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Sample records for green ceramic compacts

  1. Formation of Green compact structure of low-temperature ceramics with taking into account the thermal degradation of the binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovpinets, A. O.; Leytsin, V. N.; Dmitrieva, M. A.; Ivonin, I. V.; Ponomarev, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    The solution of the tasks in the field of creating and processing materials for additive technologies requires the development of a single theory of materials for various applications and processes. A separate class of materials that are promising for use in additive technologies includes materials whose consolidation is ensured by the presence of low-melting components in the initial mixture which form a matrix at a temperature not exceeding the melting point, recrystallization or destruction of any of the responsible refractory components of the initial dispersion. The study of the contribution of the binder thermal destruction to the structure and phase composition of the initial compact of the future composite is essential for the development of modern technologies for the synthesis of low-temperature ceramics. This paper investigates the effect of the thermal destruction of a binder on the formation of a green compact of low-temperature ceramics and the structural-mechanical characteristics of sintered ceramics. The approach proposed in Ref. [1] for evaluating the structure and physical characteristics of sintered low-temperature ceramics is improved to clarify the structure of green compacts obtained after thermal destruction of the polymer binder, with taking into account the pores formed and the infusible residue. The obtained results enable a more accurate prediction of thermal stresses in the matrix of sintered ceramics and serve as a basis for optimization.

  2. Compact Ceramic Microchannel Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewinsohn, Charles [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-10-31

    The objective of the proposed work was to demonstrate the feasibility of a step change in power plant efficiency at a commercially viable cost, by obtaining performance data for prototype, compact, ceramic microchannel heat exchangers. By performing the tasks described in the initial proposal, all of the milestones were met. The work performed will advance the technology from Technology Readiness Level 3 (TRL 3) to Technology Readiness Level 4 (TRL 4) and validate the potential of using these heat exchangers for enabling high efficiency solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or high-temperature turbine-based power plants. The attached report will describe how this objective was met. In collaboration with The Colorado School of Mines (CSM), specifications were developed for a high temperature heat exchanger for three commercial microturbines. Microturbines were selected because they are a more mature commercial technology than SOFC, they are a low-volume and high-value target for market entry of high-temperature heat exchangers, and they are essentially scaled-down versions of turbines used in utility-scale power plants. Using these specifications, microchannel dimensions were selected to meet the performance requirements. Ceramic plates were fabricated with microchannels of these dimensions. The plates were tested at room temperature and elevated temperature. Plates were joined together to make modular, heat exchanger stacks that were tested at a variety of temperatures and flow rates. Although gas flow rates equivalent to those in microturbines could not be achieved in the laboratory environment, the results showed expected efficiencies, robust operation under significant temperature gradients at high temperature, and the ability to cycle the stacks. Details of the methods and results are presented in this final report.

  3. Green strength of zirconium sponge and uranium dioxide powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishna, Palanki; Murty, B. Narasimha; Sahoo, P.K.; Gopalakrishna, T.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium metal sponge is compacted into rectangular or cylindrical shapes using hydraulic presses. These shapes are stacked and electron beam welded to form a long electrode suitable for vacuum arc melting and casting into solid ingots. The compact electrodes should be sufficiently strong to prevent breakage in handling as well as during vacuum arc melting. Usually, the welds are strong and the electrode strength is limited by the green strength of the compacts, which constitute the electrode. Green strength is also required in uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder compacts, to withstand stresses during de-tensioning after compaction as well as during ejection from the die and for subsequent handling by man and machine. The strengths of zirconium sponge and UO 2 powder compacts have been determined by bending and crushing respectively, and Weibul moduli evaluated. The green density of coarse sponge compact was found to be larger than that from finer sponge. The green density of compacts from lightly attrited UO 2 powder was higher than that from unattrited category, accompanied by an improvement in UO 2 green crushing strength. The factors governing green strength have been examined in the light of published literature and experimental evidence. The methodology and results provide a basis for quality control in metal sponge and ceramic powder compaction in the manufacture of nuclear fuel

  4. Characterization of ceramic powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanai, K.; Ishimoto, S.; Kubo, T.; Ito, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Hayashi, H.

    1995-01-01

    UO 2 and Al 2 O 3 powder packing structures in cylindrical powder compacts are observed by scanning electron microscopy using polished cross sections of compacts fixed by low viscosity epoxy resin. Hard aggregates which are not destroyed during powder compaction are observed in some of the UO 2 powder compacts. A technique to measure local density in powder compacts is developed based on counting characteristic X-ray intensity by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The local density of the corner portion of the powder compact fabricated by double-acting dry press is higher than that of the inner portion. ((orig.))

  5. Hydrodynamic modeling and explosive compaction of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenig, C.; Holt, A.; Finger, M.; Kuhl, W.

    1977-01-01

    High-density ceramics with high-strength microstructure were achieved by explosive compaction. Well-characterized Al 2 O 3 , AlN, and boron powders were explosively compacted in both cylindrical and flat plate geometries. In cylindrical geometries compacted densities between 91 and 98 percent of theoretical were achieved. Microhardness measurements indicated that the strength and integrity of the microstructure were comparable to conventionally fabricated ceramics, even though all samples with densities greater than 90 percent theoretical contained macrocracks. Fractured surfaces evaluated by SEM showed evidence of boundary melting. Equation of state data for porous Al 2 O 3 were used to calculate the irreversible work done on the sample as a function of pressure. This was expressed as a percentage of the total sample which could be melted. Calculations show that very little melting can be expected in samples shocked to less than 3 GPa. Significant melting and grain boundary fusion can be expected in samples shocked to pressures greater than 8 GPa. Hydrodynamic modeling of right cylinder compaction with detonation at one end was attempted by using a two-dimensional computer code. The complications of this analysis led to experiments using plane shock waves. Flat-plate compaction assemblies were designed and analyzed by 2-D hydrodynamic codes. The use of porous shock attenuators was evaluated. Experiments were performed on aluminum oxide powders in plane wave geometry. Microstructure evaluations were made as a function of location in the flat plate samples. 11 figures, 1 table

  6. Planning multifunctional green infrastructure for compact cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rieke; Olafsson, Anton Stahl; van der Jagt, Alexander P.N.

    2018-01-01

    green space functions or the purposive design and management of multifunctional parks. Based on the findings, we arrive at five recommendations for promoting multifunctional urban green infrastructure in densifying urban areas: 1) undertake systematic spatial assessments of all urban green (and blue....... Further, spatial assessment, strategic planning and site design need to 4) consider synergies, trade-offs and the capacity of urban green spaces to provide functions as part of the wider green infrastructure network; and 5) largely benefit from cooperation between different sectors and public departments......Urban green infrastructure planning aims to develop green space networks on limited space in compact cities. Multifunctionality is considered key to achieving this goal as it supports planning practice that considers the ability of green spaces to provide multiple benefits concurrently. However...

  7. Complex-shaped ceramic composites obtained by machining compact polymer-filler mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria da Rocha

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Research in the preparation of ceramics from polymeric precursors is giving rise to increased interest in ceramic technology because it allows the use of several promising polymer forming techniques. In this work ceramic composite pieces were obtained by pyrolysis of a compacted mixture of a polysiloxane resin and alumina/silicon powder. The mixture consists of 60 vol% of the polymer phase and 40 vol% of the filler in a 1:1 ratio for alumina/silicon, which was hot pressed to crosslink the polymer, thus forming a compact body. This green body was trimmed into different geometries and pyrolised in nitrogen atmosphere at temperatures up to 1600 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the formation of phases such as mullite and Si2ON2 during pyrolysis, that result from reactions between fillers, polymer decomposition products and nitrogen atmosphere. The porosity was found to be less than 20% and the mass loss around 10%. The complex geometry was maintained after pyrolysis and shrinkage was approximately 8%, proving pyrolisis to be a suitable process to form near-net-shaped bulk ceramic components.

  8. Additive Manufacturing for Cost Efficient Production of Compact Ceramic Heat Exchangers and Recuperators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulman, Holly [Ceralink Incorporated, Troy, NY (United States); Ross, Nicole [Ceralink Incorporated, Troy, NY (United States)

    2015-10-30

    An additive manufacture technique known as laminated object manufacturing (LOM) was used to fabricate compact ceramic heat exchanger prototypes. LOM uses precision CO2 laser cutting of ceramic green tapes, which are then precision stacked to build a 3D object with fine internal features. Modeling was used to develop prototype designs and predict the thermal response, stress, and efficiency in the ceramic heat exchangers. Build testing and materials analyses were used to provide feedback for the design selection. During this development process, laminated object manufacturing protocols were established. This included laser optimization, strategies for fine feature integrity, lamination fluid control, green handling, and firing profile. Three full size prototypes were fabricated using two different designs. One prototype was selected for performance testing. During testing, cross talk leakage prevented the application of a high pressure differential, however, the prototype was successful at withstanding the high temperature operating conditions (1300 °F). In addition, analysis showed that the bulk of the part did not have cracks or leakage issues. This led to the development of a module method for next generation LOM heat exchangers. A scale-up cost analysis showed that given a purpose built LOM system, these ceramic heat exchangers would be affordable for the applications.

  9. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  10. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, Dennis; Zhang, Dajie

    2009-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm -3 (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  11. Characterization techniques to predict mechanical behaviour of green ceramic bodies fabricated by ceramic microstereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adake, Chandrashekhar V.; Bhargava, Parag; Gandhi, Prasanna

    2018-02-01

    Ceramic microstereolithography (CMSL) has emerged as solid free form (SFF) fabrication technology in which complex ceramic parts are fabricated from ceramic suspensions which are formulated by dispersing ceramic particles in UV curable resins. Ceramic parts are fabricated by exposing ceramic suspension to computer controlled UV light which polymerizes resin to polymer and this polymer forms rigid network around ceramic particles. A 3-dimensional part is created by piling cured layers one over the other. These ceramic parts are used to build microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices after thermal treatment. In many cases green ceramic parts can be directly utilized to build MEMS devices. Hence characterization of these parts is essential in terms of their mechanical behaviour prior to their use in MEMS devices. Mechanical behaviour of these green ceramic parts depends on cross link density which in turn depends on chemical structure of monomer, concentrations of photoinitiator and UV energy dose. Mechanical behaviour can be determined with the aid of nanoindentation. And extent of crosslinking can be verified with the aid of DSC. FTIR characterization is used to analyse (-C=C-) double bond conversion. This paper explains characterization tools to predict the mechanical behaviour of green ceramic bodies fabricated in CMSL

  12. COMPACTION OF LITHIUM-SILICATE CERAMICS USING SPARK PLASMA SINTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Frantisek Kubatik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the compaction of ceramics based on lithium-silicate by spark plasma sintering (SPS. The initial powder was prepared by calcination in a resistance furnace at a temperature of 1300 °C with the ratio of Li/Si = 1. Compacting by SPS was carried out at temperatures of 800 - 1000 °C with a maximum pressure of 80 MPa. Samples with open porosity of less than 1 % were prepared at the temperature of 1000 °C. According to the quantitative Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data, the dominant phases in all samples were Li₂Si₂O₅ and Li₂SiO₃, together representing over 80 wt. % of the sintered material.

  13. Dependence of compressive strength of green compacts on pressure, density and contact area of powder particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, A.; Akram, M.; Shahid, K.A.; Javed, M.; Zaidi, S.M.

    1994-08-01

    The relationship between green compressive strength and compacting pressure as well as green density has been investigated for uniaxially pressed aluminium powder compacts in the range 0 - 520 MPa. Two linear relationships occurred between compacting pressure and green compressive strength which corresponded to powder compaction stages II and III respectively, increase in strength being large during stage II and quite small in stage III with increasing pressure. On the basis of both, the experimental results and a previous model on cold compaction of powder particles, relationships between green compressive strength and green density and interparticle contact area of the compacts has been established. (author) 9 figs

  14. Application of NDE methods to green ceramics: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Karplus, H.B.; Poeppel, R.B.; Ellingson, W.A.; Berger, H.; Robbins, C.; Fuller, E.

    1984-03-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation to assess the effectiveness of microradiography, ultrasonic methods, nuclear magnetic resonance, and neutron radiography for the nondestructive evaluation of green (unfired), ceramics. Objective is to obtain useful information on defects, cracking, delaminations, agglomerates, inclusions, regions of high porosity, and anisotropy

  15. Aspects of simulating the dynamic compaction of a granular ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, John P; Vogler, Tracy J

    2009-01-01

    Mesoscale hydrodynamic calculations have been conducted in order to gain further insight into the dynamic compaction characteristics of granular ceramics. With a mesoscale approach each individual grain, as well as the porosity, is modeled explicitly; the bulk behavior of the porous material can be resolved as a result. From these calculations bulk material characteristics such as shock speed, stress and density have been obtained and compared with experimental results. A parametric study has been conducted in order to explore the variation and sensitivity of the computationally derived dynamic response characteristics to micro-scale material properties such as Poisson's ratio, dynamic yield and tensile failure strength; macro-scale parameters such as volume fraction, particle morphology and size distribution were explored as well. The results indicate that the baseline bulk Hugoniot response under-predicts the experimentally measured response. These results are sensitive to the volume fraction, dynamic yield strength and particle arrangement, somewhat sensitive to failure strength and insensitive to the micro-scale Hugoniot and grain morphology. A discussion as to the shortcomings in the mesoscale modeling technique, as well as future considerations, is included

  16. Influence of temporary organic bond nature on the properties of compacts and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditts, A., E-mail: ditts@tpu.ru; Revva, I., E-mail: revva@tpu.ru; Pogrebenkov, V.; Kosolapov, A. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Galashov, E. [Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova Str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Nepochatov, Y. [Holding JSC “NEVZ-Soyuz”, 220, Krasny Avenue, Novosibirsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    This work contains results of investigation of obtaining high thermally conductive ceramics from commercial powders of aluminum nitride and yttrium oxide by the method of monoaxial compaction of granulate. The principal scheme of preparation is proposed and technological properties of granulate are defined. Compaction conditions for simple items to use as heat removal in microelectronics and power electrical engineering have been established. Investigations of thermophysical properties of obtained ceramics and its structure by the XRD and SEM methods have been carried out. Ceramics with thermal conductivity from 172 to 174 W/m·K has been obtained as result of this work.

  17. Application of NDE methods to green ceramics: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Karplus, H.B.; Poeppel, R.B.; Ellingson, W.A.; Berger, H.; Robbins, C.; Fuller, E.

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of microradiography, ultrasonic methods, unclear magnetic resonance, and neutron radiography was assessed for the nondestructive evaluation of green (unfired) ceramics. The application of microradiography to ceramics is reviewed, and preliminary experiments with a commercial microradiography unit are described. Conventional ultrasonic techniques are difficult to apply to flaw detection green ceramics because of the high attenuation, fragility, and couplant-absorbing properties of these materials. However, velocity, attenuation, and spectral data were obtained with pressure-coupled transducers and provided useful informaion related to density variations and the presence of agglomerates. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging techniques and neutron radiography were considered for detection of anomalies in the distribution of porosity. With NMR, areas of high porosity might be detected after the samples are doped with water. In the case of neutron radiography, although imaging the binder distribution throughout the sample may not be feasible because of the low overall concentration of binder, regions of high binder concentration (thus high porosity) should be detectable

  18. Synthesis of Highly Uniform and Compact Lithium Zinc Ferrite Ceramics via an Efficient Low Temperature Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang; Liao, Yulong; Zhang, Dainan; Zhou, Tingchuan; Li, Jie; Gan, Gongwen; Zhang, Huaiwu

    2017-04-17

    LiZn ferrite ceramics with high saturation magnetization (4πM s ) and low ferromagnetic resonance line widths (ΔH) represent a very critical class of material for microwave ferrite devices. Many existing approaches emphasize promotion of the grain growth (average size is 10-50 μm) of ferrite ceramics to improve the gyromagnetic properties at relatively low sintering temperatures. This paper describes a new strategy for obtaining uniform and compact LiZn ferrite ceramics (average grains size is ∼2 μm) with enhanced magnetic performance by suppressing grain growth in great detail. The LiZn ferrites with a formula of Li 0.415 Zn 0.27 Mn 0.06 Ti 0.1 Fe 2.155 O 4 were prepared by solid reaction routes with two new sintering strategies. Interestingly, results show that uniform, compact, and pure spinel ferrite ceramics were synthesized at a low temperature (∼850 °C) without obvious grain growth. We also find that a fast second sintering treatment (FSST) can further improve their gyromagnetic properties, such as higher 4πM s and lower ΔH. The two new strategies are facile and efficient for densification of LiZn ferrite ceramics via suppressing grain growth at low temperatures. The sintering strategy reported in this study also provides a referential experience for other ceramics, such as soft magnetism ferrite ceramics or dielectric ceramics.

  19. A survivability model for ejection of green compacts in powder metallurgy technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payman Ahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliability and quality assurance have become major considerations in the design and manufacture of today’s parts and products. Survivability of green compact using powder metallurgy technology is considered as one of the major quality attributes in manufacturing systems today. During powder metallurgy (PM production, the compaction conditions and behavior of the metal powder dictate the stress and density distribution in the green compact prior to sintering. These parameters greatly influence the mechanical properties and overall strength of the final component. In order to improve these properties, higher compaction pressures are usually employed, which make unloading and ejection of green compacts more challenging, especially for the powder-compacted parts with relatively complicated shapes. This study looked at a mathematical survivability model concerning green compact characteristics in PM technology and the stress-strength failure model in reliability engineering. This model depicts the relationship between mechanical loads (stress during ejection, experimentally determined green strength and survivability of green compact. The resulting survivability is the probability that a green compact survives during and after ejection. This survivability model can be used as an efficient tool for selecting the appropriate parameters for the process planning stage in PM technology. A case study is presented here in order to demonstrate the application of the proposed survivability model.

  20. Planar compaction of ceramic powders with mining explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuivinga, M.; Verbeek, H.J.; Carton, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    Shock compaction experiments of B 4 C powders have been performed using a planar configuration. The powders were contained between metal plates. On top of the upper plate, having a thickness of about 10 mm, was a layer of mining explosives. For this configuration, computer simulations have been performed with use of the hydrocode Autodyn. In comparison with the cylindrical compaction process the planar compaction process appears to be quite different. The reason is the very low detonation velocity of the used mining explosives (2-4 km/s), which is much lower than the sound and shock speeds of the steel plate, in combination with the relatively large thickness of the metal layer. As a result, the nature of the compaction process of the powder initially more resembles a quasi-static compaction process than a shock compaction process. Due to the quasi-static nature of the compaction, the pressure release in the powder after compression is very gradual. Therefore, no strong rarefaction waves leading to high tensile stresses in the compact arise. Flat plates (10x10 cm, 0.6-0.8 cm thick) of Al (20-30 vol %) infiltrated B 4 C have been fabricated using this configuration

  1. Lower sintering temperature of nanostructured dense ceramics compacted from dry nanopowders using powerful ultrasonic action

    OpenAIRE

    Khasanov, O.; Reichel, U.; Dvilis, E.; Khasanov, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured high dense zirconia ceramics have been sintered from dry nanopowders compacted by uniaxial pressing with simultaneous powerful ultrasonic action (PUA). Powerful ultrasound with frequency of 21 kHz was supplied from ultrasonic generator to the mold, which was the ultrasonic wave-guide. Previously the mold was filled by non-agglomerated zirconia nanopowder having average particle size of 40 nm. Any binders or plasticizers were excluded at nanopowder processing. Compaction pressur...

  2. [Effect of compaction pressure on the properties of dental machinable zirconia ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Wei, Bin; Zhang, Fu-qiang; Sun, Jing; Gao, Lian

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the effect of compaction pressure on the linear shrinkage, sintering property and machinability of the dental zirconia ceramic. The nano-size zirconia powder was compacted at different isostatic pressure and sintered at different temperature. The linear shrinkage of sintered body was measured and the relative density was tested using the Archimedes method. The cylindrical surface of pre-sintering blanks was traversed using a hard metal tool. Surface and edge quality were checked visually using light stereo microscopy. The sintering behaviour depended on the compaction pressure. Increasing compaction pressure led to higher sintering rate and lower sintering temperature. Increasing compaction pressure also led to decreasing linear shrinkage of the sintered bodies, from 24.54% of 50 MPa to 20.9% of 400 MPa. Compaction pressure showed only a weak influence on machinability of zirconia blanks, but the higher compaction pressure resulted in the poor surface quality. The better sintering property and machinability of dental zirconia ceramic is found for 200-300 MPa compaction pressure.

  3. Compaction of Ceramic Microspheres, Spherical Molybdenum Powder and Other Materials to 3 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, S R; Bonner, B P; Ryerson, F J; Hart, M M

    2006-01-01

    Pressure-volume relationships were measured at room temperature for eight granular materials and one specimen of epoxy foam. The granular materials included hollow ceramic microspheres, spherical molybdenum powder, Ottawa sand, aluminum, copper, titanium and silicon carbide powders and glassy carbon spheres. Measurements were made to 0.9 GPa in a liquid medium press for all of the granular materials and to 3 GPa in a solid medium press for the ceramic microspheres and molybdenum powder. A single specimen of epoxy foam was compressed to 30 MPa in the liquid medium press. Bulk moduli were calculated as a function of pressure for the ceramic microspheres, the molybdenum powder and three other granular materials. The energy expended in compacting the granular materials was determined by numerically integrating pressure-volume curves. More energy was expended per unit volume in compacting the molybdenum powder to 1 GPa than for the other materials, but compaction of the ceramic microspheres required more energy per gram due to their very low initial density. The merge pressure, the pressure at which all porosity is removed, was estimated for each material by plotting porosity against pressure on a semi-log plot. The pressure-volume curves were then extrapolated to the predicted merge pressures and numerically integrated to estimate the energy required to reach full density for each material. The results suggest that the glassy carbon spheres and the ceramic microspheres would require more energy than the other materials to attain full density

  4. Recycling of Malaysia's electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste into heavy-duty green ceramic tile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Pao-Ter; Anasyida, Abu Seman; Basu, Projjal; Nurulakmal, Mohd Sharif

    2014-12-01

    Recently, various solid wastes from industry such as glass waste, fly ash, sewage sludge and slag have been recycled into various value-added products such as ceramic tile. The conventional solutions of dumping the wastes in landfills or incineration, including in Malaysia are getting obsolete as the annual huge amount of the solid wastes would boost-up disposal cost and may cause permanent damage to the flora and fauna. This recent waste recycling approach is much better and greener as it can resolve problems associated with over-limit storage of industrial wastes and reduce exploration of natural resources for ceramic tile to continuously sustain the nature. Therefore, in this project, an attempt was made to recycle electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste, obtained from Malaysia's steel making industry, into ceramic tile via conventional powder compaction method. The research work was divided into two stages. The first stage was to evaluate the suitability of EAF slag in ceramic tile by varying weight percentage of EAF slag (40 wt.%, 50 wt.% and 60 wt.%) and ball clay (40 wt.%, 50 wt.% and 60 wt.%), with no addition of silica and potash feldspar. In the second stage, the weight percentage of EAF slag was fixed at 40 wt.% and the percentage of ball clay (30 wt.% and 40 wt.%), feldspar (10 wt.% and 20 wt.%) and silica (10 wt.% and 20 wt.%) added was varied accordingly. Results obtained show that as weight percentage of EAF slag increased up to 60 wt.%, the percentage of apparent porosity and water absorption also rose, with a reduction in tile flexural strength and increased porosity. On the other hand, limiting the weight percentage of EAF slag to 40 wt.% while increasing the weight percentage of ball clay led to a higher total percentage of anorthite and wollastonite minerals, resulting in higher flexural strength. It was found that introduction of silica and feldspar further improved the flexural strength due to optimization of densification process. The highest

  5. Slurry dispersion state as a parameter to control internal structure of alumina green compact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, M.; Shui, A.; Tanaka, S.; Uchida, N.; Uematsu, K. [Nagaoka Univ. of Technology, Niigata (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The dispersion state of slurry must be controlled to produce granules with appropriated properties for pressing. In this study dispersion state of alumina slurry is changed to form granules with different morphology, deformation property and packing density, and the influence on the internal structure of green compact are presented. Novel methods applying liquid immersion technique coupled with different type of microscopy were used to characterize the internal structures of green compacts. Two types of granules were obtained: dimpled, hard and dense granule, and spherical, soft and loose granule. The respective internal structures of green compacts were totally different. (orig.)

  6. Determination of Drucker-Prager failure criterion of α-SiC green compacts; Determinacion del criterio de rotura de Drucker-Prager de compactos en verde de α-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achiaga, B.; Barea, R.; Candela, N.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the mechanical behaviour of compacted ceramic green components of two α-SiC with different particle size-shape and purity with the purpose of evaluate the Drucker-Prager criterion in both material. Compaction pressures were between 60 and 100 MPa. The green compact were evaluated by two tests such as diametrical compression and uniaxial compression for different relative densities. These models are used both for die design as for parts design. The results show the different compression behaviour caused by the particles shape of each material. (Author)

  7. Compaction of lithium-silicate ceramics using spark plasma sintering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubatík, Tomáš František; Lukáč, František; Mušálek, Radek; Brožek, Vlastimil; Stehlíková, K.; Chráska, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2017), s. 40-44 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Li2Si2O5 * Li2SiO3 * Spark plasma sintering (SPS) * Quantitative Rietveld refinement * X-ray diffraction (XRD) Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2016 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/index.php?page=cs_detail_doi&id=789

  8. Lower sintering temperature of nanostructured dense ceramics compacted from dry nanopowders using powerful ultrasonic action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanov, O.; Reichel, U.; Dvilis, E.; Khasanov, A.

    2011-10-01

    Nanostructured high dense zirconia ceramics have been sintered from dry nanopowders compacted by uniaxial pressing with simultaneous powerful ultrasonic action (PUA). Powerful ultrasound with frequency of 21 kHz was supplied from ultrasonic generator to the mold, which was the ultrasonic wave-guide. Previously the mold was filled by non-agglomerated zirconia nanopowder having average particle size of 40 nm. Any binders or plasticizers were excluded at nanopowder processing. Compaction pressure was 240 MPa, power of ultrasonic generator at PUA was 1 kW and 3 kW. The fully dense zirconia ceramics has been sintered at 1345°C and high-dense ceramics with a density of 99.1%, the most grains of which had the sizes Dgr <= 200 nm, has been sintered at low sintering temperature (1325°C). Applied approach prevents essential grain growth owing to uniform packing of nanoparticles under vibrating PU-action at pressing, which provides the friction forces control during dry nanopowder compaction without contaminating binders or plasticizers.

  9. Environmental education excursions and proximity to urban green space : Densification in a ‘compact city’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolsink, M.

    2016-01-01

    The value of urban green space for environmental education fieldwork is empirically investigated in a study among all secondary schools in Amsterdam. The article describes how the proximity of schools to green spaces emerges as a new factor in the ‘sustainable city’ and the ‘compact city’ debate.

  10. Compact green-diode-based lasers for biophotonic bioimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diode lasers simultaneously offer tunability, high-power emission, and compact size at fairly low cost and are increasingly preferred for pumping titanium:sapphire lasers.......Diode lasers simultaneously offer tunability, high-power emission, and compact size at fairly low cost and are increasingly preferred for pumping titanium:sapphire lasers....

  11. Green Compact Temperature Evolution during Current-Activated Tip-Based Sintering (CATS of Nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Morsi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Current-activated tip-based sintering (CATS is a novel process where spark plasma sintering conditions are applied through an electrically conducting tip on a locally controlled area on a green powder compact/bed. The localization of electric current in CATS allows for unique temporal and spatial current and temperature distributions within the tip and powder compact. In this paper, special experimental setups were used to monitor the temperature profiles in the tip and at multiple locations on the surface of nickel powder compacts. A variation in the initial green density was found to have a significant effect on the maximum temperature in the tip as well as the temperature distribution across the powder compact. In general, the lowest green density specimens displayed the best conditions for localized densification. The concept of effective current density is introduced and results are discussed in relation to the densification parameter.

  12. [Influence of compaction pressure and pre-sintering temperature on the machinability of zirconia ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huil; Li, Jing; Zhang, Fuqiang; Sun, Jing; Gao, Lian

    2011-10-01

    In order to make certain the compaction pressure as well as pre-sintering temperature on the machinability of the zirconia ceramic. 3 mol nano-size 3 mol yttria partially stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powder were compacted at different isostatic pressure and sintered at different temperature. The cylindrical surface was traversed using a hard metal tool. Surface and edge quality were checked visually using light stereo microscopy. Pre-sintering temperature had the obviously influence on the machinability of 3Y-TZP. The cutting surface was smooth, and the integrality of edge was better when the pre-sintering temperature was chosen between 800 degrees C to 900 degrees C. Compaction pressure showed only a weak influence on machinability of 3Y-TZP blanks, but the higher compaction pressure result in the poor surface quality. The best machinability of pre-sintered zirconia body was found for 800-900 degrees C pre-sintering temperature, and 200-300 MPa compaction pressure.

  13. Sulphuric Acid Resistant of Self Compacted Geopolymer Concrete Containing Slag and Ceramic Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiq I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is a one of the developing countries where the constructions of infrastructure is still ongoing, resulting in a high demand for concrete. In order to gain sustainability factors in the innovations for producing concrete, geopolymer concrete containing granulated blast-furnace slag and ceramics was selected as a cement replacement in concrete for this study. Since Malaysia had many ceramic productions and uses, the increment of the ceramic waste will also be high. Thus, a new idea to reuse this waste in construction materials have been tested by doing research on this waste. Furthermore, a previous research stated that Ordinary Portland Cement concrete has a lower durability compared to the geopolymer concrete. Geopolymer binders have been reported as being acid resistant and thus are a promising and alternative binder for sewer pipe manufacture. Lack of study regarding the durability of the geopolymer self-compacting concrete was also one of the problems. The waste will be undergoing a few processes in the laboratory in order to get it in the best form before undergoing the next process as a binder in geopolymer concrete. This research is very significant in order to apply the concept of sustainability in the construction field. In addition, the impact of this geopolymer binder is that it emits up to nine times less CO2 than Portland Cement.

  14. Determination of binder distributions in green-state ceramics by NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, L.; Ackerman, J.L.; Ellingson, W.A.; Weyand, J.D.

    1988-03-01

    The manufacture of reliable high performance structural ceramics requires a good understanding of the different steps involved in the process. The presence of nonuniformities in the distribution of the polymeric binder could give rise to local fluctuations of density that could produce failure of the ceramic piece. Specimens prepared from Al 2 O 3 with 15 and 2.5% ww binder were imaged using NMR in order to measure binder distribution maps. Results show that NMR imaging could be a useful technique to nondestructively evaluate the quality of green-state specimens. 5 refs., 5 figs

  15. Compact Representation for Specific Heat of Interacting Fermion Systems in Terms of Fully Renormalized Matsubara Green Function

    OpenAIRE

    Miyake, Kazumasa; Tsuruta, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of the Luttinger-Ward formalism for the thermodynamic potential, the specific heat of single-component interacting fermion systems with fixed chemical potential is compactly expressed in terms of the fully renormalized Matsubara Green function.

  16. Study of green state ceramics damage by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerboul, Genevieve

    1992-01-01

    Dry pressing is a delicate operation of the conventional process of elaboration of ceramic materials as most of the detected defects in sintered products are appearing during it, this research thesis reports the study of ceramic powder forming by using the non destructive technique of acoustic emission to detect defects in pressed samples as soon as they initiate. An original signal processing system has also been designed to analyse the effective value of acoustic signals emitted during pressing on industrial hydraulic presses, but comprising a single tooling. Three powders have been tested: UO_2, Al_2O_3 and a UO_2-PuO_2 mixture. In a first part, the author recalls some elements regarding the fabrication of nuclear fuel, knowledge on powder pressing, and general principles of acoustic emission. She reports a feasibility study and then defines experimental conditions. In the second part, she presents acoustic emission periods during a pressing cycle, and reports the study of the response of flawless and flawed pressed samples. She reports the examination of their evolution with respect to powder nature and to fabrication process parameters. She reports a detailed analysis of acoustic emission parameters as a basis to define the principle of operation of an in situ and real time detection of flawed pressed samples [fr

  17. The Y2BaCuO5 oxide as green pigment in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, F.; Colon, C.; Duran, A.; Barajas, R.; Llopis, J.; Paje, S.E.; Saez-Puche, R.; Julian, I.

    1998-01-01

    Fine particles of green yttrium-barium-copper-oxide pigments Y 2 BaCuO 5 have been prepared using two different synthesis methods. The process of combustion of mixed nitrates and urea needs a maximal temperature of 900 C and provides samples formed by aggregates of homogeneous small particles with a size of about 0.3 μm. However, the ceramic method requires 1050 C as synthesis temperature, and yields rather higher particle sizes. Even after grinding, these samples are formed by heterogeneous particles with mean sizes of about 3 μm. Diffuse reflectance spectra reveal that the samples obtained using the former method present a higher brilliancy, so they have been selected to be tested as green pigment in ceramics with good results. (orig.)

  18. Laser ultrasonics for bulk-density distribution measurement on green ceramic tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, G. M.; Cavuto, A.; Pandarese, G.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper a Laser Ultrasonics (LUT) system is developed and applied to measure bulk density distribution of green ceramic tiles, which are porous materials with low heat conductivity. Bulk density of green ceramic bodies is a fundamental parameter to be kept under control in the industrial production of ceramic tiles. The LUT system proposed is based on a Nd:YAG pulsed laser for excitation and an air-coupled electro-capacitive transducer for detection. The paper reports experimental apparent bulk-density measurements on white ceramic bodies after a calibration procedures. The performances observed are better than those previously achieved by authors using air-coupled ultrasonic probes for both emission and detection, allowing to reduce average uncertainty down to about ±6 kg/m3 (±0.3%), thanks to the increase in excitation efficiency and lateral resolution, while maintaining potential flexibility for on-line application. The laser ultrasonic procedure proposed is available for both on-line and off-line application. In this last case it is possible to obtain bulk density maps with high spatial resolution by a 2D scan without interrupting the production process.

  19. Compact, Lightweight, Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Based Acoustic Liners for Reducing Subsonic Jet Aircraft Engine Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, J. Douglas; Grady, Joseph E.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments have reduced fan and jet noise contributions to overall subsonic aircraft jet-engine noise. Now, aircraft designers are turning their attention toward reducing engine core noise. The NASA Glenn Research Center and NASA Langley Research Center have teamed to investigate the development of a compact, lightweight acoustic liner based on oxide/oxide ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials. The NASA team has built upon an existing oxide/oxide CMC sandwich structure concept that provides monotonal noise reduction. Oxide/oxide composites have good high temperature strength and oxidation resistance, which could allow them to perform as core liners at temperatures up to 1000C (1832F), and even higher depending on the selection of the composite constituents. NASA has initiated the evaluation of CMC-based liners that use cells of different lengths (variable-depth channels) or effective lengths to achieve broadband noise reduction. Reducing the overall liner thickness is also a major goal, to minimize the volume occupied by the liner. As a first step toward demonstrating the feasibility of our concepts, an oxide/oxide CMC acoustic testing article with different channel lengths was tested. Our approach, summary of test results, current status, and goals for the future are reported.

  20. The Effect of Plasma Surface Treatment on a Porous Green Ceramic Film with Polymeric Binder Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun Jeong Woo

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and energy during thermal binder removal in the ceramic process, plasma surface treatment was applied before the lamination process. The adhesion strength in the lamination films was enhanced by oxidative plasma treatment of the porous green ceramic film with polymeric binding materials. The oxygen plasma characteristics were investigated through experimental parameters and weight loss analysis. The experimental results revealed the need for parameter analysis, including gas material, process time, flow rate, and discharge power, and supported a mechanism consisting of competing ablation and deposition processes. The weight loss analysis was conducted for cyclic plasma treatment rather than continuous plasma treatment for the purpose of improving the film's permeability by suppressing deposition of the ablated species. The cyclic plasma treatment improved the permeability compared to the continuous plasma treatment.

  1. Comparison of x-ray computed tomography, through-transmission ultrasound, and low-kV x-ray imaging for characterizing green-state ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.A.; Ellingson, W.A.; Vannier, M.W.

    1985-06-01

    Green-state MgAl 2 O 4 compact disk specimens have been studied by x-ray computed tomography (CT), through-transmission pulsed ultrasound, and low-kV x-ray imaging to compare the abilities of these nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods to detect flaws and density variations. X-ray computed tomographic images were obtained from a 125-kV (peak) imaging system with a 512 x 512 matrix and a pixel size of 100 μm. A 3- to 10- MHz focused-beam ultrasonic transducer was used, together with special immersion techniques, to obtain topographical maps of acoustic attenuation and phase velocity; a 30 x 30 matrix was used in the ultrasonic scans. A 35-kV x-ray system with high-resolution type RR film was used to obtain conventional radiographs. Large-scale nonuniform density gradients were detected with CT and ultrasonics in supposedly uniform ceramic disks. In addition, inclusions in the green-state samples were detected by all three methods, with each method providing certain advantages. The influence of grain structure and other ceramic powder characteristics will be examined in the future. 5 refs., 9 figs

  2. ENHANCED WARM H2 EMISSION IN THE COMPACT GROUP MID-INFRARED ''GREEN VALLEY''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluver, M. E.; Ogle, P.; Guillard, P.; Appleton, P. N.; Jarrett, T. H.; Rasmussen, J.; Lisenfeld, U.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Antonucci, R.; Bitsakis, T.; Charmandaris, V.; Boulanger, F.; Egami, E.; Xu, C. K.; Yun, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from a Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopy study of a sample of 74 galaxies located in 23 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs), chosen to be at a dynamically active stage of H I depletion. We find evidence for enhanced warm H 2 emission (i.e., above that associated with UV excitation in star-forming regions) in 14 galaxies (∼20%), with 8 galaxies having extreme values of L(H 2 S(0)-S(3))/L(7.7 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon), in excess of 0.07. Such emission has been seen previously in the compact group HCG 92 (Stephan's Quintet), and was shown to be associated with the dissipation of mechanical energy associated with a large-scale shock caused when one group member collided, at high velocity, with tidal debris in the intragroup medium. Similarly, shock excitation or turbulent heating is likely responsible for the enhanced H 2 emission in the compact group galaxies, since other sources of heating (UV or X-ray excitation from star formation or active galactic nuclei) are insufficient to account for the observed emission. The group galaxies fall predominantly in a region of mid-infrared color-color space identified by previous studies as being connected to rapid transformations in HCG galaxy evolution. Furthermore, the majority of H 2 -enhanced galaxies lie in the optical ''green valley'' between the blue cloud and red sequence, and are primarily early-type disk systems. We suggest that H 2 -enhanced systems may represent a specific phase in the evolution of galaxies in dense environments and provide new insight into mechanisms which transform galaxies onto the optical red sequence.

  3. Superconducting glass-ceramics in BiSrCaCu2Al0.5Ox---Comparison between rod and powder compacted specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, K.; Abe, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Superconducting properties are studied for glass-ceramics which were prepared by reheating glass rods and the glass powder compacts in the BiSrCaCu 2 Al 0.5 O x system, respectively. The glass-ceramic rod specimens obtained by reheating rod glass at 800--830 degree C for 50 h have a T c (R=0) of 85 K, while the disk specimens obtained by reheating the powered glass compacts in the same way do not exhibit superconductivity above 77 K. This difference in superconductivity between the specimens is discussed in terms of crystallization process and the amount of oxygen absorption of the specimens during heating

  4. ZnTiO3 ceramic nanopowder microstructure changes during compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labus N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnTiO3 nanopowder as a constitutive component in compact production was primarily characterized. Scanning electron micrographs of as received powder were recorded. Mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption were also performed on loose powder. Particle size distribution in a water powder suspension was determined with a laser particle size analyser. Compaction was performed on different pressures in a range from 100 to 400 MPa using the uniaxial double sided compaction technique without binder and lubricant. Micrographs of compacted specimens were obtained using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Pore size distribution was also determined by mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption. Results revealed that with increasing pressure during compaction interagglomerate pores diminish in size until they reach some critical diameter related to the intra-agglomerate pore size.

  5. Decision Making on Allocating Urban Green Spaces Based upon Spatially-Varying Relationships between Urban Green Spaces and Urban Compaction Degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Sheng Chang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The compact city is becoming a prevailing paradigm in the world to control urban sprawl and achieve a pattern of sustainable urban development. However, discussions of the area's overcrowded neighborhoods, its health problems, and the destruction of its green areas have inspired self-examination with respect to the compact city paradigm. High population density attracts even more residents and frequently renders the existing urban green space (UGS insufficient for use as part of a living environment. Due to the unique benefits that these qualities confer, UGS allocation is now considered a significant contributing factor to urban livability. In addition, the UGS allocation may be different due to the presence of many spatial non-stationarity processes. Therefore, this study employs geographically-weighted regression (GWR to explore the unique and spatially-explicit relationships between the degree of urban compaction and UGS within the Taipei metropolitan area. Maps summarizing the GWR results demonstrate that there is significantly insufficient UGS allocation in the central area, which consists mainly of Taipei City. Townships with higher parameters contain UGS levels that better meet the needs of their residents. Overall, the exploration of conceptualizing spatial heterogeneity of relationships between the degree of urban compaction and UGS can provide insightful analyses for decision-making on allocating UGS.

  6. Development of ceramics based fuel, Phase I, Kinetics of UO2 sintering by vibration compacting of UO2 powder (Introductory report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, M.M.

    1962-10-01

    After completing the Phase I of the task related to development of ceramics nuclear fuel the following reports are presented: Kinetics of UO 2 sintering; Vibrational compacting and sintering of UO 2 ; Characterisation of of UO 2 powder by DDK and TGA methods; Separation of UO 2 powder

  7. Investigation on the effect of lubrication and forming parameters to the green compact generated from iron powder through warm forming route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.M.; Nor, S.S.M.; Rahman, H.Y.

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate green compacts of iron ASC 100.29 powder at above ambient temperature and below its recrystallization temperature, a warm compaction rig is designed and fabricated which can be operated at various temperature and load. The aim of this paper is to present the outcomes of an investigation on the effect of lubrication and forming parameters, i.e., load and temperature to the green compacts generated through warm compaction route. The feedstock was prepared by mechanically mixing the main powder constituent, i.e., iron ASC 100.29 powder with different weight percent of zinc stearate at different mixing time. Compaction load was varied from 105 kN to 125 kN using simultaneous compaction mechanism. The microstructures of the green compacts were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and the mechanical properties are measured through density measurement, hardness test and electrical conductivity test. The study found that increase in compaction load as well as forming temperature give improved microstructure and mechanical properties. It is also found that effects of lubrication to the mechanical properties of green compacts are strongly dependant on the lubricant content as well as mixing time of iron powder with the lubricant.

  8. GREEN PEA GALAXIES AND COHORTS: LUMINOUS COMPACT EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izotov, Yuri I.; Guseva, Natalia G.; Thuan, Trinh X.

    2011-01-01

    We present a large sample of 803 star-forming luminous compact galaxies (LCGs) in the redshift range z = 0.02-0.63, selected from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The global properties of these galaxies are similar to those of the so-called green pea star-forming galaxies in the redshift range z = 0.112-0.360 and selected from the SDSS on the basis of their green color and compact structure. In contrast to green pea galaxies, our LCGs are selected on the basis of both their spectroscopic and photometric properties, resulting in a ∼10 times larger sample, with galaxies spanning a redshift range ∼>2 times larger. We find that the oxygen abundances and the heavy element abundance ratios in LCGs do not differ from those of nearby low-metallicity blue compact dwarf galaxies. The median stellar mass of LCGs is ∼10 9 M sun . However, for galaxies with high EW(Hβ), ≥ 100 A, it is only ∼7 x 10 8 M sun . The star formation rate in LCGs varies in the large range of 0.7-60 M sun yr -1 , with a median value of ∼4 M sun yr -1 , a factor of ∼3 lower than in high-redshift star-forming galaxies at z ∼> 3. The specific star formation rates in LCGs are extremely high and vary in the range ∼10 -9 -10 -7 yr -1 , comparable to those derived in high-redshift galaxies.

  9. Study on the effect of Shahin-Dezh green Tuff on the mechanical characteristics of roller compact concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Dardaei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the growing popularity of concrete structure and increasing use of them, especially Roller compacted concrete, applying Pozzolan and replacing cement with Pozzolan is very important. Nowadays, the use of the additive for cement replacement is common in RCC mix design due to its technical advantages and economic benefits as there is large quantity of Pozzolan mineral resources in Iran. In this paper the impact of produced concrete has been fully considered as well as the effect of this Pozzolan on the compressive strength, tensile strength and permeability by using green Tuff obtained from available Pozzolan in western Azarbaijan. The due results prove that Shahin-Dezh green Tuff improves concretes quality.

  10. Pump-Fed, Compact, High Performance Green Propulsion System for Secondary Payloads, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flight Works is proposing to expand its micropump-fed propulsion technology to the development of a low cost, compact, low tank pressure, high performance LPM-103S...

  11. Growth and characterization of red-green-blue cathodoluminescent ceramic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzi, Daniele; Latini, Alessandro; Salviati, Giancarlo; Armani, Nicola

    2006-06-01

    Gd2O3 and Y2O3 films, respectively, doped with Eu3+, Tb3+, and Tm3+ have been grown by the electron beam physical vapor codeposition technique on optically polished quartz substrates. The film samples have been doped at different concentrations by the corresponding rare-earth oxides. The concentration range explored is from 0.9% to 9.8% on 18 samples. For each film sample an extended characterization has been performed by thin film-x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy, cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, and color coordinate analysis. Y2O3 films display the most intense red-green-blue (RGB) emission and their film morphology and structure are more compact and crystalline with respect to Gd2O3 monoclinic films. Eu3+ and Tb3+ doped Y2O3 films grow oriented along the (222) direction. The ratios between the intensities of the electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions have been also evaluated. The blue emission of Tm3+ doped Gd2O3 is lacking in the dopant concentration range from 1.6% to 7.6%, whereas it is present in Tm3+ doped Y2O3 films, at approximately the same dopant concentration range (1.9%-9.8%). Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage plot of the color coordinates of all the RGB film samples has been reported together with the RGB phosphor standard used in cathodic ray tube TV screens.

  12. Compaction and Plasticity Comparative Behaviour of Soft Clay Treated with Coarse and Fine Sizes of Ceramic Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bared, Mohammed Ali Mohammed; Marto, Aminaton; Sati Hamonangan Harahap, Indra; Kasim, Fauziah

    2018-03-01

    Recycled blended ceramic tiles (RBT) is a waste material produced from ceramic tile factories and construction activities. RBT is found to be cost effective, sustainable, environmental-friendly and has the potential to be used as an additive in soft soil stabilization. Recent reports show that massive amounts of RBT are dumped into legal or illegal landfills every year consuming very large spaces and creating major environmental problems. On the other hand, dredged marine clay obtained from Nusajaya, Johor, Malaysia has weak physical and engineering characteristics to be considered as unsuitable soft soil that is usually excavated, dumped into landfills and replaced by stiff soil. Hence, this study investigates the suitability of possible uses of RBT to treat marine clay. Laboratory tests included Standard proctor tests and Atterberg limits tests. The plasticity of marine clay was evaluated by adding 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 0.3 mm RBT. In addition, the compaction behaviour of treated marine clay was compared by adding two different sizes (0.3 mm and 1.18 mm diameter) of RBT. For both coarse and fine sizes of RBT, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of the dry weight of the soft clay were added. The mixture of each combination was examined in order to evaluate the Maximum Dry Density (MDD) and the optimum moisture content (OMC) for the treated soft clay. MDD and OMC for soft untreated samples were 1.59 Mg/m3 and 22%, respectively. Treated samples with 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 0.30 mm size RBT resulted in a significant reduction of OMC ranged from 19 to 15% while MDD resulted in increment ranged from 1.69 to 1.77 Mg/m3. In addition, samples treated with 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 1.18 mm size RBT resulted in major reduction of OMC ranged from 15 to 13.5% while MDD increased effectively from 1.75 to 1.82 Mg/m3. For all mix designs of soft clay-RBT, MDD was gradually increasing and OMC was sharply reducing with further increments of both sizes of RBT.

  13. Compaction and Plasticity Comparative Behaviour of Soft Clay Treated with Coarse and Fine Sizes of Ceramic Tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bared Mohammed Ali Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycled blended ceramic tiles (RBT is a waste material produced from ceramic tile factories and construction activities. RBT is found to be cost effective, sustainable, environmental-friendly and has the potential to be used as an additive in soft soil stabilization. Recent reports show that massive amounts of RBT are dumped into legal or illegal landfills every year consuming very large spaces and creating major environmental problems. On the other hand, dredged marine clay obtained from Nusajaya, Johor, Malaysia has weak physical and engineering characteristics to be considered as unsuitable soft soil that is usually excavated, dumped into landfills and replaced by stiff soil. Hence, this study investigates the suitability of possible uses of RBT to treat marine clay. Laboratory tests included Standard proctor tests and Atterberg limits tests. The plasticity of marine clay was evaluated by adding 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 0.3 mm RBT. In addition, the compaction behaviour of treated marine clay was compared by adding two different sizes (0.3 mm and 1.18 mm diameter of RBT. For both coarse and fine sizes of RBT, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of the dry weight of the soft clay were added. The mixture of each combination was examined in order to evaluate the Maximum Dry Density (MDD and the optimum moisture content (OMC for the treated soft clay. MDD and OMC for soft untreated samples were 1.59 Mg/m3 and 22%, respectively. Treated samples with 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 0.30 mm size RBT resulted in a significant reduction of OMC ranged from 19 to 15% while MDD resulted in increment ranged from 1.69 to 1.77 Mg/m3. In addition, samples treated with 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 1.18 mm size RBT resulted in major reduction of OMC ranged from 15 to 13.5% while MDD increased effectively from 1.75 to 1.82 Mg/m3. For all mix designs of soft clay-RBT, MDD was gradually increasing and OMC was sharply reducing with further increments of both sizes of RBT.

  14. The Powdering Process with a Set of Ceramic Mills for Green Tea Promoted Catechin Extraction and the ROS Inhibition Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki Fujioka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For serving green tea, there are two prominent methods: steeping the leaf or the powdered leaf (matcha style in hot water. The purpose of the present study was to reveal chemical and functional differences before and after the powdering process of green tea leaf, since powdered green tea may contribute to expanding the functionality because of the different ingesting style. In this study, we revealed that the powdering process with a ceramic mill and stirring in hot water increased the average extracted concentration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG by more than three times compared with that in leaf tea using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and liquid chromatography–tandem mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analyses. Moreover, powdered green tea has a higher inhibition effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS production in vitro compared with the same amount of leaf tea. Our data suggest that powdered green tea might have a different function from leaf tea due to the higher catechin contents and particles.

  15. Quality and seasonal variation of rainwater harvested from concrete, asphalt, ceramic tile and green roofs in Chongqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianqian; Wang, Xiaoke; Hou, Peiqiang; Wan, Wuxing; Li, Ruida; Ren, Yufen; Ouyang, Zhiyun

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent requirement to examine the quality of harvested rainwater for potable and non-potable purposes, based on the type of roofing material. In this study, we examined the effect on the quality of harvested rainwater of conventional roofing materials (concrete, asphalt and ceramic tile roofs) compared with alternative roofing materials (green roof). The results showed that the ceramic tile roof was the most suitable for rainwater-harvesting applications because of the lower concentrations of leachable pollutants. However, in this study, the green roof was not suitable for rainwater harvesting applications. In addition, seasonal trends in water quality parameters showed that pollutants in roof runoff in summer and autumn were lower than those in winter and spring. This study revealed that the quality of harvested rainwater was significantly affected by the roofing material; therefore, local government and urban planners should develop stricter testing programs and produce more weathering resistant roofing materials to allow the harvesting of rainwater for domestic and public uses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Optical thermometry based on green upconversion emission in Er3+/Yb3+ codoped BaGdF5 glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting; Zhao, Shilong; Lei, Ruoshan; Huang, Lihui; Xu, Shiqing

    2018-02-01

    Er3+/Yb3+ codoped BaGdF5 glass ceramics have been prepared and used to develop a portable all-fiber temperature sensor based on fluorescence intensity ratio technique. XRD and TEM results affirm the generation of BaGdF5 nanocrystals in the borosilicate glass. Eu3+ ions are used as spectral probe to investigate external environment around rare earth (RE) ions. Intense green upconversion emissions from Er3+ ions are detected in the BaGdF5 glass ceramics and their intensity are enhanced about three orders of magnitude after heat treatment, which is attributed to the enrichment of RE ions in the BaGdF5 phase. Based on green upconversion emission from Er3+ ions, the temperature sensing property of the portable all-fiber temperature sensor is studied. The maximum absolute sensitivity is 15.5 × 10-4 K-1 at 567 K and the relative sensitivity is 1.28% K-1 at 298 K, respectively.

  17. Bluish-green color emitting Ba2Si3O8:Eu2+ ceramic phosphors for white light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, F; Xue, Y N; Zhang, Q Y

    2009-10-15

    This paper reports on the structural and optical properties of Eu(2+) activated Ba(2)Si(3)O(8) ceramic phosphors synthesized by a sol-gel method. The ceramic phosphors have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and fluorescence measurements. The structural characterization results suggest that the as-prepared phosphors are of single phase monoclinic Ba(2)Si(3)O(8) with rod-like morphology. A broad excitation band ranging from 300 to 410 nm matches well with the ultraviolet (UV) radiation of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Upon 380 nm UV light excitation, these phosphors emit bluish-green emission centered at 500 nm with color coordination (x=0.25, y=0.40). All the obtained results indicate that the Ba(2)Si(3)O(8):Eu(2+) ceramic phosphors are promising bluish-green candidates for the phosphor-converted white LEDs.

  18. Formulation and screen printing of water based conductive flake silver pastes onto green ceramic tapes for electronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faddoul, Rita; Reverdy-Bruas, Nadège; Blayo, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Formulation of water-based pastes. ► Viscosity, yield stress, elastic and viscous modulus determination. ► Screen printing onto green ceramic tapes. ► Rheology effect on line dimensions and electrical properties. ► Resistivity ∼18–33 nΩ m. Minimum width ∼60 μm after sintering. - Abstract: Environmentally friendly, water-based silver pastes, adapted for screen printing, were formulated with different silver contents (67–75%). These pastes allowed screen printing onto low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) of narrow conductive tracks with a 60 μm line width and a 3 × 10 −8 Ω m electrical resistivity. Inks were formulated with a mixture of spherical and flake shape silver particles with 2–4 μm mean diameter. Rheological behaviour of pastes was studied in order to determine its effect on printed lines properties. Prepared inks were then screen printed and sintered under normal atmosphere at 875 °C. As expected, electrical properties depended on silver content. Resistivity values varying from 1.6 × 10 −8 to 3.3 × 10 −8 Ω m were calculated over 36.3 cm line length. These values are very close to bulk silver resistivity (1.6 × 10 −8 Ω m). Compared to previous research and commercial pastes, the newly formulated pastes reached equivalent or even better conductivities with lower silver content (70% by weight).

  19. Characterization by X-ray tomography of granulated alumina powder during in situ die compaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrino, Sandrine; Jorand, Yves, E-mail: yves.jorand@insa-lyon.fr; Maire, Eric; Adrien, Jérôme

    2013-07-15

    Compaction process, the aim of which being to obtain green bodies with low porosity and small size, is often used before sintering treatment. Prior to die filling, the ceramic powder is generally granulated to improve flowability. However during compaction, density heterogeneity and critical size defects may appear due to intergranule and granule-die wall frictions. In this work, the influence of granule formulation on the compact morphology has been studied. To do so, a compaction setup was installed inside an X-ray tomography equipment so that the evolution of the compact morphology could be analysed during the whole compaction process. We have demonstrated that high humidity rate and the addition of binder in the granule formulation increase density heterogeneity and generate larger defects. - Highlights: • An original compaction set up was installed inside an X-Ray tomography equipment. • The compaction process of granulated ceramic powder is imaged. • The compact green microstructure is quantified and related to the compaction stages. • The most detrimental defects of dry-pressed parts are caused by hollow granules. • Formulations without binder allow a reduction of the number of large defects.

  20. Pressure slip casting and cold isostatic pressing of aluminum titanate green ceramics: A comparative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Papitha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum titanate (Al2TiO5 green bodies were prepared from mixture of titania and alumina powders with different particle sizes by conventional slip casting (CSC, pressure slip casting (PSC and cold isostatic pressing (CIP. Precursor-powder mixtures were evaluated with respect to the powder properties, flow behaviours and shaping parameters. Green densities were measured and correlated with the fractographs. A substantial increase in green densities up to 60 %TD (theoretical density of 4.02 g/cm3, calculated based on rule of mixtures is observed with the application of 2–3 MPa pressure with PSC. While particle size distribution and solid loading are the most influential parameters in the case of CSC, with PSC pressure also plays a key role in achieving the higher green densities. Being a dry process, high pressure of > 100 MPa for CIP is essential to achieve densities in the range of 60–65 %TD. Slip pressurization under PSC conditions facilitate the rearrangement of particles through rolling, twisting and interlocking unlike CIP processing where pressure is needed to overcome the inter-particle friction.

  1. Mesoscale simulations of shock compaction of a granular ceramic: effects of mesostructure and mixed-cell strength treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, J. G.; LaJeunesse, J. W.; Davison, T. M.; Borg, J. P.; Collins, G. S.

    2018-04-01

    The shock response of granular materials is important in a variety of contexts but the precise dynamics of grains during compaction is poorly understood. Here we use 2D mesoscale numerical simulations of the shock compaction of granular tungsten carbide to investigate the effect of internal structure within the particle bed and ‘stiction’ between grains on the shock response. An increase in the average number of contacts with other particles, per particle, tends to shift the Hugoniot to higher shock velocities, lower particle velocities and lower densities. This shift is sensitive to inter-particle shear resistance. Eulerian shock physics codes approximate friction between, and interlocking of, grains with their treatment of mixed cell strength (stiction) and here we show that this has a significant effect on the shock response. When studying the compaction of particle beds it is not common to quantify the pre-compaction internal structure, yet our results suggest that such differences should be taken into account, either by using identical beds or by averaging results over multiple experiments.

  2. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  3. Enhanced green upconversion by controlled ceramization of Er3+–Yb3+ co-doped sodium niobium tellurite glass–ceramics for low temperature sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Kumar, J.; Pavani, K.; Graça, M.P.F.; Soares, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Upconversion luminescence improved in glass–ceramics compared to host glass. • Judd–Ofelt and radiative parameters calculated. • NIR decay curve results concur the results of improved luminescence. • Temperature dependent upconversion support the use of materials for sensors. - Abstract: Tellurite based glasses are well-known for their upconversion properties besides having a disadvantage of low mechanical strength dragging them away from practical applications. The present work deals with preparation of sodium niobium tellurite (SNT) glasses using melt quenching method, in which small quantities of boron and silicon in the form of oxides are added to improve their mechanical properties. Controlled heat treatment is performed to ceramize the prepared glasses based on the thermal data given by DTA. XRD and SEM profiles of the glass–ceramics which confirmed the formation of crystalline monoclinic Sodium Tellurium Niobium Oxide (Na 1.4 Nb 3 Te 4.9 O 18 ) phase (JCPDS card No. 04–011-7556). Upconversion measurements in the visible region were made for the prepared Er 3+ –Yb 3+ co-doped glasses and glass–ceramics with 980 nm laser excitation varying the laser power and concentration of Er 3+ ions. Results showed that the upconversion luminescence intensity was enhanced by ten times in SNT glass–ceramics compared to that in the SNT glasses. Decay curves give evidence of high performance of glass–ceramics compared to glasses due to ceramization and structural changes. Temperature dependent visible upconversion was performed to test the ability of efficient SNT glass–ceramic at low temperatures and variation of upconversion intensities was studied

  4. Ho-doped SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} multifunctional ceramics with bright green emission and good electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Lei; Hao, Jigong; Li, Wei [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng (China); Xu, Zhijun; Chu, Ruiqing [School of Environmental and Materials Engineering, Yantai University, Yantai (China)

    2017-10-15

    Ho{sup 3+}-doped SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} multifunctional ferroelectric ceramics with bright green light emission and good electrical properties were fabricated in this work. Under blue light excitation, samples showed bright green light with two typical emission bands: a strong green emission centered at 545 nm corresponding to the intra f-f transition from the excited {sup 5}S{sub 2} to the ground state {sup 5}I{sub 8} and a relatively weak red emission located 653 nm induced by the {sup 5}F{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 8} transition of Ho{sup 3+}. Due to the concentration quenching effect, the intensity of emission was strongly dependent on the doping concentration. Furthermore, the electrical properties have improved by Ho{sup 3+} doping. At x = 0.004, samples exhibit optimal electrical properties with high Curie temperature (T{sub c} = 441 C) and large 2P{sub r} and d{sub 33} values (2P{sub r} = 15.54 μC cm{sup -2}, d{sub 33} = 19 pC/N). These results demonstrate that the SBN-xHo ceramics possess excellent multifunctional properties to achieve a variety of applications. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Building ceramics with improved thermal insulation parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzepa Karol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important performance characteristics of masonry units is their high thermal insulation. There are many different ways to improve this parameter, however the most popular methods in case of ceramic masonry units are: addition of pore-creating raw materials and application of proper hole pattern. This study was an attempt to improve thermal insulation of ceramics by applying thermal insulation additives. Perlite dust created as a subgrain from expansion of perlite rock was used. Perlite subgrain is not very popular among consumers, that’s why it’s subjected to granulation to obtain coarse grain. The authors presented concept of direct application of perlite dust for the production of building ceramics with improved thermal insulation. Fineness of this additive is asset for molding of ceramic materials from plastic masses. Based on the results it was found that about 70% perlite by volume can be added to obtain material with a coefficient of heat conductivity of 0,37 W/mK. Higher content of this additive in ceramic mass causes deterioration of its rheological properties. Mass loses its plasticity, it tears up and formed green bodies are susceptible to deformation. During sintering perlite takes an active part in compaction process. Higher sintering dynamics is caused by: high content of alkali oxides in perlite and glass nature of perlite. Alkali oxides generate creation of liquid phase which intensifies mass compaction processes. Active role of perlite in sintering process causes good connection of its grains with clay groundwork which is important factor for mechanical parameters of ceramic materials. It was also noted that addition of perlite above 40% by volume of mass effectively neutralized negative effect of efflorescence in ceramic materials.

  6. green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The “green” topic follows the “youngsters”, which is quite natural for the Russian language.Traditionally these words put together sound slightly derogatory. However, “green” also means fresh, new and healthy.For Russia, and for Siberia in particular, “green” architecture does sound new and fresh. Forced by the anxious reality, we are addressing this topic intentionally. The ecological crisis, growing energy prices, water, air and food deficits… Alexander Rappaport, our regular author, writes: “ It has been tolerable until a certain time, but under transition to the global civilization, as the nature is destroyed, and swellings of megapolises expand incredibly fast, the size and the significance of all these problems may grow a hundredfold”.However, for this very severe Siberian reality the newness of “green” architecture may turn out to be well-forgotten old. A traditional Siberian house used to be built on principles of saving and environmental friendliness– one could not survive in Siberia otherwise.Probably, in our turbulent times, it is high time to fasten “green belts”. But we should keep from enthusiastic sticking of popular green labels or repainting of signboards into green color. We should avoid being drowned in paper formalities under “green” slogans. And we should prevent the Earth from turning into the planet “Kin-dza-dza”.

  7. Optimization and Surface Modification of Al-6351 Alloy Using SiC-Cu Green Compact Electrode by Electro Discharge Coating Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sujoy; Kar, Siddhartha; Dey, Vidyut; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar

    2017-06-01

    This paper introduces the surface modification of Al-6351 alloy by green compact SiC-Cu electrode using electro-discharge coating (EDC) process. A Taguchi L-16 orthogonal array is employed to investigate the process by varying tool parameters like composition and compaction load and electro-discharge machining (EDM) parameters like pulse-on time and peak current. Material deposition rate (MDR), tool wear rate (TWR) and surface roughness (SR) are measured on the coated specimens. An optimum condition is achieved by formulating overall evaluation criteria (OEC), which combines multi-objective task into a single index. The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, and the analysis of variance (ANOVA) is employed to investigate the effect of relevant process parameters. A confirmation test is conducted based on optimal process parameters and experimental results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of this approach. The modified surface is characterized by optical microscope and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. XRD analysis of the deposited layer confirmed the transfer of tool materials to the work surface and formation of inter-metallic phases. The micro-hardness of the resulting composite layer is also measured which is 1.5-3 times more than work material’s one and highest layer thickness (LT) of 83.644μm has been successfully achieved.

  8. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the chlorophycean green alga Scenedesmus obliquus reveals a compact gene organization and a biased distribution of genes on the two DNA strands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cambiaire, Jean-Charles; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude; Turmel, Monique

    2006-01-01

    Background The phylum Chlorophyta contains the majority of the green algae and is divided into four classes. While the basal position of the Prasinophyceae is well established, the divergence order of the Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Chlorophyceae (UTC) remains uncertain. The five complete chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequences currently available for representatives of these classes display considerable variability in overall structure, gene content, gene density, intron content and gene order. Among these genomes, that of the chlorophycean green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has retained the least ancestral features. The two single-copy regions, which are separated from one another by the large inverted repeat (IR), have similar sizes, rather than unequal sizes, and differ radically in both gene contents and gene organizations relative to the single-copy regions of prasinophyte and ulvophyte cpDNAs. To gain insights into the various changes that underwent the chloroplast genome during the evolution of chlorophycean green algae, we have sequenced the cpDNA of Scenedesmus obliquus, a member of a distinct chlorophycean lineage. Results The 161,452 bp IR-containing genome of Scenedesmus features single-copy regions of similar sizes, encodes 96 genes, i.e. only two additional genes (infA and rpl12) relative to its Chlamydomonas homologue and contains seven group I and two group II introns. It is clearly more compact than the four UTC algal cpDNAs that have been examined so far, displays the lowest proportion of short repeats among these algae and shows a stronger bias in clustering of genes on the same DNA strand compared to Chlamydomonas cpDNA. Like the latter genome, Scenedesmus cpDNA displays only a few ancestral gene clusters. The two chlorophycean genomes share 11 gene clusters that are not found in previously sequenced trebouxiophyte and ulvophyte cpDNAs as well as a few genes that have an unusual structure; however, their single-copy regions differ

  9. Development of ceramics based fuel, Phase I, Kinetics of UO{sub 2} sintering by vibration compacting of UO{sub 2} powder (Introductory report); Razvoj goriva na bazi keramike, I faza, Kinetika sinterovanja UO{sub 2} vibraciono kompaktiranje praha UO{sub 2} (Uvodni izvestaj)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, M M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Laboratorija za reaktorske materijale, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-10-15

    After completing the Phase I of the task related to development of ceramics nuclear fuel the following reports are presented: Kinetics of UO{sub 2} sintering; Vibrational compacting and sintering of UO{sub 2}; Characterisation of of UO{sub 2} powder by DDK and TGA methods; Separation of UO{sub 2} powder.

  10. In situ-growth of silica nanowires in ceramic carbon composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the processing and microstructure of ceramic–carbon composites is critical to development of these composites for applications needing electrically conducting, thermal shock resistant ceramic materials. In the present study green compacts of carbon ceramic composites were prepared either by slurry processing or dry powder blending of one or more of the three — clay, glass, alumina and carbon black or graphite. The dried green compacts were sintered at 1400 °C in flowing argon. The ceramic carbon composites except the ones without clay addition showed formation of silica nanowires. The silica nanowire formation was observed in both samples prepared by slip casting and dry powder compaction containing either carbon black or graphite. TEM micrographs showed presence of carbon at the core of the silica nanowires indicating that carbon served the role of a catalyst. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED suggested that the silica nanowires are amorphous. Prior studies have reported formation of silica nanowires from silicon, silica, silicon carbide but this is the first report ever on formation of silica nanowires from clay.

  11. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  12. Improved ferroelectric/piezoelectric properties and bright green/UC red emission in (Li,Ho)-doped CaBi4Ti4O15 multifunctional ceramics with excellent temperature stability and superior water-resistance performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ping; Guo, Yongquan; Tian, Mijie; Zheng, Qiaoji; Jiang, Na; Wu, Xiaochun; Xia, Zhiguo; Lin, Dunmin

    2015-10-21

    Multifunctional materials based on rare earth ion doped ferro/piezoelectrics have attracted considerable attention in recent years. In this work, new lead-free multifunctional ceramics of Ca1-x(LiHo)x/2Bi4Ti4O15 were prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction method. The great multi-improvement in ferroelectricity/piezoelectricity, down/up-conversion luminescence and temperature stability of the multifunctional properties is induced by the partial substitution of (Li0.5Ho0.5)(2+) for Ca(2+) ions in CaBi4Ti4O15. All the ceramics possess a bismuth-layer structure, and the crystal structure of the ceramics is changed from a four layered bismuth-layer structure to a three-layered structure with the level of (Li0.5Ho0.5)(2+) increasing. The ceramic with x = 0.1 exhibits simultaneously, high resistivity (R = 4.51 × 10(11)Ω cm), good piezoelectricity (d33 = 10.2 pC N(-1)), high Curie temperature (TC = 814 °C), strong ferroelectricity (Pr = 9.03 μC cm(-2)) and enhanced luminescence. These behaviours are greatly associated with the contribution of (Li0.5Ho0.5)(2+) in the ceramics. Under the excitation of 451 nm light, the ceramic with x = 0.1 exhibits a strong green emission peak centered at 545 nm, corresponding to the transition of the (5)S2→(5)I8 level in Ho(3+) ions, while a strong red up-conversion emission band located at 660 nm is observed under the near-infrared excitation of 980 nm at room temperature, arising from the transition of (5)F5→(5)I8 levels in Ho(3+) ions. Surprisingly, the excellent temperature stability of ferroelectricity/piezoelectricity/luminescence and superior water-resistance behaviors of piezoelectricity/luminescence are also obtained in the ceramic with x = 0.1. Our study suggests that the present ceramics may have potential applications in advanced multifunctional devices at high temperature.

  13. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  14. Enhanced green upconversion by controlled ceramization of Er{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} co-doped sodium niobium tellurite glass–ceramics for low temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh Kumar, J., E-mail: suresh@ua.pt; Pavani, K.; Graça, M.P.F.; Soares, M.J.

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • Upconversion luminescence improved in glass–ceramics compared to host glass. • Judd–Ofelt and radiative parameters calculated. • NIR decay curve results concur the results of improved luminescence. • Temperature dependent upconversion support the use of materials for sensors. - Abstract: Tellurite based glasses are well-known for their upconversion properties besides having a disadvantage of low mechanical strength dragging them away from practical applications. The present work deals with preparation of sodium niobium tellurite (SNT) glasses using melt quenching method, in which small quantities of boron and silicon in the form of oxides are added to improve their mechanical properties. Controlled heat treatment is performed to ceramize the prepared glasses based on the thermal data given by DTA. XRD and SEM profiles of the glass–ceramics which confirmed the formation of crystalline monoclinic Sodium Tellurium Niobium Oxide (Na{sub 1.4}Nb{sub 3}Te{sub 4.9}O{sub 18}) phase (JCPDS card No. 04–011-7556). Upconversion measurements in the visible region were made for the prepared Er{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} co-doped glasses and glass–ceramics with 980 nm laser excitation varying the laser power and concentration of Er{sup 3+} ions. Results showed that the upconversion luminescence intensity was enhanced by ten times in SNT glass–ceramics compared to that in the SNT glasses. Decay curves give evidence of high performance of glass–ceramics compared to glasses due to ceramization and structural changes. Temperature dependent visible upconversion was performed to test the ability of efficient SNT glass–ceramic at low temperatures and variation of upconversion intensities was studied.

  15. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  16. Compact vacuum insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  17. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti

  18. Development and sintering of alumina based mixed oxide ceramic products for sensor applications in petroleum industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadava, Y.P.; Muniz, L.B.; Aguiar, L.A.R.; Sanguinetti Ferreira, R.A. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, CEP 50741-530, Recife-PE (Brazil); Albino Aguiar, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, CEP 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    In petroleum production, different types of sensors are required to monitor temperature, pressure, leakage of inflammable gases, etc. These sensors work in very hostile environmental conditions and frequently suffer from abrasion and corrosion problems. Presently perovskite oxide based ceramic materials are increasingly being used for such purposes, due to their highly inert behavior in hostile environment. In the present work, we have developed and characterized alumina based complex perovskite oxide ceramics, Ba{sub 2}AlSnO{sub 5.5}. These ceramics were prepared by solid state reaction process and produced in the form of circular discs by uniaxial pressure compaction technique. Green ceramic bodies were sintered at different sintering temperatures (1200 to 1500 deg. C) in air atmosphere. Structural and microstructural characteristics of sintered Ba{sub 2}AlMO{sub 5.5} were studied by XRD and SEM techniques. Mechanical properties were tested by Vickers microhardness tests. Ceramics sintered in the temperature range 1300 deg. C 1400 deg. C presented best results in terms of microstructural characteristics and mechanical performance. (authors)

  19. Peculiarities of powder brittle media compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perel'nam, V.E.; Aristarkhov, A.I.

    1981-01-01

    The paper is concerned with theoretical and practical aspects of the compaction process for powders of almost unstrained materials. Consideration from the standpoint of compressible body strain mechanics shows that such porous media may have a certain ''threshold'' density. Ductile characteristics of the porous material compacted up to this extent are identical with properties of compacrat bodies, i.e. there is a theoretically substantiated ban on a possibility of their further compaction without changing the state of the powder particle material. Theoretical conclusions are confirmed by results of experimental studies in compaction of titanium- containing ceramics [ru

  20. Synthesis and ceramic processing of alumina and zirconia based composites infiltrated with glass phase for dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Daniel Gomes

    2009-01-01

    The interest for the use of ceramic materials for dental applications started due to the good aesthetic appearance promoted by the similarity to natural teeth. However, the fragility of traditional ceramics was a limitation for their use in stress conditions. The development of alumina and zirconia based materials, that associate aesthetic results, biocompatibility and good mechanical behaviour, makes possible the employment of ceramics for fabrication of dental restorations. The incorporation of vitreous phase in these ceramics is an alternative to minimize the ceramic retraction and to improve the adhesion to resin-based cements, necessary for the union of ceramic frameworks to the remaining dental structure. In the dentistry field, alumina and zirconia ceramic infiltrated with glassy phase are represented commercially by the In-Ceram systems. Considering that the improvement of powder's synthesis routes and of techniques of ceramic processing contributes for good performance of these materials, the goal of the present work is the study of processing conditions of alumina and/or 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics infiltrated with aluminum borosilicate lanthanum glass. The powders, synthesized by hydroxide coprecipitation route, were pressed by uniaxial compaction and pre-sintered at temperature range between 950 and 1650 degree C in order to obtain porous ceramics bodies. Vitreous phase incorporation was performed by impregnation of aluminum borosilicate lanthanum powder, also prepared in this work, followed by heat treatment between 1200 and 1400 degree C .Ceramic powders were characterized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, gaseous adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. Sinterability of alumina and /or stabilized zirconia green pellets was evaluated by dilatometry. Pre-sintered ceramics were characterized by apparent density measurements (Archimedes method), X-ray diffraction and scanning electron

  1. Continuous-wave yellow-green laser at 0.56  μm based on frequency doubling of a diode-end-pumped ceramic Nd:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wenming; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Long; Li, Jiang; Tian, Yubing; Ma, Yufei; Wu, Xiaodong; Ma, Gangfei; Yang, Jianming; Pan, Yubai; Dai, Xianjin

    2015-06-20

    We present what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report on yellow-green laser generation based on the frequency doubling of the 1.1 μm transitions in Nd:YAG ceramics. By employing an 885 nm diode laser as the end-pumping source and a lithium triborate crystal as the frequency doubler, the highest continuous wave output powers of 1.4, 0.5, and 1.1 W at 556, 558, and 561 nm are achieved, respectively. These result in optical-to-optical efficiencies of 6.9%, 2.5%, and 5.4% with respect to the absorbed pump power, respectively.

  2. Rheological properties of ceramic nanopowders in aqueous and nonaqueous suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaszewski, H.; Loiko, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    The potential for ceramic nanocomposites to offer significantly enhanced mechanical properties is generally known since the first work of Niihara published in 1991. However achieving these properties needs carefully done colloidal processing, because ceramic nanopowders are naturally prone to agglomeration. The work presented here is concerned with the processing of zirconia/alumina nanocomposites via aqueous and alumina silicon carbide nanocomposites via nonaqueous colloidal route. The effect of pH of aqueous alumina and zirconia suspensions on properties of suspension and centrifuged green bodies was studied. A correlation between surface electric charge of grains (zeta potential)and agglomerate size, viscosity of suspension and porosity of green compacts was found. In the case of nonaqueous route alumina and silicon carbide suspensions in iso-propanol were investigated. Electrostatic surface charge of grains was changed by addition of chloroacetic acid and determined indirectly by the mass of powder deposited on electrode during electrophoresis. Different behaviour of SiC nanopowder than of alumina was observed and mechanism of charge creation is proposed on the base of DLVO theory. The effect of grain charge on preventing agglomeration on the silicon carbide powder is presented on micrographs of sintered nanocomposites. (author)

  3. NDE of ceramic insulator blanks by radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarvanan, S.; Venkatraman, B.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    The production of ceramic insulators in electrical industry involves a number of steps, one of which is the green blank. The defects such as voids and crack can be present in the extruded green blank. One of the best non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique radiography. This paper deals with the development of methodology based on theoretical modeling for the examination of ceramics by high sensitivity radiography. (author)

  4. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  5. Performances of multi-channel ceramic photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.; Karolak, M.; Piret, Y.; Mouly, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    Ceramic electron multipliers with real metal dynodes and independent channels ware constructed using multilayer ceramic technology. Tests of these prototypes show their capability to form sensitive detectors such as photomultipliers or light intensifiers. Here, we present results for the photocathode sensitivity, dynode activation, gain, linearity range and dynamic characteristics as well as the effect of 3-year aging of the main operational functions. The advantages provided by the ceramic components are discussed. These results motivate the development of a compact 256 pixel ceramic photomultiplier. (author)

  6. Improved compaction of ZnO nano-powder triggered by the presence of acetate and its effect on sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargatz, Benjamin; Gonzalez-Julian, Jesus; Guillon, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    The retention of nanocrystallinity in dense ceramic materials is still a challenge, even with the application of external pressure during sintering. The compaction behavior of high purity and acetate enriched zinc oxide (ZnO) nano-powders was investigated. It was found that acetate in combination with water plays a key role during the compaction into green bodies at moderate temperatures. Application of constant pressure resulted in a homogeneous green body with superior packing density (86% of theoretical value) at moderate temperature (85 °C) in the presence of water. In contrast, no improvement in density could be achieved if pure ZnO powder was used. This compaction behavior offers superior packing of the particles, resulting in a high relative density of the consolidated compact with negligible coarsening. Dissolution accompanying creep diffusion based matter transport is suggested to strongly support reorientation of ZnO particles towards densities beyond the theoretical limit for packing of ideal monosized spheres. Finally, the sintering trajectory reveals that grain growth is retarded compared to conventional processing up to 90% of theoretical density. Moreover, nearly no radial shrinkage was observed after sinter-forging for bodies performed with this advanced processing method.

  7. Method for preparing corrosion-resistant ceramic shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, R.M.; Dusek, J.T.

    1979-12-07

    Ceramic shapes having impermeable tungsten coatings can be used for containing highly corrosive molten alloys and salts. The shapes are prepared by coating damp green ceramic shapes containing a small amount of yttria with a tungsten coating slip which has been adjusted to match the shrinkage rate of the green ceramic and which will fire to a theoretical density of at least 80% to provide an impermeable coating.

  8. Modelling and Simulation of Tensile Fracture in High Velocity Compacted Metal Powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsen, P.; Haeggblad, H.-A.

    2007-01-01

    In cold uniaxial powder compaction, powder is formed into a desired shape with rigid tools and a die. After pressing, but before sintering, the compacted powder is called green body. A critical property in the metal powder pressing process is the mechanical properties of the green body. Beyond a green body free from defects, desired properties are high strength and uniform density. High velocity compaction (HVC) using a hydraulic operated hammer is a production method to form powder utilizing a shock wave. Pre-alloyed water atomised iron powder has been HVC-formed into circular discs with high densities. The diametral compression test also called the Brazilian disc test is an established method to measure tensile strength in low strength material like e.g. rock, concrete, polymers and ceramics. During the test a thin disc is compressed across the diameter to failure. The compression induces a tensile stress perpendicular to the compressed diameter. In this study the test have been used to study crack initiation and the tensile fracture process of HVC-formed metal powder discs with a relative density of 99%. A fictitious crack model controlled by a stress versus crack-width relationship is utilized to model green body cracking. Tensile strength is used as a failure condition and limits the stress in the fracture interface. The softening rate of the model is obtained from the corresponding rate of the dissipated energy. The deformation of the powder material is modelled with an elastic-plastic Cap model. The characteristics of the tensile fracture development of the central crack in a diametrically loaded specimen is numerically studied with a three dimensional finite element simulation. Results from the finite element simulation of the diametral compression test shows that it is possible to simulate fracturing of HVC-formed powder. Results from the simulation agree reasonably with experiments

  9. SEPARATION OF THE INTER- AND INTRA-PARTICLE POROSITY IN IMAGES OF POWDER COMPACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Lacaze

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Powder metallurgy is a highly developed and cheap method of manufacturing reliable materials, either metallic, ceramic or composite. This process was used to make green compacts of iron powders with a high porosity level. This study is part of a project aimed at describing the relationships between mechanical properties and morphological features of such compacts, with particular attention paid to the shape of the grains and the compaction pressure. In this report, a method is proposed to separate the intra grain porosity from the cavities located between particles. The approach is based on the covariogram of images obtained from the surface of the compacts by means of a laser roughometer. To achieve this separation, a model of the structure is proposed which assumes that the distributions of the grains and of the intra-particle cavities are random and independent. Each distribution is characterized by two parameters. A satisfactory agreement is obtained between experimental and calculated covariograms after identification of these parameters.

  10. Fabrication and studies of microstructure and mechanical properties of Ba2MgNbO5,5 ceramics for application in the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, J.C. da S.; Ferreira, R.A.S.; Yadava, Y.P.

    2011-01-01

    The present work aims at the elaboration of a ceramic complex perovskite ceramic components for temperature sensors for oil wells, as well as the study of microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of ceramics Ba 2 MgNbO 5,5 . The manufacture of pottery Ba 2 MgNbO 5,5 was performed using a thermo-mechanical and solid-state sintering. The pellets of compressed green were calcined for 24 hours at a temperature of 1200°C and then crushed with the help of a set pistil / agate mortar. The resulting powder was compacted and new pellets were sintered at a temperature of 1250°C. Basic studies of stability of ceramics sintered in the environment of crude oil, from onshore wells and the sea, the state of Sergipe in northeastern Brazil. The test results showed that the ceramic is inert to crude oil and can be used to produce ceramic components for the oil industry. (author)

  11. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  12. Sensitive Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive Ceramics is showing an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics. The experiment is working on two levels. One which has to do with designing compositions and patterns in a virtual 3d universe based on a digital dynamic system that responds on ...... with realizing the modules in ceramics by 3d printing directly in porcelain with a RapMan printer that coils up the 3d shape in layers. Finally the ceramic modules are mounted in a laser cut board that reflects the captured composition of the movement of the hands....

  13. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders: a comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Dolores R R; Bottino, Marco C; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H A

    2008-12-01

    (1) To synthesize 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. A coprecipitation route was used to synthesize a 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic processed by uniaxial compaction and pressureless sintering. Commercially available alumina or alumina/zirconia ceramics, namely Procera AllCeram (PA), In-Ceram Zirconia Block (CAZ) and In-Ceram Zirconia (IZ) were chosen for comparison. All specimens (6mmx5mmx5mm) were polished and ultrasonically cleaned. Qualitative phase analysis was performed by XRD and apparent densities were measured on the basis of Archimedes principle. Ceramics were also characterized using SEM, TEM and EDS. The hardness measurements were made employing Vickers hardness test. Fracture toughness (K(IC)) was calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). ANOVA revealed that the Vickers hardness (pceramic materials composition. It was confirmed that the PA ceramic was constituted of a rhombohedral alumina matrix, so-called alpha-alumina. Both CAZ and IZ ceramics presented tetragonal zirconia and alpha-alumina mixture of phases. The SEM/EDS analysis confirmed the presence of aluminum in PA ceramic. In the IZ and CAZ ceramics aluminum, zirconium and cerium in grains involved by a second phase containing aluminum, silicon and lanthanum were identified. PA showed significantly higher mean Vickers hardness values (H(V)) (18.4+/-0.5GPa) compared to vitreous CAZ (10.3+/-0.2GPa) and IZ (10.6+/-0.4GPa) ceramics. Experimental Y-TZP showed significantly lower results than that of the other monophased ceramic (PA) (pceramics (pceramic processing conditions led to ceramics with mechanical properties comparable to commercially available reinforced ceramic materials.

  14. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  15. Compact vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M.A.; Zafalan, I. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane. (orig.)

  16. Compact stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez-Delgado, Gabino; Estevez-Delgado, Joaquin

    2018-05-01

    An analysis and construction is presented for a stellar model characterized by two parameters (w, n) associated with the compactness ratio and anisotropy, respectively. The reliability range for the parameter w ≤ 1.97981225149 corresponds with a compactness ratio u ≤ 0.2644959374, the density and pressures are positive, regular and monotonic decrescent functions, the radial and tangential speed of sound are lower than the light speed, moreover, than the plausible stability. The behavior of the speeds of sound are determinate for the anisotropy parameter n, admitting a subinterval where the speeds are monotonic crescent functions and other where we have monotonic decrescent functions for the same speeds, both cases describing a compact object that is also potentially stable. In the bigger value for the observational mass M = 2.05 M⊙ and radii R = 12.957 Km for the star PSR J0348+0432, the model indicates that the maximum central density ρc = 1.283820319 × 1018 Kg/m3 corresponds to the maximum value of the anisotropy parameter and the radial and tangential speed of the sound are monotonic decrescent functions.

  17. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  18. Evaluation of automatic vacuum- assisted compaction solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brzeziński

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently on the mould-making machines market the companies like: DiSA, KUENKEL WAGNER, HAFLINGER, HEINRICH WAGNER SINTO, HUNTER, SAVELLI AND TECHNICAL play significant role. These companies are the manufacturers of various solutions in machines and instalations applied in foundry engineering. Automatic foundry machines for compaction of green sand have the major role in mechanisation and automation processes of making the mould. The concept of operation of automatic machines is based on the static and dynamic methods of compacting the green sand. The method which gains the importance is the compacting method by using the energy of the air pressure. It's the initial stage or the supporting process of compacting the green sand. However in the automatic mould making machines using this method it's essential to use the additional compaction of the mass in order to receive the final parameters of the form. In the constructional solutions of the machines there is the additional division which concerns the method of putting the sand into the mould box. This division distinquishes the transport of the sand with simultaneous compaction or the putting of the sand without the pre-compaction. As the solutions of the major manufacturers are often the subject for application in various foundries, the authors of the paper would like/have the confidence to present their own evaluation process confirmed by their own researches and independent analysis of the producers' solutions.

  19. High-performance ceramics. Fabrication, structure, properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzow, G.; Tobolski, J.; Telle, R.

    1996-01-01

    The program ''Ceramic High-performance Materials'' pursued the objective to understand the chaining of cause and effect in the development of high-performance ceramics. This chain of problems begins with the chemical reactions for the production of powders, comprises the characterization, processing, shaping and compacting of powders, structural optimization, heat treatment, production and finishing, and leads to issues of materials testing and of a design appropriate to the material. The program ''Ceramic High-performance Materials'' has resulted in contributions to the understanding of fundamental interrelationships in terms of materials science, which are summarized in the present volume - broken down into eight special aspects. (orig./RHM)

  20. Oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshkewitch, E.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book explores single-phase ceramic oxide systems from the standpoint of physical chemistry and technology. This second edition also focuses on advances in technology since publication of the original edition. These include improvements in raw materials and forming and sintering techniques, and the major role that oxide ceramics have had in development of advanced products and processes. The text is divided into five major sections: general fundamentals of oxide ceramics, advances in aluminum oxide technology, advances in zirconia technology, and advances in beryllium oxide technology

  1. Compaction of Ti–6Al–4V powder using high velocity compaction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Dil Faraz; Yin, Haiqing; Li, He; Qu, Xuanhui; Khan, Matiullah; Ali, Shujaat; Iqbal, M. Zubair

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We compacted Ti–6Al–4V powder by HVC technique. • As impact force rises up, the green density of the compacts increases gradually. • At impact force 1.857 kN relative sintered density of the compacts reaches 99.88%. • Spring back of the green compact’s decreases gradually with increasing impact force. • Mechanical properties of the samples increases with increasing impact force. - Abstract: High velocity compaction technique was applied to the compaction of pre-alloyed, hydride–dehydride Ti–6Al–4V powder. The powder was pressed in single stroke with a compaction speed of 7.10–8.70 ms −1 . When the speed was 8.70 ms −1 , the relative density of the compacts reaches up to 85.89% with a green density of 3.831 g cm −3 . The green samples were sintered at 1300 °C in Ar-gas atmosphere. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the surface of the sintered samples. Density and mechanical properties such as Vickers micro hardness and bending strength of the powder samples were investigated. Experimental results indicated that with the increase in impact force, the density and mechanical properties of the compacts increased. The sintered compacts exhibited a maximum relative density of 99.88% with a sintered density of 4.415 g cm −3 , hardness of 364–483 HV and the bending strength in the range of 103–126.78 MPa. The springback of the compacts decreased with increasing impact force

  2. Metaphysical green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    to adapt to urban environment. It explores the potential of Sensation of Green in the city. The paper questions whether the Sensation of Green could introduce a new spectrum of greens, beside the real green. It develops the term of metaphysical green – does green have to be green or can it be only...

  3. Dual-role plasticizer and dispersant for ceramic layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Thus, one aspect of the invention relates to a green ceramic layer comprising a ceramic material, a binder, and a dual-role dispersant and plasticizer, wherein said dual-role dispersant and plasticizer is an organic di- or tri-ester selected from compounds of formula (I), (II), (III) and (IV......). Another aspect of the present invention relates to a slurry for use in the manufacturing of a green ceramic layer comprising a ceramic material, a solvent, a binder, and a dual-role dispersant and plasticizer, wherein said dual role dispersant and plasticizer is an organic di- or tri- ester. Further...... aspects include uses of and methods of manufacturing said green ceramic layers....

  4. SnO2*CoO ceramic obtained by microwave sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordignon, M.A.N; Moura, F.; Zaghete, M.A.; Varela, J.A.; Perazolli, L.

    2009-01-01

    This work consists in the sintering study of CoO doped SnO 2 using microwave sintering oven and silicon carbide as a susceptor. The powders were obtained by dry oxides mixture and conformed in cylindrical shapes with 6mmx8mm and green density to 60%. Then the compacts were sintering up to 1.050 deg C, using heating rate of 50 deg C/min and isotherm up to 30min. The densities obtained were above 95% for both techniques. It was observed that occurred a temperature reducing of 400 deg C and time reducing of 210min to obtain the same densities, when was used the microwave oven without the phenomena of thermal runaway. So the sintered compacts were accomplished using DRX and SEM. It was made the electrical characterization (current x voltage) and it was found to have great potential in the production of dense ceramic-based SnO 2 with low resistivity to obtain electro-ceramic devices. (author)

  5. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  6. Mechanical behavior of porous ceramic disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucheu, M.A; Sandoval, M.L; Tomba Martinez, A.G; Camerucci, M.A

    2008-01-01

    mechanical resistance (σ F ) was defined from the maximum load values of the load-displacement curves. Using these the apparent force (σ)-deformation (ε) relationship was obtained by calculus and from the slope of the lineal part of these curves the apparent Young module (E a ) was estimated. The results obtained were analyzed as a function of the microstructures that developed and in relation to the behavior of the starches in aqueous suspension at temperature. Except for the disks prepared with corn starch, the values of σF for the disks in green state were higher than in the disks prepared without starch, which shows the binding power of the other starches depending on the relative order: modified ≥manioc≥ potato. The apparent Young module presented a similar behavior, indicating greater rigidity of the structure of the compacts in green state with starch that could be related partly to the differences in the behavior of the grains in water at the temperature of consolidation. All the final porous materials showed a significant increase in mechanical resistance observing a correlation between the σF values of the disks in green and sintered state compared to the type of starch used. The stress-deformation curves showed a significant increase of the lineal region compared to that observed in the disks in green state, presenting a completely fragile fracture. Additionally, the apparent Young module increased in similar proportion for each type of starch. Based on the adjustment of the fractomechanical parameters of the exponential models proposed for the fracture resistance and the elasticity module, the significant incidence of the material's global porosity is revealed and the complexity of the pores' morphology must be taken into account as well as the size of the pores that were different for each starch used. Also, it cannot be ignored that the ceramic matrix displays characteristics (for example, microfissures) that depend on which starch is used in its

  7. Green(ing) infrastructure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available the generation of electricity from renewable sources such as wind, water and solar. Grey infrastructure – In the context of storm water management, grey infrastructure can be thought of as the hard, engineered systems to capture and convey runoff..., pumps, and treatment plants.  Green infrastructure reduces energy demand by reducing the need to collect and transport storm water to a suitable discharge location. In addition, green infrastructure such as green roofs, street trees and increased...

  8. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  9. Processing of porous zirconia ceramics by direct consolidation with starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, Liliana B; Albano, Maria P

    2008-01-01

    Porous ceramics are used especially for those environments with high temperatures, heavy wear and in a corrosive medium. Zirconium-based materials are useful for such applications as sensors, filters, support for catalytic reactions, porous components for sofc and in biomedical applications. A conventional method for producing porous ceramics consists of the addition and later decomposition by calcination (pyrolisis) of different organic materials that act as pore formers. Several wet processing possibilities have been developed. Among these is a technique of direct consolidation with starch. This process begins with the preparation of an aqueous suspension of the ceramic with the dispersants needed to stabilize it, to which the starch is added. After casting in a waterproof mold, the suspension thermally hardens into the desired shape. The dry compacts undergo the sintering cycle to obtain pieces almost in their final form. This study aims to optimize the processing of porous zirconium ceramics using starch as a pore and binder forming agent. Zirconium with 3% yttrium molar stabilized in tetragonal phase was used. The aqueous suspensions (52-55% vol) of the zirconium-starch mixtures with different compositions were stabilized with a commercial solution of ammonium polyacrylate as a dispersant and were hardened in plastic molds at 90 o C for 30 min. The influence of added volume of starch on the physical characteristics of the pieces in green state was established while maintaining the temperature, the gelling time and the conditions of constant drying. The sintering was carried out at 1000-1500 o C-2h. The characteristics of the sintered product were evaluated by measuring density, volumetric contraction, intrusion of Hg and the evolution of the crystalline phases by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microstructural properties of ceramic (pore volume, the relation between open and closed porosity, size distribution, morphology of

  10. Microstructural characterization of ceramic floor tiles with the incorporation of wastes from ceramic tile industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmeane Effting

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic floor tiles are widely used in buildings. In places where people are bare feet, the thermal sensation of cold or hot depends on the environmental conditions and material properties including its microstructure and crustiness surface. The introduction of the crustiness surface on the ceramic floor tiles interfere in the contact temperature and also it can be an strategy to obtain ceramic tiles more comfortable. In this work, porous ceramic tiles were obtained by pressing an industrial atomized ceramic powder incorporated with refractory raw material (residue from porcelainized stoneware tile polishing and changing firing temperature. Raw materials and obtained compacted samples were evaluated by chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and differential thermal analysis (DTA. Thermal (thermal conductivity and effusivity and physical (porosity measurements were also evaluated.

  11. Pharmaceutical powder compaction technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Çelik, Metin

    2011-01-01

    ... through the compaction formulation process and application. Compaction of powder constituents both active ingredient and excipients is examined to ensure consistent and reproducible disintegration and dispersion profiles...

  12. Preparation of soft-agglomerated nano-sized ceramic powders by sol-gel combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Q.; Ma, X.H.; Yan, Q.Z.; Ge, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    The soft-agglomerated Gd 2 BaCuO 5 (Gd211) nano-powders were synthesized by sol-gel combustion process with binary ligand and the special pretreatment on gel. The mechanism of the formation of weakly agglomerated structure was studied in detail. The results showed that network structure in gelation process was found to be a decisive factor for preventing agglomeration of colloidal particles. The removal of free water, coordinated water, and most of hydroxyl groups during pretreatment further inhibited the formation of hydrogen bonds between adjacent particles. The soft-agglomeration of the particles was confirmed by isolated particles in calcined Gd211 powders and in green compact, a narrow monomodal pore size distribution of the green compact and the low agglomeration coefficient of the calcined Gd211 powder. Extension this process to synthesis of BaCeO 3 , BaTiO 3 and Ce 0.8 Sm 0.2 O 1.9 powders, also led to weakly agglomerated nano-powders. It suggests that this method represents a powerful and facile method for the creation of doped and multi-component nano-sized ceramic powders.

  13. Effect of sintering temperatures on titanium matrix composites reinforced by ceramic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, F.; Amigo, V.; Busquets, D.; Klyatskina, E. [Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department. Polytechnical University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Titanium and titanium composites have a potential use in aerospace and biotechnology industries, and nowadays in others like sports and fashion ones. In this work composite materials, based on titanium matrix reinforced with ceramic particles, have been developed. PM route is used to obtain compact and sintered samples. TiN and TiAl powders, are milled with Ti powder in different volumetric percentages in a ball mill. These mixtures are pressed in a uniaxial press and sintered in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures between 1180 to 1220 deg. C. Porosity of samples is analysed, before and after the sintering process, by Archimedes technique and by image analysis. Mechanical properties and the reinforcement particles influence in the titanium matrix are studied by flexion test in green and sintered states, and by hardness and microhardness tests. Complimentarily, a microstructural analysis is carried out by optical and electron microscopy, and the reactivity between the reinforce particles and titanium matrix are studied. (authors)

  14. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  15. Ceramic Seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  16. Effects of grinding on properties of Mg-PSZ ceramics prepared by the surface enrichment of zirconia powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, S.; Das, S.R.

    1995-01-01

    Commercial grade zirconia powders of mean particle size of 3.21 microns were super-ground in wet condition in alcoholic medium in a Planetary Ball-Mill for 12-hours using a zirconia pot as well as balls, in order to avoid contaminations from the grinding media. Sedigraph analysis data show the mean particle sizes within the range of 0.4 to 0.2 micron. The super-ground zirconia powders were then treated with appropriate acid and alkali solutions in order to enrich the surfaces of zirconia powders. The chemical analysis reports depict the enrichment phenomena of the processed zirconia powders. Magnesium oxide of different mole percentages (3 to 9%) have been incorporated to the above super-ground and enriched zirconia powder and green specimens were prepared by pressing with a suitable pressure of 200 MPa to yield the green compaction density of 3.06 gm/cm 3 . The compacted green specimens were sintered without pressure at 1,480 C in air followed by normal cooling. X-ray diffraction patterns of the above sintered and cooled specimens have confirmed the formation of Mg-PSZ ceramics with 40% tetragonal phase. The sintered PSZ-products have shown very good surface properties but at the cost of transverse rupture strength. The effects of grinding were observed on the above Mg-PSZ ceramics which exhibit very little change in the tetragonal phase even after 30-minutes of grinding with a 60-mesh diamond wheel at a normal pressure of 4 kg/cm 2

  17. Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains ... is nearly impossible, shaping has to be done by a replication step in the green, unfired state. ... This process chain combines the fast and inexpensive supply of master models by ...

  18. Towards green loyalty: the influences of green perceived risk, green image, green trust and green satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisjatmiko, K.

    2018-01-01

    The paper aims to present a comprehensive framework for the influences of green perceived risk, green image, green trust and green satisfaction to green loyalty. The paper also seeks to account explicitly for the differences in green perceived risk, green image, green trust, green satisfaction and green loyalty found among green products customers. Data were obtained from 155 green products customers. Structural equation modeling was used in order to test the proposed hypotheses. The findings show that green image, green trust and green satisfaction has positive effects to green loyalty. But green perceived risk has negative effects to green image, green trust and green satisfaction. However, green perceived risk, green image, green trust and green satisfaction also seems to be a good device to gain green products customers from competitors. The contributions of the paper are, firstly, a more complete framework of the influences of green perceived risk, green image, green trust and green satisfaction to green loyalty analyses simultaneously. Secondly, the study allows a direct comparison of the difference in green perceived risk, green image, green trust, green satisfaction and green loyalty between green products customers.

  19. Industrial ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengelle, Ch.

    1999-04-01

    After having given the definition of the term 'ceramics', the author describes the different manufacturing processes of these compounds. These materials are particularly used in the fields of 1)petroleum industry (in primary and secondary reforming units, in carbon black reactors and ethylene furnaces). 2)nuclear industry (for instance UO 2 and PuO 2 as fuels; SiC for encapsulation; boron carbides for control systems..)

  20. Characterization of Compaction Process on UO2 Powder Pelletisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachmawati, M; Langenati, R; Saputra, T.T; Mahpudin, A; Histori; Sutarya, D; Zahedi

    1998-01-01

    Determination of compaction pressure of pelletization which is based on density characterization in conjunction with satisfactory green strength of the UO 2 pellet, is carried out in this experiment. Cameco UO 2 powder has been mixed up with Zn-stearate lubricant prior to compaction process. The compaction pressure is varied from the range of 2 Mp up to 6 Mp. The mechanical strength is determined using diametral compression strength with the speed of loading of 0.1 mm.min 1 . The density measurement and compression strength test are performed on each of the applied pressure. The result shows that compaction at 5 Mp gives the maximum green strength of UO 2 pellet, while the maximum density is achieved at 5.7 Mp. The maximum green strength and green density of UO 2 (+ TiO 2 ) pellets is achieved at the addition of 0.25% and 0.125% TiO 2 respectively. The compaction pressure which is showing the maximum pellet green strength but still having the required density, is chosen to be the determinant compaction pressure in condition of pelletization

  1. Improving the strength of ceramics by controlling the interparticle forces and rheology of the ceramic suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Yi-Ping

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the modification of the interparticle forces of colloidal ceramic particles in aqueous suspensions in order to improve the microstructural homogeneity, and hence the reliability and mechanical performances, of subsequently formed ceramic compacts. A concentrated stable fine ceramic powder suspension has been shown to be able to generate a higher density of a ceramic product with better mechanical, and also electrical, electrochemical and optical, properties of the ceramic body. This is because in a colloidally stable suspension there are no aggregates and so defect formation, which is responsible for the ceramic body performance below its theoretical maximum, is reduced. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to form a well dispersed ceramic suspension by ensuring the interparticle forces between the particles are repulsive, with as a high a loading with particles as possible. By examining the rheological behaviour and the results of Atomic Force Microscope, the dispersion state of the suspensions and hence the interparticle forces can be analysed. In this study, concentrated ceramic suspensions were made from two kinds of zirconia powders, monoclinic (DK1) and yttria partially stabilised (HSY3) zirconia, in the presence of a dispersant, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid disodium salt (Tiron), in aqueous system. The optimum dispersant concentrations, where the viscosity and rheological moduli are the entire minimum, for DK1 and HSY3 suspensions, respectively, are 0.625% and 0.1%. The modifications of the interparticle forces were also achieved by pH adjustment and it was found that both of the suspensions at the optimum dispersant concentration were stable over the pH range 7 ∼ 10, which coincide with the results of the electrophoretic mobility measurements. Ceramic compacts have then been made by slip casting the suspensions of different dispersant concentration, followed by firing procedure. Mechanical properties of

  2. Anisotropic Material Behavior of Uni-axially Compacted Graphite Matrix for HTGR Fuel Compact Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Yoon, Ji-Hae; Cho, Moon Sung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In developing the fuel compact fabrication technology, and fuel graphite material to meet the required material properties, it is essential to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, the fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the heat treatments conditions and the material properties of fuel element. It was observed, during this development, that the pressing technique employed for the compaction fabrication prior to the two successive heat treatments (carbonization and final high temperature heat treatment) was of extreme importance in determining the material properties of the final compact product. In this work, the material behavior of the uni-axially pressed graphite matrix during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated and summarized along the different directions, viz., perpendicular and parallel directions to pressing direction. In this work, the dimensional variations and variations in thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and Vickers hardness of the graphite matrix compact samples in the axial and radial directions prepared by uni-axial pressing are evaluated, and compared with those of samples prepared by cold isostatic pressing with the available data. From this work, the followings are observed. 1) Dimensional changes of matrix graphite green compacts during carbonization show that the difference in radial and axial variations shows a large anisotropic behavior in shrinkage. The radial variation is very small while the axial variation is large. During carbonization, the stresses caused by the force would be released in to the axial direction together with the phenolic resin vapor. 2) Dimensional variation of compact samples in perpendicular and parallel directions during carbonization shows a large difference in behavior when compact sample is prepared by uni-axial pressing. However, when compact sample is prepared by cold isostatic pressing, there is

  3. Anisotropic Material Behavior of Uni-axially Compacted Graphite Matrix for HTGR Fuel Compact Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Yoon, Ji-Hae; Cho, Moon Sung

    2016-01-01

    In developing the fuel compact fabrication technology, and fuel graphite material to meet the required material properties, it is essential to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, the fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the heat treatments conditions and the material properties of fuel element. It was observed, during this development, that the pressing technique employed for the compaction fabrication prior to the two successive heat treatments (carbonization and final high temperature heat treatment) was of extreme importance in determining the material properties of the final compact product. In this work, the material behavior of the uni-axially pressed graphite matrix during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated and summarized along the different directions, viz., perpendicular and parallel directions to pressing direction. In this work, the dimensional variations and variations in thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and Vickers hardness of the graphite matrix compact samples in the axial and radial directions prepared by uni-axial pressing are evaluated, and compared with those of samples prepared by cold isostatic pressing with the available data. From this work, the followings are observed. 1) Dimensional changes of matrix graphite green compacts during carbonization show that the difference in radial and axial variations shows a large anisotropic behavior in shrinkage. The radial variation is very small while the axial variation is large. During carbonization, the stresses caused by the force would be released in to the axial direction together with the phenolic resin vapor. 2) Dimensional variation of compact samples in perpendicular and parallel directions during carbonization shows a large difference in behavior when compact sample is prepared by uni-axial pressing. However, when compact sample is prepared by cold isostatic pressing, there is

  4. Small recuperated ceramic microturbine demonstrator concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Colin F.; Rodgers, Colin

    2008-01-01

    It has been about a decade since microturbines first entered service in the distributed generation market, and the efficiencies of these turbogenerators rated in the 30-100 kW power range have remained essentially on the order of 30%. In this time frame the cost of fuel (natural gas and oil) has increased substantially, and efforts are now underway to increase the efficiency of microturbines to 40% or higher. Various near-term means of achieving this are underway by utilizing established gas turbine technology, but now based on more complex thermodynamic cycles. A longer-term approach of improving efficiency is proposed in this paper based on the retention of the basic recuperated Brayton cycle, but now operating at significantly higher levels of turbine inlet temperature. However, in small low pressure ratio recuperated microturbines embodying radial flow turbomachinery this necessitates the use of ceramic components, including the turbine, recuperator and combustor. A development approach is proposed to design, fabricate and test a 7.5 kW ceramic microturbine demonstrator concept, which for the first time would involve the coupling of a ceramic radial flow turbine, a ceramic combustor, and a compact ceramic fixed-boundary high effectiveness recuperator. In a period of some three years, the major objectives of the proposed small ceramic microturbine R and D effort would be to establish a technology base involving thermal and stress analysis, design methodology, ceramic component fabrication techniques, and component development, these culminating in the assembly and testing to demonstrate engine structural integrity, and to verify performance. This would provide a benchmark for more confidently advancing to increased size ceramic-based turbogenerators with the potential for efficiencies of over 40%. In addition, the power size of the tested prototype could possibly emerge as a viable product, namely as a natural gas-fired turbogenerator with the capability of

  5. Fiscal 1997 achievement report. Research and development of synergy ceramics; 1997 nendo synergy ceramics no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Research and development is conducted on two subjects, that is, 1) hyper organized structure control technology and 2) structural element control technology. In addition, joint research and development is conducted on the creation of new materials by hyper organized structure controlling, hyper organized structure controlling for ceramics by a structurization reaction process, designing of precursors to ceramics, and the hyper organized structure control for ceramics by nanostructure process control. The joint research and development endeavors further deal with re-entrusted projects which involve researches on sintered structure control by powdery particulate structure control; dynamic process of synergy ceramics; oxynitride liquids, glasses, and glass-ceramics; and multifunctional ceramic laminates for engineering applications. Under subject 1), researches are made on the development of precursors into ceramics by utilizing chemical reactions of organic metal compounds, and analyses are conducted into the effects, exerted by the molecular structures of precursors and the conditions of a reaction for their development into ceramics, on the microstructures and various properties of the ceramics to be composed. Under subject 2), high strength, great hardness, and high resistance to wear are realized by allowing the precipitation of nano-particulates in crystals of a fine and very compact sintered body of alumina. (NEDO)

  6. Green Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Green tourism is defined as environmentally friendly tourism activities with various focuses and meanings. In a broad term, green tourism is about being an environmentally friendly tourist or providing environmentally friendly tourist services. The green tourism concept would be highly appealing to tourism enterprises and operators owing to increasing governmental pressure to improve environmental performance by adopting effective and tangible environmental management techniques. Green to...

  7. Metaphysical green

    OpenAIRE

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    “Sensation of Green is about the mental process like touching, seeing, hearing, or smelling, resulting from the immediate stimulation of landscape forms, plants, trees, wind and water. Sensation of Green triggers a feeling of scale, cheerfulness, calmness and peace. The spatial performance of Sensation of Green is created by a physical interaction between the language of space and the language of nature” The notion of Sensation of Green was developed through a previous study ‘Learning from th...

  8. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  9. A Green Solvent Induced DNA Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathi, Sagar; Sengupta, Abhigyan; Hridya, V. M.; Gavvala, Krishna; Koninti, Raj Kumar; Roy, Bibhisan; Hazra, Partha

    2015-03-01

    Mechanistic details of DNA compaction is essential blue print for gene regulation in living organisms. Many in vitro studies have been implemented using several compaction agents. However, these compacting agents may have some kinds of cytotoxic effects to the cells. To minimize this aspect, several research works had been performed, but people have never focused green solvent, i.e. room temperature ionic liquid as DNA compaction agent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever report where we have shown that guanidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate (Gua-IL) acts as a DNA compacting agent. The compaction ability of Gua-IL has been verified by different spectroscopic techniques, like steady state emission, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and UV melting. Notably, we have extensively probed this compaction by Gua-IL through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and fluorescence microscopy images. We also have discussed the plausible compaction mechanism process of DNA by Gua-IL. Our results suggest that Gua-IL forms a micellar kind of self aggregation above a certain concentration (>=1 mM), which instigates this compaction process. This study divulges the specific details of DNA compaction mechanism by a new class of compaction agent, which is highly biodegradable and eco friendly in nature.

  10. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  11. Pharmaceutical powder compaction technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Çelik, Metin

    2011-01-01

    "Revised to reflect modern pharmaceutical compacting techniques, this Second Edition guides pharmaceutical engineers, formulation scientists, and product development and quality assurance personnel...

  12. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  13. The influence of clay fineness upon sludge recycling in a ceramic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szőke, A. M.; Muntean, M.; Sándor, M.; Brotea, L.

    2016-04-01

    The feasibility of sludge recycling in the ceramic manufacture was evaluated through laboratory testing. Such residues have similar chemical and mineralogical composition with the raw mixture of the green ceramic body used in construction. Several ceramic masses with clay and various proportion of sludge have been synthesized and then characterized by their physical-mechanical properties. The fineness of the clay, the main component of the green ceramic body, has been considered for every raw mixture. The proportion of the sludge waste addition depends on the clay fineness and the sintering capacity also, increases with the clay fineness. The ceramic properties, particularly, the open porosity, and mechanical properties, in presence of small sludge proportion (7, 20%) shows small modification. The introduction of such waste into building ceramic matrix (bricks, tiles, and plates) has a very good perspective.

  14. Ceramic to metal joining by using 1064 nm pulsed and CW laser energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Min; Kim, Soo Won; Choi, Hae Woon; Kim, Joo Han

    2013-01-01

    A novel joining method for ceramic and metallic layers is proposed using laser drilling and surface tension driven liquid metal filling. A high intensity laser beam irradiated a 500 µm thick ceramic filter, and the irradiated laser drilled the ceramic layer. The pulsed or CW laser transmitted through the ceramic layer irradiated the bottom metallic layer; the molten metallic layer then filled the drilled ceramic holes by the capillary force between the liquid metal and ceramic layer. As process variables, average laser power, pulse duration, and the number of pulses were used. The scattering optical properties were also studied for both green and red lasers. There was no significant difference between the colors and the estimated extinction coefficients were -26.94 1/mm and -28.42 1/mm for the green and red lasers, respectively.

  15. Explosive material treatment in particular the explosive compaction of powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruemmer, R.

    1985-01-01

    The constructive use of explosives in the last decades has led to new procedures in manufacturing techniques. The most important of these are explosive forming and cladding, the latter especially for the production of compound materials. The method of explosive compaction has the highest potential for further innovation. Almost theoretical densities are achievable in the green compacts as the pressure released by detonating explosives are very high. Also, the production of new conditions of materials (metastable high pressure phases) is possible. (orig.) [de

  16. Effects of compaction pressure and particle shape on the porosity and compression mechanical properties of sintered Ti6Al4V powder compacts for hard tissue implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güden, Mustafa; Celik, Emrah; Hizal, Alpay; Altindiş, Mustafa; Cetiner, Sinan

    2008-05-01

    Sintered Ti6Al4V powder compacts potentially to be used in implant applications were prepared using commercially available spherical and angular powders (100-200 mum) within the porosity range of 34-54%. Cylindrical green powder compacts were cold compacted at various pressures and then sintered at 1200 degrees C for 2 h. The final percent porosity and mean pore sizes were determined as functions of the applied compaction pressure and powder type. The mechanical properties were investigated through compression testing. Results have shown that yield strength of the powder compacts of 40-42% porosity was comparable with that of human cortical bone. As compared with previously investigated Ti powder compacts, Ti6Al4V powder compacts showed higher strength at similar porosity range. Microscopic observations on the failed compact samples revealed that failure occurred primarily by the separation of interparticle bond regions in the planes 45 degrees to the loading axis. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Industrial production of insulators using isostatic compaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drugoveiko, O.P.; Ermolaeva, L.V.; Koren' , M.G.; Kreimer, B.D.; Panichev, G.I.; Ponomarev, A.P.; Rutkovskii, V.N.

    1985-07-01

    The process of shaping ceramic products from powders using isostatic compaction method is finding increasing industrial application. The production of electrical-engineering porcelain using isostatic compaction method is, according to the authors, a promising direction since this method permits one to obtain large and complex shaped products having uniform density distribution. The authors introduce an automatic isostatic compaction line at the ''Proletarii'' Factory for the production of the IOS-110-20000UKhL, T1 type insulators having the described dimensions. According to the technological process developed at the ''Elektrokeramika'' Production Complex, insulators were manufactured on the isostatic compaction line from the G-33 mass. Presspowder having a moisture content of 0.3-0.6% and a particle size of 90-160 micrometers was obtained in a spray dryer using disk spraying. The authors studied saturability by moisture of the powder obtained.

  18. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  19. A new family of ceramic X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E.; Reiprich, S.

    1976-01-01

    The construction and performance of a family of metal-ceramic X-ray tubes are described. Four of these incorporate slanting anodes and one a plane anode giving directional and omnidirectional radiation characteristics respectively. The particular advantages of these tubes are their compactness, low weight, flash-over immunity and high thermal and mechanical stress tolerance. (orig.) [de

  20. Boric oxide or boric acid sintering aid for sintering ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    The invention described relates to the use of liquid sintering aid in processes involving sintering of ceramic materials to produce dense, hard articles having industrial uses. Although the invention is specifically discussed in regard to compositions containing silicon carbide as the ceramic material, other sinterable carbides, for example, titanium carbide, may be utilized as the ceramic material. A liquid sintering aid for densifying ceramic material is selected from solutions of H 3 BO 3 , B 2 O 3 and mixtures of these solutions. In sintering ceramic articles, e.g. silicon carbide, a shaped green body is formed from a particulate ceramic material and a resin binder, and the green body is baked at a temperature of 500 to 1000 0 C to form a porous body. The liquid sintering aid of B 2 O 3 and/or H 3 BO 3 is then dispersed through the porous body and the treated body is sintered at a temperature of 1900 to 2200 0 C to produce the sintered ceramic article. (U.K.)

  1. Metaphysical green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    example is a tiny Danish summer house from 1918 . The second example is ‘House before House’ , in Tokyo. The third example is a prefabricated house ‘CHU’ . The analysis evaluates the characteristics of diverse tones of green – from green image to green sensation. The analysis is based on the original...... of Sensation of Green is created by a physical interaction between the language of space and the language of nature” The notion of Sensation of Green was developed through a previous study ‘Learning from the Summer House’ investigating the unique architectural characteristics of the Danish summer houses...... the Sensation of Green? Three existing examples are agents to this discussion. The first example is a Danish summer house. The other two are international urban examples. While the summer house articulates the original meaning of Sensation of Green, the urban examples illustrate its urban context. The first...

  2. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  3. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  4. Uniaxial backfill block compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, V.

    2012-05-01

    The main parts of the project were: to make a literature survey of the previous uniaxial compaction experiments; do uniaxial compaction tests in laboratory scale; and do industrial scale production tests. Object of the project was to sort out the different factors affecting the quality assurance chain of the backfill block uniaxial production and solve a material sticking to mould problem which appeared during manufacturing the blocks of bentonite and cruched rock mixture. The effect of mineralogical and chemical composition on the long term functionality of the backfill was excluded from the project. However, the used smectite-rich clays have been tested for mineralogical consistency. These tests were done in B and Tech OY according their SOPs. The objective of the Laboratory scale tests was to find right material- and compaction parameters for the industrial scale tests. Direct comparison between the laboratory scale tests and industrial scale tests is not possible because the mould geometry and compaction speed has a big influence for the compaction process. For this reason the selected material parameters were also affected by the previous compaction experiments. The industrial scale tests were done in summer of 2010 in southern Sweden. Blocks were done with uniaxial compaction. A 40 tons of the mixture of bentonite and crushed rock blocks and almost 50 tons of Friedland-clay blocks were compacted. (orig.)

  5. Compaction properties of isomalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K.; Engelhart, Jeffrey J. P.; Eissens, Anko C.

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of

  6. Model Compaction Equation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The currently proposed model compaction equation was derived from data sourced from the. Niger Delta and it relates porosity to depth for sandstones under hydrostatic pressure condition. The equation is useful in predicting porosity and compaction trend in hydrostatic sands of the. Niger Delta. GEOLOGICAL SETTING OF ...

  7. CeO2-stabilized tetragonal ZrO2 polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Nono, M.C. de.

    1990-12-01

    This work presents the development and the characterization of CeO 2 -stabilized tetragonal ZrO 2 polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics), since it is considered candidate material for applications as structural high performance ceramics. Sintered ceramics were fabricated from mixtures of powders containing different CeO 2 content prepared by conventional and nonconventional techniques. These powders and their resultant sintered ceramics were specified by chemical and physical characterization, compactation state and mechanical properties. The chemical characteristics were determined by chemical analysis and the physical characteristics were evaluated by phase content, particle and agglomerate size and aspect, and powder porosity. (author)

  8. Stabilization of compactible waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  10. Ceramic Parts for Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. D.; Carpenter, Harry W.; Tellier, Jim; Rollins, Clark; Stormo, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Abilities of ceramics to serve as turbine blades, stator vanes, and other elements in hot-gas flow of rocket engines discussed in report. Ceramics prime candidates, because of resistance to heat, low density, and tolerance of hostile environments. Ceramics considered in report are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and new generation of such ceramic composites as transformation-toughened zirconia and alumina and particulate- or whisker-reinforced matrices. Report predicts properly designed ceramic components viable in advanced high-temperature rocket engines and recommends future work.

  11. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  12. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  13. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  14. Green Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  15. Green roofs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available , beetles and spiders); and the number of birds that nest in vegetated roofs (including kestrels, swallows, and wagtails). Objective The primary objective of a green roof is to create a living habitat in an otherwise barren environment, hence the use... the negative environmental impacts including plant and insect specie loss. Thus at a philosophical level green roofs support the notion “replace what you displace”. Key ecological issues that can be addressed through green roofs include: Negative effects...

  16. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Small Valdivia compact spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kubi's, W; Kubi\\'s, Wieslaw; Michalewski, Henryk

    2005-01-01

    We prove a preservation theorem for the class of Valdivia compact spaces, which involves inverse sequences of ``simple'' retractions. Consequently, a compact space of weight $\\loe\\aleph_1$ is Valdivia compact iff it is the limit of an inverse sequence of metric compacta whose bonding maps are retractions. As a corollary, we show that the class of Valdivia compacta of weight at most $\\aleph_1$ is preserved both under retractions and under open 0-dimensional images. Finally, we characterize the class of all Valdivia compacta in the language of category theory, which implies that this class is preserved under all continuous weight preserving functors.

  18. Supercritical fluid technologies for ceramic-processing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matson, D.W.; Smith, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the applications of supercritical fluid technologies for ceramic processing. The physical and chemical properties of these densified gases are summarized and related to their use as solvents and processing media. Several areas are identified in which specific ceramic processes benefit from the unique properties of supercritical fluids. The rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions provides a technique for producing fine uniform powders and thin films of widely varying materials. Supercritical drying technologies allow the formation of highly porous aerogel products with potentially wide application. Hydrothermal processes leading to the formation of large single crystals and microcrystalline powders can also be extended into the supercritical regime of water. Additional applications and potential applications are identified in the areas of extraction of binders and other additives from ceramic compacts, densification of porous ceramics, the formation of powders in supercritical micro-emulsions, and in preceramic polymer processing

  19. Green thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Frank Woolsey, III

    Many people around the world have observed green light apparently emanating from severe thunderstorms, but until recently there has been no scientific study of the phenomenon. Green thunderstorms have been observed from time to time in association with deep convection or severe weather events. Some skeptics who have not personally observed a green thunderstorm suggest that they are some kind of illusion. The existence of green thunderstorms has been objectively demonstrated by recording spectra of light from thunderstorms using a handheld spectrophotometer. During the spring and summer of 1995 and the spring of 1996 numerous storms were observed and spectra of the light emanating from these storms were recorded. Observations were made both at the ground and aboard research aircraft. Furthermore, time series of spectra were recorded as the observed color of some storms changed from dark blue to a bluish-green. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain the occurrence of green light in connection with severe storms. Fankhauser gave some observational support to the belief that green light from thunderstorms is possible and believed that the source of the light is from the blue sky penetrating thin regions in the clouds. Fraser believes that light from the setting sun, in combination with the process of scattering by atmospheric molecules, creates the green light associated with severe weather and the thunderstorm acts only as a black backdrop. Unfortunately, no cloud illuminated by the sun is black and the green airlight produced by the Fraser theory is in reality overwhelmed by light reflected by the cloud. Often the unusual coloration has been attributed to hail or to reflection of light from foliage on the ground. The quantitative measurements made during the observation period fail to support these assumptions. We have observed thunderstorms to be green over ground that was not green and we have observed blue thunderstorms over ground that was green

  20. Compact turbidity meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Proposed monitor that detects back-reflected infrared radiation makes in situ turbidity measurements of lakes, streams, and other bodies of water. Monitor is compact, works well in daylight as at night, and is easily operated in rough seas.

  1. Behaviorally Green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunstein, Cass; Reisch, Lucia A.

    2016-01-01

    of suggestion, inertia, and loss aversion. If well-chosen, green defaults are likely to have large effects in reducing the economic and environmental harms associated with various products and activities. Such defaults may or may not be more expensive to consumers. In deciding whether to establish green...

  2. Green Tea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and cancer. Green tea is consumed as a beverage. It is also sold in liquid extracts, capsules, and tablets and is sometimes used in topical products (intended to be applied to the skin). How Much Do We Know? Although many studies have been done on green tea and its ...

  3. Worldline Green functions for multiloop diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.G.; Heidelberg Univ.; Schubert, C.

    1994-03-01

    We propose a multiloop generalization of the Bern-Kosower formalism, based on Strassler's approach of evaluating worldline path integrals by worldline Green functions. Those Green functions are explicitly constructed for the basic two-loop graph, and for a loop with an arbitrary number of propagator insertions. For scalar and abelian gauge theories, the resulting integral representations allow to combine whole classes of Feynman diagrams into compact expressions. (orig.)

  4. Cracking cone fracture after cold compaction of argillaceous particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this work an experimental investigation has been focused on the `cracking cone' fracture in powder compacts. This includes studies of crack propagation and determination of operating conditions to avoid the green body fracture. The numerical modelling is implemented using a finite element method based on the Von ...

  5. Green consumerism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, Judith I.M.; Schuitema, Geertje; Garson, Carrie Lee

    and biospheric values influence the importance of such ‘green’ product characteristics on purchasing intentions. In two within-subjects full-factorial experimental studies (N = 100 and N = 107), we found that purchase intentions of products were only steered by green characteristics if prices were low...... and the brand was familiar. Green product characteristics did not influence purchase intentions at all when these proself product characteristics were not fulfilled (i.e., high prices and unfamiliar brands). The importance of proself and green product characteristics on purchasing intentions was also......Our presentation will focus on the influence of product characteristics and values on green consumerism. Although generally a majority of consumers support the idea of purchasing green products, we argue, based on social dilemma theory, that proself product characteristics and egoistic...

  6. Green lights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Peter Kielberg

    This study investigates the effect of drought on economic activity globally using remote sensing data. In particular, predicted variation in greenness is correlated with changes in the density of artificial light observed at night on a grid of 0.25 degree latitude-longitude pixels. I define drought...... as greenness estimated by lagged variation in monthly rainfall and temperature. This definition of drought performs well in identifying self-reported drought events since 2000 compared with measures of drought that do not take greenness into account, and the subsequent analysis indicates that predicted...... variation in greenness is positively associated with year-on-year changes in luminosity: If a unit of observation experiences a predicted variation in greenness that lies 1 standard deviation below the global mean, on average 1.5 - 2.5 light pixels out of 900 are extinguished that year. Finally, an attempt...

  7. Property-porosity relationships for polymer-impregnated superconducting ceramic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salib, S.; Vipulanandan, C.

    1990-01-01

    A thermoplastic polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), was used to improve the flexural properties of the high-temperature superconducting ceramic (YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ ). Ceramic specimens with different porosities were prepared by dry compacting 12.5-mm-diameter disk specimens at various uniaxial pressures. Density-pressure relationships have been developed for before- and after-sintering conditions. The PMMA polymer was impregnated into the porous ceramic at room temperature. The mechanical properties were evaluated by concentrically loading simply supported disk specimens. The load-displacement responses were analyzed using the finite-element method. Impregnation of PMMA polymer at room temperature increased the flexural strength and modulus of the superconducting ceramic without affecting its electrical properties. The flexural properties depended on the porosity of the ceramics, and, hence, linear and nonlinear property-porosity relationships have been used to characterize the behavior of superconducting ceramic with an without the polymer

  8. Sintered ceramics having controlled density and porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brassfield, H.C.; DeHollander, W.R.; Nivas, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A new method was developed for sintering ceramic uranium dioxide powders, in which ammonium oxalate is admixed with the powder prior to being pressed into a cylindrical green body, so that the end-point density of the final nuclear-reactor fuel product can be controlled. When the green body is heated, the ammonium oxalate decomposes and leaves discrete porosity in the sintered body, which corresponds to the ammonium oxalate regions in the green body. Thus the end-point density of the sintered body is a function of the amount of ammonium oxalate added. The final density of the sintered product is about 90-97% of the theoretical. The addition of ammonium oxalate also allows control of the pore size and distribution throughout the fuel. The process leaves substantially no impurities in the sintered strucuture. (DN)

  9. Acoustic emission during the compaction of brittle UO2 particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegron, Lise

    2014-01-01

    One of the options considered for recycling minor actinides is to incorporate about 10% to UO 2 matrix. The presence of open pores interconnected within this fuel should allow the evacuation of helium and fission gases to prevent swelling of the pellet and ultimately its interaction with the fuel clad surrounding it. Implementation of minor actinides requires working in shielded cell, reducing their retention and outlawing additions of organic products. The use of fragmentable particles of several hundred micrometers seems a good solution to control the microstructure of the green compacts and thus control the open porosity after sintering. The goal of this study is to monitor the compaction of brittle UO 2 particles by acoustic emission and to link the particle characteristics to the open porosity obtained after the compact sintering. The signals acquired during tensile strength tests on individual granules and compacts show that the acoustic emission allows the detection of the mechanism of fragmentation and enables identification of a characteristic waveform of this fragmentation. The influences of compaction stress, of the initial particle size distribution and of the internal cohesion of the granules, on the mechanical strength of the compact and on the microstructure and open porosity of the sintered pellets, are analyzed. By its ability to identify the range of fragmentation of the granules during compaction, acoustic emission appears as a promising technique for monitoring the compaction of brittle particles in the manufacture of a controlled porosity fuel. (author) [fr

  10. Compaction of FGD-gypsum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, B.T.J.; Larbi, J.A.; Heijnen, W.M.M.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to produce compacted gypsum with a low porosity and a high strength on a laboratory scale by uniaxial compaction of flue gas desulphurization (FGD-) gypsum powder. Compacted FGD-gypsum cylinders were produced at a compaction pres-sure between 50 and 500 MPa yielding

  11. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabloff, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  12. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Advanced Ceramics: Structural Ceramics and Glasses. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 4-11 ...

  13. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  14. LSA glass-ceramic tiles made by powder pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueira, F.C.; Bertan, F.M.; Riella, H.G.; Uggioni, E.; Bernardin, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    A low cost alternative for the production of glass-ceramic materials is the pressing of the matrix glass powders and its consolidation simultaneously with crystallization in a single stage of sintering. The main objective of this work was to obtain LSA glass ceramics with low thermal expansion, processed by pressing and sintering a ceramic frit powder. The raw materials were homogenized and melted (1480 deg C, 80min), and the melt was poured in water. The glass was chemically (XRF and AAS) and thermally (DTA, 10 deg C/min, air) characterized, and then ground (60min and 120min). The ground powders were characterized (laser diffraction) and compressed (35MPa and 45MPa), thus forming four systems. The compacts were dried (150 deg C, 24h) and sintered (1175 deg C and 1185 deg C, 10 deg C/min). Finally, the glass-ceramics were characterized by microstructural analysis (SEM and XRD), mechanical behavior (σbending) and thermal analysis (α). The best results for thermal expansion were those for the glass-ceramics processed with smaller particle size and greater compaction pressure. (author)

  15. [Ceramic inlays and onlays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, A W; de Kloet, H J; van der Kuy, P

    1996-11-01

    Large direct composite restorations can induce shrinkage related postoperative sensitivity. Indirect resin-bonded (tooth colored) restorations may perhaps prevent these complaints. Indirect bonded ceramics are especially attractive because of their biocompatibility and esthetic performance. Several procedures and techniques are currently available for the fabrication of ceramic restorations: firing, casting, heat-pressing and milling. In this article the different systems are described. Advantages, disadvantages and clinical performance of ceramic inlays are compared and discussed.

  16. Displacive Transformation in Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    PZT ), ceramics have attracted natural abundance. much attention for use in nonvolatile semiconductor mem- We attribute the observed spectra in Fig. I to...near a crack tip in piezoelectric ceramics of lead zirconate titanate ( PZT ) and barium titanate. They reasoned that the poling of ferroelectric... Texture in Ferroelastic Tetragonal Zirconia," J. Am. Ceram . Soc., 73 (1990) no. 6: 1777-1779. 27. J. F. Jue and A. Virkar, "Fabrication, Microstructural

  17. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  18. Piezo-electrostrictive ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Gi; Shin, Byeong Cheol

    1991-09-01

    This book deals with principle and the case of application of piezo-electrostrictive ceramics, which includes definition of piezoelectric materials and production and development of piezoelectric materials, coexistence of Pb(zr, Ti)O 3 ceramics on cause of coexistence in MPB PZT ceramics, electrostrictive effect of oxide type perovskite, practical piezo-electrostrictive materials, and breaking strength, evaluation technique of piezoelectric characteristic, and piezoelectric accelerometer sensor like printer head, ink jet and piezoelectric relay.

  19. SnO{sub 2}{sup *}CoO ceramic obtained by microwave sintering; Ceramicas de SnO{sub 2} {sup *}CoO obtidas por sinterizacao microondas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordignon, M.A.N; Moura, F.; Zaghete, M.A.; Varela, J.A.; Perazolli, L. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Chemistry Institute. Dept. de Biochemistry and Technological Chemistryl

    2009-07-01

    This work consists in the sintering study of CoO doped SnO{sub 2} using microwave sintering oven and silicon carbide as a susceptor. The powders were obtained by dry oxides mixture and conformed in cylindrical shapes with 6mmx8mm and green density to 60%. Then the compacts were sintering up to 1.050 deg C, using heating rate of 50 deg C/min and isotherm up to 30min. The densities obtained were above 95% for both techniques. It was observed that occurred a temperature reducing of 400 deg C and time reducing of 210min to obtain the same densities, when was used the microwave oven without the phenomena of thermal runaway. So the sintered compacts were accomplished using DRX and SEM. It was made the electrical characterization (current x voltage) and it was found to have great potential in the production of dense ceramic-based SnO{sub 2} with low resistivity to obtain electro-ceramic devices. (author)

  20. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  1. Novel gelforming process for near net shape ceramic component production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, G.V.; Johnson, S.B.; Dunstan, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    A novel gelforming process for producing near-net shape ceramic components has been developed. A low viscosity, high volume fraction, ceramic suspension containing a small amount of bio-polymer is poured or injected into a mould. The suspension is gelled within the mould by a temperature activated crosslinking mechanism. The rheological behaviour of the body within the mould is changed from liquid-like to solid-like in a short period of time. The wet mechanical strength of the gelled bodies is sufficient to allow the body to be demoulded and handled without damaging the component. Near net shapes of complex geometry are formed in this way. The wet green body is then dried and densified using traditional methods. Potentially this process can be used to produce inexpensive reliable high strength ceramic components quickly and safely. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  2. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, David A.; Bacchi, David P.; Connors, Timothy F.; Collins, III, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  3. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  4. Ceramic piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic piezoelectric materials conert reversibility electric energy into mechanical energy. In the presence of electric field piezoelectric materials exhibit deformations up to 0.15% (for single crystals up to 1.7%). The deformation energy is in the range of 10 2 - 10 3 J/m 3 and working frequency can reach 10 5 Hz. Ceramic piezoelectric materials find applications in many modern disciplines such as: automatics, micromanipulation, measuring techniques, medical diagnostics and many others. Among the variety of ceramic piezoelectric materials the most important appear to be ferroelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate so called PZT ceramics. Ceramic piezoelectric materials can be processed by methods widely applied for standard ceramics, i.e. starting from simple precursors e.g. oxides. Application of sol-gel method has also been reported. Substantial drawback for many applications of piezoelectric ceramics is their brittleness, thus much effort is currently being put in the development of piezoelectric composite materials. Other important research directions in the field of ceramic piezoelectric materials composite development of lead free materials, which can exhibit properties similar to the PZT ceramics. Among other directions one has to state processing of single crystals and materials having texture or gradient structure. (author)

  5. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  6. FINE PORE DIFFUSER SYSTEM EVALUATION FOR THE GREEN BAY METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Green Bay Metropolitan Sewerage District retrofitted two quadrants of their activated sludge aeration system with ceramic and membrane fine pore diffusers to provide savings in energy usage compared to the sparged turbine aerators originally installed. Because significant di...

  7. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  8. Green Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Engineering is the design, commercialization and use of processes and products that are feasible and economical while reducing the generation of pollution at the source and minimizing the risk to human health and the environment.

  9. Green Roofs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-08-01

    A New Technology Demonstration Publication Green roofs can improve the energy performance of federal buildings, help manage stormwater, reduce airborne emissions, and mitigate the effects of urban heat islands.

  10. Going Green

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is for a general audience and provides information on how to recycle, re-use, and restore. It also covers the benefits of “Going Green" on the environment, health, and social interaction.

  11. Effects of pressure and temperature on pore structure of ceramic synthesized from rice husk: A small angle neutron scattering investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raut Dessai, R., E-mail: reshooin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Goa University, Taleigao Plateau, Goa 403 206 (India); Desa, J.A.E. [Department of Physics, Goa University, Taleigao Plateau, Goa 403 206 (India); Sen, D.; Mazumder, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: ► A porous ceramic has been prepared from silica obtained from rice husk. ► The ceramic has a hierarchical pore structure from micrometric to nano-metric. ► Small Angle Neutron Scattering data indicate nano-pore connectivity to micro-pores. ► Pore morphology can be tuned by compaction pressure and sintering temperature. -- Abstract: Ceramic powder has been synthesized from rice husk as the source of silica. In order to probe the evolution of its hierarchical mesoscopic and microscopic porous structure, the ceramic powder was compacted at different pressures and was sintered at different temperatures. A glassy ceramic to crystalline transition under thermal treatment (up to 1000 °C) was revealed by X-ray diffraction. Existence of pores in two widely separated length scales was indicated by small angle neutron scattering with the smaller ones having mass fractal arrangement. Although no significant change in small pore structure under thermal effect was indicated, a significant modification of the same has been revealed by small angle neutron scattering at different compaction pressures. Connectivity between the pores was ascertained from scattering experiments on the ceramic compact impregnated with heavy water. Scanning electron microscopy shows the microstructure to undergo appreciable coalescence of micrometric ceramic particles for sintering temperature and pressure changes.

  12. Green lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2010-01-01

    Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range......Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range...

  13. Green Nudging

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Nicholas; Eickers, Stephanie; Geene, Leonie; Todorovic, Marijana; Villmow, Annika; Forschungsstelle für Umweltpolitik (FFU), Freie Universität Berlin

    2018-01-01

    Traditional environmental policy instruments have not always proven successful in fostering environmentally friendly behaviour. The question remains: how can policymakers tackle the attitude-behaviour gap when it comes to pro-environmental choices and sustainable lifestyles? One solution that has emerged is green nudging, a new and potentially promising policy tool born of behavioural economics and experimental psychology. This paper contributes to the current discussion surrounding green nud...

  14. Anisotropic and Hierarchical Porosity in Multifunctional Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtner, Aaron Zev

    The performance of multifunctional porous ceramics is often hindered by the seemingly contradictory effects of porosity on both mechanical and non-structural properties and yet a sufficient body of knowledge linking microstructure to these properties does not exist. Using a combination of tailored anisotropic and hierarchical materials, these disparate effects may be reconciled. In this project, a systematic investigation of the processing, characterization and properties of anisotropic and isotropic hierarchically porous ceramics was conducted. The system chosen was a composite ceramic intended as the cathode for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Comprehensive processing investigations led to the development of approaches to make hierarchical, anisotropic porous microstructures using directional freeze-casting of well dispersed slurries. The effect of all the important processing parameters was investigated. This resulted in an ability to tailor and control the important microstructural features including the scale of the microstructure, the macropore size and total porosity. Comparable isotropic porous ceramics were also processed using fugitive pore formers. A suite of characterization techniques including x-ray tomography and 3-D sectional scanning electron micrographs (FIB-SEM) was used to characterize and quantify the green and partially sintered microstructures. The effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure was quantified and discrete element simulations (DEM) were used to explain the experimental observations. Finally, the comprehensive mechanical properties, at room temperature, were investigated, experimentally and using DEM, for the different microstructures.

  15. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  16. Inhomogeneous compact extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronnikov, K.A. [Center of Gravity and Fundamental Metrology, VNIIMS, 46 Ozyornaya st., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation); Budaev, R.I.; Grobov, A.V.; Dmitriev, A.E.; Rubin, Sergey G., E-mail: kb20@yandex.ru, E-mail: buday48@mail.ru, E-mail: alexey.grobov@gmail.com, E-mail: alexdintras@mail.ru, E-mail: sergeirubin@list.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-01

    We show that an inhomogeneous compact extra space possesses two necessary features— their existence does not contradict the observable value of the cosmological constant Λ{sub 4} in pure f ( R ) theory, and the extra dimensions are stable relative to the 'radion mode' of perturbations, the only mode considered. For a two-dimensional extra space, both analytical and numerical solutions for the metric are found, able to provide a zero or arbitrarily small Λ{sub 4}. A no-go theorem has also been proved, that maximally symmetric compact extra spaces are inconsistent with 4D Minkowski space in the framework of pure f ( R ) gravity.

  17. Effect of Powder Grain Size on Microstructure and Magnetic Properties of Hexagonal Barium Ferrite Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Li-Huan; Shen, Si-Yun; Zheng, Hui; Zheng, Peng; Wu, Qiong; Zheng, Liang

    2018-05-01

    Compact hexagonal barium ferrite (BaFe12O19, BaM) ceramics with excellent magnetic properties have been prepared from powder with the optimal grain size. The dependence of the microstructure and magnetic properties of the ceramics on powder grain size was studied in detail. Single-phase hexagonal barium ferrite powder with grain size of 177 nm, 256 nm, 327 nm, and 454 nm was obtained by calcination under different conditions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that 327-nm powder was beneficial for obtaining homogeneous grain size and compact ceramic. In addition, magnetic hysteresis loops and complex permeability spectra demonstrated that the highest saturation magnetization (67.2 emu/g) and real part of the permeability (1.11) at 1 GHz were also obtained using powder with grain size of 327 nm. This relationship between the powder grain size and the properties of the resulting BaM ceramic could be significant for development of microwave devices.

  18. New ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-01-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  19. Development of carbon-ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, V.; Bhatia, G.; Mishra, A.; Sengupta, P.R.; Saha, M.; Rashmi

    2005-01-01

    Carbon-ceramic composites (C-SiC-B 4 C) were developed through in situ formation of silicon carbide by mixing coal-tar based green coke and silicon as silicon carbide (SiC) precursor, boron carbide (B 4 C) and heat-treatment to 2200 deg. C. These composites were characterised for their physical, mechanical and oxidation resistance properties. The formation of protective coatings during oxidation of the composites was confirmed by using X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy and porosity measurement. Carbon-ceramic composites, which could withstand oxidation at 800-1200 deg. C for about 10 h in air have been developed

  20. Efficient photoemission from robust ferroelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boscolo, I.; Castellano, M.; Catani, L.; Ferrario, M.; Tazzioli, F.; Giannessi, L.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental results on photoemission by ferroelectric ceramic disks, with a possible interpretation, are present. Two types of lead zirconate titanate lanthanum doped, PLZT, ceramics have been used for tests. 25 ps light pulses of 532 and 355 nm were used for excitation. The intensity ranged within the interval 0.1-3 GW/cm 2. The upper limit of the intensity was established by the damage threshold tested by the onset of ion emission. At low value of the intensity the yield was comparable at the two wavelengths. At the highest intensity of green light the emitted charge was 1 nC per 10 mm 2, but it was limited by the space charge effect. In fact, the applied field was only 20 kV/cm, allowed both by the mechanical design of the apparatus and the poor vacuum, 10 - 4 mbar. No surface processing was required. The measurement of the electron pulse length under way

  1. Laser processing of ceramics for microelectronics manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposili, Robert S.; Bovatsek, James; Patel, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    Ceramic materials are used extensively in the microelectronics, semiconductor, and LED lighting industries because of their electrically insulating and thermally conductive properties, as well as for their high-temperature-service capabilities. However, their brittleness presents significant challenges for conventional machining processes. In this paper we report on a series of experiments that demonstrate and characterize the efficacy of pulsed nanosecond UV and green lasers in machining ceramics commonly used in microelectronics manufacturing, such as aluminum oxide (alumina) and aluminum nitride. With a series of laser pocket milling experiments, fundamental volume ablation rate and ablation efficiency data were generated. In addition, techniques for various industrial machining processes, such as shallow scribing and deep scribing, were developed and demonstrated. We demonstrate that lasers with higher average powers offer higher processing rates with the one exception of deep scribes in aluminum nitride, where a lower average power but higher pulse energy source outperformed a higher average power laser.

  2. Porosity and biocompatibility study of ceramic implants based on ZrO2 and Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinova, Larisa; Shupletsova, Valeria; Leitsin, Vladimir; Vasyliev, Roman; Zubov, Dmitry; Buyakov, Ales; Kulkov, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    The work studies ZrO 2 (Me x O y )-based porous ceramics produced from the powders consisting of hollow spherical particles. It was shown that the structure is represented by a cellular framework with bimodal porosity consisting of sphere-like large pores and pores that were not filled with the powder particles during the compaction. For such ceramics, the increase of pore volume is accompanied by the increased strain in an elastic area. It was also shown that the porous ZrO 2 ceramics had no acute or chronic cytotoxicity. At the same time, ceramics possess the following osteoconductive properties: adhesion support, spreading, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs

  3. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  4. Ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  5. Green banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Drobnjaković

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to march towards “low - carbon economy”. Global challenges of diminishing fossil fuel reserves, climate change, environmental management and finite natural resources serving an expanding world population - these reasons mean that urgent action is required to transition to solutions which minimize environmental impact and are sustainable. We are at the start of the low - carbon revolution and those that have started on their low - carbon journey already are seeing benefits such as new markets and customers, improved economic, social and environmental performance, and reduced bills and risks. Green investment banks offer alternative financial services: green car loans, energy efficiency mortgages, alternative energy venture capital, eco - savings deposits and green credit cards. These items represent innovative financial products.

  6. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project: Semiannual progress report, October 1986-March 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This report contains four subelements: (1) Monolithics, (2) Ceramic Composites, (3) Thermal and Wear Coatings, and (4) Joining. Ceramic research conducted within the Monolithics subelement currently includes work activities on green state ceramic fabrication, characterization, and densification and on structural, mechanical, and physical properties of these ceramics. Research conducted within the Ceramic Composites subelement currently includes silicon carbide and oxide-based composites, which, in addition to the work activities cited for Monolithics, include fiber synthesis and characterization. Research conducted in the Thermal and Wear Coatings subelement is currently limited to oxide-base coatings and involves coating synthesis, characterization, and determination of the mechanical and physical properties of the coatings. Research conducted in the Joining subelement currently includes studies of processes to produce strong stable joints between zirconia ceramics and iron-base alloys. A major objective of the research in the Materials and Processing project element is to systematically advance the understanding of the relationships between ceramic raw materials such as powders and reactant gases, the processing variables involved in producing the ceramic materials, and the resultant microstructures and physical and mechanical properties of the ceramic materials. Success in meeting this objective will provide US companies with new or improved ways for producing economical highly reliable ceramic components for advanced heat engines.

  7. Stereolithographic processing of ceramics: Photon diffusion in colloidal dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajeev

    The technique of ceramic stereolithography (CSL) has been developed for fabricating near net shape ceramic objects. In stereolithography, the three-dimensional computer design file of the object is sliced into thin layers. Each layer is physically fabricated by photocuring the surface of a liquid photo-polymerizable resin bath by raster scanning an ultra-violet laser across the surface of the resin. In CSL, the liquid resin is a high concentration colloidal dispersion in a solution of ultraviolet curable polymers. The ceramic green body fabricated by ceramic stereolithography technique is subjected to the post processing steps of drying, binder burnout and sintering to form a dense ceramic object. An aqueous alumina dispersion in photocuring polymers with particle volume fraction greater than 0.5 was formulated for CSL process. Low molecular weight solution polymers were found to be best suited for formulating ceramic resins due to their inherently low viscosity and favorable interactions with the ceramic dispersant. A hydroxyapatite ceramic resin was also developed for the use in the CSL technique. A model is developed to describe the photocuring process in concentrated ceramic dispersion. The curing profile in ceramic dispersion is governed by multiple scattering from the ceramic particles and absorption by the photocuring polymers. Diffusion theory of light transport is used to model the multiple scattering and absorption phenomena. It is found that diffusive transport adequately describes the phenomena of laser pulse propagation in highly concentrated colloidal dispersions. A model was developed to describe the absorption in highly concentrated ceramic dispersion. Various complex-shaped monolithic alumina and hydroxyapatite objects were fabricated by CSL and shown to possess uniform microstructure. The mechanical properties and sintering behavior of the parts fabricated by CSL are shown to be comparable to those fabricated by other ceramic processing technique

  8. Green times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenclever, W.D.; Hasenclever, C.

    1982-01-01

    The authors, founding members of the ''Green Party'' have in mind to make a very personal contribution to a better understanding of the present political situation which, although it seems to have reached a deadlock, still offers positive chances and prospects. New approaches in policy are mentioned which may help to overcome the present state of resignation of many adolescents and adults. Among other things, they describe themselves setting out for new pathways, the ''Greens'' in Parliament, prospect for the future, opportunities of the ecologically oriented economic policy. Finally, they call upon the reader to think and develop further under the motto ''What we all can do''. (HSCH) [de

  9. Impact fragmentation of a brittle metal compact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Megan; Hooper, Joseph P.

    2018-05-01

    The fragmentation behavior of a metal powder compact which is ductile in compression but brittle in tension is studied via impact experiments and analytical models. Consolidated metal compacts were prepared via cold-isostatic pressing of powder at 380 MPa followed by moderate annealing at 365 °C. The resulting zinc material is ductile and strain-hardening in high-rate uniaxial compression like a traditional metal, but is elastic-brittle in tension with a fracture toughness comparable to a ceramic. Cylindrical samples were launched up to 800 m/s in a gas gun into thin aluminum perforation targets, subjecting the projectile to a complex multiaxial and time-dependent stress state that leads to catastrophic fracture. A soft-catch mechanism using low-density artificial snow was developed to recover the impact debris, and collected fragments were analyzed to determine their size distribution down to 30 μm. Though brittle fracture occurs along original particle boundaries, no power-law fragmentation behavior was observed as is seen in other low-toughness materials. An analytical theory is developed to predict the characteristic fragment size accounting for both the sharp onset of fragmentation and the effect of increasing impact velocity.

  10. Weakly compact operators and interpolation

    OpenAIRE

    Maligranda, Lech

    1992-01-01

    The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. In this survey, we have collected and ordered some of this (partly very new) knowledge. We have also included some comments, remarks and examples. The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. I...

  11. Potential of advanced ceramics elaborated from laser-synthetized powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lihrmann, J.M.; Luce, M.; Croix, O.; Cauchetier, M.

    1987-01-01

    Use of ultrafine powders obtained by pyrolysis of gaseous reagents with a CO 2 laser gives high tech ceramics. Initiated by Haggerty from MIT, this new method is in use at the CEA since 1985. Conditions for synthesis with a 1KW laser are presented. Lab production is nearly 40g/hr of SiC with yields of 99%. Methods for powder treatment and results of mechanical and chemical properties of the compact materials obtained are given [fr

  12. Industrial ceramics - Properties, forming and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, Gilbert; Niepce, Jean-Claude; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Alary, J.A.; Allard, B.; Ayral, A.; Bassat, J.M.; Elissalde, C.; Maglione, M.; Beauvy, M.; Bertrand, G.; Bignon, A.; Billieres, D.; Blanc, J.J.; Blumenfeld, P.; Bonnet, J.P.; Bougoin, M.; Bourgeon, M.; Boussuge, M.; Thorel, A.; Bruzek, C.E.; Cambier, F.; Carrerot, H.; Casabonne, J.M.; Chaix, J.M.; Chevalier, J.; Chopinet, M.H.; Couque, H.; Courtois, C.; Leriche, A.; Dhaler, D.; Denape, J.; Euzen, P.; Ganne, J.P.; Gauffinet, S.; Girard, A.; Gonon, M.; Guizard, C.; Hampshire, S.; Joulin, J.P.; Julbe, A.; Ferrato, M.; Fontaine, M.L.; Lebourgeois, R.; Lopez, J.; Maquet, M.; Marinel, S.; Marrony, M.; Martin, J.F.; Mougin, J.; Pailler, R.; Pate, M.; Petitpas, E.; Pijolat, C.; Pires-Franco, P.; Poirier, C.; Poirier, J.; Pourcel, F.; Potier, A.; Tulliani, J.M.; Viricelle, J.P.; Beauger, A.

    2013-01-01

    After a general introduction to ceramics (definition, general properties, elaboration, applications, market data), this book address conventional ceramics (elaboration, material types), thermo-structural ceramics (oxide based ceramics, non-oxide ceramics, fields of application, functional coatings), refractory ceramics, long fibre and ceramic matrix composites, carbonaceous materials, ceramics used for filtration, catalysis and the environment, ceramics for biomedical applications, ceramics for electronics and electrical engineering (for capacitors, magnetic, piezoelectric, dielectric ceramics, ceramics for hyper-frequency resonators), electrochemical ceramics, transparent ceramics (forming and sintering), glasses, mineral binders. The last chapter addresses ceramics used in the nuclear energy sector: in nuclear fuels and fissile material, absorbing ceramics and shields, in the management of nuclear wastes, new ceramics for reactors under construction or for future nuclear energy

  13. Compact stellarators as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Valanju, P.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Hirshman, S.; Spong, D.A.; Strickler, D.; Williamson, D.E.; Ware, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of compact stellarators are examined as reactors: two- and three-field-period (M=2 and 3) quasi-axisymmetric devices with volume-average =4-5% and M=2 and 3 quasi-poloidal devices with =10-15%. These low-aspect-ratio stellarator-tokamak hybrids differ from conventional stellarators in their use of the plasma-generated bootstrap current to supplement the poloidal field from external coils. Using the ARIES-AT model with B max =12T on the coils gives Compact Stellarator reactors with R=7.3-8.2m, a factor of 2-3 smaller R than other stellarator reactors for the same assumptions, and neutron wall loadings up to 3.7MWm -2 . (author)

  14. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Tolliver, J.S.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1988-05-01

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R 0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R 0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Compact Spreader Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  16. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  17. Compact nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.V.; Churakov, Yu.A.; Danchenko, Yu.V.; Bylkin, B.K.; Tsvetkov, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    Different constructions of racks for compact storage of spent fuel assemblies (FA) in ''coolin''g pools (CP) of NPPs with the BWR and PWR type reactors are described. Problems concerning nuclear and radiation safety and provision of necessary thermal conditions arising in such rack design are discussed. It is concluded that the problem of prolonged fuel storage at NPPs became Very actual for many countries because of retapdation of the rates of fuel reprocessing centers building. Application of compact storage racks is a promising solution of the problem of intermediate FA storage at NPPs. Such racks of stainless boron steel and with neutron absorbers in the from of boron carbide panels enable to increase the capacity of the present CP 2-2.6 times, and the period of FA storage in them up to 5-10 years

  18. Investigations on the performance of ultrasonic drilling process with special reference to precision machining of advanced ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adithan, M.; Laroiya, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced ceramics are assuming an important role in modern industrial technology. The applications and advantages of using advanced ceramics are many. There are several reasons why we should go in for machining of advanced ceramics after their compacting and sintering. These are discussed in this paper. However, precision machining of advanced ceramics must be economical. Critical technological issues to be addressed in cost effective machining of ceramics include design of machine tools, tooling arrangements, improved yield and precision, relationship of part dimensions and finish specifications to functional performance, and on-line inspection. Considering the above ultrasonic drilling is an important process used for the precision machining of advanced ceramics. Extensive studies on tool wear occurring in the ultrasonic machining of advanced ceramics have been carried out. In addition, production accuracy of holes drilled, surface finish obtained and surface integrity aspects in the machining of advanced ceramics have also been investigated. Some specific findings with reference to surface integrity are: a) there were no cracks or micro-cracks developed during or after ultrasonic machining of advanced ceramics, b) while machining Hexoloy alpha silicon carbide a recast layer is formed as a result of ultrasonic machining. This is attributed to the viscous heating resulting from high energy impacts during ultrasonic machining. While machining all other types of ceramics no such formation of recast layer was observed, and , c) there is no change in the microstructure of the advanced ceramics as a result of ultrasonic machining

  19. Analysis of laboratory compaction methods of roller compacted concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtík, Tomáš; Chylík, Roman; Bílý, Petr; Fládr, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) is an ordinary concrete poured and compacted with machines typically used for laying of asphalt road layers. One of the problems connected with this technology is preparation of representative samples in the laboratory. The aim of this work was to analyse two methods of preparation of RCC laboratory samples with bulk density as the comparative parameter. The first method used dynamic compaction by pneumatic hammer. The second method of compaction had a static character. The specimens were loaded by precisely defined force in laboratory loading machine to create the same conditions as during static rolling (in the Czech Republic, only static rolling is commonly used). Bulk densities obtained by the two compaction methods were compared with core drills extracted from real RCC structure. The results have shown that the samples produced by pneumatic hammer tend to overestimate the bulk density of the material. For both compaction methods, immediate bearing index test was performed to verify the quality of compaction. A fundamental difference between static and dynamic compaction was identified. In static compaction, initial resistance to penetration of the mandrel was higher, after exceeding certain limit the resistance was constant. This means that the samples were well compacted just on the surface. Specimens made by pneumatic hammer actively resisted throughout the test, the whole volume was uniformly compacted.

  20. Going Green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowsky, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Going green saves money and can even make money. Sustainable practices promote better health, less absenteeism, and more productivity. They also attract students, who are paying increasing attention to schools' environmental policies. Beyond being the smart thing to do, administrators at the University of Washington say repeatedly, it's the right…

  1. Buying Green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layng, T. V. Joe

    2010-01-01

    In "Buying Green," Joe Layng recognizes that, like all choices we make, our decisions as consumers are more likely to be influenced by their short-term consequences for us as individuals (price, quality) than they are by their long-term consequences for society (environmental impact). He believes that the equation can be tilted in favor of greener…

  2. Green pioneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueland, Jennifer

    The government has set tough targets for the NHS in England to reduce its carbon footprint. In this article, nurses and managers at Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust explain how a programme of 'greening' initiatives - including a trial of electric cars for community staff - have slashed the trust's CO2 output.

  3. Automatically Green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunstein, Cass R.; Reisch, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    reasons include the power of suggestion; inertia and procrastination; and loss aversion. If well-chosen, green defaults are likely to have large effects in reducing the economic and environmental harms associated with various products and activities. Such defaults may or may not be more expensive...

  4. Automatically Green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunstein, Cass R.; Reisch, Lucia

    reasons include the power of suggestion; inertia and procrastination; and loss aversion. If well-chosen, green defaults are likely to have large effects in reducing the economic and environmental harms associated with various products and activities. Such defaults may or may not be more expensive...

  5. Going Green

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-18

    This podcast is for a general audience and provides information on how to recycle, re-use, and restore. It also covers the benefits of “Going Green" on the environment, health, and social interaction.  Created: 4/18/2008 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), ATSDR.   Date Released: 5/8/2008.

  6. Compaction of cereal grain

    OpenAIRE

    Wychowaniec, J.; Griffiths, I.; Gay, A.; Mughal, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on simple shaking experiments to measure the compaction of a column of Firth oat grain. Such grains are elongated anisotropic particles with a bimodal polydispersity. In these experiments, the particle configurations start from an initially disordered, low-packing-fraction state and under vertical shaking evolve to a dense state with evidence of nematic-like structure at the surface of the confining tube. This is accompanied by an increase in the packing fraction of the grain.

  7. Compact nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juric, S.I.

    1975-01-01

    A compact nuclear reactor of the pressurized-water variety is described which has two separate parts separably engageable for ease of inspection, maintenance and repair. One of the parts is a pressure vessel having an active core and the other of the parts is a closure adapted on its lower surface with an integral steam generator. An integral pump, external pressurizer and control rods are provided which communicate with the active core when engaged to form a total unit. (U.S.)

  8. Compact power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Dieckamp, H.M.; Wilson, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector

  9. CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The milestone workshops on LHC experiments in Aachen in 1990 and at Evian in 1992 provided the first sketches of how LHC detectors might look. The concept of a compact general-purpose LHC experiment based on a solenoid to provide the magnetic field was first discussed at Aachen, and the formal Expression of Interest was aired at Evian. It was here that the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) name first became public. Optimizing first the muon detection system is a natural starting point for a high luminosity (interaction rate) proton-proton collider experiment. The compact CMS design called for a strong magnetic field, of some 4 Tesla, using a superconducting solenoid, originally about 14 metres long and 6 metres bore. (By LHC standards, this warrants the adjective 'compact'.) The main design goals of CMS are: 1 - a very good muon system providing many possibilities for momentum measurement (physicists call this a 'highly redundant' system); 2 - the best possible electromagnetic calorimeter consistent with the above; 3 - high quality central tracking to achieve both the above; and 4 - an affordable detector. Overall, CMS aims to detect cleanly the diverse signatures of new physics by identifying and precisely measuring muons, electrons and photons over a large energy range at very high collision rates, while also exploiting the lower luminosity initial running. As well as proton-proton collisions, CMS will also be able to look at the muons emerging from LHC heavy ion beam collisions. The Evian CMS conceptual design foresaw the full calorimetry inside the solenoid, with emphasis on precision electromagnetic calorimetry for picking up photons. (A light Higgs particle will probably be seen via its decay into photon pairs.) The muon system now foresaw four stations. Inner tracking would use silicon microstrips and microstrip gas chambers, with over 10 7 channels offering high track finding efficiency. In the central CMS barrel, the tracking elements are

  10. Compact Information Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    Department of Defense, Executive Services, Directorate (0704-0188).   Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person...which lies in the mission of AFOSR. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS sparse sampling , principal components analysis 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...approved for public release Contents 1 Training for Ph.D. Students and Postdoc Researchers 2 2 Papers 2 3 Summary of Proposed Research: Compact

  11. Green, Compact Hybrids for Nanosatellite Launchers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Low cost access to space is essential for continued commercial exploitation of near-earth environments, and to support future science missions. A serious limitation...

  12. Ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  14. Ceramic injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego

    1988-01-01

    Interest in making complex net-shape ceramic parts with good surface finishing and sharp tolerances without machining is a driving force for studying the injection molding technique. This method consists of softhening the ceramic material by means of adding some plastic and heating in order to inject the mixture under pressure into a relatively cold mold where solidification takes place. Essentially, it is the same process used in thermoplastic industry but, in the present case, the ceramic powder load ranges between 80 to 90 wt.%. This work shows results obtained from the fabrication of pieces of different ceramic materials (alumina, barium titanate ferrites, etc.) in a small scale, using equipments developed and constructed in the laboratory. (Author) [es

  15. Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics. Piezoelectric Actuators. Nano and Micropositioners. Vibration Control Systems. Computer Printers. Piezoelectric Transformers,Voltage Generators, Spark Plugs, Ultrasonic Motors,. Ultrasonic Generators and Sensors. Sonars, Medical Diagnostic. Computer Memories. NVFRAM ...

  16. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  17. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  18. Diffusion through statically compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C.L.; Shebl, M.A.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental work on the effect of compaction on contaminant flow through clay liners. The experimental program included evaluation of soil properties, compaction, permeability and solute diffusion. A permeameter was built of non reactive materials to test samples compacted at different water contents and compactive efforts. The flow of a permeating solute, LiCl, was monitored. Effluent samples were collected for solute concentration measurements. The concentrations were measured by performing atomic adsorption tests. The analyzed results showed different diffusion characteristics when compaction conditions changed. At each compactive effort, permeability decreased as molding water content increased. Consequently, transit time (measured at relative concentration 50%) increased and diffusivity decreased. As compactive effort increased for soils compacted dry of optimum, permeability and diffusion decreased. On the other hand, as compactive effort increased for soils compacted wet of optimum, permeability and diffusivity increased. Tortuosity factor was indirectly measured from the diffusion and retardation rate. Tortuosity factor also decreased as placement water content was increased from dry of optimum to wet of optimum. Then decreases were more pronounced for low compactive effort tests. 27 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Selecting Ceramics - Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM OF PRESENTATION: To compare a number of materials for extracoronal restoration of teeth with particular reference to CAD-CAM ceramics. CASE DESCRIPTION AND TREATMENT CARRIED OUT: This paper will be illustrated using clinical examples of patients treated using different ceramic restorations to present the advantages and disadvantages and each technique. The different requirements of tooth preparation, impression taking and technical procedures of each system will be presented and compar...

  20. Cavitation damage of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.I.; Marinin, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigation of ceramic material damage under the effect of cavitation field on their surface, formed in water under the face of exponential concentrator, connected with ultrasonic generator UZY-3-0.4. Amplitude of vibrations of concentrator face (30+-2)x10 -6 m, frequency-21 kHz. It was established that ceramics resistance to cavitation effect correlated with the product of critical of stress intensity factor and material hardness

  1. Dimensional Behavior of Matrix Graphite Compacts during Heat Treatments for HTGR Fuel Element Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung

    2015-01-01

    The carbonization is a process step where the binder that is incorporated during the matrix graphite powder preparation step is evaporated and the residue of the binder is carbonized during the heat treatment at about 1073 K. This carbonization step is followed by the final high temperature heat treatment where the carbonized compacts are heat treated at 2073-2173 K in vacuum for a relatively short time (about 2 hrs). In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, and for fuel matrix graphite to meet the required material properties, it is essential to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, the fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the heat treatments conditions, which has a strong influence on the further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the dimensional changes of green compacts during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated when compacts have different densities from different pressing conditions and different final heat treatment temperatures are employed, keeping other process parameters constant, such as the binder content, carbonization time, temperature and atmosphere (two hours ant 1073K and N2 atmosphere). In this work, the dimensional variations of green compacts during the carbonization and final heat treatment are evaluated when compacts have different densities from different pressing conditions and different final heat treatment temperatures are employed

  2. Pengaruh Green Marketing Hotel Terhadap Green Consumer Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Yo Fernandez, Eunike Christe; Tjoanda, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui pengaruh dari green marketing hotel terhadap green consumer behavior. Green marketing memiliki 3 dimensi, yaitu green product, green price, dan green promotion. Penelitian ini melibatkan 272 responden masyarakat Surabaya dan menggunakan metode regresi linear berganda. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa green product dan green price berpengaruh secara positif dan signifikan sedangkan green promotion berpengaruh namun tidak signifikan terhadap green con...

  3. A study on some properties of sintered stainless steel powder compacts with sintering conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bang Sik; Kim, Kwan Hyu; Lee, Doh Jae; Choi, Dap Chun

    1986-01-01

    Sintered specimens for the mechanical and corrosion tests were prepared from 316L, 410L and 434L stainless steel powder compacts with green densities in the range of 6.2∼7.0g/cm 3 . The experimental variables studied were green density, sintering atmosphere, temperature and time, type of lubricant used and cooling rate after sintering operation. Mechanical properties of green compacts and sintered specimens were evaluated. The corrosion tests were performed by potentiodynamic anodic polarization technique. Mechanical properties were very sensitive to the sintering atmosphere; sintering in dissociated ammonia resulted in the strengthing but embrittlement of sintered 316L, 410L and 434L strainless steel powder compacts. Their corrosion resistance was also decreased. The tensile strength was increased with increases in sintering time and temperature while the decreases in the yield strength were observed. The tensile properties of green compacts were shown to closely related to the green density. Addition of 1% acrawax as a lubricant was appeared to be most effective for the improvement of green strength. (Author)

  4. MECHANICS OF DYNAMIC POWDER COMPACTION PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Nurettin YAVUZ

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, interest in dynamic compaction methods of metal powders has increased due to the need to improve compaction properties and to increase production rates of compacts. In this paper, review of dynamic and explosive compaction of metal powders are given. An attempt is made to get a better understanding of the compaction process with the mechanicis of powder compaction.

  5. Green Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shalini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Green computing is all about using computers in a smarter and eco-friendly way. It is the environmentally responsible use of computers and related resources which includes the implementation of energy-efficient central processing units, servers and peripherals as well as reduced resource consumption and proper disposal of electronic waste .Computers certainly make up a large part of many people lives and traditionally are extremely damaging to the environment. Manufacturers of computer and its parts have been espousing the green cause to help protect environment from computers and electronic waste in any way.Research continues into key areas such as making the use of computers as energy-efficient as Possible, and designing algorithms and systems for efficiency-related computer technologies.

  6. Large ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, W.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Prominent ceramic raw materials and products manufacturers were surveyed to determine the state of the art for alumina ceramic fabrication. This survey emphasized current capabilities and limitations for fabrication of large, high-density, high-purity, complex shapes. Some directions are suggested for future needs and development. Ceramic-to-ceramic sealing has applications for several technologies that require large and/or complex vacuum-tight ceramic shapes. Information is provided concerning the assembly of complex monolithic ceramic shapes by bonding of subassemblies at temperatures ranging from 450 to 1500 0 C. Future applications and fabrication techniques for various materials are presented

  7. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anu, Sharma, E-mail: issaranu@gmail.com; Gayatri, Sharma, E-mail: sharmagayatri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Govt. College of Engineering & Technology, Bikaner, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  8. The history of ceramic filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, S

    2000-01-01

    The history of ceramic filters is surveyed. Included is the history of piezoelectric ceramics. Ceramic filters were developed using technology similar to that of quartz crystal and electro-mechanical filters. However, the key to this development involved the theoretical analysis of vibration modes and material improvements of piezoelectric ceramics. The primary application of ceramic filters has been for consumer-market use. Accordingly, a major emphasis has involved mass production technology, leading to low-priced devices. A typical ceramic filter includes monolithic resonators and capacitors packaged in unique configurations.

  9. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  10. Green toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertens, Alexandra; Anastas, Nicholas; Spencer, Pamela J; Stephens, Martin; Goldberg, Alan; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Historically, early identification and characterization of adverse effects of industrial chemicals was difficult because conventional toxicological test methods did not meet R&D needs for rapid, relatively inexpensive methods amenable to small amounts of test material. The pharmaceutical industry now front-loads toxicity testing, using in silico, in vitro, and less demanding animal tests at earlier stages of product development to identify and anticipate undesirable toxicological effects and optimize product development. The Green Chemistry movement embraces similar ideas for development of less toxic products, safer processes, and less waste and exposure. Further, the concept of benign design suggests ways to consider possible toxicities before the actual synthesis and to apply some structure/activity rules (SAR) and in silico methods. This requires not only scientific development but also a change in corporate culture in which synthetic chemists work with toxicologists. An emerging discipline called Green Toxicology (Anastas, 2012) provides a framework for integrating the principles of toxicology into the enterprise of designing safer chemicals, thereby minimizing potential toxicity as early in production as possible. Green Toxicology`s novel utility lies in driving innovation by moving safety considerations to the earliest stage in a chemical`s lifecycle, i.e., to molecular design. In principle, this field is no different than other subdisciplines of toxicology that endeavor to focus on a specific area - for example, clinical, environmental or forensic toxicology. We use the same principles and tools to evaluate an existing substance or to design a new one. The unique emphasis is in using 21st century toxicology tools as a preventative strategy to "design out" undesired human health and environmental effects, thereby increasing the likelihood of launching a successful, sustainable product. Starting with the formation of a steering group and a series of workshops

  11. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Richard W.; Nieman, G. William; Weertman, Julia R.

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material.

  12. Green Gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamandra Martinez, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to offer a general panoramic of the processes or experiences pilot that are carried out in the Project Green Gold, as strategy of environmental sustainability and organizational invigoration in Choco, especially in the 12 communities of the municipalities of Tado and Condoto. It is also sought to offer a minimum of information on the techniques of handmade production and to show the possibilities to carry out in a rational way the use and use of the natural resources. The Project Green Gold is carried out by the Corporation Green Gold (COV) and co-financed with resources of international and national character, the intervention of the financial resources it achievement mainly for the use of clean processes in the extraction stages and metals benefit. The project is centered primarily in the absence of use of products or toxic substances as the mercury, fair trade, organizational invigoration, execution of 11 approaches and certification of the metals Gold and Platinum. The COV, it has come executing the proposal from the year 2001 with the premise of contributing to the balance between the rational exploitation of the natural resources and the conservation of the environment in the Choco. In the project they are used technical handmade characteristic of the region framed inside the mining activity and production activities are diversified in the productive family units. Those producing with the support of entities of juridical character, specify the necessary game rules for the extraction and products commercialization

  13. Zirconia toughened ceramics for heat engine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, G.A.; Blum, J.B.; Manwiller, K.E.; Knapp, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Three classes of zirconia toughened ceramics (ZTC) were studied, i.e. Mg-PSZ (MgO-partially stabilized zirconia), Y-TZP (Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-tetragonal zirconia polycrystals) and ZTA (zirconia toughened alumina). The main objective was to improve the high temperature strength and toughness, which are not satisfactory in the ''state of the art'' ZTC materials. Powders prepared by melting/rapid solidification and by chemical routes were used. The green parts were made by both dry and wet shape forming methods. Fine grained Mg-PSZ ceramics with unique microstructures were produced using the rapidly solidified powders. The Y-TZP materials were improved mainly through microstructure control and by addition of alpha alumina as a dispersed phase. Preliminary results on ZTA ceramics made with the rapidly solidified powders were also obtained. It is concluded that the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//Y-TZP composites offer a good chance of meeting the program objectives

  14. Compact neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavi, V.; Phatak, P.R.; Bahadur, C.; Bayala, A.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Sathian, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A compact size neutron flux monitor has been developed incorporating standard boards developed for smart radiation monitors. The sensitivity of the monitors is 0.4cps/nV. It has been tested up to 2075 nV flux with standard neutron sources. It shows convincing results even in high flux areas like 6m away from the accelerator in RMC (Parel) for 106/107 nV. These monitors have a focal and remote display, alarm function with potential free contacts for centralized control and additional provision of connectivity via RS485/Ethernet. This paper describes the construction, working and results of the above flux monitor

  15. Compact ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, A.; Coppi, B.; Nassi, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on high magnetic field experiments which can be designed to investigate D-T ignition conditions based on present-day experimental results and theoretical understanding of plasma phenomena. The key machine elements are: large plasma currents, compact dimensions, tight aspect ratios, moderate elongations and significant triangularities of the plasma column. High plasma densities, strong ohmic heating, the needed degree of energy confinement, good plasma purity and robust stability against ideal and resistive instabilities can be achieved simultaneously. The Ignitor design incorporates all these characteristics and involves magnet technology developments, started with the Alcator experiment, that use cryogenically cooled normal conductors

  16. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurennoy, S.S.; O'Hara, J.F.; Rybarcyk, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  17. Compact electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    There have been many recent developments in the area of compact storage rings. Such rings would have critical wavelengths of typically 10 A, achieved with beam energies of several hundreds of MeV and superconducting dipole fields of around 5 Tesla. Although the primary motivation for progress in this area is that of commercial x-ray lithography, such sources might be an attractive source for college campuses to operate. They would be useful for many programs in materials science, solid state, x-ray microscopy and other biological areas. We discuss the properties of such sources and review developments around the world, primarily in the USA, japan and W. Germany

  18. Compact synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.; Wang, T.; Tian, J.; Lin, Y.; Chen, S.; He, W.; Hu, Y.; Li, Q.

    1985-01-01

    A compact 800 MeV synchrotron radiation source is discussed. The storage ring has a circumference of 30.3 m, two 90 degree and four 45 degree bending magnet sections, two long straight sections and four short straight sections. The radius of the bending magnet is 2.224m. The critical wave length is 24A. The injector is a 15 Mev Microtron Electrons are accelerated from 15 Mev to 800 Mev by ramping the field of the ring. The expected stored current will be around 100 ma

  19. LASL Compact Torus Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Armstrong, W.T.; Bartsch, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Compact Torus (CT) concept includes any axisymmetric toroidal plasma configuration, which does not require the linking of any material through the hole in the torus. Thus, the magnet coils, vacuum vessel, etc., have a simple cylindrical or spherical geometry instead of the toroidal geometry required for Tokamaks and RFP's. This simplified geometry results in substantial engineering advantages in CT reactor embodiments while retaining the good confinement properties afforded by an axisymmetric toroidal plasma-field geometry. CT's can be classified into three major types by using the ion gyro radius rho/sub i/ and the magnitude of the maximum toroidal field B/sub tm/

  20. Compact Q-balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D., E-mail: bazeia@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Losano, L.; Marques, M.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Departamento de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58297-000 Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 58109-970 Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Rocha, R. da [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil)

    2016-07-10

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space–time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  1. Surface modification of ceramics. Ceramics no hyomen kaishitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hioki, T. (Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-07-05

    Surface modification of ceramics and some study results using in implantation in surface modification are introduced. The mechanical properties (strength, fracture toughness, flaw resistance) of ceramics was improved and crack was repaired using surface modification by ion implantation. It is predicted that friction and wear properties are considerably affected because the hardness of ceramics is changed by ion implantation. Cementing and metalization are effective as methods for interface modification and the improvement of the adhesion power of the interface between metal and ceramic is their example. It was revealed that the improvement of mechanical properties of ceramics was achieved if appropriate surface modification was carried out. The market of ceramics mechanical parts is still small, therefore, the present situation is that the field of activities for surface modification of ceramics is also narrow. However, it is thought that in future, ceramics use may be promoted surely in the field like medicine and mechatronics. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Sintering studies on iron-carbon-copper compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perianayagam Philomen-D-Anand Raj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sintered Iron-Carbon-Copper parts are among the most widely used powder metallurgy product in automobile. In this paper, studies have been carried out to find out the sintering characteristics of iron-carbon-copper compacts when sintered in nitrogen atmosphere. The effects of various processing parameters on the sintering characteristics were studied. The various processing parameters considered were compaction pressure, green density and sintering temperature. The sintering characteristics determined were sintered density, porosity, dimensional change, micro hardness and radial crush strength. The results obtained have been discussed on the basis of micro structural observations. The characteristics of SEM fractography were also used to determine the mechanism of fracture. The fracture energy is strongly dependent on density of the compact.

  3. [Raman and EDXRF Study on Overglaze Decorations of Jingdezhen Ceramics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Zhang, Mao-lin; Wu, Jun-ming; Li, Qi-jiang; Cao, Jian-wen; Li, Qing-hui; Zhao, Hong-xia

    2015-05-01

    Overglaze decoration porcelain is an important category of ancient Chinese ceramics, which has significant artistic value and scientific value. Nondestructive analysis methods such as Raman spectroscopy and EDXRF were used to analyze the overglaze decorations on the Jingdezhen ceramic samples of Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasty. The recipe and color mechanism of the overglaze pigments were discussed according to the chemical composition and phase composition analysis. The study found that dark red overglaze decorations of ancient Honglvcai, Wucai and famille rose in Jingdezhen are colored by hematite, yellow color is lead tin yellow, carmine decoration is colored by gold less than 0. 1 % in concentration, and green decorations are colored by bivalent copper ion. The result also indicates that the effective combination of Raman spectroscopy and EDXRF can play an important role in the deep research on ceramic artifacts, especially for the overglaze decoration pigments which are interveined each other.

  4. Sintering and annealing effects on undoped yttria transparent ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letue, Laetitia; Petit, Johan, E-mail: johan.petit@onera.fr; Ritti, Marie-Hélène; Lalanne, Sylvie; Landais, Stéphane

    2017-06-15

    Transparent yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) ceramics were processed by several densifications steps without any doping species. The green bodies were obtained by the aqueous way and sintered at high temperature under vacuum and then under high pressure. We studied the effects of different sintering cycles and air annealing at different steps of the process on the density and the grain growth. We also focused on the reaction between yttria ceramics and BN-coated graphite crucible which occurs during HIP. We noted that a low heating rate and two annealing steps are necessary to improve our samples’ transparency. - Highlights: • The quality of transparent ceramics is compared with the tested process parameters. • Air annealing is critical when using a carbon environment in the process. • Intra-granular pores, and so the final transparency, are directly linked to the sintering heating rates.

  5. Modeling of thermal explosion under pressure in metal ceramic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, M.; Dudko, V.; Skachek, B.; Matvienko, A.; Gotman, I.; Gutmanas, E.Y.

    1998-01-01

    The process of reactive in situ synthesis of dense ceramic matrix composites in Ti-B-C, Ti-B-N, Ti-Si-N systems is modeled. These ceramics are fabricated on the basis of compacted blends of ceramic powders, namely Ti-B 4 C and/or Ti-BN. The objectives of the project are to identify and investigate the optimal thermal conditions preferable for production of fully dense ceramic matrix composites. Towards this goal heat transfer and combustion in dense and porous ceramic blends are investigated during monotonous heating at a constant rate. This process is modeled using a heat transfer-combustion model with kinetic parameters determined from the differential thermal analysis of the experimental data. The kinetic burning parameters and the model developed are further used to describe the thermal explosion synthesis in a restrained die under pressure. It is shown that heat removal from the reaction zone affects the combustion process and the final phase composition

  6. Processing and properties of large-sized ceramic slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondo, M.; Dondi, M.; Zanelli, C.; Guarini, G.; Gozzi, A.; Marani, F.; Fossa, L.

    2010-07-01

    Large-sized ceramic slabs with dimensions up to 360x120 cm{sup 2} and thickness down to 2 mm are manufactured through an innovative ceramic process, starting from porcelain stoneware formulations and involving wet ball milling, spray drying, die-less slow-rate pressing, a single stage of fast drying-firing, and finishing (trimming, assembling of ceramic-fiberglass composites). Fired and unfired industrial slabs were selected and characterized from the technological, compositional (XRF, XRD) and microstructural (SEM) viewpoints. Semi-finished products exhibit a remarkable microstructural uniformity and stability in a rather wide window of firing schedules. The phase composition and compact microstructure of fired slabs are very similar to those of porcelain stoneware tiles. The values of water absorption, bulk density, closed porosity, functional performances as well as mechanical and tribological properties conform to the top quality range of porcelain stoneware tiles. However, the large size coupled with low thickness bestow on the slab a certain degree of flexibility, which is emphasized in ceramic-fiberglass composites. These outstanding performances make the large-sized slabs suitable to be used in novel applications: building and construction (new floorings without dismantling the previous paving, ventilated facades, tunnel coverings, insulating panelling), indoor furnitures (table tops, doors), support for photovoltaic ceramic panels. (Author) 24 refs.

  7. Processing and properties of large-sized ceramic slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondo, M.; Dondi, M.; Zanelli, C.; Guarini, G.; Gozzi, A.; Marani, F.; Fossa, L.

    2010-01-01

    Large-sized ceramic slabs with dimensions up to 360x120 cm 2 and thickness down to 2 mm are manufactured through an innovative ceramic process, starting from porcelain stoneware formulations and involving wet ball milling, spray drying, die-less slow-rate pressing, a single stage of fast drying-firing, and finishing (trimming, assembling of ceramic-fiberglass composites). Fired and unfired industrial slabs were selected and characterized from the technological, compositional (XRF, XRD) and microstructural (SEM) viewpoints. Semi-finished products exhibit a remarkable microstructural uniformity and stability in a rather wide window of firing schedules. The phase composition and compact microstructure of fired slabs are very similar to those of porcelain stoneware tiles. The values of water absorption, bulk density, closed porosity, functional performances as well as mechanical and tribological properties conform to the top quality range of porcelain stoneware tiles. However, the large size coupled with low thickness bestow on the slab a certain degree of flexibility, which is emphasized in ceramic-fiberglass composites. These outstanding performances make the large-sized slabs suitable to be used in novel applications: building and construction (new floorings without dismantling the previous paving, ventilated facades, tunnel coverings, insulating panelling), indoor furnitures (table tops, doors), support for photovoltaic ceramic panels. (Author) 24 refs.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrani, K.A., E-mail: kurt.terrani@gmail.com [Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kiggans, J.O.; Katoh, Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Shimoda, K. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Montgomery, F.C.; Armstrong, B.L.; Parish, C.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hinoki, T. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hunn, J.D. [Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, L.L. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The current generation of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels, consisting of Tristructural Isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix, is fabricated by hot pressing. Matrix powder feedstock is comprised of alumina-yttria additives thoroughly mixed with silicon carbide nanopowder using polyethyleneimine as a dispersing agent. Fuel compacts are fabricated by hot pressing the powder-fuel particle mixture at a temperature of 1800-1900 Degree-Sign C using compaction pressures of 10-20 MPa. Detailed microstructural characterization of the final fuel compacts shows that oxide additives are limited in extent and are distributed uniformly at silicon carbide grain boundaries, at triple joints between silicon carbide grains, and at the fuel particle-matrix interface.

  9. Density determination of sintered ceramic nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Medek, J.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility was tested of using solids for pycnometric determination of the density of uranium dioxide-based sintered ceramic fuel materials manufactured by the sol-gel method in the shape of spherical particles of 0.7 to 1.0 mm in size and of particles smaller than 200 μm. For fine particles, this is the only usable method of determining their density which is a very important parameter of the fine fraction when it is employed for the manufacture of fuel elements by vibration compacting. The method consists in compacting a mixture of pycnometric material and dispersed particles of uranium dioxide, determining the size and weight of the compact, and in calculating the density of the material measured from the weight of the oxide sample in the mixture. (author)

  10. Greens of the European Green Capitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömertler, Seval

    2017-10-01

    Well established and maintained green areas have a key role on reaching the high quality of life and sustainability in urban environments. Therefore, green areas must be carefully accounted and evaluated in the urban planning affairs. In this context, the European Green Capitals, which attach a great importance to the green areas, have a great potential to act as a role model for both small and big cities in all around the world. These leading cities (chronologically, Stockholm, Hamburg, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Nantes, Copenhagen, Bristol, Ljubljana, Essen and Nijmegen) are inspiring for the other cities which seek to achieve more sustainable and environmentally friendly places through green areas. From this point of view, the aim of this paper was to investigate the green areas of the European Green Capitals. The paper covered whole European Green Capitals, and the application form of each Green Capital was used as a primary data source. Consequently, the paper put forwarded that the European Green Capitals have considerably large amount and high proportion of green areas. Further, these cities provide an excellent access to the public green areas. As a result of abundant provision and proper distribution, the almost all citizens in most of the Green Capitals live within a distance of 300 meters to a green area. For further researches, the paper suggested that these green capitals should be investigated in terms of their efforts, measures, goals and plans, policies and implications to administer, to protect, to enhance and to expand the green areas.

  11. Optimization of the injection molding process for development of high performance calcium oxide -based ceramic cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P. P.; Wu, G. Q.; Tao, Y.; Cheng, X.; Zhao, J. Q.; Nan, H.

    2018-02-01

    The binder composition used for ceramic injection molding plays a crucial role on the final properties of sintered ceramic and to avoid defects on green parts. In this study, the effects of binder compositions on the rheological, microstructures and the mechanical properties of CaO based ceramic cores were investigated. It was found that the optimized formulation for dispersant, solid loading was 1.5 wt% and 84 wt%, respectively. The microstructures, such as porosity, pore size distribution and grain boundary density were closely related to the plasticizer contents. The decrease of plasticizer contents can enhance the strength of the ceramic cores but with decreased shrinkage. Meanwhile, the creep resistance of ceramic cores was enhanced by decreasing of plasticizer contents. The flexural strength of the core was found to decrease with the increase of the porosity, the improvement of creep resistance is closely related to the decrease of porosity and grain boundary density.

  12. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Scalable Nonlinear Compact Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Debojyoti [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Constantinescu, Emil M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Brown, Jed [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we focus on compact schemes resulting in tridiagonal systems of equations, specifically the fifth-order CRWENO scheme. We propose a scalable implementation of the nonlinear compact schemes by implementing a parallel tridiagonal solver based on the partitioning/substructuring approach. We use an iterative solver for the reduced system of equations; however, we solve this system to machine zero accuracy to ensure that no parallelization errors are introduced. It is possible to achieve machine-zero convergence with few iterations because of the diagonal dominance of the system. The number of iterations is specified a priori instead of a norm-based exit criterion, and collective communications are avoided. The overall algorithm thus involves only point-to-point communication between neighboring processors. Our implementation of the tridiagonal solver differs from and avoids the drawbacks of past efforts in the following ways: it introduces no parallelization-related approximations (multiprocessor solutions are exactly identical to uniprocessor ones), it involves minimal communication, the mathematical complexity is similar to that of the Thomas algorithm on a single processor, and it does not require any communication and computation scheduling.

  14. Compact magnetic fusion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, R.K.

    1983-12-01

    If the core (first wall, blanket, shield, and magnet coils) of fusion reactor systems could be made smaller in mass and volume for a given net electric power output than is usually predicted for the mainline tokamak/sup 1/ and mirror concepts, the cost of the technological development of the core and the construction of power plants might be significantly reduced. Although progress in plasma physics and engineering approaches should continue to yield improvements in reactor designs, certain physics features of the mainline concepts may prevent major reductions in the size of the core without straining the limits of technology. However, more than a factor of ten reduction in volume and mass of the core, at constant output power, may be possible for a class of toroidal confinement concepts in which the confining magnetic fields are supported more by currents flowing in the plasma than those in the external coils. In spite of this dramatic increase in power density (ratio of total thermal output power to the volume of the core), the design of compact systems need not rely on any materials requirements that are qualitatively more difficult than those proposed for the lower-power-density mainline fusion concepts. In some respects compact systems require less of an extension of existing technology, e.g. magnetics.

  15. Compact magnetic fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    If the core (first wall, blanket, shield, and magnet coils) of fusion reactor systems could be made smaller in mass and volume for a given net electric power output than is usually predicted for the mainline tokamak 1 and mirror concepts, the cost of the technological development of the core and the construction of power plants might be significantly reduced. Although progress in plasma physics and engineering approaches should continue to yield improvements in reactor designs, certain physics features of the mainline concepts may prevent major reductions in the size of the core without straining the limits of technology. However, more than a factor of ten reduction in volume and mass of the core, at constant output power, may be possible for a class of toroidal confinement concepts in which the confining magnetic fields are supported more by currents flowing in the plasma than those in the external coils. In spite of this dramatic increase in power density (ratio of total thermal output power to the volume of the core), the design of compact systems need not rely on any materials requirements that are qualitatively more difficult than those proposed for the lower-power-density mainline fusion concepts. In some respects compact systems require less of an extension of existing technology, e.g. magnetics

  16. Diffusion in compacted betonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Rantanen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this report is to collect the literature bearing on the diffusion in compacted betonite, which has been suggested as possible buffer material for the disposal of spent fuel. Diffusion in a porous, water-saturated material is usually described as diffusion in the pore-water where sorption on the solid matter can delay the migration in the instationary state. There are also models which take into consideration that the sorbed molecules can also move while being sorbed. Diffusion experiments in compacted bentonite have been reported by many authors. Gases, anions, cations and actinides have been used as diffusing molecules. The report collects the results and the information on the measurement methods. On the basis of the results can be concluded that different particles possibly follow different diffusion mechanisms. The parameters which affect the diffusion seem to be for example the size, the electric charge and the sorption properties of the diffusing molecule. The report also suggest the parameters to be used in the diffusion calculation of the safety analyses of spent fuel disposal. (author)

  17. Compact Infrasonic Windscreen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Shams, Qamar A.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Comeaux, Toby

    2005-01-01

    A compact windscreen has been conceived for a microphone of a type used outdoors to detect atmospheric infrasound from a variety of natural and manmade sources. Wind at the microphone site contaminates received infrasonic signals (defined here as sounds having frequencies <20 Hz), because a microphone cannot distinguish between infrasonic pressures (which propagate at the speed of sound) and convective pressure fluctuations generated by wind turbulence. Hence, success in measurement of outdoor infrasound depends on effective screening of the microphone from the wind. The present compact windscreen is based on a principle: that infrasound at sufficiently large wavelength can penetrate any barrier of practical thickness. Thus, a windscreen having solid, non-porous walls can block convected pressure fluctuations from the wind while transmitting infrasonic acoustic waves. The transmission coefficient depends strongly upon the ratio between the acoustic impedance of the windscreen and that of air. Several materials have been found to have impedance ratios that render them suitable for use in constructing walls that have practical thicknesses and are capable of high transmission of infrasound. These materials (with their impedance ratios in parentheses) are polyurethane foam (222), space shuttle tile material (332), balsa (323), cedar (3,151), and pine (4,713).

  18. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  19. Transparent ceramic photo-optical semiconductor high power switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werne, Roger W.; Sullivan, James S.; Landingham, Richard L.

    2016-01-19

    A photoconductive semiconductor switch according to one embodiment includes a structure of sintered nanoparticles of a high band gap material exhibiting a lower electrical resistance when excited by light relative to an electrical resistance thereof when not exposed to the light. A method according to one embodiment includes creating a mixture comprising particles, at least one dopant, and at least one solvent; adding the mixture to a mold; forming a green structure in the mold; and sintering the green structure to form a transparent ceramic. Additional system, methods and products are also presented.

  20. Low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, Isabelle; Holloway, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorapatite glass-ceramics have been shown to be excellent candidates as scaffold materials for bone grafts, however, scaffold production by sintering is hindered by concurrent crystallization of the glass. Our goal was to investigate the effect of Ca/Al ratio on the sintering behavior of Nb-doped fluorapatite-based glasses in the SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-MgO-Na2O-K2O-CaO-CaF2 system. Glass compositions with Ca/Al ratio of 1 (A), 2 (B), 4 (C) and 19 (D) were prepared by twice melting at 1525°C for 3h. Glasses were either cast as cylindrical ingots or ground into powders. Disc-shaped specimens were prepared by either sectioning from the ingots or powder-compacting in a mold, followed by heat treatment at temperatures ranging between 700 and 1050°C for 1h. The density was measured on both sintered specimens and heat treated discs as controls. The degree of sintering was determined from these measurements. XRD showed that fluorapatite crystallized in all glass-ceramics. A high degree of sintering was achieved at 775°C for glass-ceramic D (98.99±0.04%), and 900°C for glass-ceramic C (91.31±0.10). Glass-ceramics A or B were only partially sintered at 1000°C (63.6±0.8% and 74.1±1.5%, respectively). SEM revealed a unique microstructure of micron-sized spherulitic fluorapatite crystals in glass-ceramics C and D. Increasing the Ca/Al ratio promoted low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics, which are traditionally difficult to sinter. PMID:24252652

  1. Low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, Isabelle; Holloway, Julie A

    2014-02-01

    Fluorapatite glass-ceramics have been shown to be excellent candidates as scaffold materials for bone grafts, however, scaffold production by sintering is hindered by concurrent crystallization of the glass. Objective, our goal was to investigate the effect of Ca/Al ratio on the sintering behavior of Nb-doped fluorapatite-based glasses in the SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-MgO-Na2O-K2O-CaO-CaF2 system. Methods, glass compositions with Ca/Al ratio of 1 (A), 2 (B), 4 (C) and 19 (D) were prepared by twice melting at 1525°C for 3h. Glasses were either cast as cylindrical ingots or ground into powders. Disk-shaped specimens were prepared by either sectioning from the ingots or powder-compacting in a mold, followed by heat treatment at temperatures ranging between 700 and 1050°C for 1h. The density was measured on both sintered specimens and heat treated discs as controls. The degree of sintering was determined from these measurements. Results and Significance XRD showed that fluorapatite crystallized in all glass-ceramics. A high degree of sintering was achieved at 775°C for glass-ceramic D (98.99±0.04%), and 900°C for glass-ceramic C (91.31±0.10). Glass-ceramics A or B were only partially sintered at 1000°C (63.6±0.8% and 74.1±1.5%, respectively). SEM revealed a unique microstructure of micron-sized spherulitic fluorapatite crystals in glass-ceramics C and D. Increasing the Ca/Al ratio promoted low temperature sintering of fluorapatite glass-ceramics, which are traditionally difficult to sinter. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  3. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  4. Development task of compact reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurushima, Morihiro

    1982-01-01

    In the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, studies proceed on the usage of compact medium and small LWRs. As such, the reactors from 100 to 200 MW may meet varieties of demands in scale and kind in view of the saving of petroleum and the economy of nuclear power. In this case, the technology of light water reactors with already established safety will be suitable for the development of compact reactors. The concept of ''nuclear power community'' using the compact reactors in local society and industrial zones was investigated. The following matters are described: need for the introduction of compact reactors, the survey on the compact reactor systems, and the present status and future problems for compact reactor usage. (J.P.N.)

  5. Tetragonal zirconia ceramics in Zr O2-Ce O2 system (Ce-TZP): preparation, characterization and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Nono, M.C. de.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the results achieved in a study about Ce-TZP ceramics prepared from conventional powder mixtures of Zr O 2 and Ce O 2 (with composition in the range of 8 to 16 mol% Ce O 2 ). Physical and chemical characteristics were related with the powder compaction behavior and with the sintering state. The sintered ceramics showed a level of high porosity (≅ 4%), mainly due to the fairly adequate powder characteristics and compaction. The crystalline phases were analysed from X-rays diffraction data and showed that these ceramics can present tetragonal-to-monoclinic stress induced transformation. The bending strength, fracture toughness and Vickers hardness results were influenced by Ce O 2 content microstructure and sintering temperature. These Ce-TZP ceramics showed mechanical strength results comparable to those published in the international literature. (author)

  6. The United Nations Global Compact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Waddock, Sandra; McIntosh, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the interdisciplinary literature on the UN Global Compact. The review identifies three research perspectives, which scholars have used to study the UN Global Compact so far: a historical perspective discussing the Global Compact in the context of UN-business relations...... key empirical as well as conceptual scholarly contributions. The remainder of this article contains focused summaries of the articles selected for this Special Issue. All articles are introduced and evaluated against the background of the three research perspectives....

  7. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  8. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ceramic combustor mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Melvin G.; Janneck, Frank W.

    1982-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a metal engine block including a wall portion defining a housing for a combustor having ceramic liner components. A ceramic outlet duct is supported by a compliant seal on the metal block and a reaction chamber liner is stacked thereon and partly closed at one end by a ceramic bypass swirl plate which is spring loaded by a plurality of circumferentially spaced, spring loaded guide rods and wherein each of the guide rods has one end thereof directed exteriorly of a metal cover plate on the engine block to react against externally located biasing springs cooled by ambient air and wherein the rod spring support arrangement maintains the stacked ceramic components together so that a normal force is maintained on the seal between the outlet duct and the engine block under all operating conditions. The support arrangement also is operative to accommodate a substantial difference in thermal expansion between the ceramic liner components of the combustor and the metal material of the engine block.

  10. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  11. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  12. The role of the native oxide shell on the microwave sintering of copper metal powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Morsi M.; Link, Guido; Thumm, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thin oxide native layer had a critical role on microwave sintering of copper. • Explain why microwaves interact with copper powder differently than its bulk. • Abnormal expansion in copper is due to the plastic deformation and crack formation. • In-situ setup gives important insight about the microwave sintering of metals. • Microwave sintering is a promising candidate technology in powder metallurgy. - Abstract: Successful microwave sintering of several metal powders had been reported by many researchers with remarkable improvements in the materials properties and/or in the overall process. However, the concept behind microwave heating of metal powders has not been fully understood till now, as it is well known that bulk metals reflect microwaves. The progress of microwave sintering of copper metal powder compacts was investigated via combining both in-situ electrical resistivity and dilatometry measurements that give important information about microstructural changes with respect to the inter-particle electrical contacts during sintering. The sintering behavior of copper metal powders was depending on the type of the gas used, particle size, the initial green density, the soaking sintering time and the thin oxide layer on the particles surfaces. The thin copper oxide native layer (ceramics) that thermodynamically formed on the particles surfaces under normal handling and ambient environmental conditions had a very critical and important role in the microwave absorption and interaction, the sintering behavior and the microstructural changes. This finding could help to have a fundamental understanding of why MW’s interact with copper metal powder in a different way than its bulk at room temperature, i.e. why a given metal powder could be heated using microwaves while its bulk reflects it

  13. High flow ceramic pot filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more

  14. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  15. Compact particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2017-08-29

    A compact particle accelerator having an input portion configured to receive power to produce particles for acceleration, where the input portion includes a switch, is provided. In a general embodiment, a vacuum tube receives particles produced from the input portion at a first end, and a plurality of wafer stacks are positioned serially along the vacuum tube. Each of the plurality of wafer stacks include a dielectric and metal-oxide pair, wherein each of the plurality of wafer stacks further accelerate the particles in the vacuum tube. A beam shaper coupled to a second end of the vacuum tube shapes the particles accelerated by the plurality of wafer stacks into a beam and an output portion outputs the beam.

  16. The Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses his lab's plan for completing the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) conceptual design during calendar year 1987. Around July 1 they froze the subsystem envelopes on the device to continue with the conceptual design. They did this by formalizing a general requirements document. They have been developing the management plan and submitted a version to the DOE July 10. He describes a group of management activities. They released the vacuum vessel Request For Proposals (RFP) on August 5. An RFP to do a major part of the system engineering on the device is being developed. They intend to assemble the device outside of the test cell, then move it into the the test cell, install it there, and bring to the test cell many of the auxiliary facilities from TFTR, for example, power supplies

  17. Compact cryocooler heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, J.; Frederking, T.H.K.

    1991-01-01

    Compact heat exchangers are subject to different constraints as a room temperature gas is cooled down by a cold stream returning from a JT valve (or a similar cryoprocess component). In particular, the optimization of exchangers for liquid helium systems has to cover a wide range in temperature and density of the fluid. In the present work we address the following thermodynamic questions: 1. The optimization of intermediate temperatures which optimize stage operation (a stage is assumed to have a constant cross section); 2. The optimum temperature difference available for best overall economic performance values. The results are viewed in the context of porous media concepts applied to rather low speeds of fluid flow in narrow passages. In this paper examples of fluid/solid constraints imposed in this non-classical low temperature area are presented

  18. Compact semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Siyuan; Lourtioz, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book brings together in a single volume a unique contribution by the top experts around the world in the field of compact semiconductor lasers to provide a comprehensive description and analysis of the current status as well as future directions in the field of micro- and nano-scale semiconductor lasers. It is organized according to the various forms of micro- or nano-laser cavity configurations with each chapter discussing key technical issues, including semiconductor carrier recombination processes and optical gain dynamics, photonic confinement behavior and output coupling mechanisms, carrier transport considerations relevant to the injection process, and emission mode control. Required reading for those working in and researching the area of semiconductors lasers and micro-electronics.

  19. Green Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  20. Green chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, John C.; Cannon, Amy S.; Dye, Kevin M.

    2004-01-01

    A grand challenge facing government, industry, and academia in the relationship of our technological society to the environment is reinventing the use of materials. To address this challenge, collaboration from an interdisciplinary group of stakeholders will be necessary. Traditionally, the approach to risk management of materials and chemicals has been through inerventions intended to reduce exposure to materials that are hazardous to health and the environment. In 1990, the Pollution Prevention Act encouraged a new tact-elimination of hazards at the source. An emerging approach to this grand challenge seeks to embed the diverse set of environmental perspectives and interests in the everyday practice of the people most responsible for using and creating new materials--chemists. The approach, which has come to be known as Green Chemistry, intends to eliminate intrinsic hazard itself, rather than focusing on reducing risk by minimizing exposure. This chapter addresses the representation of downstream environmental stakeholder interests in the upstream everyday practice that is reinventing chemistry and its material inputs, products, and waste as described in the '12 Principles of Green Chemistry'

  1. Green urbanity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Fikfak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism and other culture-based types of small business, which are the leitmotif in the planning of the Europark Ruardi, are becoming the guiding motif in the spatial development of urban centres that are influenced by dynamic transformation processes. The system should build upon the exploitation of both local and regional environmental features. This would encourage the quest for special environmental features, with an emphasis on their conservation, i.e. sustainable development, and connections in a wider context.The Europark is seen as a new strategic point of the Zasavje Region (the region of the central Sava Valley, which is linked to other important points in a region relevant for tourism. Due to the "smallness" of the region and/or the proximity of such points, development can be fast and effective. The interaction of different activities in space yields endless opportunities for users, who choose their own goals and priorities in the use of space. Four theme areas of the Europark area planning are envisaged. The organisation of activities is based on the composition of the mosaic field patterns, where green fields intertwine with areas of different, existing and new, urban functions. The fields of urban and recreation programmes are connected with a network of green areas and walking trails, along which theme park settings are arranged.

  2. Green shipping management

    CERN Document Server

    Lun, Y H Venus; Wong, Christina W Y; Cheng, T C E

    2016-01-01

    This book presents theory-driven discussion on the link between implementing green shipping practices (GSP) and shipping firm performance. It examines the shipping industry’s challenge of supporting economic growth while enhancing environmental performance. Consisting of nine chapters, the book covers topics such as the conceptualization of green shipping practices (GSPs), measurement scales for evaluating GSP implementation, greening capability, greening and performance relativity (GPR), green management practice, green shipping network, greening capacity, and greening propensity. In view of the increasing quest for environment protection in the shipping sector, this book provides a good reference for firms to understand and evaluate their capability in carrying out green operations on their shipping activities.

  3. From green architecture to architectural green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    that describes the architectural exclusivity of this particular architecture genre. The adjective green expresses architectural qualities differentiating green architecture from none-green architecture. Currently, adding trees and vegetation to the building’s facade is the main architectural characteristics...... they have overshadowed the architectural potential of green architecture. The paper questions how a green space should perform, look like and function. Two examples are chosen to demonstrate thorough integrations between green and space. The examples are public buildings categorized as pavilions. One......The paper investigates the topic of green architecture from an architectural point of view and not an energy point of view. The purpose of the paper is to establish a debate about the architectural language and spatial characteristics of green architecture. In this light, green becomes an adjective...

  4. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  5. Cyclic mechanical fatigue in ceramic-ceramic composites: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D. III

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to cyclic mechanical fatigue effects in a number of ceramics and ceramic composites, including several monolithic ceramics in which significant residual stresses should be present as a result of thermal expansion mismatches and anisotropy. Fatigue is also noted in several BN-containing ceramic matrix-particulate composites and in SiC fiber-ceramic matrix composites. These results suggest that fatigue testing is imperative for ceramics and ceramic composites that are to be used in applications subject to cyclic loading. Fatigue process models are proposed which provide a rationale for fatigue effect observations, but do not as yet provide quantitative results. Fiber composite fatigue damage models indicate that design stresses in these materials may have to be maintained below the level at which fiber pullout occurs

  6. An Experiment on the Carbonization of Fuel Compact Matrix Graphite for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Cho, Moon Sung

    2012-01-01

    The fuel element for HTGR is manufactured by mixing coated fuel particles with matrix graphite powder and forming into either pebble type or cylindrical type compacts depending on their use in different HTGR cores. The coated fuel particle, the so-called TRISO particle, consists of 500-μm spherical UO 2 particles coated with the low density buffer Pyrolytic Carbon (PyC) layer, the inner and outer high density PyC layer and SiC layer sandwiched between the two inner and outer PyC layers. The coated TRISO particles are mixed with a properly prepared matrix graphite powder, pressed into a spherical shape or a cylindrical compact, and finally heat-treated at about 1800 .deg. C. These fuel elements can have different sizes and forms of compact. The basic steps for manufacturing a fuel element include preparation of graphite matrix powder, over coating the fuel particles, mixing the fuel particles with a matrix powder, carbonizing green compact, and the final high-temperature heat treatment of the carbonized fuel compact. The carbonization is a process step where the binder that is incorporated during the matrix graphite powder preparation step is evaporated and the residue of the binder is carbonized during the heat treatment at about 1073 K, In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, and for fuel matrix graphite to meet the required material properties, it is of extreme importance to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the carbonization condition, which has a strong influence on further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the carbonization behavior of green compact samples prepared from the matrix graphite powder mixtures with different binder materials was investigated in order to elucidate the behavior of binders during the carbonization heat treatment by analyzing the change in weight, density and its

  7. Studies on the sintering of copper powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmasry, M.A.A.; Abadir, M.F.; Mahdy, A.N.; Elkinawy, W.S.

    1995-01-01

    Solid state sintering behavior of cylindrical compacts, (1 cm diameter and 1 cm height), made of copper powder was studied within a range of compacting pressure of 75 up to 300 MPa, sintering temperature of 600 up to to 900 degree C, and sintering time of 5 up to 60 min in a reducing atmosphere composed of H2 and N 2 gases with a volumetric ratio 3:1. The green and the sintered densities were found to to increase with the compacting pressure. Higher sintering temperature, and time favour increased sintered density. probable mechanisms during the initial stage of sintering were disclosed. It was found that low pressures cause dilation of closed pores, and vice versa. At low pressures and temperatures the surface diffusion mechanism is favoured, While high temperatures favour lattice diffusion mechanism. at high pressures, the lattice diffusion mechanism is suppressed while surface diffusion predominates. Density and hence shrinkage were also found to increase with the increase of sintering time, While its rate increases with the increase of sintering temperature. the influence of sintering conditions on the hardness of the compacts was studied. An increase in hardness, When higher compacting pressures and higher sintering temperatures were adopted, has bee obtained. 11 figs

  8. Compact magnetic fusin reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    Compact, high-power-density approaches to fusion power represent alternatives to main-line fusion concepts, Tokamaks and mirrors. If technological issues are resolved, theses approaches would yield small, low-cost fusion power plants. This survey reviews the principal physics and technology employed by leading compact magnetic fusion plants. (Author)

  9. Solid targetry for compact cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comor, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation authors present experimental results of solid targetry for compact cyclotrons. It is concluded: Solid targetry is not restricted to large accelerator centers anymore; Small and medium scale radioisotope production is feasible with compact cyclotrons; The availability of versatile solid target systems is expected to boost the radiochemistry of 'exotic' positron emitters

  10. Roller-compacted concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Roller-compacted concrete (RCC) gets its name from the heavy vibratory steel drum and rubber-tired rollers used to help compact it into its final form. RCC has similar strength properties and consists of the same basic ingredients as conventional con...

  11. Machine for compacting solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, J.

    1981-11-01

    Machine for compacting solid residues, particularly bulky radioactive residues, constituted of a horizontally actuated punch and a fixed compression anvil, in which the residues are first compacted horizontally and then vertically. Its salient characteristic is that the punch and the compression anvil have embossments on the compression side and interpenetrating plates in the compression position [fr

  12. Structural, thermal, and optical properties of Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped oxyhalide tellurite glasses, glass-ceramics and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, C.; Rai, R.N.; Rai, S.B.

    2012-01-01

    Glass-ceramics and ceramics containing nano-crystals of different phases doped with Er 3+ /Yb 3+ ions have been successfully prepared by heat treatment of the precursor oxyhalide glasses synthesized by the melt-quench method. X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images verify the precipitation of nano-crystals. Emission of Er 3+ enhances several times when Yb 3+ ion is added with the matrix. The Stark splitting and the intensity of different emission bands increase to a great extent when we approach to ceramics from glasses via glass-ceramics. The intensity of the blue and green emission bands increases much faster than the red and NIR emission bands. Intense upconversion emission observed by the naked eye has been quantified in terms of standard chromaticity diagram (CIE). Power dependence study shows that the upconversion of NIR radiation to visible radiation takes place mainly via photon avalanche (PA) process.

  13. Green business will remain green

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcan, P.

    2008-01-01

    It all started with two words. Climate change. The carbon dioxide trading scheme, which was the politicians' idea on solving the number one global problem, followed. Four years ago, when the project was begun, there was no data for project initiation. Quotas for polluters mainly from energy production and other energy demanding industries were distributed based on spreadsheets, maximum output and expected future development of economies. Slovak companies have had a chance to profit from these arrangements since 2005. Many of them took advantage of the situation and turned the excessive quotas into an extraordinary profit which often reached hundreds of million Sk. The fact that the price of free quotas offered for sale dropped basically to 0 in 2006 only proved that the initial distribution was too generous. And the market reacted to the first official measurements of emissions. Slovak companies also contributed to this development. However, when planning the maximum emission volumes for 2008-2012 period, in spite of the fact that actual data were available, their expectations were not realistic. A glance at the figures in the proposal of the Ministry of Environment is sufficient to realize that there will be no major change in the future. And so for many Slovak companies business with a green future will remain green for the next five years. The state decided to give to selected companies even more free space as far as emissions are concerned. The most privileged companies can expect quotas increased by tens of percent. (author)

  14. Observations on infiltration of silicon carbide compacts with an aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    The melt infiltration of ceramic particulates permits an opportunity to observe such fundamental materials phenomena as nucleation, dynamic wetting and growth in constrained environments. Experimental observations are presented on the infiltration behavior and matrix microstructures that form when porous compacts of platelet-shaped single crystals of alpha- (hexagonal) silicon carbide are infiltrated with a liquid 2014 Al alloy. The infiltration process involved counter gravity infiltration of suitably tamped and preheated compacts of silicon carbide platelets under an external pressure in a special pressure chamber for a set period, then by solidification of the infiltrant metal in the interstices of the bed at atmospheric pressure.

  15. Green Power Partner Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Green Power Partners can access tools and resources to help promote their green power commitments. Partners use these tools to communicate the benefits of their green power use to their customers, stakeholders, and the general public.

  16. Green Vehicle Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label Buy green. Save green. Learn about MPG math Discover fuel-saving tips Promote green ... U.S. consumers who have already purchased new vehicles under the fuel economy & greenhouse gas standard! More about the standards » Check ...

  17. Green Transformational Leadership and Green Performance: The Mediation Effects of Green Mindfulness and Green Self-Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shan Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available No prior literature explores the influence of green transformational leadership on green performance, thus, this study develops a novel research framework to fill the research gap. This study investigates the influence of green transformational leadership on green performance and discusses the mediation effects of green mindfulness and green self-efficacy by means of structural equation modeling (SEM. The results indicate that green transformational leadership positively influences green mindfulness, green self-efficacy, and green performance. Moreover, this study demonstrates that the positive relationship between green transformational leadership and green performance is partially mediated by the two mediators: green mindfulness and green self-efficacy. It means that green transformational leadership can not only directly affect green performance positively but also indirectly affect it positively through green mindfulness and green self-efficacy. Therefore, firms need to raise their green transformational leadership, green mindfulness, and green self-efficacy to increase their green performance.

  18. Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention, Conference, Keramik Museum, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Invited conference speaker, Westerwald Keramik Museum, August 2009. Paper title: Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention.\\ud \\ud This paper will examine the integration of non-ceramic media into the discourse of ceramics.

  19. Forging loads, deformation modes and fracture in axi-symmetrric closed die cold forging of sintered aluminium powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, M.A.; Ali, L.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental investigation into closed-die cold forging of sintered aluminium powder rod- shaped compacts was carried out. Axi-symmetric components were forged from sintered powder preforms with different initial diameter to height ratios. Different compaction pressures, sintering and lubrication conditions were used as variables during the investigations. Detailed observations were made on green/sintered density, compaction defects, forging loads, deformation modes and on the onset of fracture during progressive forging of sintered powder compacts. Experimental results obtained during the investigations have been presented and discussed in detail. (author)

  20. Piezoelectric displacement in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This Good Practice Guide is intended to aid a user to perform displacement measurements on piezoelectric ceramic materials such as PZT (lead zirconium titanate) in either monolithic or multilayer form. The various measurement issues that the user must consider are addressed, and good measurement practise is described for the four most suitable methods. (author)

  1. Dense ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockbain, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the manufacture of articles of substantially pure dense ceramic materials, for use in severe environments. Si N is very suitable for use in such environments, but suffers from the disadvantage that it is not amenable to sintering. Some disadvantages of the methods normally used for making articles of Si N are mentioned. The method described comprises mixing a powder of the substantially pure ceramic material with an additive that promotes densification, and which is capable of nuclear transmutation into a gas when exposed to radiation, and hot pressing the mixture to form a billet. The billet is then irradiated to convert the additive into a gas which is held captive in the billet, and it is then subjected to a hot forging operation, during which the captive gas escapes and an article of substantially pure dense ceramic material is forged. The method is intended primarily for use for Si N, but may be applied to other ceramic materials. The additive may be Li or Be or their compounds, to the extent of at least 5 ppm and not more than 5% by weight. Irradiation is effected by proton or neutron bombardment. (UK)

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  3. Dissolution of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    The present program objectives are to lay out the fundamentals of crystalline waste form dissolution. Nuclear waste ceramics are polycrystalline. An assumption of the work is that to the first order, the release rate of a particular radionuclide is the surface-weighted sum of the release rates of the radionuclide from each crystalline form that contains it. In the second order, of course, there will be synergistic effects. There will be also grain boundary and other microstructural influences. As a first approximation, we have selected crystalline phases one at a time. The sequence of investigations and measurements is: (i) Identification of the actual chemical reactions of dissolution including identification of the solid reaction products if such occur. (ii) The rates of these reactions are then determined empirically to give what may be called macroscopic kinetics. (iii) Determination of the rate-controlling mechanisms. (iv) If the rate is controlled by surface reactions, the final step would be to determine the atomic kinetics, that is the specific atomic reactions that occur at the dissolving interface. Our concern with the crystalline forms are in two areas: The crystalline components of the reference ceramic waste form and related ceramics and the alumino-silicate phases that appear in some experimental waste forms and as waste-rock interaction products. Specific compounds are: (1) Reference Ceramic Phases (zirconolite, magnetoplumbite, spinel, Tc-bearing spinel and perovskite); (2) Aluminosilicate phases (nepheline, pollucite, CsAlSi 5 O 12 , Sr-feldspar). 5 figures, 1 table

  4. Ceramic analysis in Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilditch, J.

    2016-01-01

    Scientific, analytical or ‘archaeometric’ techniques for investigating ceramic material have been used within archaeology for over 50 years and now constitute an indispensable tool for archaeologists in the Aegean world (see Jones 1986 for a detailed summary of early work in Greece and Italy) and

  5. Ceramic solid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Center for Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-02-15

    Strategies for the design of ceramic solid electrolytes are reviewed. Problems associated with stoichiometric and doped compounds are compared. In the illustration of design principles, emphasis is given to oxide-ion electrolytes for use in solid-oxide fuel cells, oxygen pumps, and oxygen sensors

  6. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  7. On the influence of particle morphology on the post-impact ballistic response of ceramic armour materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Amer; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Wood, David; Jaansalu, Kevin

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence that the ballistic-resistance of fragmented (comminuted) ceramics is independent of the original strength of the material. In particular, experimental investigations into the ballistic behaviour of such fragmented ceramics have indicated that this response is correlated to shattered ceramic morphology. This suggests that careful control of ceramic microstructure - and therefore failure paths - might provide a route to optimise post-impact ballistic performance, thereby enhancing multi-hit capability. In this study, building on previous in-house work, ballistic tests were conducted using pre-formed `fragmented-ceramic' analogues based around three morphologically differing (but chemically identical) alumina feedstock materials compacted into target `pucks. In an evolution of previous work, variation of target thickness provided additional insight into an apparent morphology-based contribution to ballistic response.

  8. Central Region Green Infrastructure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This Green Infrastructure data is comprised of 3 similar ecological corridor data layers ? Metro Conservation Corridors, green infrastructure analysis in counties...

  9. Compact radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altschuler, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    Eighty-seven compact radio sources were monitored between 1971 and 1974 with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory interferometer. Both flux density and polarization were measured at intervals of about one month at wavelengths of 3.7 and 11.1 cms. Forty-four sources showed definite variability in their total and/or polarized flux density. The variations in polarization were of a shorter time scale than the corresponding flux density variations. Some of the qualitative features of an expanding source model were observed. The data suggest that some form of injection of relativistic electrons is taking place. The absence of significant depolarization in the variable sources indicates that only a small fraction of the mass of the radio outburst is in the form of non-relativistic plasma. Some of the objects observed belong to the BL-Lacertal class. It is shown that this class is very inhomogeneous in its radio properties. For the violently variable BL-Lacertal type objects the spectrum, flux variations and polarization data strongly suggest that these are very young objects

  10. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  11. Compact stellarator coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomphrey, N.; Berry, L.A.; Boozer, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental devices to study the physics of high-beta (β>∼4%), low aspect ratio (A<∼4.5) stellarator plasmas require coils that will produce plasmas satisfying a set of physics goals, provide experimental flexibility, and be practical to construct. In the course of designing a flexible coil set for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, we have made several innovations that may be useful in future stellarator design efforts. These include: the use of Singular Value Decomposition methods for obtaining families of smooth current potentials on distant coil winding surfaces from which low current density solutions may be identified; the use of a Control Matrix Method for identifying which few of the many detailed elements of the stellarator boundary must be targeted if a coil set is to provide fields to control the essential physics of the plasma; the use of Genetic Algorithms for choosing an optimal set of discrete coils from a continuum of potential contours; the evaluation of alternate coil topologies for balancing the tradeoff between physics objective and engineering constraints; the development of a new coil optimization code for designing modular coils, and the identification of a 'natural' basis for describing current sheet distributions. (author)

  12. Compact neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  13. Compact tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.; Wiley, J.C.; Edmonds, P.H.; Ross, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The possible use of tokamaks for thermonuclear power plants is discussed, in particular tokamaks with low aspect ratio and copper toroidal field coils. Three approaches are presented. First, the existing literature is reviewed and summarized. Second, using simple analytic estimates, the size of the smallest tokamak to produce an ignited plasma is derived. This steady state energy balance analysis is then extended to determine the smallest tokamaks power plant, by including the power required to drive the toroidal field and by considering two extremes of plasma current drive efficiency. Third, the analytic results are augmented by a numerical calculation that permits arbitrary plasma current drive efficiency and different confinement scaling relationships. Throughout, the importance of various restrictions is emphasized, in particular plasma current drive efficiency, plasma confinement, plasma safety factor, plasma elongation, plasma beta, neutron wall loading, blanket availability and recirculation of electric power. The latest published reactor studies show little advantage in using low aspect ratios to obtain a more compact device (and a low cost of electricity) unless either remarkably high efficiency plasma current drive and low safety factor are combined, or unless confinement (the H factor), the permissible elongation and the permissible neutron wall loading increase as the aspect ratio is reduced. These results are reproduced with the analytic model. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs

  14. Zirconia toughened mica glass ceramics for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, Sivaranjani; K, Ravikumar; Murthy, B V S; Basu, Bikramjit

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to understand the role of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) in achieving the desired spectrum of clinically relevant mechanical properties (hardness, elastic modulus, fracture toughness and brittleness index) and chemical solubility of mica glass ceramics. The glass-zirconia mixtures with varying amounts of YSZ (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20wt.%) were ball milled, compacted and sintered to obtain pellets of glass ceramic-YSZ composites. Phase analysis was carried out using X-ray diffraction and microstructural characterization with SEM revealed the crystal morphology of the composites. Mechanical properties such as Vickers hardness, elastic modulus, indentation fracture toughness and chemical solubility were assessed. Phase analysis of sintered pellets of glass ceramic-YSZ composites revealed the characteristic peaks of fluorophlogopite (FPP) and tetragonal zirconia. Microstructural investigation showed plate and lath-like interlocking mica crystals with embedded zirconia. Vickers hardness of 9.2GPa, elastic modulus of 125GPa, indentation toughness of 3.6MPa·m 1/2 , and chemical solubility of 30μg/cm 2 (well below the permissible limit) were recorded with mica glass ceramics containing 20wt.% YSZ. An increase in hardness and toughness of the glass ceramic-YSZ composites with no compromise on their brittleness index and chemical solubility has been observed. Such spectrum of properties can be utilised for developing a machinable ceramic for low stress bearing inlays, onlays and veneers. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The green building envelope : Vertical greening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottelé, M.

    2011-01-01

    Planting on roofs and façades is one of the most innovative and fastest developing fields of green technologies with respect to the built environment and horticulture. This thesis is focused on vertical greening of structures and to the multi-scale benefits of vegetation. Vertical green can improve

  16. Rare earth ion controlled crystallization of mica glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garai, Mrinmoy; Karmakar, Basudeb, E-mail: basudebk@cgcri.res.in

    2016-09-05

    In understanding the effects of rare earth ions to control the crystallization and microstructure of alkaline boroaluminosilicate system, the CeO{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped K{sub 2}O−MgO−B{sub 2}O{sub 3}−Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}−SiO{sub 2}−F glasses were synthesized by melt-quenching at 1550 °C. Higher density (2.82–3.06 g cm{sup −3}) and thermal stability (glass phase) is experiential on addition of rare earth content, which also affects in increasing the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) and crystallization temperature (T{sub c}). Decrease of thermal expansion in glasses with rare earth ion content is maintained by the stabilization of glass matrix owing to their large cationic field strength. A significant change in the non-isothermal DSC thermogram observed at 750–1050 °C is attributed to fluorophlogopite crystallization. Opaque glass-ceramics were prepared from such glasses by single step heat-treatment at 1050 °C; and the predominant crystalline phases are identified as fluorophlogopite mica, KMg{sub 3}(AlSi{sub 3}O{sub 10})F{sub 2} by XRD and EDX analysis. The compact glass-ceramic microstructure by the agglomeration of fluorophlogopite mica crystallites (crystal size ∼ 100–500 nm, FESEM) is achieved in attendance of rare earth ion; and such microstructure controlled the variation of density, thermal expansion and microhardness value. Higher thermal expansion (11.11–14.08 × 10{sup −6}/K at 50–800 °C and 50–900 °C) of such glass-ceramics approve that these rare earth containing glasses can be useful for high temperature vacuum sealing application with metal or solid electrolyte. The increase of Vickers microhardness (5.27–5.61 GPa) in attendance of rare earth ions is attributed to the compact crystallinity of fluorophlogopite mica glass-ceramic microstructure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of rare earth oxide doped alkaline boroaluminosilicate glasses. • Development of opaque

  17. Rare earth ion controlled crystallization of mica glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garai, Mrinmoy; Karmakar, Basudeb

    2016-01-01

    In understanding the effects of rare earth ions to control the crystallization and microstructure of alkaline boroaluminosilicate system, the CeO_2, Nd_2O_3, Sm_2O_3 and Gd_2O_3 doped K_2O−MgO−B_2O_3−Al_2O_3−SiO_2−F glasses were synthesized by melt-quenching at 1550 °C. Higher density (2.82–3.06 g cm"−"3) and thermal stability (glass phase) is experiential on addition of rare earth content, which also affects in increasing the glass transition temperature (T_g) and crystallization temperature (T_c). Decrease of thermal expansion in glasses with rare earth ion content is maintained by the stabilization of glass matrix owing to their large cationic field strength. A significant change in the non-isothermal DSC thermogram observed at 750–1050 °C is attributed to fluorophlogopite crystallization. Opaque glass-ceramics were prepared from such glasses by single step heat-treatment at 1050 °C; and the predominant crystalline phases are identified as fluorophlogopite mica, KMg_3(AlSi_3O_1_0)F_2 by XRD and EDX analysis. The compact glass-ceramic microstructure by the agglomeration of fluorophlogopite mica crystallites (crystal size ∼ 100–500 nm, FESEM) is achieved in attendance of rare earth ion; and such microstructure controlled the variation of density, thermal expansion and microhardness value. Higher thermal expansion (11.11–14.08 × 10"−"6/K at 50–800 °C and 50–900 °C) of such glass-ceramics approve that these rare earth containing glasses can be useful for high temperature vacuum sealing application with metal or solid electrolyte. The increase of Vickers microhardness (5.27–5.61 GPa) in attendance of rare earth ions is attributed to the compact crystallinity of fluorophlogopite mica glass-ceramic microstructure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of rare earth oxide doped alkaline boroaluminosilicate glasses. • Development of opaque fluorophlogopite mica glass-ceramics by single-step heat treatment. • Nanocrystalline glass-ceramic

  18. How Green is 'Green' Energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Luke; Wilman, Elspeth N; Laurance, William F

    2017-12-01

    Renewable energy is an important piece of the puzzle in meeting growing energy demands and mitigating climate change, but the potentially adverse effects of such technologies are often overlooked. Given that climate and ecology are inextricably linked, assessing the effects of energy technologies requires one to consider their full suite of global environmental concerns. We review here the ecological impacts of three major types of renewable energy - hydro, solar, and wind energy - and highlight some strategies for mitigating their negative effects. All three types can have significant environmental consequences in certain contexts. Wind power has the fewest and most easily mitigated impacts; solar energy is comparably benign if designed and managed carefully. Hydropower clearly has the greatest risks, particularly in certain ecological and geographical settings. More research is needed to assess the environmental impacts of these 'green' energy technologies, given that all are rapidly expanding globally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Modified PZT ceramics as a material that can be used in micromechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariasz, Radosław; Bochenek, Dariusz

    2015-11-01

    Results on investigations of the PZT type ceramics with the following chemical composition: Pb0.94Sr0.06(Zr0.50 Ti0.50)0.99 Cr0.01O3 (PSZTC) which belongs to a group of multicomponent ceramic materials obtained on basis of the PZT type solid solution, are presented in this work. Ceramics PSZTC was obtained by a free sintering method under the following conditions: Tsint = 1250 °C and tsint = 2 h. Ceramic compacts of specimens for the sintering process were made from the ceramic mass consisting of a mixture of the synthesized PSZTC powder and 3% polyvinyl alcohol while wet. The PSZTC ceramic specimens were subjected to poling by two methods: low temperature and high temperature. On the basis of the examinations made it has been found that the ceramics obtained belongs to ferroelectric-hard materials and that is why it may be used to build resonators, filters and ultrasonic transducers. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Materials for Dielectric Applications" edited by Maciej Jaroszewski and Sabu Thomas.

  20. Wonderland of ceramics superplasticity; Ceramics chososei no sekai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, F. [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    It has been ten years since it was found that ceramics, which is strong and hard at room temperatures and does not deform at all, may exhibit a superplasticity phenomenon at high temperatures that it endlessly elongates when pulled as if it were chewing gum. This phenomenon is one of peculiar behaviours which nano-crystal ceramics, pulverized to an extent that the crystalline particle size is on the order of nanometers, show. The application of superplasticity made the material engineers`s old dream come true that hard ceramics are arbitrarily deformed and machined like metal. Using as models materials such as silicone nitride, alumina and zirconia, this paper describes the history and deformation mechanism of ceramics superplasticity, material design aiming at superplasticization and application of ceramics superplasticity to the machining technology. Furthermore, it describes the trend and future development of international joint researches on the basic surveys on ceramics superplasticity. 25 refs., 11 figs.

  1. Development of laundry drainage treatment system with ceramic ultra filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Masanori; Kurahasi, Takafumi

    1995-01-01

    A compact laundry drainage treatment system (UF system hereafter) with a ceramic ultra filter membrane (UF membrane hereafter) has been developed to reduce radioactivity in laundry drainage from nuclear power plants. The UF membrane is made of sintered fine ceramic. The UF membrane has 0.01 μm fine pores, resulting in a durable, heat-resistant, and corrosion-resistant porous ceramic filter medium. A cross-flow system, laundry drainage is filtrated while it flows across the UF membrane, is used as the filtration method. This method creates less caking when compared to other methods. The UF membrane is back washed at regular intervals with permeated water to minimize caking of the filter. The UF membrane and cross-flow system provides long stable filtration. The ceramic UF membrane is strong enough to concentrate suspended solids in laundry drainage up to a weight concentration of 10%. The final concentrated laundry drainage can be treated in an incinerator. The performance of the UF system was checked using radioactive laundry drainage. The decontamination factor of the UF system was 25 or more. The laundry drainage treatment capacity and concentration ratio of the UF system, as well as the service life of the UF membrane were also checked by examination using simulated non-radioactive laundry drainage. Even though laundry drainage was concentrated 1000 times, the UF system showed good permeated water quality and permeated water flux. (author)

  2. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Naslain , R.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  3. Compact Holographic Data Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T. H.; Reyes, G. F.; Zhou, H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's future missions would require massive high-speed onboard data storage capability to Space Science missions. For Space Science, such as the Europa Lander mission, the onboard data storage requirements would be focused on maximizing the spacecraft's ability to survive fault conditions (i.e., no loss in stored science data when spacecraft enters the 'safe mode') and autonomously recover from them during NASA's long-life and deep space missions. This would require the development of non-volatile memory. In order to survive in the stringent environment during space exploration missions, onboard memory requirements would also include: (1) survive a high radiation environment (1 Mrad), (2) operate effectively and efficiently for a very long time (10 years), and (3) sustain at least a billion write cycles. Therefore, memory technologies requirements of NASA's Earth Science and Space Science missions are large capacity, non-volatility, high-transfer rate, high radiation resistance, high storage density, and high power efficiency. JPL, under current sponsorship from NASA Space Science and Earth Science Programs, is developing a high-density, nonvolatile and rad-hard Compact Holographic Data Storage (CHDS) system to enable large-capacity, high-speed, low power consumption, and read/write of data in a space environment. The entire read/write operation will be controlled with electrooptic mechanism without any moving parts. This CHDS will consist of laser diodes, photorefractive crystal, spatial light modulator, photodetector array, and I/O electronic interface. In operation, pages of information would be recorded and retrieved with random access and high-speed. The nonvolatile, rad-hard characteristics of the holographic memory will provide a revolutionary memory technology meeting the high radiation challenge facing the Europa Lander mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Compact instantaneous water heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Jorge G.W.; Machado, Antonio R.; Ferraz, Andre D.; Rocha, Ivan C.C. da; Konishi, Ricardo [Companhia de Gas de Santa Catarina (SCGAS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Lehmkuhl, Willian A.; Francisco Jr, Roberto W.; Hatanaka, Ricardo L.; Pereira, Fernando M.; Oliveira, Amir A.M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of combustion in an inert porous medium in a liquid heating device application. This project aims to increase efficiency in the application of natural gas in residential and commercial sectors with the use of advanced combustion and heat transfer. The goal is to facilitate the development of a high performance compact water heater allowing hot water supply for up to two simultaneous showers. The experiment consists in a cylindrical porous burner with an integrated annular water heat exchanger. The reactants were injected radially into the burner and the flame stabilizes within the porous matrix. The water circulates in a coiled pipe positioned at the center of the burner. This configuration allows for heat transfer by conduction and radiation from the solid matrix to the heat exchanger. This article presented preliminary experimental results of a new water heater based on an annular porous burner. The range of equivalence ratios tested varied from 0.65 to 0.8. The power range was varied from 3 to 5 kW. Increasing the equivalence ratio or decreasing the total power input of the burner resulted in increased thermal efficiencies of the water heater. Thermal efficiencies varying from 60 to 92% were obtained. The condition for the goal of a comfortable bath was 20 deg C for 8-12 L/min. This preliminary prototype has achieved water temperature of 11deg C for 5 L/min. Further optimizations will be necessary in order to achieve intense heating with high thermal efficiency. (author)

  5. The First Static and Dynamic Analysis of 3-D Printed Sintered Ceramics for Body Armor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    hardness , and fracture strength) and semi-infinite penetration performance of 3-D printed sintered alumina. These results are compared with traditionally...parameters (including density, hardness , and fracture strength), semi-infinite penetration performance, and the fracture profile following impact of 3...of advanced ceramics differs mostly in terms of the initial green part formation when compared with a traditional manufacturing process. The

  6. LIMITS IN APPLICATION OF INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS TO INNOVATIVE CERAMIC SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Fragassa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gres Porcelain stoneware is a ceramic with a compact, hard, coloured and non-porous body. It is largely used as building materials, for a quality architecture, offering high resistance to impact, stress, wear, scratching, frost, chemical attach and stains. It is produced in flat tiles, billions of tons per year. A very prominent technology, based on a pyroclastic deformation, permits to obtain bended porcelain tiles as innovative solutions for a modern architecture. This technology is grounded on a proper combination of heavy machining by cutting tools and secondary firing in a kiln. This new element, the bended tile, can be used in several innovative applications (as steps, shelves, benches, radiators.... But, new functions require a better and in-depth knowledge of these materials, especially referring to the mechanical proprieties. This paper investigates the limits of applicability of ISO standards for the quality classification of ceramics and experimental measures of their mechanical proprieties.

  7. Structure and properties of hot-pressed boron carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koval' chenko, M S; Tkachenko, IU G; Koval' chuk, V V; Iurchenko, D Z; Satanin, S V [Institut Problem Materialovedeniia, Kiev (Ukrainian SSR)

    1990-07-01

    The microstructure and strength of B4C-TiB2-TiO{sub 2} ceramics samples, hot-compacted from a mixture of two types of B4C-TiO2-C powder, are examined. The two types are obtained by combining boric acid with either sucrose or carbon black. The grain-sizes of the two powders are found to be distinctly different from one another both before and after the grinding procedure and the degree of dispersion is not high. The strength tests show 600 MPa, the Vicker's hardness is 34.5 GPa, and the crack resistance coefficient of ceramics containing 15 percent TiB2 by mass is 5 MPa m exp 1/2. The use of soluble boron carbide powder helps achieve higher levels of strength and crack resistance. 5 refs.

  8. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  9. Collapse settlement in compacted soils

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Booth, AR

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Research into collapse settlement in compacted soils is described, with special reference to recent cases in Southern Africa where collapse settlement occurred in road embankments following wetting of the soil. The laboratory work described...

  10. A compact frequency stabilized telecom laser diode for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, C.; Holleville, D.; Le Targat, R.; Wolf, P.; Leveque, T.; Le Goff, R.; Martaud, E.; Acef, O.

    2017-09-01

    We report on a Telecom laser diode (LD) frequency stabilization to a narrow iodine hyperfine line in the green range, after frequency tripling process using fibered nonlinear waveguide PPLN crystals. We have generated up to 300 mW optical power in the green range ( 514 nm) from 800 mW of infrared power ( 1542 nm), corresponding to a nonlinear conversion efficiency h = P3?/P? 36%. Less than 10 mW of the generated green power are used for Doppler-free spectroscopy of 127I2 molecular iodine, and -therefore- for the frequency stabilization purpose. The frequency tripling optical setup is very compact (test the potential of this new frequency standard based on the couple "1.5 ?m laser / iodine molecule". We have already demonstrated a preliminary frequency stability of 4.8 x 10-14 ? -1/2 with a minimum value of 6 x 10-15 reached after 50 s of integration time, conferred to a laser diode operating at 1542.1 nm. We focus now our efforts to expand the frequency stability to a longer integration time in order to meet requirements of many space experiments, such earth gravity missions, inters satellites links or space to ground communications. Furthermore, we investigate the potential of a new approach based on frequency modulation technique (FM), associated to a 3rd harmonic detection of iodine lines to increase the compactness of the optical setup.

  11. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  12. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husband, P; Selim, F A; Bartošová, I; Slugeň, V

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics. (paper)

  13. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  14. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  15. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying responses to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today that will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications. (author)

  16. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications

  17. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  18. Advanced ceramic in structural engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Rodea, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The work deals with "Advanced Ceramics in Structural Engineering”. Throughout this work we present the different types of ceramic that are currently in wider use, and the main research lines that are being followed. Ceramics have very interesting properties, both mechanical and electrical and refractory where we can find some of the most interesting points of inquiry. Through this work we try tounderstand this complex world, analyzing both general and specific properties of ...

  19. The technical ceramics (second part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auclerc, S.; Poulain, E.

    2004-01-01

    This work deals with ceramics used in the nuclear and the automotive industries. Concerning the nuclear sector, ceramics are particularly used in reactors, in the treatment of radioactive wastes and for the storage of the ultimate wastes. Details are given about the different ceramics used. In the automobile sector, aluminium is principally used for its lightness and cordierite, basic material of catalyst supports is especially used in the automobile devices of cleansing. (O.M.)

  20. Ceramic superconductors II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    This volume compiles papers on ceramic superconductors. Topics include: structural patterns in High-Tc superconductors, phase equilibria of barium oxide superconductors, localized electrons in tetragonal YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-δ/, lattice and defect structure and properties of rare earth/alkaline earth-copper-oxide superconductors, alternate candidates for High-Tc superconductors, perovskite-structure superconductors; superconductive thin film fabrication, and superconductor/polymer composites

  1. Piezoelectric Ceramics Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jordan, T

    2001-01-01

    ... the behavior of a piezoelectric material. We have attempted to cover the most common measurement methods as well as introduce parameters of interest. Excellent sources for more in-depth coverage of specific topics can be found in the bibliography. In most cases, we refer to lead zirconate titanate (PZT) to illustrate some of the concepts since it is the most widely used and studied piezoelectric ceramic to date.

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques

  3. Unfolding Green Defense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Knus

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many states have developed and implemented green solutions for defense. Building on these initiatives NATO formulated the NATO Green Defence Framework in 2014. The framework provides a broad basis for cooperation within the Alliance on green solutions for defense. This report aims...... to inform and support the further development of green solutions by unfolding how green technologies and green strategies have been developed and used to handle current security challenges. The report, initially, focuses on the security challenges that are being linked to green defense, namely fuel...... consumption in military operations, defense expenditure, energy security, and global climate change. The report then proceeds to introduce the NATO Green Defence Framework before exploring specific current uses of green technologies and green strategies for defense. The report concludes that a number...

  4. Opalescence of all-ceramic core and veneer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon-Sang; Yu, Bin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-06-01

    The enamel of natural teeth is opalescent, where there is light scattering of the shorter wavelengths of the visible spectrum, giving a tooth a bluish appearance in the reflected color and an orange/brown appearance in the transmitted color. The objective of this study was to determine the opalescence of all-ceramic core, veneer and layered specimens with a color measuring spectrophotometer. Colors of core (A2-corresponding shade), veneer (A2- and A3-corresponding shades) and layered (A2- and A3-layered) ceramics for all-ceramic restorations in clinically relevant thicknesses were measured in the reflectance and transmittance modes. The opalescence parameter (OP), which was calculated as the difference in blue-yellow coordinate (Deltab(*)) and red-green coordinate (Deltaa(*)), and the differences in blue-yellow coordinate (Deltab(*)) and in color (DeltaE(ab)(*)) between the reflected and transmitted colors were calculated. One-way ANOVA was performed for the OP values of the core, veneer and layered specimens by the kind of materials. Regression analysis was performed between the OP and Deltab(*), and the OP and DeltaE(ab)(*) values. The range of the OP value was 1.6-6.1, 2.0-7.1, 1.3-5.0 and 1.6-4.2 for the core, veneer, A2- and A3-layered specimens, respectively, all of which were significantly influenced by the kind of materials (pOpalescence varied by kind of ceramics. The OP values of ceramics were lower than those of tooth enamel. All-ceramic materials that can simulate the opalescence of natural teeth should be developed.

  5. Process Development of Porcelain Ceramic Material with Binder Jetting Process for Dental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaji, Hadi; Zhang, Shanshan; Lassell, Austin; Zandinejad, Amirali; Yang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Custom ceramic structures possess significant potentials in many applications such as dentistry and aerospace where extreme environments are present. Specifically, highly customized geometries with adequate performance are needed for various dental prostheses applications. This paper demonstrates the development of process and post-process parameters for a dental porcelain ceramic material using binder jetting additive manufacturing (AM). Various process parameters such as binder amount, drying power level, drying time and powder spread speed were studied experimentally for their effect on geometrical and mechanical characteristics of green parts. In addition, the effects of sintering and printing parameters on the qualities of the densified ceramic structures were also investigated experimentally. The results provide insights into the process-property relationships for the binder jetting AM process, and some of the challenges of the process that need to be further characterized for the successful adoption of the binder jetting technology in high quality ceramic fabrications are discussed.

  6. Ion conductivity of nasicon ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoj, J.W.; Engell, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Nasicon ss ,Na 1 + X Zr 2 Si X P 3 - X O 12 o , X , 3, includes some of the best solid state sodium conductors known today. Compositions in the interval 1.6 , X , 2.6 show conductivities comparable to the best β double-prime-alumina ceramics. It is well known that the ion conductivity of β-alumina is strongly dependent on the texture of the ceramic. Here a similar behavior is reported for Nasicon ceramics. Ceramics of the bulk composition Na 2.94 Zr 1.49 Si 2.20 P 0.80 O 10.85 were prepared by a gel method. The final ceramics consist of Nasicon crystals with x = 2.14 and a glass phase. The grain size and texture of the ceramics were controlled by varying the thermal history of the gel based raw materials and the sintering conditions. The room temperature resistivity of the resulting ceramics varies from 3.65*10 3 ohm cm to 1.23*10 3 ohm cm. Using the temperature comparison method and estimates of the area of grain boundaries in the ceramics, the resistivity of the Nasicon phase is estimated to be 225 ohm cm at 25 degrees C. B 2 O 3 - or Al 2 O 3 -doping of the glass bearing Nasicon ceramic lower the room temperature resistivity by a factor 2 to 5. The dopants do not substitute into the Nasicon phase in substantial amounts

  7. Green industrial policy

    OpenAIRE

    Dani Rodrik

    2014-01-01

    Green growth requires green technologies: production techniques that economize on exhaustible resources and emit fewer greenhouse gases. The availability of green technologies both lowers social costs in the transition to a green growth path and helps achieve a satisfactory rate of material progress under that path. The theoretical case in favour of using industrial policy to facilitate green growth is quite strong. Economists’ traditional scepticism on industrial policy is grounded instead o...

  8. Nondestructive density measured in powder metallurgy and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlieper, G.; Arnold, V.; Dirkes, H.

    1989-01-01

    Absorption measurements with gamma radiation have been utilized for the determination of porosities (densities) in materials compacted or sintered from metallic or ceramic powders. The mathematical background for the assessment of this method, and for evaluations of the accuracy of measurement is presented within the reported paper. The equipment for the practical application of density measurements in industry has been developed. Hardware and software of this computerized instrument are designed for a maximum of safety, ease of operation, reliability, flexibility, and efficiency. (orig./RHM) [de

  9. Fracture strength of three all-ceramic systems: Top-Ceram compared with IPS-Empress and In-Ceram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quran, Firas Al; Haj-Ali, Reem

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fracture loads and mode of failure of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using Top-Ceram and compare it with all-ceramic crowns fabricated from well-established systems: IPS-Empress II, In-Ceram. Thirty all-ceramic crowns were fabricated; 10 IPS-Empress II, 10 In-Ceram alumina and 10 Top-Ceram. Instron testing machine was used to measure the loads required to introduce fracture of each crown. Mean fracture load for In-Ceram alumina [941.8 (± 221.66) N] was significantly (p > 0.05) higher than those of Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II. There was no statistically significant difference between Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II mean fracture loads; 696.20 (+222.20) and 534 (+110.84) N respectively. Core fracture pattern was highest seen in Top- Ceram specimens.

  10. Advanced ceramics for nuclear heat utilization and energy harvesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Deep; Purohit, R.D.; Sinha, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years concerns related to global warming and green house gas emissions have focused the attention towards lowering the carbon foot print of energy generation. In this scenario, nuclear energy is considered as one of the strongest options to take on the challenges. Further, the nuclear heat, originated from the fission of nuclear fuels may be utilized not only by conversion to electricity using conventional techniques, but also may be used for production of hydrogen by splitting water. In the endeavor of realizing sustainable energy generation technologies, ceramic materials find key role as critical components. This paper covers an overview of various ceramic materials which are potential candidates for energy and hydrogen generation devices. These include solid oxide fuel cells, thermoelectric oxides and sodium conducting beta-alumina for alkali metal thermoelectric converters (AMTEC). The materials, which are generally complex oxides often need to be synthesized using chemical methods for purity and compositional control. Further, ceramic materials offer advantages in terms of doping different cations to engineer defects and maneuver properties. Nonetheless, shaping of ceramics to complex components is a challenging task, due to which various techniques such as isopressing, tape-casting, extrusion, slurry coating, spray deposition etc. are employed. The paper also provides a highlight of fabrication techniques and demonstration of miniature devices which are at various stages of development. (author)

  11. Fracture Toughness (KIC) of Lithography Based Manufactured Alumina Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nindhia, T. G. T.; Schlacher, J.; Lube, T.

    2018-04-01

    Precision shaped ceramic components can be obtained by an emerging technique called Lithography based Ceramic Manufacturing (LCM). A green part is made from a slurry consisting of a ceramic powder in a photocurable binder with addition of dispersant and plasticizer. Components are built in a layer–by-layer way by exposing the desired cross- sections to light. The parts are subsequently sintered to their final density. It is a challenge to produce ceramic component with this method that yield the same mechanical properties in all direction. The fracture toughness (KIc) of of LCM-alumina (prepared at LITHOZ GmbH, Austria) was tested by using the Single-Edge-V-Notched Beam (SEVNB) method. Notches are made into prismatic bend-bars in all three direction X, Y and Z to recognize the value of fracture toughness of the material in all three directions. The microstructure was revealed with optical microscopy as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that the fracture toughness in Y-direction has the highest value (3.10 MPam1/2) that is followed by the one in X-direction which is just a bit lower (2.90 MPam1/2). The Z-direction is found to have a similar fracture toughness (2.95 MPam1/2). This is supported by a homogeneous microstructure showing no hint of the layers used during production.

  12. Compact and energy saving magnet technology for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baurichter, A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that funding agencies and industrial users of particle accelerators get more and more alerted about costs of civil engineering, installation and operation, only little effort has been put into development of sustainable, energy and cost saving accelerator technology. In order to reduce the total-cost-of ownership of accelerator magnets, operating at high electrical power for twenty years or more, permanent magnet based Green Magnet technology has been developed at a consortium around Danfysik's R and D team. Together with our partners from ISA, Aarhus University, the Aarhus School of Engineering, the company Sintex and Aalborg University all obstacles in applying permanent magnet technology as e.g. thermal drift and inhomogeneities of magnetic fields have been overcome. The first Green Magnet has now been operated for more than half a year in an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility at the ETH in Zurich. The performance of this B=0.43T 90 deg. H-type bending magnet and the most recently builtB=1T, 30 deg. C-type Green Magnet for the synchrotron light source ASTRID2 at ISA in Aarhus will be presented. Danfysik also is designing, manufacturing and testing 60 compact magnet systems, developed at MAX-Lab for the new MAXIV 3.0 GeV synchrotron light source. In addition, 12 for the 1.5 GeV light source and another 12 for the new SOLARIS light source in Krakow, Poland are buying built. Up to a dozen or more magnet functions have been integrated into one yoke of these compact magnet systems, which makes the new MAXIV light sources compact, energy saving and at the same time very bright. Test results and design concepts of the new MAXIV and SOLARIS magnets will be presented. (author)

  13. Effects of forming temperature and sintering rate to the final properties of FeCuAl powder compacts formed through uniaxial die compaction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. M.; Ismail, M. A.; Sopyan, I.; Rahman, H. Y.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of an experimental investigation on the effects of forming temperature and sintering schedule to the final characteristics of FeCuAl powder mass formed at different temperature and sintered at different schedule. A lab-scale uni-axial die compaction rig was designed and fabricated which enabled the compaction of powder mass at room temperature as well as elevated temperature. Iron (Fe) powder ASC 100.29 was mechanically mixed with other elemental powders, namely copper (Cu), and aluminum (Al) for 60 minutes and compacted at three different temperature, i.e., 30°C, 150°C, and 200°C by applying 425 MPa of simultaneous downward and upward axial loading to generate green compacts. The as-pressed samples were inspected visually and the defect-free green compacts were subsequently sintered in an argon gas fired furnace at 800°C for 60 min at three different heating/cooling rates, i.e., 5, 10, and 15°C/min, respectively. The sintered samples were then characterised for their physical, electrical, and mechanical properties. The microstructures of the sintered samples were also analysed. The results revealed that a forming temperature of 150°C and a sintering rate of 10°C/min could produce a product with better characteristics.

  14. Effect of natural and synthetic organics on the processing of ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Brett M.

    Dry pressing has been shown to be an efficient and cost effective method of manufacturing ceramic ware. Dry pressed parts are typically manufactured with a low moisture content which has the further advantage of eliminating the drying step that is necessary for plastic formed ware, i.e., jiggered or ram pressed. Problems associated with the use of dry pressing in an industrial setting involve the high loss rate during the bisque firing process and the poor surface finish of the green (unfired) ware. It was the goal of this research to improve the surface finish of dry pressed ware to a level that is satisfactory for decorating of the bisque fired ware. The adsorption of organic additives, specifically dispersants, on the surface of particles is an important aspect of ceramic processing. The interactions between organic additives, specifically sodium poly[acrylic acid] and poly[vinyl alcohol], have been demonstrated to result in phase separation into distinct domains during the spray-drying process. This phase separation leads to a poly[vinyl alcohol]-rich film on the surface of the granulate which will increase the P1 value, the pressure at the onset of granule deformation, of the granulate. This negative interaction between the organics increases the surface roughness of the dry pressed ware. The roughness of the industrially prepared ware was determined using an optical interferometer to set a baseline for improvements in the surface finish of the dry pressed ware. Blending of dried granulate was determined to significantly improve the surface finish of the ware. Alternative binders to replace a plasticized poly[vinyl alcohol] were observed to show improvements in the surface finish of the ware dry pressed in a semi-isostatic die. In summary the most important aspect to improving the surface finish of dry pressed ware, i.e. facilitating compaction, is the selection of the organic additives. Additives which are observed to have a negative interaction, i.e. to

  15. Compact Intracloud Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    In November of 1993, mysterious signals recorded by a satellite-borne broadband VHF radio science experiment called Blackboard led to a completely unexpected discovery. Prior to launch of the ALEXIS satellite, it was thought that its secondary payload, Blackboard, would most often detect the radio emissions from lightning when its receiver was not overwhelmed by noise from narrowband communication carriers. Instead, the vast majority of events that triggered the instrument were isolated pairs of pulses that were one hundred times more energetic than normal thunderstorm electrical emissions. The events, which came to be known as TIPPs (for transionospheric pulse pairs), presented a true mystery to the geophysics community. At the time, it was not even known whether the events had natural or anthropogenic origins. After two and one half years of research into the unique signals, two ground-based receiver arrays in New Mexico first began to detect and record thunderstorm radio emissions that were consistent with the Blackboard observations. On two occasions, the ground-based systems and Blackboard even recorded emissions that were produced by the same exact events. From the ground based observations, it has been determined that TIPP events areproduced by brief, singular, isolated, intracloud electrical discharges that occur in intense regions of thunderstorms. These discharges have been dubbed CIDS, an acronym for compact intracloud discharges. During the summer of 1996, ground-based receiver arrays were used to record the electric field change signals and broadband HF emissions from hundreds of CIDS. Event timing that was accurate to within a few microseconds made possible the determination of source locations using methods of differential time of arrival. Ionospheric reflections of signals were recorded in addition to groundwave/line-of-sight signals and were used to determine accurate altitudes for the discharges. Twenty-four CIDS were recorded from three

  16. Deodorant ceramic catalyst. Dasshu ceramics shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, K. (Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe (Japan)); Naka, R. (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    Concerning debromination to be used for the filter of deodorizing device, those of long life and high deodorizing performance are demanded a great deal. As one of this kind of debromination, a deodorant ceramic catalyst (mangantid) has been developed and put for practical use as deodorant for refrigerator. In this article, the information and knowledge obtained by the development of mangantid, the features as well as several properties of the product are stated. The deodorizing methods currently used practically are roughly divided into 6 kinds such as the adsorption method, the direct combustion method, the catalytic method and the oxidation method, but each of them has its own merit and demerit, hence it is necessary to select the method in accordance with the kind of odor and its generating condition. Mangantid is a compound body of high deodorant material in a honeycomb configuration, and has the features that in comparison with the existing deordorants, its pressure loss is smaller, its deodorizing rate is bigger, and acidic, neutral and basic gaseous components can be removed in a well-balanced manner. Deodorization with mangantid has the mechanism to let the odorous component contact and react with the catalyst and change the component to the non-odorous component in the temperature range from room temperature to the low temperature region. 5 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Development of waste-based ceramic pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa, G.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the preparation of ceramic pigments using industrial wastes as primary sources. In this context, the use of Al-rich sludge generated in the wastewater treatment unit of an anodising or surface coating industrial plant, and a galvanizing sludge from the Cr/Ni plating process, will be detailed. The ceramic pigments reported here were prepared using typical solid state reactions involving the metal rich sludge. The main focus will be on the synthesis of chrome-tin orchid cassiterite (Sn,CrO2, chrome-tin red malayaite Ca(Cr,SnSiO5, victoria green garnet Ca3Cr2Si3O12, and chrome alumina pink/green corundum (Cr,Al2O3 pigments. The pigments were fully characterised and then were tested in a standard ceramic glaze after. Typical working conditions and colour development will be reported.

    Se presenta la preparación de pigmentos cerámicos empleando residuos industriales como fuente de materias primas. Se detallan el uso de barros ricos en aluminio obtenidos en los tratamientos de depuración de aguas de plantas industriales de anodizado y barros de galvanizados de chapados de Cr/Ni. Los pigmentos cerámicos se prepararon empleando reacción en estados sólido a partir del barro rico en metal. Los principales pigmentos estudiados son orquídea casiterita de cromo-estaño (Sn,CrO2, malayita rojo de cromo-estaño Ca(Sn,CrSiO3, granate verde victoria Ca3Cr2Si3O12, y corindón rosa/verde de cromo alúmina (Cr,Al2O3. Los pigmentos fueron caracterizados y ensayados después de ser vidriados en cerámicas estándares. Se presentan las condiciones de trabajo y el desarrollo de color.

  18. Summary of Self-compacting Concrete Workability

    OpenAIRE

    GUO Gui-xiang; Duan Hong-jun

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of a large number of domestic and foreign literature, situation and development of self-compacting concrete is introduced. Summary of the compacting theory of self-compacting concrete. And some of the factors affecting the workability of self-compacting concrete were discussed and summarized to a certain extent. Aims to further promote the application and research of self-compacting concrete

  19. Clustering of near clusters versus cluster compactness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Gao; Yipeng Jing

    1989-01-01

    The clustering properties of near Zwicky clusters are studied by using the two-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation functions for compact and medium compact clusters, for open clusters, and for all near Zwicky clusters are estimated. The results show much stronger clustering for compact and medium compact clusters than for open clusters, and that open clusters have nearly the same clustering strength as galaxies. A detailed study of the compactness-dependence of correlation function strength is worth investigating. (author)

  20. Compact magnetic confinement fusion: Spherical torus and compact torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spherical torus (ST and compact torus (CT are two kinds of alternative magnetic confinement fusion concepts with compact geometry. The ST is actually a sub-category of tokamak with a low aspect ratio; while the CT is a toroidal magnetic configuration with a simply-connected geometry including spheromak and field reversed pinch. The ST and CT have potential advantages for ultimate fusion reactor; while at present they can also provide unique fusion science and technology contributions for mainstream fusion research. However, some critical scientific and technology issues should be extensively investigated.

  1. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  2. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  3. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 12. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Functional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 12 December 1999 pp 21-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Traditional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Summary of ceramic pigments by polymer precursors Pechini method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.M. da; Galvao, S.B.; Paskocimas, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work were synthesized nitrate chromium nitrate and iron-doped titanium oxide by the polymeric precursor method, for application as ceramic pigments. The stains were developed between the temperatures 700 deg C to 1000 deg C, in green for chromium oxide and orange for iron. Noticing an increase of its opacity by increasing temperature. Characterization by thermogravimetry (TG) showed strong thermo decomposition from 355 deg C for the chromium oxide and thermo decomposition gradual for the iron. By analysis of X-ray diffraction revealed the formation of crystalline phases as Iron Titanate (FeTiO3) and Chrome Titanate (CrTiO3), respectively. The scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of rounded particles for both oxides. Thus, the synthesized oxides were within the requirements to be applied as pigments and shown to be possible to propose its use in ceramic materials. (author)

  6. Direct ink write fabrication of transparent ceramic gain media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ivy Krystal; Seeley, Zachary M.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Duoss, Eric B.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2018-01-01

    Solid-state laser gain media based on the garnet structure with two spatially distinct but optically contiguous regions have been fabricated. Transparent gain media comprised of a central core of Y2.97Nd0.03Al5.00O12.00 (Nd:YAG) and an undoped cladding region of Y3Al5O12 (YAG) were fabricated by direct ink write and transparent ceramic processing. Direct ink write (DIW) was employed to form the green body, offering a general route to preparing functionally structured solid-state laser gain media. Fully-dense transparent optical ceramics in a "top hat" geometry with YAG/Nd:YAG have been fabricated by DIW methods with optical scatter at 1064 nm of <3%/cm.

  7. Green corridors basics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagakos, George

    2016-01-01

    SuperGreen project, which aimed at advancing the green corridor concept through a benchmarking exercise involving Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). The chapter discusses the available definitions of green corridors and identifies the characteristics that distinguish a green corridor from any other...... efficient surface transportation corridor. After providing examples of green corridor projects in Europe, it focuses on the KPIs that have been proposed by various projects for monitoring the performance of a freight corridor. Emphasis is given to the SuperGreen KPIs, covering the economic, technical...

  8. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  9. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi, E-mail: kinsakai@ngk.co.jp [Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya 467-8530 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R and D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  10. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  11. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  12. Zirconia based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressiani, J.C.; Bressiani, A.H.A.

    1989-05-01

    Within the new generation of ceramic materials, zirconia continues to attract ever increasing attention of scients, technologists and users by virtue of its singular combination of properties and being able to perform thermo-mechanical, electroeletronic, chemico-biological functions. Nevertheless, in order to obtain these properties, a through understanding of the phase transformation mechanisms and microstructural changes is necessary. This paper discusses the main parameters that require control during fabrication of these materials to obtain desired properties for a specific application. (author) [pt

  13. Directionally Solidified Multifunctional Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Vidrio , Vol. 44 [5] (2005) pp 347 - 352. 9. F. W. Dynys and A. Sayir, "Self Assemble Silicide Architectures by Directional Solidification," Journal...Sociedad Espanola de Ceramica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [4] (2004) pp 753 - 758. 21. A. Sayir and F. S. Lowery, "Combustion-Resistance of Silicon-Based Ceramics...Espafiola de Cerdmica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [3], 2004. ISSN-0366-3175-BSCVB9. 14 37. P. Berger, A. Sayir and M. H. Berger, "Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic

  14. Formulation and synthesis by melting process of titanate enriched glass-ceramics and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, T.; Fillet, C.; Lacombe, J.; Bonnetier, A.; McGlinn, P.

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide containment for the separated radionuclides in stable oxide phases with proven resistance to leaching and irradiation damage and in consequence to obtain a glass ceramic or a ceramic material using a vitrification process. Sphene glass ceramic, zirconolite glass ceramic and zirconolite enriched ceramic have been fabricated and characterized by XRD, SEM/EDX and DTA

  15. Professional Windows Embedded Compact 7

    CERN Document Server

    Phung, Samuel; Joubert, Thierry; Hall, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Learn to program an array of customized devices and solutions As a compact, highly efficient, scalable operating system, Windows Embedded Compact 7 (WEC7) is one of the best options for developing a new generation of network-enabled, media-rich, and service-oriented devices. This in-depth resource takes you through the benefits and capabilities of WEC7 so that you can start using this performance development platform today. Divided into several major sections, the book begins with an introduction and then moves on to coverage of OS design, application development, advanced application developm

  16. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baity, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

  17. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  18. Compact toroid refueling of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Hogan, J.T.; Milora, S.L.; Thomas, C.E.

    1988-04-01

    The feasibility of refueling fusion reactors and devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) with high-velocity compact toroids is investigated. For reactors with reasonable limits on recirculating power, it is concluded that the concept is not economically feasible. For typical ITER designs, the compact toroid fueling requires about 15 MW of electrical power, with about 5 MW of thermal power deposited in the plasma. At these power levels, ideal ignition (Q = ∞) is not possible, even for short-pulse burns. The pulsed power requirements for this technology are substantial. 6 ref., 1 figs

  19. Co-compact Gabor Systems on Locally Compact Abelian Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mads Sielemann; Lemvig, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    In this work we extend classical structure and duality results in Gabor analysis on the euclidean space to the setting of second countable locally compact abelian (LCA) groups. We formulate the concept of rationally oversampling of Gabor systems in an LCA group and prove corresponding characteriz...

  20. Isometric coactions of compact quantum groups on compact ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a compact quantum metric space in the framework of Rieffel, where the ... This problem can be formulated and studied in various settings. ... The spaces we are interested in this paper are metric spaces, both classical and quantum. ... He has given a definition for a quantum symmetry of a classical ...... by the construction of I.

  1. Green Power Partnership 100 Green Power Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. Partners on this list use green power to meet 100 of their U.S. organization-wide electricity use.

  2. Fabrication of crystal-oriented barium-bismuth titanate ceramics in high magnetic field and subsequent reaction sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Tomita, Yusuke; Furushima, Ryoichi; Uematsu, Keizo; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Doshida, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    High magnetic field was applied to fabricate novel lead-free piezoelectric ceramics with a textured structure. A compact of crystallographically oriented grains was prepared by dry forming in a high magnetic field from a mixed slurry of bismuth titanate and barium titanate powders. Bismuth titanate particles with a size of about 1 μ m were used as the host material. In the forming process, the slurry was poured into a mold and set in a magnetic field of 10 T until completely dried. Bismuth titanate particles were highly oriented in the slurry under the magnetic field. The dried powder compact consisted of highly oriented bismuth titanate particles and randomly oriented barium titanate particles. Barium bismuth titanate ceramics with a- and b-axis orientations were successfully produced from the dried compact by sintering at temperatures above 1100 deg. C.

  3. Provenance studies of Sgraffiato and Late Green Glazed wares from Siraf, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, H.V.; Asaro, F.; Frierman, J.D.

    1975-03-01

    Results of neutron activation analyses of 23 elements in ceramic archaeological specimens are given. Various wares are divided into the following categories: early Sgraffiato, late Sgraffiato, late Green A, late Green B, and Samarra ware. Results are given on the following elements: Al, Ca, Dy, Mn, Na, K, U, Sm, La, Ti, Lu, Co, Sc, Fe, Cs, Cr, Ni, Eu, Ce, Hf, Ta, Th, and Yb. (JGB)

  4. Nano-ceramics and its molding technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian; Xu Yunshu

    2007-01-01

    Nano-ceramics and its related knowledge were introduced. Fabrication of nano-ceramic powder, as well as the molding and sintering technologies of nano-ceramics were reviewed. Features of the present molding technologies were analyzed. The applications of nano-ceramics were prospected. (authors)

  5. Preparation of 147Pm ceramic source core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mielcarski, M.

    1989-01-01

    Preparation of ceramic pellets containing fixed promethium-147 is described. Incorporation rate of 147 Pm into the ceramic material was determined. The leachability and vaporization of promethium from the obtained ceramics was investigated. The ceramic pellets prepared by the described procedure, mounted in special holders, can be applied as point sources in beta backscatter thickness gauges. (author)

  6. Urban Greening Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the San Francisco Bay Water Quality Project (SFBWQP) Urban Greening Bay Area, a large-scale effort to re-envision urban landscapes to include green infrastructure (GI) making communities more livable and reducing stormwater runoff.

  7. Tribal Green Building Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Tribal Green Building Toolkit (Toolkit) is designed to help tribal officials, community members, planners, developers, and architects develop and adopt building codes to support green building practices. Anyone can use this toolkit!

  8. Green Power Partner List

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. There are thousands of Green Power Partners, all listed on this page.

  9. Green Power Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    GPCs are towns, villages, cities, counties, or tribal governments in which the local government, businesses, and residents collectively use green power in amounts that meet or exceed EPA's Green Power Community purchase requirements.

  10. Blue-Green Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that taking a specific blue-green algae product (Super Blue-Green Algae, Cell Tech, Klamath Falls, OR) ... system. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Depression. Digestion. Heart disease. Memory. Wound healing. Other conditions. More evidence is needed ...

  11. Green Bank Observatory (GBO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The largest fully steerable telescope in the world - the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), began observations in Green Bank, West Virginia in 2000and is a...

  12. Green Infrastructure Modeling Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green infrastructure, such as rain gardens, green roofs, porous pavement, cisterns, and constructed wetlands, is becoming an increasingly attractive way to recharge aquifers and reduce the amount of stormwater runoff that flows into wastewater treatment plants or into waterbodies...

  13. Compaction dynamics of crunchy granular material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillard François

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compaction of brittle porous material leads to a wide variety of densification patterns. Static compaction bands occurs naturally in rocks or bones, and have important consequences in industry for the manufacturing of powder tablets or metallic foams for example. Recently, oscillatory compaction bands have been observed in brittle porous media like snow or cereals. We will discuss the great variety of densification patterns arising during the compaction of puffed rice, including erratic compaction at low velocity, one or several travelling compaction bands at medium velocity and homogeneous compaction at larger velocity. The conditions of existence of each pattern are studied thanks to a numerical spring lattice model undergoing breakage and is mapped to the phase diagram of the patterns based on dimensionless characteristic quantities. This also allows to rationalise the evolution of the compaction behaviour during a single test. Finally, the localisation of compaction bands is linked to the strain rate sensitivity of the material.

  14. Compaction dynamics of crunchy granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, François; Golshan, Pouya; Shen, Luming; Valdès, Julio R.; Einav, Itai

    2017-06-01

    Compaction of brittle porous material leads to a wide variety of densification patterns. Static compaction bands occurs naturally in rocks or bones, and have important consequences in industry for the manufacturing of powder tablets or metallic foams for example. Recently, oscillatory compaction bands have been observed in brittle porous media like snow or cereals. We will discuss the great variety of densification patterns arising during the compaction of puffed rice, including erratic compaction at low velocity, one or several travelling compaction bands at medium velocity and homogeneous compaction at larger velocity. The conditions of existence of each pattern are studied thanks to a numerical spring lattice model undergoing breakage and is mapped to the phase diagram of the patterns based on dimensionless characteristic quantities. This also allows to rationalise the evolution of the compaction behaviour during a single test. Finally, the localisation of compaction bands is linked to the strain rate sensitivity of the material.

  15. Fibrous monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, D.; King, B.H.; Trice, R.W.; Halloran, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Fibrous monolithic ceramics are an example of a laminate in which a controlled, three-dimensional structure has been introduced on a submillimeter scale. This unique structure allows this all-ceramic material to fail in a nonbrittle manner. Materials have been fabricated and tested with a variety of architectures. The influence on mechanical properties at room temperature and at high temperature of the structure of the constituent phases and the architecture in which they are arranged are discussed. The elastic properties of these materials can be effectively predicted using existing models. These models also can be extended to predict the strength of fibrous monoliths with an arbitrary orientation and architecture. However, the mechanisms that govern the energy absorption capacity of fibrous monoliths are unique, and experimental results do not follow existing models. Energy dissipation occurs through two dominant mechanisms--delamination of the weak interphases and then frictional sliding after cracking occurs. The properties of the constituent phases that maximize energy absorption are discussed. In this article, the authors examine the structure of Si 3 N 4 -BN fibrous monoliths from the submillimeter scale of the crack-deflecting cell-cell boundary features to the nanometer scale of the BN cell boundaries

  16. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  17. Additive colours approach for dental ceramics translucency characteristics made from Sumatra and Java natural sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarini, V.; Gunawan, J.; Hasratiningsih, Z.; Rudyawan, A.

    2018-04-01

    Translucency is one of dental ceramics desirable aesthetic characteristics, which can be used as an indirect restoration. Dental ceramics can also be made using Computed Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) unit that can create variety blocks as an ingot into a customized restoration. This paper presents the results of self-synthesized porcelain blocks generated from natural sand of Sumatera and Java Islands to promote national independency. This research aims to determine the translucency of dental ceramics made from Indonesia’s natural sand. Six samples each of two different synthesized temperatures, 1150 °C and 1200 °C, were made. To analyse translucency of the sample, their image was taken in bright light background in a black box, then additive green and blue colours histogram channel with range 0 (opaque) to 255 (transparent) were evaluated using Matlab R2015B. The result revealed that mean of green peaks on 1150 °C has an average translucency value of 41%, compared to 34% of blue peaks. Lower percentage of translucency, 31% and 25% on the green and blue channel respectively were attained in samples synthesized in 1200 °C. These suggest that 1150 °C is the optimum temperature for translucency for these ceramic samples from natural sands as they contain leucite crystals shown by the XRD analyses as a result of silica-undersaturated mixture indicated by the Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy. SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) results show remnant of air pocket in the samples sintered at higher temperature.In conclusion, natural sand from Sumatera and Java can be considered as reliable, cheap basic material options in developing self-synthesized dental ceramics with a desirable translucency. These preliminary results indicate that better balance between strength and translucency could potentially be achieved by making nano-sized dental ceramics.

  18. On the combined effect of lubrication and compaction temperature on properties of iron-based P/M parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babakhani, Abolfazl; Haerian, Ali; Ghambari, Mohammad

    2006-01-01

    Addition of lubricant in the form of admixed with powder reduces friction between die wall and powder during compaction of P/M parts. However, it has detrimental effect on mechanical properties. On the other hand, warm compaction of powders improves density and hence, the mechanical properties of these parts. Die wall lubrication can be used along with warm compaction to avoid the disadvantages of the admixed lubricant while reducing the friction, and benefiting the advantages of warm compaction. In this study, the combined effect of warm compaction and die wall lubrication with various amounts of admixed lubricant has been examined. Compacts were made of admixed powders containing from 0 to 0.6% lithium stearate with the die wall lubricated by 1.5% emulsion of lithium stearate under two different pressing pressures of 500 and 650 MPa. The temperatures used were: RT, 130, 150 and 165 deg. C. It was found out that at both compaction pressures, reduction of admixed lubricant down to 0% increased the green density and mechanical properties of the sintered parts. For samples pressed at 500 and 650 MPa the increase in green density due to elimination of admixed lubricant and using die wall lubrication was 0.33 and 0.35 g/cm 3 , respectively. It was also found out that die wall lubrication is more effective in increasing green density at higher compaction pressures. Sinter density and mechanical properties increased by increasing compaction temperature up to 150 deg. C. Both parameters were deteriorated above this temperature for admixed powders, while it kept increasing for die wall lubrication

  19. Novel binder-free forming of Al2O3 ceramics by microwave-assisted hydration reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Takashi; Yasuoka, Masaki; Watari, Koji

    2008-01-01

    A novel binder-free forming of ceramics via microwave irradiation is developed. The irradiation of microwave to an alumina green body enhances the hydration reaction strongly between water and particle surfaces, creating surface aluminum trihydroxides structure adjacent to particles that bind them together tightly. This process makes it possible to manufacture mechanically strong green bodies with excellent shape retention ability without the use of organic binders

  20. Show Me the Green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Gone are the days when green campus initiatives were a balm to the soul and a drain on the wallet. Today's environmental initiatives are all about saving lots of green--in every sense of the word. The environmental benefits of green campus projects--whether wind turbines or better insulation--are pretty clear. Unfortunately, in today's…

  1. Green roof Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Gatt, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    In Malta, buildings cover one third of the Island, leaving greenery in the dirt track. Green roofs are one way to bring plants back to urban areas with loads of benefits. Antoine Gatt, who manages the LifeMedGreenRoof project at the University of Malta, tells us more. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/green-roof-malta/

  2. EPA's Green Roof Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a presentation on the basics of green roof technology. The presentation highlights some of the recent ORD research projects on green roofs and provices insight for the end user as to the benefits for green roof technology. It provides links to currently available EPA re...

  3. In the Green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Education officials used to debate whether they could afford to pursue green design and construction. Now the green movement has gained a foothold not just in education, but in society at large, and the prevailing attitude seems to have shifted. Can schools afford "not" to go green? As budgets are slashed repeatedly, education administrators must…

  4. The green agenda

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This business guide to Green IT was written to introduce, to a business audience, the opposing groups and the key climate change concepts, to provide an overview of a Green IT strategy and to set out a straightforward, bottom line-orientated Green IT action plan.

  5. The Green Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Newlin, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The Jolly Green Giant. Robin Hood. The Bamberg Cathedral. Tales of King Arthur. Ecology. What do they have in common? What legends and ancient myths are shrouded in the tales of the Green Man? Most often perceived as an ancient Celtic symbol as the god of spring and summer, the Green Man disappears and returns year after year, century after…

  6. Compact objects and accretion disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blandford, Roger; Agol, Eric; Broderick, Avery; Heyl, Jeremy; Koopmans, Leon; Lee, Hee-Won

    2002-01-01

    Recent developments in the spectropolarimetric study of compact objects, specifically black holes (stellar and massive) and neutron stars are reviewed. The lectures are organized around five topics: disks, jets, outflows, neutron stars and black holes. They emphasize physical mechanisms and are

  7. Engineering aspects of compact stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Benson, R.D.; Brooks, A.

    2003-01-01

    Compact stellarators could combine the good confinement and high beta of a tokamak with the inherently steady state, disruption-free characteristics of a stellarator. Two U.S. compact stellarator facilities are now in the conceptual design phase: the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) and the Quasi- Poloidal Stellarator (QPS). NCSX has a major radius of 1.4 m and a toroidal field up to 2 T. The primary feature of both NCSX and QPS is the set of modular coils that provide the basic magnetic configuration. These coils represent a major engineering challenge due to the complex shape, precise geometric accuracy, and high current density of the windings. The winding geometry is too complex for conventional hollow copper conductor construction. Instead, the modular coils will be wound with flexible, multi strand cable conductor that has been compacted to a 75% copper packing fraction. Inside the NCSX coil set and surrounding the plasma is a highly contoured vacuum vessel. The vessel consists of three identical, 120 deg. segments that are bolted together at double sealed joints. The QPS device has a major radius of 0.9 m, a toroidal field of 1 T, and an aspect ratio of only 2.7. Instead of an internal vacuum vessel, the QPS modular coils will operate in an external vacuum tank. (author)

  8. Compact Circuit Preprocesses Accelerometer Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Compact electronic circuit transfers dc power to, and preprocesses ac output of, accelerometer and associated preamplifier. Incorporated into accelerometer case during initial fabrication or retrofit onto commercial accelerometer. Made of commercial integrated circuits and other conventional components; made smaller by use of micrologic and surface-mount technology.

  9. Elaboration of new ceramic composites containing glass fibre production wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenstrauha, I.; Sosins, G.; Krage, L.; Sedmale, G.; Vaiciukyniene, D.

    2013-01-01

    Two main by-products or waste from the production of glass fibre are following: sewage sludge containing montmorillonite clay as sorbent material and ca 50 % of organic matter as well as waste glass from aluminium borosilicate glass fibre with relatively high softening temperature (> 600 degree centigrade). In order to elaborate different new ceramic products (porous or dense composites) the mentioned by-products and illitic clay from two different layers of Apriki deposit (Latvia) with illite content in clay fraction up to 80-90 % was used as a matrix. The raw materials were investigated by differential-thermal (DTA) and XRD analysis. Ternary compositions were prepared from mixtures of 15 - 35 wt % of sludge, 20 wt % of waste glass and 45 - 65 wt % of clay and the pressed green bodies were thermally treated in sintering temperature range from 1080 to 1120 degree centigrade in different treatment conditions. Materials produced in temperature range 1090 - 1100 degree centigrade with the most optimal properties - porosity 38 - 52 %, water absorption 39 -47 % and bulk density 1.35 - 1.67 g/cm 3 were selected for production of porous ceramics and materials showing porosity 0.35 - 1.1 %, water absorption 0.7 - 2.6 % and bulk density 2.1 - 2.3 g/cm 3 - for dense ceramic composites. Obtained results indicated that incorporation up to 25 wt % of sewage sludge is beneficial for production of both ceramic products and glass-ceramic composites according to the technological properties. Structural analysis of elaborated composite materials was performed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM). By X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) the quartz, diopside and anorthite crystalline phases were detected. (Author)

  10. Fabrication and testing of ceramic UO2 fuel - I-III. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.

    1961-12-01

    The task described consists of the following: fabrication of UO 2 with different granulation from uranyl nitrate by ammonia diuranate; determination of size and shape distributions of metal and ceramic powders; fabrication of sintered pressed samples UO 2 ; investigating the properties of sintered uranium dioxide dependent on the fabrication process; producing a vibrator for compacting UO 2 powder. This volume includes reports on the first two tasks

  11. Green Transformational Leadership and Green Performance: The Mediation Effects of Green Mindfulness and Green Self-Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Shan Chen; Ching-Hsun Chang; Yu-Hsien Lin

    2014-01-01

    No prior literature explores the influence of green transformational leadership on green performance, thus, this study develops a novel research framework to fill the research gap. This study investigates the influence of green transformational leadership on green performance and discusses the mediation effects of green mindfulness and green self-efficacy by means of structural equation modeling (SEM). The results indicate that green transformational leadership positively influences green min...

  12. INFLUENCE OF MACHINING TECHNOLOGIES ON VALUES OF RESIDUAL STRESSES OF OXIDE CUTTING CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Němeček

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the intensive development of engineering ceramic and effort to replace sintered carbides as cutting materials are in progress. With the development of the sintering technology it is now possible to produce compact ceramic cutting samples with very good mechanical properties. The advantage of these materials is their easy accessibility and low purchase price. In this work, the influence of the finishing machine technology on the values of surface residual stresses of cutting ceramic samples Al2O3+TiC were studying. The samples were supplied by Moscow State University of Technology STANKIN. Measurements made in the X-ray diffraction laboratory at the Department of solid state engineering were performed for both the phases. The influence of the parameters of machining to residual stresses was studied and the resulting values were compared with each other.

  13. Fabrication and characterisation of ceramics via low-cost DLP 3D printing

    OpenAIRE

    Giftymol Varghese; Mónica Moral; Miguel Castro-García; Juan José López-López; Juan Ramón Marín-Rueda; Vicente Yagüe-Alcaraz; Lorena Hernández-Afonso; Juan Carlos Ruiz-Morales; Jesus Canales-Vázquez

    2018-01-01

    A stereolithography-based additive manufacturing technique has been used for the fabrication of advanced ceramics. A customised 3D printer using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) projector as UV source has been built to fabricate green bodies from photosensitive resins loaded with 25–60 wt% of alumina, 3- and 8-YSZ. The 3D-printed bodies were then sintered in the 1200–1500 °C and exhibited thermal stability. As expected, higher ceramic loadings rendered objects with higher density for a given ...

  14. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  15. X-ray shielding behaviour of kaolin derived mullite-barites ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripin, A.; Mohamed, F.; Choo, T. F.; Yusof, M. R.; Hashim, S.; Ghoshal, S. K.

    2018-03-01

    Mullite-barite ceramic (MBC) is an emergent material for effective shielding of redundant ionizing radiation exposure. The composition dependent mechanical, thermal, and microstructure properties of MBC that makes MBC a high performing novel radiation shielding candidate remained unexplored. This paper examines the possibility of exploiting Malaysian kaolin (AKIM-35) and barite (BaSO4) derived ceramic (MBC) system for X-ray shielding operation. Using conventional pressing and sintering method six ceramic samples are prepared by mixing AKIM-35 with barite at varying contents (0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 wt%). Synthesized pressed mixtures are calcined at 400 °C for 30 min and then sintered to 1300 °C for 120 min at a heating rate of 10 °C/min. Sintered samples are characterized via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), lead equivalent (LE), uniformity and dose reduction analyses. XRD pattern of prepared ceramics revealed the presence of monoclinic barium alumino-silicate (BAS) and orthorhombic mullite as major shielding phases together with other minor phase of barite and hexagonal quartz (SiO2) structures. Furthermore, FESEM images of ceramics (between 0 and 30 wt%) displayed the existence of compacted monoclinic plate of BAS and acicular mullite morphology (ceramics at 40 and 50 wt%). Radiation tests displayed the capacity of ceramics (at 0 and 10 wt%) to shield the X-ray radiation emanated at tube potential range of 50-120 kV. The highest radiation attenuation is ascertained at 70 kV where the dose is reduced remarkably between 99.11% and 97.42%. Ceramics at 0 and 10 wt% demonstrated the highest lead (Pb) equivalent thickness (LE) of 0.44 mm and 0.34 mm, respectively. It is established that such MBC may contribute towards the development of shielding material against ionizing radiation in diagnostic radiology (X-ray) dose range.

  16. Improvement of the stability of hydroxyapatite through glass ceramic reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Na Ra; Yang, Zheng Xun; Hwang, Kyu Hong; Kim, Tae Suk; Lee, Jong Kook

    2010-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite has achieved significant application in orthopedic and dental implants due to its excellent biocompatibility. Sintered hydroxyapatites showed significant dissolution, however, after their immersion in water or simulated body fluid (SBF). This grain boundary dissolution, even in pure hydroxyapatites, resulted in grain separation at the surfaces, and finally, in fracture. In this study, hydroxyapatite ceramics containing apatite-wollastonite (AW) or calcium silicate (SG) glass ceramics as additives were prepared to prevent the dissolution. AW and SG glass ceramics were added at 0-7 wt% and powder-compacted uniaxially followed by firing at moisture conditions. The glass phase was incorporated into the hydroxyapatite to act as a sintering aid, followed by crystallization, to improve the mechanical properties without reducing the biocompatibility. As seen in the results of the dissolution test, a significant amount of damage was reduced even after more than 14 days. TEM and SEM showed no decomposition of HA to the secondary phase, and the fracture toughness increased, becoming even higher than that of the commercial hydroxyapatite.

  17. Preparation of SiC Compacts by the Rapid Proto typing Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelrahman, A.A.M.; Ahmed, A.Z.; Elmasry, M.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    The preparation of ceramic green bodies from powders by the rapid proto typing is a promising technique. In this work SiC green bodies were prepared from black SiC powder mixed with 10 wt % organic binder namely Ave be SP G20 starch. Different liquid binders were investigated and were successful in producing strong green bodies such as NH 4 OH in the ph range 9-10 or 1 % HCl solution in water and or a mixture of 1% NH 4 Cl and NH 4 OH in the ph range of 8.5 to 9. The green bodies were then preheated at 200 degree C to eliminate the starch by thermal decomposition. After that these parts were infiltrated using molten silicon at 1450 degree C in Argon atmosphere. Unfortunately it was impossible to infiltrate the green bodies using liquid silicon. Another technique was followed which is dipping of the green bodies in liquid silicon. This method was successful. The densities of the green and dipped bodies were determined and they were examined under the metallo graph and SEM. It was found that no SiC dissolved in the silicon after dipping. This was concluded from the presence of sharp corners of SiC grains

  18. Ceramic drug-delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, A; Bajpai, P K

    1998-01-01

    A variety of ceramics and delivery systems have been used to deliver chemicals, biologicals, and drugs at various rates for desired periods of time from different sites of implantation. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that ceramics can successfully be used as drug-delivery devices. Matrices, inserts, reservoirs, cements, and particles have been used to deliver a large variety of therapeutic agents such as antibiotics, anticancer drugs, anticoagulants, analgesics, growth factors, hormones, steroids, and vaccines. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of conventional drug-delivery systems and the different approaches used to deliver chemical and biological agents by means of ceramic systems will be reviewed.

  19. High flow ceramic pot filters

    OpenAIRE

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more water without sacrificing their microbial removal efficacy. High flow pot filters, produced by increasing the rice husk content, had a higher initial flow rate (6–19 L h−1), but initial LRVs for E. coli o...

  20. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al 2 O 3 with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material

  1. Porous ceramics out of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakunov, V.S.; Balkevich, V.L.; Vlasov, A.S.; Guzman, I.Ya.; Lukin, E.S.; Poluboyarinov, D.N.; Poliskij, R.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    A review is made of manufacturing procedures and properties of oxide ceramics intended for high-temperature thermal insulation and thermal protection applications. Presented are structural characteristics of porous oxide refractories and their properties. Strength and thermal conductivity was shown to depend upon porosity. Described is a procedure for manufacturing porous ceramic materials from aluminium oxide, zirconium dioxide, magnesium oxide, beryllium oxide. The thermal resistance of porous ceramics from BeO is considerably greater than that of other high-refractoriness oxides. Listed are areas of application for porous materials based on oxides

  2. Study on Effects of Different Replacement Rate on Bending Behavior of Big Recycled Aggregate Self Compacting Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Guo, Tiantian; Gao, Shuai; Jiang, Lin; Zhao, Zhijun; Wang, Yalin

    2018-03-01

    Big recycled aggregate self compacting concrete is a new type of recycled concrete, which has the advantages of low hydration heat and green environmental protection, but its bending behavior can be affected by different replacement rate. Therefor, in this paper, the research status of big Recycled aggregate self compacting concrete was systematically introduced, and the effect of different replacement rate of big recycled aggregate on failure mode, crack distribution and bending strength of the beam were studied through the bending behavior test of 4 big recycled aggregate self compacting concrete beams. The results show that: The crack distribution of the beam can be affected by the replacement rate; The failure modes of big recycled aggregate beams are the same as those of ordinary concrete; The plane section assumption is applicable to the big recycled aggregate self compacting concrete beam; The higher the replacement rate, the lower the bending strength of big recycled aggregate self compacting concrete beams.

  3. Green Thunderstorms Observed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Frank W., III; Beasley, William H.; Bohren, Craig F.

    1996-12-01

    Green thunderstorms have been observed from time to time in association with deep convection or severe weather events. Often the green coloration has been attributed to hail or to reflections of light from green foliage on the ground. Some skeptics who have not personally observed a green thunderstorm do not believe that green thunderstorms exist. They suggest that the green storms may be fabrications by excited observers. The authors have demonstrated the existence of green thunderstorms objectively using a spectrophotometer. During the spring and summer of 1995 the authors observed numerous storms and recorded hundreds of spectra of the light emanating corn these storms. It was found that the subjective judgment of colors can vary somewhat between observers, but the variation is usually in the shade of green. The authors recorded spectra of green and nongreen thunderstorms and recorded spectral measurements as a storm changed its appearance from dark blue to a bluish green. The change in color is gradual when observed from a stationary position. Also, as the light from a storm becomes greener, the luminance decreases. The authors also observed and recorded the spectrum of a thunderstorm during a period of several hours as they flew in an aircraft close to a supercell that appeared somewhat green. The authors' observations refute the ground reflection hypothesis and raise questions about explanations that require the presence of hail.

  4. Rate type isotach compaction of consolidated sandstone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, J.A. de; Thienen-Visser, K. van; Pruiksma, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on samples from a consolidated sandstone reservoir are presented that demonstrate rate type compaction behaviour similar to that observed on unconsolidated sands and soils. Such rate type behaviour can have large consequences for reservoir compaction, surface subsidence and

  5. Siting actions in compacts and nonmember states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullis, J.

    1986-05-01

    This paper examines the status of siting actions in those compacts and states currently progressing with siting studies. The efforts of the Central Compact Commission, Texas, California, Colorado and Illinois are highlighted to illustrate progress, methodology, and problems encountered

  6. The compaction and sintering of UO_2-Zr cermet pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri Yulianto; Meniek Rachmawati; Etty Mutiara

    2013-01-01

    An innovative fuel pellet of UO_2-Zr cermet has been developed to improve thermal conductivity of UO_2 pellet by adding small amount Zr metal in to UO_2 matrix below 10 % weight. Zirconium powder will serve for the creation of bridges or web structure during compaction and will effectively reduce contact between of UO_2 particles. Based on the theory of phase equilibrium of metals-metal oxides-ceramic, this fabrication technique may produce UO_2 pellets containing continuous metal channel on the grain boundary of UO_2 through sintering in a reduction atmosphere. The fabrication was done by varying process parameters of mixing and compaction. Characterisation of UO_2-Zr cermet pellet involved visual test, dimensional and density measurement, and ceramography test. This advanced cermet fabrication technology may address common issue with cermet fuels such as microstructure with continuous metal channel structure in the UO_2 matrix, which is more effectively than the commonly accepted microstructure involving fraction of UO_2 pellet by standard fabrication route. (author)

  7. Compact 80-keV neutral-beam module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Baird, E.D.; Berkner, K.H.; Cooper, W.S.; Duffy, T.J.; Ehlers, K.W.; Fink, J.; Garner, D.; Wilder, C.

    1977-01-01

    A compact and maintainable source of 80-keV neutral beams that focus to a high power density is required for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF). In the new source being designed and built to meet these requirements, the cross-sectional area is reduced in two ways: by immersing the source in a vacuum where high voltage can be held over smaller distances and by redesigning grid supporting structures. Reliability is increased by reducing the electric fields everywhere else below those present between grids and by design innovations. The latter include techniques to reduce stray magnetic field and disperse gas uniformly, all metal-ceramic construction, and a 60-kV shield enclosing all 80-kV electrodes. Wherever possible, we have attempted to simplify the construction. We expect to solve problems that arise during testing either with add-on fixes or with the techniques already tested successfully on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) 120-keV source. Easy maintenance is obtained by a compact isolation valve and by modular construction. Curving both the grid wires and their holders provides focusing in two planes

  8. Performance of a compact four-strap fast wave antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wukitch, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) is expected to be a primary auxiliary heating source in future experiments and fusion reactors. Compact antennas with high power density able to withstand large disruption forces present significant challenges to ICRF antenna design. A compact four-strap antenna has been installed in Alcator C-Mod and its performance has been compared with a pair of two-strap antennas. The key design features are the long vacuum strip line feeds, folded current strap configuration, use of ceramic insulators in the Faraday screen, and open Faraday screen. The heating efficiency and impurity generation are nearly identical to the other antennas while the loading is ∼2.5 higher. The power handling of the antenna was limited by arcing at relatively low maximum voltage. The strip line and antenna strap had arc damage localized to regions where the RF E-field was parallel to the tokamak B-field. For E parallel B, the breakdown voltage was determined to be ∼15 kV/cm. Redesign of the strip line has resulted in an increase in the maximum voltage from 17 kV to 25 kV. Finally, the current strap is being modified to increase the maximum voltage to ∼35 kV. (author)

  9. Agglomeration of ceramic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James D.; Larosa, Judith; Dirkse, Fredrick

    1989-01-01

    A research program directed at a critical comparison of numerical models for power agglomeration with experimental observations is currently underway. Central to this program is the quantitative characterization of the distribution of mass within an agglomerate as a function of time. Current experiments are designed to restrict agglomeration to a surface, which is oriented perpendicular to the force of gravity. These experiments are discussed with reference to: their significance to ceramic processing; artifacts which may be avoided in microgravity experiments; and the comparison of information available in real space (from optical microscopy) to that in reciprocal space (from light scattering). The principle machine requirement appears to be a need to obtain information at small scattering angles.

  10. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  11. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  12. Cacao Intensification in Sulawesi: A Green Prosperity Model Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, K.; Elchinger, M.; Hill, G.; Katz, J.; Barnett, J.

    2014-09-01

    NREL conducted eight model projects for Millennium Challenge Corporation's (MCC) Compact with Indonesia. Green Prosperity, the largest project of the Compact, seeks to address critical constraints to economic growth while supporting the Government of Indonesia's commitment to a more sustainable, less carbon-intensive future. This study evaluates techniques to improve cacao farming in Sulawesi Indonesia with an emphasis on Farmer Field Schools and Cocoa Development Centers to educate farmers and for train the trainer programs. The study estimates the economic viability of cacao farming if smallholder implement techniques to increase yield as well as social and environmental impacts of the project.

  13. Powder compaction in systems of bimodal distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, A. K.; Whittemore, O. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The compaction of mixtures involving different particle sizes is discussed. The various stages of the compaction process include the rearrangement of particles, the filling of the interstices of the large particles by the smaller ones, and the change in particle size and shape upon further densification through the application of pressure. Experimental approaches and equipment used for compacting material are discussed together with the theoretical relations of the compacting process.

  14. UV written compact broadband optical couplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivero, Massimo; Svalgaard, Mikael

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the first demonstration of compact asymmetric directional couplers made by UV writing is presented. The combined performance in terms bandwidth, loss and compactness exceeds that reported using other, more elaborate fabrication techniques.......In this paper the first demonstration of compact asymmetric directional couplers made by UV writing is presented. The combined performance in terms bandwidth, loss and compactness exceeds that reported using other, more elaborate fabrication techniques....

  15. Moessbauer studies of Inca ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, U.; Wagner, F.E.; Marticorena, B.; Salazar, R.; Schwabe, R.; Riederer, J.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain information on the firing of Inca ceramics, 7 samples from different locations were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy including a detailed laboratory refiring procedure. The glaze typical for the surface of this ware was studied by Moessbauer scattering. (Auth.)

  16. Non destructive evaluation of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.E. Jr

    1992-01-01

    While monolithic and composite ceramics have been successfully manufactured, inconsistencies in processing and the unpredictable nature of their failure have limited their use as engineering materials. The optimization of the processing and properties of ceramics and the structures, devices and systems made from them demand the innovative application of modern nondestructive materials characterization techniques to monitor and control as many stages of the production process as possible. This paper will describe the state-of-the-art of nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterization of monolithic ceramics and ceramic composites. Among the techniques to be discussed are laser ultrasonics, acoustic microscopy, thermography, microfocus and x-ray tomography, and micro-photoelasticity. Application of these and other nondestructive evaluation techniques for more effective and efficient real-time process control will result in improved product quality and reliability. 27 refs

  17. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  18. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  19. A compact bipolar pulse-forming network-Marx generator based on pulse transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huibo; Yang, Jianhua; Lin, Jiajin; Yang, Xiao

    2013-11-01

    A compact bipolar pulse-forming network (PFN)-Marx generator based on pulse transformers is presented in this paper. The high-voltage generator consisted of two sets of pulse transformers, 6 stages of PFNs with ceramic capacitors, a switch unit, and a matched load. The design is characterized by the bipolar pulse charging scheme and the compact structure of the PFN-Marx. The scheme of bipolar charging by pulse transformers increased the withstand voltage of the ceramic capacitors in the PFNs and decreased the number of the gas gap switches. The compact structure of the PFN-Marx was aimed at reducing the parasitic inductance in the generator. When the charging voltage on the PFNs was 35 kV, the matched resistive load of 48 Ω could deliver a high-voltage pulse with an amplitude of 100 kV. The full width at half maximum of the load pulse was 173 ns, and its rise time was less than 15 ns.

  20. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian

    2002-01-01

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  1. Multiphase-Multifunctional Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    systems for high temperatura applications” “ Estudios de Ferroelasticidad en Sistemas Cerámicos Multifásicos para Aplicaciones en Alta Temperatura ...Ceramic Coatings Performing Organization names: Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional – Unidad Queretaro...materials, Cinvestav. Thesis: “Ferroelasticity studies in multiphase ceramic systems for high temperatura applications”. Her work mainly focused in the

  2. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  3. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  4. Invariant subsets under compact quantum group actions

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Huichi

    2012-01-01

    We investigate compact quantum group actions on unital $C^*$-algebras by analyzing invariant subsets and invariant states. In particular, we come up with the concept of compact quantum group orbits and use it to show that countable compact metrizable spaces with infinitely many points are not quantum homogeneous spaces.

  5. Equationally Compact Acts : Coproducts / Peeter Normak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Normak, Peeter

    1998-01-01

    In this article equational compactness of acts and its generalizations are discussed. As equational compactness does not carry over to coproducts a slight generalization of c-equational campactness is introduced. It is proved that a coproduct of acts is c-equationally compact if and only if all components are c-equationally campact

  6. Formation and evolution of compact binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, Marcel Vincent van der

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the formation and evolution of compact binaries. Chapters 2 through 4 deal with the formation of luminous, ultra-compact X-ray binaries in globular clusters. We show that the proposed scenario of magnetic capture produces too few ultra-compact X-ray binaries to explain

  7. GREEN MANAGEMENT: THE REALITY OF BEING GREEN IN BUSINESS

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Green management and going green are not as clear cut and easy as hyped by the general media. While going ecologically green is indeed beneficial and appropriate, the process and procedure of becoming green is anything but easy. Firstly, turning green is largely not a legal requirement, but a voluntary process. Thus, even though LEED (which is by far the more publicly known green certification standard) governs the certification of the green management effort, it is not a compulsory condition...

  8. Fracture-dissociation of ceramic liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sung Kwan; Oh, Jin-Rok; Her, Man Seung; Shim, Young Jun; Cho, Tae Yeun; Kwon, Sung Min

    2008-08-01

    The use of BIOLOX delta ceramic (CeramTec AG, Plochingen, Germany) has been increasing. This ceramic prevents cracking by restraining the phase transformation due to the insertion of nano-sized, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia into the alumina matrix. This restrains the progress of cracking through the formation of platelet-like crystal or whiskers due to the addition of an oxide additive. We observed a case of BIOLOX delta ceramic liner (CeramTec AG) rim fracture 4 months postoperatively. Radiographs showed that the ceramic liner was subluxated from the acetabular cup. Scratches on the acetabular cup and femoral neck were seen, and the fracture was visible on the rim of the liner. Under electron microscope, metal particle coatings from the ceramic liner were identified. The ceramic liner, fracture fragments, and adjacent tissues were removed and replaced with a ceramic liner and femoral head of the same size and design. We believe the mechanism of the fracture-dissociation of the ceramic liner in this case is similar to a case of separation of the ceramic liner from the polyethylene shell in a sandwich-type ceramic-ceramic joint. To prevent ceramic liner fracture-dissociation, the diameter of the femoral neck needs to be decreased in a new design, while the diameter of the femoral head needs to be increased to ensure an increase in range of motion.

  9. Compact sources for eyesafe illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Nadia; Pu, Rui; Stebbins, Kenneth; Bystryak, Ilya; Rayno, Michael; Ezzo, Kevin; DePriest, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Q-peak has demonstrated a compact, pulsed eyesafe laser architecture operating with >10 mJ pulse energies at repetition rates as high as 160 Hz. The design leverages an end-pumped solid-state laser geometry to produce adequate eyesafe beam quality (M2˜4), while also providing a path toward higher-density laser architectures for pulsed eyesafe applications. The baseline discussed in this paper has shown a unique capability for high-pulse repetition rates in a compact package, and offers additional potential for power scaling based on birefringence compensation. The laser consists of an actively Q-switched oscillator cavity producing pulse widths designed to fit within a volume of 3760 cm3. We will discuss details of the optical system design, modeled thermal effects and stress-induced birefringence, as well as experimental advantages of the end-pumped laser geometry, along with proposed paths to higher eyesafe pulse energies.

  10. Fabrication of ceramic components for fluidics with green machining and reaction binding of Al-containing precursor mixes - component design and testing. Final report; Fertigung von keramischen Bauteilen fuer die Fluidtechnik mit Gruenbearbeitung und Reaktionsbinden von Al-haltigen Precursormischungen - Bauteilgestaltung und Erprobung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skirde, E.; Esders, H.; Ivantysyn, J.

    2003-03-05

    The Sauer-Danfoss project covered the testing of ceramic pistons and bushings in oil-hydraulic swash plate axial piston pumps. Both components move relative to each other while transmitting very high forces. This results in high component stresses and in high tribological loads of the contact surface. If the ceramic components can withstand both types of stress, the range of permissible operating parameters can be extended, especially the maximum speed as ceramics have a much lower specific mass than metals, which result in much lower inertial forces. In conventional systems of steel piston and metal bushing, high speed and high temperatures will result in poor lubrication and cause freezing of the piston. This is not the case with ceramics because of their great hardness, heat resistance, and chemical inertness. (orig.) [German] Das Teilprojekt von Sauer-Danfoss befasste sich mit der Erprobung keramischer Kolben und Buchsen in oelhydraulischen Schraegscheiben-Axialkolbenpumpen. Beide Bauteile (die sogenannten Leitteile) bewegen sich relativ zueinander und uebertragen dabei sehr hohe Betriebskraefte. Daraus resultieren nicht nur grosse Spannungen in den Teilen, sondern auch hohe tribologische Beanspruchungen in der Kontaktflaeche. Wenn die keramischen Bauteile beiden Beanspruchungsarten gewachsen sind, dann ist eine Ausdehnung des Bereichs erlaubter Betriebsparameter moeglich. Insbesondere ist hier die maximale Drehzahl zu nennen, da aus der im Vergleich zu metallischen Werkstoffen sehr geringen spezifischen Masse von Keramik weitaus geringere Traegheitskraefte resultieren. Bei der konventionellen Werkstoffpaarung (gehaerteter Stahlkolben-Messingbuchse) besteht ausserdem bei hohen Drehzahlen und Temperaturen wegen der damit verbundenen schlechten Schmierung die Gefahr des Festfressens. Diese ist bei keramischen Werkstoffen aufgrund der hohen Haerte, Waermebestaendigkeit und chemischen Inertheit nicht zu erwarten. (orig.)

  11. Ceramics as nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Ceramics are widely accepted as nuclear reactor fuel materials, for both metal clad ceramic and all-ceramic fuel designs. Metal clad UO 2 is used commercially in large tonnages in five different power reactor designs. UO 2 pellets are made by familiar ceramic techniques but in a reactor they undergo complex thermal and chemical changes which must be thoroughly understood. Metal clad uranium-plutonium dioxide is used in present day fast breeder reactors, but may eventually be replaced by uranium-plutonium carbide or nitride. All-ceramic fuels, which are necessary for reactors operating above about 750 0 C, must incorporate one or more fission product retentive ceramic coatings. BeO-coated BeO matrix dispersion fuels and silicate glaze coated UO 2 -SiO 2 have been studied for specialised applications, but the only commercial high temperature fuel is based on graphite in which small fuel particles, each coated with vapour deposited carbon and silicon carbide, are dispersed. Ceramists have much to contribute to many aspects of fuel science and technology. (author)

  12. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  13. Method for Waterproofing Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Hygroscopic ceramic materials which are difficult to waterproof with a silane, substituted silane or silazane waterproofing agent, such as an alumina containing fibrous, flexible and porous, fibrous ceramic insulation used on a reentry space vehicle, are rendered easy to waterproof if the interior porous surface of the ceramic is first coated with a thin coating of silica. The silica coating is achieved by coating the interior surface of the ceramic with a silica precursor converting the precursor to silica either in-situ or by oxidative pyrolysis and then applying the waterproofing agent to the silica coated ceramic. The silica precursor comprises almost any suitable silicon containing material such as a silane, silicone, siloxane, silazane and the like applied by solution, vapor deposition and the like. If the waterproofing is removed by e.g., burning, the silica remains and the ceramic is easily rewaterproofed. An alumina containing TABI insulation which absorbs more that five times its weight of water, absorbs less than 10 wt. % water after being waterproofed according to the method of the invention.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamical processes near compact objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisnovatyi Kogan, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamical processes near compact objects are reviewed in this paper. First the accretion of the magnetized matter into a single black hole and spectra of radiation are considered. Then the magnetic-field phenomena in the disk accretion, when the black hole is in a pair are discussed. Furthermore, the magnetohydrodynamics phenomena during supernova explosion are considered. Finally the magnetohydrodynamics in the accretion of a neutron star is considered in connection With x-ray sources

  15. Compact toroids with Alfvenic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhehui; Tang, X.Z.

    2004-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar equilibria form a class of stationary ideal magnetohydrodynamics equilibria stabilized by magnetic-field-aligned Alfvenic flows. Analytic solutions of the Chandrasekhar equilibria are explicitly constructed for both field-reversed configurations and spheromaks. Favorable confinement property of nested closed flux surfaces and the ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of the compact toroids are of interest for both magnetic trapping of high energy electrons in astrophysics and confinement of high temperature plasmas in laboratory

  16. Green energy in Europe: selling green energy with green certificates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouillet, L.

    2002-01-01

    Sales of green power products are booming in Europe: 50,000 customers in the United Kingdom, 775,000 in the Netherlands and 300,000 in Germany. Laws of physics are however formal: the way in which electricity flows within the grid does not allow suppliers to assure customers that they are directly receiving electricity produced exclusively from renewable energy sources. What are marketers selling their customers then? Laetitia Ouillet, Greenprices, takes a closer look and focuses on the potential of selling green energy in the forms of renewable energy certificates. (Author)

  17. Durability of Self Compacting Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmarce, A.; Boudjehem, H.; Bendjhaiche, R.

    2011-01-01

    Self compacting concrete (SCC) seem to be a very promising materials for construction thanks to their properties in a fresh state. Studying of the influence of the parameters of specific designed mixes to their mechanical, physical and chemical characteristics in a state hardened is an important stage so that it can be useful for new-to-the-field researchers and designers (worldwide) beginning studies and work involving self compacting concrete. The objective of this research is to study the durability of self compacting concrete. The durability of concrete depends very much on the porosity; the latter determines the intensity of interactions with aggressive agents. The pores inside of concrete facilitate the process of damage, which began generally on the surface. We are interested to measure the porosity of concrete on five SCC with different compositions (w/c, additives) and vibrated concrete to highlight the influence of the latter on the porosity, thereafter on the compressive strength and the transfer properties (oxygen permeability, chloride ion diffusion, capillary absorption). (author)

  18. Comminution circuits for compact itabirites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ferreira Pinto

    Full Text Available Abstract In the beneficiation of compact Itabirites, crushing and grinding account for major operational and capital costs. As such, the study and development of comminution circuits have a fundamental importance for feasibility and optimization of compact Itabirite beneficiation. This work makes a comparison between comminution circuits for compact Itabirites from the Iron Quadrangle. The circuits developed are: a crushing and ball mill circuit (CB, a SAG mill and ball mill circuit (SAB and a single stage SAG mill circuit (SSSAG. For the SAB circuit, the use of pebble crushing is analyzed (SABC. An industrial circuit for 25 million tons of run of mine was developed for each route from tests on a pilot scale (grinding and industrial scale. The energy consumption obtained for grinding in the pilot tests was compared with that reported by Donda and Bond. The SSSAG route had the lowest energy consumption, 11.8kWh/t and the SAB route had the highest energy consumption, 15.8kWh/t. The CB and SABC routes had a similar energy consumption of 14.4 kWh/t and 14.5 kWh/t respectively.

  19. Strange matter in compact stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klähn, Thomas; Blaschke, David B.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss possible scenarios for the existence of strange matter in compact stars. The appearance of hyperons leads to a hyperon puzzle in ab-initio approaches based on effective baryon-baryon potentials but is not a severe problem in relativistic mean field models. In general, the puzzle can be resolved in a natural way if hadronic matter gets stiffened at supersaturation densities, an effect based on the quark Pauli quenching between hadrons. We explain the conflict between the necessity to implement dynamical chiral symmetry breaking into a model description and the conditions for the appearance of absolutely stable strange quark matter that require both, approximately masslessness of quarks and a mechanism of confinement. The role of strangeness in compact stars (hadronic or quark matter realizations) remains unsettled. It is not excluded that strangeness plays no role in compact stars at all. To answer the question whether the case of absolutely stable strange quark matter can be excluded on theoretical grounds requires an understanding of dense matter that we have not yet reached.

  20. Strange matter in compact stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klähn Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss possible scenarios for the existence of strange matter in compact stars. The appearance of hyperons leads to a hyperon puzzle in ab-initio approaches based on effective baryon-baryon potentials but is not a severe problem in relativistic mean field models. In general, the puzzle can be resolved in a natural way if hadronic matter gets stiffened at supersaturation densities, an effect based on the quark Pauli quenching between hadrons. We explain the conflict between the necessity to implement dynamical chiral symmetry breaking into a model description and the conditions for the appearance of absolutely stable strange quark matter that require both, approximately masslessness of quarks and a mechanism of confinement. The role of strangeness in compact stars (hadronic or quark matter realizations remains unsettled. It is not excluded that strangeness plays no role in compact stars at all. To answer the question whether the case of absolutely stable strange quark matter can be excluded on theoretical grounds requires an understanding of dense matter that we have not yet reached.

  1. Design and In-Situ Processing of Metal-Ceramic and Ceramic-Ceramic Microstructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sass, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    .... Metal-ceramic microstructures have been synthesized in situ by a variety of novel processing techniques, including the partial reduction of oxide compounds and displacement reactions and sol-gel...

  2. FOREWORD: Focus on Advanced Ceramics Focus on Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Naoki

    2011-06-01

    Much research has been devoted recently to developing technologies for renewable energy and improving the efficiency of the processes and devices used in industry and everyday life. Efficient solutions have been found using novel materials such as platinum and palladium-based catalysts for car exhaust systems, samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets for electrical motors, and so on. However, their realization has resulted in an increasing demand for rare elements and in their deficit, the development of new materials based on more abundant elements and new functionalities of traditional materials. Moreover, increasing environmental and health concerns demand substitution of toxic or hazardous substances with nature-friendly alternatives. In this context, this focus issue on advanced ceramics aims to review current trends in ceramics science and technology. It is related to the International Conference on Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics (STAC) held annually to discuss the emerging issues in the field of ceramics. An important direction of ceramic science is the collaboration between experimental and theoretical sciences. Recent developments in density functional theory and computer technology have enabled the prediction of physical and chemical properties of ceramics, thereby assisting the design of new materials. Therefore, this focus issue includes articles devoted to theory and advanced characterization techniques. As mentioned above, the potential shortage of rare elements is becoming critical to the industry and has resulted in a Japanese government initiative called the 'Ubiquitous Element Strategy'. This focus issue also includes articles related to this strategy and to the associated topics of energy conversion, such as phosphors for high-efficiency lighting and photocatalysts for solar-energy harvesting. We hope that this focus issue will provide a timely overview of current trends and problems in ceramics science and

  3. All-ceramic crowns: bonding or cementing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Despite the wide variety of all-ceramic systems available today, the majority of dental practitioners hesitate to recommend and insert all-ceramic crowns. This article regards the nature of the ceramic materials, the principles of bonding and adhesion, and the clinical problems of the acid-etch technique for crowns. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, and the influences of different factors on the strength of all-ceramic crowns are presented. Finally, the conclusion is drawn that conventional cementing of all-ceramic crowns is possible when the specific properties of the ceramics are taken into consideration.

  4. Exoelectron emission from magnesium borate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Yanagisawa, Hideo; Nakamichi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Riichi; Kawanishi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) of a magnesium borate glass ceramics was investigated for its application to dosemetric use. It has been found that the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics as well as a Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics depend on the kind of the radiation used and that the heat resistance of the magnesium borate glass ceramics is higher than that of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics. Therefore, the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics indicate a possibility to be used as the dose measurement for each kind of radiation in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  5. Producing ceramic laminate composites by EPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, P.S.; Sarkar, P.; Datta, S.

    1996-01-01

    The search for tough structural ceramics to operate at high temperatures in hostile environments has led to the development of ceramic composites. This class of material includes laminar ceramic-ceramic composites, continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic composites and functionally graded materials. The present authors developed electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to synthesize lamellar, fiber-reinforced and functionally graded composites. This paper briefly describes the synthesis and characterization of these EPD composites and introduces a novel class of lamellar composites with nonplanar layers. The synthesis of the latter demonstrates the facility of the EPD process for the synthesis of ceramic composites. The process is totally controllable via suspension concentration, deposition current, voltage and time

  6. Green growth in fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Max; Ravensbeck, Lars; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    harming the environment. Fishery is an environment-dependent sector and it has been argued that there is no potential for green growth in the sector owing to global overexploitation, leaving no scope for production growth. The purpose of this paper is to explain what green growth is and to develop......Climate change and economic growth have gained a substantial amount of attention over the last decade. Hence, in order to unite the two fields of interest, the concept of green growth has evolved. The concept of green growth focuses on how to achieve growth in environment-dependent sectors, without...... a conceptual framework. Furthermore, the aim is to show that a large green growth potential actually exists in fisheries and to show how this potential can be achieved. The potential green growth appears as value-added instead of production growth. The potential can be achieved by reducing overcapacity...

  7. Thermal evolution of massive compact objects with dense quark cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Daniel; Sedrakian, Armen

    2011-01-01

    We examine the thermal evolution of a sequence of compact objects containing low-mass hadronic and high-mass quark-hadronic stars constructed from a microscopically motivated equation of state. The dependence of the cooling tracks in the temperature versus age plane is studied on the variations of the gaplessness parameter (the ratio of the pairing gap for red-green quarks to the electron chemical potential) and the magnitude of blue quark gap. The pairing in the red-green channel is modeled assuming an inhomogeneous superconducting phase to avoid tachionic instabilities and anomalies in the specific heat; the blue colored condensate is modeled as a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type color superconductor. We find that massive stars containing quark matter cool faster in the neutrino-cooling era if one of the colors (blue) is unpaired and/or the remaining colors (red-green) are paired in a inhomogeneous gapless superconducting state. The cooling curves show significant variations along the sequence, as the mass (or the central density) of the models is varied. This feature provides a handle for fine-tuning the models to fit the data on the surface temperatures of same-age neutron stars. In the late-time photon cooling era we observe inversion in the temperature arrangement of models, i.e., stars experiencing fast neutrino cooling are asymptotically hotter than their slowly cooling counterparts.

  8. Response Of Lowland Rice To Soil Compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idawati; Haryanto

    2000-01-01

    Soil compaction, as a new tillage practice for paddy soil, is to substitute pudding in order to reduce land preparation cost. To study response of lowland rice to soil compaction, a pot experiment has been conducted which took place in the greenhouse of P3TIR-BATAN. Soil for experiment was taken from pusakanegara. Two factors (degree of soil compaction and rice variety) were combined. Degree of compaction was split into 3 levels (DI = normal; D215% more compact than normal; 30 % more compact than normal), and rice variety into 2 levels (IR64 and Atomita IV). KH 2 32 PO 4 solution was injected into the soil surrounding rice clump to test the root activity at blooming stage of rice plant. Data resulted from this experiment is presented together with additional data from some other experiments of fertilization in the research s erie to study soil compaction. Some information's from experiment results are as following. Both rice varieties tested gave the same response to soil compaction. Root activity, according to data of 32 P absorbed by plant, was not harmed by soil compaction at the degree tested in the experiment. This prediction is supported by the growth by rice observed at generative growth stage, in pot experiment as well as in field experiment, which showed that soil compaction tested did not decrease rice yield but in opposite in tended to increase the yield. In practising soil compaction in land preparation, fertilizers should be applied by deep placement to have higher increasing is rice yield

  9. Prediction of reservoir compaction and surface subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Waal, J.A.; Smits, R.M.M.

    1988-06-01

    A new loading-rate-dependent compaction model for unconsolidated clastic reservoirs is presented that considerably improves the accuracy of predicting reservoir rock compaction and surface subsidence resulting from pressure depletion in oil and gas fields. The model has been developed on the basis of extensive laboratory studies and can be derived from a theory relating compaction to time-dependent intergranular friction. The procedure for calculating reservoir compaction from laboratory measurements with the new model is outlined. Both field and laboratory compaction behaviors appear to be described by one single normalized, nonlinear compaction curve. With the new model, the large discrepancies usually observed between predictions based on linear compaction models and actual (nonlinear) field behavior can be explained.

  10. Diverse Formation Mechanisms for Compact Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Ah; Paudel, Sanjaya; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2018-01-01

    Compact, quenched galaxies such as M32 are unusual ones located off the mass - size scaling relation defined by normal galaxies. Still, their formation mechanisms remain unsolved. Here we investigate the evolution of ~100 compact, quenched galaxies at z = 0 identified in the Illustris cosmological simulation. We identify three ways for a galaxy to become a compact one and, often, multiple mechanisms operate in a combined manner. First, stripping is responsible for making about a third of compact galaxies. Stripping removes stars from galaxies, usually while keeping their sizes intact. About one third are galaxies that cease their growth early on after entering into more massive, gigantic halos. Finally, about half of compact galaxies, ~ 35 % of which turn out to undergo stripping, experience the compaction due to the highly centrally concentrated star formation. We discuss the evolutionary path of compact galaxies on the mass – size plane for each mechanism in a broader context of dwarf galaxy formation and evolution.

  11. Experimental observation of silver and gold penetration into dental ceramic by means of a radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moya, F.; Payan, J.; Bernardini, J.; Moya, E.G.

    1987-01-01

    A radiotracer technique was used to study silver and gold diffusion into dental porcelain under experimental conditions close to the real conditions in prosthetic laboratories for porcelain bakes. It was clearly shown that these non-oxidizable elements were able to diffuse into the ceramic as well as oxidizable ones. The penetration depth varied widely according to the element. The ratio DAg/DAu was about 10(3) around 850 degrees C. In contrast to gold, the silver diffusion rate was high enough to allow silver, from the metallic alloy, to be present at the external ceramic surface after diffusion into the ceramic. Hence, the greening of dental porcelains baked on silver-rich alloys could be explained mainly by a solid-state diffusion mechanism

  12. Homogeneity of Gd-based garnet transparent ceramic scintillators for gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Z. M.; Cherepy, N. J.; Payne, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Transparent polycrystalline ceramic scintillators based on the composition Gd1.49Y1.49Ce0.02Ga2.2Al2.8O12 are being developed for gamma spectroscopy detectors. Scintillator light yield and energy resolution depend on the details of various processing steps, including powder calcination, green body formation, and sintering atmosphere. We have found that gallium sublimation during vacuum sintering creates compositional gradients in the ceramic and can degrade the energy resolution. While sintering in oxygen produces ceramics with uniform composition and little afterglow, light yields are reduced, compared to vacuum sintering. By controlling the atmosphere during the various process steps, we were able to minimize the gallium sublimation, resulting in a more homogeneous composition and improved gamma spectroscopy performance.

  13. Green electricity buyer's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, B.; Klein, S.; Olivastri, B.

    2002-06-01

    The electricity produced in whole or in large part from renewable energy sources like wind, small hydro electricity and solar energy, is generally referred to as green electricity. The authors designed this buyer's guide to assist customers in their understanding of green electricity, as the customers can now choose their electricity supplier. The considerations and steps involved in the purchasse of green electricity are identified, and advice is provided on ways to maximize the benefits from the purchase of green electricity. In Alberta and Ontario, customers have access to a competitive electricity market. The emphasis when developing this guide was placed firmly on the large buyers, as they can have enormous positive influence on the new market for green electricity. The first chapter of the document provides general information on green electricity. In chapter two, the authors explore the opportunity for environmental leadership. Chapter three reviews the basics of green electricity, which provides the link to chapter four dealing with the creation of a policy. Purchasing green electricity is dealt with in Chapter five, and maximizing the benefits of green electricity are examined in Chapter Six. 24 refs., 3 tabs

  14. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  15. GREEN PACKAGING, GREEN PRODUCT, GREEN ADVERTISING, PERSEPSI, DAN MINAT BELI KONSUMEN

    OpenAIRE

    Imam Santoso; Rengganis Fitriani

    2016-01-01

    Environmental problems become one of the strategic issues in achieving global competitiveness. One of the issues is products that are made from environmental friendly materials or known as green product. Furthermore, in green products marketing, the company also uses green packaging and green advertising concept. This study aimed to analyze the effect of green packaging, green products, and green advertising on consumer perception and purchasing intention. The study was conducted in Ketawangg...

  16. Soft lithography of ceramic microparts using wettability-tunable poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Bo; Zhang, Aijun; Meng, Junhu; Zhang, Zhaozhu

    2016-01-01

    Green alumina microparts were fabricated from a high solid content aqueous suspension by microtransfer molding using air plasma-treated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. The wettability of the air plasma-treated PDMS molds spontaneously changed between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic states during the process. Initial hydrophilicity of the air plasma-treated PDMS molds significantly improved the flowability of the concentrated suspension. Subsequent hydrophobic recovery of the air plasma-treated PDMS molds enabled a perfect demolding of the green microparts. Consequently, defect-free microchannel parts of 60 μ m and a micromixer with an area of several square centimeters were successfully fabricated. In soft lithography, tuning the wetting behavior of PDMS molds has a great effect on the quality of ceramic microparts. Using wettability-tunable PDMS molds has great potential in producing complex-shaped and large-area ceramic microparts and micropatterns. (paper)

  17. Quality assurance in ceramic materials and components. High-resolution non-destructive testing especially of ceramic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, H.; Hoffmann, B.; Morsch, A.; Arnold, W.; Schneider, E.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the influence of defects on the failure behavior of ceramic materials under four-point bending stress. In this connection various Si 3 N 4 and SiC materials with and without artificially introduced defect particles (Fe, WC, Si, pores) were examined by the following non-destructive test methods: photoacoustic microscopy, scanning laser acoustic microscopy, microfocus roentgenoscopy and ultrasound transit-time measurements. Finally, a four-point bending test and a fracture-mechanical evaluation of the fracture-incuding defects were carried out at the Institute for reliability and failure studies in mechanical engineering of the University of Karlsruhe. According to the type of stress the samples predominantly failed in the case of defects in the surface zone of the side in tension. Among the ndt methods applied the photoacoustic microscopy as a typical surface testing method could predict most of the fracture-inducing defects (30-50 %) without causing destruction. In this connection a different detection sensitivity which corresponds to the thermal reflection factors became apparent according to the type of defect. Furthermore the reports describes the results of some preliminary tests on ndt of green ceramics. In these investigations both the microfocus roentgenoscopy test and the roentgen computed tomography showed a high potential of detecting inhomogeneities and defects in green Si 3 N 4 and SiC components. (orig.) [de

  18. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  19. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  20. Reliability of ceramics for heat engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of monolithic ceramics in heat engines are discussed. The principle gaps in the state of understanding of ceramic material, failure origins, nondestructive tests as well as life prediction are included.