which funnel protons to the orifice of an internal proton wire leading to the protein's active site. Yet such constructions were never directly visualized. Here we report an X-ray structure of green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the highest resolution to date (0.9 A). It allows the identification of some pivotal hydrogen atoms pertinent to uncertainties concerning the protonation state of the chromophore. Applying a computer algorithm for mapping proton wires in proteins reveals the previously observed "active site wire" connecting Glu222 with the surface carboxylate Glu5. In addition, it is now possible to identify what appears to be a proton-collecting apparatus of GFP. It consists of a negative surface patch containing carboxylates, threonines, and water molecules, connected by a HB network to Glu5. Furthermore, we detect exit points via Asn146 and His148 to a hydrophobic surface region. The more extensive HB network of the present structure, as compared with earlier GFP structures, is not accidental. A systematic investigation of over 100 mutants shows a clear correlation between the observed water content of GFP X-ray structures and their resolution. With increasing water content, the proton wires become progressively larger. These findings corroborate the scenario in which the photodissociated proton from wild-type GFP can leak outside, whereafter another proton is recruited via the proton-collecting apparatus reported herein.

  9. Temperature dependence of proton transfer kinetics in the green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Champion, Paul; Sage, J. Timothy; van Thor, Jasper; Fitzpatrick, Ann

    2012-02-01

    In green fluorescent protein (GFP), near UV photoexcitation leads to proton transfer from the chromophore phenolic oxygen along a proton ``wire'' consisting of an internal water molecule, Ser205 and Glu222. Using transient absorption kinetics, the complete cycle, including the picosecond excited-state proton transfer, the nanosecond radiative emission, and the slower ground state proton back-transfer reactions have been studied holistically as a function of temperature. This experiment was performed for both the hydrogenated and deuterated forms of GFP. We have extracted the Arrhenius prefactors and activation energy barriers for both the forward and back proton transfer kinetics. A large kinetic isotope effect for the ground state proton back-transfer has been observed at high temperatures suggesting that tunneling plays an important role. At lower temperatures the data suggest a cross-over to a different pathway for the back-transfer reaction. To investigate this hypothesis we studied the E222D mutant of GFP, which substitutes aspartate for glutamate on the proton wire. The H/D kinetics of this mutant explicitly test for the source of proton donors and indicate that proton transfer proceeds along the same pathway in the native protein at room temperature.

  10. Green direct determination of mineral elements in artichokes by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Marqués, Alba; Martínez-García, Maria; Garrigues, Salvador; Cervera, M Luisa; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Near infrared (NIR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy were investigated to predict the concentration of calcium, potassium, iron, magnesium, manganese and zinc in artichoke samples. Sixty artichokes were purchased from different Spanish areas (Benicarló, Valencia and Murcia). NIR and XRF spectra, combined with partial least squares (PLS) data treatment, were used to develop chemometric models for the prediction of mineral concentration. To obtain reference data, samples were mineralised and analysed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Coefficients of determination obtained for the regression between predicted values and reference ones for calcium, potassium, magnesium, iron, manganese and zinc were 0.61, 0.79, 0.53, 0.77, 0.54 and 0.60 for NIR and 0.96, 0.93, 0.80, 0.79, 0.76 and 0.90 for XRF, respectively. Both assayed methodologies, offer green alternatives to classical mineral analysis, but XRF provided the best results in order to be used as a quantitative screening method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hybridization of Deoxyribonucleic Acid and Immobilization of Green Fluorescent Protein on Nanostructured Organosilane Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanii, Takashi; Hosaka, Takumi; Miyake, Takeo; Kanari, Yuzo; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Funatsu, Takashi; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2005-07-01

    We propose a novel process for preferential immobilization of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) onto organosilane self-assembled monolayer (SAM) templates. One of the advantages of using the organosilane SAM as the template is that it is electron-beam sensitive and, by utilizing the SAM as an alternative resist film, we can make nanopatterns on a molecular scale because the proximity effect is negligible owing to the film’s thinness. An other advantage is that the organosilane SAM is repellent to both DNA and GFP. Thus, the patterned SAM can be utilized as the passivation film covering the outside of the pattern while DNA and GFP are immobilized within the pattern. We investigate two kinds of organosilane SAMs for the template. One is n-octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS) SAM, and the other is 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (FDS) SAM. Our results indicate that the ODS SAM is more repellent to DNA than the FDS SAM and is suitable for DNA immobilization, while the FDS SAM template is suitable for GFP immobilization via biotin-avidin coupling because the FDS SAM surface prevents the nonspecific adsorption of streptavidin. Although the nonspecific adsorption of DNA and GFP on a SAM is also recognized, by controlling both the concentration and the incubation time, we can immobilize DNA and GFP preferentially onto nanopatterns of 100 nm diameter.

  12. Dark proteins: effect of inclusion body formation on quantification of protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iafolla, Marco A J; Mazumder, Mostafizur; Sardana, Vandit; Velauthapillai, Tharsan; Pannu, Karanbir; McMillen, David R

    2008-09-01

    Plasmid-borne gene expression systems have found wide application in the emerging fields of systems biology and synthetic biology, where plasmids are used to implement simple network architectures, either to test systems biology hypotheses about issues such as gene expression noise or as a means of exerting artificial control over a cell's dynamics. In both these cases, fluorescent proteins are commonly applied as a means of monitoring the expression of genes in the living cell, and efforts have been made to quantify protein expression levels through fluorescence intensity calibration and by monitoring the partitioning of proteins among the two daughter cells after division; such quantification is important in formulating the predictive models desired in systems and synthetic biology research. A potential pitfall of using plasmid-based gene expression systems is that the high protein levels associated with expression from plasmids can lead to the formation of inclusion bodies, insoluble aggregates of misfolded, nonfunctional proteins that will not generate fluorescence output; proteins caught in these inclusion bodies are thus "dark" to fluorescence-based detection methods. If significant numbers of proteins are incorporated into inclusion bodies rather than becoming biologically active, quantitative results obtained by fluorescent measurements will be skewed; we investigate this phenomenon here. We have created two plasmid constructs with differing average copy numbers, both incorporating an unregulated promoter (P(LtetO-1) in the absence of TetR) expressing the GFP derivative enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), and inserted them into Escherichia coli bacterial cells (a common model organism for work on the dynamics of prokaryotic gene expression). We extracted the inclusion bodies, denatured them, and refolded them to render them active, obtaining a measurement of the average number of EGFP per cell locked into these aggregates; at the same time, we used

  13. Red-Green-Blue Trichromophoric Nanoparticles with Dual Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer: Highly Sensitive Fluorogenic Response Toward Polyanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinjia; Takai, Atsuro; Takeuchi, Masayuki

    2016-09-05

    A red-green-blue (RGB) trichromophoric fluorescent organic nanoparticle exhibiting multi-colour emission was constructed; the blue-emitting cationic oligofluorene nanoparticle acted as an energy-donor scaffold to undergo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to a red-emitting dye embedded in the nanoparticle (interior FRET) and to a green-emitting dye adsorbed on the surface through electrostatic interactions (exterior FRET). Each FRET event occurs independently and is free from sequential FRET, thus the resultant dual-FRET system exhibits multi-colour emission, including white, in aqueous solution and film state. A characteristic white-emissive nanoparticle showed visible responses upon perturbation of the exterior FRET efficiency by acceptor displacement, leading to highly sensitive responses toward polyanions in a ratiometric manner. Specifically, our system exhibits high sensitivity toward heparin with an extremely low detection limit. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Functional Coexpression of HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase and Green Fluorescent Protein: Implications for Noninvasive Imaging of Transgene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Andreas; Dubrovin, Michael; Hewett, Jeff; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Tan, Cui-Wen; Slack, Mark; Sadelain, Michele; Breakefield, Xandra O; Tjuvajev, Juri G

    1999-01-01

    Current gene therapy technology is limited by the paucity of methodology for determining the location and magnitude of therapeutic transgene expression in vivo. We describe and validate a paradigm for monitoring therapeutic transgene expression by noninvasive imaging of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) marker gene expression. To test proportional coexpression of therapeutic and marker genes, a model fusion gene comprising green fluorescent protein (gfp) and HSV-1-tk...

  15. Benzylglucosinolate Derived Isothiocyanate from Tropaeolum majus Reduces Gluconeogenic Gene and Protein Expression in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Pérez, Valentina; Bumke-Vogt, Christiane; Schreiner, Monika; Mewis, Inga; Borchert, Andrea; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2016-01-01

    Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L.) contains high concentrations of benzylglcosinolate. We found that a hydrolysis product of benzyl glucosinolate-the benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC)-modulates the intracellular localization of the transcription factor Forkhead box O 1 (FOXO1). FoxO transcription factors can antagonize insulin effects and trigger a variety of cellular processes involved in tumor suppression, longevity, development and metabolism. The current study evaluated the ability of BITC-extracted as intact glucosinolate from nasturtium and hydrolyzed with myrosinase-to modulate i) the insulin-signaling pathway, ii) the intracellular localization of FOXO1 and, iii) the expression of proteins involved in gluconeogenesis, antioxidant response and detoxification. Stably transfected human osteosarcoma cells (U-2 OS) with constitutive expression of FOXO1 protein labeled with GFP (green fluorescent protein) were used to evaluate the effect of BITC on FOXO1. Human hepatoma HepG2 cell cultures were selected to evaluate the effect on gluconeogenic, antioxidant and detoxification genes and protein expression. BITC reduced the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT/PKB) and FOXO1; promoted FOXO1 translocation from cytoplasm into the nucleus antagonizing the insulin effect; was able to down-regulate the gene and protein expression of gluconeogenic enzymes; and induced the gene expression of antioxidant and detoxification enzymes. Knockdown analyses with specific siRNAs showed that the expression of gluconeogenic genes was dependent on nuclear factor (erythroid derived)-like2 (NRF2) and independent of FOXO1, AKT and NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-1 (SIRT1). The current study provides evidence that BITC might have a role in type 2 diabetes T2D by reducing hepatic glucose production and increasing antioxidant resistance.

  16. Benzylglucosinolate Derived Isothiocyanate from Tropaeolum majus Reduces Gluconeogenic Gene and Protein Expression in Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Guzmán-Pérez

    Full Text Available Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L. contains high concentrations of benzylglcosinolate. We found that a hydrolysis product of benzyl glucosinolate-the benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC-modulates the intracellular localization of the transcription factor Forkhead box O 1 (FOXO1. FoxO transcription factors can antagonize insulin effects and trigger a variety of cellular processes involved in tumor suppression, longevity, development and metabolism. The current study evaluated the ability of BITC-extracted as intact glucosinolate from nasturtium and hydrolyzed with myrosinase-to modulate i the insulin-signaling pathway, ii the intracellular localization of FOXO1 and, iii the expression of proteins involved in gluconeogenesis, antioxidant response and detoxification. Stably transfected human osteosarcoma cells (U-2 OS with constitutive expression of FOXO1 protein labeled with GFP (green fluorescent protein were used to evaluate the effect of BITC on FOXO1. Human hepatoma HepG2 cell cultures were selected to evaluate the effect on gluconeogenic, antioxidant and detoxification genes and protein expression. BITC reduced the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT/PKB and FOXO1; promoted FOXO1 translocation from cytoplasm into the nucleus antagonizing the insulin effect; was able to down-regulate the gene and protein expression of gluconeogenic enzymes; and induced the gene expression of antioxidant and detoxification enzymes. Knockdown analyses with specific siRNAs showed that the expression of gluconeogenic genes was dependent on nuclear factor (erythroid derived-like2 (NRF2 and independent of FOXO1, AKT and NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-1 (SIRT1. The current study provides evidence that BITC might have a role in type 2 diabetes T2D by reducing hepatic glucose production and increasing antioxidant resistance.

  17. A dark green fluorescent protein as an acceptor for measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Hideji; Shibata, Akihiro C E; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Nabekura, Junichi

    2015-10-15

    Measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM-FRET) is a powerful method for visualization of intracellular signaling activities such as protein-protein interactions and conformational changes of proteins. Here, we developed a dark green fluorescent protein (ShadowG) that can serve as an acceptor for FLIM-FRET. ShadowG is spectrally similar to monomeric enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) and has a 120-fold smaller quantum yield. When FRET from mEGFP to ShadowG was measured using an mEGFP-ShadowG tandem construct with 2-photon FLIM-FRET, we observed a strong FRET signal with low cell-to-cell variability. Furthermore, ShadowG was applied to a single-molecule FRET sensor to monitor a conformational change of CaMKII and of the light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain in HeLa cells. These sensors showed reduced cell-to-cell variability of both the basal fluorescence lifetime and response signal. In contrast to mCherry- or dark-YFP-based sensors, our sensor allowed for precise measurement of individual cell responses. When ShadowG was applied to a separate-type Ras FRET sensor, it showed a greater response signal than did the mCherry-based sensor. Furthermore, Ras activation and translocation of its effector ERK2 into the nucleus could be observed simultaneously. Thus, ShadowG is a promising FLIM-FRET acceptor.

  18. New cell line development for antibody-producing Chinese hamster ovary cells using split green fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Yeon-Gu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The establishment of high producer is an important issue in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell culture considering increased heterogeneity by the random integration of a transfected foreign gene and the altered position of the integrated gene. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS-based cell line development is an efficient strategy for the selection of CHO cells in high therapeutic protein production. Results An internal ribosome entry site (IRES was introduced for using two green fluorescence protein (GFP fragments as a reporter to both antibody chains, the heavy chain and the light chain. The cells co-transfected with two GFP fragments showed the emission of green fluorescence by the reconstitution of split GFP. The FACS-sorted pool with GFP expression had a higher specific antibody productivity (qAb than that of the unsorted pool. The qAb was highly correlated with the fluorescence intensity with a high correlation coefficient, evidenced from the analysis of median GFP and qAb in individual selected clones. Conclusions This study proved that the fragment complementation for split GFP could be an efficient indication for antibody production on the basis of high correlation of qAb with reconstitution of GFP. Taken together, we developed an efficient FACS-based screening method for high antibody-producing CHO cells with the benefits of the split GFP system.

  19. Green synthesis of fluorescence carbon nanoparticles from yum and application in sensitive and selective detection of ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zixuan; Cai, Jiao; Wang, Qi; Su, Yingying; Zhang, Lichun; Lv, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (CPs), a fascinating class of recently discovered nanocarbons, have been widely known as some of the most promising sensing probes in biological or chemical analysis. In this study, we demonstrate a green synthetic methodology for generating water-soluble CPs with a quantum yield of approximately 24% via a simple heating process using yum mucilage as a carbon source. The prepared carbon nanoparticles with an ~10 nm size possessed excellent fluorescence properties, and the fluorescence of the CPs was strongly quenched by Fe(3+), and recovered by adenosine triphosphate (ATP), thus, an 'off' and 'on' system can be easily established. This 'CPs-Fe(3+)-ATP' strategy was sensitive and selective at detecting ATP with the linear range of 0.5 µmol L(-1) to 50 µmol L(-1) and with a detection limit of 0.48 µmol L(-1). Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Monitoring the intracellular pH of Zygosaccharomyces bailii by green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, T D T; De Maeseneire, S L; Zhang, B Y; De Vos, W H; Rajkovic, A; Vermeulen, A; Van Impe, J F; Devlieghere, F

    2012-06-01

    It is generally known that intracellular pH (pH(i)) plays a vital role in cell physiology and that pH(i) homeostasis is essential for normal cellular functions. Therefore, it is desirable to know the pH(i) during cell life cycle or under various growth conditions. Different methods to measure pH(i) have been developed and among these methods, the use of pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a pH(i) indicator is a promising technique. By using this approach, not only can more accurate pH(i) results be obtained but also long-term experiments on pH(i) can be performed. In this study, the wild type Zygosaccharomyces bailii, a notorious food spoilage yeast, was transformed with a plasmid encoding a pH-sensitive GFP (i.e. pHluorin), enabling the pH(i) of the yeast to be determined based on cellular fluorescent signals. After the transformation, growth and pH(i) of the yeast were investigated in four different acidic conditions at 22°C during 26days. From the experimental results, the transformation effectiveness was verified and a good correlation between yeast growth and pH(i) was noticed. Particularly, it was observed that the yeast has an ability to tolerate a significant pH(i) drop during exponential phase and a subsequent pH(i) recovery in stationary phase, which may underlie the exceptional acid resistance of the yeast. This was the first time that a GFP-based approach for pH(i) measurement was applied in Z. bailii and that the pH(i) of the yeast was monitored during such a long period (26days). It can be expected that greater understanding of the physiological properties and mechanisms behind the special acid resistance of the yeast will be obtained from further studies on this new yeast strain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Basis for pH Sensitivity and Proton Transfer in Green Fluorescent Protein: Protonation and Conformational Substates from Electrostatic Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Scharnagl, C.; Raupp-Kossmann, R.; Fischer, S.F.

    1999-01-01

    We performed a theoretical study to elucidate the coupling between protonation states and orientation of protein dipoles and buried water molecules in green fluorescent protein, a versatile biosensor for protein targeting. It is shown that the ionization equilibria of the wild-type green fluorescent protein-fluorophore and the internal proton-binding site E222 are mutually interdependent. Two acid-base transitions of the fluorophore occur in the presence of neutral (physiologic pH) and ionize...

  2. Selective Permeation and Organic Extraction of Recombinant Green Fluorescent Protein (gfpuv from Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Marina

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transformed cells of Escherichia coli DH5-α with pGFPuv, induced by IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside, express the green fluorescent protein (gfpuv during growth phases. E. coli subjected to the combination of selective permeation by freezing/thawing/sonication cycles followed by the three-phase partitioning extraction (TPP method were compared to the direct application of TPP to the same culture of E. coli on releasing gfpuv from the over-expressing cells. Material and Methods Cultures (37°C/100 rpm/ 24 h; μ = 0.99 h-1 - 1.10 h-1 of transformed (pGFP Escherichia coli DH5-α, expressing the green fluorescent protein (gfpuv, absorbance at 394 nm and emission at 509 nm were sonicated in successive intervals of sonication (25 vibrations/pulse to determine the maximum amount of gfpuv released from the cells. For selective permeation, the transformed previously frozen (-75°C cells were subjected to three freeze/thaw (-20°C/ 0.83°C/min cycles interlaid by sonication (3 pulses/ 6 seconds/ 25 vibrations. The intracellular permeate with gfpuv in extraction buffer (TE solution (25 mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0, 1 mM β-mercaptoethanol β-ME, 0.1 mM PMSF was subjected to the three-phase partitioning (TPP method with t-butanol and 1.6 M ammonium sulfate. Sonication efficiency was verified on the application to the cells previously treated by the TPP method. The intra-cell releases were mixed and eluted through methyl HIC column with a buffer solution (10 mM Tris-HCl, 10 mM EDTA, pH 8.0. Results The sonication maximum released amount obtained from the cells was 327.67 μg gfpuv/mL (20.73 μg gfpuv/mg total proteins – BSA, after 9 min of treatment. Through the selective permeation by three repeated freezing/thawing/sonication cycles applied to the cells, a close content of 241.19 μg gfpuv/mL (29.74 μg gfpuv/mg BSA was obtained. The specific mass range of gfpuv released from the same cultures, by the three-phase partitioning (TPP

  3. Infectious bursal disease virus as a replication-incompetent viral vector expressing green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Yung-Yi C; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2017-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) has been established as a replication-competent viral vector capable of carrying an epitope at multiple loci in the genome. To enhance the safety and increase the insertion capacity of IBDV as a vector, a replication-incompetent IBDV vector was developed in the present study. The feasibility of replacing one of the viral gene loci, including pvp2, vp3, vp1, or the polyprotein vp243, with the sequence of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was explored. A method combining TCID 50 and immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) determined the most feasible locus for gene replacement to be pvp2. The genomic segment containing gfp at the pvp2 locus was able to be encapsidated into IBDV particles. Furthermore, the expression of GFP in GFP-IBDV infected cells was confirmed by Western blotting and GFP-IBDV particles showed similar morphology and size to that of wildtype IBDV by electron microscopy. By providing the deleted protein in trans in a packaging cell line (pVP2-DF1), replication-incompetent GFP-IBDV particles were successfully plaque-quantified. The gfp sequence from the plaque-forming GFP-IBDV in pVP2-DF1 was confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. To our knowledge, GFP-IBDV developed in the present study is the first replication-incompetent IBDV vector which expresses a foreign protein in infected cells without the capability to produce viral progeny. Additionally, such replication-incompetent IBDV vectors could serve as bivalent vaccine vectors for conferring protection against infections with IBDV and other economically important, or zoonotic, avian pathogens.

  4. Looking at the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) chromophore from a different perspective: A computational insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-02-01

    In the present contribution Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been applied to explore molecular dipole moment, frontier molecular orbital (FMO) features, chemical hardness, and the molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPS) characteristics for optimized molecular geometry of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) chromophore p-hydroxybenzylideneimidazolinone (HBDI) both in its protonated (neutral) and deprotonated (anion) forms. The distribution of atomic charges over the entire molecular framework as obtained from Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis is found to faithfully replicate the predictions from the MEP map in respect of reactivity map of HBDI (neutral and anion) and possible sites for hydrogen bonding interactions etc. The three dimensional MEP map encompassing the entire molecule yields a reliable reactivity map of HBDI molecule also displaying the most probable regions for non-covalent interactions. The differential distribution of the electrostatic potential over the neutral and anionic species of HBDI is authentically reflected on MEP map and NBO charge distribution analysis. Thermodynamic properties such as heat capacity, thermal energy, enthalpy, entropy have been calculated and the correlation of the various thermodynamic functions with temperature has been established for neutral molecule. More importantly, however, the computational approach has been employed to unveil the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of protonated (neutral) and deprotonated (anion) HBDI. Also in an endeavor to achieve a fuller understanding on this aspect the effect of basis set on the NLO properties of the title molecule has been investigated. Our computations delineate the discernible differences in NLO properties between the neutral and anionic species of HBDI whereby indicating the possibility of development of photoswitchable NLO device.

  5. Parathyroid gland angiography with indocyanine green fluorescence to predict parathyroid function after thyroid surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Fortuny, J; Belfontali, V; Sadowski, S M; Karenovics, W; Guigard, S; Triponez, F

    2016-04-01

    Postoperative hypoparathyroidism remains the most common complication following thyroidectomy. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the use of intraoperative parathyroid gland angiography in predicting normal parathyroid gland function after thyroid surgery. Angiography with the fluorescent dye indocyanine green (ICG) was performed in patients undergoing total thyroidectomy, to visualize vascularization of identified parathyroid glands. Some 36 patients underwent ICG angiography during thyroidectomy. All patients received standard calcium and vitamin D supplementation. At least one well vascularized parathyroid gland was demonstrated by ICG angiography in 30 patients. All 30 patients had parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels in the normal range on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 10, and only one patient exhibited asymptomatic hypocalcaemia on POD 1. Mean(s.d.) PTH and calcium levels in these patients were 3·3(1·4) pmol/l and 2·27(0·10) mmol/l respectively on POD 1, and 4·0(1.6) pmol/l and 2·32(0·08) mmol/l on POD 10. Two of the six patients in whom no well vascularized parathyroid gland could be demonstrated developed transient hypoparathyroidism. None of the 36 patients presented symptomatic hypocalcaemia, and none received treatment for hypoparathyroidism. PTH levels on POD 1 were normal in all patients who had at least one well vascularized parathyroid gland demonstrated during surgery by ICG angiography, and none required treatment for hypoparathyroidism. © 2016 The Authors. BJS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of BJS Society Ltd.

  6. Accurate thermometry based on the red and green fluorescence intensity ratio in NaYF4: Yb, Er nanocrystals for bioapplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixin; Qin, Feng; Lv, Tianquan; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2016-10-15

    A biological temperature measurement method based on the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) was developed to reduce uncertainty. The upconversion luminescence of NaYF4:Yb, Er nanocrystals was studied as a function of temperature around the physiologically relevant range of 300-330 K. We found that the green-green FIR Fe and red-green FIR (I660/I540) varied linearly as temperature increased. The thermometric uncertainties using the two FIRs were discussed and were determined to be almost constant at 0.6 and 0.09 K for green-green and red-green, respectively. The lower thermometric uncertainty comes from the intense signal-to-noise ratio of the measured FIRs owing to their comparable fluorescence intensities.

  7. "Turn-off" fluorescent sensor for highly sensitive and specific simultaneous recognition of 29 famous green teas based on quantum dots combined with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Fan, Yao; Fu, Haiyan; Chen, Feng; Ni, Chuang; Wang, Jinxing; Yin, Qiaobo; Mu, Qingling; Yang, Tianming; She, Yuanbin

    2017-04-22

    Fluorescent "turn-off" sensors based on water-soluble quantum dots (QDs) have drawn increasing attention owing to their unique properties such as high fluorescence quantum yields, chemical stability and low toxicity. In this work, a novel method based on the fluorescence "turn-off" model with water-soluble CdTe QDs as the fluorescent probes for differentiation of 29 different famous green teas is established. The fluorescence of the QDs can be quenched in different degrees in light of positions and intensities of the fluorescent peaks for the green teas. Subsequently, with aid of classic partial least square discriminant analysis (PLSDA), all the green teas can be discriminated with high sensitivity, specificity and a satisfactory recognition rate of 100% for training set and 98.3% for prediction set, respectively. Especially, the "turn-off" fluorescence PLSDA model based on second-order derivatives (2nd der) with reduced least complexity (LVs = 3) was the most effective one for modeling. Most importantly, we further demonstrated the established "turn-off" fluorescent sensor mode has several significant advantages and appealing properties over the conventional fluorescent method for large-class-number classification (LCNC) of green teas. This work is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report on the rapid and effective identification of so many kinds of famous green teas based on the "turn-off" model of QDs combined with chemometrics, which also implies other potential applications on complex LCNC classification system with weak fluorescence or even without fluorescence to achieve higher detective response and specificity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Amphioxus encodes the largest known family of green fluorescent proteins, which have diversified into distinct functional classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deheyn Dimitri D

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green fluorescent protein (GFP has been found in a wide range of Cnidaria, a basal group of metazoans in which it is associated with pigmentation, fluorescence, and light absorbance. A GFP has been recently discovered in the pigmentless chordate Branchiostoma floridae (amphioxus that shows intense fluorescence mainly in the head region. Results The amphioxus genome encodes 16 closely-related GFP-like proteins, all of which appear to be under purifying selection. We divide them into 6 clades based on protein sequence identity and show that representatives of each clade have significant differences in fluorescence intensity, extinction coefficients, and absorption profiles. Furthermore, GFPs from two clades exhibit antioxidant capacity. We therefore propose that amphioxus GFPs have diversified their functions into fluorescence, redox, and perhaps just light absorption in relation to pigmentation and/or photoprotection. Conclusion The rapid radiation of amphioxus GFP into clades with distinct functions and spectral properties reveals functional plasticity of the GFP core. The high sequence similarities between different clades provide a model system to map sequence variation to functional changes, to better understand and engineer GFP.

  9. Excited-state structural dynamics of a dual-emission calmodulin-green fluorescent protein sensor for calcium ion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, Breland G; Liu, Weimin; Zhao, Yongxin; Tang, Longteng; Wang, Yanli; Campbell, Robert E; Fang, Chong

    2014-07-15

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have played a pivotal role in bioimaging and advancing biomedicine. The versatile fluorescence from engineered, genetically encodable FP variants greatly enhances cellular imaging capabilities, which are dictated by excited-state structural dynamics of the embedded chromophore inside the protein pocket. Visualization of the molecular choreography of the photoexcited chromophore requires a spectroscopic technique capable of resolving atomic motions on the intrinsic timescale of femtosecond to picosecond. We use femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy to study the excited-state conformational dynamics of a recently developed FP-calmodulin biosensor, GEM-GECO1, for calcium ion (Ca(2+)) sensing. This study reveals that, in the absence of Ca(2+), the dominant skeletal motion is a ∼ 170 cm(-1) phenol-ring in-plane rocking that facilitates excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) with a time constant of ∼ 30 ps (6 times slower than wild-type GFP) to reach the green fluorescent state. The functional relevance of the motion is corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. Upon Ca(2+) binding, this in-plane rocking motion diminishes, and blue emission from a trapped photoexcited neutral chromophore dominates because ESPT is inhibited. Fluorescence properties of site-specific protein mutants lend further support to functional roles of key residues including proline 377 in modulating the H-bonding network and fluorescence outcome. These crucial structural dynamics insights will aid rational design in bioengineering to generate versatile, robust, and more sensitive optical sensors to detect Ca(2+) in physiologically relevant environments.

  10. Embedding and Chemical Reactivation of Green Fluorescent Protein in the Whole Mouse Brain for Optical Micro-Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Yadong; Zhou, Hongfu; Jia, Yao; Liu, Ling; Liu, Xiuli; Rao, Gong; Li, Longhui; Wang, Xiaojun; Lv, Xiaohua; Xiong, Hanqing; Yang, Zhongqin; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2017-01-01

    Resin embedding has been widely applied to fixing biological tissues for sectioning and imaging, but has long been regarded as incompatible with green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled sample because it reduces fluorescence. Recently, it has been reported that resin-embedded GFP-labeled brain tissue can be imaged with high resolution. In this protocol, we describe an optimized protocol for resin embedding and chemical reactivation of fluorescent protein labeled mouse brain, we have used mice as experiment model, but the protocol should be applied to other species. This method involves whole brain embedding and chemical reactivation of the fluorescent signal in resin-embedded tissue. The whole brain embedding process takes a total of 7 days. The duration of chemical reactivation is ~2 min for penetrating 4 μm below the surface in the resin-embedded brain. This protocol provides an efficient way to prepare fluorescent protein labeled sample for high-resolution optical imaging. This kind of sample was demonstrated to be imaged by various optical micro-imaging methods. Fine structures labeled with GFP across a whole brain can be detected.

  11. A novel duct-lobular segmentectomy for breast tumors with nipple discharge using near-infrared indocyanine green fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ohno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A 44-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with pathological nipple discharge from her left breast. Ultrasonography revealed a solid tumor beneath her left areola that measured 17 mm in diameter with a dilated mammary duct. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed an early-enhanced cystic tumor and a dilated mammary duct. We performed a duct-lobular segmentectomy using near-infrared indocyanine green (ICG-fluorescence imaging. Under general anesthesia, a silicone tube was inserted into an orifice of a fluid-discharging mammary duct, and 1 mL dye-fluorescence liquid containing ICG and indigo carmine was injected into the mammary duct. A periareolar incision was made, and the fluorescence image of the demarcated mammary duct segment was obtained. The mammary duct segment was dissected, along with the demarcation line. The cystic lesion and dilated mammary duct were fully resected, and the pathological diagnosis was intraductal papilloma of the breast. We report that near-infrared ICG fluorescence could be applied for imaging of the mammary duct segment, and the fluorescence image allowed for easier duct-lobular segmentectomy for nipple discharge.

  12. TRPM4 protein expression in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Soldini, Davide; Jung, Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 4 (TRPM4) messenger RNA (mRNA) has been shown to be upregulated in prostate cancer (PCa) and might be a new promising tissue biomarker. We evaluated TRPM4 protein expression and correlated the expression level.......79-2.62; p = 0.01-0.03 for the two observers) when compared to patients with a lower staining intensity. CONCLUSIONS: TRPM4 protein expression is widely expressed in benign and cancerous prostate tissue, with highest staining intensities found in PCa. Overexpression of TRPM4 in PCa (combination of high...

  13. Crystal structure of the fluorescent protein from Dendronephthya sp. in both green and photoconverted red forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Sergei; Pakhomov, Alexey A.; Chertkova, Rita V.; Martynov, Vladimir I.; Muslinkina, Liya; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir Z.

    2016-07-13

    The fluorescent protein fromDendronephthyasp. (DendFP) is a member of the Kaede-like group of photoconvertible fluorescent proteins with a His62-Tyr63-Gly64 chromophore-forming sequence. Upon irradiation with UV and blue light, the fluorescence of DendFP irreversibly changes from green (506 nm) to red (578 nm). The photoconversion is accompanied by cleavage of the peptide backbone at the Cα—N bond of His62 and the formation of a terminal carboxamide group at the preceding Leu61. The resulting double Cα=Cβbond in His62 extends the conjugation of the chromophore π system to include imidazole, providing the red fluorescence. Here, the three-dimensional structures of native green and photoconverted red forms of DendFP determined at 1.81 and 2.14 Å resolution, respectively, are reported. This is the first structure of photoconverted red DendFP to be reported to date. The structure-based mutagenesis of DendFP revealed an important role of positions 142 and 193: replacement of the original Ser142 and His193 caused a moderate red shift in the fluorescence and a considerable increase in the photoconversion rate. It was demonstrated that hydrogen bonding of the chromophore to the Gln116 and Ser105 cluster is crucial for variation of the photoconversion rate. The single replacement Gln116Asn disrupts the hydrogen bonding of Gln116 to the chromophore, resulting in a 30-fold decrease in the photoconversion rate, which was partially restored by a further Ser105Asn replacement.

  14. Development of CRTEIL and CETRIZ, Cre-loxP-Based Systems, Which Allow Change of Expression of Red to Green or Green to Red Fluorescence upon Transfection with a Cre-Expression Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Ohtsuka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed Cre-loxP-based systems, termed CRTEIL and CETRIZ, which allow gene switching in a noninvasive manner. Single transfection with pCRTEIL resulted in predominant expression of red fluorescence. Cotransfection with pCRTEIL and Cre-expression plasmid (pCAG/NCre caused switching from red to green fluorescence. Similarly, cotransfection with pCETRIZ and pCAG/NCre resulted in change of green to red fluorescence. These noninvasive systems will be useful in cell lineage analysis, since descendants of cells exhibiting newly activated gene expression can be continuously monitored in noninvasive fashion.

  15. Construction of a plasmid coding for green fluorescent protein tagged cathepsin L and data on expression in colorectal carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Tamhane

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The endo-lysosomal cysteine cathepsin L has recently been shown to have moonlighting activities in that its unexpected nuclear localization in colorectal carcinoma cells is involved in cell cycle progression (Tamhane et al., 2015 [1]. Here, we show data on the construction and sequence of a plasmid coding for human cathepsin L tagged with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (phCL-EGFP in which the fluorescent protein is covalently attached to the C-terminus of the protease. The plasmid was used for transfection of HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells, while data from non-transfected and pEGFP-N1-transfected cells is also shown. Immunoblotting data of lysates from non-transfected controls and HCT116 cells transfected with pEGFP-N1 and phCL-EGFP, showed stable expression of cathepsin L-enhanced green fluorescent protein chimeras, while endogenous cathepsin L protein amounts exceed those of hCL-EGFP chimeras. An effect of phCL-EGFP expression on proliferation and metabolic states of HCT116 cells at 24 h post-transfection was observed.

  16. Label-free fluorescent detection of thrombin activity based on a recombinant enhanced green fluorescence protein and nickel ions immobilized nitrilotriacetic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Lei, Chunyang; Nie, Zhou; Guo, Manli; Huang, Yan; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-11-15

    Herein, a novel label-free fluorescent assay has been developed to detect the activity of thrombin and its inhibitor, based on a recombinant enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and Ni(2+) ions immobilized nitrilotriacetic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Ni(2+)-NTA MNPs). The EGFP, containing a thrombin cleavage site and a hexahistidine sequence (His-tag) at its N-terminal, was adsorbed onto Ni(2+)-NTA MNPs through Ni(2+)-hexahistidine interaction, and dragged out of the solution by magnetic separation. Thrombin can selectively digest EGFP accompanied by His-tag peptide sequence leaving, and the resulting EGFP cannot be captured by Ni(2+)-NTA MNPs and kept in supernatant. Hence the fluorescence change of supernatant can clearly represent the activity of thrombin. Under optimized conditions, such assay showed a relatively low detection limit (3.0×10(-4) U mL(-1)), and was also used to detect the thrombin inhibitor, Hirudin, and further applied to detect thrombin activity in serum. Combined with the satisfactory reusability of Ni(2+)-NTA MNPs, our method presents a promising candidate for simple, sensitive, and cost-saving protease activity detecting and inhibitor screening. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Asante Calcium Green and Asante Calcium Red--novel calcium indicators for two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Jahn

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and potential dysfunctions therein, an analysis of the ubiquitous intracellular second messenger calcium is of particular interest. This study examined the suitability of the novel Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dyes Asante Calcium Red (ACR and Asante Calcium Green (ACG for two-photon (2P-excited time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Both dyes displayed sufficient 2P fluorescence excitation in a range of 720-900 nm. In vitro, ACR and ACG exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay behavior and the two decay time components in the ns-range could be attributed to the Ca(2+-free and Ca(2+-bound dye species. The amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay time changed in a Ca(2+-dependent way, unraveling in vitro dissociation constants K(D of 114 nM and 15 nM for ACR and ACG, respectively. In the presence of bovine serum albumin, the absorption and steady-state fluorescence behavior of ACR was altered and its biexponential fluorescence decay showed about 5-times longer decay time components indicating dye-protein interactions. Since no ester derivative of ACG was commercially available, only ACR was evaluated for 2P-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM in living cells of American cockroach salivary glands. In living cells, ACR also exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay with clearly resolvable short (0.56 ns and long (2.44 ns decay time components attributable to the Ca(2+-free and Ca(2+-bound ACR species. From the amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay times, an in situ K(D of 180 nM was determined. Thus, quantitative [Ca(2+]i recordings were realized, unraveling a reversible dopamine-induced [Ca(2+]i elevation from 21 nM to 590 nM in salivary duct cells. It was concluded that ACR is a promising new Ca(2+ indicator dye for 2P-FLIM recordings applicable in diverse biological systems.

  18. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from green fluorescent protein positive (GFP+) transgenic rodents: the grass is not always green(er).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, Matthew T; Jimenez, Fernando; Cox, Charles S

    2009-01-01

    Cellular therapy is under intense basic science and clinical investigation as a therapeutic intervention. One of the challenges lies in tracking these cells in vivo. While there are many ways to label and track cells--each with strengths and weaknesses--the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a reporter gene commonly employed. We report a significant and consistent reduction in the expression of GFP with the culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from the bone marrow of GFP(+) transgenic rodents. After MSC isolation and immunophenotype characterization, along with co-localization with GFP, MSCs were evaluated for GFP expression through flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy, revealing that only 50% of the cells expressed GFP. Differentiation of the cells to adipocytes did not alter the GFP expression significantly. Incubation with an anti-GFP antibody increased the fluorescent intensity of the GFP-expressing and some of the GFP nonexpressing cells. Incubation of MSCs with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A, did not significantly alter GFP expression, while incubation with a DNA demethylation reagent, 5-azacytidine, increased GFP expression, suggesting that epigenetic modification by DNA methylation may play a role in GFP expression among MSCs.

  19. Tunable recombinant protein expression with E. coli in a mixed-feed environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagmeister, Patrick; Schimek, Clemens; Meitz, Andrea; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2014-04-01

    Controlling the recombinant protein production rate in Escherichia coli is of utmost importance to ensure product quality and quantity. Up to now, only the genetic construct, introduced into E. coli, and the specific growth rate of the culture were used to influence and stir the productivity. However, bioprocess technological means to control or even tune the productivity of E. coli are scarce. Here, we present a novel method for the process-technological control over the recombinant protein expression rate in E. coli. A mixed-feed fed-batch bioprocess based on the araBAD promoter expression system using both D-glucose and L-arabinose as assimilable C-sources was designed. Using the model product green fluorescent protein, we show that the specific product formation rate can be efficiently tuned even on the cellular level only via the uptake rate of L-arabinose. This novel approach introduces an additional degree of freedom for the design of recombinant bioprocesses with E. coli. We anticipate that the presented method will result in significant quality and robustness improvement as well as cost and process time reduction for recombinant bacterial bioprocesses in the future.

  20. Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... [Ganguli P, Chowdhury S, Bhowmick R and Sarkar RR 2015 Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling cascade during T-cell activation: A ... cells and tissues by studying different signalling pathways, such as Hedgehog ...... Murray JD 2003 On the mechanochemical theory of biological.

  1. A Rapid Label-Free Fluorescent Aptasensor PicoGreen-Based Strategy for Aflatoxin B₁ Detection in Traditional Chinese Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Dou, Xiaowen; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Meifeng; Zhao, Ming; OuYang, Zhen; Kong, Dandan; Antonio, F Logrieco; Yang, Meihua

    2018-02-28

    Aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁) is a very hazardous carcinogen, readily contaminating foodstuffs and traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) that has inspired increasing health concerns due to dietary exposure. Colloidal nanocrystals have been proposed as optical labels for aptasensor assembly, but these typically require tedious multistep conjugation and suffer from unsatisfactory robustness when used for complex matrices. In the present study, we report a rapid and sensitive method for screening for trace AFB₁ levels in TCMs using a label-free fluorescent aptasensor PicoGreen dye-based strategy. Using PicoGreen to selectively measure complementary double-stranded DNA, fluorescence enhancement due to dsDNA is 'turned off' in the presence of AFB₁ due binding of aptamer target over complementary sequence. Self-assembly of a label-free fluorescent aptasensor based on AFB₁ aptamer and PicoGreen dye was performed. Due to competition between the complementary sequence and AFB₁ target, this rapid method was capable of highly sensitive and selective screening for AFB₁ in five types of TCMs. This proposed approach had a limit of detection as low as 0.1 μg·L -1 and good linearity with a range of 0.1-10 μg·L -1 (0.1-10 ppb). Among the 20 samples tested, 6 batches were found to be contaminated with AFB₁ using this method, which was confirmed using sophisticated liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis. The results of this study indicate the developed method has the potential to be a simple, quick, and sensitive tool for detecting AFB₁ in TCMs.

  2. Early Reporting of Apoptosis by Real-time Imaging of Cancer Cells Labeled with Green Fluorescent Protein in the Nucleus and Red Fluorescent Protein in the Cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Jiang, Ping; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-05-01

    We previously developed PC-3 human prostate cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) in the cytoplasm and green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to histone H2B expressed in the nucleus. We demonstrate in the present report the use of these dual-color cells for early detection of apoptosis in the presence of cancer chemotherapy agents. Induction of apoptosis was observed by real-time imaging of cytoplasmic and nuclear size and shape changes and nuclear fragmentation using fluorescence microscopy. Apoptosis was also detected by measuring DNA fragmentation. The cancer chemotherapy agents paclitaxel and vinblastine were used for induction of apoptosis. When the PC-3 dual-color cells were treated with paclitaxel or vinblastine, cytoplasmic and nuclear size and shape changes and nuclear fragmentation were observed by 24 hours. The paclitaxel-treated PC-3 dual-color cells exhibited ring-like structures formed by the fragmented nuclei, which could be brightly visualized by H2B-GFP fluorescence. Apoptosis was also detected by the dual-color PC-3 cells by 24 hours when treated with vinblastine. However, no nuclear ring-like structures were formed in the PC-3 cells by vinblastine treatment. In contrast, DNA fragmentation could not be observed in PC-3 cells until 48 hours after exposure to paclitaxel. Dual-color PC-3 cells can serve as a simple real-time early reporter of apoptosis and as a screen for novel cancer therapeutics or genotoxic agents. The dual-color cell real-time imaging assay is a more sensitive and earlier reporter for apoptosis than the DNA fragmentation assay. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of the minimal region in lipase ABC transporter recognition domain of Pseudomonas fluorescens for secretion and fluorescence of green fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Yeonwoo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TliA is a thermostable lipase secreted by the type 1 secretion system (T1SS of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The secretion is promoted by its secretion/chaperone domain located near the C-terminus, which is composed mainly of four Repeat-in-Toxin (RTX repeats. In order to identify the minimal region of TliA responsible for its secretion, five different copies of the secretion/chaperone domain, each involving truncated N-terminal residues and a common C-terminus, were acquired and named as lipase ABC transporter recognition domains (LARDs. Each LARD was fused to epidermal growth factor (EGF or green fluorescent protein (GFP, and the secretion of EGF-LARD or GFP-LARD fusion proteins was assessed in Escherichia coli with ABC transporter. Results Among the fusion proteins, GFP or EGF with 105-residue LARD3 was most efficiently secreted. In addition, GFP-LARD3 emitted wild type GFP fluorescence. Structurally, LARD3 had the 4 RTX repeats exposed at the N-terminus, while other LARDs had additional residues prior to them or missed some of the RTX repeats. LARD3 was both necessary and sufficient for efficient secretion and maintenance of GFP fluorescence in E. coli, which was also confirmed in P. fluorescens and P. fluorescens ▵tliA, a knock-out mutant of tliA. Conclusion LARD3 was a potent secretion signal in T1SS for its fusion flanking RTX motif, which enhanced secretion and preserved the fluorescence of GFP. LARD3-mediated secretion in E. coli or P. fluorescens will enable the development of enhanced protein manufacturing factory and recombinant microbe secreting protein of interest in situ.

  4. Peptide aptamer-assisted immobilization of green fluorescent protein for creating biomolecule-complexed carbon nanotube device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Daisuke; Nozawa, Yosuke; Miyachi, Mariko; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Tomo, Tatsuya; Shimada, Yuichiro

    2017-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a novel material for next-generation applications. In this study, we generated carbon nanotube and green fluorescent protein (GFP) conjugates using affinity binding peptides. The carbon nanotube-binding motif was introduced into the N-terminus of the GFP through molecular biology methods. Multiple GFPs were successfully aligned on a single-walled carbon nanotube via the molecular recognition function of the peptide aptamer, which was confirmed through transmission electron microscopy and optical analysis. Fluorescence spectral analysis results also suggested that the carbon nanotube-GFP complex was autonomously formed with orientation and without causing protein denaturation during immobilization. This simple process has a widespread potential for fabricating carbon nanotube-biomolecule hybrid devices.

  5. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics of stabilized A state mutants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP): Snipping the proton wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner-Ma, Deborah; Jaye, Andrew A.; Ronayne, Kate L.; Nappa, Jérôme; Tonge, Peter J.; Meech, Stephen R.

    2008-06-01

    Two blue absorbing and emitting mutants (S65G/T203V/E222Q and S65T at pH 5.5) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) have been investigated through ultrafast time resolved infra-red (TRIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy. In these mutants, in which the excited state proton transfer reaction observed in wild-type GFP has been blocked, the photophysics are dominated by the neutral A state. It was found that the A∗ excited state lifetime is short, indicating that it is relatively less stabilised in the protein matrix than the anionic form. However, the lifetime of the A state can be increased through modifications to the protein structure. The TRIR spectra show that a large shifts in protein vibrational modes on excitation of the A state occurs in both these GFP mutants. This is ascribed to a change in H-bonding interactions between the protein matrix and the excited state.

  6. Competition between photodetachment and autodetachment of the 21ππ* state of the green fluorescent protein chromophore anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooney, Ciarán R. S.; Parkes, Michael A.; Zhang, Lijuan; Hailes, Helen C.; Fielding, Helen H.; Simperler, Alexandra; Bearpark, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and quantum chemistry calculations, we have identified competing electron emission processes that contribute to the 350–315 nm photoelectron spectra of the deprotonated green fluorescent protein chromophore anion, p-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone. As well as direct electron detachment from S 0 , we observe resonant excitation of the 2 1 ππ* state of the anion followed by autodetachment. The experimental photoelectron spectra are found to be significantly broader than photoelectron spectrum calculated using the Franck-Condon method and we attribute this to rapid (∼10 fs) vibrational decoherence, or intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution, within the neutral radical

  7. Role of Untranslated Regions in Regulation of Gene Expression, Replication, and Pathogenicity of Newcastle Disease Virus Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Samal, Siba K.

    2009-01-01

    To gain insight into the role of untranslated regions (UTRs) in regulation of foreign gene expression, replication, and pathogenicity of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene flanked by 5′ and 3′ UTRs of each NDV gene was individually expressed by recombinant NDVs. UTRs of each gene modulated GFP expression positively or negatively. In particular, UTRs of the M and F genes enhanced levels of GFP expression at the junction of the P and M genes without altering r...

  8. Role of untranslated regions in regulation of gene expression, replication, and pathogenicity of Newcastle disease virus expressing green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Samal, Siba K

    2010-03-01

    To gain insight into the role of untranslated regions (UTRs) in regulation of foreign gene expression, replication, and pathogenicity of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene flanked by 5' and 3' UTRs of each NDV gene was individually expressed by recombinant NDVs. UTRs of each gene modulated GFP expression positively or negatively. In particular, UTRs of the M and F genes enhanced levels of GFP expression at the junction of the P and M genes without altering replication of NDV, suggesting that UTRs could be used for enhanced expression of a foreign gene by NDV.

  9. Normal modes and the Duschinsky mixing of the ground- and excited-state vibrations of the green fluorescent protein chromophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran

    2013-11-01

    Ground- and excited-state vibrational frequencies were calculated for the chromophore of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method and detailed normal-mode analyses were carried out for ground and excited states. The mixing of the vibrational modes between the different states was studied by applying the Duschinsky effect by the expressing excited-state normal modes in terms of the ground-state normal modes. It was found that the low-frequency vibrational modes in the vertical excited state play a significant role in structural adjustment.

  10. The mechanism of dehydration in chromophore maturation of wild-type green fluorescent protein: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingying; Yu, Jian-Guo; Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Smith, Sean C.

    2015-07-01

    An interesting aspect of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is its autocatalytic chromophore maturation. Numerous experimental studies have indicated that dehydration is the last step in the chromophore maturation process of wild-type GFP. Based on the crystal structure of wild-type GFP, the mechanism of the reverse reaction of dehydration was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) in this study. Our results proposed that the dehydration is exothermic. Moreover, the rate-limiting step of the mechanism is the proton on guanidinium of Arg96 transferring to the β-carbon anion of Tyr66, which is consistent with the experimental observation.

  11. Variable selection based on clustering analysis for improvement of polyphenols prediction in green tea using synchronous fluorescence spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jiajia; Wang, Xue; Zhou, Hao; Han, Shuqing; Riza, Dimas Firmanda Al; Kondo, Naoshi

    2018-04-01

    Synchronous fluorescence spectra, combined with multivariate analysis were used to predict flavonoids content in green tea rapidly and nondestructively. This paper presented a new and efficient spectral intervals selection method called clustering based partial least square (CL-PLS), which selected informative wavelengths by combining clustering concept and partial least square (PLS) methods to improve models’ performance by synchronous fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence spectra of tea samples were obtained and k-means and kohonen-self organizing map clustering algorithms were carried out to cluster full spectra into several clusters, and sub-PLS regression model was developed on each cluster. Finally, CL-PLS models consisting of gradually selected clusters were built. Correlation coefficient (R) was used to evaluate the effect on prediction performance of PLS models. In addition, variable influence on projection partial least square (VIP-PLS), selectivity ratio partial least square (SR-PLS), interval partial least square (iPLS) models and full spectra PLS model were investigated and the results were compared. The results showed that CL-PLS presented the best result for flavonoids prediction using synchronous fluorescence spectra.

  12. Different visible colors and green fluorescence were obtained from the mutated purple chromoprotein isolated from sea anemone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Yi-Lin; Tsai, Huai-Jen

    2014-08-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like proteins have been studied with the aim of developing fluorescent proteins. Since the property of color variation is understudied, we isolated a novel GFP-like chromoprotein from the carpet anemone Stichodactyla haddoni, termed shCP. Its maximum absorption wavelength peak (λ(max)) is located at 574 nm, resulting in a purple color. The shCP protein consists of 227 amino acids (aa), sharing 96 % identity with the GFP-like chromoprotein of Heteractis crispa. We mutated aa residues to examine any alteration in color. When E63, the first aa of the chromophore, was replaced by serine (E63S), the λ(max) of the mutated protein shCP-E63S was shifted to 560 nm and exhibited a pink color. When Q39, T194, and I196, which reside in the surrounding 5 Å of the chromophore's microenvironment, were mutated, we found that (1) the λ(max) of the mutated protein shCP-Q39S was shifted to 518 nm and exhibited a red color, (2) shCP-T194I exhibited a purple-blue color, and (3) an additional mutation at I196H of the mutated protein shCP-E63L exhibited green fluorescence. In contrast, when the aa located neither at the chromophore nor within its microenvironment were mutated, the resultant proteins shCP-L122H, -E138G, -S137D, -T95I, -D129N, -T194V, -E138Q, -G75E, -I183V, and -I70V never altered their purple color, suggesting that mutations at the shCP chromophore and the surrounding 5 Å microenvironment mostly control changes in color expression or cause fluorescence to develop. Additionally, we found that the cDNAs of shCP and its mutated varieties are faithfully and stably expressed both in Escherichia coli and zebrafish embryos.

  13. Satellite chlorophyll fluorescence measurements reveal large-scale decoupling of photosynthesis and greenness dynamics in boreal evergreen forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Sophia; Voigt, Maximilian; Thum, Tea; Gonsamo, Alemu; Zhang, Yongguang; Köhler, Philipp; Jung, Martin; Varlagin, Andrej; Guanter, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Mid-to-high latitude forests play an important role in the terrestrial carbon cycle, but the representation of photosynthesis in boreal forests by current modelling and observational methods is still challenging. In particular, the applicability of existing satellite-based proxies of greenness to indicate photosynthetic activity is hindered by small annual changes in green biomass of the often evergreen tree population and by the confounding effects of background materials such as snow. As an alternative, satellite measurements of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) can be used as a direct proxy of photosynthetic activity. In this study, the start and end of the photosynthetically active season of the main boreal forests are analysed using spaceborne SIF measurements retrieved from the GOME-2 instrument and compared to that of green biomass, proxied by vegetation indices including the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) derived from MODIS data. We find that photosynthesis and greenness show a similar seasonality in deciduous forests. In high-latitude evergreen needleleaf forests, however, the length of the photosynthetically active period indicated by SIF is up to 6 weeks longer than the green biomass changing period proxied by EVI, with SIF showing a start-of-season of approximately 1 month earlier than EVI. On average, the photosynthetic spring recovery as signalled by SIF occurs as soon as air temperatures exceed the freezing point (2-3 °C) and when the snow on the ground has not yet completely melted. These findings are supported by model data of gross primary production and a number of other studies which evaluated in situ observations of CO2 fluxes, meteorology and the physiological state of the needles. Our results demonstrate the sensitivity of space-based SIF measurements to light-use efficiency of boreal forests and their potential for an unbiased detection of photosynthetic activity even under the challenging conditions interposed by evergreen

  14. "Turn-off" fluorescent sensor based on double quantum dots coupled with chemometrics for highly sensitive and specific recognition of 53 famous green teas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ou; Xu, Lu; Fu, Haiyan; Yang, Tianming; Fan, Yao; Lan, Wei; Tang, Hebing; Wu, Yu; Ma, Lixia; Wu, Di; Wang, Yuan; Xiao, Zuobing; She, Yuanbin

    2018-05-30

    Fluorescent "turn-off" sensors based on double quantum dots (QDs) has attracted increasing attention in the detection of many materials due to their properties such as more useful information, higher fluorescence efficiency and stability compared with the fluorescent "turn-off" sensors based on single QDs. In this work, highly sensitive and specific method for recognition of 53 different famous green teas was developed based on the fluorescent "turn-off" model with water-soluble ZnCdSe-CdTe double QDs. The fluorescence of the two QDs can be quenched by different teas with varying degrees, which results in the differences in positions and intensities of two peaks. By the combination of classic partial least square discriminant analysis (PLSDA), all the green teas can be discriminated with high sensitivity, specificity and a satisfactory recognition rate of 100% for training set and 100% for prediction set, respectively. The fluorescent "turn-off" sensors based on the single QDs (either ZnCdSe QDs or CdTe QDs) coupled with PLSDA were also employed to recognize the 53 famous green teas with unsatisfactory results. Therefore, the fluorescent "turn-off" sensors based on the double QDs is more appropriate for the large-class-number classification (LCNC) of green teas. Herein, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that so many kinds of famous green teas can be discriminated by the "turn-off" model of double QDs combined with chemometrics, which has largely extended the capability of traditional fluorescence and chemometrics, as well as exhibits great potential to perform LCNC in other practical applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  16. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Lam, Amy J; Kim, Bongjae B; Jacobs, Conor L; Howe, Elizabeth S; Davidson, Michael W; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-02-16

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude.

  17. [Artificial Cysteine Bridges on the Surface of Green Fluorescent Protein Affect Hydration of Its Transition and Intermediate States].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, T N; Nagibina, G S; Surin, A K; Glukhova, K A; Melnik, B S

    2018-01-01

    Studying the effect of cysteine bridges on different energy levels of multistage folding proteins will enable a better understanding of the process of folding and functioning of globular proteins. In particular, it will create prospects for directed change in the stability and rate of protein folding. In this work, using the method of differential scanning microcalorimetry, we have studied the effect of three cysteine bridges introduced in different structural elements of the green fluorescent protein on the denaturation enthalpies, activation energies, and heat-capacity increments when this protein passes from native to intermediate and transition states. The studies have allowed us to confirm that, with this protein denaturation, the process hardly damages the structure initially, but then changes occur in the protein structure in the region of 4-6 beta sheets. The cysteine bridge introduced in this region decreases the hydration of the second transition state and increases the hydration of the second intermediate state during the thermal denaturation of the green fluorescent protein.

  18. Functional Coexpression of HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase and Green Fluorescent Protein: Implications for Noninvasive Imaging of Transgene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Jacobs

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Current gene therapy technology is limited by the paucity of methodology for determining the location and magnitude of therapeutic transgene expression in vivo. We describe and validate a paradigm for monitoring therapeutic transgene expression by noninvasive imaging of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk marker gene expression. To test proportional coexpression of therapeutic and marker genes, a model fusion gene comprising green fluorescent protein (gfp and HSV-1-tk genes was generated (tkgfp gene and assessed for the functional coexpression of the gene product, TKGFP fusion protein, in rat 9L gliosarcoma, RG2 glioma, and W256 carcinoma cells. Analysis of the TKGFP protein demonstrated that it can serve as a therapeutic gene by rendering tkgfp transduced cells sensitive to ganciclovir or as a screening marker useful for identifying transduced cells by fluorescence microscopy or fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. TK and GFP activities in the TKGFP fusion protein were similar to corresponding wild-type proteins and accumulation of the HSV-1-tk-specific radiolabeled substrate, 2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-1β-D-arabino-furanosyl-5-iodo-uracil (FIAU, in stability transduced clones correlated with gfp-fluorescence intensity over a wide range of expression levels. The tkgfp fusion gene itself may be useful in developing novel cancer gene therapy approaches. Valuable information about the efficiency of gene transfer and expression could be obtained by non-invasive imaging of tkgfp expression with FIAU and clinical imaging devices (gamma camera, positron-emission tomography [PET], single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT], and/or direct visualization of gfp expression in situ by fluorescence microscopy or endoscopy.

  19. Quantification of early adipose-derived stem cell survival: comparison between sodium iodide symporter and enhanced green fluorescence protein imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quach, Cung Hoa Thien; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Paik, Jin-Young; Park, Jin-Won; Lee, Eun Jeong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Strategies to overcome the problem of extensive early stem cell loss following transplantation requires a method to quantitatively assess their efficacy. This study compared the ability of sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) imaging to monitor the effectiveness of treatments to enhance early stem cell survival. Methods: Human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) transduced with an adenoviral vector to express both NIS and EGFP were mixed with culture media (control), matrigel (matrigel group) or pro-survival cocktail (PSC group), and 5 × 10 6 cells were injected into thigh muscles of C57BL/6 mice. Animals underwent serial optical imaging and 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy. Image-based EGFP fluorescence and 99m TcO 4 - uptake was measured by region-of-interest analysis, and extracted tissues were measured for 99m Tc activity. Fluorescent intensity measured from homogenized muscle tissue was used as reference for actual amount of viable ADSCs. Results: ADSCs were efficiently transduced to express EGFP and NIS without affecting proliferative capacity. The absence of significant apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V FACS analysis and Western blots for activated caspase-3. Both fluorescence optical imaging and 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy visualized implanted cells in living mice for up to 5 days. However, optical imaging displayed large variations in fluorescence intensity, and thus failed to detect difference in cell survival between groups or its change over time. In comparison, 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy provided more reliable assessment of within-in group donor cell content as well as its temporal change. As a result, NIS imaging was able to discern beneficial effects of matrigel and pro-survival cocktail treatment on early ADSC survival, and provided quantitative measurements that correlated to actual donor cell content within implanted tissue. Conclusion: NIS reporter imaging may be useful for noninvasively assessing the

  20. Green fluorescent protein as a marker for gene expression and cell biology of mycobacterial interactions with macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandayuthapani, S; Via, L E; Thomas, C A; Horowitz, P M; Deretic, D; Deretic, V

    1995-09-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria offers certain advantages over other bioluminescence systems because no exogenously added substrate or co-factors are necessary, and fluorescence can be elicited by irradiation with blue light without exposing the cells producing GFP to invasive treatments. A mycobacterial shuttle-plasmid vector carrying gfp cDNA was constructed and used to generate transcriptional fusions with promoters of interest and to examine their expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG grown in macrophages or on laboratory media. The promoters studied were: (i) ahpC from Mycoosis and Mycobacterium leprae, a gene encoding alkyl hydroperoxide reductase which, along with the divergently transcribed regulator oxyR, are homologues of corresponding stress-response systems in enteric bacteria and play a role in isoniazid sensitivity; (ii) mtrA, an M. tuberculosis response regulator belonging to the superfamily of bacterial two-component signal-transduction systems; (iii) hsp60, a previously characterized heat-shock gene from M. bovis; and (iv) tbprc3, a newly isolated promoter from M. tuberculosis. Expression of these promoters in mycobacteria was analysed using epifluorescence microscopy, laser scanning confocal microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and flow cytometry. These approaches permitted assessment of fluorescence prior to and after macrophage infection, and analyses of promoter expression in individual mycobacteria and its distribution within populations of bacterial cells. Bacteria expressing GFP from a strong promoter could be separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting from cells harbouring the vector used to construct the fusion. In addition, the stable expression of mtrA-gfp fusion in M. bovis BCG facilitated localization and isolation of phagocytic vesicles containing mycobacteria. The experiments presented here suggest that GFP will be a useful tool for analysis of mycobacterial

  1. [Construction of transgenic RAW264.7 monoclonal cell line by dual-labeling of +8-green fluorescent protein and modified red fluorescent protein phosphatidylserine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, L; Wang, Y Q; Michael, Glogauer

    2016-09-01

    To establish the transgenic RAW264.7 monoclone cell line labelled by green fluorescent protein(GFP) and modified red fluorescent protein(mRFP), for investigating the mechanism of cell membrane fusion and cell biological behavior during osteoclastogenesis. A dual-labeling technique involving GFP and mRFP was applied to RAW264.7 cell line by pVSVG for in situ monitoring of membrane fusion during osteoclastogenesis. The live-cell imaging technology was adopted to consecutively observe the process of osteoclast formation induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand(RANKL). Furthermore, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining(TRAP) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole(DAPI) staining were also used to identify the function and characteristics of RAW264.7 monoclonecell line transfected with phosphatidylserine(PS) and + 8 membrane charge. The normal morphology of RAW264.7 monoclonecell line transfected with + 8-GFP and PS-mRFP was preserved. The PS and (8+) biosensors co-expressed on the membrane of monocytes. No significant difference of fluorescence density was found. In osteoclasts, (8 + )probes disappeared, while PS expressed in both internal organelles and membrane of osteoclasts. Live-cell imaging observation showed that the multinuclear osteoclasts were generated among monocytes and apocytes. All fusion processes occurred under the condition of cell adherence. Successful construction of transgenic RAW264.7 monoclone cell line by GFP and mRFP tags provided a wide field of vision for further investigating the cytoskeleton and organelles of subcellular spatial dimension in osteoclastogenesis.

  2. Deployment of a fully-automated green fluorescent protein imaging system in a high arctic autonomous greenhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Talal; Bamsey, Matthew; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Graham, Thomas; Braham, Stephen; Noumeir, Rita; Berinstain, Alain; Ferl, Robert

    2013-03-13

    Higher plants are an integral part of strategies for sustained human presence in space. Space-based greenhouses have the potential to provide closed-loop recycling of oxygen, water and food. Plant monitoring systems with the capacity to remotely observe the condition of crops in real-time within these systems would permit operators to take immediate action to ensure optimum system yield and reliability. One such plant health monitoring technique involves the use of reporter genes driving fluorescent proteins as biological sensors of plant stress. In 2006 an initial prototype green fluorescent protein imager system was deployed at the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse located in the Canadian High Arctic. This prototype demonstrated the advantageous of this biosensor technology and underscored the challenges in collecting and managing telemetric data from exigent environments. We present here the design and deployment of a second prototype imaging system deployed within and connected to the infrastructure of the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse. This is the first imager to run autonomously for one year in the un-crewed greenhouse with command and control conducted through the greenhouse satellite control system. Images were saved locally in high resolution and sent telemetrically in low resolution. Imager hardware is described, including the custom designed LED growth light and fluorescent excitation light boards, filters, data acquisition and control system, and basic sensing and environmental control. Several critical lessons learned related to the hardware of small plant growth payloads are also elaborated.

  3. Deployment of a Fully-Automated Green Fluorescent Protein Imaging System in a High Arctic Autonomous Greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Berinstain

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Higher plants are an integral part of strategies for sustained human presence in space. Space-based greenhouses have the potential to provide closed-loop recycling of oxygen, water and food. Plant monitoring systems with the capacity to remotely observe the condition of crops in real-time within these systems would permit operators to take immediate action to ensure optimum system yield and reliability. One such plant health monitoring technique involves the use of reporter genes driving fluorescent proteins as biological sensors of plant stress. In 2006 an initial prototype green fluorescent protein imager system was deployed at the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse located in the Canadian High Arctic. This prototype demonstrated the advantageous of this biosensor technology and underscored the challenges in collecting and managing telemetric data from exigent environments. We present here the design and deployment of a second prototype imaging system deployed within and connected to the infrastructure of the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse. This is the first imager to run autonomously for one year in the un-crewed greenhouse with command and control conducted through the greenhouse satellite control system. Images were saved locally in high resolution and sent telemetrically in low resolution. Imager hardware is described, including the custom designed LED growth light and fluorescent excitation light boards, filters, data acquisition and control system, and basic sensing and environmental control. Several critical lessons learned related to the hardware of small plant growth payloads are also elaborated.

  4. Rapid and ultrasensitive detection of active thrombin based on the Vmh2 hydrophobin fused to a Green Fluorescent Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, Alessandra; Pennacchio, Anna; Cicatiello, Paola; Politi, Jane; De Stefano, Luca; Giardina, Paola

    2017-01-15

    A fusion protein designed in order to combine the fluorescence emission of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) with the adhesion ability of the class I hydrophobin Vmh2 was heterologously produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The Vmh2-GFP fusion protein has proven to be a smart and effective tool for the study of Vmh2 self-assembling. Since the two proteins were linked by the specific cutting site of the thrombin, the fusion protein was used as the active biological element in the realization of a thrombin biosensor. When the thrombin present in the target solution specifically hydrolyzed its cleavage sequence, a consequent decrease in the fluorescence intensity of the sample could be observed. The Vmh2-GFP based assay allowed quantification of thrombin in solution with a detection limit of 2.27aM. The specificity of the assay with respect to other proteases and proteins granted the measurement of thrombin added to healthy human plasma with same high sensitivity and a limit of detection of 2.3aM. Further advantages of the developed biosensor are the simplicity of its design and preparation, and the low requirements in terms of samples, reagents and time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Expression analysis of green fluorescent protein in tissues and organs in α-1,3 galactosyltransferase knockout pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-fang; Feng, Chong; Ji, Hui-li; Shi, Ning-ning; Song, Xiao-feng; Zhao, Qin-li; Long, Chuan; Pan, Deng-ke; Yang, Xiao-gan

    2015-12-01

    The pig is an ideal source to provide organs because its organ size and physiology are similar to humans. However, an acute rejection will ensue after pig-to-human xenotransplantation. The α-1,3 galactosyltransferase gene knockout (GTKO) pigs were generated in recent years, and could solve the problem of hyperacute rejection. But due to lack of reporting genes, the rejection status of cells and organs post pig-to-human xenotransplantation cannot be visualized. In this study, we introduced the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene driven by the CAG promoter into GTKO porcine ear fibroblasts. Then we produced transgenic pigs expressing the EGFP gene by nuclear transfer technology. Expression levels of EGFP in different tissues and organs of the cloned pig were investigated by Nightsea DFP-1 Fluorescent Protein Flashlight, fluorescence microscope and quantitative PCR assays. The results showed that the protein and transcript of EGFP were expressed in all tissues and organs of the GTKO pig, but the expression was weak in the liver and central nervous system. In conclusion, we have successfully produced the transgenic GTKO pigs expressing EGFP in all tested tissues and organs, which builds up a good basis to track transplanted cells or tissues.

  6. Structural and dynamic changes associated with beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion mutations in enhanced green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpino, James A J; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Jones, D Dafydd

    2014-08-01

    Single-amino-acid deletions are a common part of the natural evolutionary landscape but are rarely sampled during protein engineering owing to limited and prejudiced molecular understanding of mutations that shorten the protein backbone. Single-amino-acid deletion variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) have been identified by directed evolution with the beneficial effect of imparting increased cellular fluorescence. Biophysical characterization revealed that increased functional protein production and not changes to the fluorescence parameters was the mechanism that was likely to be responsible. The structure EGFP(D190Δ) containing a deletion within a loop revealed propagated changes only after the deleted residue. The structure of EGFP(A227Δ) revealed that a `flipping' mechanism was used to adjust for residue deletion at the end of a β-strand, with amino acids C-terminal to the deletion site repositioning to take the place of the deleted amino acid. In both variants new networks of short-range and long-range interactions are generated while maintaining the integrity of the hydrophobic core. Both deletion variants also displayed significant local and long-range changes in dynamics, as evident by changes in B factors compared with EGFP. Rather than being detrimental, deletion mutations can introduce beneficial structural effects through altering core protein properties, folding and dynamics, as well as function.

  7. Using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) promoter fusions to study gene regulation at single cell and population levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utratna, Marta; O'Byrne, Conor P

    2014-01-01

    Reporter gene fusions based on the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) are powerful experimental tools that allow real-time changes in gene expression to be monitored both in single cells and in populations. Here we describe the development of a chromosomally integrated transcriptional reporter fusion in Listeria monocytogenes that allows real-time measurements of gene expression. To construct a single copy of an EGFP-based fluorescent reporter fused to a promoter of interest (Px) in L. monocytogenes, a suicide shuttle vector carrying the Px::egfp gene fusion is first constructed in Escherichia coli (as an intermediate host). Then, the vector is transformed into L. monocytogenes and integrated into its chromosome by homologous recombination within the selected promoter region. Subsequently, analysis of fluorescence exhibited by cells carrying a single copy reporter can be performed under selected experimental conditions by stringent sample preparation, optimized image acquisition, and processing of the digital data with the image analysis freeware ImageJ. Thus, the methodology described here can be adapted to investigate the activity and regulation of any promoter in L. monocytogenes both at the cell and population levels.

  8. Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase promoter (PSH fusion to gfp (green fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bat-Erdene Jugder

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyse the oxidation or production of molecular hydrogen (H2. Amongst a number of promising candidates for application in the oxidation of H2 is a soluble [Ni–Fe] uptake hydrogenase (SH produced by Cupriavidus necator H16. In the present study, molecular characterisation of the SH operon, responsible for functional SH synthesis, was investigated by developing a green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter system to characterise PSH promoter activity using several gene cloning approaches. A PSH promoter-gfp fusion was successfully constructed and inducible GFP expression driven by the PSH promoter under de-repressing conditions in heterotrophic growth media was demonstrated in the recombinant C. necator H16 cells. Here we report the first successful fluorescent reporter system to study PSH promoter activity in C. necator H16. The fusion construct allowed for the design of a simple screening assay to evaluate PSH activity. Furthermore, the constructed reporter system can serve as a model to develop a rapid fluorescent based reporter for subsequent small-scale process optimisation experiments for SH expression.

  9. Monitoring the active conformation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and β-glucosidase adsorbed on soil particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Belpaire, Isabel; Gerin, Patrick A

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of various soil components on the activity of proteins, we monitored the fluorescence and the enzymatic activity of, respectively, green fluorescent protein (GFP) and β-glucosidase adsorbed on fine soil particles. We also monitored the activity of these proteins in the presence of components that are representative of soil colloids: a montmorillonite clay, goethite and organic matter extracted from soil. Upon adsorption on clay and goethite, GFP lost its fluorescence properties while β-glucosidase suffered only a partial loss of its catalytic activity. Extractable organic matter had an inactivating role on GFP while it did not cause inactivation of β-glucosidase. When GFP and β-glucosidase adsorbed on particles from natural soil samples, their behaviour was consistent with the behaviour observed for these proteins in the presence of the separate components, suggesting that the macroscopic activity of proteins adsorbed on soil particles corresponds to an average of the activities of proteins adsorbed on a mixture of surfaces. The monitoring of the proteins on soil particles with different organic matter contents has also shown that organic matter can have different effects (protecting or inactivating) on different proteins.

  10. Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase promoter (PSH) fusion to gfp (green fluorescent protein).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Welch, Jeffrey; Braidy, Nady; Marquis, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyse the oxidation or production of molecular hydrogen (H2). Amongst a number of promising candidates for application in the oxidation of H2 is a soluble [Ni-Fe] uptake hydrogenase (SH) produced by Cupriavidus necator H16. In the present study, molecular characterisation of the SH operon, responsible for functional SH synthesis, was investigated by developing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system to characterise PSH promoter activity using several gene cloning approaches. A PSH promoter-gfp fusion was successfully constructed and inducible GFP expression driven by the PSH promoter under de-repressing conditions in heterotrophic growth media was demonstrated in the recombinant C. necator H16 cells. Here we report the first successful fluorescent reporter system to study PSH promoter activity in C. necator H16. The fusion construct allowed for the design of a simple screening assay to evaluate PSH activity. Furthermore, the constructed reporter system can serve as a model to develop a rapid fluorescent based reporter for subsequent small-scale process optimisation experiments for SH expression.

  11. Deployment of a Fully-Automated Green Fluorescent Protein Imaging System in a High Arctic Autonomous Greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Talal; Bamsey, Matthew; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Graham, Thomas; Braham, Stephen; Noumeir, Rita; Berinstain, Alain; Ferl, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants are an integral part of strategies for sustained human presence in space. Space-based greenhouses have the potential to provide closed-loop recycling of oxygen, water and food. Plant monitoring systems with the capacity to remotely observe the condition of crops in real-time within these systems would permit operators to take immediate action to ensure optimum system yield and reliability. One such plant health monitoring technique involves the use of reporter genes driving fluorescent proteins as biological sensors of plant stress. In 2006 an initial prototype green fluorescent protein imager system was deployed at the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse located in the Canadian High Arctic. This prototype demonstrated the advantageous of this biosensor technology and underscored the challenges in collecting and managing telemetric data from exigent environments. We present here the design and deployment of a second prototype imaging system deployed within and connected to the infrastructure of the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse. This is the first imager to run autonomously for one year in the un-crewed greenhouse with command and control conducted through the greenhouse satellite control system. Images were saved locally in high resolution and sent telemetrically in low resolution. Imager hardware is described, including the custom designed LED growth light and fluorescent excitation light boards, filters, data acquisition and control system, and basic sensing and environmental control. Several critical lessons learned related to the hardware of small plant growth payloads are also elaborated. PMID:23486220

  12. Toxicant induced changes on delayed fluorescence decay kinetics of cyanobacteria and green algae: a rapid and sensitive biotest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Leunert

    Full Text Available Algal tests have developed into routine tools for testing toxicity of pollutants in aquatic environments. Meanwhile, in addition to algal growth rates, an increasing number of fluorescence based methods are used for rapid and sensitive toxicity measures. The present study stresses the suitability of delayed fluorescence (DF as a promising parameter for biotests. DF is based on the recombination fluorescence at the reaction centre of photosystem II, which is emitted only by photosynthetically active cells. We analyzed the effects of three chemicals (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU, 3,5 Dichlorophenol (3,5 DCP and copper on the shape of the DF decay kinetics for potential use in phytoplankton toxicity tests. The short incubation tests were done with four phytoplankton species, with special emphasis on the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. All species exhibited a high sensitivity to DCMU, but cyanobacteria were more affected by copper and less by 3,5 DCP than the tested green algae. Analyses of changes in the DF decay curve in response to the added chemicals indicated the feasibility of the DF decay approach as a rapid and sensitive testing tool.

  13. Establishment of a green fluorescent protein tracing murine model focused on the functions of host components in necrosis repair and the niche of subcutaneously implanted glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhao-Hui; Lv, Ke; Zhang, Jin-Shi; Dai, Chun-Gang; Liu, Bin; Ma, Xiao-Yu; He, Lin-Ming; Jia, Jing-Yun; Chen, Yan-Ming; Dai, Xing-Liang; Wang, Ai-Dong; Dong, Jun; Zhang, Quan-Bin; Lan, Qing; Huang, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    Due to progress in the research of glioma stem cells and the glioma niche, development of an animal model that facilitates the elucidation of the roles of the host tissue and cells is necessary. The aim of the present study was to develop a subcutaneous xenograft green fluorescent protein nude mouse model and use this model to analyze the roles of host cells in tumor necrosis repair. Tumors derived from the human glioma stem/progenitor cell line SU3 were subcutaneously implanted in green fluorescent protein nude mice. The implanted tumors were then passed from animal to animal for 10 generations. Finally, subcutaneous xenografts were assayed with traditional pathology, immunopathological techniques and fluorescence photography. For each generation, the tumorigenicity rate was 100%. Subcutaneous xenografts were rich in blood vessels, and necrotic and hemorrhagic foci, which highly expressed hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, tumor necrosis factor, Ki-67, CD68 and CD11b. In the interstitial tissue, particularly in old hemorrhagic foci, there were numerous cells expressing green fluorescent protein, CD68 and CD11b. Green fluorescent protein nude mouse subcutaneous xenografts not only consistently maintained the high invasiveness and tumorigenicity of glioma stem/progenitor cells, but also consisted of a high concentration of tumor blood vessels and necrotic and hemorrhagic foci. Subcutaneous xenografts also expressed high levels of tumor microenvironment-related proteins and host-derived tumor interstitial molecules. The model has significant potential for further research on tumor tissue remodeling and the tumor microenvironment.

  14. Rare distribution of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in hydroids from Porto Cesareo, Lecce, Italy, with reference to biological meaning of this rarity

    OpenAIRE

    Kubota, Shin; Gravili, Cinzia

    2011-01-01

    A reliable taxonomic character, distributional pattern of green fluorescent protein (GFP), that is contributable to species demarcation by observing living materials under the fluorescent microscope, has not been much done in hydroids in contrast to hydromedusae. We carried out such a fundamental study in diverse hydroids collected from Porto Cesareo, Lecce, Italy. In contrast to diversified distribution of GFP in the hydromedusae, GFP distribution in hydroids are unexpectedly very rare, and ...

  15. Regulatory mechanism of the arginine vasopressin-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion gene expression in acute and chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Kawasaki, Makoto; Ohnishi, Hideo; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Ueta, Yoichi

    2009-09-01

    Various kinds of stress cause neuroendocrine responses such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) or arginine vasopressin (AVP) release from parvocellular division of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. We examined the effects of acute and chronic stress on the expression of the AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion gene in the hypothalamus, using chronic salt loading as an osmotic stimulation, intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as acute inflammatory stress and adjuvant arthritis (AA) as chronic inflammatory/nociceptive stress. Salt loading caused a marked increase in the eGFP gene expression and eGFP fluorescence in the supraoptic nucleus, magnocellular division of the PVN and internal layer of the median eminence (ME). Administration of LPS caused increased fluorescence in parvocellular division of the PVN and external layer of the ME. AA rats revealed an increased expression of the eGFP gene and eGFP fluorescence in both magnocellular and parvocellular divisions of the PVN and both internal and external layers of the ME. On the other hand, the levels of the CRH gene expression in parvocellular division of the PVN were significantly decreased as AA developed, though plasma concentrations of corticosterone were significantly increased. These results indicate that AVP-eGFP transgenic rats enable the detection of changes in AVP expression more easily than by using procedures such as immunohistochemistry. We propose that AVP-eGFP transgenic rats represent a useful animal model for further understanding of the physiology of AVP expression in the hypothalamo-pituitary system under various physiological conditions, including various kinds of stress.

  16. Determination of Mercury in Milk by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence: A Green Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Green analytical chemistry principles were introduced to undergraduate students in a laboratory experiment focused on determining the mercury concentration in cow and goat milk. In addition to traditional goals, such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and limits of detection in method selection and development, attention was paid to the…

  17. Fluorescent visualisation of the hypothalamic oxytocin neurones activated by cholecystokinin-8 in rats expressing c-fos-enhanced green fluorescent protein and oxytocin-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 fusion transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, A; Shoguchi, K; Matsuoka, H; Yoshimura, M; Ohkubo, J-I; Matsuura, T; Maruyama, T; Ishikura, T; Aritomi, T; Fujihara, H; Hashimoto, H; Suzuki, H; Murphy, D; Ueta, Y

    2014-05-01

    The up-regulation of c-fos gene expression is widely used as a marker of neuronal activation elicited by various stimuli. Anatomically precise observation of c-fos gene products can be achieved at the RNA level by in situ hybridisation or at the protein level by immunocytochemistry. Both of these methods are time and labour intensive. We have developed a novel transgenic rat system that enables the trivial visualisation of c-fos expression using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) tag. These rats express a transgene consisting of c-fos gene regulatory sequences that drive the expression of a c-fos-eGFP fusion protein. In c-fos-eGFP transgenic rats, robust nuclear eGFP fluorescence was observed in osmosensitive brain regions 90 min after i.p. administration of hypertonic saline. Nuclear eGFP fluorescence was also observed in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) 90 min after i.p. administration of cholecystokinin (CCK)-8, which selectively activates oxytocin (OXT)-secreting neurones in the hypothalamus. In double transgenic rats that express c-fos-eGFP and an OXT-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) fusion gene, almost all mRFP1-positive neurones in the SON and PVN expressed nuclear eGFP fluorescence 90 min after i.p. administration of CCK-8. It is possible that not only a plane image, but also three-dimensional reconstruction image may identify cytoplasmic vesicles in an activated neurone at the same time. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  18. Molecular Dynamic Indicators of the Photoswitching Properties of Green Fluorescent Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyrnova, Daryna; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Michielssens, Servaas; Hofkens, Johan; Dedecker, Peter; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2015-09-10

    Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) are highly useful probes for a range of applications including diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy. It was previously shown that reversible photoswitching not only involves cis-trans isomerization and protonation-deprotonation of the chromophore but also results in a marked difference in β-barrel flexibility. In this work, we performed flexibility profiling and functional mode analysis (FMA) using molecular dynamics calculations to study how the flexibility of the RSFP β-barrel influences the photoswitching properties of several fluorescent proteins. We also used Partial Least-Squared (PLS) FMA to detect promising mutation sites for the modulation of photoswitching properties of RSFPs. Our results show that the flexibility of RSFP does depend on its state with a systematically higher flexibility in the dark state compared to the bright state. In particular our method highlights the importance of Val157 in Dronpa, which upon mutation yields a striking difference in the collective motions of the two mutants. Overall, we show that PLS-FMA yields information, complementary to static structures, that can guide the rational design of fluorescent proteins.

  19. Polyplex exposure inhibits cell cycle, increases inflammatory response, and can cause protein expression without cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Rebecca L; Erickson, Blake; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta F; Baker, James R; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2013-04-01

    We sought to evaluate the relationship between cell division and protein expression when using commercial poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-based polyplexes. The membrane dye PKH26 was used to assess cell division, and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was used to monitor protein expression. When analyzed at the whole population level, a greater number of cells divided than expressed protein, regardless of the level of protein expression observed, giving apparent consistency with the hypothesis that protein expression requires cells to pass through mitosis in order for the transgene to overcome the nuclear membrane. However, when the polyplex-exposed population was evaluated for the amount of division in the protein-expressing subpopulation, it was observed that substantial amounts of expression had occurred in the absence of division. Indeed, in HeLa S3 cells, this represented the majority of expressing cells. Of interest, the doubling time for both cell lines was slowed by ~2-fold upon exposure to polyplexes. This change was not altered by the origin of the plasmid DNA (pDNA) transgene promoter (cytomegalovirus (CMV) or elongation factor-1 alpha (EF1α)). Gene expression arrays in polyplex-exposed HeLa S3 cells showed upregulation of cell cycle arrest genes and downregulation of genes related to mitosis. Chemokine, interleukin, and toll-like receptor genes were also upregulated, suggesting activation of proinflammatory pathways. In summary, we find evidence that a cell division-independent expression pathway exists, and that polyplex exposure slows cell division and increases inflammatory response.

  20. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) leakage from microbial biosensors provides useful information for the evaluation of the scale-down effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delvigne, Frank; Brognaux, Alison; Francis, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Mixing deficiencies can be potentially detected by the use of a dedicated whole cell microbial biosensor. In this work, a csiE promoter induced under carbon-limited conditions was involved in the elaboration of such biosensor. The cisE biosensor exhibited interesting response after up and down......-shift of the dilution rate in chemostat mode. Glucose limitation was accompanied by green fluorescent protein (GFP) leakage to the extracellular medium. In order to test the responsiveness of microbial biosensors to substrate fluctuations in large-scale, a scale-down reactor (SDR) experiment was performed. The glucose...... results suggest that GFP leakage could be used in parallel to the normal GFP biosensor function in order to assess microbial viability in process conditions...

  1. Green fluorescent protein as a reporter for the spatial and temporal expression of actIII in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Beneit, Fernando; Errington, Jeff

    2017-08-01

    Polyketides constitute a large group of structurally diverse natural products with useful biological activities. Insights into their biosynthetic mechanisms are crucial for developing new structures. One of the most studied model polyketide is the blue-pigmented antibiotic actinorhodin, produced by Streptomyces coelicolor. This aromatic polyketide is synthesized by minimal type II polyketide synthases and tailoring enzymes. The ActIII actinorhodin ketoreductase is a key tailoring enzyme in actinorhodin biosynthesis. Previous papers have reported contradictory findings for localization of the protein in the cytoplasmic fraction or associated with the cell wall. We have now used green fluorescent protein as a reporter to analyse the spatial and temporal expression of actIII (SCO5086) in S. coelicolor under actinorhodin producing and non-producing conditions. We provide evidence in support of ActIII being a cytosolic protein, with limited if any association with the membrane or cell wall.

  2. Role of non-Condon vibronic coupling and conformation change on two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yuejie; Tian, Guangjun; Luo, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) often show a blue-shift band compared to their conventional one-photon absorption spectra, which is an intriguing feature that has not been well understood. We present here a systematic study on one- and two-photon spectra of GFP chromophore by means of the density functional response theory and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods. It shows that the popular density functional fails to provide correct vibrational progression for the spectra. The non-Condon vibronic coupling, through the localised intrinsic vibrational modes of the chromophore, is responsible for the blue-shift in the TPA spectra. The cis to trans isomerisation can be identified in high-resolution TPA spectra. Our calculations demonstrate that the high level ab initio multiconfigurational CASSCF method, rather than the conventional density functional theory is required for investigating the essential excited-state properties of the GFP chromophore.

  3. Spontaneous silencing of humanized green fluorescent protein (hGFP) gene expression from a retroviral vector by DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, G J; Nielsen, S D; Hansen, J E

    1998-01-01

    packaging cells returned to untreated control levels within 2 weeks. Using flow cytometric analysis, hGFP expression was detected in up to 15% of transduced MT4 cells (a CD4+ lymphocytic cell line) after coculturing with packaging cells for 4 days. A 3-day postcoculture treatment with 5-azacytidine......We have constructed a functional murine leukemia virus (MLV)-derived retroviral vector transducing two genes encoding the autofluorescent humanized green fluorescent protein (hGFP) and neomycin phosphotransferase (Neo). This was done to determine whether hGFP could function as a marker gene...... in a retroviral vector and to investigate the expression of genes in a retroviral vector. Surprisingly, clonal vector packaging cell lines showed variable levels of hGFP expression, and expression was detected in as few as 49% of the cells in a clonally derived culture. This indicated that hGFP expression...

  4. Analytical Harmonic Vibrational Frequencies for the Green Fluorescent Protein Computed with ONIOM: Chromophore Mode Character and Its Response to Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lee M; Lasoroski, Aurélie; Champion, Paul M; Sage, J Timothy; Frisch, Michael J; van Thor, Jasper J; Bearpark, Michael J

    2014-02-11

    A systematic comparison of different environmental effects on the vibrational modes of the 4-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone (HBDI) chromophore using the ONIOM method allows us to model how the molecule's spectroscopic transitions are modified in the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). ONIOM(QM:MM) reduces the expense of normal mode calculations when computing the majority of second derivatives only at the MM level. New developments described here for the efficient solution of the CPHF equations, including contributions from electrostatic interactions with environment charges, mean that QM model systems of ∼100 atoms can be embedded within a much larger MM environment of ∼5000 atoms. The resulting vibrational normal modes, their associated frequencies, and dipole derivative vectors have been used to interpret experimental difference spectra (GFPI2-GFPA), chromophore vibrational Stark shifts, and changes in the difference between electronic and vibrational transition dipoles (mode angles) in the protein environment.

  5. Vibrational energy flow through the green fluorescent protein-water interface: communication maps and thermal boundary conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Leitner, David M

    2014-07-17

    We calculate communication maps for green fluorescent protein (GFP) to elucidate energy transfer pathways between the chromophore and other parts of the protein in the ground and excited state. The approach locates energy transport channels from the chromophore to remote regions of the protein via residues and water molecules that hydrogen bond to the chromophore. We calculate the thermal boundary conductance between GFP and water over a wide range of temperature and find that the interface between the protein and the cluster of water molecules in the β-barrel poses negligible resistance to thermal flow, consistent with facile vibrational energy transfer from the chromophore to the β-barrel waters observed in the communication maps.

  6. La proteína verde fluorescente ilumina la biociencia The Green Fluorescent Protein that glows in Bioscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Inés Pérez Millán

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available La proteína verde fluorescente (o GFP, por sus siglas en inglés, Green Fluorescent Protein es una proteína producida por la medusa Aequorea victoria que emite bioluminiscencia en la zona verde del espectro visible. El gen que codifica esta proteína ha sido clonado y se utiliza habitualmente en biología molecular como marcador. Los descubrimientos relacionados a la GFP merecieron el Premio Nobel de Química 2008, en conjunto a los tres investigadores, Dres Shimomura, Chalfie y Tsien que participaron escalonadamente en dilucidar la estructura y función de la proteína. El Dr. Shimomura descubrió y estudió las propiedades de GFP, el Dr. Chalfie usando técnicas de biología molecular logró introducir el gen que codificaba para la GFP en el ADN del gusano transparente C. elegans, e inició la era de GFP como marcador de procesos en células y organismos. Finalmente el Dr. Tsien modificó la estructura de la proteína para producir moléculas que emiten luz a distintas longitudes de onda, extendiendo la paleta de colores de las proteínas. Las proteínas fluorescentes, entre las cuales se encuentra la GFP, son muy versátiles y se utilizan en diversos campos como la microbiología, ingeniería genética, fisiología, e ingeniería ambiental. Permiten ver procesos previamente invisibles, como el desarrollo de neuronas, cómo se diseminan las células cancerosas, o la contaminación de agua con arsénico, por mencionar algunos usos. Con la obtención de proteínas de muchos colores complejas redes biológicas pueden ser marcadas diferencialmente, lo que permite visualizar la biología celular en acción.Green fluorescent protein (GFP is a protein produced by the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, that emits bioluminescence in the green zone of the visible spectrum. The GFP gene has been cloned and is used in molecular biology as a marker. The three researchers that participated independently in elucidating the structure and function of this and its

  7. Kinetics of proton transfer in a green fluorescent protein: A laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    triggered by the UV laser shot through a photodiode; thus, the zero of time was deter- mined by the incoming laser flash. This instrument was calibrated by photoactivation of a solution containing 2 mM o-NBA and 1 µM of the fluorescent pH indicator fluorescein at pH 8 (figure 3). The pH jump-induced decrease in ...

  8. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-06

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation.

  9. Steric and electronic effects in capsule-confined green fluorescent protein chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Anthony; Samanta, Shampa R; Jayaraj, Nithyanandhan; Ramamurthy, V; Tolbert, Laren M

    2011-02-02

    The turn-on of emission in fluorescent protein chromophores sequestered in an "octaacid" capsule is controlled by stereoelectronic effects described by a linear free energy relationship. The stereochemical effects are governed by both the positions and volumes of the aryl substituents, while the electronic effects, including ortho effects, can be treated with Hammett σ parameters. The use of substituent volumes rather than A values reflects packing of the molecule within the confines of the capsule.

  10. Human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV-3); Construction and rescue of an infectious, recombinant virus expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability to rescue an infectious, recombinant, RNA virus from a cDNA clone, has led to new opportunities for measuring viral replication from a viral expressed reporter gene. In this protocol, the process of inserting enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene into the human parainfluenza vi...

  11. A flow cytometry-optimized assay using an SOS-green fluorescent protein (SOS-GFP) whole-cell biosensor for the detection of genotoxins in complex environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Hansen, Lars H.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2006-01-01

    /mL, and proved far more sensitive than a previously published assay using the same biosensor strain. By applying the SOS-green fluorescent protein (GFP) whole-cell biosensor directly to soil microcosms we were also able to evaluate both the applicability and sensitivity of a biosensor based on SOS...

  12. Validation of a rapid yeast estrogen bioassay, based on the expression of green fluorescent protein, for the screening of estrogenic activity in calf urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Heskamp, H.H.; Hamers, A.R.M.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2005-01-01

    Previously we described the construction and properties of a rapid yeast bioassay stably expressing human estrogen receptor a (hERa) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) in response to estrogens. In the present study, this yeast estrogen assay was validated as a qualitative screening

  13. Green fluorescent protein-mtalin causes defects in actin organization and cell expansion in Arabidopsis and inhibits actin depolymerizing factor's actin depolymerizing activity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.; Anthony, R.G.; Hussey, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to an actin binding domain is a commonly used method for live cell imaging of the actin cytoskeleton. One of these chimeric proteins is GFP-mTalin (GFP fused to the actin binding domain of mouse talin). Although it has been demonstrated that

  14. Downward vascular translocation of a green fluorescent protein-tagged strain of Dickeya sp. (Biovar 3) from stem and leaf inoculation sites on potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czajkowski, R.L.; de Boer, W.J.; Van Veen, J.A.; Van der Wolf, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Translocation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Dickeya sp. from stems or from leaves to underground parts of potato plants was studied in greenhouse experiments. Thirty days after stem inoculation, 90% of plants expressed symptoms at the stem base and 95% of plants showed browning of

  15. Downward Vascular Translocation of a Green Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Strain of Dickeya sp. (Biovar 3) from Stem and Leaf Inoculation Sites on Potato.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czajkowski, R.L.; Boer, de W.; Veen, van J.A.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Translocation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Dickeya sp. from stems or from leaves to underground parts of potato plants was studied in greenhouse experiments. Thirty days after stem inoculation, 90% of plants expressed symptoms at the stem base and 95% of plants showed browning of

  16. A universal host material for high external quantum efficiency close to 25% and long lifetime in green fluorescent and phosphorescent OLEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Joo; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2014-06-25

    High quantum efficiency close to 25% and long lifetime in green thermally activated delayed fluorescent and phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes are achieved using universal 3',5'-di(carbazol-9-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3,5-dicarbonitrile host material. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A set of enhanced green fluorescent protein concatemers for quantitative determination of nuclear localization signal strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Jennifer; Thavaraja, Ramya; Giehler, Susanne; Nalaskowski, Marcus M

    2017-09-15

    Regulated transport of proteins between nucleus and cytoplasm is an important process in the eukaryotic cell. In most cases, active nucleo-cytoplasmic protein transport is mediated by nuclear localization signal (NLS) and/or nuclear export signal (NES) motifs. In this study, we developed a set of vectors expressing enhanced GFP (EGFP) concatemers ranging from 2 to 12 subunits (2xEGFP to 12xEGFP) for analysis of NLS strength. As shown by in gel GFP fluorescence analysis and αGFP Western blotting, EGFP concatemers are expressed as fluorescent full-length proteins in eukaryotic cells. As expected, nuclear localization of concatemeric EGFPs decreases with increasing molecular weight. By oligonucleotide ligation this set of EGFP concatemers can be easily fused to NLS motifs. After determination of intracellular localization of EGFP concatemers alone and fused to different NLS motifs we calculated the size of a hypothetic EGFP concatemer showing a defined distribution of EGFP fluorescence between nucleus and cytoplasm (n/c ratio = 2). Clear differences of the size of the hypothetic EGFP concatemer depending on the fused NLS motif were observed. Therefore, we propose to use the size of this hypothetic concatemer as quantitative indicator for comparing strength of different NLS motifs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Generation of transgenic mesenchymal stem cells expressing green fluorescent protein as reporter gene using no viral vector in caprine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Yasotha, T; Singh, R K; Singh, Renu; Kumar, Kuldeep; Ranjan, R; Meshram, Chetan D; Das, B C; Bag, Sadhan

    2013-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent cells that can be derived from many different organs and tissues. While there are many ways to label and track cells each with strengths and weakness, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a reporter gene commonly employed. In the present study, caprine MSC were collected from bone marrow and cells were characterised with MSC specific markers. Passage 10 (P10) MSC cells were transfected using plasmid vector containing GFP as reporter gene with different concentrations of DNA and lipofectamine. Six different concentrations of DNA and lipofectamine as 1 microg DNA: 2 microL lipofectamine, 1 microg DNA: 2.5 microL lipofectamine, 1.2 microg DNA: 2.2 microL lipofectamine, 1.2 microg DNA: 2.5 microL lipofectamine, 1.5 microg DNA: 2.5 microL lipofectamine, 1.5 microg DNA: 3 microL lipofectamine were used. After 24 h and 48 h of transfection, caprine MSC were observed under florescent microscope. Highest transfection rate indicating green flourecscent MSC were found when the cells were transfected with 1.2 microg DNA: 2.2 microL lipofectamine and 1.5 microg DNA: 2.5 microL lipofectamine than other combinations. These cells have been propagated beyond 4th passage maintaining GFP expression. The results indicated that stable GFP positive MSC cells can be generated using the above protocol. These cells are being used for transplantation studies.

  19. Distribution and Spectroscopy of Green Fluorescent Protein and Acyl-CoA: Cholesterol Acytransferase in Sf21 Insect Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, R. C.; Mahtani, H.; Lu, X.; Chang, T. Y.; Malak, H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is thought to significantly participate in the pathway of cholesterol esterification that underlies the pathology of artherosclerosis. This enzyme is a membrane protein known to be preferentially bound within the endoplasmic reticulum of mammalian cells, from which location it esterifies cholesterol derived from low density lipoprotein. Cultures of insect cells were separately infected with baculovirus containing the gene for green fluroescent protein (GFP) and with baculovirus containing tandem genes for GFP and ACAT. These infected cultures expressed GFP and the fusion protein GCAT, respectively, with maximum expression occurring on the fourth day after infection. Extraction of GFP- and of GCAT-expressing cells with urea and detergent resulted in recovery of fluorescent protein in aqueous solution. Fluorescence spectra at neutral pH were identical for both GFP and GCAT extracts in aqueous solution, indicating unperturbed tertiary structure for the GFP moiety within GCAT. In a cholesterol esterification assay, GCAT demonstrated ACAT activity, but with less efficiency compared to native ACAT. It was hypothesized that the membrane protein ACAT would lead to differences in localization of GCAT compared to GFP within the respective expressing insect cells. The GFP marker directly and also within the fusion protein GCAT was accordingly used as the intracellular probe that was fluorescently analyzed by the new biophotonics technique of hyperspectral imaging. In that technique, fluorescence imaging was obtained from two dimensional arrays of cells, and regions of interest from within those images were then retrospectively analyzed for the emission spectra that comprises the image. Results of hyperspectral imaging of insect cells on day 4 postinfection showed that GCAT was preferentially localized to the cytoplasm of these cells compared to GFP. Furthermore, the emission spectra obtained for the localized GCAT displayed a peak

  20. [A hydroponic cultivation system for rapid high-yield transient protein expression in Nicotiana plants under laboratory conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Qianzhen; Mai, Rongjia; Yang, Zhixiao; Chen, Minfang; Yang, Tiezhao; Lai, Huafang; Yang, Peiliang; Chen, Qiang; Zhou, Xiaohong

    2012-06-01

    To develop a hydroponic Nicotiana cultivation system for rapid and high-yield transient expression of recombinant proteins under laboratory conditions. To establish the hydroponic cultivation system, several parameters were examined to define the optimal conditions for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants. We used the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the geminiviral plant transient expression vector as the model protein/expression vector. We examined the impact of Nicotiana species, the density and time of Agrobacterium infiltration, and the post-infiltration growth period on the accumulation of GFP. The expression levels of GFP in Nicotiana leaves were then examined by Western blotting and ELISA. Our data indicated that a hydroponic Nicotiana cultivation system with a light intensity of 9000 LX/layer, a light cycle of 16 h day/8 h night, a temperature regime of 28 degrees celsius; day/21 degrees celsius; night, and a relative humidity of 80% could support the optimal plant growth and protein expression. After agroinfiltration with pBYGFPDsRed.R/LBA4404, high levels of GFP expression were observed in both N. benthamiana and N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) plants cultured with this hydroponic cultivation system. An optimal GFP expression was achieved in both Nicotiana species leaves 4 days after infiltration by Agrobacterium with an OD(600) of 0.8. At a given time point, the average biomass of N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) was significantly higher than that of N. benthamiana. The leaves from 6-week-old N. benthamiana plants and 5-week-old N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) plants could be the optimal material for agroinfiltration. We have established a hydroponic cultivation system that allows robust growth of N. benthamiana and N. tobaccum (cv. Yuyan No.5) plants and the optimal GFP expression in the artificial climate box.

  1. Visualization of nuclear localization of transcription factors with cyan and green fluorescent proteins in the red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uji, Toshiki; Takahashi, Megumu; Saga, Naotsune; Mikami, Koji

    2010-04-01

    Transcription factors play a central role in expression of genomic information in all organisms. The objective of our study is to analyze the function of transcription factors in red algae. One way to analyze transcription factors in eukaryotic cells is to study their nuclear localization, as reported for land plants and green algae using fluorescent proteins. There is, however, no report documenting subcellular localization of transcription factors from red algae. In the present study, using the marine red alga Porphyra yezoensis, we confirmed for the first time successful expression of humanized fluorescent proteins (ZsGFP and ZsYFP) from a reef coral Zoanthus sp. and land plant-adapted sGFP(S65T) in gametophytic cells comparable to expression of AmCFP. Following molecular cloning and characterization of transcription factors DP-E2F-like 1 (PyDEL1), transcription elongation factor 1 (PyElf1) and multiprotein bridging factor 1 (PyMBF1), we then demonstrated that ZsGFP and AmCFP can be used to visualize nuclear localization of PyElf1 and PyMBF1. This is the first report to perform visualization of subcellular localization of transcription factors as genome-encoded proteins in red algae.

  2. Development of a reverse genetics system to generate a recombinant Ebola virus Makona expressing a green fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albariño, César G.; Wiggleton Guerrero, Lisa; Lo, Michael K.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Towner, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential application of reverse genetics technology in studying a broad range of aspects of viral biology, including gene regulation, protein function, cell entry, and pathogenesis. Here, we describe a highly efficient reverse genetics system used to generate recombinant Ebola virus (EBOV) based on a recent isolate from a human patient infected during the 2014–2015 outbreak in Western Africa. We also rescued a recombinant EBOV expressing a fluorescent reporter protein from a cleaved VP40 protein fusion. Using this virus and an inexpensive method to quantitate the expression of the foreign gene, we demonstrate its potential usefulness as a tool for screening antiviral compounds and measuring neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Recombinant Ebola virus (EBOV) derived from Makona variant was rescued. • New protocol for viral rescue allows 100% efficiency. • Modified EBOV expresses a green fluorescent protein from a VP40-fused protein. • Modified EBOV was tested as tool to screen antiviral compounds and measure neutralizing antibodies

  3. Development of a reverse genetics system to generate a recombinant Ebola virus Makona expressing a green fluorescent protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albariño, César G., E-mail: calbarino@cdc.gov; Wiggleton Guerrero, Lisa; Lo, Michael K.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Towner, Jonathan S.

    2015-10-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential application of reverse genetics technology in studying a broad range of aspects of viral biology, including gene regulation, protein function, cell entry, and pathogenesis. Here, we describe a highly efficient reverse genetics system used to generate recombinant Ebola virus (EBOV) based on a recent isolate from a human patient infected during the 2014–2015 outbreak in Western Africa. We also rescued a recombinant EBOV expressing a fluorescent reporter protein from a cleaved VP40 protein fusion. Using this virus and an inexpensive method to quantitate the expression of the foreign gene, we demonstrate its potential usefulness as a tool for screening antiviral compounds and measuring neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Recombinant Ebola virus (EBOV) derived from Makona variant was rescued. • New protocol for viral rescue allows 100% efficiency. • Modified EBOV expresses a green fluorescent protein from a VP40-fused protein. • Modified EBOV was tested as tool to screen antiviral compounds and measure neutralizing antibodies.

  4. Using membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein to monitor neurotoxic protein-dependent degeneration of Drosophila eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Aaron A; Tsou, Wei-Ling; Ristic, Gorica; Todi, Sokol V

    2014-09-01

    Age-related neurodegeneration has been studied extensively through the use of model organisms, including the genetically versatile Drosophila melanogaster. Various neurotoxic proteins have been expressed in fly eyes to approximate degeneration occurring in humans, and much has been learned from this heterologous system. Although Drosophila expedites scientific research through rapid generational times and relative inexpensiveness, one factor that can hinder analyses is the examination of milder forms of degeneration caused by some toxic proteins in fly eyes. Whereas several disease proteins cause massive degeneration that is easily observed by examining the external structure of the fly eye, others cause mild degeneration that is difficult to observe externally and requires laborious histological preparation to assess and monitor. Here, we describe a sensitive fluorescence-based method to observe, monitor, and quantify mild Drosophila eye degeneration caused by various proteins, including the polyglutamine disease proteins ataxin-3 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 3) and huntingtin (Huntington's disease), mutant α-synuclein (Parkinson's disease), and Aβ42 (Alzheimer's disease). We show that membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein reports degeneration robustly and quantitatively. This simple yet powerful technique, which is amenable to large-scale screens, can help accelerate studies to understand age-related degeneration and to find factors that suppress it for therapeutic purposes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Enhanced green fluorescent protein in optofluidic Fabry-Perot microcavity to detect laser induced temperature changes in a bacterial culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, F.; Martín, I. R.; Walo, D.; Freire, R.; Gil-Rostra, J.; Yubero, F.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    Thermal therapy using laser sources can be used in combination with other cancer therapies to eliminate tumors. However, high precision temperature control is required to avoid damage in healthy surrounding tissues. Therefore, in order to detect laser induced temperature changes, we have used the fluorescence signal of the enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) over-expressed in an E. coli bacterial culture. For that purpose, the bacteria expressing eGFP are injected in a Fabry-Perot (FP) optofluidic planar microcavity. In order to locally heat the bacterial culture, external infrared or ultraviolet lasers were used. Shifts in the wavelengths of the resonant FP modes are used to determine the temperature increase as a function of the heating laser pump power. Laser induced local temperature increments up to 6-7 °C were measured. These results show a relatively easy way to measure laser induced local temperature changes using a FP microcavity and using eGFP as a molecular probe instead of external nanoparticles, which could damage/alter the cell. Therefore, we believe that this approach can be of interest for the study of thermal effects in laser induced thermal therapies.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of dielectric response and vibrational energy relaxation in photoactive yellow protein and green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran; Leitner, David

    2012-02-01

    The first step in the photocycle of many proteins involves conformational change of a chromophore or a charge transfer reaction following photoexcitation. To explore the response of the protein and solvent environment to photoexcitation of the chromophore in photoactive yellow protein (PYP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) we carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the dielectric response and vibrational energy relaxation (VER) from the chromophore to the protein and solvent. In PYP the time scale of the protein response, mainly contributed by Tyr42 and Glu46, to photoexcitation appears prominently between 0.1 and 0.3 picoseconds. The frequency-dependent VER rate also reveals dynamic coupling between the chromophore and residues that hydrogen bond to it. Resonances in the VER rate appear at frequencies comparable to the oscillations observed in recent fluorescence decay studies. In GFP, which undergoes excited state proton transfer about 10 ps following photoexcitation that may be assisted by specific chromophore vibrations, both the protein and water molecules inside the β-barrel surrounding the chromophore mediate the dielectric response.

  7. Screening by coral green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromoproteins supports a role in photoprotection of zooxanthellae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E. G.; D'Angelo, C.; Salih, A.; Wiedenmann, J.

    2013-06-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments are responsible for the vivid colouration of many reef-building corals and have been proposed to act as photoprotectants. Their role remains controversial because the functional mechanism has not been elucidated. We provide direct evidence to support a photoprotective role of the non-fluorescent chromoproteins (CPs) that form a biochemically and photophysically distinct group of GFP-like proteins. Based on observations of Acropora nobilis from the Great Barrier Reef, we explored the photoprotective role of CPs by analysing five coral species under controlled conditions. In vitro and in hospite analyses of chlorophyll excitation demonstrate that screening by CPs leads to a reduction in chlorophyll excitation corresponding to the spectral properties of the specific CPs present in the coral tissues. Between 562 and 586 nm, the CPs maximal absorption range, there was an up to 50 % reduction of chlorophyll excitation. The screening was consistent for established and regenerating tissue and amongst symbiont clades A, C and D. Moreover, among two differently pigmented morphs of Acropora valida grown under identical light conditions and hosting subclade type C3 symbionts, high CP expression correlated with reduced photodamage under acute light stress.

  8. Effects of nanoencapsulation and PEGylation on biodistribution of indocyanine green in healthy mice: quantitative fluorescence imaging and analysis of organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahmani B

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Baharak Bahmani,1 Christian Y Lytle,2 Ameae M Walker,2 Sharad Gupta,1 Valentine I Vullev,1 Bahman Anvari1 1Department of Bioengineering, 2Division of Biomedical Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA Abstract: Near-infrared nanoconstructs present a potentially effective platform for site-specific and deep tissue optical imaging and phototherapy. We have engineered a polymeric nanocapsule composed of polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH chains cross-linked with sodium phosphate and doped with indocyanine green (ICG toward such endeavors. The ICG-doped nanocapsules were coated covalently with polyethylene glycol (5000 daltons through reductive amination. We administrated the constructs by tail vein injection to healthy mice. To characterize the biodistribution of the constructs, we performed in vivo quantitative fluorescence imaging and subsequently analyzed the various extracted organs. Our results suggest that encapsulation of ICG in these PEGylated constructs is an effective approach to prolong the circulation time of ICG and delay its hepatic accumulation. Increased bioavailability of ICG, due to encapsulation, offers the potential of extending the clinical applications of ICG, which are currently limited due to rapid elimination of ICG from the vasculature. Our results also indicate that PAH and ICG-doped nanocapsules (ICG-NCs are not cytotoxic at the levels used in this study. Keywords: cancer, fluorescent imaging, nanoprobes, near infrared, pharmacokinetics, phototherapy, vascular imaging

  9. Facile green synthesis of fluorescent N-doped carbon dots from Actinidia deliciosa and their catalytic activity and cytotoxicity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arul, Velusamy; Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan

    2018-04-01

    Green synthesis of fluorescent nitrogen doped carbon dots (N-CDs) using Actinidia deliciosa (A. deliciosa) fruit extract as a carbon precursor and aqueous ammonia as a nitrogen dopant is reported here. The synthesized N-CDs were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The average size of the N-CDs was approximately 3.59 nm and the calculated inter layer distance was found to be 0.21 nm. Raman spectroscopy and SAED pattern revealed the graphitic nature of the synthesized N-CDs. The N-CDs were found to emit intense blue color at 405 nm under the excitation of 315 nm. The doping of nitrogen over the surface of the N-CDs was confirmed by EDS, FT-IR and XPS studies. The synthesized N-CDs were found to exhibit excellent catalytic activity in the reduction of Rhodamine-B using sodium borohydrate. The MTT assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of N-CDs towards L-929 and MCF-7 cells. From the results obtained, it was found that the N-CDs exhibit low cytotoxicity and superior biocompatibility on both L-929 and MCF-7 cells.

  10. Improved technique for evaluating oral free flaps by pinprick testing assisted by indocyanine green near-infrared fluorescence angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Tetsuji; Masumoto, Kazuma; Uchiyama, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Yoshiko; Azuma, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yuji; Katou, Fuminori

    2014-10-01

    In head and neck surgery, free-flap reconstruction using a microvascular anastomosis is an indispensable option after tumor ablation. Because the success of free-flap reconstruction is enhanced by rapid identification and salvage of failing flaps, postoperative monitoring of free flaps is essential. We describe a new technique using indocyanine green (ICG) near-infrared angiography and pinprick testing to monitor intraoral free flaps. A solution of ICG (Diagnogreen, 5 ml) was intravenously injected, and scanning was performed with a near-infrared video camera system. Thirty seconds after ICG injection, a pinprick test was performed by placing a 24-gage needle through the dermis to the subcutaneous fat of the flap. Pinprick testing during ICG fluorescence imaging was performed in 30 patients. Flap perfusion was confirmed in all patients, and all flaps survived postoperatively. ICG fluorescence imaging demonstrated that flap perfusion was maintained. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vivo self-assembly of stable green fluorescent protein fusion particles and their uses in enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venning-Slater, Mark; Hooks, David O; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial inclusion bodies are aggregations of mostly inactive and misfolded proteins. However, previously the in vivo self-assembly of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions into fluorescent particles which displayed specific binding sites suitable for applications in bioseparation and diagnostics was demonstrated. Here, the suitability of GFP particles for enzyme immobilization was assessed. The enzymes tested were a thermostable α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis, N-acetyl-d-neuraminic acid aldolase (NanA) from Escherichia coli, and organophosphohydrolase (OpdA) from Agrobacterium radiobacter. Respective GFP particles were isolated and could be stably maintained outside the cell. These enzyme-bearing GFP particles exhibited considerable stability across a range of temperature, pH, and storage conditions and could be recycled. The α-amylase-bearing particles retained activity after treatments at 4 to 85°C and at pHs 4 to 10, were stable for 3 months at 4°C, and could be recycled up to three times. OpdA-bearing particles retained degradation activity after treatments at 4 to 45°C and at pHs 5 to 10 and were able to be recycled up to four times. In contrast, the performance of NanA-bearing particles rapidly declined (>50% loss) after each recycling step and 3 months storage at 4°C. However, they were still able to convert N-acetylmannosamine and pyruvate to N-acetylneuraminic acid after treatment at 4 to 85°C and at pHs 4 to 11. Fluorescent GFP fusion particles represent a novel method for the immobilization and display of enzymes. Potential applications include diagnostic assays, biomass conversion, pharmaceutical production, and bioremediation.

  12. Use of green fluorescent protein for visualization of cell-specific gene expression and subcellular protein localization during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, C D; Decatur, A; Teleman, A; Losick, R

    1995-10-01

    We report the use of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria to visualize cell-specific gene expression and protein subcellular localization during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. Sporangia bearing the gene (gfp) for the green fluorescent protein fused to genes under the control of the sporulation transcription factor sigma F exhibited a forespore-specific pattern of fluorescence. Forespore-specific fluorescence could be detected with fusions to promoters that are utilized with low (csfB) and high (sspE-2G) efficiency by sigma F-containing RNA polymerase. Conversely, a mother cell-specific pattern of fluorescence was observed in sporangia bearing a transcriptional fusion of gfp to a spore coat protein gene (cotE) under the control of sigma E and an in-frame fusion to a regulatory gene (gerE) under the control of sigma K. An in-frame fusion of gfp to cotE demonstrated that GFP can also be used to visualize protein subcellular localization. In sporangia producing the CotE-GFP fusion protein, fluorescence was found to localize around the developing spore, and this localization was dependent upon SpoIVA, a morphogenetic protein known to determine proper localization of CotE.

  13. ``Green'' functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles via tea polyphenol for magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Lai, Kuilin; Liu, Kexia; Xia, Rui; Gao, Fabao; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-01-01

    Tea polyphenol serves as an environmentally friendly ligand-exchange molecule to synthesize multifunctional metal-doped superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via a catechol-metal coordination interaction. The resultant particles not only exhibit excellent hydrophilicity and protein adsorption resistance, but also are applicable as magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging probes due to their high T2 relaxivity, autofluorescence and large cellular uptake.Tea polyphenol serves as an environmentally friendly ligand-exchange molecule to synthesize multifunctional metal-doped superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via a catechol-metal coordination interaction. The resultant particles not only exhibit excellent hydrophilicity and protein adsorption resistance, but also are applicable as magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging probes due to their high T2 relaxivity, autofluorescence and large cellular uptake. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information and figures (Fig. S1-S7), including experimental sections, characterization of the products, protein corona analysis, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake quantification. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05003c

  14. Green Synthesis, Optical, Structural, Photocatalytic, Fluorescence Quenching and Degradation Studies of ZnS Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayodhya, Dasari; Veerabhadram, Guttena

    2016-11-01

    The study describes a simple hydrothermal method for the synthesis of zinc sulfide nanoparticles (ZnS NPs) using bovine serum albumin (BSA). The synthesized NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), fluorescence, UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and zeta potential techniques. The morphologies and sizes were characterized by SEM and TEM. The size of ZnS NPs was observed with an effective diameter size of 20 nm. The photocatalytic activity of ZnS NPs was evaluated by the degradation of rhodamine B (RB) dye under sunlight irradiation. The degradation reaction follows the pseudo-first order kinetics. In addition, the fluorescence quenching and binding of ZnS NPs with crystal violet (CV) molecules have been studied. The binding constant (K a ) between ZnS NPs and CV is calculated using modified Stern-Volmer equation. The photocatalytic degradation and kinetics of CV dye by ZnS NPs in the presence of UV light has been investigated using spectrofluorometer.

  15. Flash fluorescence with indocyanine green videoangiography to identify the recipient artery for bypass with distal middle cerebral artery aneurysms: operative technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Lawton, Michael T

    2012-06-01

    Distal middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms frequently have nonsaccular morphology that necessitates trapping and bypass. Bypasses can be difficult because efferent arteries lie deep in the opercular cleft and may not be easily identifiable. We introduce the "flash fluorescence" technique, which uses videoangiography with indocyanine green (ICG) dye to identify an appropriate recipient artery on the cortical surface for the bypass, enabling a more superficial and easier anastomosis. Flash fluorescence requires 3 steps: (1) temporary clip occlusion of the involved afferent artery; (2) videoangiography demonstrating fluorescence in uninvolved arteries on the cortical surface; and (3) removal of the temporary clip with flash fluorescence in the involved efferent arteries on the cortical surface, thereby identifying a recipient. Alternatively, temporary clips can occlude uninvolved arteries, and videoangiography will demonstrate initial fluorescence in efferent arteries during temporary occlusion and flash fluorescence in uninvolved arteries during reperfusion. From a consecutive series of 604 MCA aneurysms treated microsurgically, 22 (3.6%) were distal aneurysms and 11 required a bypass. The flash fluorescence technique was used in 3 patients to select the recipient artery for 2 superficial temporal artery-to-MCA bypasses and 1 MCA-MCA bypass. The correct recipient was selected in all cases. The flash fluorescence technique provides quick, reliable localization of an appropriate recipient artery for bypass when revascularization is needed for a distal MCA aneurysm. This technique eliminates the need for extensive dissection of the efferent artery and enables a superficial recipient site that makes the anastomosis safer, faster, and less demanding.

  16. green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The “green” topic follows the “youngsters”, which is quite natural for the Russian language.Traditionally these words put together sound slightly derogatory. However, “green” also means fresh, new and healthy.For Russia, and for Siberia in particular, “green” architecture does sound new and fresh. Forced by the anxious reality, we are addressing this topic intentionally. The ecological crisis, growing energy prices, water, air and food deficits… Alexander Rappaport, our regular author, writes: “ It has been tolerable until a certain time, but under transition to the global civilization, as the nature is destroyed, and swellings of megapolises expand incredibly fast, the size and the significance of all these problems may grow a hundredfold”.However, for this very severe Siberian reality the newness of “green” architecture may turn out to be well-forgotten old. A traditional Siberian house used to be built on principles of saving and environmental friendliness– one could not survive in Siberia otherwise.Probably, in our turbulent times, it is high time to fasten “green belts”. But we should keep from enthusiastic sticking of popular green labels or repainting of signboards into green color. We should avoid being drowned in paper formalities under “green” slogans. And we should prevent the Earth from turning into the planet “Kin-dza-dza”.

  17. Model and methods to assess hepatic function from indocyanine green fluorescence dynamical measurements of liver tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Chloe; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E

    2018-03-30

    The indocyanine green (ICG) clearance, presented as plasma disappearance rate is, presently, a reliable method to estimate the hepatic "function". However, this technique is not instantaneously available and thus cannot been used intra-operatively (during liver surgery). Near-infrared spectroscopy enables to assess hepatic ICG concentration over time in the liver tissue. This article proposes to extract more information from the liver intensity dynamics by interpreting it through a dedicated pharmacokinetics model. In order to account for the different exchanges between the liver tissues, the proposed model includes three compartments for the liver model (sinusoids, hepatocytes and bile canaliculi). The model output dependency to parameters is studied with sensitivity analysis and solving an inverse problem on synthetic data. The estimation of model parameters is then performed with in-vivo measurements in rabbits (El-Desoky et al. 1999). Parameters for different liver states are estimated, and their link with liver function is investigated. A non-linear (Michaelis-Menten type) excretion rate from the hepatocytes to the bile canaliculi was necessary to reproduce the measurements for different liver conditions. In case of bile duct ligation, the model suggests that this rate is reduced, and that the ICG is stored in the hepatocytes. Moreover, the level of ICG remains high in the blood following the ligation of the bile duct. The percentage of retention of indocyanine green in blood, which is a common test for hepatic function estimation, is also investigated with the model. The impact of bile duct ligation and reduced liver inflow on the percentage of ICG retention in blood is studied. The estimation of the pharmacokinetics model parameters may lead to an evaluation of different liver functions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantification of green fluorescent protein-(GFP-) tagged membrane proteins by capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danish, Azeem; Lee, Sang-Yong; Müller, Christa E

    2017-10-07

    A fast and robust procedure for the quantification of GFP-tagged membrane proteins in cell homogenates was developed employing capillary gel electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF). The new method was found to be highly sensitive and applicable to structurally diverse membrane proteins including synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A), adenosine A 2A receptor (A 2A AR), and connexin 43 (Cx43). Quantification of SV2A and A 2A AR using radioligand binding assays confirmed the results obtained with CGE-LIF. The CGE-LIF method showed significantly higher sensitivity as compared to fluorimetric measurement in a microplate. Importantly, CGE-LIF involves separation of the target proteins and their degradation products prior to quantification and thereby ensures specificity. We anticipate broad applicability of the method for any fluorophore-tagged protein.

  19. Economical and green synthesis of bagasse-derived fluorescent carbon dots for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Fengyi; Zhang, Miaomiao; Li, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Xinyi; Li, Zhang; Hua, Ye; Shao, Genbao; Jin, Jie; Shao, Qixiang; Gong, Aihua; Li, Jianan; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CDs) are promising nanomaterials in biomedical, photocatalytical and photoelectronic applications. However, determining how to explore an ideal precursor for a renewable carbon resource is still an interesting challenge. Here, for the first time, we report that renewable wastes of bagasse as a new precursor were prepared for fluorescent CDs by a hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process. The characterization results show that such bagasse-derived CDs are monodispersed, contain quasi spherical particles with a diameter of about 1.8 nm and exhibit favorable photoluminescence properties, super-high photostability and good dispersibility in water. Most importantly, bagasse-derived CDs have good biocompatibility and can be easily and quickly internalized by living cancer cells; they can also be used for multicolour biolabeling and bioimaging in cancer cells. It is suggested that bagasse-derived CDs might have potential applications in biomedical and photoelectronic fields. (paper)

  20. Photoconversion and fluorescence properties of a red/green-type cyanobacteriochrome AM1_C0023g2 that binds not only phycocyanobilin but also biliverdin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji eFushimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs are distantly related to the red/far-red responsive phytochromes. Red/green-type CBCRs are widely distributed among various cyanobacteria. The red/green-type CBCRs covalently bind phycocyanobilin (PCB and show red/green reversible photoconversion. Recent studies revealed that some red/green-type CBCRs from chlorophyll d-bearing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina covalently bind not only PCB but also biliverdin (BV. The BV-binding CBCRs show far-red/orange reversible photoconversion. Here, we identified another CBCR (AM1_C0023g2 from A. marina that also covalently binds not only PCB but also BV with high binding efficiencies, although BV chromophore is unstable in the presence of urea. Replacement of Ser334 with Gly resulted in significant improvement in the yield of the BV-binding holoprotein, thereby ensuring that the mutant protein is a fine platform for future development of optogenetic switches. We also succeeded in detecting near-infrared fluorescence from mammalian cells harboring PCB-binding AM1_C0023g2 whose fluorescence quantum yield is 3.0%. Here the PCB-binding holoprotein is shown as a platform for future development of fluorescent probes.

  1. Study of cell-differentiation and assembly of photosynthetic proteins during greening of etiolated Zea mays leaves using confocal fluorescence microspectroscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yutaka; Katoh, Wataru; Tahara, Yukari

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescence microspectroscopy observations were used to study the processes of cell differentiation and assemblies of photosynthesis proteins in Zea mays leaves under the greening process. The observations were done at 78K by setting the sample in a cryostat to avoid any undesired progress of the greening process during the measurements. The lateral and axial spatial resolutions of the system were 0.64μm and 4.4μm, respectively. The study revealed the spatial distributions of protochlorophyllide (PChld) in both the 632-nm-emitting and 655-nm-emitting forms within etiolated Zea mays leaves. The sizes of the fluorescence spots attributed to the former were larger than those of the latter, validating the assignment of the former and latter to the prothylakoid and prolamellar bodies, respectively. In vivo microspectroscopy observations of mature Zea mays leaves confirmed the different photosystem II (PS I)/photosystem I (PS II) ratio between the bundle sheath (BS) and mesophyll (MS) cells, which is specific for C4-plants. The BS cells in Zea mays leaves 1h after the initiation of the greening process tended to show fluorescence spectra at shorter wavelength side (at around 679nm) than the MS cells (at around 682nm). The 679-nm-emitting chlorophyll-a form observed mainly in the BS cells was attributed to putative precursor complexes to PS I. The BS cells under 3-h greening showed higher relative intensities of the PS I fluorescence band at around 735nm, suggesting the reduced PS II amount in the BS cells in this greening stage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Green light-emitting polyepinephrine-based fluorescent organic dots and its application in intracellular metal ions sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Li, Ting Ting; Xu, Xiao Lei; Liu, Yi Yao; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, we present a class of bio-dots, polyepinephrine (PEP)-based fluorescent organic dots (PEP-FODs) for selective and sensitive detection of Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Cu(2+). The PEP-FODs were derived from epinephrine via self-polymerization at relatively low temperature down to 60°C with low cytotoxicity and relative long lifetime (7.24ns). The surface morphology and optical properties of the synthesized PEP-FODs were characterized. We found that the diameters of PEP-FODs were mainly distributed in the narrow range of 2-4nm with an average diameter of 2.9nm. An optimal emission peak located at 490nm was observed when the green light-emitting PEP-FODs were excited at 400nm. It is discovered that Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Cu(2+)can strongly quench the fluorescence of PEP-FODs through the nonradiative electron-transfer. The detection limit of 0.16, 0.67, and 0.15μM was obtained for Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Cu(2+), respectively. The independent sensing platform of Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Cu(2+)could be established by using NaF as a complexing agent and by regulating the reaction time between NaF and metal ions. Cell viability studies reveal that the as-prepared PEP-FODs possess good solubility and biocompatibility, making it as excellent imaging nanoprobes for intracellular Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Cu(2+)sensing. The developed PEP-FODs might hold great promise to broaden applications in nanotechnology and bioanalysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Intraoperative Laparoscopic Near-Infrared Fluorescence Cholangiography to Facilitate Anatomical Identification: When to Give Indocyanine Green and How Much.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrinpar, Ali; Dutson, Erik P; Mobley, Constance; Busuttil, Ronald W; Lewis, Catherine E; Tillou, Areti; Cheaito, Ali; Hines, O Joe; Agopian, Vatche G; Hiyama, Darryl T

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled real-time near-infrared fluorescence cholangiography (NIRFC) with indocyanine green (ICG). Whereas several studies have shown its feasibility, dosing and timing for practical use have not been optimized. We undertook a prospective study with systematic variation of dosing and timing from injection of ICG to visualization. Adult patients undergoing laparoscopic biliary and hepatic operations were enrolled. Intravenous ICG (0.02-0.25 mg/kg) was administered at times ranging from 10 to 180 minutes prior to planned visualization. The porta hepatis was examined using a dedicated laparoscopic system equipped to detect NIRFC. Quantitative analysis of intraoperative fluorescence was performed using a scoring system to identify biliary structures. A total of 37 patients were enrolled. Visualization of the extrahepatic biliary tract improved with increasing doses of ICG, with qualitative scores improving from 1.9 ± 1.2 (out of 5) with a 0.02-mg/kg dose to 3.4 ± 1.3 with a 0.25-mg/kg dose (P < .05 for 0.02 vs 0.25 mg/kg). Visualization was also significantly better with increased time after ICG administration (1.1 ± 0.3 for 10 minutes vs 3.4 ± 1.1 for 45 minutes, P < .01). Similarly, quantitative measures also improved with both dose and time. There were no complications from the administration of ICG. These results suggest that a dose of 0.25 mg/kg administered at least 45 minutes prior to visualization facilitates intraoperative anatomical identification. The dosage and timing of administration of ICG prior to intraoperative visualization are within a range where it can be administered in a practical, safe, and effective manner to allow intraoperative identification of extrahepatic biliary anatomy using NIRFC. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Acid-denatured Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Rosa E; Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Ramos, Marco A

    2011-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been widely used in several molecular and cellular biology applications, since it is remarkably stable in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, native GFP is resistant to the most common chemical denaturants; however, a low fluorescence signal has been observed after acid-induced denaturation. Furthermore, this acid-denatured GFP has been used as substrate in studies of the folding activity of some bacterial chaperones and other chaperone-like molecules. Protein disulfide isomerase enzymes, a family of eukaryotic oxidoreductases that catalyze the oxidation and isomerization of disulfide bonds in nascent polypeptides, play a key role in protein folding and it could display chaperone activity. However, contrasting results have been reported using different proteins as model substrates. Here, we report the further application of GFP as a model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) enzymes. Since refolding of acid-denatured GFP can be easily and directly monitored, a simple micro-assay was used to study the effect of the molecular participants in protein refolding assisted by PDI. Additionally, the effect of a well-known inhibitor of PDI chaperone activity was also analyzed. Because of the diversity their functional activities, PDI enzymes are potentially interesting drug targets. Since PDI may be implicated in the protection of cells against ER stress, including cancer cells, inhibitors of PDI might be able to enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy; furthermore, it has been demonstrated that blocking the reductive cleavage of disulfide bonds of proteins associated with the cell surface markedly reduces the infectivity of the human immunodeficiency virus. Although several high-throughput screening (HTS) assays to test PDI reductase activity have been described, we report here a novel and simple micro-assay to test the chaperone activity of PDI enzymes, which is amenable for HTS of PDI

  5. Colonization of resistant and susceptible lettuce cultivars by a green fluorescent protein-tagged isolate of Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallad, G E; Subbarao, K V

    2008-08-01

    Interactions between lettuce and a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing, race 1 isolate of Verticillium dahliae, were studied to determine infection and colonization of lettuce cultivars resistant and susceptible to Verticillium wilt. The roots of lettuce seedlings were inoculated with a conidial suspension of the GFP-expressing isolate. Colonization was studied with the aid of laser scanning confocal and epi-fluorescence microscopes. Few differences in the initial infection and colonization of lateral roots were observed between resistant and susceptible cultivars. Hyphal colonies formed on root tips and within the root elongation zones by 5 days, leading to the colonization of cortical tissues and penetration of vascular elements regardless of the lettuce cultivar by 2 weeks. By 8 to 10 weeks after inoculation, vascular discoloration developed within the taproot and crown regions of susceptible cultivars well in advance of V. dahliae colonization. Actual foliar wilt coincided with the colonization of the taproot and crown areas and the eruption of mycelia into surrounding cortical tissues. Advance colonization of stems, pedicels, and inflorescence, including developing capitula and mature achenes was observed. Seedborne infection was limited to the maternal tissues of the achene, including the pappus, pericarp, integument, and endosperm; but the embryo was never compromised. Resistant lettuce cultivars remained free of disease symptoms. Furthermore, V. dahliae colonization never progressed beyond infected lateral roots of resistant cultivars. Results indicated that resistance in lettuce may lie with the plant's ability to shed infected lateral roots or to inhibit the systemic progress of the fungus through vascular tissues into the taproot.

  6. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging and photodynamic therapy with indocyanine green lactosome has antineoplastic effects for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Tsuda

    Full Text Available Anticancer agents and operating procedures have been developed for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients, but their prognosis remains poor. It is necessary to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for HCC to improve its prognosis. Lactosome is a core-shell-type polymeric micelle, and enclosing labeling or anticancer agents into this micelle enables drug delivery. In this study, we investigated the diagnostic and therapeutic efficacies of indocyanine green (ICG-loaded lactosome for near-infrared fluorescence (NIF imaging and photodynamic therapy (PDT for HCC.The human HCC cell line HuH-7 was treated with ICG or ICG-lactosome, followed by PDT, and the cell viabilities were measured (in vitro PDT efficiency. For NIF imaging, HuH-7 cells were subcutaneously transplanted into BALB/c nude mice, followed by intravenous administration of ICG or ICG-lactosome. The transplanted animals were treated with PDT, and the antineoplastic effects were analyzed (in vivo PDT efficiency.PDT had toxic effects on HuH-7 cells treated with ICG-lactosome, but not ICG alone. NIF imaging revealed that the fluorescence of tumor areas in ICG-lactosome-treated animals was higher than that of contralateral regions at 24 h after injection and thereafter. PDT exerted immediate and continuous phototoxic effects in the transplanted mice treated with ICG-lactosome.Our results demonstrate that ICG-lactosome accumulated in xenograft tumors, and that PDT had antineoplastic effects on these malignant implants. NIF imaging and PDT with ICG-lactosome could be useful diagnostic and/or therapeutic strategies for HCC.

  7. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) gene expression in Tetraselmis subcordiformis chloroplast with endogenous regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yulin; Zhao, Jialin; Hou, Shichang; Qin, Song

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of fundamental genetic transformation technologies, the goal of this study was to optimize Tetraselmis subcordiformis chloroplast transformation through the use of endogenous regulators. The genes rrn16S, rbcL, psbA, and psbC are commonly highly expressed in chloroplasts, and the regulators of these genes are often used in chloroplast transformation. For lack of a known chloroplast genome sequence, the genome-walking method was used here to obtain full sequences of T. subcordiformis endogenous regulators. The resulting regulators, including three promoters, two terminators, and a ribosome combination sequence, were inserted into the previously constructed plasmid pPSC-R, with the egfp gene included as a reporter gene, and five chloroplast expression vectors prepared. These vectors were successfully transformed into T. subcordiformis by particle bombardment and the efficiency of each vector tested by assessing EGFP fluorescence via microscopy. The results showed that these vectors exhibited higher efficiency than the former vector pPSC-G carrying exogenous regulators, and the vector pRFA with Prrn, psbA-5'RE, and TpsbA showed the highest efficiency. This research provides a set of effective endogenous regulators for T. subcordiformis and will facilitate future fundamental studies of this alga.

  8. Quantification of dsDNA using the Hitachi F-7000 Fluorescence Spectrophotometer and PicoGreen dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luis A; Cox, Kendra L

    2010-11-05

    Quantification of DNA, especially in small concentrations, is an important task with a wide range of biological applications including standard molecular biology assays such as synthesis and purification of DNA, diagnostic applications such as quantification of DNA amplification products, and detection of DNA molecules in drug preparations. During this video we will demonstrate the capability of the Hitachi F-7000 Fluorescence Spectrophotometer equipped with a Micro Plate Reader accessory to perform dsDNA quantification using Molecular Probes Quant-it PicoGreen dye reagent kit. The F-7000 Fluorescence Spectrophotometer offers high sensitivity and high speed measurements. It is a highly flexible system capable of measuring fluorescence, luminescence, and phosphorescence. Several measuring modes are available, including wavelength scan, time scan, photometry and 3-D scan measurement. The spectrophotometer has sensitivity in the range of 50 picomoles of fluorescein when using a 300 μL sample volume in the microplate, and is capable of measuring scan speeds of 60,000 nm/minute. It also has a wide dynamic range of up to 5 orders of magnitude which allows for the use of calibration curves over a wide range of concentrations. The optical system uses all reflective optics for maximum energy and sensitivity. The standard wavelength range is 200 to 750 nm, and can be extended to 900 nm when using one of the optional near infrared photomultipliers. The system allows optional temperature control for the plate reader from 5 to 60 degrees Celsius using an optional external temperature controlled liquid circulator. The microplate reader allows for the use of 96 well microplates, and the measuring speed for 96 wells is less than 60 seconds when using the kinetics mode. Software controls for the F-7000 and Microplate Reader are also highly flexible. Samples may be set in either column or row formats, and any combination of wells may be chosen for sample measurements. This allows

  9. Generating a battery of monoclonal antibodies against native green fluorescent protein for immunostaining, FACS, IP, and ChIP using a unique adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Philip; Daniels, Karla J; Park, Yang-Nim; Soll, David R

    2014-04-01

    Using a unique, nontoxic adjuvant compound of poly(I:C) and anti-CD40 MAb, a battery of eight mouse monoclonal antibodies was generated against native green fluorescent protein. All were effective to varying degrees for immunostaining paraformaldehyde-fixed cells, six for staining sections of paraffin-embedded tissue, all to varying degrees in fluorescent-activated cell sorting, five for immunoprecipitation, and seven for chromatin immunoprecipitation. None worked in denaturing Western blots since the target was the native GFP protein. Both the hybridomas and antibodies are available at cost through DSHB, a non-profit National Resource created by the National Institutes of Health.

  10. Structural Insight into the Photochemistry of Split Green Fluorescent Proteins: A Unique Role for a His-Tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Alan; Boxer, Steven G

    2018-01-10

    Oligohistidine affinity tags (His-tags) are commonly fused to proteins to aid in their purification via metal affinity chromatography. These His-tags are generally assumed to have minimal impact on the properties of the fusion protein, as they have no propensity to form ordered elements, and are small enough not to significantly affect the solubility or size. Here we report structures of two variants of truncated green fluorescent protein (GFP), i.e., split GFP with a β-strand removed, that were found to behave differently in the presence of light. In these structures, the N-terminal His-tag and several neighboring residues play a highly unusual structural and functional role in stabilizing the truncated GFP by substituting as a surrogate β-strand in the groove vacated by the native strand. This finding provides an explanation for the seemingly very different peptide binding and photodissociation properties of split proteins involving β-strands 10 and 11. We show that these truncated GFPs can bind other non-native sequences, and this promiscuity invites the possibility for rational design of sequences optimized for strand binding and photodissociation, both useful for optogenetic applications.

  11. Photoactivatable green fluorescent protein-based visualization and quantification of mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial network complexity in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowski, Mariusz; Cleland, Megan M; Roelofs, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Technological improvements in microscopy and the development of mitochondria-specific imaging molecular tools have illuminated the dynamic rearrangements of these essential organelles. These rearrangements are mainly the result of two opposing processes: mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial fission. Consistent with this, in addition to mitochondrial motility, these two processes are major factors determining the overall degree of continuity of the mitochondrial network, as well as the average size of mitochondria within the cell. In this chapter, we detail the use of advanced confocal microscopy and mitochondrial matrix-targeted photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (mito-PAGFP) for the investigation of mitochondrial dynamics. We focus on direct visualization and quantification of mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial network complexity in living mammalian cells. These assays were instrumental in important recent discoveries within the field of mitochondrial biology, including the role of mitochondrial fusion in the activation of mitochondrial steps in apoptosis, participation of Bcl-2 family proteins in mitochondrial morphogenesis, and stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion. We present some basic directions that should be helpful in designing mito-PAGFP-based experiments. Furthermore, since analyses of mitochondrial fusion using mito-PAGFP-based assays rely on time-lapse imaging, critical parameters of time-lapse microscopy and cell preparation are also discussed.

  12. Application of green fluorescent protein-labeled assay for the study of subcellular localization of Newcastle disease virus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhiqiang; Li, Qunhui; He, Liang; Zhao, Guo; Chen, Jian; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Xiufan

    2013-12-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) used as a powerful marker of gene expression in vivo has so far been applied widely in studying the localizations and functions of protein in living cells. In this study, GFP-labeled assay was used to investigate the subcellular localization of matrix (M) protein of different virulence and genotype Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains. The M protein of ten NDV strains fused with GFP (GFP-M) all showed nuclear-and-nucleolar localization throughout transfection, whereas that of the other two strains were observed in the nucleus and nucleolus early in transfection but in the cytoplasm late in transfection. In addition, mutations to the previously defined nuclear localization signal in the GFP-M fusion protein were studied as well. Single changes at positions 262 and 263 did not affect nuclear localization of M, while changing both of these arginine residues to asparagine caused re-localization of M mainly to the cytoplasm. The GFP-M was validated as a suitable system for studying the subcellular localization of M protein and could be used to assist us in further identifying the signal sequences responsible for the nucleolar localization and cytoplasmic localization of M protein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Green fluorescent protein as a scaffold for high efficiency production of functional bacteriotoxic proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Cho, Hye-Sun; Ahn, Byeongyong; Choi, Minkyung; Thong, Le Minh; Choi, Hojun; Cha, Se-Yeoun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Park, Choi-Kyu; Seo, Kunho; Park, Chankyu

    2016-02-11

    The availability of simple, robust, and cost-effective methods for the large-scale production of bacteriotoxic peptides such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is essential for basic and pharmaceutical research. However, the production of bacteriotoxic proteins has been difficult due to a high degree of toxicity in bacteria and proteolytic degradation. In this study, we inserted AMPs into the Green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a loop region and expressed them as insoluble proteins in high yield, circumventing the inherent toxicity of AMP production in Escherichia coli. The AMPs inserted were released by cyanogen bromide and purified by chromatography. We showed that highly potent AMPs such as Protegrin-1, PMAP-36, Buforin-2, and Bactridin-1 are produced in high yields and produced AMPs showed similar activities compared to chemically synthesized AMPs. We increased the yield more than two-fold by inserting three copies of Protegrin-1 in the GFP scaffold. The immunogold electron micrographs showed that the expressed Protegrin-1 in the GFP scaffold forms large and small size aggregates in the core region of the inclusion body and become entirely nonfunctional, therefore not influencing the proliferation of E. coli. Our novel method will be applicable for diverse bacteriotoxic peptides which can be exploited in biomedical and pharmaceutical researches.

  14. Detection of soluble expression and in vivo interactions of the inner membrane protein OppC using green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Q J; Zhai, J F; Zhang, M; Zhang, B

    2015-12-22

    In this study, the in vivo interaction system of oligopeptide permease (Opp) proteins was analyzed, and a high expression system of inner membrane protein OppC was constructed by flexible usage of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The Escherichia coli OppC gene, which encodes a transmembrane component of oligopeptide transporter, was cloned into different vectors. Recombinant plasmids were transformed into different E. coli strains, and the expression conditions were optimized. The effect of plasmids and expression strains on OppC production was evaluated by in-gel and western blot analyses. OppC produced by the pWaldo-GFPe vector, harboring the GFP reporter gene, transformed into E. coli C43(DE3) provided sufficient functional protein for biochemical and biophysical studies. In vivo protein-protein interactions were detected among oligopeptide permease proteins using a GFP fragment reassembly protocol. The substrate binding protein OppA showed no interaction with the other components, while the ATP-binding component OppD did not interact with OppF. OppD and OppF interacted with the transmembrane components OppB and OppC. OppB also showed direct interaction with OppC. In vivo OppC functionality was determined by constructing an OppC gene deletion strain. OppC was shown to be essential for peptide uptake, and non-essential for cell viability. These results could help in elucidating the oligopeptide transport mechanism in bacteria.

  15. Non-peptide guided auto-secretion of recombinant proteins by super-folder green fluorescent protein in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Tang, Rongxing; Zhu, Dewu; Wang, Wenfeng; Yi, Li; Ma, Lixin

    2017-08-01

    Protein secretion in Escherichia coli is usually led by a signal peptide that targets the protein to specific secretory pathways. In this study, we demonstrated that the superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) could be served as a non-signal peptide to guide protein auto-secretion in E. coli. This auto-secretion was characterized as a three-step process through the sub-cellular localization analysis: inner membrane trans-location followed by anchoring at outer membrane, and then being released into culture media. We further determined that the beta-barrel structure and net negative charges of sfGFP played important roles in its auto-extracellular secretion property. Using sfGFP as a carrier, heterologous proteins ranging from peptide to complex protein, including antibacterial peptide PG4, endo-beta-N-acethylglucosamindase H (Endo H), human arginase-1 (ARG1), and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) were all successfully expressed and secreted extracellularly when fused to the carboxyl end of sfGFP. Besides facilitating the extracellular secretion, sfGFP fusion proteins can also be correctly folded and formed the active complex protein structure, including the trimetric human ARG1 and homo-hexametric GAD. This is the first report that sfGFP can guide the secretion of recombinant proteins out of the cells from cytoplasm in E. coli without affecting their conformation and function.

  16. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based plasmid system to study post-transcriptional control of gene expression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Johannes H; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are an emerging class of regulators of bacterial gene expression, which mainly modulate the translation of trans-encoded mRNAs. Typically, these molecules are 50-200 nucleotides in size and do not contain expressed open reading frames (ORFs). In Escherichia coli, about 70 members of this group have been identified to date and further estimates assume hundreds of sRNAs per bacterial genome. Regulation of gene expression by sRNAs is predominantly mediated by physical sRNA/target mRNA interactions that are based on short and imperfect complementarity. Although the contribution of sRNAs to overall bacterial gene regulation is now being appreciated, the function of many sRNAs is still unknown and their targets await to be uncovered. We recently developed a modular two-plasmid system, based on the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as non-invasive reporter of gene expression, to rapidly monitor the regulatory potential of sRNA/target mRNA pairs under investigation in vivo. The specialized reporter plasmid series also provides a suitable platform to study the function of cis-encoded riboregulators such as natural riboswitches, thermosensors, or engineered aptamer-based regulatory switches.

  17. Effect of mutations in a simian virus 40 PolyA signal enhancer on green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H G; Wang, X F; Jing, X Y; Li, Z; Zhang, Y; Lv, Z J

    2011-08-26

    Our previous studies have shown that tandem Alu repeats inhibit green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene expression when inserted downstream of the GFP gene in the pEGFP-C1 vector. We found that the 22R sequence (5'-GTGAAAAAAATGCTTTATTTGT-3') from the antisense PolyA (240 bp polyadenylation signal) of simian virus 40, eliminated repression of GFP gene expression when inserted between the GFP gene and the Alu repeats. The 22R sequence contains an imperfect palindrome; based on RNA structure software prediction, it forms an unstable stem-loop structure, including a loop, a first stem, a bulge, and a second stem. Analysis of mutations of the loop length of the 22R sequence showed that the three-nucleotide loop (wild-type, 22R) induced much stronger GFP expression than did other loop lengths. Two mutations, 4TMI (A7→T, A17→T) and 5AMI (A6→T, T18→A), which caused the base type changes in the bulge and in the second stem in the 22R sequence, induced stronger GFP gene expression than 22R itself. Mutation of the bulge base (A17→T), leading to complete complementation of the stem, caused weaker GFP gene expression. Sequences without a palindrome (7pieA, 5'-GTGAAAAAAATG CAAAAAAAGT-3', 7pieT, 5'-GTGTTTTTTTTGCTTTTTTTGT-3') did not activate GFP gene expression. We conclude that an imperfect palindrome affects and can increase GFP gene expression.

  18. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) leakage from microbial biosensors provides useful information for the evaluation of the scale-down effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvigne, Frank; Brognaux, Alison; Francis, Frédéric; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Gorret, Nathalie; Sorensen, Soren J; Thonart, Philippe

    2011-08-01

    Mixing deficiencies can be potentially detected by the use of a dedicated whole cell microbial biosensor. In this work, a csiE promoter induced under carbon-limited conditions was involved in the elaboration of such biosensor. The cisE biosensor exhibited interesting response after up and down-shift of the dilution rate in chemostat mode. Glucose limitation was accompanied by green fluorescent protein (GFP) leakage to the extracellular medium. In order to test the responsiveness of microbial biosensors to substrate fluctuations in large-scale, a scale-down reactor (SDR) experiment was performed. The glucose fluctuations were characterized at the single cell level and tend to decrease the induction of GFP. Simulations run on the basis of a stochastic hydrodynamic model have shown the variability and the frequencies at which biosensors are exposed to glucose gradient in the SDR. GFP leakage was observed to a great extent in the case of a culture operated in well-mixed fed-batch mode, by comparison with those operated in SDR. GFP leakage seems to be correlated to a higher membrane permeability, confirming previous studies highlighting a better cell viability in cultures operated in a fluctuating environment. Our results suggest that GFP leakage could be used in parallel to the normal GFP biosensor function in order to assess microbial viability in process conditions. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in contaminated sediments and soils using green fluorescent protein-based bacterial biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, V.H.-C.; Chien, M.-T.; Tseng, Y.-Y.; Ou, K.-L.

    2006-01-01

    A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based bacterial biosensor Escherichia coli DH5α (pVLCD1) was developed based on the expression of gfp under the control of the cad promoter and the cadC gene of Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258. DH5α (pVLCD1) mainly responded to Cd(II), Pb(II), and Sb(III), the lowest detectable concentrations being 0.1 nmol L -1 , 10 nmol L -1 , and 0.1 nmol L -1 , respectively, with 2 h exposure. The biosensor was field-tested to measure the relative bioavailability of the heavy metals in contaminated sediments and soil samples. The results showed that the majority of heavy metals remained adsorbed to soil particles: Cd(II)/Pb(II) was only partially available to the biosensor in soil-water extracts. Our results demonstrate that the GFP-based bacterial biosensor is useful and applicable in determining the bioavailability of heavy metals with high sensitivity in contaminated sediment and soil samples and suggests a potential for its inexpensive application in environmentally relevant sample tests. - Nonpathogenic GFP-based bacterial biosensor is applicable in determining the bioavailability of heavy metals in environmental samples

  20. A quasi-lentiviral green fluorescent protein reporter exhibits nuclear export features of late human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcripts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, Marcus; Ludwig, Christine; Kehlenbeck, Sylvia; Jungert, Kerstin; Wagner, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that Rev-dependent expression of HIV-1 Gag from CMV immediate early promoter critically depends on the AU-rich codon bias of the gag gene. Here, we demonstrate that adaptation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene to HIV codon bias is sufficient to turn this hivGFP RNA into a quasi-lentiviral message following the rules of late lentiviral gene expression. Accordingly, GFP expression was significantly decreased in transfected cells strictly correlating with reduced RNA levels. In the presence of the HIV 5' major splice donor, the hivGFP RNAs were stabilized in the nucleus and efficiently exported to the cytoplasm following fusion of the 3' Rev-responsive element (RRE) and coexpression of HIV-1 Rev. This Rev-dependent translocation was specifically inhibited by leptomycin B suggesting export via the CRM1-dependent pathway used by late lentiviral transcripts. In conclusion, this quasi-lentiviral reporter system may provide a new platform for developing sensitive Rev screening assays

  1. investigating acid production by Streptococcus mutans with a surface-displayed pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Guo

    Full Text Available Acidogenicity and aciduricity are the main virulence factors of the cavity-causing bacterium Streptococcus mutans. Monitoring at the individual cell level the temporal and spatial distribution of acid produced by this important oral pathogen is central for our understanding of these key virulence factors especially when S. mutans resides in multi-species microbial communities. In this study, we explored the application of pH-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (pHluorins to investigate these important features. Ecliptic pHluorin was functionally displayed on the cell surface of S. mutans as a fusion protein with SpaP. The resulting strain (O87 was used to monitor temporal and spatial pH changes in the microenvironment of S. mutans cells under both planktonic and biofilm conditions. Using strain O87, we revealed a rapid pH drop in the microenviroment of S. mutans microcolonies prior to the decrease in the macro-environment pH following sucrose fermentation. Meanwhile, a non-uniform pH distribution was observed within S. mutans biofilms, reflecting differences in microbial metabolic activity. Furthermore, strain O87 was successfully used to monitor the S. mutans acid production profiles within dual- and multispecies oral biofilms. Based on these findings, the ecliptic pHluorin allows us to investigate in vivo and in situ acid production and distribution by the cariogenic species S. mutans.

  2. The role of bone marrow-derived cells in bone fracture repair in a green fluorescent protein chimeric mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Rei; Migita, Makoto; Hanawa, Hideki; Ito, Hiromoto; Orimo, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the role of bone marrow cells in bone fracture repair using green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric model mice. First, the chimeric model mice were created: bone marrow cells from GFP-transgenic C57BL/6 mice were injected into the tail veins of recipient wild-type C57BL/6 mice that had been irradiated with a lethal dose of 10 Gy from a cesium source. Next, bone fracture models were created from these mice: closed transverse fractures of the left femur were produced using a specially designed device. One, three, and five weeks later, fracture lesions were extirpated for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. In the specimens collected 3 and 5 weeks after operation, we confirmed calluses showing intramembranous ossification peripheral to the fracture site. The calluses consisted of GFP- and osteocalcin-positive cells at the same site, although the femur consisted of only osteocalcin-positive cells. We suggest that bone marrow cells migrated outside of the bone marrow and differentiated into osteoblasts to make up the calluses

  3. Use of KikGR a photoconvertible green-to-red fluorescent protein for cell labeling and lineage analysis in ES cells and mouse embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadjantonakis Anna-Katerina

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of genetically-encoded fluorescent proteins has revolutionized the fields of cell and developmental biology and in doing so redefined our understanding of the dynamic morphogenetic processes that shape the embryo. With the advent of more accessible and sophisticated imaging technologies as well as an abundance of fluorescent proteins with different spectral characteristics, the dynamic processes taking place in situ in living cells and tissues can now be probed. Photomodulatable fluorescent proteins are one of the emerging classes of genetically-encoded fluorescent proteins. Results We have compared PA-GFP, PS-CFP2, Kaede and KikGR four readily available and commonly used photomodulatable fluorescent proteins for use in ES cells and mice. Our results suggest that the green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent protein, Kikume Green-Red (KikGR, is most suitable for cell labeling and lineage studies in ES cells and mice because it is developmentally neutral, bright and undergoes rapid and complete photoconversion. We have generated transgenic ES cell lines and strains of mice exhibiting robust widespread expression of KikGR. By efficient photoconversion of KikGR we labeled subpopulations of ES cells in culture, and groups of cells within ex utero cultured mouse embryos. Red fluorescent photoconverted cells and their progeny could be followed for extended periods of time. Conclusion Transgenic ES cells and mice exhibiting widespread readily detectable expression of KikGR are indistinguishable from their wild type counterparts and are amenable to efficient photoconversion. They represent novel tools for non-invasive selective labeling specific cell populations and live imaging cell dynamics and cell fate. Genetically-encoded photomodulatable proteins such as KikGR represent emergent attractive alternatives to commonly used vital dyes, tissue grafts and genetic methods for investigating dynamic behaviors of individual cells

  4. Removal of a cryptic intron and subcellular localization of green fluorescent protein are required to mark transgenic Arabidopsis plants brightly

    OpenAIRE

    Haseloff, Jim; Siemering, Kirby R.; Prasher, Douglas C.; Hodge, Sarah

    1997-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is finding wide use as a genetic marker that can be directly visualized in the living cells of many heterologous organisms. We have sought to express GFP in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, but have found that proper expression of GFP is curtailed due to aberrant mRNA processing. An 84-nt cryptic intron is efficiently recognized and excised from transcripts of the GFP coding sequence. The cryptic intron contains seq...

  5. Green fluorescent protein purification through Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatografy (IMAC) and its relevance for Biomedical Science students during Biochemistry practical classes at La Trobe University – Australia

    OpenAIRE

    de Melo Silva, Alex Jose José; Alves, Lumar Lucena; Pakay, Julian

    2016-01-01

    This work was performed as an integrated practical of a Biomedical Science undergraduate course of Biochemistry subject, in order to demonstrate used techniques to purify of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). To perform the experiments the main methodology applied was the by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC).  The open reading frame for enhanced GFP was sub-cloned into the pQE30 expression vector. The subsequent production of protein tagged N-terminally with hexahistidine, facili...

  6. Use of Green Fluorescent Protein and Reverse Transcription-PCR To Monitor Candida albicans Agglutinin-Like Sequence Gene Expression in a Murine Model of Disseminated Candidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Clayton B.; Zhao, Xiaomin; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2005-01-01

    Candida albicans PALS-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains were inoculated into mice in a disseminated candidiasis model, and GFP production was monitored by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). GFP production from the ALS1 and ALS3 promoters was detected immunohistochemically. ALS1, ALS2, ALS3, ALS4, and ALS9 transcription was detected by RT-PCR, further identifying ALS genes expressed in this model.

  7. Use of green fluorescent protein and reverse transcription-PCR to monitor Candida albicans agglutinin-like sequence gene expression in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Clayton B; Zhao, Xiaomin; Hoyer, Lois L

    2005-03-01

    Candida albicans PALS-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains were inoculated into mice in a disseminated candidiasis model, and GFP production was monitored by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). GFP production from the ALS1 and ALS3 promoters was detected immunohistochemically. ALS1, ALS2, ALS3, ALS4, and ALS9 transcription was detected by RT-PCR, further identifying ALS genes expressed in this model.

  8. A vector carrying the GFP gene (Green fluorescent protein as a yeast marker for fermentation processes Um vetor com o gene da GFP (Green fluorescent protein para a marcação de leveduras em processos fermentativos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Humberto Gomes

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Contaminant yeasts spoil pure culture fermentations and cause great losses in quality and product yields. They can be detected by a variety of methods although none being so efficient for early detection of contaminant yeast cells that appear at low frequency. Pure cultures bearing genetic markers can ease the direct identification of cells and colonies among contaminants. Fast and easy detection are desired and morphological markers would even help the direct visualization of marked pure cultures among contaminants. The GFP gene for green fluorescent protein of Aquorea victoria, proved to be a very efficient marker to visualize transformed cells in mixed populations and tissues. To test this marker in the study of contaminated yeast fermentations, the GFP gene was used to construct a vector under the control of the ADH2 promoter (pYGFP3. Since ADH2 is repressed by glucose the expression of the protein would not interfere in the course of fermentation. The transformed yeasts with the vector pYGFP3 showed high stability and high bioluminescence to permit identification of marked cells among a mixed population of cells. The vector opens the possibility to conduct further studies aiming to develop an efficient method for early detection of spoilage yeasts in industrial fermentative processes.Leveduras contaminantes podem causar grandes perdas em processos fermentativos quando infectam culturas puras e degradam a qualidade do produto final. Estas leveduras podem ser detectadas por diversos métodos mas nenhum deles oferece resultados com a exatidão e precisão necessárias, quando os contaminantes estão em baixa freqüência. Culturas puras contendo um gene marcador podem ser utilizadas para a direta identificação de células e colônias contaminantes. Detecção rápida e fácil é desejada e marcadores morfológicos podem auxiliar na visualização da cultura marcada. O gene da GFP (green fluorescent protein extraído da Aequorea victoria

  9. Dynamics of Transgenic Enterobacter cloacae Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein-Defensin (GFP-D in Anopheles stephensi under Laboratory Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dehghan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterobacter cloacae bacterium is a known symbiont of the most Anopheles gut microflora and nominated as a good candidate for paratransgenic control of malaria. However, the population dynamics of this bacterium with­in An. stephensi and its introduction methods to the mosquitoes have not yet been explored.Methods: Enterobacter cloacae subsp. dissolvens expressing green fluorescent protein and defensin (GFP-D was used to study transstadial transmission and the course of time, larval habitat, sugar, and blood meal on dynamics of the bacterium in the mosquito life stages in the laboratory condition. The bacterial quantities were measured by plating samples and counting GFP expressing colonies on the Tet-BHI agar medium.Results: The E. cloacae population remained stable in sugar bait at least for eleven days whereas it was lowered in the insectary larval habitat where the bacteria inadequately recycled. The bacterium was weakly transmitted transstadi­ally from larval to adult stage. The bacterial populations increased smoothly and then dramatically in the guts of An. stephensi following sugar and blood meal respectively followed by a gradual reduction over the time.Conclusion: Enterobacter cloacae was highly stable in sugar bait and increased tremendously in the gut of female adult An. stephensi within 24h post blood meal. Sugar bait stations can be used for introduction of the transgenic bacteria in a paratransgenic approach. It is recommended to evaluate the attraction of sugar bait in combination with attractive kairomones as well as its stability and survival rate in the semi-field or field conditions.

  10. Ectopic bone formation cannot occur by hydroxyapatite/{beta}-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics in green fluorescent protein chimeric mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Lijia [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Duan Xin [Department of Orthopaedics, Chengdu Second People' s Hospital, Chengdu (China); Department of Orthopaedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Xiang Zhou [Department of Orthopaedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Shi Yujun; Lu Xiaofeng; Ye Feng [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Bu Hong, E-mail: hongbu@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Transplant Engineering and Immunology, Ministry of Health, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Department of Pathology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Firstly, chimeric mouse model could be established successfully by bone marrow transplantation after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondly, bone induction can occur in wild-type mice 90 days after implantation, but not occur in chimeric mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thirdly, destruction of immune function will block osteoinduction by calcium phosphate ceramics. - Abstract: Many studies have shown that calcium phosphate ceramics (CP) have osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties; however, the exact mechanism of bone induction has not yet been reported. This study was performed to investigate if destroying immunological function will influence osteogenesis, to explain the mechanism which is unclear. In this study, twenty C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups (n = 10), in group 1, a hydroxyapatite/{beta}-tricalcium phosphate (HA/{beta}-TCP) ceramic was implanted into both the left and right leg muscles of each mouse; in group 2, ten mice experienced lethal irradiation, then were injected bone marrow (BM) cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice by tail veil, after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and muscle were harvested for biological analysis, after the GFP chimera model was established successfully, the same HA/{beta}-TCP ceramic was implanted into both leg muscles of each mouse immediately after irradiation. 45 and 90 days after implantation, the ceramics of the two groups were harvested to perform with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining; the results showed that there was no bone formation in group 2, while new bone tissues were detected in group 1. Our findings suggest that the BM cell from GFP transgenic mice is a good biomarker and it could set a good platform for chimera model; it also shows that BM cell is one of cell resources of bone induction, and destruction of immune function will impede

  11. A study on the effect of surface lysine to arginine mutagenesis on protein stability and structure using green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering.

  12. Ectopic bone formation cannot occur by hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics in green fluorescent protein chimeric mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Lijia; Duan Xin; Xiang Zhou; Shi Yujun; Lu Xiaofeng; Ye Feng; Bu Hong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Firstly, chimeric mouse model could be established successfully by bone marrow transplantation after irradiation. ► Secondly, bone induction can occur in wild-type mice 90 days after implantation, but not occur in chimeric mice. ► Thirdly, destruction of immune function will block osteoinduction by calcium phosphate ceramics. - Abstract: Many studies have shown that calcium phosphate ceramics (CP) have osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties; however, the exact mechanism of bone induction has not yet been reported. This study was performed to investigate if destroying immunological function will influence osteogenesis, to explain the mechanism which is unclear. In this study, twenty C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups (n = 10), in group 1, a hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) ceramic was implanted into both the left and right leg muscles of each mouse; in group 2, ten mice experienced lethal irradiation, then were injected bone marrow (BM) cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice by tail veil, after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and muscle were harvested for biological analysis, after the GFP chimera model was established successfully, the same HA/β-TCP ceramic was implanted into both leg muscles of each mouse immediately after irradiation. 45 and 90 days after implantation, the ceramics of the two groups were harvested to perform with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining; the results showed that there was no bone formation in group 2, while new bone tissues were detected in group 1. Our findings suggest that the BM cell from GFP transgenic mice is a good biomarker and it could set a good platform for chimera model; it also shows that BM cell is one of cell resources of bone induction, and destruction of immune function will impede osteoinduction by CP. Overall, our results may shed light on clear mechanism study of bone

  13. Determination of the topology of endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins using redox-sensitive green-fluorescence protein fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsachaki, Maria; Birk, Julia; Egert, Aurélie; Odermatt, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are involved in a wide array of essential cellular functions. Identification of the topology of membrane proteins can provide significant insight into their mechanisms of action and biological roles. This is particularly important for membrane enzymes, since their topology determines the subcellular site where a biochemical reaction takes place and the dependence on luminal or cytosolic co-factor pools and substrates. The methods currently available for the determination of topology of proteins are rather laborious and require post-lysis or post-fixation manipulation of cells. In this work, we have developed a simple method for defining intracellular localization and topology of ER membrane proteins in living cells, based on the fusion of the respective protein with redox-sensitive green-fluorescent protein (roGFP). We validated the method and demonstrated that roGFP fusion proteins constitute a reliable tool for the study of ER membrane protein topology, using as control microsomal 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) proteins whose topology has been resolved, and comparing with an independent approach. We then implemented this method to determine the membrane topology of six microsomal members of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) family. The results revealed a luminal orientation of the catalytic site for three enzymes, i.e. 17β-HSD6, 7 and 12. Knowledge of the intracellular location of the catalytic site of these enzymes will enable future studies on their biological functions and on the role of the luminal co-factor pool. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Green fluorescent protein labeling of Listeria, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 for safety-related studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Guodong; Doyle, Michael P

    2011-04-04

    Many food safety-related studies require tracking of introduced foodborne pathogens to monitor their fate in complex environments. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene (gfp) provides an easily detectable phenotype so has been used to label many microorganisms for ecological studies. The objectives of this study were to label major foodborne pathogens and related bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains, with GFP and characterize the labeled strains for stability of the GFP plasmid and the plasmid's effect on bacterial growth. GFP plasmids were introduced into these strains by a CaCl(2) procedure, conjugation or electroporation. Stability of the label was determined through sequential propagation of labeled strains in the absence of selective pressure, and rates of plasmid-loss were calculated. Stability of the GFP plasmid varied among the labeled species and strains, with the most stable GFP label observed in E. coli O157:H7. When grown in nonselective media for two consecutive subcultures (ca. 20 generations), the rates of plasmid loss among labeled E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria strains ranged from 0%-30%, 15.8%-99.9% and 8.1%-93.4%, respectively. Complete loss (>99.99%) of the plasmid occurred in some labeled strains after five consecutive subcultures in the absence of selective pressure, whereas it remained stable in others. The GFP plasmid had an insignificant effect on growth of most labeled strains. E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria strains can be effectively labeled with the GFP plasmid which can be stable in some isolates for many generations without adversely affecting growth rates.

  15. Use of Indocyanine Green Fluorescence Endoscopy to Treat Concurrent Perimedullary and Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas in the Cervical Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akira; Endo, Toshiki; Inoue, Tomoo; Endo, Hidenori; Sato, Kenichi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-05-01

    Intraoperative microscopic fluorescence angiography using indocyanine green (ICG) provides visual information on real-time blood flow. However, this method cannot be applied for lesions that are not visible under microscopic imaging because excitation light does not reach the targeted vascular structures. Endoscope-integrated ICG video-angiography has recently been advocated to compensate for this limitation. This is the first reported case of a spinal arteriovenous malformation in which endoscope-integrated ICG video-angiography was successfully used. We report the case of a 63-year-old man who presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a spinal arteriovenous malformation at the C3 level. We chose the direct surgery option with a posterior approach to treat this lesion. Although the preoperative diagnosis was a perimedullary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with multiple feeders, we found concurrent dural AVF and perimedullary AVFs during surgery. We introduced an endoscope and performed endoscope-integrated ICG video-angiography because it was difficult to identify the angioarchitectures of the perimedural and dural AVFs on the ventral surface of the spinal cord under microscopic view alone. Endoscope-integrated ICG video-angiography gave us clear and magnified angioarchitectures of these lesions. The fistulous point and the varix of the perimedullary AVF was coagulated and dissected under endoscopic view, and the draining vein of the dural AVF was also coagulated and dissected at the origin from the dura mater under microscopic view. A posterior approach with the assistance of an endoscope and endoscope-integrated ICG video-angiography is feasible for spinal vascular diseases located ventrally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Green fluorescent protein labeling of Listeria, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 for safety-related studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    Full Text Available Many food safety-related studies require tracking of introduced foodborne pathogens to monitor their fate in complex environments. The green fluorescent protein (GFP gene (gfp provides an easily detectable phenotype so has been used to label many microorganisms for ecological studies. The objectives of this study were to label major foodborne pathogens and related bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains, with GFP and characterize the labeled strains for stability of the GFP plasmid and the plasmid's effect on bacterial growth. GFP plasmids were introduced into these strains by a CaCl(2 procedure, conjugation or electroporation. Stability of the label was determined through sequential propagation of labeled strains in the absence of selective pressure, and rates of plasmid-loss were calculated. Stability of the GFP plasmid varied among the labeled species and strains, with the most stable GFP label observed in E. coli O157:H7. When grown in nonselective media for two consecutive subcultures (ca. 20 generations, the rates of plasmid loss among labeled E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria strains ranged from 0%-30%, 15.8%-99.9% and 8.1%-93.4%, respectively. Complete loss (>99.99% of the plasmid occurred in some labeled strains after five consecutive subcultures in the absence of selective pressure, whereas it remained stable in others. The GFP plasmid had an insignificant effect on growth of most labeled strains. E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria strains can be effectively labeled with the GFP plasmid which can be stable in some isolates for many generations without adversely affecting growth rates.

  17. Semi-automated hydrophobic interaction chromatography column scouting used in the two-step purification of recombinant green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Orrin J; Biette, Kelly M; Murphy, Patrick J M

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) most commonly requires experimental determination (i.e., scouting) in order to select an optimal chromatographic medium for purifying a given target protein. Neither a two-step purification of untagged green fluorescent protein (GFP) from crude bacterial lysate using sequential HIC and size exclusion chromatography (SEC), nor HIC column scouting elution profiles of GFP, have been previously reported. Bacterial lysate expressing recombinant GFP was sequentially adsorbed to commercially available HIC columns containing butyl, octyl, and phenyl-based HIC ligands coupled to matrices of varying bead size. The lysate was fractionated using a linear ammonium phosphate salt gradient at constant pH. Collected HIC eluate fractions containing retained GFP were then pooled and further purified using high-resolution preparative SEC. Significant differences in presumptive GFP elution profiles were observed using in-line absorption spectrophotometry (A395) and post-run fluorimetry. SDS-PAGE and western blot demonstrated that fluorometric detection was the more accurate indicator of GFP elution in both HIC and SEC purification steps. Comparison of composite HIC column scouting data indicated that a phenyl ligand coupled to a 34 µm matrix produced the highest degree of target protein capture and separation. Conducting two-step protein purification using the preferred HIC medium followed by SEC resulted in a final, concentrated product with >98% protein purity. In-line absorbance spectrophotometry was not as precise of an indicator of GFP elution as post-run fluorimetry. These findings demonstrate the importance of utilizing a combination of detection methods when evaluating purification strategies. GFP is a well-characterized model protein, used heavily in educational settings and by researchers with limited protein purification experience, and the data and strategies presented here may aid in development other of HIC-compatible protein

  18. Supercharged green fluorescent protein delivers HPV16E7 DNA and protein into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevalli, Fatemeh; Bolhassani, Azam; Hesami, Shilan; Shahbazi, Sepideh

    2018-02-01

    Macromolecules including DNA and proteins serve as important human therapeutics but are limited by their general inability to cross cell membranes. Supercharged proteins have been known as potent tools for delivery of macromolecules into mammalian cells. Thus, the use of these delivery systems is important to reduce the human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated malignancies through improvement of vaccine modalities. In this study, we used a supercharged green fluorescent protein (+36 GFP) for delivery of the full-length HPV16 E7 DNA and protein into mammalian cells and evaluated immune responses, and protective/therapeutic effects of different formulations in C57BL/6 tumor mice model. Our results showed that the complexes of E7 DNA/+36 GFP and also E7 protein/+36 GFP form stable nanoparticles through non-covalent binding with an average size of ∼ 200-300 nm. The efficient delivery of E7 DNA or protein by +36 GFP was detected in HEK-293T cell line for 4 h and 24 h post-transfection. Mice immunization with E7 protein/+36 GFP nanoparticles elicited a higher Th1 cellular immune response with the predominant IgG2a and IFN-γ levels than those induced by E7 protein, E7 DNA, E7 DNA/+36 GFP and control groups (p GFP and E7 protein/+36 GFP nanoparticles similarly protected mice against TC-1 tumor challenge (∼67%) as compared to E7 DNA and E7 protein (∼33%), respectively. These data suggest that +36 GFP may provide a promising platform to improve protein and DNA delivery in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ectopic bone formation cannot occur by hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics in green fluorescent protein chimeric mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lijia; Duan, Xin; Xiang, Zhou; Shi, Yujun; Lu, Xiaofeng; Ye, Feng; Bu, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Many studies have shown that calcium phosphate ceramics (CP) have osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties; however, the exact mechanism of bone induction has not yet been reported. This study was performed to investigate if destroying immunological function will influence osteogenesis, to explain the mechanism which is unclear. In this study, twenty C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups (n = 10), in group 1, a hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) ceramic was implanted into both the left and right leg muscles of each mouse; in group 2, ten mice experienced lethal irradiation, then were injected bone marrow (BM) cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice by tail veil, after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and muscle were harvested for biological analysis, after the GFP chimera model was established successfully, the same HA/β-TCP ceramic was implanted into both leg muscles of each mouse immediately after irradiation. 45 and 90 days after implantation, the ceramics of the two groups were harvested to perform with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining; the results showed that there was no bone formation in group 2, while new bone tissues were detected in group 1. Our findings suggest that the BM cell from GFP transgenic mice is a good biomarker and it could set a good platform for chimera model; it also shows that BM cell is one of cell resources of bone induction, and destruction of immune function will impede osteoinduction by CP. Overall, our results may shed light on clear mechanism study of bone induction in the future.

  20. Semi-Automated Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography Column Scouting Used in the Two-Step Purification of Recombinant Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) most commonly requires experimental determination (i.e., scouting) in order to select an optimal chromatographic medium for purifying a given target protein. Neither a two-step purification of untagged green fluorescent protein (GFP) from crude bacterial lysate using sequential HIC and size exclusion chromatography (SEC), nor HIC column scouting elution profiles of GFP, have been previously reported. Methods and Results Bacterial lysate expressing recombinant GFP was sequentially adsorbed to commercially available HIC columns containing butyl, octyl, and phenyl-based HIC ligands coupled to matrices of varying bead size. The lysate was fractionated using a linear ammonium phosphate salt gradient at constant pH. Collected HIC eluate fractions containing retained GFP were then pooled and further purified using high-resolution preparative SEC. Significant differences in presumptive GFP elution profiles were observed using in-line absorption spectrophotometry (A395) and post-run fluorimetry. SDS-PAGE and western blot demonstrated that fluorometric detection was the more accurate indicator of GFP elution in both HIC and SEC purification steps. Comparison of composite HIC column scouting data indicated that a phenyl ligand coupled to a 34 µm matrix produced the highest degree of target protein capture and separation. Conclusions Conducting two-step protein purification using the preferred HIC medium followed by SEC resulted in a final, concentrated product with >98% protein purity. In-line absorbance spectrophotometry was not as precise of an indicator of GFP elution as post-run fluorimetry. These findings demonstrate the importance of utilizing a combination of detection methods when evaluating purification strategies. GFP is a well-characterized model protein, used heavily in educational settings and by researchers with limited protein purification experience, and the data and strategies presented here may aid in

  1. A transgenic rat expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in peripheral nerves provides a new hindlimb model for the study of nerve injury and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Amy M; Borschel, Gregory H; Santosa, Katherine A; Flagg, Eric R; Tong, Alice Y; Kasukurthi, Rahul; Newton, Piyaraj; Yan, Ying; Hunter, Daniel A; Johnson, Philip J; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2012-02-15

    In order to evaluate nerve regeneration in clinically relevant hindlimb surgical paradigms not feasible in fluorescent mice models, we developed a rat that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) in neural tissue. Transgenic Sprague-Dawley rat lines were created using pronuclear injection of a transgene expressing GFP under the control of the thy1 gene. Nerves were imaged under fluorescence microscopy and muscles were imaged with confocal microscopy to determine GFP expression following sciatic nerve crush, transection and direct suturing, and transection followed by repair with a nerve isograft from nonexpressing littermates. In each surgical paradigm, fluorescence microscopy demonstrated the loss and reappearance of fluorescence with regeneration of axons following injury. Nerve regeneration was confirmed with imaging of Wallerian degeneration followed by reinnervation of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle motor endplates using confocal microscopy. The generation of a novel transgenic rat model expressing GFP in neural tissue allows in vivo imaging of nerve regeneration and visualization of motor endplate reinnervation. This rat provides a new model for studying peripheral nerve injury and regeneration over surgically relevant distances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Intestinal blood flow assessment by indocyanine green fluorescence imaging in a patient with the incarcerated umbilical hernia: Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunjin Ryu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available After reduction of the incarceration during surgery for incarcerated hernia, intestinal blood flow (IBF and the need for bowel resection must be evaluated. We report the case of a patient with incarcerated umbilical hernia in whom the bowel was preserved after evaluating IBF using indocyanine green (ICG fluorescence. A woman in her 40s with a chief complaint of abdominal pain visited our hospital, was diagnosed with incarcerated umbilical hernia and underwent surgery. Laparotomy was performed to reduce bowel incarceration. After reducing the incarceration, IBF was observed using ICG fluorescence detected using a brightfield full-color fluorescence camera. The small bowel that had been incarcerated showed deep-red discoloration on gross evaluation, but intravenous injection of ICG revealed uniform fluorescence of the mesentery and bowel wall. This indicated an absence of irreversible ischemic changes of the bowel, so no resection was performed. The patient showed a good postoperative course, including resumption of eating on day 4 and discharge on day 11. In surgery for incarcerated hernia, ICG fluorescence may offer a useful method to evaluate IBF after reducing the incarceration. This case implied that PINPOINT could be used in open conventional surgery.

  3. An endogenous green fluorescent protein-photoprotein pair in Clytia hemisphaerica eggs shows co-targeting to mitochondria and efficient bioluminescence energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourrage, Cécile; Swann, Karl; Gonzalez Garcia, Jose Raul; Campbell, Anthony K; Houliston, Evelyn

    2014-04-09

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and calcium-activated photoproteins of the aequorin/clytin family, now widely used as research tools, were originally isolated from the hydrozoan jellyfish Aequora victoria. It is known that bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is possible between these proteins to generate flashes of green light, but the native function and significance of this phenomenon is unclear. Using the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica, we characterized differential expression of three clytin and four GFP genes in distinct tissues at larva, medusa and polyp stages, corresponding to the major in vivo sites of bioluminescence (medusa tentacles and eggs) and fluorescence (these sites plus medusa manubrium, gonad and larval ectoderms). Potential physiological functions at these sites include UV protection of stem cells for fluorescence alone, and prey attraction and camouflaging counter-illumination for bioluminescence. Remarkably, the clytin2 and GFP2 proteins, co-expressed in eggs, show particularly efficient BRET and co-localize to mitochondria, owing to parallel acquisition by the two genes of mitochondrial targeting sequences during hydrozoan evolution. Overall, our results indicate that endogenous GFPs and photoproteins can play diverse roles even within one species and provide a striking and novel example of protein coevolution, which could have facilitated efficient or brighter BRET flashes through mitochondrial compartmentalization.

  4. Optimized green fluorescent protein fused to FoF1-ATP synthase for single-molecule FRET using a fast anti-Brownian electrokinetic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienerowitz, Maria; Ilchenko, Mykhailo; Su, Bertram; Deckers-Hebestreit, Gabriele; Mayer, Günter; Henkel, Thomas; Heitkamp, Thomas; Börsch, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Observation times of freely diffusing single molecules in solution are limited by the photophysics of the attached fluorescence markers and by a small observation volume in the femtolitre range that is required for a sufficient signal-to-background ratio. To extend diffusion-limited observation times through a confocal detection volume, A. E. Cohen and W. E. Moerner have invented and built the ABELtrap -- a microfluidic device to actively counteract Brownian motion of single nanoparticles with an electrokinetic trap. Here we present a version of an ABELtrap with a laser focus pattern generated by electro-optical beam deflectors and controlled by a programmable FPGA chip. This ABELtrap holds single fluorescent nanoparticles for more than 100 seconds, increasing the observation time of fluorescent nanoparticles compared to free diffusion by a factor of 10000. To monitor conformational changes of individual membrane proteins in real time, we record sequential distance changes between two specifically attached dyes using Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). Fusing the a-subunit of the FoF1-ATP synthase with mNeonGreen results in an improved signal-to-background ratio at lower laser excitation powers. This increases our measured trap duration of proteoliposomes beyond 2 s. Additionally, we observe different smFRET levels attributed to varying distances between the FRET donor (mNeonGreen) and acceptor (Alexa568) fluorophore attached at the a- and c-subunit of the FoF1-ATP synthase respectively.

  5. Gold Nanoclusters-Indocyanine Green Nanoprobes for Synchronous Cancer Imaging, Treatment, and Real-Time Monitoring Based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haodong; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Jingnan; Gao, Guanhui; Chen, Ze; Li, Wenjun; Gong, Ping; Sheng, Zonghai; Cai, Lintao

    2017-08-02

    Well-designed gold nanoclusters-indocyanine green nanoprobes (Au NCs-INPs) have been developed by the conjugation of Au NC assemblies with indocyanine green (ICG) for the therapeutic real-time monitoring based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The synthesized Au NCs-INPs demonstrated the improved cellular uptake and effective tumor targeting because of the enhanced permeability and retention effect and the gp60-mediated secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine combined transport pathway, suggesting excellent dual-modal near-infrared fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging. Moreover, the simultaneous photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) of Au NCs-INPs exhibited higher cancer cell killing and tumor removal efficiency than those of PDT or PTT alone. More importantly, a promising therapeutic monitoring strategy was performed based on FRET between Au NCs and ICG, suggesting that Au NCs-INPs could be utilized to evaluate the therapeutic response by real-time monitoring the change in Au NCs in fluorescence intensity together with ICG supersession. Therefore, Au NCs-INPs as a novel photosensitizer have great potentials for combined tumor imaging, therapy, and therapeutic monitoring in real time.

  6. Plasmid transfection in bovine cells: Optimization using a realtime monitoring of green fluorescent protein and effect on gene reporter assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Johan S; Bionaz, Massimo

    2017-08-30

    Gene reporter technology (GRT) has opened several new avenues for monitoring biological events including the activation of transcription factors, which are central to the study of nutrigenomics. However, this technology relies heavily on the insertion of foreign plasmid DNA into the nuclei of cells (i.e., transfection), which can be very challenging and highly variable among cell types. The objective of this study was to investigate the optimal conditions to generate reliable GRT assay data on bovine immortalized cell lines, Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) and bovine mammary epithelial alveolar (MACT) cells. Results are reported for two experiments. In Experiment 1, using 96 well-plate and a robotic inverted fluorescent microscope, we compared transfection efficiency among commercially available transfection reagents (TR) Lipofectamine® 3000 (Lipo3), Lipofectamine® LTX (LipoLTX), and TransIT-X2® (TransX2), three doses of TR (i.e., 0.15, 0.3, and 0.4μL/well), and three doses of Green Fluorescent Protein plasmid DNA (i.e., 10, 25, and 50ng/well). Transfection efficiency and mortality rate were analyzed using CellProfiler software. Transfection efficiency increased until the end of the experiment (20h post-transfection) at which point MACT had greater transfection than MDBK cells (16.3% vs. 2.2%). It is unclear the reason for the low transfection in MDBK cells. Maximal transfection efficiency was obtained with 0.3μL/well of LipoLTX plus 25ng/well of plasmid DNA (ca. 29.5±1.9%) and 0.15μL/well of LipoLTX plus 25ng/well of plasmid DNA (ca. 4.0±0.4%) for MACT and MDBK cells, respectively. The higher amount of TR and DNA was generally associated with higher cell mortality. Using high, medium, and low transfection efficiency conditions determined in Experiment 1, we performed a GRT assay for peroxisome proliferator-activated response element (PPRE) luciferase in MACT and MDBK cells treated with 10nM or 100nM of synthetic Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor

  7. The E1 mechanism in photo-induced beta-elimination reactions for green-to-red conversion of fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Hideaki; Mizuno, Hideaki; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Furuta, Toshiaki; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2009-11-25

    KikGR is a fluorescent protein engineered to display green-to-red photoconvertibility that is induced by irradiation with ultraviolet or violet light. Similar to Kaede and EosFP, two naturally occurring photoconvertible proteins, KikGR contains a His(62)-Tyr(63)-Gly(64) tripeptide sequence, which forms a green chromophore that can be photoconverted to a red one via formal beta-elimination and subsequent extension of a pi-conjugated system. Using a crystallizable variant of KikGR, we determined the structures of both the green and red state at 1.55 A resolution. The double bond between His(62)-C(alpha) and His(62)-C(beta) in the red chromophore is in a cis configuration, indicating that rotation along the His(62) C(alpha)-C(beta) bond occurs following cleavage of the His(62) N(alpha)-C(alpha) bond. This structural rearrangement provides evidence that the beta-elimination reaction governing the green-to-red photoconversion of KikGR follows an E1 (elimination, unimolecular) mechanism.

  8. Fluorescent minerals - A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark.

  9. Comparison of Superparamagnetic and Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Cell Labeling for Tracking Green Fluorescent Protein Gene Marker with Negative and Positive Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhuoli; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Mascheri, Nicole; Fan, Zhaoyang; Wu, Shengyong; Li, Debiao

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the feasibility of imaging green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles with the fast low-angle positive contrast steady-state free precession (FLAPS) method and to compare them with the traditional negative contrast technique. The GFP-R3230Ac cell line (GFP cell) was incubated for 24 hours using 20 μg Fe/mL concentration of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide...

  10. Subcellular localization and functional expression of the glycerol uptake protein 1 (GUP1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae tagged with green fluorescent protein

    OpenAIRE

    Bleve, Gianluca; Zacheo, Giuseppe; Cappello, Maria Stella; Dellaglio, Franco; Grieco, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    GFP (green fluorescent protein) from Aequorea victoria was used as an in vivo reporter protein when fused to the N- and C-termini of the glycerol uptake protein 1 (Gup1p) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The subcellular localization and functional expression of biologically active Gup1–GFP chimaeras was monitored by confocal laser scanning and electron microscopy, thus supplying the first study of GUP1 dynamics in live yeast cells. The Gup1p tagged with GFP is a functional glycerol transporter lo...

  11. Optical imaging of green fluorescent protein markers for tracking vascular gene expression: a feasibility study in human tissue-like phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ananda; Chen, Hunter H.; Long, Erin; Wang, Danming; Yang, Xiaoming

    2002-06-01

    Vascular gene therapy is an exciting approach to the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. However, to date, there are no imaging modalities available for non-invasive detection of vascular gene expression. We have developed an optical imaging method to track vascular gene expression by detecting fluorescent signals emitted from arterial walls following gene transfer. To investigate the feasibility of this new technique, we performed experiments on a set of human tissue-like phantoms using a common biological marker in gene therapy, the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The phantoms were constructed to mimic the arterial geometry beneath a tissue layer. Human smooth muscle cells transfected with GFP were embedded in a capillary tube in the phantom. Monte Carlo modeling of the phantom experiment was performed to optimize the performance of the optical imaging system. We compared the fluence rates among three types of light beams, including ring beam, Gaussian beam, and flat beam. The results showed that our optical imaging system was able to detect fluorescent signals up to 5-mm depth in the phantom, and that flat beam geometry would produce the optimum fluorescence remittance. This study provides valuable insights for improvements to the optical imaging system and refinement of the new technique to non-invasively detect/track vascular gene expression.

  12. Cucurbitacin delta 23-reductase from the fruit of Cucurbita maxima var. Green Hubbard. Physicochemical and fluorescence properties and enzyme-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirr, H W; Schabort, J C; Weitz, C

    1986-02-01

    Cucurbitacin delta 23-reductase from Cucurbita maxima var. Green Hubbard fruit displays an apparent Mr of 32,000, a Stokes radius of 263 nm and a diffusion coefficient of 8.93 X 10(-7) cm2 X s-1. The enzyme appears to possess a homogeneous dimeric quaternary structure with a subunit Mr of 15,000. Two tryptophan and fourteen tyrosine residues per dimer were found. Emission spectral properties of the enzyme and fluorescence quenching by iodide indicate the tryptophan residues to be buried within the protein molecule. In the pH range 5-7, where no conformational changes were detected, protonation of a sterically related ionizable group with a pK of approx. 6.0 markedly influenced the fluorescence of the tryptophan residues. Protein fluorescence quenching was employed to determine the dissociation constants for binding of NADPH (Kd 17 microM), NADP+ (Kd 30 microM) and elaterinide (Kd 227 microM). Fluorescence energy transfer between the tryptophan residues and enzyme-bound NADPH was observed.

  13. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  14. Automated Analysis of Protein Expression and Gene Amplification within the Same Cells of Paraffin-Embedded Tumour Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Gaiser

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The simultaneous detection of protein expression and gene copy number changes in patient samples, like paraffin-embedded tissue sections, is challenging since the procedures of immunohistochemistry (IHC and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH negatively influence each other which often results in suboptimal staining. Therefore, we developed a novel automated algorithm based on relocation which allows subsequent detection of protein content and gene copy number changes within the same cell.

  15. Molecular basis for pH sensitivity and proton transfer in green fluorescent protein: protonation and conformational substates from electrostatic calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharnagl, C; Raupp-Kossmann, R; Fischer, S F

    1999-10-01

    We performed a theoretical study to elucidate the coupling between protonation states and orientation of protein dipoles and buried water molecules in green fluorescent protein, a versatile biosensor for protein targeting. It is shown that the ionization equilibria of the wild-type green fluorescent protein-fluorophore and the internal proton-binding site E222 are mutually interdependent. Two acid-base transitions of the fluorophore occur in the presence of neutral (physiologic pH) and ionized (pH > 12) E222, respectively. In the pH-range from approximately 8 to approximately 11 ionized and neutral sites are present in constant ratio, linked by internal proton transfer. The results indicate that modulation of the internal proton sharing by structural fluctuations or chemical variations of aligning residues T203 and S65 cause drastic changes of the neutral/anionic ratio-despite similar physiologic fluorophore pK(a) s. Moreover, we find that dipolar heterogeneities in the internal hydrogen-bond network lead to distributed driving forces for excited-state proton transfer. A molecular model for the unrelaxed surrounding after deprotonation is discussed in relation to pathways providing fast ground-state recovery or slow stabilization of the anion. The calculated total free energy for excited-state deprotonation ( approximately 19 k(B)T) and ground-state reprotonation ( approximately 2 k(B)T) is in accordance with absorption and emission data (

  16. Establishment of insect cell lines expressing green fluorescent protein on cell surface based on AcMNPV GP64 membrane fusion characteristic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ben-Xiang; Chen, Ying-Jian; Su, Rui; Li, Yi-Fei; Zheng, Gui-Ling; Li, Chang-You

    2017-10-01

    Displaying a protein on the surface of cells has been provided a very successful strategy to function research of exogenous proteins. Based on the membrane fusion characteristic of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus envelope protein GP64, we amplified and cloned N-terminal signal peptide and C-terminal transmembrane domain as well as cytoplasmic tail domain of gp64 gene into vector pIZ/V5-His with multi-cloning sites to construct the cell surface expression vector pIZ/V5-gp64. To verify that the vector can be used to express proteins on the membrane of insect cells, a recombinant plasmid pIZ/V5-gp64-GFP was constructed by introducing the PCR amplified green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene and transfected into insect cell lines Sf9 and H5. The transected cells were screened with zeocin and cell cloning. PCR verification results showed that the GFP gene was successfully integrated into these cells. Green fluorescence in Sf9-GFP and H5-GFP cells was observed by using confocal laser scanning microscopy and immunofluorescence detection indicated that GFP protein was located on the cell membrane. Western blot results showed that a fusion protein GP64-GFP of about 40 kDa was expressed on the membrane of Sf9-GFP and H5-GFP cells. The expression system constructed in this paper can be used for localization and continuous expression of exogenous proteins on insect cell membrane.

  17. Efficient expression of codon-adapted affinity tagged super folder green fluorescent protein for synchronous protein localization and affinity purification studies in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gürkan; Arslanyolu, Muhittin

    2015-03-25

    A superior Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) mutant, known as superfolder GFP (sfGFP), is more soluble, faster folding, and is the brightest of the known GFP mutants. This study aimed to create a codon-adapted sfGFP tag (TtsfGFP) for simultaneous protein localization and affinity purification in Tetrahymena thermophila. In vivo fluorescence spectroscopic analyses of clones carrying a codon-adapted and 6 × His tagged TtsfGFP cassette showed approximately 2-4-fold increased fluorescence emission compared with the control groups at 3 h. Fluorescence microscopy also revealed that TtsfGFP reached its emission maxima at 100 min, which was much earlier than controls expressing EGFP and sfGFP (240 min). A T. thermophila ATP-dependent DNA ligase domain containing hypothetical gene (H) was cloned into the 3' end of 6 × His-TtsfGFP to assess the affinity/localization dual tag feature. Fluorescence microscopy of the 6 × His-TtsfGFP-H clone confirmed its localization in the macro- and micronucleus of vegetative T. thermophila. Simultaneous affinity purification of TtsfGFP and TtsfGFP-H with Ni-NTA beads was feasible, as shown by Ni-NTA purified proteins analysis by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. We successfully codon adapted the N-terminal 6 × His-TtsfGFP tag and showed that it could be used for protein localization and affinity purification simultaneously in T. thermophila. We believe that this dual tag will advance T. thermophila studies by providing strong visual traceability of the target protein in vivo and in vitro during recombinant production of heterologous and homologous proteins.

  18. Generation and characterization of a trackable plant-made influenza H5 virus-like particle (VLP) containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Katie R; Arthus-Cartier, Guillaume; Yam, Karen K; Lavoie, Pierre-Olivier; Landry, Nathalie; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Couture, Manon M-J; Ward, Brian J

    2015-09-01

    Medicago, Inc. has developed an efficient virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine production platform using the Nicotiana benthamiana expression system, and currently has influenza-based products targeting seasonal/pandemic hemagglutinin (HA) proteins in advanced clinical trials. We wished to generate a trackable HA-based VLP that would allow us to study both particle assembly in plants and VLP interactions within the mammalian immune system. To this end, a fusion protein was designed, composed of H5 (from influenza A/Indonesia/05/2005 [H5N1]) with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). Expression of H5-eGFP in N. benthamiana produced brightly fluorescent ∼160 nm particles resembling H5-VLPs. H5-eGFP-VLPs elicited anti-H5 serologic responses in mice comparable to those elicited by H5-VLPs in almost all assays tested (hemagglutination inhibition/IgG(total)/IgG1/IgG2b/IgG2a:IgG1 ratio), as well as a superior anti-GFP IgG response (mean optical density = 2.52 ± 0.16 sem) to that elicited by soluble GFP (mean optical density = 0.12 ± 0.06 sem). Confocal imaging of N. benthamiana cells expressing H5-eGFP displayed large fluorescent accumulations at the cell periphery, and draining lymph nodes from mice given H5-eGFP-VLPs via footpad injection demonstrated bright fluorescence shortly after administration (10 min), providing proof of concept that the H5-eGFP-protein/VLPs could be used to monitor both VLP assembly and immune trafficking. Given these findings, this novel fluorescent reagent will be a powerful tool to gain further fundamental insight into the biology of influenza VLP vaccines. © FASEB.

  19. The Use of Living Cancer Cells Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein in the Nucleus and Red Fluorescence Protein in the Cytoplasm for Real-time Confocal Imaging of Chromosome and Cytoplasmic Dynamics During Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Meng; Yamamoto, Norio; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saji, Shigetoyo; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-05-01

    A library of dual-color fluorescent cancer cells with green fluorescent protein (GFP), linked to histone H2B, expressed in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) expressed in the cytoplasm was previously genetically engineered. The aim of the current study was to use the dual-color cancer cells to visualize chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Using an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope, a library of dual-color cells from the major cancer types was cultured on plastic. The cells were imaged by confocal microscopy to demonstrate chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Nuclear GFP expression enabled visualization of chromosomes behavior, whereas simultaneous cytoplasmic RFP expression enabled visualization of cytoplasmic behavior during mitosis. Thus, total cellular dynamics can be visualized at high resolution, including individual chromosomes in some cases, in living dual-color cells in real time. Dual-color cancer cells expressing H2B-GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm provide unique tools for visualizing subcellular nuclear and cytoplasm dynamics, including the behavior of individual chromosomes during mitosis. The dual-color cells can be used to evaluate chromosomal loss or gain in real time during treatment with a variety of agents or as the cells are selected for increased or decreased malignancy in culture or in vivo. The dual color cells will be a useful tool to discover and evaluate novel strategies for killing cancer cells. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Imaging of Borrelia turicatae Producing the Green Fluorescent Protein Reveals Persistent Colonization of the Ornithodoros turicata Midgut and Salivary Glands from Nymphal Acquisition through Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnavajhala, Aparna; Wilder, Hannah K; Boyle, William K; Damania, Ashish; Thornton, Justin A; Pérez de León, Adalberto A; Teel, Pete D; Lopez, Job E

    2017-03-01

    Relapsing fever (RF) spirochetes colonize and are transmitted to mammals primarily by Ornithodoros ticks, and little is known regarding the pathogen's life cycle in the vector. To further understand vector colonization and transmission of RF spirochetes, Borrelia turicatae expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) marker ( B. turicatae-gfp ) was generated. The transformants were evaluated during the tick-mammal infectious cycle, from the third nymphal instar to adult stage. B. turicatae-gfp remained viable for at least 18 months in starved fourth-stage nymphal ticks, and the studies indicated that spirochete populations persistently colonized the tick midgut and salivary glands. Our generation of B. turicatae-gfp also revealed that within the salivary glands, spirochetes are localized in the ducts and lumen of acini, and after tick feeding, the tissues remained populated with spirochetes. The B. turicatae-gfp generated in this study is an important tool to further understand and define the mechanisms of vector colonization and transmission. IMPORTANCE In order to interrupt the infectious cycle of tick-borne relapsing fever spirochetes, it is important to enhance our understanding of vector colonization and transmission. Toward this, we generated a strain of Borrelia turicatae that constitutively produced the green fluorescent protein, and we evaluated fluorescing spirochetes during the entire infectious cycle. We determined that the midgut and salivary glands of Ornithodoros turicata ticks maintain the pathogens throughout the vector's life cycle and remain colonized with the spirochetes for at least 18 months. We also determined that the tick's salivary glands were not depleted after a transmission blood feeding. These findings set the framework to further understand the mechanisms of midgut and salivary gland colonization. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Dynamics of vacuoles and H+-pyrophosphatase visualized by monomeric green fluorescent protein in Arabidopsis: artifactual bulbs and native intravacuolar spherical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segami, Shoji; Makino, Sachi; Miyake, Ai; Asaoka, Mariko; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2014-08-01

    We prepared Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing a functional green fluorescent protein (GFP)-linked vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) under the control of its own promoter to investigate morphological dynamics of vacuoles and tissue-specific expression of H(+)-PPase. The lines obtained had spherical structures in vacuoles with strong fluorescence, which are referred to as bulbs. Quantitative analyses revealed that the occurrence of the bulbs correlated with the amount of GFP. Next, we prepared a construct of H(+)-PPase linked with a nondimerizing GFP (mGFP); we detected no bulbs. These results indicate that the membranes adhere face-to-face by antiparallel dimerization of GFP, resulting in the formation of bulbs. In plants expressing H(+)-PPase-mGFP, intravacuolar spherical structures with double membranes, which differed from bulbs in fluorescence intensity and intermembrane spacing, were still observed in peripheral endosperm, pistil epidermis and hypocotyls. Four-dimensional imaging revealed the dynamics of formation, transformation, and disappearance of intravacuolar spherical structures and transvacuolar strands in living cells. Visualization of H(+)-PPase-mGFP revealed intensive accumulation of the enzyme, not only in dividing and elongating cells but also in mesophyll, phloem, and nectary cells, which may have high sugar content. Dynamic morphological changes including transformation of vacuolar structures between transvacuolar strands, intravacuolar sheet-like structures, and intravacuolar spherical structures were also revealed. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamics of Vacuoles and H+-Pyrophosphatase Visualized by Monomeric Green Fluorescent Protein in Arabidopsis: Artifactual Bulbs and Native Intravacuolar Spherical Structures[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segami, Shoji; Makino, Sachi; Miyake, Ai; Asaoka, Mariko; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    We prepared Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing a functional green fluorescent protein (GFP)-linked vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase) under the control of its own promoter to investigate morphological dynamics of vacuoles and tissue-specific expression of H+-PPase. The lines obtained had spherical structures in vacuoles with strong fluorescence, which are referred to as bulbs. Quantitative analyses revealed that the occurrence of the bulbs correlated with the amount of GFP. Next, we prepared a construct of H+-PPase linked with a nondimerizing GFP (mGFP); we detected no bulbs. These results indicate that the membranes adhere face-to-face by antiparallel dimerization of GFP, resulting in the formation of bulbs. In plants expressing H+-PPase-mGFP, intravacuolar spherical structures with double membranes, which differed from bulbs in fluorescence intensity and intermembrane spacing, were still observed in peripheral endosperm, pistil epidermis and hypocotyls. Four-dimensional imaging revealed the dynamics of formation, transformation, and disappearance of intravacuolar spherical structures and transvacuolar strands in living cells. Visualization of H+-PPase-mGFP revealed intensive accumulation of the enzyme, not only in dividing and elongating cells but also in mesophyll, phloem, and nectary cells, which may have high sugar content. Dynamic morphological changes including transformation of vacuolar structures between transvacuolar strands, intravacuolar sheet-like structures, and intravacuolar spherical structures were also revealed. PMID:25118245

  3. High efficiency and low roll-off green OLEDs with simple structure by utilizing thermally activated delayed fluorescence material as the universal host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Miao, Yanqin; Wang, Zhongqiang; Wang, Kexiang; Wang, Hua; Hao, Yuying; Xu, Bingshe; Li, Wenlian

    2017-08-01

    We achieved high-efficiency and low-roll-off green fluorescent and phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) simultaneously by adopting the thermally activated delayed fluorescence material of bis[4-(9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridine)phenyl]sulfone as the universal host. At a luminance of 1000 cd/m2, fluorescent OLEDs based on C545T get a current efficiency, power efficiency, and external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 31.8 cd/A, 25.0 lm/W, and 9.26%, respectively. This is almost the highest efficiency based on C545T at the luminance of 1000 cd/m2 to date. On the other hand, phosphorescent OLEDs with Ir(ppy)3 as the emitter realize a maximum current efficiency, power efficiency, and EQE of 64.3 cd/A, 62.4 lm/W, and 18.5%, respectively. More important, the EQE remains 17.8% at the representative luminance of 1000 cd/m2 and the roll-off ratio is just 3.78%. The transient photoluminescence decay measurement demonstrates that the up-conversion of host triplet excitons plays a key role in the high efficiency and low roll-off. More detailed discussions are also given.

  4. High efficiency and low roll-off green OLEDs with simple structure by utilizing thermally activated delayed fluorescence material as the universal host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Bo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We achieved high-efficiency and low-roll-off green fluorescent and phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs simultaneously by adopting the thermally activated delayed fluorescence material of bis[4-(9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridinephenyl]sulfone as the universal host. At a luminance of 1000 cd/m2, fluorescent OLEDs based on C545T get a current efficiency, power efficiency, and external quantum efficiency (EQE of 31.8 cd/A, 25.0 lm/W, and 9.26%, respectively. This is almost the highest efficiency based on C545T at the luminance of 1000 cd/m2 to date. On the other hand, phosphorescent OLEDs with Ir(ppy3 as the emitter realize a maximum current efficiency, power efficiency, and EQE of 64.3 cd/A, 62.4 lm/W, and 18.5%, respectively. More important, the EQE remains 17.8% at the representative luminance of 1000 cd/m2 and the roll-off ratio is just 3.78%. The transient photoluminescence decay measurement demonstrates that the up-conversion of host triplet excitons plays a key role in the high efficiency and low roll-off. More detailed discussions are also given.

  5. A recombinant, infectious human parainfluenza virus type 3 expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein for use in high-throughput antiviral assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jason P.; Li, Joseph K.-K.; Smee, Donald F.; Morrey, John D.; Barnard, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to rescue an infectious, recombinant, negative-stranded, RNA virus from a cDNA clone, has led to new opportunities for measuring viral replication from a viral expressed reporter gene. In this study, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene was inserted into the human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV-3) antigenome and a recombinant, infectious virus was rescued. Maximum EGFP expression levels, measured by fluorescence, were seen at day 3. Comparison of a three-day, viral expressed EGFP fluorescence assay to a seven-day, neutral red assay, based on complete cell destruction in virus infected MA-104 cells, yielded Z′-factor values of 0.83 and 0.70, respectively. A three-day, endpoint EGFP-based antiviral assay and a seven-day, endpoint neutral red based antiviral assay were run in parallel to establish antiviral sensitivity profiles of 23 compounds based on selective index (SI) values. Using an SI threshold of 10, the EGFP-based antiviral assay had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 54%. Thus, the use of an EGFP-based antiviral assay for testing potential antiviral compounds against HPIV-3 in a high-throughput format may be justified. PMID:19189850

  6. Uses and limitations of green fluorescent protein as a viability marker in Enterococcus faecalis: An observational investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Crielaard, Wim; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2015-08-01

    Enterococci are capable of producing biofilms that are notoriously difficult to treat and remove, for instance in root canal infections. The tenacious nature of these organisms makes screening of known and novel antimicrobial compounds necessary. While traditionally growth and fluorescence-based screening methods have proven useful, these methods have their limitations when applied to enterococci (e.g. time consuming, no kinetic data, diffusion properties of the fluorescent dyes). The aim of this study was to develop and validate a GFP-based high-throughput screening system to assess the bactericidal activity of a broad range of antimicrobial agents on Enterococcus faecalis and its biofilms. The effect of antimicrobial compounds on cell viability and GFP fluorescence of enterococcal planktonic and biofilm cells was determined using colony forming unit counts, fluorescence spectrophotometry and real-time imaging devices. There was a linear correlation between cell viability and GFP fluorescence. The intensity of the GFP signal was effected by the extracellular pH. For a range of antimicrobials however, there was no correlation between these two parameters. In contrast, for oxidizing agents such as sodium hypochlorite, the antimicrobial of choice for root canal disinfection, there was a correlation between loss of fluorescence and loss of viability. To conclude, the use of a GFP-based system to monitor the antimicrobial activity of compounds on E. faecalis is possible despite significant limitations. This approach is useful for analysis of susceptibility to oxidizing agents. Using real-time measuring devices to follow GFP fluorescence it should be possible to investigate the mode of action and rate of diffusion of oxidizing agents in E. faecalis biofilm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural Basis of X-ray-Induced Transient Photo-bleaching in a Photoactivatable Green Fluorescent Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, V. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Carpentier, Ph.; Lelimousin, M.; Darnault, C.; Bourgeois, D. [IBS, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel, CEA, CNRS, UniVersite Joseph Fourier, 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble (France); Violot, S. [Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Vegetale, Institut de Recherches en Technologie et Sciences pour le ViVant, CEA, CNRS, INRA, UniVersite Joseph Fourier, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Nienhaus, U. [Institute of Applied Physics and Center for Functional nano-structures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Nienhaus, U. [Department of Physics, UniVersity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (US)

    2009-07-01

    We have observed the photoactivatable fluorescent protein IrisFP in a transient dark state with near-atomic resolution. This dark state is assigned to a radical species that either relaxes to the ground state or evolves into a permanently bleached chromophore. We took advantage of X-rays to populate the radical, which presumably forms under illumination with visible light by an electron-transfer reaction in the triplet state. The combined X-ray diffraction and in crystallo UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, and Raman data reveal that radical formation in IrisFP involves pronounced but reversible distortion of the chromophore, suggesting a transient loss of {pi} conjugation. These results reveal that the methylene bridge of the chromophore is the Achilles' heel of fluorescent proteins and help unravel the mechanisms of blinking and photo-bleaching in FPs, which are of importance in the rational design of photo-stable variants. and is also partly reversible. (authors)

  8. Detection of Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Minimally Invasive Surgery Using Indocyanine Green and Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging for Uterine and Cervical Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Elizabeth L.; Huang, Juan Juan; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R.; Gardner, Ginger J.; Brown, Carol L.; Sonoda, Yukio; Barakat, Richard R.; Levine, Douglas A.; Leitao, Mario M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Our primary objective was to assess the detection rate of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) using indocyanine green (ICG) and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging for uterine and cervical malignancies. Methods NIR fluorescence imaging for the robotic platform was obtained at our institution in 12/2011. We identified all cases planned for SLN mapping using fluorescence imaging from 12/2011-4/2013. Intracervical ICG was the fluorophobe in all cases. Four cc (1.25 mg/mL) of ICG was injected into the cervix alone divided into the 3- and 9-o'clock positions, with 1 cc deep into the stroma and 1cc submucosally before initiating laparoscopic entry. Blue dye was concurrently injected in some cases. Results Two hundred twenty-seven cases were performed. Median age was 60 years (range, 28-90). Median BMI was 30.2 kg/m2 (range, 18-60). The median SLN count was 3 (range, 1-23). An SLN was identified in 216 cases (95%), with bilateral pelvic mapping in 179 (79%). An aortic SLN was identified in 21 (10%) of the 216 mapped cases. When ICG alone was used to map cases, 188/197 patients mapped, for a 95% detection rate compared to 93% (28/30) in cases in which both dyes were used (P=NS). Bilateral mapping was seen in 156/197 (79%) ICG-only cases and 23/30 (77%) ICG and blue dye cases (P=NS). Conclusions NIR fluorescence imaging with intracervical ICG injection using the robotic platform has a high bilateral SLN detection rate and appears favorable to using blue dye alone and/or other modalities. Combined use of ICG and blue dye appears unnecessary. PMID:24582865

  9. Construction and characterization of stable, constitutively expressed, chromosomal green and red fluorescent transcriptional fusions in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengchang; Bangar, Hansraj; Saldanha, Roland; Pemberton, Adin; Aronow, Bruce; Dean, Gary E; Lamkin, Thomas J; Hassett, Daniel J

    2014-10-01

    Here, we constructed stable, chromosomal, constitutively expressed, green and red fluorescent protein (GFP and RFP) as reporters in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Using bioinformatic approaches and other experimental analyses, we identified P0253 and P1 as potent promoters that drive the optimal expression of fluorescent reporters in single copy in B. anthracis and Burkholderia spp. as well as their surrogate strains, respectively. In comparison, Y. pestis and its surrogate strain need two chromosomal copies of cysZK promoter (P2cysZK) for optimal fluorescence. The P0253-, P2cysZK-, and P1-driven GFP and RFP fusions were first cloned into the vectors pRP1028, pUC18R6KT-mini-Tn7T-Km, pmini-Tn7-gat, or their derivatives. The resultant constructs were delivered into the respective surrogates and subsequently into the select agent strains. The chromosomal GFP- and RFP-tagged strains exhibited bright fluorescence at an exposure time of less than 200 msec and displayed the same virulence traits as their wild-type parental strains. The utility of the tagged strains was proven by the macrophage infection assays and lactate dehydrogenase release analysis. Such strains will be extremely useful in high-throughput screens for novel compounds that could either kill these organisms, or interfere with critical virulence processes in these important bioweapon agents and during infection of alveolar macrophages. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Stable expression of green fluorescent protein and targeted disruption of thioredoxin peroxidase-1 gene in Babesia bovis with the WR99210/dhfr selection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Masahito; Tanaka, Miho; Goto, Yasuyuki; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Inoue, Noboru; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro

    2012-02-01

    We have achieved stable expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Babesia bovis by using the WR99210/human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene selection system. A GFP-expression plasmid with a dhfr expression cassette (DHFR-gfp) was constructed and transfected into B. bovis by nucleofection. Following WR99210 selection, a GFP-fluorescent parasite population was obtained and the fluorescent parasite was maintained for more than 7 months under WR99210 drug pressure. The DHFR-gfp was used to construct a small circular chromosome and to target gene disruption in the parasite. For construction of the small circular chromosome (DHFR-gfp-Bbcent2), the putative centromere region of B. bovis chromosome 2 (Bbcent2) was cloned and inserted into the DHFR-gfp plasmid. Addition of Bbcent2 to the DHFR-gfp plasmid improved its segregation efficiency during parasite multiplication and GFP-expressing parasites were maintained for more than 2 months without drug pressure. For targeted disruption of a B. bovis gene we attempted to knockout the thioredoxin peroxidase-1 (TPx-1) gene (a single-copy 2-Cys peroxiredoxin gene, Tbtpx-1) by homologous recombination. To generate the targeting construct (DHFR-gfp-Bbtpx1KO), 5' and 3' portions of Bbtpx-1 were cloned into the DHFR-gfp plasmid. Following nucleofection, WR99210 selection and cloning, a GFP-fluorescent parasite population was obtained. Integration of the construct into the Bbtpx-1 locus was confirmed by PCR. The absence of Bbtpx-1 mRNA and protein were verified by reverse transcription PCR and western blot analysis/indirect immunofluorescence assay, respectively. This is the first report of targeted gene disruption of a Babesia gene. These advances in the methodology of genetic manipulation in B. bovis will facilitate functional analysis of Babesia genomes and will improve our understanding of the basic biology of apicomplexan parasites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. One-pot evaporation–condensation strategy for green synthesis of carbon nitride quantum dots: An efficient fluorescent probe for ion detection and bioimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Yumin; Gao, Tangling; Yao, Tai; Han, Jiecai; Han, Zhengbin; Zhang, Zhihua; Wu, Qiong; Song, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Herein, highly blue graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots (g-CNQDs) were synthesized by one-step microwave-assisted evaporation–condensation strategy using bulk g-C 3 N 4 as the precursor within 5 min. In contrast with conventional chemical routes, the as-synthesized g-CNQDs exhibited a high crystalline quality, excellent fluorescence characteristics, and a narrow size distribution with an average diameter of 3.5 ± 0.5 nm. More importantly, by using a household microwave oven, this method has the advantages of wide accessibility, environmental friendliness, a high yield of ∼40%, and can be facilely synthesized in a large scale (scaled up to a gram scale). Notably, owing to the absence of any organic reagents, the blueas-prepared g-CNQDs show the excitation wavelength-independent photoluminescence (PL) behavior. Moreover, benefiting from the stable PL emission, good water solubility, and extraordinary biocompatibility with a high quantum yield of ∼17%, the fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a potential sensitive and selective probe for Fe 3+ detection with a super low detection limit of 2 nM and an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging. This work provides a unique opportunity to obtain g-CNQDs in large scale via a facile route, which may pave the way for the further design of g-CNQDs with other applications. - Highlights: • Green synthesis of g-CNQDs via one-step evaporation-condensation method. • The g-CNQDs have shown high crystalline quality and intrinsic fluorescence features. • The fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a sensitive and selective probe to detect Fe 3+ ions with a low detection limit of 2 nM. • g-CNQDs can serve as an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging with extraordinary biocompatibility.

  12. One-pot evaporation–condensation strategy for green synthesis of carbon nitride quantum dots: An efficient fluorescent probe for ion detection and bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Yumin [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gao, Tangling [Institute of Petrochemistry, Heilongjiang Academy of Sciences, Harbin 150040 (China); Yao, Tai [Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Han, Jiecai [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Han, Zhengbin, E-mail: hanzhengbin@hit.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Zhihua [Liaoning Key Materials Laboratory for Railway, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian 116028 (China); Wu, Qiong [School of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Song, Bo, E-mail: songbo@hit.edu.cn [Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Herein, highly blue graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots (g-CNQDs) were synthesized by one-step microwave-assisted evaporation–condensation strategy using bulk g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} as the precursor within 5 min. In contrast with conventional chemical routes, the as-synthesized g-CNQDs exhibited a high crystalline quality, excellent fluorescence characteristics, and a narrow size distribution with an average diameter of 3.5 ± 0.5 nm. More importantly, by using a household microwave oven, this method has the advantages of wide accessibility, environmental friendliness, a high yield of ∼40%, and can be facilely synthesized in a large scale (scaled up to a gram scale). Notably, owing to the absence of any organic reagents, the blueas-prepared g-CNQDs show the excitation wavelength-independent photoluminescence (PL) behavior. Moreover, benefiting from the stable PL emission, good water solubility, and extraordinary biocompatibility with a high quantum yield of ∼17%, the fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a potential sensitive and selective probe for Fe{sup 3+} detection with a super low detection limit of 2 nM and an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging. This work provides a unique opportunity to obtain g-CNQDs in large scale via a facile route, which may pave the way for the further design of g-CNQDs with other applications. - Highlights: • Green synthesis of g-CNQDs via one-step evaporation-condensation method. • The g-CNQDs have shown high crystalline quality and intrinsic fluorescence features. • The fluorescent g-CNQDs can serve as a sensitive and selective probe to detect Fe{sup 3+} ions with a low detection limit of 2 nM. • g-CNQDs can serve as an effective labeling agent for live-cell imaging with extraordinary biocompatibility.

  13. Tuning protein expression using synonymous codon libraries targeted to the 5' mRNA coding region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Borch Jensen, Martin; Bentin, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    intermediate expression levels of green fluorescent protein in Escherichia coli. At least in one case, no apparent effect on protein stability was observed, pointing to RNA level effects as the principal reason for the observed expression differences. Targeting a synonymous codon library to the 5' coding...

  14. Uses and limitations of green fluorescent protein as a viability marker in Enterococcus faecalis: an observational investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Crielaard, W.; Krom, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci are capable of producing biofilms that are notoriously difficult to treat and remove, for instance in root canal infections. The tenacious nature of these organisms makes screening of known and novel antimicrobial compounds necessary. While traditionally growth and fluorescence-based

  15. Recombinant subgroup B human respiratory syncytial virus expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein efficiently replicates in primary human cells and is virulent in cotton rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Ken; Nguyen, D Tien; Ludlow, Martin; Rennick, Linda J; Yüksel, Selma; van Amerongen, Geert; McQuaid, Stephen; Rima, Bert K; de Swart, Rik L; Duprex, W Paul

    2015-03-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is the most important viral cause of severe respiratory tract disease in infants. Two subgroups (A and B) have been identified, which cocirculate during, or alternate between, yearly epidemics and cause indistinguishable disease. Existing in vitro and in vivo models of HRSV focus almost exclusively on subgroup A viruses. Here, a recombinant (r) subgroup B virus (rHRSV(B05)) was generated based on a consensus genome sequence obtained directly from an unpassaged clinical specimen from a hospitalized infant. An additional transcription unit containing the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was introduced between the phosphoprotein and matrix genes (position 5) of the genome to generate rHRSV(B05)EGFP(5). The recombinant viruses replicated efficiently in both HEp-2 cells and in well-differentiated normal human bronchial cells grown at air-liquid interface. Intranasal infection of cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) resulted in high numbers of EGFP(+) cells in epithelia of the nasal septum and conchae. When administered in a relatively large inoculum volume, the virus also replicated efficiently in bronchiolar epithelial cells and spread extensively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Virus replication was not observed in ciliated epithelial cells of the trachea. This is the first virulent rHRSV strain with the genetic composition of a currently circulating wild-type virus. In vivo tracking of infected cells by means of EGFP fluorescence in the absence of cytopathic changes increases the sensitivity of virus detection in HRSV pathogenesis studies. Virology as a discipline has depended on monitoring cytopathic effects following virus culture in vitro. However, wild-type viruses isolated from patients often do not cause significant changes to infected cells, necessitating blind passage. This can lead to genetic and phenotypic changes and the generation of high-titer, laboratory-adapted viruses with

  16. Bcl-2 protein expression is associated with p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishizaki Takashi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental studies have shown that Bcl-2, which has been established as a key player in the control of apoptosis, plays a role in regulating the cell cycle and proliferation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between Bcl-2 and p27 protein expression, p53 protein expression and the proliferation activity as defined by the MIB-1 counts. The prognostic implication of Bcl-2 protein expression in relation to p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts for breast cancer was also evaluated. Methods The immunohistochemical expression of Bcl-2 protein was evaluated in a series of 249 invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast, in which p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts had been determined previously. Results The Bcl-2 protein expression was found to be decreased in 105 (42% cases. A decreased Bcl-2 protein expression was significantly correlated with a nuclear grade of III, a negative estrogen receptor, a decreased p27 protein expression, a positive p53 protein expression, positive MIB-1 counts and a positive HER2 protein expression. The incidence of a nuclear grade of III and positive MIB-1 counts increased as the number of abnormal findings of Bcl-2, p27 and p53 protein expressions increased. A univariate analysis indicated a decreased Bcl-2 protein expression to be significantly (p = 0.0089 associated with a worse disease free survival (DFS, while a multivariate analysis indicated the lymph node status and MIB-1 counts to be independently significant prognostic factors for the DFS. Conclusion The Bcl-2 protein expression has a close correlation with p27 and p53 protein expressions and the proliferation activity determined by MIB-1 counts in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. The prognostic value of Bcl-2 as well as p27 and p53 protein expressions was dependent on the proliferation activity in breast cancer.

  17. Bcl-2 protein expression is associated with p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Shinichi; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Kosuke; Takeuchi, Hideya; Nishizaki, Takashi; Higashi, Hidefumi; Era, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have shown that Bcl-2, which has been established as a key player in the control of apoptosis, plays a role in regulating the cell cycle and proliferation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between Bcl-2 and p27 protein expression, p53 protein expression and the proliferation activity as defined by the MIB-1 counts. The prognostic implication of Bcl-2 protein expression in relation to p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts for breast cancer was also evaluated. The immunohistochemical expression of Bcl-2 protein was evaluated in a series of 249 invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast, in which p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts had been determined previously. The Bcl-2 protein expression was found to be decreased in 105 (42%) cases. A decreased Bcl-2 protein expression was significantly correlated with a nuclear grade of III, a negative estrogen receptor, a decreased p27 protein expression, a positive p53 protein expression, positive MIB-1 counts and a positive HER2 protein expression. The incidence of a nuclear grade of III and positive MIB-1 counts increased as the number of abnormal findings of Bcl-2, p27 and p53 protein expressions increased. A univariate analysis indicated a decreased Bcl-2 protein expression to be significantly (p = 0.0089) associated with a worse disease free survival (DFS), while a multivariate analysis indicated the lymph node status and MIB-1 counts to be independently significant prognostic factors for the DFS. The Bcl-2 protein expression has a close correlation with p27 and p53 protein expressions and the proliferation activity determined by MIB-1 counts in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. The prognostic value of Bcl-2 as well as p27 and p53 protein expressions was dependent on the proliferation activity in breast cancer

  18. Viable, but non-culturable, state of a green fluorescence protein-tagged environmental isolate of Salmonella typhi in groundwater and pond water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J C; Kim, S J

    1999-01-01

    An environmental isolate of Salmonella typhi was chromosomally marked with a gfp gene encoding green fluorescence protein (GFP) isolated from Aequorea victoria. The hybrid transposon mini Tn5 gfp was transconjugated from E. coli to S. typhi, resulting in constitutive GFP production. The survival of S. typhi GFP155 introduced into groundwater and pond water microcosms was examined by GFP-based plate counts, total cell counts, and direct viable counts. A comparison between GFP-based direct viable counts and plate counts was a good method for verifying the viable, but non-culturable (VBNC), state of S. typhi. The entry into a VBNC state of S. typhi was shown in all microcosms. S. typhi survived longer in groundwater than in pond water as both a culturable and a VBNC state.

  19. Broadening Horizons and Teaching Basic Biology Through Cell-Free Synthesis of Green Fluorescent Protein in a High School Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Cem; Jones, K. C.; Swartz, James R.

    2013-12-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a practical method for producing a broad variety of proteins. In addition, the direct accessibility to the reaction environment makes CFPS particularly suitable as a learning vehicle for fundamental biological concepts. Here, we describe its implementation as a teaching tool for a high school laboratory course. Ninety students in a biotechnology class used CFPS to study the effects of the concentrations of amino acids, cell extract, DNA, and the energy source on accumulation of active super-folder green fluorescent protein. Students estimated product concentrations simply by comparing solution colors to a printed green color gradient. This simple and inexpensive method allows for immediate measurements, and 26 of the 30 groups observed measurable product concentrations within 60 min. These student-generated data were then discussed to illustrate concepts of data analysis such as outliers and standard deviation. We also combined the laboratory experience with a visit to a university campus that included a laboratory tour and a college-style lecture. Our overall objective was to excite the students about the scientific enterprise and to instill a sense of personal relevance and attainability so that these students could realistically consider technical careers.

  20. Locally accelerated growth is part of the innate immune response and repair mechanisms in reef-building corals as detected by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, C.; Smith, E. G.; Oswald, F.; Burt, J.; Tchernov, D.; Wiedenmann, J.

    2012-12-01

    Homologs of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are a prevalent group of host pigments responsible for the green, red and purple-blue colours of many reef-building corals. They have been suggested to contribute to the striking coloration changes of different corals species in response to wounding and infestation with epibionts/parasites. In order to elucidate the physiological processes underlying the potentially disease-related colour changes, we have analysed spatial and temporal expression patterns of GFP-like proteins and other biomarkers in corals from the Red Sea, the Arabian/Persian Gulf and Fiji both in their natural habitat and under specific laboratory conditions. The expression of distinct GFP-like proteins and the growth marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen was upregulated in growing branch tips and margins of healthy coral colonies as well as in disturbed colony parts. Furthermore, phenoloxidase activity increased in these proliferating tissues. It is thus demonstrated that locally accelerated growth is part of the innate immune response and repair mechanisms in reef-building corals and, moreover, these processes can be detected utilizing the excellent biomarker properties of GFP-like proteins. Finally, the results of this work suggest an additional vulnerability of corals in predicted future scenarios of increased ocean acidification, warming and eutrophication that are anticipated to reduce coral growth capacity.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi Coexpressing Ornithine Decarboxylase and Green Fluorescence Proteins as a Tool to Study the Role of Polyamines in Chagas Disease Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremías José Barclay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines are essential for Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. As T. cruzi behaves as a natural auxotrophic organism, it relies on host polyamines biosynthesis. In this paper we obtained a double-transfected T. cruzi parasite that expresses the green fluorescent protein (GFP and a heterologous ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, used itself as a novel selectable marker. These autotrophic and fluorescent parasites were characterized; the ODC presented an apparent Km for ornithine of 0.51 ± 0.16 mM and an estimated Vmax value of 476.2 nmoles/h/mg of protein. These expressing ODC parasites showed higher metacyclogenesis capacity than the auxotrophic counterpart, supporting the idea that polyamines are engaged in this process. This double-transfected T. cruzi parasite results in a powerful tool—easy to follow by its fluorescence—to study the role of polyamines in Chagas disease pathology and in related processes such as parasite survival, invasion, proliferation, metacyclogenesis, and tissue spreading.

  2. Fluorescent minerals--A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Infection of the upper respiratory tract of hamsters by the bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 BN-1 strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Takashi; Minakuchi, Moeko; Sagai, Mami; Kokuho, Takehiro; Konishi, Misako; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2015-02-01

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is an important pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). We have generated a recombinant BPIV3 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (rBPIV3-EGFP) based on the BN-1 strain isolated in Japan. After intranasal infection of hamsters with rBPIV3-EGFP, EGFP fluorescence was detected in the upper respiratory tract including the nasal turbinates, pharynx, larynx, and trachea. In the nasal turbinates, rBPIV3-EGFP attained high titers (>10(6) TCID50/g of tissue) 2-4 days after infection. Ciliated epithelial cells in the nasal turbinates and trachea were infected with rBPIV3-EGFP. Histopathological analysis indicated that mucosal epithelial cells in bronchi were shed by 6 days after infection, leaving non-ciliated cells, which may have increased susceptibility to bacterial infection leading to the development of BRDC. These data indicate that rBPIV3-EGFP infection of hamsters is a useful small animal model for studying the development of BPIV3-associated BRDC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The canonical twin-arginine translocase components are not required for secretion of folded green fluorescent protein from the ancestral strain of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Anthony J; Mukherjee, Sampriti; Glass, J Kyle; Kearns, Daniel B; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana

    2014-05-01

    Cellular processes, such as the digestion of macromolecules, phosphate acquisition, and cell motility, require bacterial secretion systems. In Bacillus subtilis, the predominant protein export pathways are Sec (generalized secretory pathway) and Tat (twin-arginine translocase). Unlike Sec, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery secretes fully folded proteins across the plasma membrane and into the medium. Proteins are directed for Tat-dependent export by N-terminal signal peptides that contain a conserved twin-arginine motif. Thus, utilizing the Tat secretion system by fusing a Tat signal peptide is an attractive strategy for the production and export of heterologous proteins. As a proof of concept, we expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the PhoD Tat signal peptide in the laboratory and ancestral strains of B. subtilis. Secretion of the Tat-GFP construct, as well as secretion of proteins in general, was substantially increased in the ancestral strain. Furthermore, our results show that secreted, fluorescent GFP could be purified directly from the extracellular medium. Nonetheless, export was not dependent on the known Tat secretion components or the signal peptide twin-arginine motif. We propose that the ancestral strain contains additional Tat components and/or secretion regulators that were abrogated following domestication.

  5. Combined quantum-mechanical molecular mechanics calculations with NWChem and AMBER: Excited state properties of green fluorescent protein chromophore analogue in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirojsirikul, Teerapong [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla California 92093; Götz, Andreas W. [San Diego Supercomputer Center, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla California 92093; Weare, John [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla California 92093; Walker, Ross C. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla California 92093; GlaxoSmithKline, 1250 S. Collegeville Road Collegeville Pennsylvania 19426; Kowalski, Karol [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P. O. Box 999 Richland Washington 99352; Valiev, Marat [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P. O. Box 999 Richland Washington 99352

    2017-05-03

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is a widely used fluorescent biomarker for the study of biological systems. Our investigation is focused on providing a reliable theoretical description of the GFP chromophore, the photochemical properties of which can be influenced through both the surrounding protein environment and pH levels. In this work we are specifically addressing the effect of an aqueous solvation environment , where a number of experimental measurements have been performed. Our approach is based on a combined quantum mechanics molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methodology, which incorporates high level coupled cluster theory for the analysis of excited states. It also presents the first application of the newly developed NWChem/AMBER QM/MM interface. Using a systematic approach, which involves comparison of gas phase and aqueous results for different protonation states and conformations, we have resolved existing uncertainties regarding theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. We observe that the impact of aqueous environment on charged states generally results in blue shifts, but the magnitude of the effect is sensitive to charge state and conformation and can be rationalized based on charge movement into the area of higher/lower external electrostatic potentials. At neutral pH levels the experimentally observed absorption signal is most likely coming from the phenol protonated form. Our results also show that the high level coupled description is essential for proper description of excited states of GFP.

  6. Dynamic expression of N-myc in mouse embryonic development using an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene in the N-myc locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Zhao, Kai; Wu, Wenting; Sun, Ruilin; Fei, Jian

    2014-02-01

    N-myc belongs to the Myc oncogene family and plays an essential role in mammalian embryonic development. The expression of N-myc is dynamically regulated during embryonic development; however, its expression pattern has not been well characterized due to the lack of a suitable animal model. In this paper, a genetically modified mouse model was generated in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) coding sequence was inserted into the N-myc locus, so that endogenous N-myc expression could be traced by the signal of EGFP. The EGFP signal in the transgenic mouse was confirmed to be consistent with the expression pattern of endogenous N-myc by fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, the spatial and temporal expre